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Sample records for interstitial thermal therapy

  1. Ultrasound interstitial thermal therapy (USITT) in the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Deardorff, Dana L.

    1999-05-01

    This research represents an experimental investigation of the use of interstitial catheter-cooled ultrasound applicators in various treatment strategies for the management of localized prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The anticipated clinical approaches under consideration were: (1) Ultrasound Interstitial Thermal therapy (USITT) alone for treatment of the whole gland, (2) high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with USITT to treat local recurrences or extracapsular extensions of the disease, and (3) sequence HDR brachytherapy and hyperthermia. Directional multielement catheter-cooled ultrasound applicators were fabricated using cylindrical piezoceramic transducers which can be inserted into 13 or 14 gage catheters. The applicators were characterized through measurements of acoustic power output, and beam profile distributions in degassed water. Thermal lesion formation studies were performed in an in vitro setup using fresh beef muscle. Various implant strategies were evaluated for the ability to control the temperature distribution within a pre-determined volume of tissue. Lesions extending more than 15 mm from the applicator surface were generated within 5 minutes of heating. Preliminary results from this study demonstrate the versatility of catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound applicators, and their potential to provide controlled thermal therapy in the prostate.

  2. Perturbative diffusion theory formalism for interpreting temporal light intensity changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lee C L; Whelan, William M; Vitkin, I Alex

    2007-03-21

    In an effort to understand dynamic optical changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT), we utilize the perturbative solution of the diffusion equation in heterogeneous media to formulate scattering weight functions for cylindrical line sources. The analysis explicitly shows how changes in detected interstitial light intensity are associated with the extent and location of the volume of thermal coagulation during treatment. Explanations for previously reported increases in optical intensity observed early during laser heating are clarified using the model and demonstrated with experimental measurements in ex vivo bovine liver tissue. This work provides an improved understanding of interstitial optical signal changes during LITT and indicates the sensitivity and potential of interstitial optical monitoring of thermal damage.

  3. Intradiscal thermal therapy using interstitial ultrasound: an in vivo investigation in ovine cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Nau, William H; Diederich, Chris J; Shu, Richard; Kinsey, Adam; Bass, Elisa; Lotz, Jeff; Hu, Serena; Simko, Jeff; Ferrier, William; Sutton, Jeff; Attawia, Mohamed; Pellegrino, Richard

    2007-03-01

    In vivo investigation of intradiscal ultrasound thermal therapy in ovine cervical spine model. To evaluate the potential of interstitial ultrasound for selective heating of intradiscal tissue in vivo. Application of heat in the spine using resistive wire and radiofrequency current heating devices is currently being used clinically for minimally invasive treatment of discogenic low back pain. Treatment temperatures are representative of those required for thermal necrosis of ingrowing nociceptor nerve fibers and disc cellularity alone, or with coagulation and restructuring of anular collagen in the high temperature case. Two interstitial ultrasound applicator design configurations with directional heating patterns were evaluated in vivo in ovine cervical intervertebral discs (n = 62), with up to 45-day survival periods. Two heating protocols were employed in which the temperature measured 5 mm away from the applicator was controlled to either <54 C (capable of nerve and cellular necrosis) or >70 C (for coagulation of collagen) for a 10-minute treatment period. Transient and steady state temperature maps, calculated thermal doses (t43), and histology were used to assess the thermal treatments. These studies demonstrated the capability to control spatial temperature distributions within selected regions of the in vivo intervertebral disc and anular wall using interstitial ultrasound. Ultrasound energy is capable of penetrating within the highly attenuating disc tissue to produce more extensive radial thermal penetration, lower maximum intradiscal temperature, and shorter treatment times than can be achieved with current clinical intradiscal heating technology. Thus, interstitial ultrasound offers potential as a more precise and faster heating modality for the clinical management of low back pain and studies of thermal effects on disc tissue in animal models.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry and Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo; Sharma, Mayur; Juthani, Rupa; Meola, Antonio; Barnett, Gene H

    2017-10-01

    Recent technological advancements in intraoperative imaging are shaping the way for a new era in brain tumor surgery. Magnetic resonance thermometry has provided intraoperative real-time imaging feedback for safe and effective application of laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) in neuro-oncology. Thermal ablation has also established itself as a surgical option in epilepsy surgery and is currently used in spine oncology with promising results. This article reviews the principles and rationale as well as the clinical application of LITT for brain tumors. It also discusses the technical nuances of the current commercially available systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasound interstitial thermal therapy (USITT) for the treatment of uterine myomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H., Jr.; Diederich, Chris J.; Simko, Jeff; Juang, Titania; Jacoby, Alison; Burdette, E. C.

    2007-02-01

    Uterine myomas (fibroids) are the most common pelvic tumors occurring in women, and are the leading cause of hysterectomy. Symptoms can be severe, and traditional treatments involve either surgical removal of the uterus (hysterectomy), or the fibroids (myomectomy). Interstitial ultrasound technologies have demonstrated potential for hyperthermia and high temperature thermal therapy in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors. These ultrasound devices offer favorable energy penetration allowing large volumes of tissue to be treated in short periods of time, as well as axial and angular control of heating to conform thermal treatment to a targeted tissue, while protecting surrounding tissues from thermal damage. The goal of this project is to evaluate interstitial ultrasound for controlled thermal coagulation of fibroids. Multi-element applicators were fabricated using tubular transducers, some of which were sectored to produce 180° directional heating patterns, and integrated with water cooling. Human uterine fibroids were obtained after routine myomectomies, and instrumented with thermocouples spaced at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 cm from the applicator. Power levels ranging from 8-15 W per element were applied for up to 15 minute heating periods. Results demonstrated that therapeutic temperatures >50° C and cytotoxic thermal doses (t 43) extended beyond 2 cm radially from the applicator (>4 cm diameter). It is anticipated that this system will make a significant contribution toward the treatment of uterine fibroids.

  6. Laser interstitial thermal therapy in treatment of brain tumors--the NeuroBlate System.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Alireza M; Schroeder, Jason L

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of brain tumors remains challenging. Cytoreductive surgery is used as the first line treatment for most brain tumors. However complete, curative, resection is not achievable in many tumors leading to the need for adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive cytoreductive treatment. A low voltage laser is used to induce hyperthermia and to kill tumor cells. The extent of thermal damage is controlled through use of real-time MR-thermography guidance. Initial results have shown the feasibility of LITT for a variety of brain pathologies. LITT can be considered as an alternative type of surgery for difficult to access brain tumors and also for tumors in patients who are deemed high risk for more traditional surgery. Randomized trials are currently planned to continue assessing the efficacy of LITT and long-term follow-up data are awaited.

  7. A multi-element interstitial ultrasound applicator for the thermal therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Canney, Michael S; Chavrier, Françoise; Tsysar, Sergey; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2013-08-01

    Interstitial thermal therapy is a minimally invasive treatment modality that has been used clinically for ablating both primary and secondary brain tumors. Here a multi-element interstitial ultrasound applicator is described that allows for increased spatial control during thermal ablation of tumors as compared to existing clinical devices. The device consists of an array of 56 ultrasound elements operating at 6 MHz, oriented on the seven faces of a 3.2 mm flexible catheter. The device was first characterized using the acoustic holography method to examine the functioning of the array. Then experiments were performed to measure heating in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and ex vivo tissue samples using magnetic resonance imaging-based thermometry. Experimental measurements were compared with results obtained using numerical simulations. Last, simulations were performed to study the feasibility of using the device for thermal ablation in the brain. Experimental results show that the device can be used to induce a temperature rise of greater than 20 °C in ex vivo tissue samples and numerical simulations further demonstrate that tumors with diameters of greater than 30-mm could potentially be treated.

  8. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Dadey, David Y A; Kamath, Ashwin A; Leuthardt, Eric C; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although open resection remains the standard therapy, complication rates remain high. To minimize morbidity, less invasive approaches, such as endoscope-assisted resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy with mTOR pathway inhibitors, are also used to treat these lesions. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a relatively new modality that is increasingly used to treat a variety of intracranial lesions. In this report, the authors describe two pediatric cases of SEGA that were treated with LITT. In both patients the lesion responded well to this treatment modality, with tumor shrinkage observed on follow-up MRI. These cases highlight the potential of LITT to serve as a viable minimally invasive therapeutic approach to the management of SEGAs in the pediatric population.

  9. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, José M.; Jarosz, Boguslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m-1, 115  ±  4 dB m-1 and 175  ±  9 dB m-1, respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m-3 and 1545  ±  44 m s-1, respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m-1 K-1. The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  10. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José M; Jarosz, Boguslaw J

    2015-03-07

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m(-1), 115  ±  4 dB m(-1) and 175  ±  9 dB m(-1), respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m(-3) and 1545  ±  44 m s(-1), respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m(-1) K(-1). The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  11. Evaluation of multielement catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound applicators for high-temperature thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Nau, W H; Diederich, C J; Burdette, E C

    2001-07-01

    Catheter-cooled (CC) interstitial ultrasound applicators were evaluated for their use in high-temperature coagulative thermal therapy of tissue. Studies in ex vivo beef muscle were conducted to determine the influences of applied electrical power levels (5-20 W per element), catheter flow rate (20-60 ml min(-1)), circulating water temperature (7-40 degrees C), and frequency (7-9 MHz) on temperature distribution and thermal lesion geometry. The feasibility of using multiple interstitial applicators to thermally coagulate a predetermined volume of tissue was also investigated. Results of these studies revealed that the directional shape of the thermal lesions is maintained with increasing time and power. Radial depths of the thermal lesions ranged from 10.7 +/- 0.7 mm after heating for 4 min with an applied power level of 5 W, to 16.2 +/- 1.4 mm with 20 W. The axial length of the thermal lesions is controlled tightly by the number of active transducers. A catheter flow rate of 20 to 40 ml min(-1) (52.2 +/- 5.5 kPa at 40 ml min(-1)) with 22 degrees C water was determined to provide sufficient cooling of the transducers for power levels used in this study. In vivo temperatures measured in the center of a 3-cm-diam peripheral implant of four applicators in pig thigh muscle reached 89.3 degrees C after 4 min of heating, with boundaries of coagulation clearly defined by applicator position and directivity. Conformability of heating in a clinically relevant model was demonstrated by inserting two directional CC applicators with a 2 cm separation within an in vivo canine prostate, and generating a thermal lesion measuring 3.8 cm x 2.2 cm in cross section while directing energy away from, and protecting the rectum. Maximum measured temperatures at midgland exceeded 90 degrees C within 20 min of heating. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of single or multiple CC applicators for conformal thermal coagulation and high temperature thermal therapy, with potential

  12. Laser neurosurgery: A systematic analysis of magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapies.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Carlito; Chung, Lawrance K; Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Ung, Nolan; Bui, Timothy T; Lee, Seung J; Voth, Brittany L; Yang, Isaac

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a novel minimally invasive modality that uses heat from laser probes to destroy tissue. Advances in probe design, cooling mechanisms, and real-time MR thermography have increased laser utilization in neurosurgery. The authors perform a systematic analysis of two commercially available MRgLITT systems used in neurosurgery: the Visualase® thermal therapy and NeuroBlate® Systems. Data extraction was performed in a blinded fashion. Twenty-two articles were included in the quantitative synthesis. A total of 223 patients were identified with the majority having undergone treatment with Visualase (n=154, 69%). Epilepsy was the most common indication for Visualase therapy (n=8 studies, 47%). Brain mass was the most common indication for NeuroBlate therapy (n=3 studies, 60%). There were no significant differences, except in age, wherein the NeuroBlate group was nearly twice as old as the Visualase group (p<0.001). Frame, total complications, and length-of-stay (LOS) were non-significant when adjusted for age and number of patients. Laser neurosurgery has evolved over recent decades. Clinical indications are currently being defined and will continue to emerge as laser technologies become more sophisticated. Head-to-head comparison of these systems was difficult given the variance in indications (and therefore patient population) and disparate literature.

  13. Real-Time 3D Microwave Monitoring of Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanbo; Stang, John; Haynes, Mark; Leuthardt, Eric; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2017-05-08

    We report a method for real-time 3D monitoring of thermal therapy through the use of non-contact microwave imaging. This method is predicated on using microwaves to image changes in the dielectric properties of tissue with changing temperature. Instead of the precomputed linear Born approximation that was used in prior work to speed up the frameto- frame inversions, here we use the nonlinear Distorted Born Iterative Method (DBIM) to solve the electric volume integral equation to image the temperature change. This is made possible by using a recently developed GPU accelerated conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) method to solve the forward problem and update the electric field in the monitored region in each DBIM iteration. Compared to our previous work, this approach provides a far superior approximation of the electric field within the volume integral equation (VIE), and thus yields a more accurate reconstruction of tissue temperature change. The proposed method is validated using a realistic numerical model of interstitial thermal therapy for a deep seated brain lesion. With the new DBIM, we reduced the average estimation error of the mean temperature within the region of interest from 2.5 to 1.0 degrees for the noise-free case, and from 2.9 to 1.7 degrees for the 2% background noise case.

  14. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Technology, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Thermometry, and Technical Considerations for Proper Catheter Placement During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nitesh V; Mian, Matthew; Stafford, R Jason; Nahed, Brian V; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced thermal therapy has become a powerful tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium. The physics of laser therapy are complex, but a sound understanding of this topic is clinically relevant, as many centers have incorporated it into their treatment algorithm, and educated patients are demanding consideration of its use for their disease. Laser ablation has been used for a wide array of intracranial lesions. Laser catheter placement is guided by stereotactic planning; however, as the procedure has popularized, the number of ways in which the catheter can be inserted has also increased. There are many technical nuances for laser placement, and, to date, there is not a clear understanding of whether any one technique is better than the other. In this review, we describe the basic physics of magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy and describe the several common techniques for accurate Visualase laser catheter placement in a stepwise fashion. MRg-LITT, magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapyPAD, precision aiming device.

  15. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy in neuro-oncology: a review of its current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Barnett, Gene H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive treatment modality with recent increasing use to ablate brain tumors. When originally introduced in the late 1980s, the inability to precisely monitor and control the thermal ablation limited the adoption of LITT in neuro-oncology. Popularized as a means of destroying malignant hepatic and renal metastatic lesions percutaneously, its selective thermal tumor destruction and preservation of adjacent normal tissues have since been optimized for use in neuro-oncology. The progress made in real-time thermal imaging with MRI, laser probe design, and computer algorithms predictive of tissue kill has led to the resurgence of interest in LITT as a means to ablate brain tumors. Current LITT systems offer a surgical option for some inoperable brain tumors. We discuss the origins, principles, current indications, and future directions of MRI-guided LITT in neuro-oncology. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joon Y; Wu, Chengyuan; Tracy, Joseph; Lorenzo, Matthew; Evans, James; Nei, Maromi; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Sharan, Ashwini D; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    To describe mesial temporal lobe ablated volumes, verbal memory, and surgical outcomes in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) treated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT). We prospectively tracked seizure outcome in 20 patients at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with drug-resistant mTLE who underwent MRI-guided LiTT from December 2011 to December 2014. Surgical outcome was assessed at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and at the most recent visit. Volume-based analysis of ablated mesial temporal structures was conducted in 17 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and results were compared between the seizure-free and not seizure-free groups. Following LiTT, proportions of patients who were free of seizures impairing consciousness (including those with auras only) are as follows: 8 of 15 patients (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 30.1-75.2%) after 6 months, 4 of 11 patients (36.4%, 95% CI 14.9-64.8%) after 1 year, 3 of 5 patients (60%, 95% CI 22.9-88.4%) at 2-year follow-up. Median follow-up was 13.4 months after LiTT (range 1.3 months to 3.2 years). Seizure outcome after LiTT suggests an all or none response. Four patients had anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) after LiTT; three are seizure-free. There were no differences in total ablated volume of the amygdalohippocampus complex or individual volumes of hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus between seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients. Contextual verbal memory performance was preserved after LiTT, although decline in noncontextual memory task scores were noted. We conclude that MRI-guided stereotactic LiTT is a safe alternative to ATL in patients with medically intractable mTLE. Individualized assessment is warranted to determine whether the reduced odds of seizure freedom are worth the reduction in risk, discomfort, and recovery time. Larger prospective

  17. Feasibility of using interstitial ultrasound for intradiscal thermal therapy: a study in human cadaver lumbar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Shu, Richard

    2005-06-01

    Application of heat in the spine using resistive wire heating devices is currently being used clinically for minimally invasive treatment of discogenic low back pain. In this study, interstitial ultrasound was evaluated for the potential to heat intradiscal tissue more precisely by directing energy towards the posterior annular wall while avoiding vertebral bodies. Two single-element directional applicator design configurations were tested: a 1.5 mm OD direct-coupled (DC) applicator which can be implanted directly within the disc, and a catheter-cooled (CC) applicator which is inserted in a 2.4 mm OD catheter with integrated water cooling and implanted within the disc. The transducers were sectored to produce 90° spatial heating patterns for directional control. Both applicator configurations were evaluated in four human cadaver lumbar disc motion segments. Two heating protocols were employed in this study in which the temperature measured 5 mm away from the applicator was controlled to either T = 52 °C, or T > 70 °C for the treatment period. These temperatures (thermal doses) are representative of those required for thermal necrosis of in-growing nociceptor nerve fibres and disc cellularity alone, or with coagulation and restructuring of annular collagen in the high-temperature case. Steady-state temperature maps, and thermal doses (t43) were used to assess the thermal treatments. Results from these studies demonstrated the capability of controlling temperature distributions within selected regions of the disc and annular wall using interstitial ultrasound, with minimal vertebral end-plate heating. While directional heating was demonstrated with both applicator designs, the CC configuration had greater directional heating capabilities and offered better temperature control than the DC configuration, particularly during the high-temperature protocol. Further, ultrasound energy was capable of penetrating within the highly attenuating disc tissue to produce more

  18. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J. Carl; Gertner, Mark R.; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Dolan, Alfred M.; Sherar, Michael D.

    2003-04-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 °C to 90 °C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy.

  19. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom.

    PubMed

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-04-21

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 degrees C to 90 degrees C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy.

  20. Combination of transurethral and interstitial ultrasound applicators for high-temperature prostate thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Diederich, C J; Nau, W H; Burdette, E C; Bustany, I S; Deardorff, D L; Stauffer, P R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a transurethral ultrasound applicator in combination with implantable ultrasound applicators for inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of localized cancer lesions or benign disease within the prostate gland. The potential to treat target zones in the anterior and lateral portions of the prostate with the angularly directive transurethral applicator, while simultaneously treating regions of extracapsular extension and zones in the posterior prostate with the directive implantable applicators in combination with a rectal cooling bolus, is evaluated. Biothermal computer simulations, acoustic characterizations, and in vivo thermal dosimetry experiments with canine prostates were used to evaluate the performance of each applicator type and combinations thereof. Simulations have demonstrated that transurethral applicators with 180-270 degrees acoustic active zones can direct therapeutic heating patterns to the anterior and lateral prostate, implantable needles can isolate heating to the posterior gland while avoiding rectal tissue, and that the combination of applicators can be used to produce conformal heating to the whole gland. Single implantable applicators (1.8 mm OD x 10 mm long, approximately 180 degrees active sector, approximately 7 MHz, direct-coupled type) produced directional thermal lesions within in vivo prostate, with temperatures >50 degrees C extending more than 10 mm radially after 10-15 min. Combination of interstitial applicators (1-2) and a transurethral applicator (3-2.5 mm OD x 6 mm long, approximately 180 degrees active sector, 6.8 MHz, 6 mm OD delivery catheter) produced conforming temperature distributions (48-85 degrees C) and zones of acute thermal damage within 15 min. The preliminary results of this investigation demonstrate that implantable directional ultrasound applicators, in combination with a transurethral ultrasound applicator, have the potential to provide

  1. A ferrite core/metallic sheath thermoseed for interstitial thermal therapies.

    PubMed

    Cetas, T C; Gross, E J; Contractor, Y

    1998-01-01

    An alternative form of ferromagnetic seed for thermal therapy has been developed following Matsuki, Murakami, and their colleagues [1]-[4]. A nearly lossless ceramic ferrite core (FC) is surrounded by an electrically conductive sheath. The FC has a high relative intrinsic permeability, typically 3000 at low magnetic field strengths, and a sharp transition from the ferrimagnetic state to the nonmagnetic state. The sheath is either a metallic tube or coating on the core. When this composite seed is excited with a radiofrequency magnetic field, large eddy currents are induced in the metallic sheath (MS) due to the concentrated magnetic flux in the core leading to Joule heating. Advantages of this configuration are that this ferrite core/metallic sheath (FC/MS) thermoseed has high power absorption efficiency and a sharp transition compared to ferromagnetic alloy systems; means of optimizing efficiency are apparent from simple expressions; the outer sheath can be of any biocompatible metal; the production method for the ferrites leads to large quantities of seeds with reproducible properties. The FC/MS configuration solves many of the technical problems that have hindered the clinical implementation of thermally regulating ferromagnetic implants for thermal therapies.

  2. Delayed Intraparenchymal and Intraventricular Hemorrhage Requiring Surgical Evacuation after MRI-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Lesional Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sean M; Tomycz, Luke; George, Timothy; Clarke, Dave F; Lee, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage is a rare complication of laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT). To present a unique case of delayed symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurring after a LITT procedure for epilepsy in a high-volume center (68 LITT procedures for pediatric epilepsy have been performed). An 18-year-old male with epilepsy underwent LITT to an area of heterotopia near the right lateral ventricle. He did well initially and was discharged home on postoperative day 1 but returned on postoperative day 9 with headache and left hemiparesis. He was found to have intraparenchymal and intraventricular hemorrhage in the region of the LITT catheter tract. CT angiography on admission revealed a small vascular abnormality near the focus of hemorrhage suspicious for pseudoaneurysm, although conventional angiography was negative. The patient declined neurologically and underwent craniotomy and hemorrhage evacuation. He eventually convalesced and was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation with persistent left hemiparesis. He has been seizure free since the intervention but remains on antiepileptic drugs. Evidence from the literature suggests that the pathophysiology of symptomatic hemorrhage after LITT may be related to vascular injury and pseudoaneurysm formation from LITT catheter placement and/or thermal injury from the ablation itself. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Helical antenna arrays for interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate cancer: tissue phantom testing and simulations for treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherar, Michael D.; Gladman, Aviv S.; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Gertner, Mark R.

    2001-07-01

    Interstitial microwave therapy is an experimental treatment for prostate cancer. The objective of this work was to measure the power deposition (specific absorption rate, SAR) patterns of helical microwave antennae both individually and in array patterns that would be useful for clinical treatment protocols. Commercial helical antenna 3D SAR patterns were measured in muscle equivalent phantoms using a thermographic technique. Two array patterns were tested: a `square' and a `crescent' array, both surrounding the urethra. To assess the feasibility of pre-treatment planning, the measured SAR patterns were input to a treatment planning computer simulation program based on a series of trans-rectal ultrasound images from a prostate cancer patient. The simulation solved the Pennes linear bioheat heat transfer equation in prostate tissue, with the aim of achieving a target of 55 °C at the prostate periphery while not allowing normal surrounding tissues (bladder, urethra, rectum) to rise above 42 °C. These criteria could not be met with the square array but they could be met with the crescent array, provided that the prostate was first dissected away from the rectum. This can be done with a procedure such as `hydrodissection', where sterile saline is injected to separate the prostate and rectum. The results of these SAR measurements and heat transfer simulations indicate that arrays of helical antennae could be used for safe and effective thermal therapy for prostate cancer.

  4. Development of a novel loosely wound helical coil for interstitial radiofrequency thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    McCann, Claire; Sherar, Michael D

    2006-08-07

    We have developed a novel, radiofrequency thermal therapy device designed to improve local control of large solid tumours using heat in the range 55-90 degrees C. The device is a solenoid or helical coil designed to be loosely wound inside a tumour and excited with radiofrequency energy. Typically, we associate a uniform axially directed magnetic field with a solenoid coil, which when time varying, results in an electric field inside the coil, which lies mainly in the circumferential direction. In addition to this magnetically induced electric field, there exists a less familiar axially directed electric field inside the coil. Previous investigators have demonstrated the presence of this secondary axial electric field both experimentally and theoretically. Our design exploits the size and uniformity of these electric fields, for heating and coagulating a large tissue volume with a single applicator. The loosely wound solenoid is constructed from Nitinol, an electrically conductive shape memory alloy that permits the minimally invasive percutaneous insertion of the coil through a single cannulating delivery needle. To demonstrate the potential of this device and to determine the optimal frequency of operation, phantom tissue models and finite-element calculation models using COMSOL 3.2 were used to characterize frequency- and geometry-dependent trends in absorption rate density (ARD), which is proportional to electric field intensity. Radial and axial ARD profiles were measured, calculated and evaluated to determine the frequency and geometry best suited for producing large, homogenous coagulation volumes. Based on the trade-off between radial and axial uniformities of the ARD profiles, a 2 cm diameter coil with a 4 cm length and 1 cm pitch, operated at 27.12 MHz, produced the optimal heating pattern, as determined using tissue-mimicking phantom models.

  5. MO-FG-BRA-09: Quantification of Nanoparticle Heating and Concentration for MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, CJ; Melancon, M; Fuentes, D; Stafford, RJ; Salatan, F; Yang, Q; Hwang, KP

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy (npLITT) is a technique that utilizes tumor localized optically activated nanoparticles to increase the conformality of laser ablation procedures. Temperatures in these procedures are dependent on the particle concentration which generally cannot be measured noninvasively prior to therapy. In this work we attempt to quantify particle concentration in vivo by estimating the increase in R2* relaxation induced by bifunctional magnetic resonance (MR)-visible gold-based nanoparticles (SPIO@Au) and relate it to the temperature increase observed during real time MR temperature imaging (MRTI) of laser ablation. Methods: SPIO@Au nanoparticles (90nm) were synthesized containing a silica-iron core (for MR visibility via R2*) and gold shell (for near-infrared absorption). High resolution R2* maps were acquired before and after injecting four different particle concentrations (saline,1e10, 5e10, and 10e10 particles/mL) into HN5 flank xenografts. Tumors were monitored using MRTI during treatment with an interstitial fiber. (1 watt, 808 nm, 3 minutes) Results: The maximum temperature within the tumors increased linearly with concentration of injected particles, reaching 34.0, 37.6, 45.8, and 55.4 {sup 0}C for saline, 1e10, 5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively (R2=.994). The highest temperatures occur at the injection site rather than the fiber, confirming that SPIO@Au nanoparticles are the primary absorber. The differences between the median R2* measured at the injection site and the rest of the tumor were −6, 134, 111, 156 s-1 for the saline,1e10,5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively. This R2* change is consistent with the measured relaxivity for the 1e10 particles/mL injection but does not maintain linearity at higher concentrations. Conclusion: Bifunctional SPIO@Au nanoparticles are a promising technology for providing noninvasive estimates of particle concentration via MRI and

  6. The use of a dispersive ground electrode with a loosely wound helical coil for interstitial radiofrequency thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    McCann, Claire; Sherar, Michael D

    2006-08-07

    We have developed a novel, thermal therapy device designed to improve local control of large solid tumours using heat in the range 55-90 degrees C. The device is a helical coil designed to be loosely wound inside a tumour and excited with radiofrequency energy at 27.12 MHz. This design exploits the size and uniformity of the electric fields generated by magnetic induction inside this solenoidal geometry for heating and coagulating a large target volume. The use of the electrically conductive shape memory alloy Nitinol for the coil and an external ground plane permit the minimally invasive percutaneous insertion of the coil through a single cannulating delivery needle. To demonstrate the feasibility of this device, phantom models and finite-element models using COMSOL 3.2 were used to characterize uniformity of the radial and axial ARD (absorption rate density) profiles of different monopolar coil geometries. COMSOL 3.2 was also used to calculate temperature profiles and distributions produced by these coils in a non-perfused tissue-mimicking domain following a 10 min heating period. ARD results showed that optimum radial and axial uniformities were achieved with a 0.75 cm pitch and 3 cm length for a 1.5 cm diameter coil, and a 1.4 cm pitch and 4.2 cm length for a 2 cm diameter coil. These coils were able to produce lesions in excised bovine liver of 4 cm x 4.5 cm and 3.5 cm x 6.5 cm, respectively. Predicted temperature profiles showed similar profile sizes and shapes in a non-perfused domain, with the absolute temperature rise determined by the source input to the coil. These results demonstrate the potential of this interstitial, monopolar induction coil device for heating large tumours using a single applicator delivered through a single needle insertion.

  7. A Novel Use of the Intraoperative MRI for Metastatic Spine Tumors: Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Percutaneous Treatment of Epidural Metastatic Spine Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jonathan G; Al-Holou, Wajd N; de Almeida Bastos, Dhiego Chaves; Ghia, Amol J; Li, Jing; Bishop, Andrew J; Amini, Behrang; Rhines, Laurence D; Tatsui, Claudio E

    2017-10-01

    Spinal laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) appears to be a promising novel modality for treatment of epidural metastatic spine disease in patients who are poor candidates for larger-scale oncologic spinal surgery and can act synergetically with spinal stereotactic radiosurgery to maximize local control and palliate pain. This technique is ideally suited for the intraoperative MRI suite to monitor the extent of the ablation in the epidural space. As percutaneous navigation, imaging, and LITT technology improve, broader applicability of this minimally invasive technique in spinal oncology is foreseen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo evaluation of a MR-guided 980nm laser interstitial thermal therapy system for ablations in porcine liver.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Medina, Oscar; Gorny, Krzysztof; McNichols, Roger; Friese, Jeremy; Misra, Sanjay; Amrami, Kimberly; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Callstrom, Matthew; Woodrum, David

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the use of a 980-nm diode laser for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MR-guided LITT) ablations in liver tissue in an in vivo porcine model. MR-guided guided LITT was performed on nine juvenile pigs placed under general anesthesia. Target ablation sites were selected in the left and right lobes of the liver. Laser applicators were placed in the liver using intermittent MR guidance. Up to four separate ablations were performed in each animal using a 15 or 30 W laser generator using one or two applicators. During the ablations, continuous MR-based temperature mapping (MR-thermal mapping), using a proton resonance frequency technique, was performed to monitor the size of the ablation in real-time. Extent of thermal tissue damage was continuously estimated based on Arrhenius model. Two-minute ablations were performed at each site. MR-thermal mapping of ablations within the posteroinferior liver were accomplished with continuous breathing at low tidal volume. In the mid right lobe of the liver, due to motion artefacts, MR-thermometry was performed intermittently during breath hold periods. In the left lobe of the liver, ablations were performed with ventilation using positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 10 cm of water. Upon completion, MR imaging with gadolinium contrast was performed to assess the extent of treatment. Thermal lesions were subsequently measured using both, MR-thermal dose and MR gadolinium images, for comparison. Following the animal euthanasia, the liver was harvested and subjected to formalin fixation and paraffin embedding for histological examination. Between one and four focal liver ablations (total 24 ablations) were successfully performed in nine animals with either a 15 or 30 W laser generator. For the 15-W laser generator, the average single applicator ablation size was (2.0 ± 0.5) × (2.6 ± 0.4) cm(2) , as measured by magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry, or (1.7 ± 0.4)

  9. Quantitative evaluation of treatment related changes on multi-parametric MRI after laser interstitial thermal therapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Toth, Robert; Rusu, Mirabela; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert; Futterer, Jurgen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently shown great promise as a treatment strategy for localized, focal, low-grade, organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Additionally, LITT is compatible with multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) which in turn enables (1) high resolution, accurate localization of ablation zones on in vivo MP-MRI prior to LITT, and (2) real-time monitoring of temperature changes in vivo via MR thermometry during LITT. In spite of rapidly increasing interest in the use of LITT for treating low grade, focal CaP, very little is known about treatment-related changes following LITT. There is thus a clear need for studying post-LITT changes via MP-MRI and consequently to attempt to (1) quantitatively identify MP-MRI markers predictive of favorable treatment response and longer term patient outcome, and (2) identify which MP-MRI markers are most sensitive to post-LITT changes in the prostate. In this work, we present the first attempt at examining focal treatment-related changes on a per-voxel basis (high resolution) via quantitative evaluation of MR parameters pre- and post-LITT. A retrospective cohort of MP-MRI data comprising both pre- and post- LITT T2-weighted (T2w) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) acquisitions was considered, where DWI MRI yielded an Apparent Diffusion Co-efficient (ADC) map. A spatially constrained affine registration scheme was implemented to first bring T2w and ADC images into alignment within each of the pre- and post-LITT acquisitions, following which the pre- and post-LITT acquisitions were aligned. Pre- and post-LITT MR parameters (T2w intensity, ADC value) were then standardized to a uniform scale (to correct for intensity drift) and then quantified via the raw intensity values as well as via texture features derived from T2w MRI. In order to quantify imaging changes as a result of LITT, absolute differences were calculated between the normalized pre- and post-LITT MRI parameters. Quantitatively

  10. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications.

  11. Theoretical and experimental design of site-specific applicators and heating protocols for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyreus, Per Daniel; Nau, William H.; Wu, Alex; Diederich, Chris J.

    2003-06-01

    Theoretical and experimental approaches were used to develop and evaluate site-specific designs of internally cooled direct coupled (ICDC) and catheter-cooled (CC) ultrasound applicators for thermal coagulation of disease in the prostate, liver, brain, and uterus. The diameter of an interstitial applicator can influence its clinical practicality and effectiveness as well as application site. One purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of larger ultrasound transducers and the inherent increase in applicator size could be justified by potentially producing larger lesion diameters. A second purpose was to explore how the response of tissue acoustic attenuation to heating effects lesion size and preferred applicator configuration. Four applicator configurations and sizes were studied using ex vivo tissue experiments in liver and beef and using acoustic and biothermal simulations. Transmission attenuation measurements showed a 6 to 8 fold increase in baseline tissue attenution inside interstitial ultrasound lesions. Formation of these high attenuation zones in lesions reduced potential lesion size. Larger applicators produced lesions with radial penetration depths superior to their smaller counterparts at power levels in the 20-40W /cm range. The higher cooling rates along the outer surface of the larger diameter applicators due to their greater surface area was a dominant factor in increasing lesion size. The higher cooling rates pushed the maximum temperature farther from the applicator surface and reduced the formation of high acoustic attenuation tissue zones. Acoustic and biothermal simulations matched the experimental data well and were applied to model these applicators within sites of clinical interest such as prostate, uterine fibroid, brain, and normal liver. Lesions of 3.9 to 4.7cm diameter were predicted for moderately perfused tissues such as prostate and fibroid and 2.8 to 3.2cm for highly perfused tissues such as normal liver. Feedback

  12. Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis: Multimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is an increasingly common disease characterized by urgency, frequency, and pelvic pain. Its etiology is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. A proposed pathophysiology describing a cascade of events, including epithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, and neurogenic inflammation, is presented. Using this model, multimodality therapy regimens have been developed that treat all components of this cascade. Multimodality therapy appears more effective than single agents in the treatment of interstitial cystitis. PMID:16986029

  13. Interstitial Condensation Risk at Thermal Rehabilitated Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, I.; Bliuc, I.; Iacob, A.; Dumitrescu, L.; Pescaru, R. A.; Helepciuc, C.

    2016-11-01

    The increasing thermal insulation degree of existing residential buildings, aiming to reduce the energy requirements for ensuring the indoor comfort, has as expected effect the elimination of condensation risk. However, in some cases this phenomenon occurs, both on the inner surface of the closing element and also in its structure. The surface condensation causes can be identified and can be easily removed. Instead, the causes and even the presence of interstitial condensation are more difficult to be observed. But the moistening of the insulation materials and the reduction of thermal insulation capacity or even its total degradation, contravene into a large extent or totally to the main purpose of the additional thermal protection. To avoid such situations, it is necessary to respect some principles concerning the structure, resulted from the knowledge of the water vapour diffusion behaviour of various materials. It is known that condensation vulnerability is higher for the additional thermal protection solutions by disposing the insulating material on the inside surface of the closing element. But practice has shown that the condensation phenomenon is not totally excluded neither in the case of outside thermal insulation - which is the current solution applied to the rehabilitation works - if the principles mentioned above are not known and respected. In this paper two models are compared on which the risk of interstitial condensation can be checked. The analysis made on two structures of exterior walls with thermal insulation demonstrates the need for additional verifications before proposing a solution for thermal rehabilitation of the envelope elements.

  14. The role of laser interstitial thermal therapy in enhancing progression-free survival of difficult-to-access high-grade gliomas: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Alireza M; Hawasli, Ammar H; Rodriguez, Analiz; Schroeder, Jason L; Laxton, Adrian W; Elson, Paul; Tatter, Stephen B; Barnett, Gene H; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2014-08-01

    Surgical extent-of-resection has been shown to have an impact on high-grade glioma (HGG) outcomes; however, complete resection is rarely achievable in difficult-to-access (DTA) tumors. Controlled thermal damage to the tumor may have the same impact in DTA-HGGs. We report our multicenter results of laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) in DTA-HGGs. We retrospectively reviewed 34 consecutive DTA-HGG patients (24 glioblastoma, 10 anaplastic) who underwent LITT at Cleveland Clinic, Washington University, and Wake Forest University (May 2011-December 2012) using the NeuroBlate(®) System. The extent of thermal damage was determined using thermal damage threshold (TDT) lines: yellow TDT line (43 °C for 2 min) and blue TDT line (43°C for 10 min). Volumetric analysis was performed to determine the extent-of-coverage of tumor volume by TDT lines. Patient outcomes were evaluated statistically. LITT was delivered as upfront in 19 and delivered as salvage in 16 cases. After 7.2 months of follow-up, 71% of cases demonstrated progression and 34% died. The median overall survival (OS) for the cohort was not reached; however, the 1-year estimate of OS was 68 ± 9%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.1 months. Thirteen cases who met the following two criteria-(1) <0.05 cm(3) tumor volume not covered by the yellow TDT line and (2) <1.5 cm(3) additional tumor volume not covered by the blue TDT line-had better PFS than the other 21 cases (9.7 vs. 4.6 months; P = 0.02). LITT can be used effectively for treatment of DTA-HGGs. More complete coverage of tumor by TDT lines improves PFS which can be translated as the extent of resection concept for surgery.

  15. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  16. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: Preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13–14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1–3 cm diameter tumors located 2–10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and

  17. Photodynamic therapy: superficial and interstitial illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Katarina; Bendsoe, Niels; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is reviewed using the treatment of skin tumors as an example of superficial lesions and prostate cancer as an example of deep-lying lesions requiring interstitial intervention. These two applications are among the most commonly studied in oncological PDT, and illustrate well the different challenges facing the two modalities of PDT-superficial and interstitial. They thus serve as good examples to illustrate the entire field of PDT in oncology. PDT is discussed based on the Lund University group's over 20 yr of experience in the field. In particular, the interplay between optical diagnostics and dosimetry and the delivery of the therapeutic light dose are highlighted. An interactive multiple-fiber interstitial procedure to deliver the required therapeutic dose based on the assessment of light fluence rate and sensitizer concentration and oxygen level throughout the tumor is presented.

  18. Identifying Quantitative In Vivo Multi-Parametric MRI Features For Treatment Related Changes after Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Satish; Toth, Robert; Rusu, Mirabela; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert; Futterer, Jurgen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a new therapeutic strategy being explored in prostate cancer (CaP), which involves focal ablation of organlocalized tumor via an interstitial laser fiber. While little is known about treatment-related changes following LITT, studying post-LITT changes via imaging is extremely significant for enabling early image-guided intervention and follow-up. In this work, we present the first attempt at examining focal treatment-related changes on a per-voxel basis via quantitative comparison of MRI features pre- and post-LITT, and hence identifying computerized MRI features that are highly sensitive as well as specific to post-LITT changes within the ablation zone in the prostate. A retrospective cohort of 5 patient datasets comprising both pre- and post-LITT T2-weighted (T2w) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) acquisitions was considered, where DWI MRI yielded an Apparent Diffusion Co-efficient (ADC) map. Our scheme involved (1) inter-protocol registration of T2w and ADC MRI, as well as inter-acquisition registration of pre- and post-LITT MRI, (2) quantitation of MRI parameters by correcting for intensity drift in order to examine tissuespecific response, and (3) quantification of the information captured by T2w MRI and ADC maps via texture and intensity features. Correction of parameter drift resulted in visually discernible improvements in highlighting tissue-specific response in different MRI features. Quantitative, voxel-wise comparison of the changes in different MRI features indicated that steerable and non-steerable gradient texture features, rather than the original T2w intensity and ADC values, were highly sensitive as well as specific in identifying changes within the ablation zone pre- and post-LITT. The highest ranked texture feature yielded a normalized percentage change of 186% within the ablation zone and 43% in a spatially distinct normal region, relative to its pre-LITT value. By comparison, both the original T2w

  19. Irradiation system for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, L.; Stolik, S.; De la Rosa, J.

    2013-11-01

    Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy (IPDT) is a promising form of treatment of deep-seated and bulky malignant tumors, based on the lethal cell response to the photochemical reactions when drug is light activated in presence of oxygen. In order to accomplish an effective internal illumination, laser sources are preferably used because of two important reasons: the monochromatic light can be confined to the narrow absorption band of the drug and the laser beam is easily focused into optical fibers. In this work the development of a diode-laser-light-source is presented. The system is tuned by temperature to get a better match in the 5-ALA absorption band. This system also comprises a trifurcated fiber system to accomplish interstitial illumination.

  20. Tissue temperature monitoring during interstitial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Jenny; Johansson, Ann; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    During δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy (IPDT) a high light fluence rate is present close to the source fibers. This might induce an unintentional tissue temperature increase of importance for the treatment outcome. In a previous study, we have observed, that the absorption in the tissue increases during the treatment. A system to measure the local tissue temperature at the source fibers during IPDT on tissue phantoms is presented. The temperature was measured by acquiring the fluorescence from small Cr3+-doped crystals attached to the tip of the illumination fiber used in an IPDT-system. The fluorescence of the Alexandrite crystal used is temperature dependent. A ratio of the intensity of the fluorescence was formed between two different wavelength bands in the red region. The system was calibrated by immersing the fibers in an Intralipid solution placed in a temperature controlled oven. Measurements were then performed by placing the fibers interstitially in a pork chop as a tissue phantom. Measurements were also performed superficially on skin on a volunteer. A treatment was conducted for 10 minutes, and the fluorescence was measured each minute during the illumination. The fluorescence yielded the temperature at the fiber tip through the calibration curve. The measurements indicate a temperature increase of a few degrees during the simulated treatment.

  1. Intravesical liposome therapy for interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Kashyap, Mahendra; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Kawamorita, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been lot of interest in the use of liposomes as lipid-based biocompatible carriers for drugs administered by the intravesical route. The lipidic bilayer structure of liposomes facilitates their adherence to the apical membrane surface of luminal cells in the bladder, and their vesicular shape allows them to co-opt the endocytosis machinery for bladder uptake after instillation. Liposomes have been shown to enhance the penetration of both water-soluble and insoluble drugs, toxins, and oligonucleotides across the bladder epithelium. Empty liposomes composed entirely of the endogenous phospholipid, sphingomyelin, could counter mucosal inflammation and promote wound healing in patients suffering from interstitial cystitis. Recent clinical studies have tested multilamellar liposomes composed entirely of sphingomyelin as a novel intravesical therapy for interstitial cystitis. In addition, liposomes have been used as a delivery platform for the instillation of botulinum toxin in overactive bladder patients. The present review discusses the properties of liposomes that are important for their intrinsic therapeutic effect, summarizes the recently completed clinical studies with intravesical liposomes and covers the latest developments in this field. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-30

    The ICRU has previously published reports dealing with Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy with Photons and Electrons (ICRU Report 29, ICRU, 1978), Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy (ICRU Report 50, ICRU, 1993) and Dose and Volume Specification for Reporting Intracavitary Therapy in Gynecology (ICRU Report 38, ICRU, 1985). The present report addresses the problem of absorbed dose specification for report interstitial therapy. Although specific to interstitial therapy, many of the concepts developed in this report are also applicable to certain other kinds of brachytherapy applications. In particular, special cases of intraluminal brachytherapy and plesio-brachytherapy via surface molds employing x or gamma emitters are addressed in this report.

  3. Interstitial therapy of perineal and gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A; Herstein, P; Portnuff, J

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients, 38 to 88 years of age, were treated with 125-Iodine or 192-Iridium interstitial implants at Stanford University Medical Center between July 1974, and December, 1978. There were 25 primary epithelial malignancies, eight extensions from intrapelvic organs and two metastatic tumors (hypernephroma and Hodgkin's disease). The involved sites were: urethra (6 patients); vulva (9 patients); vagina (8 patients); anus (7 patients); cervix (5 patients). Implantation was usually performed to treat evident or microscopic disease in conjunction with external beam pelvic treatment with or without local excision. Computerized implant preplanning was used. 125-Iodine seeds were inserted either directly or within absorbable suture Polyglactin 910; 192-Iridium in nylon carriers was placed by suture or transperineal template. Two patients were lost to follow-up leaving 33 patients, 27 of whom are alive and free of local disease from 37 to 76 months. The overall local control rate was 88%, or 29/33 patients. All four local recurrences appeared before 24 months. Minor complications included: 10 patients with transient mucositis, four with superficial ulcers, and one patient with infection at the implanted site. Two major complications occurred: a necrotic rectal ulcer requiring a colostomy and a contracted, painful bladder necessitating a urinary diversion. We conclude that in selected cases interstitial irradiation provides good local control of perineal and gynecological malignancies with low morbidity in this elderly and quite often fragile group of patients.

  4. Optothermal profile of an ablation catheter with integrated microcoil for MR-thermometry during Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies of the liver—An in-vitro experimental and theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Kardoulaki, Evdokia M.; Syms, Richard R. A.; Young, Ian R.; Choonee, Kaushal; Rea, Marc; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Flexible microcoils integrated with ablation catheters can improve the temperature accuracy during local MR-thermometry in Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies. Here, the authors are concerned with obtaining a preliminary confirmation of the clinical utility of the modified catheter. They investigate whether the thin-film substrate and copper tracks of the printed coil inductor affect the symmetry of the thermal profile, and hence of the lesion produced. Methods: Transmission spectroscopy in the near infrared was performed to test for the attenuation at 1064 nm through the 25 μm thick Kapton substrate of the microcoil. The radial transmission profile of an infrared high-power, light emitting diode with >80% normalized power at 1064 nm was measured through a cross section of the modified applicator to assess the impact of the copper inductor on the optical profile. The measurements were performed in air, as well as with the applicator surrounded by two types of scattering media; crystals of NaCl and a layer of liver-mimicking gel phantom. A numerical model based on Huygens–Fresnel principle and finite element simulations, using a commercially available package (COMSOL Multiphysics), were employed to compare with the optical measurements. The impact of the modified optical profile on the thermal symmetry was assessed by examining the high resolution microcoil derived thermal maps from a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a liver-mimicking gel phantom. Results: Less than 30% attenuation through the Kapton film was verified. Shadowing behind the copper tracks was observed in air and the measured radial irradiation correlated well with the diffraction pattern calculated numerically using the Huygens–Fresnel principle. Both optical experiments and simulations, demonstrate that shadowing is mitigated by the scattering properties of a turbid medium. The microcoil derived thermal maps at the end of a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a gel phantom in a

  5. Optothermal profile of an ablation catheter with integrated microcoil for MR-thermometry during Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies of the liver—an in-vitro experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kardoulaki, Evdokia M; Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Choonee, Kaushal; Rea, Marc; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M W

    2015-03-01

    Flexible microcoils integrated with ablation catheters can improve the temperature accuracy during local MR-thermometry in Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies. Here, the authors are concerned with obtaining a preliminary confirmation of the clinical utility of the modified catheter. They investigate whether the thin-film substrate and copper tracks of the printed coil inductor affect the symmetry of the thermal profile, and hence of the lesion produced. Transmission spectroscopy in the near infrared was performed to test for the attenuation at 1064 nm through the 25 μm thick Kapton substrate of the microcoil. The radial transmission profile of an infrared high-power, light emitting diode with >80% normalized power at 1064 nm was measured through a cross section of the modified applicator to assess the impact of the copper inductor on the optical profile. The measurements were performed in air, as well as with the applicator surrounded by two types of scattering media; crystals of NaCl and a layer of liver-mimicking gel phantom. A numerical model based on Huygens-Fresnel principle and finite element simulations, using a commercially available package (COMSOL Multiphysics), were employed to compare with the optical measurements. The impact of the modified optical profile on the thermal symmetry was assessed by examining the high resolution microcoil derived thermal maps from a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a liver-mimicking gel phantom. Less than 30% attenuation through the Kapton film was verified. Shadowing behind the copper tracks was observed in air and the measured radial irradiation correlated well with the diffraction pattern calculated numerically using the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Both optical experiments and simulations, demonstrate that shadowing is mitigated by the scattering properties of a turbid medium. The microcoil derived thermal maps at the end of a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a gel phantom in a 3 T scanner confirm that the

  6. Optical dosimetry for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arnfield, M.R.; Tulip, J.; Chetner, M.; McPhee, M.S. )

    1989-07-01

    An approach to photodynamic treatment of tumors is the interstitial implantation of fiber optic light sources. Dosimetry is critical in identifying regions of low light intensity in the tumor which may prevent tumor cure. We describe a numerical technique for calculating light distributions within tumors, from multiple fiber optic sources. The method was tested using four translucent plastic needles, which were placed in a 0.94 X 0.94 cm grid pattern within excised Dunning R3327-AT rat prostate tumors. A cylindrical diffusing fiber tip, illuminated by 630 nm dye laser light was placed within one needle and a miniature light detector was placed within another. The average penetration depth in the tumor region between the two needles was calculated from the optical power measured by the detector, using a modified diffusion theory. Repeating the procedure for each pair of needles revealed significant variations in penetration depth within individual tumors. Average values of penetration depth, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and mean scattering cosine were 0.282 cm, 0.469 cm-1, 250 cm-1 and 0.964, respectively. Calculated light distributions from four cylindrical sources in tumors gave reasonable agreement with direct light measurements using fiber optic probes.

  7. Near-infrared fiber delivery systems for interstitial photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatkine, Michael; Mead, Douglass S.; Konwitz, Eli; Rosenberg, Zvi

    1995-05-01

    Interstitial photothermal coagulation has long been recognized as a potential important, minimally invasive modality for treating a variety of pathologic conditions. We present two different technologies for interstitial photothermal coagulation of tissue with infrared lasers: An optical fiber with a radially symmetric diffusing tip for deep coagulation, and a flat bare fiber for the coagulation of thin and long lesions by longitudinally moving the fiber while lasing in concert. Urology and Gynecology Fibers: The fibers are 600 microns diameter with 20 - 40 mm frosted distal tips protected by a smooth transparent cover. When used with a Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser, the active fiber surface diffuses optical radiation in a radial pattern, delivering up to 40 W power, and thus providing consistent and uniform interstitial photothermal therapy. Coagulation depth ranges from 4 to 15 mm. Animal studies in the United States and clinical studies in Europe have demonstrated the feasibility of using these fibers to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and endometrial coagulation. Rhinology Fiber: The fiber is an 800 micron diameter flat fiber operated at 8 W power level while being interstitially pushed and pulled along its axis. A long and thin coagulated zone is produced. The fiber is routinely used for the shrinking of hypertrophic turbinates without surrounding and bone mucusal damage in ambulatory environments.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Therapies as Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kristene E

    2002-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis (IC) is predominantly the reduction of the symptoms of frequency, urgency, and pain. Multimodal treatment approaches for IC are helpful in customizing therapy for individual patients. Complementary and alternative therapies are a quintessential addition to the therapeutic armamentarium and frequently include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, neuromodulation, stress reduction, and sex therapy. Dietary modification involves elimination of bladder irritants, fluid regulation, and a bowel regimen. Nutraceuticals studied for the treatment of IC include calcium glycerophosphate, L-arginine, mucopolysaccharides, bioflavinoids, and Chinese herbs. Bladder training is effective after pain reduction. The neuromodulation of high-tone pelvic-floor muscle dysfunction is achieved with physical therapy and acupuncture. Stress reduction and sex therapy are best administered by a qualified stress manager and sex therapist. Multimodal, nonconventional management may add efficacy to the treatment of IC. PMID:16986031

  9. [Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis without arthritis: successful therapy with hydroxychloroquine].

    PubMed

    Gerbing, Eva Kristina; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A; Ständer, Sonja

    2003-02-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a rare entity characterized by cutaneous linear strands (the "rope sign") and rheumatoid arthritis. In the past years, 12 other cases have been described with variable cutaneous symptoms. All showed similar histological features, resembling those of granuloma annulare or 'palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis', suggesting a wide spectrum for a single entity. A 60-year-old patient presented with erythematous patches with an indurated, violaceous border resembling the "rope sign" on both flanks. The histological investigation revealed dense diffuse interstitial inflammatory infiltrates composed of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in the superficial and deep dermis. In the deep dermis, prominent eosinophilic degenerated collagen fibres with surrounding macrophages ('floating sign') occurred. In contrast to most previously described patients, our patient did not have arthralgias. The skin findings cleared following therapy with hydroxychloroquine.

  10. Interstitial radiation: short-term palliation or curative therapy?

    PubMed

    Whitmore, W F; Hilaris, B; Batata, M; Sogani, P; Herr, H; Morse, M

    1985-02-01

    The management of clinically localized prostatic cancer by interstitial implantation of 125I seeds has been under exploration at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center for thirteen years. This investigation was prompted by clinical evidence of the radioresponsiveness of some prostatic cancers, the limited applicability of surgical excision, and the possibility that interstitial therapy would have less of an adverse effect on the quality of life than would alternative treatments. Cumulative experience indicates that the technique is associated with low morbidity and mortality and high functional preservation rates; local control rates (routine biopsies were not done), within the constraints of still-limited follow-up intervals, are in the 80 per cent to 90 per cent range; and actuarial survival rates at nine years (including patients who received endocrine therapy for metastatic or intractable local disease) are approximately 90 per cent for T1, 60 per cent for T2, and 45 per cent for T3 lesions. Approximate actuarial nine-year survival rates are 80 per cent for all patients with negative nodes and 50 per cent for all patients with positive nodes. Taking into account limitations of the data and the hazards of comparing this therapy with other uncontrolled treatments, 125I appears to be a therapeutic option for the control of clinically localized prostatic cancer.

  11. Low-Level Laser Therapy Decreases Renal Interstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fabiana Aparecida Mayrink; Moraes, Ana Carolina Meneghin; Paiva, Amanda Povoa; Schinzel, Vânia; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Semedo, Patricia; Castoldi, Angêla; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Oliveira, Roberto Sotto-Maior Fortes; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Background data: Regardless of the etiology, CKD involves progressive widespread tissue fibrosis, tubular atrophy, and loss of kidney function. This process also occurs in kidney allograft. At present, effective therapies for this condition are lacking. We investigated the effects of LLLT on the interstitial fibrosis that occurs after experimental UUO in rats. Methods: The occluded kidney of half of the 32 Wistar rats that underwent UUO received a single intraoperative dose of LLLT (AlGaAs laser, 780 nm, 22.5 J/cm2, 30 mW, 0.75 W/cm2, 30 sec on each of nine points). After 14 days, renal fibrosis was assessed by Sirius red staining under polarized light. Immunohistochemical analyses quantitated the renal tissue cells that expressed fibroblast (FSP-1) and myofibroblast (α-SMA) markers. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and Smad3. Results: The UUO and LLLT animals had less fibrosis than the UUO animals, as well having decreased expression inflammatory and pro-fibrotic markers. Conclusions: For the first time, we showed that LLLT had a protective effect regarding renal interstitial fibrosis. It is conceivable that by attenuating inflammation, LLLT can prevent tubular activation and transdifferentiation, which are the two processes that mainly drive the renal fibrosis of the UUO model. PMID:23134313

  12. Thermal annealing of vacancy and interstitial loops in ion irradiated copper

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.; Noggle, T.S.; Barhorst, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray diffuse scattering has been used to study the thermal annealing of vacancy and interstitial loops in Ni-ion irradiated copper. The diffuse scattering formalism is reviewed and diffuse scattering measurements are reported on liquid-He temperature Ni-ion irradiated copper after annealing to 40, 275, and 300/sup 0/C. Size distributions are presented for vacancy and interstitial loops after each anneal and the thermal-induced changes are discussed in terms of loop dissolution and coalescence.

  13. Magnetic resonance thermometry for predicting thermal damage: an application of interstitial laser coagulation in an in vivo canine prostate model.

    PubMed

    Peters, R D; Chan, E; Trachtenberg, J; Jothy, S; Kapusta, L; Kucharczyk, W; Henkelman, R M

    2000-12-01

    Magnetic resonance image-guidance for interstitial thermal therapy has proven to be a valuable tool in its traditional role in device localization and, more recently, in monitoring heat deposition within tissue. However, a quantitative understanding of how temperature-time exposure relates to thermal damage is crucial if the predictive value of real-time MR thermal-monitoring is to be fully realized. Results are presented on interstitial laser coagulation of two canine prostate models which are shown to provide an opportunity to evaluate three models of thermal damage based on a threshold maximum temperature, an Arrhenius damage integral, and a temperature-time product. These models were compared to the resultant lesion margin as derived from post-treatment T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MR images, as well as from direct histological evaluation of the excised canine prostate. Histological evaluation shows that the thermal-injury boundary can be predicted from a threshold-maximum temperature of approximately 51 degrees C or an equivalent Arrhenius t(43) period of 200 minutes, but it is not reliably predicted using the temperature-time product. The methods described in this study are expected to have implications for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer with interstitial laser coagulation, which will be the focus of future human studies.

  14. Near "real" time magnetic resonance images as a monitoring system for interstitial laser therapy: experimental protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Dan J.; Farahani, Keyvan; Soudant, Jacques; Zwarun, Andrew A.; Lufkin, Robert B.

    1992-06-01

    The failure rate of cancer treatment remains unacceptably high, still being a leading cause of mortality in adults and children despite major advances over the past 50 years in the fields of surgery, radiation therapy and, more recently, chemo and immunotherapy. Surgical access to some deep tumors of the head and neck and other areas often require extensive dissections with residual functional and cosmetic deformities. Repeated treatment is not possible after maximum dose radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still limited by its systemic toxicity. An attractive solution to these problems would be the development of a new adjunctive method combining the best features of interstitial laser therapy for selective tumor destruction via minimally invasive techniques for access and 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a monitoring system for laser-tissue interactions. Interstitial laser therapy (ILT) via fiberoptics allow laser energy to be delivered directly into deeper tissues. However, this concept will become clinically useful only when noninvasive, accurate, and reproducible monitoring methods are developed to measure energy delivery to tissues. MRI has numerous advantages in evaluating the irreversible effects of laser treatment in tissues, since laser energy includes changes not only in the thermal motions of hydrogen protons within the tissue, but also in the distribution and mobility of water and lipids. These techniques should greatly improve the use of ILT in combination with MRI to allow treatment of deeper, more difficult to reach tumors of head and neck and other anatomical areas with a single needle stick.

  15. Realization of Combined Diagnosis/Treatment System By Ultrasound Strain Measurement-Based Shear Modulus Reconstruction/Imaging Technique Examples With Application on The New Type Interstitial RF Electromagnetic Wave Thermal Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    wave thermal therapy, tion I. INTRODUCTION ll known that the pathological stage of living human soft highly correlates with the static...demonstration on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues,” Phys. Med. Biol., vol. 45, pp. 1511-1520, 2000. [6] C. Sumi, “Toward 3D

  16. Interstitial photodynamic therapy in a rat liver metastasis model.

    PubMed Central

    van Hillegersberg, R.; Marijnissen, J. P.; Kort, W. J.; Zondervan, P. E.; Terpstra, O. T.; Star, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of hepatic tumours has been restricted owing to the preferential retention of photosensitizers in liver tissue. We therefore investigated interstitial tumour illumination as a means of selective PDT. A piece of colon carcinoma CC531 was implanted in the liver of Wag/Rij rats. Photofrin was administered (5 mg kg-1 i.v.) 2 days before laser illumination. Tumours with a mean (+/- s.e.) diameter of 5.7 +/- 0.1 mm (n = 106, 20 days after implantation) were illuminated with 625 nm light, at 200 mW cm-1 from a 0.5 cm cylindrical diffuser and either 100, 200, 400, 800 or 1600 J cm-1. Control groups received either laser illumination only, Photofrin only or diffuser insertion only. Short-term effects were studied on the second day after illumination by light microscopy and computer-assisted integration of the circumference of damaged areas. Long-term effects were studied on day 36. To determine the biochemistry of liver damage and function, serum ASAT and ALAT levels were measured on day 1 and 2, and antipyrine clearance on day 1. Tumour and surrounding liver necrosis increased with light dose delivered (P < 0.001). Best long-term results were obtained at 800 J cm-1 with complete tumour remission in 4 out of 6 animals. No deterioration in liver function was found. The results of this study show the ability of interstitial PDT to cause major destruction of tumour tissue in the liver combined with minimal liver damage. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1457339

  17. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and glycosaminoglycans replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating chronic disease characterized by discomfort or recurrent abdominal and pelvic pains in the absence of urinary tract infections. Its symptomatology includes discomfort, increased bladder pressure, sensitivity and intense pain in the bladder and pelvic areas, increased voiding frequency and urgency, or a combination of these symptoms. For these reasons, this pathology has a very negative impact on quality of life. The etiology of IC/BPS is still not well understood and different hypotheses have been formulated, including autoimmune processes, allergic reactions, chronic bacterial infections, exposure to toxins or dietary elements, and psychosomatic factors. The finding of an effective and specific therapy for IC/BPS remains a challenge for the scientific community because of the lack of a consensus regarding the causes and the inherent difficulties in the diagnosis. The last recent hypothesis is that IC/BPS could be pathophysiologically related to a disruption of the bladder mucosa surface layer with consequent loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This class of mucopolysaccharides has hydrorepellent properties and their alteration expose the urothelium to many urinary toxic agents. It has been hypothesized that when these substances penetrate the bladder wall a chain is triggered in the submucosa. In order to improve the integrity and function of the bladder lining, GAG layer replenishment therapy is widely accepted as therapy for patients with IC/BPS who have poor or inadequate response to conventional therapy. Currently, Chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and pentosan polysulphate (PPS), and combinations of two GAGs (CS and HA) are the available substances with different effectiveness rates in patients with IC/BPS. There are four different commercially available products for GAG replenishment including CS, heparin, HA and PPS. Each product has different concentrations and

  18. Effect of interstitial low level laser therapy on tibial defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Hwang, Donghyun; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Tibial defect is very common musculoskeletal disorder which makes patient painful and uncomfortable. Many studies about bone regeneration tried to figure out fast bone healing on early phase. It is already known that low level laser therapy (LLLT) is very convenient and good for beginning of bone disorder. However, light scattering and absorption obstruct musculoskeletal therapy which need optimal photon energy delivery. This study has used an interstitial laser probe (ILP) to overcome the limitations of light penetration depth and scattering. Animals (mouse, C57BL/6) were divided into three groups: laser treated test group 1 (660 nm; power 10 mW; total energy 5 J) and test group 2 (660 nm; power 20 mW; total energy 10 J); and untreated control group. All animals were taken surgical operation to make tibial defect on right crest of tibia. The test groups were treated every 48 hours with ILP. Bone volume and X-ray attenuation coefficient were measured on 0, 14th and 28th day with u-CT after treatment and were used to evaluate effect of LLLT. Results show that bone volume of test groups has been improved more than control group. X-ray attenuation coefficients of each groups have slightly different. The results suggest that LLLT combined with ILP may affect on early phase of bone regeneration and may be used in various musculoskeletal disease in deep tissue layer.

  19. A robotic multi-channel platform for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharikova, Anna V.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    A custom-made robotic multichannel platform for interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) was developed and tested in a phantom experiment. The system, which was compatible with the operating room (OR) environment, had 16 channels for independent positioning of light sources and/or isotropic detectors in separate catheters. Each channel’s motor had an optical encoder for position feedback, with resolution of 1.5 mm, and a maximum speed of 5 cm/s. Automatic calibration of detector positions was implemented using an optical diode beam that defined the starting position of each motor, and by means of feedback algorithms controlling individual channels. As a result, the accuracy of zero position of 0.1 mm for all channels was achieved. We have also employed scanning procedures where detectors automatically covered the appropriate range around source positions. Thus, total scan time for a typical optical properties (OP) measurement throughout the phantom was about 1.5 minutes with point sources. The OP were determined based on the measured light fluence rates. These enhancements allow a tremendous improvement of treatment quality for a bulk tumor compared to the systems employed in previous clinical trials. PMID:25914794

  20. Granuloma-forming interstitial pneumonia occurring one year after the start of everolimus therapy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshinobu; Kunugi, Shinobu; Suzuki, Yasutomo; Narita, Kousuke; Miura, Yukiko; Minegishi, Yuji; Kimura, Go; Kondo, Yukihiro; Azuma, Arata; Fukuda, Yuh; Gemma, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    We experienced a case of interstitial lung disease (ILD) that occurred one year after the start of everolimus therapy for renal cell carcinoma. The pathological features included interstitial pneumonia with granuloma formation. Everolimus is known to cause ILD; however, its pathology is unclear. Granuloma-forming interstitial pneumonia associated with everolimus is uncommon, although it may be one of the pathological patterns associated with everolimus-induced ILD. This is a slow-onset case of everolimus-induced ILD in a patient with renal cell carcinoma. Physicians should thus be aware of the potential for the development of ILD at any time during the administration of everolimus therapy.

  1. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    disease of the urinary bladder . The goal of this project is to advance key preclinical experiments towards the development of a new drug. Specific...factor (NGF) bladder drug delivery system targeting Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS), IC/PBS is a chronic, severely debilitating...interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, liposome, nerve growth factor, afferent hyper-excitability, antisense 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  2. Interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Milligan, A J; Dobelbower, R R

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer continues to gain popularity in the medical community. One of the disappointing findings has been the inability to deliver uniform thermal doses to tumor volumes. This inability to heat certain tumors is due to a variety of physical and physiologic phenomena. To increase the ability of heating tumors, local interstitial techniques have been developed that are proving to be safe and effective. These techniques employ implanted microwave or radiofrequency antennae for the delivery of local thermal doses. Recently, investigations into the placement of interstitially located ferromagnetic seeds for local hyperthermia have also been conducted. The seeds can be heated by delivery of a high-wattage RF magnetic field to the implanted volume by an external source after implantation. The tissue surrounding the ferromagnetic implant is heated by conduction of heat away from the implanted seeds. While these techniques have been effective, further development of the instrumentation for interstitial therapies is continuing. These developments will include the application of specific control circuitry for delivery of accurate thermal doses.

  3. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-01-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy. PMID:22191937

  4. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  5. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method.

    PubMed

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E; Chen, Wei R

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  6. Oxygen Therapy for Interstitial Lung Disease. A Mismatch between Patient Expectations and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yet H; Goh, Nicole S L; McDonald, Christine F; Holland, Anne E

    2017-06-01

    Domiciliary oxygen therapy is commonly prescribed for patients with interstitial lung disease and hypoxemia, either at rest or during exertion, with the aim of improving symptoms and functional status. This study aimed to explore perspectives of adults with interstitial lung disease about domiciliary oxygen therapy, comparing insights from patients using and not using oxygen therapy. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews was undertaken on 24 adults residing in and near Melbourne, Australia who had a diagnosis of interstitial lung disease and met the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand guidelines for domiciliary oxygen therapy. Study subjects included individuals who were oxygen-naive (n = 12) and oxygen-experienced (n = 12). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two investigators in accordance with the grounded theory method of analysis. Themes were established by consensus. Patients using domiciliary oxygen therapy described widespread variation in usage. Oxygen-naive patients expected oxygen therapy to relieve dyspnea, whereas oxygen-experienced patients emphasized the benefits of oxygen on other, non-dyspnea-related physical symptoms. Practical and psychosocial challenges of using oxygen therapy were raised by both groups of patients. This study highlights the different expectations and experiences of domiciliary oxygen therapy for adults with interstitial lung disease. It is important to understand and address patients' concerns about the use of oxygen therapy for these patients.

  7. Depletion of interstitial oxygen in silicon and the thermal donor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Singh, Vijay A.; Corbett, James W.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown here that the experimental results of Newman (1985) and Tan et al. (1986) regarding the loss of oxygen interstitials during 450 C annealing of Czochralski silicon are consistent with the recently proposed model of Borenstein, Peak, and Corbett (1986) for thermal donor formation. Calculations were carried out for TD cores corresponding to O2, O3, O4, and/or O5 clusters. A simple model which attempts to capture the essential physics of the interstitial depletion has been constructed, and is briefly described.

  8. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy Using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    potential channel A1 and mechanosensitive two pore- domain K+ channels between the lumbar splanchnic and pel- vic nerve innervations of mouse urinary...cystitis” evaluates the feasibility of an anti- nerve growth factor (NGF) bladder drug delivery as a treatment for Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder...treatments for this indication. With this project, these efforts now include local administration of anti- nerve growth factor (NGF) into the bladder, which

  9. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Studies Examining the Use of Brain Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy versus Craniotomy for the Treatment of High-Grade Tumors in or near Areas of Eloquence: An Examination of the Extent of Resection and Major Complication Rates Associated with Each Type of Surgery.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Gene H; Voigt, Jeffrey D; Alhuwalia, Manmeet S

    2016-01-01

    The extent of resection (EOR) of high-grade gliomas (WHO grade III or IV) in or near areas of eloquence is associated with overall patient survival, but with higher major neurocognitive complications. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken of the peer-reviewed literature in order to identify studies which examined EOR or extent of ablation (EOA) and major complications (defined as neurocognitive or functional complications which last >3 months duration after surgery) associated with either brain laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) or open craniotomy in high-grade tumors in or near areas of eloquence. Eight studies on brain LITT (n = 79 patients) and 12 craniotomy studies (n = 1,036 patients) were identified which examined either/both EOR/EOA and complications. Meta-analysis demonstrated an EOA/EOR of 85.4 ± 10.6% with brain LITT versus 77.0 ± 40% with craniotomy (mean difference: 8%; 95% CI: 2-15; p = 0.01; inverse variance, random effects model). Meta-analysis of proportions of major complications for each individual therapy demonstrated major complications of 5.7% (95% CI: 1.8-11.6) and 13.8% (95% CI: 10.3-17.9) for LITT and craniotomy, respectively. In patients presenting with high-grade gliomas in or near areas of eloquence, early results demonstrate that brain LITT may be a viable surgical alternative. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Interstitial laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Douglas E.; Cromeens, Douglas M.; Price, Roger E.

    1994-05-01

    Interstitial laser coagulation of the canine prostate using the Sharplan interstitial thermal therapy fiber (Model 25432) was performed in 9 adult dogs and the subsequent gross and histopathologic changes occurring in the prostate were studied at intervals ranging from 1 hour to 5 weeks. A large well-demarcated area of acute coagulative necrosis developed around each fiber tract which in turn was surrounded by a prominent narrow zone of marked tissue disruption and an outer zone of hemorrhage. Liquefaction developed within the coagulative areas within 24 hours and by 4 days, each prostatic lobe contained an irregular cavity which became lined by normal-appearing transitional epithelium and that by 5 weeks, communicated with the prostatic urethra. These changes, similar to those reported following transurethral visual laser ablation of the prostate, suggest that interstitial laser thermal therapy may provide an alternative means for treating selected patients suffering from prostatic enlargement.

  11. Treatment of Systemic Sclerosis-related Interstitial Lung Disease: A Review of Existing and Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Elizabeth R; Tashkin, Donald P

    2016-11-01

    Although interstitial lung disease accounts for the majority of deaths of patients with systemic sclerosis, treatment options for this manifestation of the disease are limited. Few high-quality, randomized, controlled trials exist for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease, and historically, studies have favored the use of cyclophosphamide. However, the benefit of cyclophosphamide for this disease is tempered by its complex adverse event profile. More recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of mycophenolate for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease, including Scleroderma Lung Study II. This review highlights the findings of this study, which was the first randomized controlled trial to compare cyclophosphamide with mycophenolate for the treatment of systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease. The results reported in this trial suggest that there is no difference in treatment efficacy between mycophenolate and cyclophosphamide; however, mycophenolate appears to be safer and more tolerable than cyclophosphamide. In light of the ongoing advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis, this review also summarizes novel treatment approaches, presenting clinical and preclinical evidence for rituximab, tocilizumab, pirfenidone, and nintedanib, as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation. This review further explores how reaching a consensus on appropriate study end points, as well as trial enrichment criteria, is central to improving our ability to judiciously evaluate the safety and efficacy of emerging experimental therapies for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease.

  12. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pulmonary Fibrosis Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Refer ... ILD clinical trials and most effective therapies. Interstitial Lung Disease Care at National Jewish Health At National ...

  13. 3-d modeling of the thermal coagulation necrosis induced by an interstitial ultrasonic transducer

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Carole; Lafon, Cyril; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a temperature-varying attenuation approach for pre-operative planning of high intensity ultrasound interstitial targeted therapy. Such approach is mainly aimed at the treatment of primary liver cancer for which a precise lesion control must be achieved. It is shown through simulation that the shape and size of the resulting necrotic volume is significantly different from the one obtained when this tissue property is considered constant in time. PMID:18270029

  14. MRI-controlled interstitial ultrasound brain therapy: An initial in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Lipsman, Nir; Bronskill, Michael; Schwartz, Michael; Kucharczyk, Walter; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-11-01

    The recent emergence at the clinical level of minimally-invasive focal therapy such as laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) has demonstrated promise in the management of brain metastasis [1], although control over the spatial pattern of heating is limited. Delivery of HIFU from minimally-invasive applicators enables high spatial control of the heat deposition in biological tissues, large treatment volumes and high treatment rate in well chosen conditions [2,3]. In this study, the feasibility of MRI-guided interstitial ultrasound therapy in brain was studies in-vivo in a porcine model. A prototype system originally developed for transurethral ultrasound therapy [4,5,6] was used in this study. Two burr holes of 12 mm in diameter were created in the animal's skull to allow the insertion of the therapeutic ultrasound applicator (probe) into the brain at two locations (right and left frontal lobe). A 4-element linear ultrasound transducer (f = 8 MHz) was mounted at the tip of a 25-cm linear probe (6 mm in diameter). The target boundary was traced to cover in 2D a surface compatible with the treatment of a 2 cm brain tumor. Acoustic power of each element and rotation rate of the device were adjusted in real-time based on MR-thermometry feedback control to optimize heat deposition at the target boundary [2,4,5]. Two MRT-controlled ultrasound brain treatments per animal have been performed using a maximal surface acoustic power of 10W.cm-2. In all cases, it was possible to increase accurately the temperature of the brain tissues in the targeted region over the 55°C threshold necessary for the creation of irreversible thermal lesion. Tissue changes were visible on T1w contrast-enhanced images immediately after treatment. These changes were also evident on T2w FSE images taken 2 hours after the 1st treatment and correlated well with the temperature image. On average, the targeted volume was 4.7 ± 2.3 cm3 and the 55°C treated volume was 6.7 ± 4.4 cm3. The volumetric

  15. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions.

    PubMed

    Salas, Nelson; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J; Denham, David B; Minhaj, Ahmed M; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S

    2004-05-07

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 degrees C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 x 10(3) mm3) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  16. Thermal effects in tissues induced by interstitial irradiation of near infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Johsi, Chet; Figueroa, Daniel; Goddard, Jessica; Li, Xiaosong; Towner, Rheal A.; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), using non-invasive laser irradiation, has resulted in promising outcomes in the treatment of late-stage cancer patients. However, the tissue absorption of laser light limits the clinical applications of LIT in patients with dark skin, or with deep tumors. The present study is designed to investigate the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using an 805-nm laser with a cylindrical diffuser, in order to overcome the limitations of the non-invasive mode of treatment. Cow liver and rat tumors were irradiated using interstitial fiber. The temperature increase was monitored by thermocouples that were inserted into the tissue at different sites around the cylinder fiber. Three-dimensional temperature distribution in target tissues during and after interstitial laser irradiation was also determined by Proton Resonance Frequency. The preliminary results showed that the output power of laser and the optical parameters of the target tissue determined the light distribution in the tissue. The temperature distributions varied in the tissue according to the locations relative to the active tip of the cylindrical diffuser. The temperature increase is strongly related to the laser power and irradiation time. Our results using thermocouples and optical sensors indicated that the PRF method is reliable and accurate for temperature determination. Although the inhomogeneous biological tissues could result in temperature fluctuation, the temperature trend still can be reliable enough for the guidance of interstitial irradiation. While this study provides temperature profiles in tumor tissue during interstitial irradiation, the biological effects of the irradiation remain unclear. Future studies will be needed, particularly in combination with the application of immunostimulant for inducing tumor-specific immune responses in the treatment of metastatic tumors.

  17. Exacerbation of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias associated with lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Yuji; Takenaka, Kiyoshi; Mizutani, Hideki; Sudoh, Junko; Noro, Rintaro; Okano, Tetsuya; Azuma, Arata; Yoshimura, Akinobu; Ando, Masahiro; Tsuboi, Eitaka; Kudoh, Shoji; Gemma, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) frequently occur in association with lung cancer. However, there is no consensus on the best treatment of acute exacerbation of IIP in lung cancer patients (LC with IIP), including those with iatrogenic acute lung injury resulting from cancer treatments. We aimed to identify an appropriate strategy for treatment of this condition. We analyzed clinical features of 120 LC with IIP, retrospectively. The incidence of acute exacerbation related to anticancer treatment was 22.7%; when the incidence was examined separately for patients receiving chemotherapy or the best supportive care, the incidence was 20.0% and 31.3%, respectively. Additional investigations should be directed to finding suitable regimens for treatment of LC with IIP and the selection of appropriate patients with LC with IIP for chemotherapy. The incidence of acute exacerbation caused by combination regimens of carboplatin + paclitaxel or a platinum agent + etoposide was significantly lower than that of other regimens (0% vs. 18%, respectively; p=0.025, Fisher's Exact Test). Patients with high levels of C-reactive protein before chemotherapy had a significantly higher risk of developing acute exacerbation (odds ratio 5.60, p=0.028). There was no evidence that anticancer treatment, including chemotherapy, should be avoided in LC with IIP. To establish an appropriate cancer treatment for LC with IIP, a prospective clinical study should be performed to evaluate various treatment modalities in a larger patient population.

  18. Interstitial laser coagulation therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Alsudani, Mohammed

    1996-05-01

    Alternatives to the side-firing laser method include controlled destruction of prostatic adenoma by an atraumatic saline cooled laser fiber introduced endoscopically into the prostate under visual and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) control. Laser light produces intense heating and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) occurs with characteristic TRUS changes which are used to control the volume of tissue destruction. The prostatic urethral lining is preserved which may reduce laser side effects). Thirty-six men with symptomatic BPH were treated by ILC between April 1994 and September 1995. All were discharged home on the first post-operative day and reviewed periodically to 12 months post-treatment with measurement of IPSS, flow rate (FR), residual volume, complications, potency and TRUS. Seventeen men (47%) voided immediately, 15 (42%) performed intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) for 3.5 days (2 - 5). Four men (11%) required catheterization for 1/52. Thirty-five men tolerated the treatment well, requiring only mild oral analgesia. One man developed dysuria and required early transurethral resection revealing a large volume of coagulative necrosis. Improvement in symptoms and flow rate developed from 1 - 30 days later. There were no significant complications. Hyperechoic and cystic zones developed at the ILC site which persisted to 12 months. This clinical study indicates the feasibility and safety of intense heating by ILC with visible and ultrasound control to coagulate the adenoma while preserving the urethra. Changes are easily seen on TRUS, symptomatic improvement is good and there have been minimal urethral symptoms or complications.

  19. Interstitial /sup 252/Cf neutron therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Chin, H.W.; Young, A.B.; Bean, J.; Tibbs, P.; Beach, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    /sup 252/Cf brachytherapy has been combined with whole brain photon beam therapy to 6000 rads in 5-7 weeks. In early phase I studies, all patients selected for study tolerated the procedure and the subsequent photon beam therapy. All showed improvement in performance status and decreased tumor size by CT scan evaluation, but it became clear that these tumors are of large size and bulk, produce marked adjacent brain edema, and require individualized implant therapy as well as high-dose external beam irradiation if response is to occur.

  20. Image guidance, treatment planning and evaluation of cancer interstitial focal therapy using liposomal radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Steve William

    Focally ablative therapy of cancer has gained significant interest recently. Improvements in diagnostic techniques have created possibilities for treatment which were once clinically unfeasible. Imaging must be capable of allowing accurate diagnosis, staging and planning upon initiation of therapy. Recent improvements in MRI and molecular imaging techniques have made it possible to accurately localize lesions and in so doing, improve the accuracy of proposed focal treatments. Using multimodality imaging it is now possible to target, plan and evaluate interstitial focal treatment using liposome encapsulated beta emitting radionuclides in a variety of cancer types. Since most absorbed dose is deposited early and heterogeneously in beta-radionuclide therapy, investigation of the resultant molecular and cellular events during this time is important for evaluating treatment efficacy. Additionally, investigating a multifocal entity such as prostate cancer is helpful for determining whether MRI is capable of discriminating the proper lesion for therapy. Correlation of MRI findings with histopathology can further improve the accuracy of interstitial focal radionuclide therapy by providing non-invasive surrogates for tissue compartment sizes. In the application of such therapies, compartmental sizes are known to heavily influence the distribution of injected agents. This has clear dosimetric implications with the potential to significantly alter the efficacy of treatment. The hypothesis of this project was that multimodality imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography (AR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be used to target, plan, and evaluate interstitial focal therapy with non-sealed source, liposome-encapsulated 186Re beta emitting radionuclides. The specific aims of this project were to 1) Identify suitable targets for interstitial focal therapy. This was done by retrospectively analyzing MRI data to characterize the tumor

  1. Intravesical NGF Antisense Therapy Using Lipid Nanoparticle for Interstitial Cystitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Michael Chancellor CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lipella Pharmaceuticals , Inc. Pittsburgh, PA 15208 REPORT DATE: December 2016 TYPE OF REPORT...Contact E-Mail: David.chancellor@lipella.com 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Lipella Pharmaceuticals , Inc...local NGF antisense therapies for the IC/BPS indication. Lipella Pharmaceuticals Inc collaborated with investigators located at the University Of

  2. Diamond chain with delocalized interstitial spins: Magnetization, thermal and entanglement properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaryan, Hrachya; Nalbandyan, Mikayel; Ananikian, Nerses

    2016-08-01

    We study physical properties of the symmetric diamond chain with delocalized interstitial spins. We derive an exact solution of the model and characterize the phases of the system at zero temperature. On the basis of this solution, we examine its magnetic and thermal properties as well. The case of nonconserved electron number is then considered. There are phases, which we term as nonclassical, for which electrons in Hubbard dimers are in quantum entangled states. We finally study quantum entanglement depending on Hamiltonian parameters and temperature.

  3. Enhanced Doppler ultrasound imaging of interstitial laser therapy in rat mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasuly, James M.; Fan, Ming; Dowlatshahi, Kambiz

    1997-05-01

    In order to better develop ultrasonography for use in monitoring interstitial laser therapy (ILT), we imaged rat mammary tumors using power Doppler ultrasound in conduction with intravenous contrast agent (Albunex) before and after laser therapy. Small vessel perfusion throughout a variable portion of the tumor could be detected by power Doppler ultrasound. Lesions created with diode laser by delivery of 500 to 3000 J appeared as perfusion defects on post-treatment images. Image topography and lesion size correlated with gross histologic findings. We conclude that ultrasonographic monitoring of local changes in blood flow using contrast enhancing agent can be useful in characterizing lesions created with ILT.

  4. Interstitial photodynamic therapy for the prostate: a canine feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sugandh D.; Sirls, Larry T.; Chen, Qun; Hetzel, Fred W.; Cerny, Joseph C.

    1996-05-01

    Prior to a possible clinical application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, optical properties of the prostate gland need to be studied. The specific objectives of this study were (1) to determine the light penetration depth, (2) to document the photosensitizer levels in the prostate, and (3) to document the lesion size after PDT. Sixteen dogs were injected with Photofrin II (1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) 24 hrs prior to laser application. After laparotomy and exposure of prostate, monochromatic light (630 nm, via an argon pumped dye laser) was applied through an isotropic fiber at 100 mw for a total dose of 400 joules. Continuous light fluence and temperature were documented. Prostates were harvested at 1 week and examined histologically for the lesion size. Four sham dogs were treated without Photofrin II. At Photofrin doses of 1, 3 and 5 mg/kg the mean prostatic Photofrin levels were 1.78 plus or minus 0.33, 1.47 plus or minus 0.08 and 1.95 plus or minus 0.44 (mu) gm/ml. The mean light penetration depths were 2.08, 1.37 and 1.64 mm respectively. Photofrin dose escalation (1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) increased the lesion size to radius of 4.1 plus or minus 0.9 mm, 4.4 plus or minus 0.8 mm and 6.3 plus or minus 0.9 mm. There were no lesions seen in sham dogs. These results demonstrate that light penetration in prostate is consistent and therapeutic levels of photosensitizer are achieved in prostatic tissue. Moreover, increasing size of the lesions were documented with dose escalation.

  5. Interstitial pneumonitis in a patient with chronic hepatitis C and chronic renal failure on interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Jung; Kim, Dong Kyun; Jeon, Seong Ran; Choi, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Soung Won; Jang, Jae Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Uh, Soo Taek

    2011-07-01

    After 4-months of alpha interferon (IFN-α), a 64-year old woman with chronic hepatitis C developed a cough and dyspnea and showed diffuse infiltrative opacities on her chest X-ray. Her symptoms persisted after stopping the IFN-α therapy. Pulmonary function testing revealed a reduced forced vital capacity. High-resolution computed tomography of the lung showed peripheral and peribronchovascular ground glass attenuation and consolidation associated with reticulation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed for further evaluation and showed a lymphocyte level of 8.2%, an uncommon finding in IFN-α-induced interstitial pneumonitis. We performed a lung biopsy to diagnose her disease and it suggested interstitial pneumonitis. This was considered to be due to the immunomodulatory effects of INF-α. Although rare, any sign of significant pulmonary involvement should be evaluated.

  6. Ultrasound-guided interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy of cavernous hemangiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Offergeld, Christian F.; Huettenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Hackert, I.; Scholz, A.

    1995-05-01

    Preoperative embolization and excision used to be standard therapy amongst a wide range of other more or less successful methods for the treatment of voluminous hemangiomas. Nowadays a combination of argon, tunable dye, copper vapor and Nd:YAG laser therapy achieves better cosmetic and functional results. Due to its limited penetration depth percutaneous laser therapy can only be utilized for superficial vascular malformations. Interstitial laser therapy, as performed with the Nd:YAG laser, allows treatment of voluminous hemangiomas in their full extent. The localization of these vascular lesions is evaluated by high resolution ultrasound with a new anular array scanner which ensures the precise intraoperative placement of the laser light fiber in the target tissue. Modified new light applicators improve the interstitial thermotherapy of hemangiomas. The tip design of the scattering-dome fiber allows diffuse circumferential irradiation with larger defined coagulation volume and minimized carbonization. Continuous intraoperative sonographic monitoring lowers the risk of damaging adjacent intact anatomical structures, helps to reach all tumor areas an to estimate the effect of the applied laser light caused by changes of sonomorphology. The postoperative outcome is evaluated by B-mode sonography and the new technique of ultrasound color angiography.

  7. Infrared thermographic SAR measurements of interstitial hyperthermia applicators: errors due to thermal conduction and convection.

    PubMed

    Sherar, M D; Gladman, A S; Davidson, S R H; Easty, A C; Joy, M L

    2004-08-01

    Thermal conduction and convection were examined as sources of error in thermographically measured SAR patterns of an interstitial microwave hyperthermia applicator. Measurements were performed in a layered block of muscle-equivalent phantom material using an infrared thermographic technique with varying heating duration. There was a 52.7% reduction in maximum SAR and 75.5% increase in 50% iso-SAR contour area for a 60-s heating duration relative to a 10-s heating duration. A finite element model of heat transfer in an homogeneous medium was used to model conductive and convective heat transfer during the thermographic measurement. Thermal conduction artefacts were found to significantly distort thermographically measured SAR patterns. Convective cooling, which occurs when phantom layers are exposed for thermal image acquisition, was found to significantly affect the magnitude, but not the spatial distribution, of thermographically measured SAR patterns. Results from this investigation suggest that the thermal diffusion artefacts can be minimized if the duration of the applied power pulse is restricted to 10 s or less.

  8. Catheter-based ultrasound devices and MR thermal monitoring for conformal prostate thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Chris J; Nau, Will H; Kinsey, Adam; Ross, Tony; Wootton, Jeff; Juang, Titania; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Rieke, Viola; Chen, Jing; Bouley, Donna M; Sommer, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been developed for delivering hyperthermia or high-temperature thermal ablation of cancer and benign disease of the prostate. These devices allow for control of heating along the length and angular expanse during therapy delivery. Four types of transurethral applicators were devised for thermal treatment of prostate combined with MR thermal monitoring: sectored tubular transducer devices with directional heating patterns and rotation; planar and curvilinear devices with narrow heating patterns and rotation; and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. Interstitial devices (2.4 mm OD) have been developed for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control. In vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature imaging were used to evaluate these devices and develop treatment delivery strategies. MR thermal imaging was used to monitor temperature and thermal dose in multiple slices through the target volume. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the gland in short treatment times without applicator manipulation. The sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transurethral devices produce directional coagulation zones, extending 15-20 mm radial distance to the outer prostate capsule. Sequential rotation under motor control and modulated dwell time can be used to tightly conform thermal ablation to selected regions. Interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate targeted regions of the gland while protecting the rectum. The MR derived 52 degrees C and lethal thermal dose contours (t43=240 min) effectively defined the extent of thermal damage and provided a means for real-time control of the applicators. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, combined with MR thermal monitoring, can produce relatively fast (5-40 min) and precise thermal

  9. ICDC interstitial ultrasound applicators for high-temperature thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyreus, Per Daniel; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.

    2001-06-01

    Theoretical and experimental approaches were used to evaluate Internally-Cooled Direct-Coupled (ICDC) ultrasound applicators for treating disease in the prostate and liver. 2-D and 3-D transient biothermal models, which account for dynamic tissue changes, were used to calculate temperature distributions and zones of coagulation. Experimental evaluations and verification of these models were performed using in vitro tissue and in vivo porcine and canine models. Devices of 2.2 mm outer diameter were evaluated under varied applied power schemes and cooling levels. Both duty cycle power application and PI-controlled power application were found to improve applicator performance by increasing radial depths of lesions with lower maximum temperature. ICDC applicators were found to be able to create 3-5 cm diameter lesions in liver and muscle under 15 minute treatment times using the optimal designs and power application schemes found in this study. From these initial feasibility studies it has been demonstrated that ICDC devices have potential for treating cancerous tumors in prostate, liver and possibly breast.

  10. Thermal balance in convective therapies.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonio; Mancini, Elena; Canova, Cristina; Mambelli, Emanuele

    2003-08-01

    Among the factors causing intradialytic haemodynamic instability, dialysate temperature has been shown to play a relevant role. An improved cardiovascular response during isolated ultrafiltration or with cooled dialysate has been described in the past. Cold dialysate may increase the external heat loss compensating for the increase in core temperature, thus avoiding vasodilatation, but it also increases myocardial contractility. However, a better haemodynamic response to dialysis treatment has long been known in convective therapies as well, and the hypothesis of a leading role for thermal balance is under discussion. In conventional haemofiltration (HF), venous blood cooling is expected, on the basis of the infusate temperature and the filtration fraction. In on-line HF, the infusate temperature and its volume may have a different impact on thermal balance depending on the site of infusion (pre- or post-dialyser). In an in vitro study comparing haemodialysis (HD) (conventional HD, dialysate 37 degrees C; and cold HD, dialysate 35.5 degrees C) with HF (pre- and post-dilution, 37 degrees C), we observed a more negative thermal balance with cold HD (-130 kJ/h) and with post-dilution HF (-75 kJ/h). The beneficial pressor effects of HF have been confirmed even in on-line HF, which actually has very few differences in the thermal balance compared with conventional HD (dialysate 37 degrees C). In on-line HF, the amount of warm infusion, often exceeding the blood flow, makes the achievement of a negative thermal balance highly unlikely. Thus, there is not sufficient evidence that vascular stability in on-line HF is solely related to different thermal energy balances. Other factors playing a relevant role in the cardiocirculatory response to convective dialysis should thus be considered.

  11. In-vivo investigations on interstitial Ho:YAG laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Pongratz, T.; Muschter, Rolf

    1997-05-01

    Laser induced interstitial thermotherapy is a new minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study Ho:YAG laser induced lesions were investigated on liver, kidney and prostates of canines. While the dependency of the induced lesions on the energy/pulse at a constant mean power had been investigated on the liver, the dependency on the pulse duration was studied on the kidney. Additionally the dependency of the lesions induced on the total applied energy at optimized parameters had been determined in prostate tissue. In all experiments it could be demonstrated that interstitial pulsed Ho:YAG irradiation resulted in a cavity surrounded by a coagulation zone. The results show that changing the pulse duration by a factor of two or changing the energy/pulse at a constant mean power result in no significant alteration of the lesions sizes. These experimental findings may offer new treatment modalities with respect to interstitial laser therapy of BPH without damaging the urethra.

  12. Endoscopic and interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy to control duodenal and periampullary carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Hugh; Fowler, Aiden L.

    1996-12-01

    Duodenal and periampullary cancer present with jaundice, bleeding and obstruction. Many patients are unsuitable for radical surgery. Endoscopic palliation of jaundice can be achieved using endoscopic sphincterotomy or stent insertion. However, the problems of bleeding and obstruction can be difficult to manage. Ten patients were treated using superficial Nd:YAG laser ablation and lower power interstitial laser therapy. After initial outpatient endoscopic therapy, treatment was repeated at 4 monthly intervals to prevent recurrent symptoms. Bleeding was controlled in all patients and only one patient developed obstructive symptoms between treatment sessions. This responded to further endoscopic laser therapy. The median survival was 21 months. Laser treated patients were compared with a historical series of 22 patients treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy or stent insertion. The complication rate was less in patients treated with the laser.

  13. The role of interstitial brachytherapy in the management of primary radiation therapy for uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuma; Kato, Tomoyasu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shima, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Keisuke; Kashihara, Tairo; Harada, Ken; Takahashi, Kana; Umezawa, Rei; Inaba, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to report the clinical results of uterine cervical cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy including brachytherapy, and investigate the role of interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). Material and methods All consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients who were treated by primary radiation therapy were reviewed, and those who were treated by ISBT were further investigated for clinical outcomes and related toxicities. Results From December 2008 to October 2014, 209 consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients were treated with primary radiation therapy. Among them, 142 and 42 patients were treated by intracavitary and hybrid brachytherapy, respectively. Twenty-five patients (12%) were treated by high-dose-rate (HDR)-ISBT. Five patients with distant metastasis other than para-aortic lymph node were excluded, and 20 patients consisted of the analysis. Three-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) rate were 44.4%, 38.9%, and 87.8%, respectively. Distant metastasis was the most frequent site of first relapse after HDR-ISBT. One and four patients experienced grade 3 and 2 rectal bleeding, one grade 2 cystitis, and two grade 2 vaginal ulcer. Conclusions Feasibility and favorable local control of interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer was demonstrated through a single institutional experience with a small number of patients. PMID:27895680

  14. Adapting preclinical concepts for use in clinical trials of serosal and interstitial photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith

    2012-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires an optimal combination of drug and light. To achieve the ideal conditions, a tight bond between the research laboratory and the clinic is essential. This continual 2-way street allows preclinical ideas and concepts to be tested in the clinic and refinements in technique to be made. This article clearly illustrates the close connection between the bench and the bedside, exploring intraoperative pleural PDT, challenges in matching fluence and photosensitizer, improvements in animal models that lead to adjustments in the operating room, and clinical applications for interstitial PDT in prostate cancer and beyond.

  15. Early CT findings after interstitial radiation therapy for primary malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolly, T.L.; Bruckman, J.E.; Czarnecki, D.J.; Frazin, L.J.; Lewis, H.J.; Richards, M.J.; Adamkiewicz, J.J. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    The CT findings after interstitial radiation therapy for brain tumors have not been extensively described. We evaluated retrospectively the CT scans of 13 patients who were treated with brachytherapy for malignant glioma. We found no typical CT appearance that differentiates recurrent tumor from radiation effect. After undergoing brachytherapy, eight of the 13 patients scanned demonstrated enhancement of brain tissue beyond the margins of the original enhancing tumor mass. In most cases, the pattern of enhancement diminished and extended more peripherally from the central necrotic area with time. We also report a new CT finding of focal calcification developing at the site of the radioactive implant.

  16. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  17. Fatal interstitial lung disease associated with oral erlotinib therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Demosthenes; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Copin, Marie Christine; Colin, Guillaume; Brun, Luc; Lafitte, Jean Jacques; Marquette, Charles Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Erlotinib is a Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Type 1/tyrosine kinase (EGFR) inhibitor which is used for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment. Despite that erlotinib is considered to have a favorable safety profile, adverse events such as interstitial lung disease (ILD) were reported in pivotal studies. The authors report the first histologically confirmed case of fatal ILD associated with erlotinib therapy. Case Presentation The medical record of a patient who developed fatal ILD after receiving erlotinib treatment was reviewed to identify the cause of death and other factors potentially contributive to this adverse outcome. A 55-year-old smoker with no evidence of pre-existing interstitial disease developed bilateral ILD and respiratory failure which could be explained only as a toxicity of erlotinib. He had a history of stage IV left upper lobe squamous-cell carcinoma for which he had received three successive regimens of chemotherapy (ifosfamide plus gemcitabine, docetaxel, mitomycin plus navelbine), followed five months later by erlotinib. At initiation of erlotinib treatment there were no radiological signs suggestive of ILD disease or apparent clinical signs of respiratory distress. While the patient completed two months with erlotinib therapy he developed bilateral interstitial infiltrates; despite discontinuation of erlotinib he was admitted with respiratory failure two weeks later. Diagnostic work up for other causes of pneumonitis including infectious diseases, congestive cardiac failure and pulmonary infraction was negative. Empiric treatment with oxygene, corticosteroids and later with cyclophosphamide was ineffective and the patient progressively deteriorated and died. The clinical and post-mortem examination findings are presented and the possible association relationship between erlotinib induced ILD and previous chemotherapy is discussed. Conclusion Physicians should be alert to the fact that erlotinib related ILD, although

  18. Effectiveness of Combined Therapy with Pirfenidone and Erythromycin for Unclassifiable Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by HTLV-1-associated Bronchioloalveolar Disorder (HABA)

    PubMed Central

    Yokohori, Naoko; Sato, Akitoshi; Hasegawa, Mizue; Katsura, Hideki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Takemura, Tamiko

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus involved in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTVL-1-associated bronchioloalveolar disorder (HABA). The clinical and pathological findings of HABA have been characterized as either a diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) pattern or idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) pattern. Treatments for HABA include corticosteroids for the IIP pattern and erythromycin for the DPB pattern. We herein report a case of HABA-associated unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia that improved with combined therapy with pirfenidone and erythromycin. This is the first report on the effectiveness of combined therapy with pirfenidone and erythromycin for HABA. PMID:28050003

  19. Image-guided Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinomas: Preclinical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Sajisevi, Mirabelle; Rigual, Nestor R; Bellnier, David A.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2014-01-01

    Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved minimally invasive treatment for cancer. In this preclinical study, using an imaging-guided approach, we examined the potential utility of PDT in the management of bulky squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Methods To mimic bulky oropharyngeal cancers seen in the clinical setting, intramuscular SCCs were established in six-to-eight week old female C3H mice. Animals were injected with the photosensitizer, 2-[hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; 0.4 μmol/kg, i.v.) and tumors were illuminated 24 hours post injection with 665 nm light. PDT as a single treatment modality was administered by surface illumination or by interstitial placement of fibers (iPDT). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to guide treatment and assess tumor response to PDT along with correlative histopathologic assessment. Results Interstitial HPPH-PDT resulted in a marked change on T2 maps 24 hours post treatment compared to untreated controls or transcutaneous illumination. Corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps also showed hyperintense areas in tumors following iPDT suggestive of effective photodynamic cell kill. Histologic sections (H&E) confirmed presence of extensive tumor necrosis following iPDT. Conclusions These results highlight the potential utility of PDT in the treatment of bulky oropharyngeal cancers. The findings of our study also demonstrate the utility of MRI as a non-invasive tool for mapping of early tissue response to PDT. PMID:25750858

  20. Online dosimetry for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy using the canine prostate as model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Höglund, Odd V.; Hansson, Kerstin; Södersten, Fredrik; Axelsson, Johan; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Online light dosimetry with real-time feedback was applied for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) of dog prostate. The aim was to investigate the performance of online dosimetry by studying the correlation between light dose plans and the tissue response, i.e., extent of induced tissue necrosis and damage to surrounding organs at risk. Light-dose planning software provided dose plans, including light source positions and light doses, based on ultrasound images. A laser instrument provided therapeutic light and dosimetric measurements. The procedure was designed to closely emulate the procedure for whole-prostate PDT in humans with prostate cancer. Nine healthy dogs were subjected to the procedure according to a light-dose escalation plan. About 0.15 mg/kg temoporfin was administered 72 h before the procedure. The results of the procedure were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and gross pathology and histopathology of excised tissue. Light dose planning and online dosimetry clearly resulted in more focused effect and less damage to surrounding tissue than interstitial PDT without dosimetry. A light energy dose-response relationship was established where the threshold dose to induce prostate gland necrosis was estimated from 20 to 30 J/cm2.

  1. Online dosimetry for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy using the canine prostate as model.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Johannes; Höglund, Odd V; Hansson, Kerstin; Södersten, Fredrik; Axelsson, Johan; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Online light dosimetry with real-time feedback was applied for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) of dog prostate. The aim was to investigate the performance of online dosimetry by studying the correlation between light dose plans and the tissue response, i.e., extent of induced tissue necrosis and damage to surrounding organs at risk. Light-dose planning software provided dose plans, including light source positions and light doses, based on ultrasound images. A laser instrument provided therapeutic light and dosimetric measurements. The procedure was designed to closely emulate the procedure for whole-prostate PDT in humans with prostate cancer. Nine healthy dogs were subjected to the procedure according to a light-dose escalation plan. About 0.15 mg/kg temoporfin was administered 72 h before the procedure. The results of the procedure were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and gross pathology and histopathology of excised tissue. Light dose planning and online dosimetry clearly resulted in more focused effect and less damage to surrounding tissue than interstitial PDT without dosimetry. A light energy dose-response relationship was established where the threshold dose to induce prostate gland necrosis was estimated from 20 to 30  J/cm2.

  2. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for interstitial cystitis: an update from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Megan Danielle; Shah, Nima M.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) has shifted from organ-specific to a multifactorial, multidisciplinary and individualized approach. Patients with refractory and debilitating symptoms may respond to complementary and alternative medical treatments (CAM). Through CAM therapies, practitioners assist the patient to be at the center of their care, empowering them to be emotionally and physically involved. Multi-disciplinary care, including urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, neurology, psychology, physiotherapy and pain medicine, is also identified to be the crux of adequate management of patients with chronic pelvic pain because of its variable etiology. The purpose of this review is to emphasize these changes and discuss management strategies. PMID:26816868

  3. Monte Carlo fluence simulation for prospective evaluation of interstitial photodynamic therapy treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Jeffrey; Betz, Vaughn; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) delivers a localized cytotoxic dose that is a function of tissue oxygen availability, photosensitive drug concentration, and light fluence. Providing safe and effective PDT requires an understanding of all three elements and the physiological response to the radicals generated. Interstitial PDT (IPDT) for solid tumours poses particular challenges due to complex organ geometries and the associated limitations for diffusion theory based fluence rate prediction, in addition to restricted access for light delivery and dose monitoring. As a first step towards enabling a complete prospective IPDT treatment-planning platform, we demonstrate use of our previously developed FullMonte tetrahedral Monte Carlo simulation engine for modeling of the interstitial fluence field due to intravesicular insertion of brief light sources. The goal is to enable a complete treatment planning and monitoring work flow analogous to that used in ionizing radiation therapy, including plan evaluation through dose-volume histograms and algorithmic treatment plan optimization. FullMonte is to our knowledge the fastest open-source tetrahedral MC light propagation software. Using custom hardware acceleration, we achieve 4x faster computing with 67x better power efficiency for limited-size meshes compared to the software. Ongoing work will improve the performance advantage to 16x with unlimited mesh size, enabling algorithmic plan optimization in reasonable time. Using FullMonte, we demonstrate significant new plan-evaluation capabilities including fluence field visualization, generation of organ dose-volume histograms, and rendering of isofluence surfaces for a representative bladder cancer mesh from a real patient. We also discuss the advantages of MC simulations for dose-volume histogram generation and the need for online personalized fluence-rate monitoring.

  4. High-intensity interstitial ultrasound for thermal ablation of focal cancer targets in prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena; Kurhanewicz, John; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    targets could be ablated with single or multiple interstitial applicators placed along the prostate periphery. In the representative cases explored during this study, thermal targets could be ablated with acoustic intensity values between 11 - 19 W/cm2 within 6 - 15 min of sonication time. Unifocal ablation could be performed by a single directional applicator (210° sectors). Hemi-gland targets were ablated by two directional applicators (210° sectors). Hockey-stick ablations were performed using 3 directional applicators (2 - 210° and 1 - 150°).

  5. Dual-mode 5-element transducer for image-guided interstitial ultrasound therapy: In vitro evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, N. R.; Bouchoux, G.; Murillo-Rincon, A.; Merouche, S.; Birer, A.; Chapelon, J. Y.; Berriet, R.; Fleury, G.; Lafon, C.

    2009-04-01

    Interstitial probes with dual-mode transducers are effective devices to guide and monitor with ultrasound imaging the application of ultrasound therapy. Here, a dual-mode 5-element transducer, with oscillatory motion for sector imaging and directive therapy, was characterized and evaluated in vitro with porcine liver. The transducer had 3.8×3.0-mm2 elements, a 20×3.0-mm2 aperture, and was cylindrically focused to 14-mm. In therapy mode, elements were maximally efficient, 72±4% (ave±std), at 5.6-MHz. In imaging mode, the pulse-echo impulse response for each electrically-matched element was 160±16 ns long at -6 dB, and insertion loss was minimally 9.8±0.5 dB at 5.2-MHz. Electrical crosstalk was less than -57 dB at 5.6-MHz. Lateral resolution, measured by scanning a wire of 0.1-mm diameter wire though the focal plane, was 1.0-mm at -6 dB. During experiment, an initial B-mode image was formed over a 140° sector. Then, therapy was applied for 90 s, with 18-W/cm2 transducer surface intensity, at each of 5 angles (Δθ = 20°) to form volumes of composite protein denaturization. Pulse-echo data were collected periodically to monitor therapy with real-time M-mode imaging. After therapy, another B-mode image was formed, and the depth of protein denaturization was measured by gross histology. B-mode images adequately represented the liver structure. Analysis of M-mode images was consistent with gross histology.

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for refractory interstitial lung disease associated with polymyositis/dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuzo; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Miwa, Seiichi; Shirai, Masahiro; Fujii, Masato; Gemma, Hitoshi; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with polymyositis/dermatomyositis (ILD-PM/DM), including amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM), is recognized as an important condition because it frequently causes death, despite intensive therapy with high-dose corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents, such as cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIG) has shown efficacy for myopathy associated with PM/DM, but its usefulness for ILD-PM/DM is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of IVIG for refractory ILD-PM/DM. A review was made of medical charts of five patients (2 men and 3 women) who were treated with IVIG for refractory ILD-PM/DM resistant to high-dose corticosteroid and cyclosporine A and/or cyclophosphamide. One patient had acute ILD-PM and four patients had acute ILD-ADM. Of the five patients, one patient with ILD-PM and one patient with ILD-ADM survived. No adverse reactions were seen due to IVIG treatment. There were no critical differences in the clinical parameters and clinical courses between survivors and nonsurvivors. IVIG treatment is safe and could be an effective salvage therapy for refractory ILD-PM/DM in certain cases, suggesting that further controlled trials are worthwhile.

  7. Investigation of the thermal and tissue injury behavior in microwave thermal therapy of the porcine kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoming; Mcgee, Shawn; Coad, James E.; Schmidlin, Franz R.; Iaizzo, Paul; Swanlund, David J.; Rudie, Eric; Kluge, Stan; Bischof, John C.

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, we report the characterization of microwave therapy in normal porcine kidneys both in vitro and in vivo. This technology is being developed for eventual use in the treatment of small renal cell carcinomas (RCC) using minimally invasive procedures. Microwave energy was applied through an interstitial microwave probe (Urologix, Plymouth, MN) to the kidney cortex with involvement of the medulary region. The thermal histories at several locations were recorded. After treatment, the kidneys were bisected and tissue sections were prepared for histologic study at approximately the same depth as the thermal probe. Histologic cellular injury and microvascular stasis were quantitatively evaluated. Absolute rate kinetic models of cellular injury and vascular stasis were fit to the thermal and histologic data to determine the kinetic parameters. A 3-D finite element thermal model based on the Pennes Bioheat equation was developed and solved using a commercial software package (ANSYS, V5.7). The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the microwave probe was measured experimentally. This is the first thermal model validated using measured in vitro thermal histories and then used to determine the blood perfusion term in vivo.

  8. Interstitial laser hyperthermia model development for minimally invasive therapy of breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D S; Parel, J M; Denham, D B; González-Cirre, X; Manns, F; Milne, P J; Schachner, R D; Herron, A J; Comander, J; Hauptmann, G

    1998-03-01

    This investigation describes the preclinical development of a laser fiberoptic interstitial delivery system for the thermal destruction of small breast cancers. We propose adaptation of this technology to stereotactic mammographic instrumentation currently employed for diagnostic core biopsy to thermally ablate a site of disease with maximal treatment efficacy, minimal observable superficial change, reduced patient trauma, and lowered overall treatment costs. Laser hyperthermia is a clinical modality that seeks to achieve tumor destruction through controlled tissue heating. The advantage of laser-induced hyperthermia over traditionally used heat sources such as ultrasound, microwave, or radiowave radiation lies in the ability to focus heat localization to the specific tumor tissue site. Neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser light transmitted through a fiberoptic cable to a diffusing quartz tip can induce such temperature increases leading to localized tissue destruction. Because breast cancer occurs with greatest frequency in the mature woman whose breast tissue has undergone glandular involution with fatty replacement, this study concentrates on determining the resultant laser energy heat distribution within fat and fibrofatty tissue. This investigation studied the time-temperature responses of ex vivo human breast and porcine fibrofatty tissue, which led to an in vivo subcutaneous porcine model for the practical demonstration of a laser hyperthermia treatment of small volumes of porcine mammary chain tissue. Spatial recordings of the resultant temperature fields through time exhibited similar, reproducible thermal profiles in both ex vivo human breast and subcutaneous porcine fat. In vivo laser-produced temperature fields in porcine subcutaneous fat were comparable to those in the ex vivo analyses, and showed a histologically, sharply defined, and controllable volume of necrosis with no injury to adjacent tissues or to overlying skin. Interstitially

  9. System for interstitial photodynamic therapy with online dosimetry: first clinical experiences of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Axelsson, Johan; Ahlgren, Göran; Kälkner, Karl Mikael; Nilsson, Sten; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    The first results from a clinical study for Temoporfin-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) of low-grade (T1c) primary prostate cancer using online dosimetry are presented. Dosimetric feedback in real time was applied, for the first time to our knowledge, in interstitial photodynamic therapy. The dosimetry software IDOSE provided dose plans, including optical fiber positions and light doses based on 3-D tissue models generated from ultrasound images. Tissue optical property measurements were obtained using the same fibers used for light delivery. Measurements were taken before, during, and after the treatment session. On the basis of these real-time measured optical properties, the light-dose plan was recalculated. The aim of the treatment was to ablate the entire prostate while minimizing exposure to surrounding organs. The results indicate that online dosimetry based on real-time tissue optical property measurements enabled the light dose to be adapted and optimized. However, histopathological analysis of tissue biopsies taken six months post-PDT treatment showed there were still residual viable cancer cells present in the prostate tissue sections. The authors propose that the incomplete treatment of the prostate tissue could be due to a too low light threshold dose, which was set to 5 J/cm2.

  10. Image-guided therapy system for interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy in a multimodality operating suite.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, an image-guided therapy system supporting gynecologic radiation therapy is introduced. The overall workflow of the presented system starts with the arrival of the patient and ends with follow-up examinations by imaging and a superimposed visualization of the modeled device from a PACS system. Thereby, the system covers all treatments stages (pre-, intra- and postoperative) and has been designed and constructed by a computer scientist with feedback from an interdisciplinary team of physicians and engineers. This integrated medical system enables dispatch of diagnostic images directly after acquisition to a processing workstation that has an on-board 3D Computer Aided Design model of a medical device. Thus, allowing precise identification of catheter location in the 3D imaging model which later provides rapid feedback to the clinician regarding device location. Moreover, the system enables the ability to perform patient-specific pre-implant evaluation by assessing the placement of interstitial needles prior to an intervention via virtual template matching with a diagnostic scan.

  11. Association of Acute Interstitial Nephritis With Programmed Cell Death 1 Inhibitor Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Shirali, Anushree C; Perazella, Mark A; Gettinger, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors that target the programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling pathway have recently been approved for use in advanced pretreated non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma. Clinical trial data suggest that these drugs may have adverse effects on the kidney, but these effects have not been well described. We present 6 cases of acute kidney injury in patients with lung cancer who received anti-PD-1 antibodies, with each case displaying evidence of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) on kidney biopsy. All patients were also treated with other drugs (proton pump inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) linked to AIN, but in most cases, use of these drugs long preceded PD-1 inhibitor therapy. The association of AIN with these drugs in our patients raises the possibility that PD-1 inhibitor therapy may release suppression of T-cell immunity that normally permits renal tolerance of drugs known to be associated with AIN. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Alleviates Interstitial Cystitis by Activating Wnt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Miho; Lim, Jisun; Yu, Hwan Yeul; Park, Junsoo; Chun, Ji-Youn; Jeong, Jaeho; Heo, Jinbeom; Kang, Hyunsook; Kim, YongHwan; Cho, Yong Mee; Kim, Seong Who; Oh, Wonil; Choi, Soo Jin; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Park, Sanghyeok

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a syndrome characterized by urinary urgency, frequency, pelvic pain, and nocturia in the absence of bacterial infection or identifiable pathology. IC is a devastating disease that certainly decreases quality of life. However, the causes of IC remain unknown and no effective treatments or cures have been developed. This study evaluated the therapeutic potency of using human umbilical cord-blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) to treat IC in a rat model and to investigate its responsible molecular mechanism. IC was induced in 10-week-old female Sprague–Dawley rats via the instillation of 0.1 M HCl or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; sham). After 1 week, human UCB-MSC (IC+MSC) or PBS (IC) was directly injected into the submucosal layer of the bladder. A single injection of human UCB-MSCs significantly attenuated the irregular and decreased voiding interval in the IC group. Accordingly, denudation of the epithelium and increased inflammatory responses, mast cell infiltration, neurofilament production, and angiogenesis observed in the IC bladders were prevented in the IC+MSC group. The injected UCB-MSCs successfully engrafted to the stromal and epithelial tissues and activated Wnt signaling cascade. Interference with Wnt and epidermal growth factor receptor activity by small molecules abrogated the benefits of MSC therapy. This is the first report that provides an experimental evidence of the therapeutic effects and molecular mechanisms of MSC therapy to IC using an orthodox rat animal model. Our findings not only provide the basis for clinical trials of MSC therapy to IC but also advance our understanding of IC pathophysiology. PMID:25745847

  13. Percutaneous MRI-guided laser thermal therapy in canine prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Roger J.; Gowda, Ashok; Gelnett, Marc D.; Stafford, Roger J.

    2005-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men excluding skin cancer, and approximately 230,000 cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2004. In the non-surgical treatment of localized prostate cancer, fiberoptically delivered interstitial laser thermal therapy may be ideal for treating discrete tumors with minimal invasiveness. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging can be used to compute temperature changes based on the proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift, and two-dimensional maps of temperature rise and chronic thermal damage can be constructed in order to control laser therapy. In this work, we describe an MRI-compatible percutaneous grid template and localization and planning software for precise placement of minimally invasive laser catheters to effect a target ablation zone. We evaluated the accuracy of the catheter placement, and we present our preliminary experience with percutaneous MRI-guided feedback controlled laser ablation in a canine prostate model. Histological analysis is used to assess the effectiveness and accuracy of treatment visualization.

  14. Light dosimetry in vivo in interstitial photodynamic therapy of human tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynes, Anne M.; Diebold, Simon; Lignon, Dominique; Granjon, Yves; Guillemin, Francois H.

    1991-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy, developed since 1961 with Lipson''s studies, is now limited in its clinical applications by the lack of knowledge about light comportment and the action of hematoporphyrin in tissues. Using human tumor models in mice, the intratumoral light flux was measured during an interstitial illumination (cylindrical diffusor 5 mm of length) by an argon dye laser emitting continuously at 630 nm (Spectra-Physics 375 B). The flux measured was captured by a plane-cut fiber (400 micrometers ) linked with an optical power meter (Newport 815). The light decrease in tissue had an exponential shape, and k, the global attenuation coefficient, was easily calculated as well as the depth penetration (1/k). Control measurements were performed in beef muscle, and the k value was very consistent with published data. In small tumors (3), the results presented a good reproducibility for the same histology (ksarcoma equals 0.48 +/- 0.08 mm-1, kcholangiocarcinoma equals 0.67 +/- 0.01 mm-1). The intraperitoneal injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD at 10 mg/kg) did not seem to significantly influence the light evolution in tissues compared with control measurements without HpD. The simplicity and the reproducibility of this technique raises hopes of a coming clinical application and a possible comparison between different studies with measurable references.

  15. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as intravesical therapy for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: A review.

    PubMed

    Rawls, William F; Cox, Lindsey; Rovner, Eric S

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to update the current understanding of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and its role in the treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC). A systematic review was conducted using the PRIMSA checklist to identify published articles involving intravesical DMSO for the treatment of IC. Thirteen cohort studies and three randomized-controlled trials were identified. Response rates relying on subjective measurement scores range from 61 to 95%. No increased efficacy was found with "cocktail" DMSO therapy. Great variation existed in diagnostic criteria, DMSO instillation protocols and response measurements. The current evidence backing DMSO is a constellation of cohort studies and a single randomized-controlled trial versus placebo. The optimal dose, dwell time, type of IC most likely to respond to DMSO, definitions of success/failure and the number of treatments are not universally agreed upon. Improvements in study design, phenotyping patients based on symptoms, as well as the emergence of reliable biomarkers of the disease may better guide the use of DMSO in the future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Interstitial photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: light fractionation study on a preclinical model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Vermandel, Maximilien; Tétard, Marie-Charlotte; Lejeune, Jean-Paul; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Background Glioblastoma is a high-grade cerebral tumor with local recurrence and poor outcome. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a local treatment based on the light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen to form cytotoxic species. Fractionation of light delivery may enhance treatment efficiency by restoring tissue oxygenation. Objectives To evaluate the efficiency of light fractionation using MRI imaging, including diffusion and perfusion, compared to histological data. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine "Nude" rats were grafted with human U87 cells into the right putamen. After PS precursor intake (5-ALA), an optic fiber was introduced into the tumor. The rats were randomized in three groups: without illumination, with monofractionated illumination and the third one with multifractionated light. Treatment effects were assessed with early MRI including diffusion and perfusion sequences. The animals were eventually sacrificed to perform brain histology. Results On MRI, we observed elevated diffusion values in the center of the tumor among treated animals, especially in multifractionated group. Perfusion decreased around the treatment site, all the more in the multifractionated group. Histology confirmed our MRI findings, with a more extensive necrosis and associated with a rarified angiogenic network in the treatment area, after multifractionated PDT. However, we observed more surrounding edema and neovascularization in the peripheral ring after multifractionated PDT. Conclusion Fractionated interstitial PDT induced specific tumoral lesions. The multifractionated scheme was more efficient, inducing increased tumoral necrosis, but it also caused significant peripheral edema and neovascularization. Diffusion and perfusion MRI imaging were able to predict the histological lesions.

  17. Investigation of the thermal and tissue injury behaviour in microwave thermal therapy using a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    He, X; McGee, S; Coad, J E; Schmidlin, F; Iaizzo, P A; Swanlund, D J; Kluge, S; Rudie, E; Bischof, J C

    2004-09-01

    Minimally invasive microwave thermal therapies are being developed for the treatment of small renal cell carcinomas (RCC, d<3 cm). This study assessed the thermal history and corresponding tissue injury patterns resulting from microwave treatment of the porcine renal cortex. Three groups of kidneys were evaluated: (1) in vitro treated, (2) in vivo with 2-h post-treatment perfusion (acute) and (3) in vivo with 7-day post-treatment perfusion (chronic). The kidneys were treated with an interstitial water-cooled microwave probe (Urologix, Plymouth, MN) that created a lesion centered in the renal cortex (50 W for 10 min). The thermal histories were recorded at 0.5 cm radial intervals from the probe axis for correlation with the histologic cellular and vascular injury. The kidneys showed a reproducible 2 cm chronic lesion with distinct histologic injury zones identified. The thermal histories at the edge of these zones were found using Lagrangian interpolation. The threshold thermal histories for microvascular injury and stasis appeared to be lower than that for renal epithelial cell injury. The Arrhenius kinetic injury models were fit to the thermal histories and injury data to determine the kinetic parameters (i.e. activation energy and frequency factor) for the thermal injury processes. The resultant activation energies are consistent in magnitude with those for thermally induced protein denaturation. A 3-D finite element thermal model based on the Pennes bioheat equation was developed and solved using ANSYS (V7.0). The real geometry of the kidneys studied and temperature dependent thermal properties were used in this model. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the microwave probe required for the thermal modelling was experimentally determined. The results from the thermal modelling suggest that the complicated change of local renal blood perfusion with temperature and time during microwave thermal therapy can be predicted, although a first order kinetic model may

  18. Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sean R. H.; Weersink, Robert A.; Haider, Masoom A.; Gertner, Mark R.; Bogaards, Arjen; Giewercer, David; Scherz, Avigdor; Sherar, Michael D.; Elhilali, Mostafa; Chin, Joseph L.; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2009-04-01

    With the development of new photosensitizers that are activated by light at longer wavelengths, interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a feasible alternative for the treatment of larger volumes of tissue. Described here is the application of PDT treatment planning software developed by our group to ensure complete coverage of larger, geometrically complex target volumes such as the prostate. In a phase II clinical trial of TOOKAD vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) for prostate cancer in patients who failed prior radiotherapy, the software was used to generate patient-specific treatment prescriptions for the number of treatment fibres, their lengths, their positions and the energy each delivered. The core of the software is a finite element solution to the light diffusion equation. Validation against in vivo light measurements indicated that the software could predict the location of an iso-fluence contour to within approximately ±2 mm. The same software was used to reconstruct the treatments that were actually delivered, thereby providing an analysis of the threshold light dose required for TOOKAD-VTP of the post-irradiated prostate. The threshold light dose for VTP-induced prostate damage, as measured one week post-treatment using contrast-enhanced MRI, was found to be highly heterogeneous, both within and between patients. The minimum light dose received by 90% of the prostate, D90, was determined from each patient's dose-volume histogram and compared to six-month sextant biopsy results. No patient with a D90 less than 23 J cm-2 had complete biopsy response, while 8/13 (62%) of patients with a D90 greater than 23 J cm-2 had negative biopsies at six months. The doses received by the urethra and the rectal wall were also investigated.

  19. Thermally confined micropulsed 1444-nm Nd:YAG interstitial fiber laser in the aging face and neck: an update.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, J David

    2014-05-01

    This article provides an update on the contemporary use of the thermally confined micropulsed 1444-nm Nd:YAG interstitial fiber laser in the aging face and neck. Beginning with the concept that the use of Nd:YAG fiber lasers in aesthetic surgery is no longer limited to laser lipolysis, the article also covers the differentiating characteristics of the available Nd:YAG fiber laser wavelengths and laser tissue interaction and safety considerations when incorporating the use of these lasers into aging face surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal modelling using discrete vasculature for thermal therapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kok, H.P.; Gellermann, J.; van den Berg, C.A.T.; Stauffer, P.R.; Hand, J.W.; Crezee, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reliable temperature information during clinical hyperthermia and thermal ablation is essential for adequate treatment control, but conventional temperature measurements do not provide 3D temperature information. Treatment planning is a very useful tool to improve treatment quality and substantial progress has been made over the last decade. Thermal modelling is a very important and challenging aspect of hyperthermia treatment planning. Various thermal models have been developed for this purpose, with varying complexity. Since blood perfusion is such an important factor in thermal redistribution of energy in in vivo tissue, thermal simulations are most accurately performed by modelling discrete vasculature. This review describes the progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature for the purpose of hyperthermia treatment planning and thermal ablation. There has been significant progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature. Recent developments have made real-time simulations possible, which can provide feedback during treatment for improved therapy. Future clinical application of thermal modelling with discrete vasculature in hyperthermia treatment planning is expected to further improve treatment quality. PMID:23738700

  1. [Methods for geometric and nonlinear optimization of the structure of interstitial implants for interstitial x-ray therapy of malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Klepper, L Ia

    2007-01-01

    In 1990 G. K. Edmundson suggested a geometric optimization method for determination of the effective structure of interstitial implants. In 1997 Y. Anacak, M. Essassolak, A. Aydin, et al. used this method for two-level interstitial implantation. It was shown in their work that the geometric optimization method provided higher efficiency of the dose distribution than conventionally used dose distributions produced by interstitial implants with equal exposure times. In 1983 the problem of optimization of the interstitial implant structure was formulated in our works. Its mathematical interpretation was also suggested. The goal of this work was to show that the geometric optimization method does not always provide high efficiency of the dose distribution, even in comparison with conventionally used dose distributions produced by interstitial implants with equal exposure times. The interstitial implant structure can be optimized by solving special mathematical programming problems.

  2. 1D multi-element CMUT arrays for ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, William Apoutou; Canney, Michael; Meynier, Cyril; Chavrier, Françoise; Lafon, Cyril; Nguyen-Dinh, An; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2017-03-01

    Interstitial therapeutic ultrasound devices are a promising technology for performing thermal ablation in a wide variety of organs. In this study, the use of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (CMUTs) for interstitial heating applications was investigated. CMUTs exhibit potential advantages for use in therapeutic ultrasound applications in comparison to standard piezo ultrasound transducer technologies as they have good characteristics in terms of miniaturization (cell size: few dozens of microns), bandwidth (several MHz) and high electro-acoustic efficiency. Two designs of CMUT arrays were studied: (1) a 1D 128-element planar-CMUT array originally dedicated to abdominal ultrasound imaging purposes (5 MHz, element size: 0.3 × 8.0 mm2); (2) a 12-element linear-array, 32.4-mm long and 0.8-mm wide, developed specifically for minimally-invasive interstitial therapeutic applications (6 MHz, element size: 2.7 × 0.8 mm2). Simulations were performed to evaluate the ability to generate thermal lesions in soft tissues with: (1) 1 single linear array, (2) a combination of multiple linear arrays positioned on a cylindrical catheter. Experimental investigations performed with the CMUT imaging array showed the ability to generate surface acoustic intensities (Iac) up to 20 W.cm-2 and to generate intense centimetric thermal lesions in in-vitro turkey breast tissues. At 6 MHz, a single element was able to generate in water a maximum peak pressure of >0.5 MPa. In simulations, the ability to use various power levels and frequencies on independent elements, as well as combinations of multiple linear-arrays offered sufficient flexibility to achieve a wide variety of thermal ablation patterns in 3D. Simulated ablation volumes could be controlled to cover accurately non-symmetrical volumes of brain metastases. In conclusion, CMUT arrays show interesting characteristics, which may open new perspectives of spatial control for conformal interstitial thermal therapy with

  3. Recovery of optical properties from interstitial spectroscopy for photodynamic therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Timothy M.; Fenn, Michael C.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of optical properties is required to determine light dose in photodynamic therapy. We have designed an interstitial optical probe, consisting of six helically arranged side-firing fibers enclosed in a 1.1 mm diameter encapsulant, that can be used to determine these values. White light is delivered by one fiber and detected by the others. Based on a Monte Carlo (MC) model of the probe, the absorption (μa) and reduced scattering (μs') coefficients of the sample are determined. Recovery was verified in tissue-simulating phantoms containing MnTPPS or intact human erythrocytes as absorbers and Intralipid as scatterer. Mean errors in recovery of μa and μs' were 9% and 19%, respectively. In phantoms containing erythrocytes, hemoglobin oxygen saturation was recovered with mean error of 12%. Using the MC model, we mapped the volumes sampled by particular spectroscopy fibers. For μa = 0.1 cm-1 and μs' = 20cm-1, 49% of photon packets detected at the fiber adjacent to the source sampled a radius further than 5 mm from the probe, while 24% of photon packets sampled further than 7.5 mm. When μs' was reduced to 10 cm-1, 54% of photon packets traversed a radius greater than 5 mm from the probe and 29% sampled further than 7.5 mm. Changing the value of μa to 0.2 cm-1 did not have an effect on the sampled volume. We also provide a new probe design that aims to improve upon the accuracy of the current probe by incorporating a wider range of source-detector separations.

  4. [Successful combination therapy of cyclosporine and steroids in two cases with interstitial pneumonitis associated with polymyositis].

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Kobayashi, S; Yamanaka, K; Takasaki, Y; Hashimoto, H

    1995-02-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunosuppressive agent which is well-established in the transplantation of organs including kidney, liver and bone marrow. It acts by inhibiting the production of interleukin 2, thereby blocking both the development of cytotoxic lymphocytes, and the proliferation of helper T cells. T cell-mediated muscle damage is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of polymyositis. And activated cytotoxic T cells are thought to play an important role of polymyositis/dermatomyositis with active pneumonitis. It is thereby likely that cyclosporine would be effective in the management of polymyositis with interstitial pneumonitis. We have used cyclosporine in two cases of corticosteroids resistant polymyositis associated with pneumonitis. The first case was admitted because of the relapse of polymyositis. She was partially responded by the high dose of steroid, but showed decreased %DLCO and increased AaDO2 during the therapy. And oral cyclosporine was given with steroid. Within two weeks, serum creatinine kinase level was reduced to normal range, and the improvement of pneumonitis was observed. The second case was admitted because of the flare of pneumonitis. She was treated with high dose of steroid with insufficient response. And cyclosporine was prescribed. Within two weeks of treatment, her symptom was relieved, and blood gas analysis showed an improvement of pulmonary function. And steroid could be tapered. In both cases, the initial dose of cyclosporine was 200 mg/day, and the optimal trough level was thought to be ranged 100 to 150 ng/ml. In the second case, renal dysfunction was observed but it was recovered by the reduction of the dose of cyclosporine. No other side effect was appeared.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Modeling of endoluminal and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia and thermal ablation: applications to device design, feedback control, and treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Endoluminal and catheter-based ultrasound applicators are currently under development and are in clinical use for minimally invasive hyperthermia and thermal ablation of various tissue targets. Computational models play a critical role in in device design and optimization, assessment of therapeutic feasibility and safety, devising treatment monitoring and feedback control strategies, and performing patient-specific treatment planning with this technology. The critical aspects of theoretical modeling, applied specifically to endoluminal and interstitial ultrasound thermotherapy, are reviewed. Principles and practical techniques for modeling acoustic energy deposition, bioheat transfer, thermal tissue damage, and dynamic changes in the physical and physiological state of tissue are reviewed. The integration of these models and applications of simulation techniques in identification of device design parameters, development of real time feedback-control platforms, assessing the quality and safety of treatment delivery strategies, and optimization of inverse treatment plans are presented. PMID:23738697

  6. Gold nanoshell thermal confinement of conformal laser thermal therapy in liver metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Andrew M.; Wang, James; Shetty, Anil M.; Schwartz, Jon; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2008-02-01

    Cooled fiber tip technology has significantly improved the volume coverage of laser induced thermal therapy (LITT), making LITT an attractive technology for the minimally invasive treatment of cancer. Gold coated nanoshells can be tuned to experience a plasmon resonance at a desired laser frequency, there introduction into the treatment region can greatly amplify the effectiveness of the thermal treatment. The goal is to conformaly heat the target, while sparing surrounding healthy tissue. To this end a treatment option that is self-confining to the target lesion is highly desirable. This can be achieved in the liver by allowing nanoshells to be taken up by the healthy tissue of the liver as part of their natural removal from the blood stream. The lesion is then incased inside the nanoshell laden tissue of the surrounding healthy tissue. When an interstitial laser probe is introduced into the center of the lesion the thermal radiation scatters outward until it interacts with and is absorbed by the nanoshells located around the lesion periphery. As the periphery heats it acts as secondary source of thermal radiation, sending heat back into lesion and giving rise to ablative temperatures within the lesion while sparing the surrounding tissue. In order to better monitor therapy and know when the target volume has been ablated, or exceeded, accurate knowledge is needed of both the spatial distribution of heating and the maximum temperature achieved. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) is capable of monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of temperature in vivo[1]. Experiments have been performed in vitro using a dog liver containing nanoshells (concentration 860ppm) and a tissue like lesion phantom designed to have the optical properties of liver metastasis [2].

  7. [Methods and clinical results of interstitial thermoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Seegenschmiedt, M H; Sauer, R

    1989-05-01

    Besides percutaneous hyperthermia techniques, some new interstitial procedures have been developed and included into the arsenal of radiotherapists. As compared to percutaneous techniques, considerable benefits are offered by interstitial methods: a more homogeneous distribution of therapeutical temperatures, a better sparing of normal tissue, the possibility to treat deep tumors, and better therapy control and evaluation by extensive "thermal mapping" within the target volume. This study presents the technical principles and the clinical possibilities of the interstitial hyperthermia methods developed hitherto: resistive radiofrequency hyperthermia, radiative microwave hyperthermia, inductive ferromagnetic seed hyperthermia, and conductive hot-water perfusion hyperthermia. Until now, interstitial thermo-radiotherapy was only performed during some phase I/II studies. It was applied for palliative reasons in persisting and recurrent tumors accessible for implantation and situated in superficial to semi-deep locations with no or insufficient response to differently combined treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy). The preliminary clinical results obtained in almost 300 patients are quite promising: complete remission rates up to 70% have been achieved. Interstitial hyperthermia represents an effective and safe therapy modality, especially when combined with radiotherapy in palliative tumor therapy. At present, several prospective randomized multicentric studies are conducted to investigate its value as adjuvant therapy modality.

  8. Comparison of flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers as treatment sources for interstitial photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Baran, Timothy M; Foster, Thomas H

    2014-02-01

    For interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) of bulky tumors, careful treatment planning is required in order to ensure that a therapeutic dose is delivered to the tumor, while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. In clinical contexts, iPDT has typically been performed with either flat cleaved or cylindrical diffusing optical fibers as light sources. Here, the authors directly compare these two source geometries in terms of the number of fibers and duration of treatment required to deliver a prescribed light dose to a tumor volume. Treatment planning software for iPDT was developed based on graphics processing unit enhanced Monte Carlo simulations. This software was used to optimize the number of fibers, total energy delivered by each fiber, and the position of individual fibers in order to deliver a target light dose (D90) to 90% of the tumor volume. Treatment plans were developed using both flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers, based on tissue volumes derived from CT data from a head and neck cancer patient. Plans were created for four cases: fixed energy per fiber, fixed number of fibers, and in cases where both or neither of these factors were fixed. When the number of source fibers was fixed at eight, treatment plans based on flat cleaved fibers required each to deliver 7180-8080 J in order to deposit 90 J/cm(2) in 90% of the tumor volume. For diffusers, each fiber was required to deliver 2270-2350 J (333-1178 J/cm) in order to achieve this same result. For the case of fibers delivering a fixed 900 J, 13 diffusers or 19 flat cleaved fibers at a spacing of 1 cm were required to deliver the desired dose. With energy per fiber fixed at 2400 J and the number of fibers fixed at eight, diffuser fibers delivered the desired dose to 93% of the tumor volume, while flat cleaved fibers delivered this dose to 79%. With both energy and number of fibers allowed to vary, six diffusers delivering 3485-3600 J were required, compared to ten flat cleaved

  9. Comparison of flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers as treatment sources for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Timothy M. Foster, Thomas H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: For interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) of bulky tumors, careful treatment planning is required in order to ensure that a therapeutic dose is delivered to the tumor, while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. In clinical contexts, iPDT has typically been performed with either flat cleaved or cylindrical diffusing optical fibers as light sources. Here, the authors directly compare these two source geometries in terms of the number of fibers and duration of treatment required to deliver a prescribed light dose to a tumor volume. Methods: Treatment planning software for iPDT was developed based on graphics processing unit enhanced Monte Carlo simulations. This software was used to optimize the number of fibers, total energy delivered by each fiber, and the position of individual fibers in order to deliver a target light dose (D{sub 90}) to 90% of the tumor volume. Treatment plans were developed using both flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers, based on tissue volumes derived from CT data from a head and neck cancer patient. Plans were created for four cases: fixed energy per fiber, fixed number of fibers, and in cases where both or neither of these factors were fixed. Results: When the number of source fibers was fixed at eight, treatment plans based on flat cleaved fibers required each to deliver 7180–8080 J in order to deposit 90 J/cm{sup 2} in 90% of the tumor volume. For diffusers, each fiber was required to deliver 2270–2350 J (333–1178 J/cm) in order to achieve this same result. For the case of fibers delivering a fixed 900 J, 13 diffusers or 19 flat cleaved fibers at a spacing of 1 cm were required to deliver the desired dose. With energy per fiber fixed at 2400 J and the number of fibers fixed at eight, diffuser fibers delivered the desired dose to 93% of the tumor volume, while flat cleaved fibers delivered this dose to 79%. With both energy and number of fibers allowed to vary, six diffusers delivering 3485–3600 J

  10. Intracranial interstitial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, D.; Rittenmeyer, H.; Hitchon, P.

    1986-06-01

    Primary malignant brain tumors are fatal, with 90% of patients having these tumors dying within two years following diagnosis. Cranial interstitial radiation therapy, a technique under investigation to control these tumors, involves implantation of radioactive iodine 125 seeds into the tumor bed by stereotaxic technique. The interstitial radiation technique, monitoring of radiation, and nursing care of patients are discussed. Case histories are presented, along with discussion of results attained using this therapy, and its future.

  11. Interstitial microwave hyperthermia treatment investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siauve, N.; Lormel, C.

    2012-11-01

    Microwave ablation also called interstitial hyperthermia is a medical procedure used in the treatment of many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. With this medical therapy, an electromagnetic source (antenna) is directly positioned in the target tissue and a sufficient power is injected to necrosis the tissue. The aim of this study is to propose a design procedure and develop the associated tools, for determining the optimal shape, dimensions, type and operating frequency of antenna according to the target volume. In this context, a 3D numerical predictive model of temperature elevation induced by the electric fields and two benches for thermal and electrical tissues properties characterization have been developed. To validate the procedure and the different tools, an experimental bench test which includes interstitial antenna, external microwave generator, phantom that represents the target tissue and measurement system of temperature and electric field has been elaborated.

  12. Magnetic resonance-guided interstitial therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N. . E-mail: aviswanathan@partners.org; Cormack, Robert; Holloway, Caroline L.; Tanaka, Cynthia; O'Farrell, Desmond C.; Devlin, Phillip M.; Tempany, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and to describe the acute toxicity of a real-time intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR)-image guided interstitial approach to treating vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to April 2005, 10 patients with recurrent endometrial cancer underwent MR-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Parameters evaluated included needle placement, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and complications. Results: Magnetic resonance-image guidance resulted in accurate needle placement. Tumor DVH values included median volume, 47 cc; V100, 89%; V150, 61%; V200, 38%; D90, 71 Gy; and D100, 60 Gy. DVH of organs at risk resulted in a median D2cc of external beam and brachytherapy dose (% of brachytherapy prescription): bladder, 75Gy{sub 3} (88%); rectum, 70Gy{sub 3} (87%); and sigmoid, 56Gy{sub 3} (41%). All patients experienced either a Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicity related to the radiation; only 1 patient had Grade 3 toxicity. No toxicities were attributable to the use of MR guidance. Conclusions: Real-time MR guidance during the insertion of interstitial needles reduces the likelihood of an inadvertent insertion of the needles into the bladder and the rectum. Three-dimensional dosimetry allows estimation of the dose to organs at risk. Toxicities are limited.

  13. Effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease by B-cell targeted therapy with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Wolfgang; Maier, Judith; Pfeifer, Michael; Fleck, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis- (RA-) associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is the extra-articular complication with most adverse impact on the quality of life and survival in RA patients. However, treatment options are limited and controlled studies are lacking. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old patient suffering from severe RA-ILD, which has been successfully treated with Rituximab (RTX). After failure of conventional DMARD therapy, our patient showed sustained improvement of clinical pulmonary parameters as well as joint inflammation following B-cell depletion with RTX. The six-minute-walk test improved from 380 meters to 536 meters and the forced vital capacity from 2.49 liters to 3.49. The disease activity score could be reduced from 7.7 to 2.8. Therefore, RTX might be considered as an alternative treatment for RA-ILD in patients not responding to conventional DMARD therapy.

  14. Surface morphology and electrical transport of rapid thermal annealed chromium-doped indium zinc oxides: The influence of zinc interstitials and out-diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2013-12-09

    We investigate the complex impedance (CI) spectra of chromium-doped indium zinc oxide (CIZO) films with different rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperatures. The CI spectra drawn from the impedance contributions of Zn-O and In-O bondings in CIZO films were analyzed by two sets of parallel resistance and capacitance components in series. The result demonstrates that zinc interstitials controls electron concentration and transition of electrical transport from semiconducting to metallic. At higher RTA temperature, high-density zinc interstitial promotes Zn atom diffusion from the surface, modifying surface morphology.

  15. Direct identification of interstitial Mn in heavily p-type doped GaAs and evidence of its high thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Decoster, S.; Vantomme, A.; Silva, M. R. da; Araujo, J. P.

    2011-05-16

    We report on the lattice location of Mn in heavily p-type doped GaAs by means of {beta}{sup -} emission channeling from the decay of {sup 56}Mn. The majority of the Mn atoms substitute for Ga and up to 31% occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site with As nearest neighbors. Contrary to the general belief, we find that interstitial Mn is immobile up to 400 deg. C, with an activation energy for diffusion of 1.7-2.3 eV. Such high thermal stability of interstitial Mn has significant implications on the strategies and prospects for achieving room temperature ferromagnetism in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As.

  16. Examination of light distribution from sol-gel based applicators for interstitial laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hołowacz, I.; Ulatowska-Jarża, A.; Podbielska, H.; Garbaczewska, I.

    2006-02-01

    We describe here the construction of sol-gel based applicators for interstitial thermotheraphy. The silica sol-gel coatings were prepared from silicate precursor TEOS (tetraethylorthosilicate) mixed with ethyl alcohol in acid catalyzed hydrolysis. The matrices were produced with various ratios R=5, 10, 20, 32, 50, whereas R denotes the number of solvent molds (here ethanol) to the number of TEOS moles. The spatial light intensity distribution was examined in order to find out the influence of R factor on the light distribution shape. It was shows that the most homogeneous patterns are observed for sol-gel coatings with R factors equal 10 and 20.

  17. The use of custom 3D printed stereotactic frames for laser interstitial thermal ablation: technical note.

    PubMed

    Brandmeir, Nicholas J; McInerney, James; Zacharia, Brad E

    2016-10-01

    Over the last several years, laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) has gained wide acceptance for the treatment of a myriad of cranial lesions. A wide variety of techniques for placement of the laser fiber have been reported with a spectrum of perceived benefits and drawbacks. The authors present the first report of a customized 3D printed stereotactic frame for LITT. Approximately 1 week prior to surgery, 3-4 skull fiducials were placed after each of 5 patients received a local anesthetic as an outpatient. Radiographs with these fiducials were then used to create a trajectory to the lesion that would be treated with LITT. After the plan was completed, software was used to render a customized frame. On the day of surgery, the frame was attached to the implanted skull fiducials and the LITT catheter was placed. This procedure was carried out in 5 consecutive patients. In 2 patients, a needle biopsy was also performed. Intraoperative and postoperative imaging studies confirmed the accurate placement of the LITT catheter and the lesion created. Mean operating room time for all patients was 45 minutes but only 26 minutes when excluding the cases in which a biopsy was performed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a specific system, the STarFix microTargeting system, for use with LITT and brain biopsy. This system offers several advantages including fast operating times, extensive preoperative planning, no need for cranial fixation, and no need for frame or fiducial placement on the day of surgery. The accuracy of the system combined with these advantages may make this a preferred stereotactic method for LITT, especially in centers where LITT is performed in a diagnostic MRI suite.

  18. Comparative thermal dosimetry of interstitial microwave and radiofrequency-LCF hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, P R; Sneed, P K; Suen, S A; Satoh, T; Matsumoto, K; Fike, J R; Phillips, T L

    1989-01-01

    Steady-state temperature distributions induced by commercial radiofrequency localized current field (RF-LCF) and microwave (MW) interstitial heating systems were compared in dog thigh muscle in vivo using repeated 15-min heating experiments in the same implant site. Control experiments consisting of up to nine successive, identical heat trials with either modality verified that induced temperature distributions could be duplicated reliably. For all comparative dosimetry experiments a square array of parallel heat sources and thermometry probes was inserted percutaneously through a 5 mm grid Plexiglas template to a depth of 7.0-8.0 cm. Metal trocar electrodes were left at the corners of square arrays for two or three successive RF-LCF heat trials. After the metal trocars were removed, two or three more heat trials were performed using dipole microwave antennas in Teflon catheters at the same four positions. The three-dimensional temperature distributions within the array boundaries were characterized by mapping up to 11 fibre optic temperature probes in 1 cm increments during the steady-state plateau of each trial. The distributions were analysed quantitatively in terms of the percentage of measured points which achieved at least 50 per cent of the maximum array temperature increase above baseline (delta Tmax). Results showed that the RF-LCF technique heated more uniformly with depth along the bare metal electrodes and more consistently within the array boundaries than the microwave dipole antennas. For all array spacings studied (1.0-3.5 cm), the RF electrodes heated approximately 10-20 per cent more of the array volume to greater than 50 per cent of delta Tmax.

  19. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on hydrochloric acid-induced interstitial cystitis in rats: a histological and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Cakmak, Tolga; Yenilmez, Aydin; Baseskioglu, Barbaros; Metin, Suleyman

    2016-01-01

    Currently no definitive cure exists for interstitial cystitis (IC). We investigated the therapeutic effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy in this syndrome in an experimental IC model through biochemical analyses and histopathological assessments. 24 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three treatment groups sham (transurethral intravesical injection with sterile distilled water), rats with IC (induced by transurethral intravesical injection with hydrochloric acid), and rats with IC + HBO₂. After completion of experiments the animals were sacrificed and their urinary bladders were removed surgically. Tissues were evaluated by light and electron microscopy. Lesion index scoring system for IC was used to evaluate vesical injury. TNF-α levels were measured by ELISA test kit. Lesion index scores and TNF-α levels of the sham and IC + HBO₂ treatment groups were quite similar (p < 0.01). Although HBO₂ treatment did not show any effect in reducing the number of mast cells (p > 0.05), it reduced the mast cell activity (p < 0.05). All parameters except mitochondrial damage (p > 0.05) were improved in the IC + HBO₂ treatment group compared to the IC without HBO₂ treatment group. HBO₂ treatment may alleviate the inflammation, may lead to a certain degree of reversal of adverse histopathological changes, and is effective in enhancing the healing process in interstitial cystitis. We believe that HBO₂ treatment may be included as a weapon in our armamentarium against IC.

  20. Treatment plan evaluation for interstitial photodynamic therapy in a mouse model by Monte Carlo simulation with FullMonte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Jeffrey; Betz, Vaughn; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-02-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is recognized as the “gold standard” for biophotonic simulation, capturing all relevant physics and material properties at the perceived cost of high computing demands. Tetrahedral-mesh-based MC simulations particularly are attractive due to the ability to refine the mesh at will to conform to complicated geometries or user-defined resolution requirements. Since no approximations of material or light-source properties are required, MC methods are applicable to the broadest set of biophotonic simulation problems. MC methods also have other implementation features including inherent parallelism, and permit a continuously-variable quality-runtime tradeoff. We demonstrate here a complete MC-based prospective fluence dose evaluation system for interstitial PDT to generate dose-volume histograms on a tetrahedral mesh geometry description. To our knowledge, this is the first such system for general interstitial photodynamic therapy employing MC methods and is therefore applicable to a very broad cross-section of anatomy and material properties. We demonstrate that evaluation of dose-volume histograms is an effective variance-reduction scheme in its own right which greatly reduces the number of packets required and hence runtime required to achieve acceptable result confidence. We conclude that MC methods are feasible for general PDT treatment evaluation and planning, and considerably less costly than widely believed.

  1. Minimally invasive interventional therapy for Tarlov cysts causing symptoms of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Freidenstein, James; Aldrete, J Antonio; Ness, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Tarlov cysts (TC) are present in 4.6% of the population and represent a potential source of chronic pain. When present at lumbosacral levels, symptoms are classically described as perineal pain/pressure, radiculopathy, and headache. Treatment outlined to date primarily includes cyst drainage with fibrin glue sealant and surgical interventions. We present 2 cases in which TC presented with signs and symptomatology consistent with interstitial cystitis who were treated with caudal epidural steroid injections. Patients with urinary bladder pain and urgency received urological workups demonstrating hallmark features of interstitial cystitis including cystoscopic evidence of glomerulations. Radiographic imaging identified TC to be present on sacral nerve roots. Since pelvic pains could represent compressive radiculopathy of sacral roots, a cautious trial of minimally invasive caudal epidural steroid injections was performed. Both patients attained nearly 100% relief of pain for a period ranging from 6 months to 2 years following low volume, targeted caudal epidural steroid injection. They continue to be followed clinically and continue to report benefit with this treatment. This limited case series is retrospective in nature and potential complications have been noted by others in association with TC. Use of caudal epidural steroid injections proved beneficial in the treatment of pelvic pain symptomatology and so may be considered as an option in patients with identified sacral TC.

  2. Safety and effectiveness of low-dose lenalidomide therapy for multiple myeloma complicated with bortezomib-associated interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nagamachi, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Naofumi; Muramatsu, Hirohito; Okamoto, Tetsuro; Inomata, Hidetoshi; Nozawa, Eri; Koyama, Ryuzo; Ihara, Koji; Nishisato, Takuji; Yamada, Hideyuki; Yano, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Shingo; Ono, Kaoru; Kikuchi, Shohei; Kato, Junji

    2013-05-01

    A 78-year-old woman was diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM: IgG κ type, stage IIIA, ISS III) at a nearby hospital in August 2010. High-dose dexamethasone therapy was ineffective, and she was treated with 2 courses of bortezomib. She was referred to our hospital with back pain and dyspnea in November. She was diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia (IP) and improved rapidly with steroid pulse therapy. Because the involvement of bortezomib was suspected in IP, lenalidomide therapy was selected for MM. Lenalidomide (15 mg) was administered for 2 courses. The patient achieved a PR and the treatment is still ongoing with a good response. According to the interim report on PMS (post-marketing surveillance), 3 of the 1,177 patients treated with lenalidomide developed IP. The dose level was 25 mg in 2 cases and 10 mg in 1 case. The outcomes of these patients were death in 1 case, not recovered in 1 case, and unknown in 1 case. When lenalidomide is used to treat bortezomib-induced IP, there are no rules or regulations about its dose level. In the present case, the dose of lenalidomide (15 mg) was based on the retreatment dose after bone marrow suppression. Low-dose lenalidomide therapy was effective and safe against MM with a bortezomib-associated lung disorder.

  3. Endobronchial ultrasound—guidance for interstitial photodynamic therapy of locally advanced lung cancer—a new interventional concept

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Emily; Bellnier, David; Shafirstein, Gal

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in interventional pulmonology led to a significant expansion of the diagnostic and therapeutic role of endobronchial ultrasound. In this paper, we describe a new concept for using endobronchial ultrasound to guide interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). For this purpose, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments using a phantom and animal models, respectively. A new 0.5 mm optical fiber, with cylindrical diffuser end, was used to deliver the therapeutic light through the 21-gauge endobronchial ultrasound needle. The animal experiments were performed under real-time ultrasonography guidance in mice and rabbits’ tumor models. Safe and effective fiber placements and tumor illumination was accomplished. In addition, computer simulation of light propagation suggests that locally advanced lung cancer tumor can be illuminated. This study demonstrates the potential feasibility of this new therapeutic modality approach, justifying further investigation in the treatment of locally advanced lung cancers. PMID:28932569

  4. Dosimetric considerations of interstitial photodynamic therapy of the canine prostate mediated by intra-arterially administered hypocrellin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiyang; Dickey, Dwayne J.; Xiao, Zhengwen; Moore, Ronald B.; Tulip, John

    2008-02-01

    Interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) is a promising minimally invasive treatment modality for locally confined prostate cancer. Therapeutically excited at 635nm, the photophysical properties of SL-052 (a novel hypocrellin derivative photosensitizer) lend themselves uniquely to iPDT, facilitating real-time monitoring. Under 635nm excitation, SL-052 exhibits near infrared fluorescence, allowing both photosensitizer fluorescence and tissue transmissivity to be continuously monitored. The absorption and fluorescence characteristics of SL-052 in vivo and in vitro are first illustrated. SL-052 mediated iPDT of canine prostate was performed with a novel switched light delivery system and novel intra-arterial drug delivery method. A preliminary examination of the dosimetric properties of intra-arterial iPDT is presented, focusing on transmissivity dynamics. Spectrofluorimetry results relating specifically to the unique photophysical properties of SL-052 iPDT are also included.

  5. MR monitoring of tumour thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Germain, D; Chevallier, P; Laurent, A; Saint-Jalmes, H

    2001-08-01

    Thermal therapy of tumour including hyperthermia and thermal ablation by heat or cold delivery requires on line monitoring. Due to its temperature sensitivity, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) allows thermal mapping at the time of the treatment. The different techniques of MR temperature monitoring based on water proton resonance frequency (PRF), longitudinal relaxation time T1, diffusion coefficient and MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) are reviewed and debated. The PRF method appears the most widely used and the most efficient at high magnetic field in spite of important drawbacks. The T1 method is the easiest method of visualisation of qualitative temperature distribution and quantitative measurement seems possible in the tissue surrounding the tumour up to a temperature of 45-65 degrees C. Despite its high temperature sensitivity, application of the diffusion method in vivo is restricted due to its high motion sensitivity. The recent MRSI technique seems very promising provided acquisition times can be reduced. Results from the literature indicate that MR temperature monitoring in vivo can be achieved in vivo with a precision of about 3 degrees C in 13 s for a voxel of 16 mm3 (1.5 x 1.5 x 7 mm) in 1.5 T scanners.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of multi-parametric MR imaging marker changes post-laser interstitial ablation therapy (LITT) for epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Danish, Shabbar; Wong, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently emerged as a new, less invasive alternative to craniotomy for treating epilepsy; which allows for focussed delivery of laser energy monitored in real time by MRI, for precise removal of the epileptogenic foci. Despite being minimally invasive, the effects of laser ablation on the epileptogenic foci (reflected by changes in MR imaging markers post-LITT) are currently unknown. In this work, we present a quantitative framework for evaluating LITT-related changes by quantifying per-voxel changes in MR imaging markers which may be more reflective of local treatment related changes (TRC) that occur post-LITT, as compared to the standard volumetric analysis which involves monitoring a more global volume change across pre-, and post-LITT MRI. Our framework focuses on three objectives: (a) development of temporal MRI signatures that characterize TRC corresponding to patients with seizure freedom by comparing differences in MR imaging markers and monitoring them over time, (b) identification of the optimal time point when early LITT induced effects (such as edema and mass effect) subside by monitoring TRC at subsequent time-points post-LITT, and (c) identification of contributions of individual MRI protocols towards characterizing LITT-TRC for epilepsy by identifying MR markers that change most dramatically over time and employ individual contributions to create a more optimal weighted MP-MRI temporal profile that can better characterize TRC compared to any individual imaging marker. A cohort of patients were monitored at different time points post-LITT via MP-MRI involving T1-w, T2-w, T2-GRE, T2-FLAIR, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) protocols. Post affine registration of individual MRI protocols to a reference MRI protocol pre-LITT, differences in individual MR markers are computed on a per-voxel basis, at different time-points with respect to baseline (pre-LITT) MRI as well as across subsequent time

  7. Breast conservation therapy without capsular contracture in young augmented women using interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe a breast-conserving technique using interstitial brachytherapy after lumpectomy and axillary nodal sampling in selected women who are diagnosed with breast cancer in the presence of augmentation mammoplasty. Material and methods Over the past 20 years, we have developed and improved a technique of “pinch view” image-guided catheter insertion that avoids implant puncture. Selection criteria include: 1) women of any age with either subpectoral or retroglandular, augmentation implants (silicone or saline) who were diagnosed with stages Tis, T1, T2, N0, or N1 breast cancer; 2) any pathologic subtype of malignant breast cancer was accepted; 3) microscopic tumor extent ≤ 3 cm; 4) axillary node negative or metastasis to 1 to 3 nodes without extracapsular extension; and 5) surgical margins clear by the NSABP “no ink on tumor” definition. More than 250 women have been successfully treated. Patients were treated with high dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 or 32 Gy in 8 twice daily fractions. The target volume was the surgical cavity edge with 1.5 to 2 cm margin using 3-D treatment planning systems. Results The implant technique as currently employed is described. There have been no implant ruptures, and the Planning Treatment Volume (PTV-eval) exhibited at least 90% coverage by the 90% isodose line in the vast majority of cases. Dose Homogeneity Index exceeded 70% in most cases. The maximum skin dose was below the prescription dose in every case. Other than some patients with pre-existing capsular contracture, less than 5% experience new capsular contracture after interstitial brachytherapy. Conclusions A technique of reliable and reproducible accelerated partial breast irradiation is described that minimizes the risk of capsular contracture by avoiding circumferential dose to the foreign body in the breast. PMID:25097566

  8. Proton MR Spectroscopy and Diffusion MR Imaging Monitoring to Predict Tumor Response to Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Magali; Pinel, Sophie; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Thomassin, Magalie; Thomas, Eloise; Moussaron, Albert; Meng, Dominique; Plénat, François; Amouroux, Marine; Bastogne, Thierry; Frochot, Céline; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent progress in conventional therapeutic approaches, the vast majority of glioblastoma recur locally, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required. Interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) appears as a very promising and complementary approach to conventional therapies. However, an optimal fractionation scheme for iPDT remains the indispensable requirement. To achieve that major goal, we suggested following iPDT tumor response by a non-invasive imaging monitoring. Nude rats bearing intracranial glioblastoma U87MG xenografts were treated by iPDT, just after intravenous injection of AGuIX® nanoparticles, encapsulating PDT and imaging agents. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allowed us an original longitudinal follow-up of post-treatment effects to discriminate early predictive markers. We successfully used conventional MRI, T2 star (T2*), Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and MRS to extract relevant profiles on tissue cytoarchitectural alterations, local vascular disruption and metabolic information on brain tumor biology, achieving earlier assessment of tumor response. From one day post-iPDT, DWI and MRS allowed us to identify promising markers such as the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values, lipids, choline and myoInositol levels that led us to distinguish iPDT responders from non-responders. All these responses give us warning signs well before the tumor escapes and that the growth would be appreciated.

  9. Proton MR Spectroscopy and Diffusion MR Imaging Monitoring to Predict Tumor Response to Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Magali; Pinel, Sophie; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Thomassin, Magalie; Thomas, Eloise; Moussaron, Albert; Meng, Dominique; Plénat, François; Amouroux, Marine; Bastogne, Thierry; Frochot, Céline; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent progress in conventional therapeutic approaches, the vast majority of glioblastoma recur locally, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required. Interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) appears as a very promising and complementary approach to conventional therapies. However, an optimal fractionation scheme for iPDT remains the indispensable requirement. To achieve that major goal, we suggested following iPDT tumor response by a non-invasive imaging monitoring. Nude rats bearing intracranial glioblastoma U87MG xenografts were treated by iPDT, just after intravenous injection of AGuIX® nanoparticles, encapsulating PDT and imaging agents. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allowed us an original longitudinal follow-up of post-treatment effects to discriminate early predictive markers. We successfully used conventional MRI, T2 star (T2*), Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and MRS to extract relevant profiles on tissue cytoarchitectural alterations, local vascular disruption and metabolic information on brain tumor biology, achieving earlier assessment of tumor response. From one day post-iPDT, DWI and MRS allowed us to identify promising markers such as the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values, lipids, choline and myoInositol levels that led us to distinguish iPDT responders from non-responders. All these responses give us warning signs well before the tumor escapes and that the growth would be appreciated. PMID:28255341

  10. Development of transrectal diffuse optical tomography combined with 3D-transrectal ultrasound imaging to monitor the photocoagulation front during interstitial photothermal therapy of primary focal prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie; Weersink, Robert; Veilleux, Israel; Mayo, Kenwrick; Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Alam, Adeel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial near-infrared laser thermal therapy (LITT) is currently undergoing clinical trials as an alternative to watchful waiting or radical surgery in patients with low-risk focal prostate cancer. Currently, we use magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based thermography to monitor treatment delivery and determine indirectly the completeness of the target tissue destruction while avoiding damage to adjacent normal tissues, particularly the rectal wall. However, incomplete tumor destruction has occurred in a significant fraction of patients due to premature termination of treatment, since the photocoagulation zone is not directly observed. Hence, we are developing transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT), in combination with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS), to address his limitation. This is based on the large changes in optical scattering expected upon tissue coagulation. Here, we present forward simulations of a growing coagulated lesion with optical scattering contrast, using an established finite element analysis software platform (NIRFAST). The simulations were validated in tissue-simulating phantoms, with measurements acquired by a state-of-the-art continuous wave (CW) TRDOT system and a recently assembled bench-top CW-DOT system, with specific source-detector configurations. Two image reconstruction schemes were investigated and evaluated, specifically for the accurate delineation of the posterior boundary of the coagulation zone as the critical parameter for treatment guidance in this clinical application.

  11. A Hepatitis C Virus-Associated Cirrhotic Patient Developing Interstitial Pneumonia during the Course of Antiviral Therapy with Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir

    PubMed Central

    Tarao, Kazuo; Yamada, Kouzo

    2017-01-01

    Oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are the main therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated liver disease in Japan. Daclatasvir/asunaprevir is the first agent and sofosbuvir/ledipasvir is the secondary agent for HCV genotype 1b. More recently, ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir is also recommended as a potent therapy for HCV genotype 1b. Among the adverse events associated with these oral DAAs, interstitial pneumonia is one of the most severe ones. Regarding treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir or sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir, a few cases have already been reported in a postmarketing surveillance. Recently, we have encountered a HCV-associated genotype 1b cirrhosis patient who developed interstitial pneumonia during treatment with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and who recovered after drug discontinuation without corticosteroid therapy. Interstitial pneumonia was confirmed by chest x-ray and chest computed tomography. The serum KL-6 level was elevated to 1,180 U/mL. The total duration of the drug administration was 7 weeks, and she achieved SVR24. This is the first detailed report in the literature on the development of interstitial pneumonia during treatment with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir. When dry cough appeared in the treatment with DAAs, chest computed tomography and the evaluation of serum KL-6 level were recommended. PMID:28690490

  12. Salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia for local recurrence after radiation therapy failure.

    PubMed

    Kukiełka, A M; Hetnał, M; Dąbrowski, T; Walasek, T; Brandys, P; Nahajowski, D; Kudzia, R; Dybek, D; Reinfuss, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate toxicity and early clinical outcomes of interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) combined with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in patients with biopsy-confirmed local recurrence of prostate cancer after previous external beam radiotherapy. Between September 2008 and March 2013, 25 patients with local recurrence of previously irradiated prostate cancer were treated. The main eligibility criteria for salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia were biopsy confirmed local recurrence and absence of nodal and distant metastases. All patients were treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 3 fractions at 21-day intervals. We performed 62 hyperthermia procedures out of 75 planned (83 %). The aim of the hyperthermia treatment was to heat the prostate to 41-43 °C for 60 min. Toxicity for the organs of the genitourinary system and rectum was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v. 4.03). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure was based on the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The median age was 71 years (range 62-83 years), the median initial PSA level was 16.3 ng/ml (range 6.37-64 ng/ml), and the median salvage PSA level was 2.8 ng/ml (1.044-25.346 ng/ml). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 4-48 months). The combination of HDR brachytherapy and IHT was well tolerated. The most frequent complications were nocturia, weak urine stream, urinary frequency, hematuria, and urgency. Grade 2 rectal hemorrhage was observed in 1 patient. No grade 3 or higher complications were observed. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after salvage treatment was 74 %. The PSA in 20 patients decreased below the presalvage level, while 11 patients achieved a PSA nadir < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients are still alive. Of the 7 patients who experienced biochemical failure, bone metastases were found in

  13. Real-time magnetic resonance-guided laser thermal therapy for focal metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; McNichols, Roger J; Stafford, R Jason; Itzcovitz, Julian; Guichard, Jean-Pierre; Reizine, Daniel; Delaloge, Suzette; Vicaut, Eric; Payen, Didier; Gowda, Ashok; George, Bernard

    2008-07-01

    We report the initial results of a pilot clinical trial exploring the safety and feasibility of the first real-time magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy of treatment-resistant focal metastatic intracranial tumors. Patients with resistant metastatic intracranial tumors who had previously undergone chemotherapy, whole-brain radiation therapy, and radiosurgery and who were recused from surgery were eligible for this trial. Under local anesthesia, a Leksell stereotactic head frame was used to insert a water-cooled interstitial fiberoptic laser applicator inside the cranium. In the bore of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, laser energy was delivered to heat the tumor while continuous MRI was performed. A computer workstation extracted temperature-sensitive information to display images of laser heating and computed estimates of the thermal damage zone. Posttreatment MRI scans were used to confirm the zone of thermal necrosis, and follow-up was performed at 7, 15, 30, and 90 days after treatment. In all cases, the procedure was well tolerated without secondary effect, and patients were discharged to home within 14 hours after the procedure. Follow-up imaging showed an acute increase in apparent lesion volume followed by a gradual and steady decrease. No tumor recurrence within thermal ablation zones was noted. In this ongoing trial, a total of four patients have had six metastatic tumors treated with laser thermal ablations. Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy appears to provide a new, efficient treatment for recurrent focal metastatic brain disease. This therapy is a prelude to the future development of closed-head interventional MRI techniques in neurosurgery.

  14. Interstitial photodynamic therapy of canine prostate with meso-tetra-(m-hydroxyphenyl) chlorin and 5-aminolevulinic acid: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shi-Chung; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is proved to have potential for managing various malignancies. We investigated tissue biodistribution and photodynamic effects on a canine model in vivo using second generation photosensitizers, meso-tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) and 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) to evaluate the feasibility and possible future application of PDT on the prostate. Using fluorescence microscopy, the optimal sensitization time of the prostate was between 24 - 72 hours with mTHPC and, 3 hours with ALA. After optimum time of sensitization, prostates of mature beagle were treated with laser at various sites by placing fiber interstitially under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound. The light dose for each treatment site was 100 J (100 mW for 1,000 seconds at the wavelength of 650 and 630 nm, respectively). With mTHPC, single laser fiber was able to induce organ confined PDT lesion as large as 20 by 18 by 18 mm in size. However, the PDT lesion with ALA was negligible 3 days after treatment. Physical distress manifested as urinary retention, poor appetite and body weigh loss, was more prominent with increasing number of treatment sites as a result of extensive prostatic swelling and urethral damages. However, these problems usually alleviated spontaneously 7 to 10 days after PDT. The characteristic histological changes were hemorrhagic necrosis and glandular destruction with preservation of interlobular collagen fibers. Urethral damage seen at the early stage healed by regeneration of urothelium in 4 weeks. We conclude that interstitial PDT with mTHPC is technically possible to produce extensive glandular necrosis in the normal prostate which heals safely and does not change the prostatic architecture. ALA, although it seems promising for bladder tumors, is much less effective than mTHPC on the prostate. With mTHPC, it might have the potential for treating prostate cancers localized in the periphery of the gland.

  15. Interstitial radiation therapy for early-stage nasal vestibule cancer: A continuing quest for optimal tumor control and cosmesis

    SciTech Connect

    Levendag, Peter C. . E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl; Nijdam, Wideke M.; Moolenburgh, Sanne E. van; Tan, Lisa; Noever, Inge R.T.T.; Rooy, Peter van; Mureau, Marc; Jansen, Peter P.; Munte, Kai; Hofer, Stefan O.P.

    2006-09-01

    Introduction: This article reports on the effectiveness, cosmetic outcome, and costs of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for early-stage cancer of the nasal vestibule (NV) proper and/or columella high-dose-rate (HDR). Methods and Materials: Tumor control, survival, cosmetic outcome, functional results, and costs were established in 64 T1/T2N0 nasal vestibule cancers treated from 1991-2005 by fractionated interstitial radiation therapy (IRT) only. Total dose is 44 Gy: 2 fractions of 3 Gy per day, 6-hour interval, first and last fraction 4 Gy. Cosmesis is noted in the chart by the medical doctor during follow-up, by the patient (visual analog scale), and by a panel. Finally, full hospital costs are computed. Results: A local relapse-free survival rate of 92% at 5 years was obtained. Four local failures were observed; all four patients were salvaged. The neck was not treated electively; no neck recurrence in follow-up was seen. Excellent cosmetic and functional results were observed. With 10 days admission for full treatment, hospital costs amounted to Euro 5772 ($7044). Conclusion: Excellent tumor control, cosmesis, and function of nasal airway passage can be achieved when HDR-IRT for T1/T2N0 NV cancers is used. For the more advanced cancers (Wang classification: T3 tumor stage), we elect to treat by local excision followed by a reconstructive procedure. The costs, admission to hospital inclusive, for treatment by HDR-IRT amounts to Euro 5772 ($7044 US). This contrasts substantially with the full hospital costs when NV cancers are treated by plastic reconstructive surgery, being on average threefold as expensive.

  16. SAR distributions for 915 MHz interstitial microwave antennas used in hyperthermia for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.M.; Mechling, J.A.; Trembly, B.S.; Strohbehn, J.W.

    1988-10-01

    Many research centers are investigating interstitial microwave antenna array hyperthermia (IMAAH) systems as a treatment modality for tumors at various sites. This paper presents theoretical and experimental specific absorption rate (SAR< W/kg) distributions for single insulated antennas operating at 915 MHz in muscle phantom; SAR is deduced from measured temperature rise. These coaxial antennas were typically 1-2 mm in diameter and 5-10 cm in length. Results show that dipoles with lengths much shorter than their resonant length have a characteristically large reactive input impedance component and a substantially smaller absolute SAR magnitude than resonant dipoles. Over the range of dimensions studied, the thickness of the catheter wall has little effect on the SAR distribution. All cases investigated demonstrate that the maximum SAR occurs near the junction regardless of insertion depth. Furthermore, the insertion depth has little effect on the radial SAR distribution or the distribution near the antenna tip. If the length of the tip section is shorter than resonant length, the radial SAR pattern decreases. As predicted by theory, experimental results show that an antenna with the tip section equal to a quarter-wave-length and the insertion depth equal to a half-wavelength achieves a substantial increase in the longitudinal power distribution compared to other antenna designs that were evaluated.

  17. Interstitial Nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, AIN, interstitial nephritis, kidney disorders, kidney failure, renal failure, renal infection Men, Seniors, Women December 2004 ...

  18. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  19. Prostate thermal therapy with catheter-based ultrasound devices and MR thermal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Ross, Tony; Wootton, Jeff; Juang, Titania; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Ricke, Viola; Liu, Erin H.; Chen, Jing; Bouley, Donna M.; Van den Bosch, Maurice; Sommer, Graham

    2007-02-01

    Four types of transurethral applicators were devised for thermal ablation of prostate combined with MR thermal monitoring: sectored tubular transducer devices with directional heating patterns; planar and curvilinear devices with narrow heating patterns; and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. These devices are integrated with a 4 mm delivery catheter, incorporate an inflatable cooling balloon (10 mm OD) for positioning within the prostate and capable of rotation via an MR-compatible motor. Interstitial devices (2.4 mm OD) have been developed for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control. In vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature imaging were used to evaluate the heating technology and develop treatment control strategies. MR thermal imaging in a 0.5 T interventional MRI was used to monitor temperature and thermal dose in multiple slices through the target volume. Sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transurethral devices produce directional coagulation zones, extending 15-20 mm radial distance to the outer prostate capsule. Sequential rotation and modulated dwell time can conform thermal ablation to selected regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the gland in short treatment times without applicator manipulation. Interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate the posterior peripheral zone of the gland while protecting the rectum. The MR derived 52 °C and lethal thermal dose contours (t 43=240 min) allowed for real-time control of the applicators and effectively defined the extent of thermal damage. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, combined with MR thermal monitoring, can produce relatively fast and precise thermal ablation of prostate, with potential for treatment of cancer or BPH.

  20. Tissue-mimicking gel phantoms for thermal therapy studies.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Ali; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Ramasindarum, Chanthiriga; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms that are currently available for routine biomedical applications may not be suitable for high-temperature experiments or calibration of thermal modalities. Therefore, design and fabrication of customized thermal phantoms with tailored properties are necessary for thermal therapy studies. A multitude of thermal phantoms have been developed in liquid, solid, and gel forms to simulate biological tissues in thermal therapy experiments. This article is an attempt to outline the various materials and techniques used to prepare thermal phantoms in the gel state. The relevant thermal, electrical, acoustic, and optical properties of these phantoms are presented in detail and the benefits and shortcomings of each type are discussed. This review could assist the researchers in the selection of appropriate phantom recipes for their in vitro study of thermal modalities and highlight the limitations of current phantom recipes that remain to be addressed in further studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. [Interstitial lung diseases caused by long-term neurological-psychiatric drug therapy?].

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, G; Pielesch, W

    1991-03-01

    The development of alveolitis or lung fibrosis through drugs is wellknown, however rare described in the spectrum of drug side effects. In six cases of patients with neurological diseases were studied the relationship between alveolitis or lung fibrosis and a long-time therapy with especially drugs in a neurological practice. By the etiological examination of alveolitis or lung fibrosis it is necessary to pay attention to the possible relationship between drug and disease.

  2. Novel microwave applicators for thermal therapy, ablation, and hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Clegg, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Microwave applicators are becoming more prevalent in cancer ablation therapy due to factors of penetration, high power, and shortened treatment time. These applicators create the largest zones of necrosis of available energy sources. Progress has been made both with interstitial applicators for surgical, laparoscopic, or radiological approaches, as well as surface applicators that provide hemostasis or precoagulation prior to resection. Most commonly, the applicators operate at 915 MHz or 2450 MHz, and are well matched to tissue. Surgical applicators are as large as 5.6 mm and have the capability to operate at 100-200 W. With smaller applicators, internal cooling may be required to avoid heating sensitive skin surfaces if used percutaneously or laparoscopically. With the interstitial applicators, animal studies have shown a strong relationship between power and ablation volume, including reaching a steady-state plateau in performance based more on power level and less on time. As shown in-vivo, MW surface applicators are very efficient in surface coagulation for hemostasis or precoagulation and in the treatment of surface breaking lesions. These applicators are also capable of deep penetration as applied from the surface. Characteristic treatment times for interstitial applicators are four minutes and for surface applicators, one minute or less is sufficient. Examples will be shown of multi-organ results with surface coagulation using high-power microwaves. Finally, future trends will be discussed that include treatment planning, multiple applicators, and navigation.

  3. Numerical study and optimization of interstitial antennas for microwave ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Vyacheslav V.

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic and thermal characteristics of coaxial monopole antennas of 2.45 GHz and 24.125 GHz for microwave ablation of malignant tumors are investigated. Microwave heating processes in an interaction domain (biological tissue) are described by the coupled electromagnetic and heat transfer problem, which was solved numerically in the present study. Proposed applicators provide reducing of reflected power and localized distribution of temperature in the near-field zone. Different mathematical models are used to optimize the antennas sizes and simulate heating patterns.

  4. [A new treatment: thermal therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akinori; Munemoto, Takao; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-06-01

    Thermal therapy using far-infrared ray dry sauna was performed for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Symptoms such as fatigue, pain, and low-grade fever were dramatically improved on two patients. And prednisolone administration was discontinued and became socially rehabilitated 6 months after discharge. On other 11 patients with CFS, physical symptoms such as fatigue and pain improved, too. Furthermore, we reported that repeated thermal therapy had relaxation effect and diminishes appetite loss and subjective complaints in mildly depressed patients. These results suggest that repeated thermal therapy may be a promising method for the treatment of CFS.

  5. Contributions of vacancies and self-interstitials to self-diffusion in silicon under thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kube, R.; Bracht, H.; Hüger, E.; Schmidt, H.; Hansen, J. Lundsgaard; Larsen, A. Nylandsted; Ager, J. W., III; Haller, E. E.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.

    2013-08-01

    Since many years, the contribution of vacancies (V) and self-interstitials (I) to silicon (Si) self-diffusion is a matter of debate. Native defects and their interaction among themselves and with foreign atoms influence the processes taking place during device fabrication, starting with the growth of Si single crystals and ending with doping of nanosized electronic devices. Considering this relevance, it is remarkable that present data about the properties of native point defects in Si are still limited and controversial. This work reports experiments on self-diffusion in Si for temperatures between 650∘C and 960∘C to verify recent results of Shimizu [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.095901 98, 095901 (2007)] that give rise to inconsistencies in V-mediated self- and dopant diffusion. Two different structures of isotopically controlled epitaxial layers of Si are used for the diffusion study. One structure consisting of 20 bilayers of 29Si/28Si was grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The other structure with a 28Si layer sandwiched between natural Si was grown by means of chemical vapor deposition. Self-diffusion in (29Si/28Si)20 multilayers (ML) was analyzed by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron reflectometry, whereas self-diffusion in natSi/28Si/natSi sandwich (SW) structures was measured with SIMS only. Analysis of the experimental profiles reveals an enhanced self-diffusion in ML compared to SW structures. The enhanced diffusion is ascribed to the dissolution of V- and I-related defect clusters grown-in during MBE. On the other hand, self-diffusion in the SW structures accurately confirms the data of Shimizu that are considered to represent data for thermal equilibrium conditions. The temperature dependence of self-diffusion is described by V- and I-mediated contributions with temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of V. This interpretation can solve the inconsistency between self- and dopant diffusion in Si, but

  6. A pilot study: a combined therapy using polymyxin-B hemoperfusion and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Itai, Junji; Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Kida, Yoshiko; Ota, Kohei; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Hirohashi, Nobuyuki; Bonella, Francesco; Guzman, Josune; Costabel, Ulrich; Kohno, Nobuoki; Tanigawa, Koichi

    2015-01-05

    Direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-DHP) might be beneficial for treating acute exacerbation (AE) of interstitial pneumonia (IP). Venovenous extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (VV-ECMO) is an emerging tool to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury. This is a report presenting the first three patients with AE of IP treated with a combined therapy of PMX-DHP and VV-ECMO. Patient 1 was a 68-year-old male with acute interstitial pneumonia, patient 2 a 67-year-old male with AE of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and patient 3 a 61-year-old female with AE of collagen vascular disease-associated interstitial pneumonia. All patients were severely hypoxemic and required mechanical ventilation. A combined therapy using PMX-DHP and VV-ECMO was initiated with support of intravenous corticosteroids and antibiotics. Radiological findings, oxygenation and laboratory findings markedly improved and all patients survived without severe complications. A combined therapy of PMX-DHP and VV-ECMO might be a therapeutic option for AE of IP.

  7. Catheter-based ultrasound technology for image-guided thermal therapy: Current technology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound (CBUS) is being applied to deliver minimally invasive thermal therapy to solid cancer tumors, benign tissue growth, vascular disease, and tissue remodeling. Compared to other energy modalities used in catheter-based surgical interventions, unique features of ultrasound result in conformable and precise energy delivery with high selectivity, fast treatment times, and larger treatment volumes. Here, a concise review of CBUS technology being currently utilized in animal and clinical studies or being developed for future applications is presented. CBUS devices have been categorized into interstitial, endoluminal and endovascular/cardiac applications. Basic applicator designs, site specific evaluations and possible treatment applications have been discussed in brief. Particular emphasis has been given on ablation studies that incorporate image-guidance for applicator placement, therapy monitoring, feedback control, and post-procedure assessment. Examples of devices included here span the entire spectrum of development cycle from preliminary simulation based design studies to implementation in clinical investigations. The use of CBUS under image guidance has the potential for significantly improving precision and applicability of thermal therapy delivery. PMID:25799287

  8. Interstitial bipolar rf-thermotherapy (RFITT): therapy planning by computer simulation and MRI monitoring--a new concept for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desinger, Kai; Stein, Thomas; Mueller, Gerhard J.; Mack, Martin G.; Vogl, Thomas J.

    1998-04-01

    In addition to the laser, microwave or other energy sources, interstitial thermotherapy with radio-frequency current (RFITT) in bipolar technique has already been shown in vitro to be a safe and an economical alternative energy source with a comparable operating performance. The therapeutical application efficiency of these bipolar RF-needle applicators was evaluated using 3 different types of probes: standard, flushed and high performance cooled RF-probes (3 mm). These can be used to create large coagulation volumes in tissue such as for the palliative treatment of liver metastases or the therapy of the benign prostate hyperplasia. It was shown that the achievable lesion size resulting from the cooled RF-probes could be increased by a factor of three compared to a standard bipolar probe. With these bipolar power RF-applicators, coagulation dimensions of 5 cm length and 4 cm diameter with a power input of 40 watt could be achieved within 20 minutes. No carbonization and electrode tissue adherence was observed. Investigations in vitro with adapted RFITT-probes, using paramagnetic materials such as titanium alloys and high performance plastic, have shown that monitoring under MRI (Siemens Magnetom, 1.5 Tesla) allows visualization of the development of the spatial temperature distribution in tissue using an intermittent diagnostic and therapeutical application. This is no loss in performance compared to continuous applications. A ratio of 1:4 (15 s Thermal Flash MRI, 60 s RF-energy) has shown to be feasible. A computer simulation of the temperature and damage distribution during a bipolar RFITT application has been developed. The simulation works on-line with a RF-generator and measures the output power continuously. The electric power density (heat generating term) and the damage distribution is displayed graphically in real time.

  9. Interstitial keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... However, interstitial keratitis accounts for 10% of avoidable blindness in the least developed countries worldwide. ... chap 4.17. World Health Organization. Causes of blindness and visual impairment. Prevention of blindness and visual ...

  10. Interstitial thermoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, C T; Strohbehn, J W

    1989-05-01

    The more recent engineering and clinical aspects of interstitial hyperthermia are reviewed. The advantages and difficulties of microwave, radiofrequency, and ferromagnetic seeds are evaluated and some future directions for improvements are outlined.

  11. Interstitial nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    Arend LJ. Tubulointerstitial diseases. In: Lager DJ, Abrahams NA, eds. Practical Renal Pathology . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 7. Nangaku M. Chronic interstitial nephritis. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege ...

  12. Randomized multicenter clinical trial of myofascial physical therapy in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and pelvic floor tenderness.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, M P; Payne, C K; Lukacz, E S; Yang, C C; Peters, K M; Chai, T C; Nickel, J C; Hanno, P M; Kreder, K J; Burks, D A; Mayer, R; Kotarinos, R; Fortman, C; Allen, T M; Fraser, L; Mason-Cover, M; Furey, C; Odabachian, L; Sanfield, A; Chu, J; Huestis, K; Tata, G E; Dugan, N; Sheth, H; Bewyer, K; Anaeme, A; Newton, K; Featherstone, W; Halle-Podell, R; Cen, L; Landis, J R; Propert, K J; Foster, H E; Kusek, J W; Nyberg, L M

    2012-06-01

    We determined the efficacy and safety of pelvic floor myofascial physical therapy compared to global therapeutic massage in women with newly symptomatic interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. A randomized controlled trial of 10 scheduled treatments of myofascial physical therapy vs global therapeutic massage was performed at 11 clinical centers in North America. We recruited women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome with demonstrable pelvic floor tenderness on physical examination and a limitation of no more than 3 years' symptom duration. The primary outcome was the proportion of responders defined as moderately improved or markedly improved in overall symptoms compared to baseline on a 7-point global response assessment scale. Secondary outcomes included ratings for pain, urgency and frequency, the O'Leary-Sant IC Symptom and Problem Index, and reports of adverse events. We compared response rates between treatment arms using the exact conditional version of the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for clustering by clinical center. For secondary efficacy outcomes cross-sectional descriptive statistics and changes from baseline were calculated. A total of 81 women randomized to the 2 treatment groups had similar symptoms at baseline. The global response assessment response rate was 26% in the global therapeutic massage group and 59% in the myofascial physical therapy group (p=0.0012). Pain, urgency and frequency ratings, and O'Leary-Sant IC Symptom and Problem Index decreased in both groups during followup, and were not significantly different between the groups. Pain was the most common adverse event, occurring at similar rates in both groups. No serious adverse events were reported. A significantly higher proportion of women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome responded to treatment with myofascial physical therapy than to global therapeutic massage. Myofascial physical therapy may be a beneficial therapy in women with this

  13. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy: Toxicity and 5-year outcome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; van der Horst, Christof; Kimmig, Bernhard; Zinsser, Fabian; Poppe, Bjoern; Luetzen, Ulf; Juenemann, Klaus-Peter; Dunst, Juergen; Siebert, Frank-André

    We report our results with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as a salvage therapy option after external beam therapy with or without BT. Emphasis was put on toxicity and 5-year outcome. From 2003 to 2011, 29 patients with local failure after previous radiotherapy for prostate cancer were treated with salvage interstitial HDR-BT. The diagnosis of local recurrence was made on the basis of choline positron emission tomography. Salvage HDR-BT was given in three fractions with a single dose of 10 Gy per fraction and weekly. The target volume covered the peripheral zone of the prostate and the positron emission tomography-positive area. Acute and late toxicities were documented according to common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE v 4.0). Twenty-two patients with minimum followup of 60 months were analyzed. The 5-year overall survival was 95.5% with a disease-specific survival of 100%. The 5-year biochemical control was 45%. Late grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in two patients (9%). No grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal late toxicities were observed. Urinary incontinence found in 2 patients (9%) and grade 2 obstruction of urinary tract occurred in one patient (4%). Interstitial HDR-BT was feasible and effective in the treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. The long-term toxicity was low and acceptable. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Temperature control in interstitial laser cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Holmes, Kyland; Burnett, Corinthius; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2003-07-01

    Positive results of Laser-Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy (LACI) have been reported previously in the irradiation of superficial tumors. This paper reports the effect of LACI using laser interstitial therapy approach. We hypothesize that the maximum immuno response depends on laser induced tumor temperature. The measurement of tumor temperature is crucial to ensure necrosis by thermal damage and immuno response. Wister Furth female rats in this study were inoculated with 13762 MAT B III rat mammary adinocarcinoma. LACI started seven to ten days following inoculation. Contrary to surface irradation, we applied laser interstitial irradiation of tumor volume to maximize the energy deposition. A diode laser with a wavelength of 805 nm was used for tumor irradiation. The laser energy was delivered inside the tumor through a quartz fiber. Tumor temperature was measured with a micro thermocouple (interstitial), while the tumor surface temperature was controlled with an IR detector. The temperature feedback demonstrates that it is possible to maintain the average tumor temperature at the same level with reasonable accuracy in the desired range from 65°C-85°C. In some experiments we used microwave thermometry to control average temperature in deep tissue for considerable period of time, to cause maximum thermal damage to the tumor. The experimental set-up and the different temperature measurement techniques are reported in detail, including the advantages and disadvantages for each method.

  15. Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles: Recent Progress in Thermal Therapy and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cherukula, Kondareddy; Manickavasagam Lekshmi, Kamali; Uthaman, Saji; Cho, Kihyun; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the development of many alternative anti-cancer approaches, such as thermal therapies, which cause minimal damage to healthy cells. Current challenges in cancer treatment are the identification of the diseased area and its efficient treatment without generating many side effects. Image-guided therapies can be a useful tool to diagnose and treat the diseased tissue and they offer therapy and imaging using a single nanostructure. The present review mainly focuses on recent advances in the field of thermal therapy and imaging integrated with multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles. The main heating sources for heat-induced therapies are the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the near infrared region and alternating magnetic fields (AMFs). The different families of inorganic nanoparticles employed for SPR- and AMF-based thermal therapies and imaging are described. Furthermore, inorganic nanomaterials developed for multimodal therapies with different and multi-imaging modalities are presented in detail. Finally, relevant clinical perspectives and the future scope of inorganic nanoparticles in image-guided therapies are discussed. PMID:28335204

  16. Characterization of measurement artefacts in fluoroptic temperature sensors: implications for laser thermal therapy at 810 nm.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean R H; Vitkin, I Alex; Sherar, Michael D; Whelan, William M

    2005-04-01

    Fluoroptic sensors are used to measure interstitial temperatures but their utility for monitoring laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is unclear because these sensors exhibit a measurement artefact when exposed to the near-infrared (NIR) treatment light. This study investigates the cause of the artefact to determine whether fluoroptic sensors can provide reliable temperature measurements during LITT. The temperature rise measured by a fluoroptic sensor irradiated in non-absorbing media (air and water) was considered an artefact. Temperature rise was measured as a function of distance from a laser source. Two different sensor designs and several laser powers were investigated. A relationship between fluence rate and measurement artefact in water was determined and coupled with a numerical simulation of LITT in liver to estimate the error in temperature measurements made by fluoroptic sensors in tissue in proximity to the laser source. The effect of ambient light on the performance of sensors capped with a transparent material ("clear-capped sensors") was also investigated. The temperature rise recorded in air by both clear- and black-capped fluoroptic sensors decreased with distance from a laser source in a manner similar to fluence rate. Sensor cap material, laser power, and the thermal properties of the surrounding medium affected the magnitude of the artefact. Numerical simulations indicated that the accuracy of a clear-capped fluoroptic sensor used to monitor a typical LITT treatment in liver is > 1 degrees C provided the sensor is further than approximately 3 mm from the source. It was also shown that clear-capped fluoroptic sensors are affected by ambient light. The measurement artefact experienced by both black-capped and clear-capped fluoroptic sensors irradiated by NIR light scales with fluence rate and is due to direct absorption of the laser light, which results in sensor self-heating. Clear-capped fluoroptic sensors can be used to accurately

  17. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  18. Effects of thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Shimodozono, Megumi; Etoh, Seiji; Miyata, Ryuji; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2011-08-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder that is characterized by widespread pain with localized tenderness. We aimed to investigate whether thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise improved pain, symptoms, and quality of life (QOL) in FMS patients. Forty-four female FMS patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria received 12-week thermal therapy program comprising sauna therapy once daily for 3 days/week and underwater exercise once daily for 2 days/week. Pain, symptoms, and QOL were assessed using a pain visual analog scale (VAS), a fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), and a short form 36-item questionnaire (SF-36), respectively. All of the patients reported significant reductions in pain and symptoms of 31-77% after the 12-week thermal therapy program, which remained relatively stable (28-68%) during the 6-month follow-up period (that is, the thermal therapy program improved both the short-term and the long-term VAS and FIQ scores). Improvements were also observed in the SF-36 score. Thermal therapy combining sauna therapy and underwater exercise improved the QOL as well as the pain and symptoms of FMS patients.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of thermal coagulation effects in a phantom for calibrating thermal therapy devices.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, L S; Bronskill, M J

    2000-05-01

    A material has been developed and tested that permanently records thermal response patterns from heating devices. The material consists of a mixture of polyacrylamide and 18% w/w bovine serum albumin. Thermal denaturation is complete when the local temperature exceeds 70 degrees C, causing a large reduction in the T2 of the material. Three-dimensional distributions of "thermal damage" can be assessed using standard magnetic resonance imaging sequences. The material works well with microwave heating devices and is adaptable for use with ultrasound, radio-frequency, or laser heating devices. Suggested uses include characterizing heating devices prior to treatment and developing new clinical applications for thermal therapies.

  20. [Thermal therapy of prostate cancer using magnetic nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Manfred; Gneveckow, Uwe; Taymoorian, Kasra; Cho, Chie Hee; Thiesen, Burghard; Scholz, Regina; Waldöfner, Norbert; Loening, Stefan A; Wust, Peter; Jordan, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    A novel method of interstitial heating using magnetic nanoparticles and a direct injection technique has been evaluated in human cancers in recent clinical trials. In prostate cancer, this approach was investigated in two separate phase-I-studies, employing magnetic nanoparticle thermotherapy alone and in combination with permanent seed brachytherapy. The feasibility and good tolerability was shown in both trials, using the first prototype of a magnetic field applicator. As with any other heating technique, this novel approach requires specific tools for planning, quality control and thermal monitoring, based on appropriate imaging and modelling techniques. In these first clinical trials, a newly developed method for planning and non-invasive calculations of the 3-dimensional temperature distribution based on computed tomography could be validated. Limiting factors of this approach at present are patient discomfort at high magnetic field strengths and suboptimal intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles. Until these limitations will be overcome and thermal ablation can safely be applied as a monotherapy, this treatment modality is being evaluated in combination with irradiation in patients with localized prostate cancer.

  1. 1125-nm quantum dot laser for tonsil thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has the potential to provide a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy. Clinical implementation requires that the lymphoid tissue of tonsils is heated homogeneously to produce an amount of primary thermal injury that corresponds to gradual postoperative tonsil shrinkage, with minimal risk of damage to underlying critical blood vessels. Optical constants are derived for tonsils from tissue components and used to calculate the depth of 1/e of irradiance. The 1125 nm wavelength is shown to correspond to both deep penetration and minimal absorption by blood. A probe for tonsil thermal therapy that comprises two opposing light emitting, temperature controlled surfaces is described. For ex vivo characterization of tonsil heating, a prototype 1125 nm diode laser is used in an experimental apparatus that splits the laser output into two components, and delivers the radiation to sapphire contact window surfaces of two temperature controlled cells arranged to irradiate human tonsil specimens from opposing directions. Temperatures are measured with thermocouple microprobes at located points within the tissue during and after irradiation. Primary thermal damage corresponding to the recorded thermal histories are calculated from Arrhenius parameters for human tonsils. Results indicate homogeneous heating to temperatures corresponding to the threshold of thermal injury and above can be achieved in advantageously short irradiation times.

  2. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

  3. Thermal fixation: a central outcome of hyperthermic therapies (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coad, James E.

    2005-04-01

    Currently, several minimally invasive hyperthermic-based surgical technologies are available for the treatment of dysfunctional and neoplastic tissues in a variety of organ systems. These therapies involve a number of different modalities for delivering heat energy to the target tissue, including radiofrequency/microwave, conductive/convective, loop resection, and others. Despite differences in energy transfer and organ system treated, hyperthermic lesions often have a multiregional architecture with a central thermal fixation region, adjacent middle coagulative-type necrosis region, and outer transitional region of variable cell injury/death. The regional percentages of these components vary depending on the overall thermal history distribution across the lesion. The thermal-fixed region generally lacks a wound healing response, resists breakdown/tissue repair, and may elicit a localized foreign body-type reaction. The other two regions generally undergo wound healing/repair with scar formation. The features of thermal fixation are highlighted and explored through several histopathologic case vignettes.

  4. Dynamic Angular Control Of Thermal Therapy With Stationary Multi-Sectored Tubular Ultrasound Applicators Under MR Temperature Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Ross, Anthony B.; Butts Pauly, Kim; Rieke, Viola; Sommer, Graham

    2006-05-01

    Multi-sectored ultrasound heating applicators with dynamic angular and longitudinal control of heating profiles are being investigated for the thermal treatment of tumors in sites such as prostate, uterus, and brain. Multi-sectored tubular ultrasound transducers with independent sector power control were incorporated into interstitial and transurethral applicators and provided dynamic angular control of a heating pattern without requiring device manipulation during treatment. Acoustic beam measurements of each applicator type demonstrated a 35-40° acoustic dead zone between each independent sector, with negligible mechanical or electrical coupling. Despite the acoustic dead zone between sectors, simulations and experiments under MR temperature (MRT) monitoring showed that the variance from the maximum lesion radius (scalloping) with all elements activated on a transducer was minimal and did not affect conformal heating of a target area. A biothermal model with a multi-point controller was used to adjust the applied power and treatment time of individual transducer segments as the tissue temperature changed in simulations of thermal lesions with both interstitial and transurethral applicators. Transurethral ultrasound applicators for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) treatment with either three or four sectors conformed a thermal dose to a simulated target area in the angular and radial dimensions. The simulated treatment was controlled to a maximum temperature of 85°C, and had a maximum duration of 5 min when power was turned off as the 52°C temperature contour reach a predetermined control point for each sector in the tissue. Experiments conducted with multi-sectored applicators under MRT monitoring showed thermal ablation and hyperthermia treatments had little or no border `scalloping', conformed to a pretreatment target area, and correlated very well with the simulated thermal lesions. The radial penetration of the heat treatments in tissue with interstitial

  5. A parametric study of thermal therapy of skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Simão; Coelho, Pedro J

    2017-01-01

    A thermal therapy for cancer in skin tissue is numerically investigated using three bioheat conduction models, namely Pennes, thermal wave and dual-phase lag models. A laser is applied at the surface of the skin for cancer ablation, and the temperature and thermal damage distributions are predicted using the three bioheat models and two different modeling approaches of the laser effect. The first one is a prescribed surface heat flux, in which the tissue is assumed to be highly absorbent, while the second approach is a volumetric heat source, which is reasonable if the scattering and absorption skin effects are of similar magnitude. The finite volume method is applied to solve the governing bioheat equation. A parametric study is carried out to ascertain the effects of the thermophysical properties of the cancer on the thermal damage. The temperature distributions predicted by the three models exhibit significant differences, even though the temperature distributions are similar when the laser is turned off. The type of bioheat model has more influence on the predicted thermal damage than the type of modeling approach used for the laser. The phase lags of heat flux and temperature gradient have an important influence on the results, as well as the thermal conductivity of the cancer. In contrast, the uncertainty in the specific heat and blood perfusion rate has a minor influence on the thermal damage.

  6. [Outcomes and predictors of T3a prostate cancer treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy combined with external radiotherapy and hormone therapy].

    PubMed

    Mai, Zhipeng; Yan, Weigang; Li, Hanzhong; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Zhien; Chen, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of T3a prostate cancer treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy combined with external radiotherapy and hormone therapy, and analyse the influence of preoperative factors on prognosis. From January 2003 to December 2008, 38 pactients with T3a prostate cancer aged from 48 to 81 years (mean: 71 years) were enrolled, with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels ranged from 10.000 to 99.800 µg/L (mean: 56.300 µg/L), Gleason score from 5 to 9 (mean: 7.6) and percentage of positive biopsy cores from 10.0% to 100% (mean: 65.3%). All patients were treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy combined with external radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The predictive factors including patient's age, prostate volume, serum pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score and percentage of positive biopsy cores were used for univariate analysis on biochemical failure-free, distant metastasis-free and overall survival. The mean follow-up was 69 months (range: 9-109 months).Nineteen patients experienced biochemical failure. The average biochemical failure time was 13.4 months (range: 1-40 months). There were 13 patients developed as distant metastatic prostate cancer since average 19.7 months (range: 1-70 months) after brachytherapy. Of all patients, 9 died of prostate cancer recurrence, while 6 passed away because of other reasons, with an average of 52.2 months (range: 9.0- 98.5 months). The 5-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS), cancer specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) rate were 44.1%, 68.6%, 82.4 and 75.8%, respectively. Twenty-nine patients experienced grade 1-2 gastrointestinal toxicity and 18 patients experienced grade 1-2 genitourinary toxicity. In univariate analysis, the percentage of positive biopsy cores was significantly correlated with BFFS (χ(2) = 17.240, P = 0.000), DMFS (χ(2) = 18.641, P = 0.000) and OS (χ(2

  7. Interstitial radiation therapy for carcinoma of the penis using iridium 192 wires: the Henri Mondor experience (1970-1979)

    SciTech Connect

    Mazeron, J.J.; Langlois, D.; Lobo, P.A.; Huart, J.A.; Calitchi, E.; Lusinchi, A.; Raynal, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Abbou, C.C.; Pierquin, B.

    1984-10-01

    From 1970 to 1979, a group of 50 patients was treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis by interstitial irradiation using an afterloading technique and iridium 192 wires. The group included 9 patients with T1 tumors, 27 with T2 tumors, and 14 with T3 tumors. Forty-five patients presented with no metastatic inguinal nodes (NO), 3 patients with N1 nodes, and 2 patients had N3 nodes. After treatment, 11 patients (1 T1, 6 T2 and 4 T3) developed local recurrences. Three patients developed post-therapeutic necrosis which necessitated partial amputation in 2 cases. Eight patients developed post-therapeutic urethral stenosis, which required surgical treatment in three of the cases. Twenty-one percent of the patients died of their disease. The authors advocate interstitial irradiation using iridium 192 wires for the treatment of non-infiltrating or moderately infiltrating squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in which the largest dimension does no exceed 4 cm. When regular follow-up can be assurred, it is reasonable to forgo prophylactic treatment of the inguinal nodes in patients presenting without groin metastasis.

  8. Interstitial Cystitis Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have IC. Get The Facts Interstitial Cystitis Association The Interstitial Cystitis Association (ICA) is the only ... events. Please leave this field empty Interstitial Cystitis Association 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300 McLean, VA ...

  9. Interstitial cystitis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - interstitial cystitis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on interstitial cystitis : Interstitial Cystitis Association -- www.ichelp.org National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www.kidney.niddk. ...

  10. Investigation on nanoparticle distribution for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Soni, Sanjeev; Tyagi, Himanshu; Taylor, Robert A; Kumar, Amod

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles delivered to a skin tumour for the thermal ablation conditions attained during thermal therapy. Ultimate aim is to define a distribution of nanoparticles as well as a combination of other therapeutic parameters to attain thermal ablation temperatures (50-60 °C) within whole of the tumour region. Three different cases of nanoparticle distributions are analysed under controlled conditions for all other parameters viz. irradiation intensity and duration, and volume fraction of nanoparticles. Results show that distribution of nanoparticles into only the periphery of tumour resulted in desired thermal ablation temperature in whole of tumour. For the tumour size considered in this study, an irradiation intensity of 1.25 W/cm(2) for duration of 300 s and a nanoparticle volume fraction of 0.001% was optimal to attain a temperature of ≥53 °C within the whole tumour region. It is concluded that distribution of nanoparticles in peripheral region of tumour, along with a controlled combination of other parameters, seems favourable and provides a promising pathway for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

  11. Interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R; Davies, M F

    1998-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a multifactorial syndrome with symptoms of pelvic or perineal pain, urinary frequency and urgency. The etiologies are unknown, but several theories have been proposed. Diagnosis is often delayed because most of the conventional evaluation is normal. Pelvic examination is normal except for bladder tenderness. Urodynamics are normal except for increased bladder sensitivity and low capacity. Urinalysis, urine culture and office cystoscopy are also normal. The diagnostic test is cystoscopy under anesthesia with bladder distension. Small submucosal hemorrhages (glomerulations) or ulcers appear after distension. Many empiric treatments have been proposed for IC. None is universally effective, and so treatments are tried sequentially until good symptom relief is achieved. Bladder distension gives excellent (but transient) relief in some patients, especially those with severe bladder inflammation (who also tend to be older). A variety of oral, intravesical and adjunctive treatments are also described.

  12. Modeling of thermal effects in antivascular ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Levenback, Benjamin J.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Wood, Andrew K. W.

    2012-01-01

    Antivascular ultrasound consisting of low-intensity sonication in the presence of circulating microbubbles of an ultrasound contrast agent has been demonstrated to disrupt blood flow in solid cancers. In this study a mathematical framework is described for the microbubble-induced heating that occurs during antivascular ultrasound. Biological tissues are modeled as a continuum of microbubble-filled vasculature, cells, and interstitial fluids with compressibility equal to the sum of the compressibility of each component. The mathematical simulations show that the absorption of ultrasound waves by viscous damping of the microbubble oscillations induced significant local heating of the tissue vasculature. The extent and the rate of temperature increase not only depends on the properties of the microbubbles and the sonication parameters but is also influenced markedly by the blood flow. Slow flow conditions lead to higher tissue temperatures due to a stronger interaction between microbubbles and ultrasound and reduced heat dissipation. Because tumors have slower blood flow than healthy tissue, the microbubble-induced ultrasound antivascular therapy is likely to affect cancerous tissue more extensively than healthy tissue, providing a way to selectively target the vasculature of cancers. PMID:22280615

  13. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is a rare entity detected in ∼0.5–0.9% of all renal biopsies. GIN has been linked to several antibiotics such as cephalosporins, vancomycin, nitrofurantoin and ciprofloxacin. It is also associated with NSAIDs and granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, fungal infections, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Renal biopsy is critical in establishing this diagnosis, and the extent of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis may aid in determining prognosis. Retrospective data and clinical experience suggest that removal of the offending agent in conjunction with corticosteroid therapy often results in improvement in renal function. We describe a patient with a history of multiple spinal surgeries complicated by wound infection who presented with confusion and rash with subsequent development of acute kidney injury. Urinalysis demonstrated pyuria and eosinophiluria, and renal biopsy revealed acute interstitial nephritis with granulomas. These findings were attributed to doxycycline treatment of his wound infection. This review explores the clinical associations, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26413275

  14. Interstitial therapy suing non-absorbable (Ir192 nylon ribbon) and absrobable (I125 "Vicryl") suturing techniques.

    PubMed

    Scott, W P

    1975-08-01

    Permanent and removable interstitial implantation techniques using absorbable and unabsorbable sutures are described. Most of these techniques can be performed in the clinic easily and quickly with basic instruments: needle holder, needle book, and hemoclips. Specifically, Ir192 (74-4 day half life, 300-610 keV, and 6.0 cm. hvl in tissue) nylon ribbon and I125 (60 day half life, 27-35 keV, and 2.0 cm. hvl in tissue) Vicryl sutures are described. A major advantage of the I125 over the Ir192 see (other than the fact that it can be permanently implanted and needs less radiation protection) is that the patient does not remain highly radioactive for as long a period due to hte extremely low I125 energy and may be allowed to leave the hospital. Both nuclides have the advantage of a long shelf life, making their use practical and economically feasible.

  15. First experiences with the interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy in the treatment of upper-aerodigestive-tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Burkard M.; Gottschlich, Stefan; Folz, Benedikt J.; Werner, Jochen A.

    1996-12-01

    The laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is a new treatment modality for advanced recurrent malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract. Since 1993 26 patients with an incurable tumor recurrence of the head and neck region were treated at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Kiel. In nine patients tumor progression was stopped or a partial regression was observed. Eight patients showed slowed down tumor growth and nine patients displayed an unchanged tumor progression. No severe complications were noted. These preliminary results show that the LITT is a suitable method for the palliative treatment of advanced tumor recurrences of the head and neck region. Through optimization and standardization of radiation parameters and application of the laser fibers the success rate could be improved.

  16. [A case of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuga, Yoshio; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Okanobu, Hideharu; Arita, Michinori; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Miwata, Tomohiro; Fujino, Hatsue; Moriya, Takashi; Ohya, Toshihide

    2011-03-01

    The patient was a 77-year-old woman admitted for nausea and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed advanced ascending colon cancer with liver metastasis. After operation, we started combination chemotherapy of S-1 and irinotecan (CPT-11); S-1(80 mg/m²) administered orally for consecutive days followed by 14 days rest.CPT -11 (100 mg/m²) was given as a 2-hour infusion on day 1 and 15. The patient complained of high fever and subsequent dyspnea with severe hypoxemia after the first course of combination chemotherapy of S-1 and CPT-11.CT scan showed diffuse interstitial lesions with ground glass opacity on both lungs. Steroid pulse therapy with oxygen therapy remarkably improved her symptoms, and abnormal findings on CT scan also resolved. Drug lymphocyte stimulation test was positive against S-1 and negative against CPT-11. These findings were consistent with S-1-induced lung injury. Drug -induced pneumonia needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy present high fever and dyspnea.

  17. Harnessing the immunomodulatory effect of thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastianpillai, Christopher; Petrides, Neophytos; Shah, Taimur; Guillaumier, Stephanie; Ahmed, Hashim U; Arya, Manit

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive interventional therapies are evolving rapidly and their use for the treatment of solid tumours is becoming more extensive. The in situ destruction of solid tumours by such therapies is thought to release antigens that can prime an antitumour immune response. In this review, we offer an overview of the current evidence for immune response activation associated with the utilisation of the main thermal and non-thermal ablation therapies currently in use today. This is followed by an assessment of the hypothesised mechanisms behind this immune response priming and by a discussion of potential methods of harnessing this specific response, which may subsequently be applicable in the treatment of cancer patients. References were identified through searches of PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane databases to identify peer-reviewed original articles, meta-analyses and reviews. Papers were searched from 1850 until October 2014. Articles were also identified through searches of the authors' files. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Thermal and non-thermal therapies have the potential to stimulate antitumour immunity although the current body of evidence is based mostly on murine trials or small-scale phase 1 human trials. The evidence for this immune-modulatory response is currently the strongest in relation to cryotherapy and radiotherapy, although data is accumulating for related ablative treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, radiofrequency ablation and irreversible electroporation. This effect may be greatly enhanced by combining these therapies with other immunostimulatory interventions. Evidence is emerging into the immunomodulatory effect associated with thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies used in cancer treatment in addition to the mechanism behind this effect and how it may be harnessed for therapeutic use. A potential exists for treatment approaches that combine ablation of the primary tumour with control and possible

  18. [Chemotherapy in Patients Complicated with Interstitial Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Sata, Masafumi; Kato, Terufumi

    2016-08-01

    Interstitial pneumonia has high risk for chemotherapy-related exacerbation. Chemotherapy-related exacerbation is often fatal with respiratory failure. When we treat the cancer patient with interstitial pneumonia, it is necessary for us to regard of the efficacy of chemotherapy, and the frequency and mortality of chemotherapy-related exacerbation. All anti-cancer drugs has the possibilities of chemotherapy-related exacerbation. The incidence of chemotherapy-related exacerbation was higher in patients with target therapy agent or immune-checkpoint therapy agent, though there is not an interstitial pneumonia patient. In patients complicated with interstitial pneumonia, you should not use of these drugs, such as target therapy agent or immune-checkpoint therapy agent.

  19. Evaluation of a fuzzy logic controller for laser thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Vanessa; Sadeghian, Alireza; Sherar, Michael D.; Whelan, William M.

    2002-06-01

    Laser thermal therapy (LTT) is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to destroy solid tumors while minimizing damage to adjacent normal tissues. Optical energy, delivered through fibers implanted into the target volume, raises tissue temperatures above 60 degree(s)C resulting in coagulative necrosis (thermal damage). Thermal damage volumes, however, can be irregular and unpredictable, resulting from dynamic changes in the tissue properties during treatment. A closed-loop feedback fuzzy logic controller for LTT was developed with the tissue treated as a black-box system. Preliminary testing was conducted for simulated LTT with a single spherically emitting source fiber at the center of 5 mm and 10 mm diameter target tissues. Dynamic changes in blood perfusion and tissue optical properties due to heating were incorporated into the LTT simulator. Input laser power was modulated to control the temperature field in an attempt to reach target temperatures at the source (90 degree(s)C to avoid tissue charring) and at the target boundary (55 degree(s)C). In all simulations, thermal damage based on Arrhenius formulation ((Omega) equals 1) was reached at the target boundary. The controller also responded efficiently to unexpected, rapid temperature changes.

  20. [Thermal therapy for the management of cardiovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Persiianova-Dubrova, A L; Badalov, N G

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of analysis of the study on the effect of thermal therapy in the patients presenting with cardiovascular diseases including coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, and myocardial infarction. It is shown that the correct application of the "Finnish" and infrared sauna taking into consideration specific clinical characteristics of the disease in question and with strict compliance to the relevant methodological recommendations can produce beneficial effects in the form of the improved endothelial function, reduced heart rate variability and oxidative stress as well as enhanced physical performance. It is concluded that full-scale studies in accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine are needed to further improve the effectiveness of the thermal treatment of cardiovascular diseases and the reliability of the data obtained.

  1. Multi-modality tissue-mimicking phantom for thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Mark; Lochhead, Shanna; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael J

    2004-07-07

    A tissue-mimicking phantom material has been developed for use with thermal therapy devices and techniques. This material has magnetic resonance properties (primarily T2) which change drastically upon thermal coagulation, enabling its use for device characterization and treatment verification using simple T2-weighted imaging techniques. The coagulation temperature of the phantom can be changed from 50-60 degrees C by adjusting the pH from 4.3 to 4.7. The energy absorption properties can be adjusted to match the acoustical and optical properties of tissues. T2 relaxation measurements are provided as a function of temperature, along with T2-weighted MR images to illustrate the visualization of heating patterns. A complete recipe for fabricating phantoms is provided.

  2. A Micro-Thermal Sensor for Focal Therapy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Harishankar; Hodges, Wyatt; Choi, Jeunghwan; Lubner, Sean; Dames, Chris; Bischof, John

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for sensors deployed during focal therapies to inform treatment planning and in vivo monitoring in thin tissues. Specifically, the measurement of thermal properties, cooling surface contact, tissue thickness, blood flow and phase change with mm to sub mm accuracy are needed. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that a micro-thermal sensor based on the supported “3ω” technique can achieve this in vitro under idealized conditions in 0.5 to 2 mm thick tissues relevant to cryoablation of the pulmonary vein (PV). To begin with “3ω” sensors were microfabricated onto flat glass as an idealization of a focal probe surface. The sensor was then used to make new measurements of ‘k’ (W/m.K) of porcine PV, esophagus, and phrenic nerve, all needed for PV cryoabalation treatment planning. Further, by modifying the sensor use from traditional to dynamic mode new measurements related to tissue vs. fluid (i.e. water) contact, fluid flow conditions, tissue thickness, and phase change were made. In summary, the in vitro idealized system data presented is promising and warrants future work to integrate and test supported “3ω” sensors on in vivo deployed focal therapy probe surfaces (i.e. balloons or catheters). PMID:26916460

  3. A Micro-Thermal Sensor for Focal Therapy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natesan, Harishankar; Hodges, Wyatt; Choi, Jeunghwan; Lubner, Sean; Dames, Chris; Bischof, John

    2016-02-01

    There is an urgent need for sensors deployed during focal therapies to inform treatment planning and in vivo monitoring in thin tissues. Specifically, the measurement of thermal properties, cooling surface contact, tissue thickness, blood flow and phase change with mm to sub mm accuracy are needed. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that a micro-thermal sensor based on the supported “3ω” technique can achieve this in vitro under idealized conditions in 0.5 to 2 mm thick tissues relevant to cryoablation of the pulmonary vein (PV). To begin with “3ω” sensors were microfabricated onto flat glass as an idealization of a focal probe surface. The sensor was then used to make new measurements of ‘k’ (W/m.K) of porcine PV, esophagus, and phrenic nerve, all needed for PV cryoabalation treatment planning. Further, by modifying the sensor use from traditional to dynamic mode new measurements related to tissue vs. fluid (i.e. water) contact, fluid flow conditions, tissue thickness, and phase change were made. In summary, the in vitro idealized system data presented is promising and warrants future work to integrate and test supported “3ω” sensors on in vivo deployed focal therapy probe surfaces (i.e. balloons or catheters).

  4. Minimally Invasive Thermal Therapy for Cancer Treatment by Using Thin Coaxial Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Therapy Hyperthermia is one of the modalities for cancer treatment , utilizing the difference of the thermal sensitivity between tumor and normal...structure of the coaxial-slot antenna. MINIMALLY INVASIVE THERMAL THERAPY FOR CANCER TREATMENT BY USING THIN COAXIAL ANTENNAS K. Ito1, K. Saito1, T...Minimally Invasive Thermal Therapy for Cancer Treatment by Using Thin Coaxial Antennas Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s

  5. Combined treatment with interstitial hyperthermia and interstitial radiotherapy in an animal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ruifrok, A C; Levendag, P C; Lakeman, R F; Deurloo, I K; Visser, A G

    1991-06-01

    An interstitial hyperthermia system operating at 27 MHz has been developed at the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center. To test this system in combination with interstitial radiotherapy and to study the interactions of interstitial radiotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia, animal experiments were performed using rhabdomyosarcoma type R1 transplanted in the flanks of female Wag/Rij rats. Using the 27 MHz system, it appeared feasible to obtain hyperthermic temperatures. In this experiment a thermal dose of 44 degrees C for 30 minutes was delivered by controlling the temperature at the periphery of the tumor to 44 degrees C. The interstitial heating applicators were inserted in four standard afterloading catheters implanted with a fixed spacing of 7 mm; the same catheters were used for the radioactive sources for interstitial radiotherapy treatment following the interstitial hyperthermia sessions. Interstitial radiotherapy was given by means of four Ir192 wires with an average activity of 4.5.10(7) Bq/cm. Minimum tumor doses of 20 to 115 Gy with a mean dose rate of 47 cGy/hour were applied. Interstitial hyperthermia alone resulted in a growth delay (GD1) of 6 +/- 2 days without significant reduction of tumor volume. The 50% tumor cure dose after interstitial radiotherapy alone was 95 +/- 9 Gy. Combination of interstitial hyperthermia and interstitial radiotherapy resulted in reduction of the 50% tumor cure dose to 48 +/- 13 Gy. The dose-effect data for cure for these modalities are compared to existing data for external irradiation and external hyperthermia in the same tumor model. It was found that the addition of hyperthermia to different modes of irradiation, that is, either to single dose or protracted radiotherapy, results in a common level of radiosensitivity through impaired repair of sublethal damage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the 27 MHz heating system in achieving hyperthermic temperatures; in the combined modality experiments a thermal

  6. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kukiełka, Andrzej M; Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40-47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients.

  7. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40–47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients. PMID:26207116

  8. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy ameliorates cyclophosphamide-induced rat acute interstitial cystitis though inhibiting inflammation and oxidative stress-in vitro and in vivo experiment studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ta; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ling; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Huang, Tein-Hung; Chang, Chia-Lo; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2014-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) therapy can attenuate cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced acute interstitial cystitis (AIC) in rats. Methods and Results: Eighteen male-adult Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into group 1 (sham control), group 2 (AIC induced by 150 mg/kg CYP by intra-peritoneal injection) and group 3 (AIC + ECSW 200 impulses at 0.11 mJ/mm2 to the urinary bladder at 3 and 24 h after CYP treatment). Smooth-muscle cells co-culture with menadione (25 µM) with and without ECSW treatment was performed. Western-blot results demonstrated that ECSW significant attenuated oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions in this in-vitro studies (all p < 0.001). 24-hour urine amount and microscopic findings of red-blood-cell count (i.e., hematuria) were higher in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3, and significantly higher in group 3 than in group 1 (all p < 0.001). The urine levels of albumin and interleukin-6 showed an identical pattern of hematuria among all three groups (all p < 0.001). The cellular and mRNA expressions of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)+, CD74+, CD68+, substance p+, and Cox-2+ cells in the bladder tissue exhibited an identical pattern of hematuria among all groups (all p < 0.0001). The integrity of epithelial layer and collagen-deposition area as stained by Sirius red displayed an opposite pattern of hematuria among the three groups (p < 0.0001). The protein expression of IL-12, iNOS, TNF-α, NF-κB, MMP-9, NOX-1, NOX-2, RANTES, and Oxyblot displayed an identical pattern of hematuria among all groups (all p < 0.01). Conclusion: ECSW therapy markedly attenuated CYP-induced AIC through inhibitions of the inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:25628776

  9. Thermal dosimetry analysis combined with patient-specific thermal modeling of clinical interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia integrated within HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Scott, Serena; Hsu, I. C.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    This study presents thermal dosimetry analysis from clinical treatments where ultrasound hyperthermia (HT) was administered following high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer as part of a clinical pilot study. HT was administered using ultrasound applicators from within multiple 13-g brachytherapy catheters implanted along the posterior periphery of the prostate. The heating applicators were linear arrays of sectored tubular transducers (˜7 MHz), with independently powered array elements enabling energy deposition with 3D spatial control. Typical heat treatments employed time-averaged peak acoustic intensities of 1 - 3 W/cm2 and lasted for 60 - 70 minutes. Throughout the treatments, temperatures at multiple points were monitored using multi-junction thermocouples, placed within available brachytherapy catheters throughout mid-gland prostate and identified as the hyperthermia target volume (HTV). Clinical constraints allowed placement of 8 - 12 thermocouple sensors in the HTV and patient-specific 3D thermal modeling based on finite element methods (FEM) was used to supplement limited thermometry. Patient anatomy, heating device positions, orientations, and thermometry junction locations were obtained from patient CT scans and HDR and hyperthermia planning software. The numerical models utilized the applied power levels recorded during the treatments. Tissue properties such as perfusion and acoustic absorption were varied within physiological ranges such that squared-errors between measured and simulated temperatures were minimized. This data-fitting was utilized for 6 HT treatments to estimate volumetric temperature distributions achieved in the HTV and surrounding anatomy devoid of thermocouples. For these treatments, the measured and simulated T50 values in the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) were between 40.1 - 43.9 °C and 40.3 - 44.9 °C, respectively. Maximum temperatures between 46.8 - 49.8 °C were measured during

  10. Interventional cardiovascular therapy by laser and thermal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Litvack, F.; Grundfest, W.S.; Segalowitz, J.; Papaioanniou, T.; Goldenberg, T.; Laudenslager, J.; Hestrin, L.; Forrester, J.S.; Eigler, N.A.; Cook, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The advent of balloon angioplasty as a clinical device crystallized the concept of nonsurgical revascularization. The problems of restenosis, diffuse disease, and total occlusions persist despite the demonstrated efficacy of balloon angioplasty. During the past 5 years, a variety of laser devices and catheter designs have demonstrated usefulness in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease. Initial success rates of 70-90% have been reported in occluded femoropopliteal arteries. Further clinical trials are warranted to compare the relative efficacy of these devices with each other and conventional therapies. Thermal ablative devices have not yet shown great promise for treatment of coronary disease. Modified versions of these devices as well as nonthermally acting excimer lasers are promising as clinical tools for enhancing our ability to nonsurgically revascularize patients, and trials with these devices are now underway. 31 references.

  11. Interstitial radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region: the Creteil experience (1971-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Mazeron, J.J.; Lusinchi, A.; Marinello, G.; Huart, J.; Martin, M.; Calitchi, E.; Raynal, M.; le Bourgeois, J.P.; Baillet, F.; Pierquin, B.

    1986-06-01

    From July 1971 to December 1981, 33 selected patients with T1, T2 tumors of the tonsillar region were treated according to the following protocol: (1) Telecobalt therapy to the primary site and to neck nodes to a dose of 45 Gy. (2) Brachytherapy to the primary site to a dose of 30 Gy using iridium 192. (3) Boost dose to involved neck nodes with electrons, or radical neck dissection, whether N1, N2, or N3. The actuarial disease-free survival was 76% when all patient groups were included and 80% for the N0 patients. The local control rate was 100%. Disease control in the neck was 94% overall and 100% for the N0 group. These results favor the use of this protocol for superficial, minimally infiltrating tumors less than 4 cm in diameter, without obvious extension to the base of the tongue or retromolar trigone.

  12. Photoacoustic temperature measurements for monitoring of thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiou-Han; Wei, Chen-Wei; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Li, Pai-Chi

    2009-02-01

    Plasmonic photothermal therapy is a new cancer thermotherapy method based on surface plasmon resonance of nanoparticles. It is important to measure the temperature during thermotherapy for safety and efficacy. In this study, we apply a photoacoustic (PA) method for real-time, non-invasive temperature measurements. In particular, this method can be effectively combined with a photothermal therapy system that we developed in parallel. The method is based on the fact that the PA pressure amplitude is linearly related to temperature. To explore its potential, a home-made, 20 MHz PA transducer was used, in which an optical fiber was inserted in its center for emitting laser pulses while the PA signal was simultaneously detected. Continuous wave (CW) laser was used to heat the subject, including both phantoms and mice. The temperature of the region of interest was also measured by a fine-needle thermal couple. Results show that the temperature was linearly proportional to the PA signal with good correlation with the CW laser irradiation. The in vivo study also demonstrated potential of this technique.

  13. Updated results of a phase I trial of motexafin lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Verigos, Kosmas; Stripp, Diana C Hsiung; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod; Busch, Theresa M; Tochner, Zelig A; Malkowicz, S; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    Locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy is a clinical problem with few acceptable treatments. One potential treatment, photodynamic therapy (PDT), is a modality that uses laser light, drug photosensitizer, and oxygen to kill tumor cells through direct cellular cytotoxicity and/or through destruction of tumor vasculature. A Phase I trial of interstitial PDT with the photosensitizer Motexafin lutetium was initiated in men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. In this ongoing trial, the primary objective is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Other objectives include evaluation of Motexafin lutetium uptake from prostate tissue using a spectrofluorometric assay and evaluation of optical properties in the human prostate. Fifteen men with biopsy-proven locally recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled and 14 have been treated. Treatment plans were developed using transrectal ultrasound images. The PDT dose was escalated by increasing the Motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 ran light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 24, 6, or 3 hr prior to 732 ran light delivery. The light dose, measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2. Light was delivered via optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room. Optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Fourteen patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I genitourinary symptoms that are PDT related have been observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter related. No rectal or other gastrointestinal PDT-related tox

  14. Heat transfer analysis of skin during thermal therapy using thermal wave equation.

    PubMed

    Kashcooli, Meisam; Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Specifying exact geometry of vessel network and its effect on temperature distribution in living tissues is one of the most complicated problems of the bioheat field. In this paper, the effects of blood vessels on temperature distribution in a skin tissue subjected to various thermal therapy conditions are investigated. Present model consists of counter-current multilevel vessel network embedded in a three-dimensional triple-layered skin structure. Branching angles of vessels are calculated using the physiological principle of minimum work. Length and diameter ratios are specified using length doubling rule and Cube law, respectively. By solving continuity, momentum and energy equations for blood flow and Pennes and modified Pennes bioheat equations for the tissue, temperature distributions in the tissue are measured. Effects of considering modified Pennes bioheat equation are investigated, comprehensively. It is also observed that blood has an impressive role in temperature distribution of the tissue, especially at high temperatures. The effects of different parameters such as boundary conditions, relaxation time, thermal properties of skin, metabolism and pulse heat flux on temperature distribution are investigated. Tremendous effect of boundary condition type at the lower boundary is noted. It seems that neither insulation nor constant temperature at this boundary can completely describe the real physical phenomena. It is expected that real temperature at the lower levels is somewhat between two predicted values. The effect of temperature on the thermal properties of skin tissue is considered. It is shown that considering temperature dependent values for thermal conductivity is important in the temperature distribution estimation of skin tissue; however, the effect of temperature dependent values for specific heat capacity is negligible. It is seen that considering modified Pennes equation in processes with high heat flux during low times is significant

  15. Effect of Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Therapies on Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Its Relation to Drug Penetration in a Rabbit Liver Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Chen, Shaofeng; Li, Lin; Liu, Yiming; Xiong, Fu; Dong, Xiangjun; Feng, Gansheng; Gupta, Sanjay; Zheng, Chuansheng

    2015-12-01

    To determine the change in tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) after transcatheter intra-arterial (IA) therapies and its relation to drug penetration in liver cancer. VX2 tumors were grown in the livers of 16 rabbits. The rabbits were treated with intravenous injection of doxorubicin (group 1; n = 4), hepatic IA injection of doxorubicin (group 2; n = 4), hepatic IA injection of doxorubicin followed by embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles (group 3; n = 4), or hepatic IA injection of doxorubicin mixed with Lipiodol followed by polyvinyl alcohol embolization (group 4; n = 4). Tumor IFP was measured with a Mikro-Tip pressure catheter before and 1 hour after treatment. Doxorubicin penetration was evaluated by immunofluorescence. Tumor IFP after treatment decreased by 5.0% ± 2.8, 3.9% ± 9.0, 27.1% ± 5.2, and 31.8% ± 7.4 in groups 1-4, respectively. The difference in IFP reduction between embolization-treated groups (groups 3 and 4) and nonembolized groups (groups 1 and 2) was significant (P < .001). Doxorubicin penetration distances were 20.3 μm ± 3.7, 45.7 μm ± 10.5, 69.5 μm ± 9.3, and 47.9 μm ± 6.4 in groups 1-4, respectively. IFP reduction was significantly correlated with doxorubicin penetration distance (r = .671, P = .004). A greater reduction of tumor IFP was associated with embolization in a preclinical liver tumor model, and embolization may indirectly contribute to increased drug penetration. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of local estrogen therapy (LET) on urinary and sexual symptoms in premenopausal women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS).

    PubMed

    Gardella, Barbara; Iacobone, Anna Daniela; Porru, Daniele; Musacchi, Valentina; Dominoni, Mattia; Tinelli, Carmine; Spinillo, Arsenio; Nappi, Rossella E

    2015-10-01

    The association between vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), a chronic, debilitating disease of unknown etiology, may involve sex hormone-dependent mechanisms regulating vulvo-vaginal health. We aimed to prospectively investigate the effects of 12 weeks of local estrogen therapy (LET) on urinary/bladder and sexual symptoms in premenopausal women with IC/BPS. Thirty-four women (mean age: 36.1 ± 8.4) diagnosed with IC/BPS were treated vulvo-vaginally three-times/week with estriol 0.5 mg cream and tested by validated questionnaires (ICSI/ICPI, pain urgency frequency [PUF], female sexual function index [FSFI]) and by cotton swab testing, vaginal health index (VHI) and maturation index (MI) before and after treatment. Vulvodynia was present in 94.1% of IC/BPS women. A significant positive effect of LET was evident on urinary and sexual function (p < 0.001, for both) following 12 weeks, as well as an improvement of the VHI (p < 0.001) and the MI (p < 0.04). The results of this open study indicate that 12 weeks of local estriol cream at vaginal and vestibular level may ameliorate urinary/bladder pain symptoms, as well as may improve domains of sexual function. The association between vulvar pain and bladder pain could, therefore, be related to a vaginal environment carrying signs of hypoestrogenism, but further studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  17. Hyperthermic therapy for human neoplasms: thermal death time.

    PubMed

    Storm, F K; Harrison, W H; Elliott, R S; Morton, D L

    1980-10-15

    Hyperthermia greater than or equal to 42 C is tumoricidal, apparently a function of absolute temperature and duration of heating. However, because the technology for producing safe and effective deep hyperthermia did not exist, there was virtually no data on the thermal death times of human cancers. The development of a fundamentally new radio frequency device that produces uniform hyperthermia to any depth without surface tissue injury has allowed preliminary testing of this hypothesis in 38 patients with advanced cancer. Temperature measurements were taken in tumors and normal adjacent tissues. Tumors were heated from 40 C to greater than or equal to 50 C, one to ten times (13-600 minutes). Serial tumor biopsies compared percent necrosis (total absence of nuclei) by type of therapy. Of 44 tumors evaluated (21 superficial, 23 visceral), 31 (70%) were heated greater than or equal to 42 C, 23 (52%) greater than or equal to 45 C, and 14 (32%) greater than or equal to 50 C, with virtually no normal tissue injury. Single, short duration hyperthermia at greater than or equal to 50 C resulted in 20-100% tumor necrosis, while lower temperatures had no effect. Two or three treatments at 45-50 C produced 70-100% necrosis, while lower temperatures produced less necrosis at more than twice the duration of heating. Multiple treatments produced increased necrosis at lower temperatures; however, at the same temperature duration, higher temperatures were most effective. These clinical results support the hypothesis that the observed necrosis is related to both temperature and treatment time and suggest that higher temperatures and longer durations of therapy are most beneficial.

  18. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  19. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle.

  20. Malignant melanoma cure by selective thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Hatta, S.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal neutrons are easily absorbed by the nonradioactive isotope /sup 10/B, resulting in the emission of alpha particles and lithium atoms, which release an energy of 2.33 MeV for up to a 14-..mu..m-diam melanoma cell. Thus, if /sup 10/B can be selectively accumulated in melanoma, it can be destroyed without injury to the surrounding normal tissues by concentrating high linear energy transfer particles. The authors have synthesized seven melanoma-seeking /sup 10/B compounds, two of which, /sup 10/B12-chlorpromazine(/sup 10/B/sup 12/-CPZ) and /sup 10/B/sub 1/-p-boronophenylalanine(/sup 10/B/sub 1/-BPA), are found to be highly effective. The enhanced melanoma-killing effect of the /sup 10/B compounds is found by in vitro radiobiological analysis. A chemical assay and alpha-track analysis 28 h after systemic administration to melanoma-bearing hamsters reveals a /sup 10/B melanoma/blood ratio of 11.5 and a melanoma/liver ratio of 15. Establishment of a clinical therapeutic method for curing human melanoma without failure is underway by correlating biophysical, biochemical, biological, and therapeutic data analysis. Recently, the authors have also been working to develop neutron capture therapy using /sup 10/B-monoclonal antibodies for melanoma and were able to make some /sup 10/B conjugates with the specific m259-0 antibody.

  1. Update on interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Pamela A; Lascola, Kara M

    2015-04-01

    Interstitial pneumonias encompass a wide variety of acute and chronic respiratory diseases and include the specific diseases equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosis and acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress. These diseases have been diagnosed in all age groups of horses, and numerous agents have been identified as potential causes of interstitial pneumonia. Despite the varied causes, interstitial pneumonia is uniformly recognized by the severity of respiratory disease and often poor clinical outcome. This article reviews the causal agents that have been associated with the development of interstitial pneumonia in horses. Pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and treatment options are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal therapy in dialysis patients - a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Lee, Li-Shan; Su, Ling-Hwa; Huang, Tien-Chuan; Liu, Chi-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of far-infrared (FIR) rays on the meridian in hemodialysis (HD) patients. End-stage renal disease or kidney failure is the last stage of chronic renal failure, and often implies that the renal function cannot be restored and HD or kidney transplantation is required as a life-saving measure. HD patients often feel sick, debilitated, demotivated, and sad. A quasi-experimental design was conducted using convenience sampling with 61 HD patients from a hemodialysis center. Meridian testing and Brief Fatigue Inventory-Taiwan Form (BFI-T) were used as screening test for HD. The experimental group (n = 36) received FIR irradiation on each acupoint for 30 min, thrice a week, for two months, whereas the control group (n = 25) received no intervention. The outcome measures included meridian equipment, the level of hemoglobin (Hb), albumin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), and BFI-T. Ryodoraku values reveal a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the left small intestine meridian, left large intestine meridian, and yin-yang ratio. Overall, the increase in the meridians of the patients of experimental group is significantly higher than that of the control group. The results establish that FIR treatment on Qihai (RN 6), Guanyuan (RN 4), Zhongji (RN 3), and Tianshu (ST 25) is effective. Based on these findings, one can believe that FIR regulates the Qi of the kidney. The findings of this study would help doctors effectively dealing with thermal therapy treatment of HD patients.

  3. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  4. Nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy: Evolving strategies for prostate cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sunil; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Cho, Sang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Recent advances in nanotechnology have resulted in the manufacture of a plethora of nanoparticles with different sizes, shapes, core physicochemical properties and surface modifications that are being investigated for potential medical applications, particularly for the treatment of cancer. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of customized gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes that efficiently generate heat upon electromagnetic (light and magnetic fields) stimulation after direct injection into tumors or preferential accumulation in tumors following systemic administration. This review will also focus on the evolving strategies to improve the therapeutic index of prostate cancer treatment using nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia. Conclusions Nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy is a new and minimally invasive tool in the armamentarium for the treatment of cancers. Unique challenges posed by this form of hyperthermia include the non-target biodistribution of nanoparticles in the reticuloendothelial system when administered systemically, the inability to visualize or quantify the global concentration and spatial distribution of these particles within tumors, the lack of standardized thermal modeling and dosimetry algorithms, and the concerns regarding their biocompatibility. Nevertheless, novel particle compositions, geometries, activation strategies, targeting techniques, payload delivery strategies, and radiation dose enhancement concepts are unique attributes of this form of hyperthermia that warrant further exploration. Capitalizing on these opportunities and overcoming these challenges offers the possibility of seamless and logical translation of this nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia paradigm from the bench to the bedside. PMID:20858069

  5. Defects involving interstitial boron in low-temperature irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khirunenko, L. I.; Sosnin, M. G.; Duvanskii, A. V.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2016-12-01

    Interstitial boron-related defects in silicon subjected to irradiation with 5 MeV electrons at a temperature of 80 K are investigated by Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. This study demonstrates the radiation-enhanced annealing of interstitial boron during irradiation. We have revealed the interaction, which occurs in the course of irradiation, of diffusing interstitial boron atoms with one another and with interstitial oxygen. The local vibrational modes associated with these defects are identified, and the thermal stability of the defects is determined.

  6. Thermal therapy: a viable adjunct in the treatment of heart failure?

    PubMed

    Mussivand, Tofy; Alshaer, Hisham; Haddad, Haissam; Beanlands, Donald S; Beanlands, Rob; Chan, Kwan-Leung; Higginson, Lyall; Leenen, Frans; Ruddy, Terrence D; Mesana, Thierry; Silver, Marc A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to review and provide a summary of published literature on the clinical impact of thermal therapy (ie, warm water immersion, traditional sauna bathing, and dry infrared sauna) in patients with heart failure. Medline and Embase database literature searches were conducted, and studies that included measurement of heart failure-related clinical parameters were reviewed. Thermal therapy was found to have a positive impact on key heart failure-related parameters across multiple studies. Significant improvements were noted across a wide scope of heart failure-related parameters in the areas of (1) endothelial function, (2) hemodynamics, (3) cardiac geometry, (4) neurohormonal markers, and (5) quality of life. Of special note, thermal therapy also conveyed a strong antiarrhythmic effect in heart failure patients. The clinical evidence highlights repeatable and compelling data showing that thermal therapy may provide an important and viable adjunct in the treatment of heart failure.

  7. [Roentgenographic pattern of interstitial pneumonia and allergic alveolitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stender, H S

    1977-01-01

    Roentgenographic examination of the lungs permits diagnosis of inflammatory and allergic pulmonary disease with predominantly interstitial and less alveolar involvement in which pulmonary fibrosis may develop. Reaction of the sensitised lung to allergic exposure causes typical roentgenological patterns. Development of pulmonary fibrosis in interstitial lung disease can be prevented be early cortison therapy.

  8. Implications and considerations of thermal effects when applying irreversible electroporation tissue ablation therapy.

    PubMed

    Davalos, Rafael V; Bhonsle, Suyashree; Neal, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) describes a cellular response to electric field exposure, resulting in the formation of nanoscale defects that can lead to cell death. While this behavior occurs independently of thermally-induced processes, therapeutic ablation of targeted tissues with IRE uses a series of brief electric pulses, whose parameters result in secondary Joule heating of the tissue. Where contemporary clinical pulse protocols use aggressive energy regimes, additional evidence is supplementing original studies that assert care must be taken in clinical ablation protocols to ensure the cumulative thermal effects do not induce damage that will alter outcomes for therapies using the IRE non-thermal cell death process for tissue ablation. In this letter, we seek to clarify the nomenclature regarding IRE as a non-thermal ablation technique, as well as identify existing literature that uses experimental, clinical, and numerical results to discretely address and evaluate the thermal considerations relevant when applying IRE in clinical scenarios, including several approaches for reducing these effects. Existing evidence in the literature describes cell response to electric fields, suggesting cell death from IRE is a unique process, independent from traditional thermal damage. Numerical simulations, as well as preclinical and clinical findings demonstrate the ability to deliver therapeutic IRE ablation without occurrence of morbidity associated with thermal therapies. Clinical IRE therapy generates thermal effects, which may moderate the non-thermal aspects of IRE ablation. Appropriate protocol development, utilization, and pulse delivery devices may be implemented to restrain these effects and maintain IRE as the vastly predominant tissue death modality, reducing therapy-mitigating thermal damage. Clinical applications of IRE should consider thermal effects and employ protocols to ensure safe and effective therapy delivery.

  9. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  10. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  11. Interstitial cystitis. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of interstitial cystitis, with special emphasis on management of this condition by family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles were identified through MEDLINE and review of abstracts presented at Urology and Interstitial Cystitis meetings during the last decade. Recent reviews were further searched for additional studies and trials. Data were summarized from large epidemiologic studies. Etiologic theories were extracted from current concepts and reviews of scientific studies. Diagnostic criteria described in this review are based on clinical interpretation of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research guidelines, interpretation of data from the NIH Interstitial Cystitis Cohort Study, and recent evidence on use of the potassium sensitivity test. Treatment suggestions are based on six randomized placebo-controlled clinical treatment trials and best available clinical data. MAIN MESSAGE: Interstitial cystitis affects about 0.01% to 0.5% of women. Its etiology is unknown, but might involve microbiologic, immunologic, mucosal, neurogenic, and other yet undefined agents. The diagnosis of interstitial cystitis is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is impossible to provide a purely evidence-based treatment strategy, but review of available evidence suggests that conservative supportive therapy (including diet modification); oral treatment with pentosan polysulfate, amitriptyline, or hydroxyzine; and intravesical treatments with heparinlike medications, dimethyl sulfoxide, or BCG vaccine could benefit some patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians should have an understanding of interstitial cystitis and be able to make a diagnosis and formulate an evidence-based treatment strategy for their patients. PMID:11153410

  12. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  13. Curvilinear transurethral ultrasound applicator for selective prostate thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Anthony B; Diederich, Chris J; Nau, William H; Rieke, Viola; Butts, R Kim; Sommer, Graham; Gill, Harcharan; Bouley, Donna M

    2005-06-01

    Thermal therapy offers a minimally invasive option for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and localized prostate cancer. In this study we investigated a transurethral ultrasound applicator design utilizing curvilinear, or slightly focused, transducers to heat prostatic tissue rapidly and controllably. The applicator was constructed with two independently powered transducer segments operating at 6.5 MHz and measuring 3.5 mm x 10 mm with a 15 mm radius of curvature across the short axis. The curvilinear applicator was characterized by acoustic efficiency measurements, acoustic beam plots, biothermal simulations of human prostate, ex vivo heating trials in bovine liver, and in vivo heating trials in canine prostate (n=3). Each transducer segment was found to emit a narrow acoustic beam (max width <3 mm), which extended the length of the transducer, with deeper penetration than previously developed planar or sectored tubular transurethral ultrasound applicators. Acoustic and biothermal simulations of human prostate demonstrated three treatment schemes for the curvilinear applicator: single shot (10 W, 60 s) schemes to generate narrow ablation zones (13 x 4 mm, 52 degrees C at the lesion boundary), incremental rotation (10 W, 10 degrees/45 s) to generate larger sector-shaped ablation zones (16 mm x 180 degrees sector), and rotation with variable sonication times (10 W, 10 degrees/15-90 s) to conform the ablation zone to a predefined boundary (9-17 mm x 180 degrees sector, 13 min total treatment time). During in vivo canine prostate experiments, guided by MR temperature imaging, single shot sonications (6 W/transducer, 2-3 min) with the curvilinear applicator ablated 20 degree sections of tissue to the prostate boundary (9-15 mm). Multiple adjacent sonications ("sweeping") ablated large sections of the prostate (180 degrees) by using the MR temperature imaging to adjust the power (4-6.4 W/transducer) and sonication time (30-180 s) at each 10 degrees rotation

  14. Salvage interstitial brachytherapy based on computed tomography for recurrent cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy: case presentations and introduction of the technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Shan; Guo, Jie; Zhao, Yang-Zhi; Lin, Xia; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Ming; Li, Jiang-Ming; Ren, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Bing-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Locally recurring cervical cancer after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy remains a major therapeutic challenge. This paper presents a new therapeutic technique for such patients: interstitial brachytherapy (BT) guided by real-time three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). Material and methods Sixteen patients with recurrent cervical cancer after radical surgery and adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were included in this study. These patients underwent high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial BT with free-hand placement of metal needles guided by real-time 3D-CT. Six Gy in 6 fractions were prescribed for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). D90 and D100 for HR-CTV of BT, and the cumulative D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, including previous EBRT and present BT were analyzed. Treatment-related complications and 3-month tumor-response rates were investigated. Results The mean D90 value for HR-CTV was 52.5 ± 3.3 Gy. The cumulative D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 85.6 ± 5.8, 71.6 ± 6.4, and 69.6 ± 5.9 Gy, respectively. The mean number of needles was 6.1 ± 1.5, with an average depth of 3.5 ± 0.9 cm for each application. Interstitial BT was associated with minor complications and passable tumor-response rate. Conclusions Interstitial BT guided by real-time 3D-CT for recurrent cervical cancer results in good dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The current technique may be clinically feasible. However, long-term clinical outcomes should be further investigated. PMID:27895683

  15. Thermal phantom of the intervertebral disc for evaluating intradiscal electrothermal therapies.

    PubMed

    Fitch, David A; de Ana, Javier

    2011-01-15

    a silicone material was evaluated as an intervertebral disc thermal phantom. Temperature mapping was performed during the intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET) procedure and compared with results from the cadaver studies. to determine whether a silicone material can be used as an intervertebral disc thermal phantom for evaluating thermal distributions of intradiscal electrothermal therapies and for reducing the need for cadaver and animal studies. studies mapping thermal profiles of intradiscal heating therapies have been performed in cadavers and animal models. These studies are expensive, require special facilities and institutional reviews, and are susceptible to intercadaver and/or interanimal variation. A search of published data yielded no proposed thermal phantoms of the intervertebral disc. METHODS.: The thermal conductivity of a silicone material was measured and compared with that of an intervertebral disc. Thermal distributions were mapped in the material during the IDET procedure and compared with the distributions seen in cadaver studies. Logarithmic regression was performed to predict temperatures at certain distances from the IDET catheter. Mapping and regression were also performed for a decompression catheter. the thermal conductivity of the silicone material, 0.587 W/m · °C, was similar to that previously reported for the intervertebral disc, 0.595 W/m · °C. Thermal distributions during the IDET procedure were comparable with those seen in previous cadaver studies. Logarithmic regression analysis predicted temperatures greater than 42°C and 60°C at distances of 14.10 and 2.31 mm, respectively, for the IDET catheter. These distances were 12.98 and 3.30 mm, respectively, for the decompression catheter. the silicone material has a thermal conductivity similar to that of intervertebral disc. Temperature distributions in the material during IDET treatment are similar to that seen in cadaver studies. The material provides an alternative to

  16. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis mimicking interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Smati, Belhassen; Ben Mrad, Sonia; Besbes, Mohammed; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid granulomatosis is a rare form of pulmonary angiitis. This case report presents a patient with lymphoid granulomatosis in whom the clinical presentation, radiological features and the partial response to corticosteroid therapy mimicked interstitial lung disease. Lymphoid granulomatosis was only diagnosed at post-mortem examination. The range of reported clinical presentations, diagnostic approaches and outcomes are described.

  17. The source-skin distance measuring bridge: A method to avoid radiation teleangiectasia in the skin after interstitial therapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Limbergen, E.; Briot, E.; Drijkoningen, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Inappropriate positioning of interstitial iridium 192 implants, used as booster dose in the breast conserving treatment of mammary cancer, may cause disturbing teleangiectasia of the breast skin, when high radiation doses are delivered on the dermal blood vessels. Based on the localization of the vascular plexuses in human breast skin, and on the dose distribution around different types of interstitial implants, a method is described to avoid overlap between the high dose area of the implant and the blood vessels in the skin. The latter are demonstrated to run within the first 5 mm under the epiderm. For source lengths varying from 5 to 8 cm, simple mathematical relations exist between the maximal security margin (MSM) and intersource distance (E) for single plane implants (MSM = 0.4 (E + 1)), double plane square implants (MSM = 0.4 E) and double plane triangular implants (MSM = 0.4 (E - 1)). We developed a device to measure precisely the distance between the radioactive wires and the overlying skin, along the whole source trajectory. Using this method, the occurrence of teleangiectasia in the breast skin after interstitial implants with Ir 192 may be significantly reduced.

  18. Engineering of optical and electrical properties of ZnO by non-equilibrium thermal processing: The role of zinc interstitials and zinc vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prucnal, S.; Wu, Jiada; Berencén, Y.; Liedke, M. O.; Wagner, A.; Liu, F.; Wang, M.; Rebohle, L.; Zhou, S.; Cai, Hua; Skorupa, W.

    2017-07-01

    A controlled manipulation of defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) and the understanding of their electronic structure can be a key issue towards the fabrication of p-type ZnO. Zn vacancy (VZn), Zn interstitials (IZn), and O vacancy (VO) are mainly native point defects, determining the optoelectronic properties of ZnO. The electronic structure of these defects still remains controversial. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the green emission in ZnO comes from VZn-related deep acceptor and VZn-VO clusters, which is accompanied by the radiative transition between the triplet and the ground singlet state with the excited singlet state located above the CB minimum. Moreover, the IZn is identified to be a shallow donor in ZnO, being mainly responsible for the n-type conductivity of non-intentionally doped ZnO.

  19. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, which are tissue-based classifications. Factors that may make you more susceptible to ... the right side of your heart Improve your sleep and sense of well-being You're most ...

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Critical Care & Sleep Medicine Interstitial Lung Disease Program Sarcoidosis Program Autoimmune Lung Center Rebecca C. Keith, MD, ... Syndromes Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis LAM Lupus Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Sarcoidosis Overview Scleroderma (SSC) Systemic Vasculitis Reasons to Visit ...

  1. [Interstitial cystitis. A challenge for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Young, Pablo; Finn, Bárbara C; González, Martín; Comercio, Laura P; Quezel, Mariano; Bruetman, Julio E

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is characterized by over 6 months of chronic pain, pressure and discomfort felt in the lower pelvis or bladder. It is often relieved with voiding, along with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of an urinary tract infection. The disorder can be divided clinically into two groups -ulcerative and non-ulcerative- based on cystoscopic findings and response to treatment. Management follows an approach of applying the least invasive therapy that affords sufficient relief of symptoms. We report a case of a patient with interstitial cystitis. The diagnosis was performed by symptoms and lesion in the cystoscopy and excellent response to amitriptyline.

  2. Irreversible electroporation: Just another form of thermal therapy?

    PubMed Central

    van Gemert, Martin J C; Wagstaff, Peter G K; de Bruin, Daniel M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; van der Wal, Allard C; Heger, Michal; van der Geld, Cees W M

    2015-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is (virtually) always called non-thermal despite many reports showing that significant Joule heating occurs. Our first aim is to validate with mathematical simulations that IRE as currently practiced has a non-negligible thermal response. Our second aim is to present a method that allows simple temperature estimation to aid IRE treatment planning. Methods We derived an approximate analytical solution of the bio-heat equation for multiple 2-needle IRE pulses in an electrically conducting medium, with and without a blood vessel, and incorporated published observations that an electric pulse increases the medium's electric conductance. Results IRE simulation in prostate-resembling tissue shows thermal lesions with 67–92°C temperatures, which match the positions of the coagulative necrotic lesions seen in an experimental study. Simulation of IRE around a blood vessel when blood flow removes the heated blood between pulses confirms clinical observations that the perivascular tissue is thermally injured without affecting vascular patency. Conclusions The demonstration that significant Joule heating surrounds current multiple-pulsed IRE practice may contribute to future in-depth discussions on this thermal issue. This is an important subject because it has long been under-exposed in literature. Its awareness pleads for preventing IRE from calling “non-thermal” in future publications, in order to provide IRE-users with the most accurate information possible. The prospect of thermal treatment planning as outlined in this paper likely aids to the important further successful dissemination of IRE in interventional medicine. Prostate 75:332–335, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25327875

  3. Thermal therapy in urologic systems: a comparison of arrhenius and thermal isoeffective dose models in predicting hyperthermic injury.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoming; Bhowmick, Sankha; Bischof, John C

    2009-07-01

    The Arrhenius and thermal isoeffective dose (TID) models are the two most commonly used models for predicting hyperthermic injury. The TID model is essentially derived from the Arrhenius model, but due to a variety of assumptions and simplifications now leads to different predictions, particularly at temperatures higher than 50 degrees C. In the present study, the two models are compared and their appropriateness tested for predicting hyperthermic injury in both the traditional hyperthermia (usually, 43-50 degrees C) and thermal surgery (or thermal therapy/thermal ablation, usually, >50 degrees C) regime. The kinetic parameters of thermal injury in both models were obtained from the literature (or literature data), tabulated, and analyzed for various prostate and kidney systems. It was found that the kinetic parameters vary widely, and were particularly dependent on the cell or tissue type, injury assay used, and the time when the injury assessment was performed. In order to compare the capability of the two models for thermal injury prediction, thermal thresholds for complete killing (i.e., 99% cell or tissue injury) were predicted using the models in two important urologic systems, viz., the benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue and the normal porcine kidney tissue. The predictions of the two models matched well at temperatures below 50 degrees C. At higher temperatures, however, the thermal thresholds predicted using the TID model with a constant R value of 0.5, the value commonly used in the traditional hyperthermia literature, are much lower than those predicted using the Arrhenius model. This suggests that traditional use of the TID model (i.e., R=0.5) is inappropriate for predicting hyperthermic injury in the thermal surgery regime (>50 degrees C). Finally, the time-temperature relationships for complete killing (i.e., 99% injury) were calculated and analyzed using the Arrhenius model for the various prostate and kidney systems.

  4. Interstitial Lung Disease in Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Sara R.; Castelino, Flavia V.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous disease of unknown etiology and with limited effective therapies. It is characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy and fibrosis and is clinically manifested by multi-organ involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of the disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of ILD hinges upon careful clinical evaluation as well as pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). A number of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic mediators are involved in the pathogenesis of SSc-ILD, with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) playing a key role in the development of fibrosis. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of disease initiation and progression, effective therapeutic options are still limited. A number of experimental therapies are currently in early phase clinical trials and show promise. PMID:25836640

  5. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  6. Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with Dermatomyositis Treated with Combination of Immunosuppressive Therapy, Direct Hemoperfusion with a Polymyxin B Immobilized Fiber Column and Intravenous Immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Takai, Motohisa; Katsurada, Naoko; Nakashita, Tamao; Misawa, Masafumi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kaneko, Norihiro; Motojima, Shinji; Aoshima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is associated with dermatomyositis (DM) and has a high mortality rate even with immunosuppressive agents. For such cases, there is no evidence on the combined effect of direct hemoperfusion with a Polymyxin B immobilized fiber column and intravenous immunoglobulin. We herein report a case of 61-year-old woman who presented with respiratory failure. She showed ILD associated with DM which did not improve with immunosuppressive agents, but was improved with the addition of both direct hemoperfusion with a Polymyxin B immobilized fiber column and intravenous immunoglobulin.

  7. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    PubMed

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy or hydroxycobalamin attenuates surges in brain interstitial lactate and glucose; and hyperbaric oxygen improves respiratory status in cyanide-intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Lawson-Smith, P; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide (CN) intoxication inhibits cellular oxidative metabolism and may result in brain damage. Hydroxycobalamin (OHCob) is one among other antidotes that may be used following intoxication with CN. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is recommended when supportive measures or antidotes fail. However, the effect of hydroxycobalamin or HBO2 on brain lactate and glucose concentrations during CN intoxication is unknown. We used intracerebral microdialysis to study the in vivo effect of hydroxycobalamin or HBO2 treatment on acute CN-induced deterioration in brain metabolism. Anesthetized rats were allocated to four groups receiving potassium CN (KCN) 5.4 mg/kg or vehicle intra-arterially: 1) vehicle-treated control rats; 2) KCN-poisoned rats; 3) KCN-poisoned rats receiving hydroxycobalamin (25 mg); and 4) KCN-poisoned rats treated with HBO2 (284 kPa for 90 minutes). KCN alone caused a prompt increase in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations peaking at 60 minutes. Both hydroxycobalamin and HBO2 abolished KCN-induced increases in brain lactate and glucose concentration. However, whereas HBO2 treatment increased cerebral PtO2 and reduced respiratory distress and cyanosis, OHCob did not have this beneficial effect. In conclusion, CN intoxication in anesthetized rats produces specific uncoupling of cerebral oxidative metabolism resulting in interstitial lactate and glucose surges that may be ameliorated by treatment with either hydroxycobalamin or HBO2.

  9. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  10. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  11. A case of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS) antibody-positive polymyositis (PM)/dermatomyositis (DM)-associated interstitial pneumonia (IP) successfully controlled with bosentan therapy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital and was diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia (IP) associated with amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM). The patient experienced three acute IP exacerbations in the 7 years that followed, which were each treated and resolved with steroid pulse therapy. The patient was closely examined for respiratory failure with right heart catheterization (RHC), which demonstrated that she had a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of 34 mmHg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) and was started on bosentan therapy, which led to improvements in mPAP as well as in subjective symptoms over time. Indeed, she had had no acute exacerbations with serum markers of IP remaining low over 6 years following initiation of bosentan therapy, suggesting that bosentan may have a role in controlling IP. In addition, she was confirmed to be anti-ARS antibody-positive after 5 years of bosentan therapy, when anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (anti-ARS) antibody testing became available.

  12. A fundamental study on hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K

    1994-12-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum with a Maxwellian distribution at a higher temperature than room temperature (300 K), was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at depth in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo code 'MCNP-V3' in order to investigate the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e. (i) depth dependence of the neutron energy spectrum, and (ii) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper areas in a living body compared with thermal neutron irradiation. When hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution are incident on a body, the reaction rates of 1/v materials such as 14N, 10B etc are about twice that observed for incident thermal neutrons at 300 K, at a depth of 5 cm. The limit of the treatable depth for tumours having 30 ppm 10B is expected to be about 1.5 cm greater by utilizing hyper-thermal neutrons at 3000 K compared with the incidence of thermal neutrons at 300 K.

  13. Model-based real-time control for laser induced thermal therapy with applications to prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David; Stafford, R. Jason; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a model-based predictive control system that is capable of capturing physical and biological variations of laser-tissue interaction as well as heterogeneity in real-time during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Using a three-dimensional predictive bioheat transfer model, which is built based on regular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomic scan and driven by imaging data produced by real-time magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI), the computational system provides a regirous real-time predictive control during surgical operation process. The unique feature of the this system is its ability for predictive control based on validated model with high precision in real-time, which is made possible by implementation of efficient parallel algorithms. The major components of the current computational systems involves real-time finite element solution of the bioheat transfer induced by laser-tissue interaction, solution module of real-time calibration problem, optimal laser source control, goal-oriented error estimation applied to the bioheat transfer equation, and state-of-the-art imaging process module to characterize the heterogeneous biological domain. The system was tested in vivo in a canine animal model in which an interstitial laser probe was placed in the prostate region and the desired treatment outcome in terms of ablation temperature and damage zone were achieved. Using the guidance of the predictive model driven by real-time MRTI data while applying the optimized laser heat source has the potential to provide unprecedented control over the treatment outcome for laser ablation.

  14. [Chronic interstitial pneumonitis].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rui; Reis, Guilhermina; Ferreira, Cristina; Oliveira, Ma José; Oliveira, Dulce; Fernandes, Paula; Ferreira, Paula; Frutuoso, Simão; Carreira, Luísa; Alves, Valter; Paiva, António; Guedes, Margarida

    2004-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease includes a group of chronic diseases characterized by alterations in alveolar walls and loss of functional alveolar-capillary units. These are rare diseases in children, mostly with an unknown cause and associated with a high morbidity and mortality due to insufficient therapeutic effectiveness. The authors report a case of a previously healthy 3 years old child who presented with wheezing and severe respiratory insufficiency following a respiratory infection. The investigation performed led to the diagnosis of chronic interstitial pneumonitis. Several treatments have been tried (corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, N-acetylcysteine) without any obvious improvement.

  15. Laser thermal therapy monitoring using complex differential variance in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Nam, Ahhyun S; Villiger, Martin; Vakoc, Benjamin J; Bouma, Brett E

    2017-01-01

    Conventional thermal therapy monitoring techniques based on temperature are often invasive, limited by point sampling, and are indirect measures of tissue injury, while techniques such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound thermometry are limited by their spatial resolution.  The visualization of the thermal coagulation zone at high spatial resolution is particularly critical to the precise delivery of thermal energy to epithelial lesions. In this work, an integrated thulium laser thermal therapy monitoring system was developed based on complex differential variance (CDV), which enables the 2D visualization of the dynamics of the thermal coagulation process at high spatial and temporal resolution with an optical frequency domain imaging system. With proper calibration to correct for noise, the CDV-based technique was shown to accurately delineate the thermal coagulation zone, which is marked by the transition from high CDV upon heating to a significantly reduced CDV once the tissue is coagulated, in 3 different tissue types ex vivo: skin, retina, and esophagus. The ability to delineate thermal lesions in multiple tissue types at high resolution opens up the possibility of performing microscopic image-guided procedures in a vast array of epithelial applications ranging from dermatology, ophthalmology, to gastroenterology and beyond. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Biothermal modeling of transurethral ultrasound applicators for MR-guided prostate thermal therapy (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Anthony B.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Tyreus, Per D.; Gill, Harcharan; Bouley, Donna; Butts, R. K.; Rieke, Viola; Daniel, Bruce; Sommer, Graham

    2005-04-01

    Thermal ablation is a minimally-invasive treatment option for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and localized prostate cancer. Accurate spatial control of thermal dose delivery is paramount to improving thermal therapy efficacy and avoiding post-treatment complications. We have recently developed three types of transurethral ultrasound applicators, each with different degrees of heating selectivity. These applicators have been evaluated in vivo in coordination with magnetic resonance temperature imaging, and demonstrated to accurately ablate specific regions of the canine prostate. A finite difference biothermal model of the three types of transurethral ultrasound applicators (sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transducer sections) was developed and used to further study the performance and heating capabilities of each these devices. The biothermal model is based on the Pennes bioheat equation. The acoustic power deposition pattern corresponding to each applicator type was calculated using the rectangular radiator approximation to the Raleigh Sommerfield diffraction integral. In this study, temperature and thermal dose profiles were calculated for different treatment schemes and target volumes, including single shot and angular scanning procedures. This study also demonstrated the ability of the applicators to conform the cytotoxic thermal dose distribution to a predefined target area. Simulated thermal profiles corresponded well with MR temperature images from previous in vivo experiments. Biothermal simulations presented in this study reinforce the potential of improved efficacy of transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy of prostatic disease.

  17. Laser thermal therapy monitoring using complex differential variance in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Villiger, Martin; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional thermal therapy monitoring techniques based on temperature are often invasive, limited by point sampling, and are indirect measures of tissue injury, while techniques such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound thermometry are limited by their spatial resolution. The visualization of the thermal coagulation zone at high spatial resolution is particularly critical to the precise delivery of thermal energy to epithelial lesions. In this work, an integrated thulium laser thermal therapy monitoring system was developed based on complex differential variance (CDV), which enables the 2D visualization of the dynamics of the thermal coagulation process at high spatial and temporal resolution with an optical frequency domain imaging system. With proper calibration to correct for noise, the CDV-based technique was shown to accurately delineate the thermal coagulation zone, which is marked by the transition from high CDV upon heating to a significantly reduced CDV once the tissue is coagulated, in 3 different tissue types ex vivo: skin, retina, and esophagus. The ability to delineate thermal lesions in multiple tissue types at high resolution opens up the possibility of performing microscopic image-guided procedures in a vast array of epithelial applications ranging from dermatology, ophthalmology, to gastroenterology and beyond. PMID:27623742

  18. IDTT therapy in cadaveric lumbar spine: temperature and thermal dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Kleinstueck, Frank; Lotz, Jeff; Bradford, David

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform extensive temperature mapping throughout human cadaveric disc (n=12) specimens during Intradiscal Thermal Therapy IDTT using the SpineCathTM applicator. Temperature distributions and accumulated thermal dose or thermal damage calculated from the temperature-time history are used to define probable regions of thermal necrosis (destruction of nerves) or thermal coagulation (induced structural changes). The IDTT procedure using SpineCath (5 cm resistive heating segment) and the current standard heating protocol (~17 min) produces intra-discal temperatures which are too low to generate appreciable regions of thermal coagulation and resultant changes in biomechanical properties. This finding was supported by temperature measurements which were mostly below the critical temperature of 60-65°C, except for regions within 1-2 mm of the SpineCath applicator. Furthermore, the analysis of the thermal dose profiles indicate that sufficient thermal doses (240-640 EM43°C) capable of generating complete thermal damage to the nociceptive nerves fibers infiltrating the disc are limited to within ~6 mm of the nucleus and IDTT probe heating segment.

  19. Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) U.S. Medical Groups Sound the Alarm on Climate Change Additional Content Medical News Overview of Idiopathic Interstitial ... HealthDay U.S. Medical Groups Sound the Alarm on Climate Change WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change ...

  20. Repeated thermal therapy upregulates arterial endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Biro, S; Kamogawa, Y; Yoshifuku, S; Eto, H; Orihara, K; Kihara, T; Tei, C

    2001-05-01

    It has been previously reported that sauna therapy, a thermal therapy, improves the hemodynamics and clinical symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and also improves endothelial function, which is impaired in such patients. The present study investigated whether the improvements observed with sauna therapy are through modulation of arterial endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. Eight male Syrian golden hamsters underwent sauna therapy, using an experimental far infrared-ray dry sauna system, at 39 degrees C for 15 min followed by 30 degrees C for 20 min daily for 4 weeks. Control group hamsters were placed in the sauna system switched off at room temperature of 24 degrees C for 35 min. Immunohistochemistry found greater amounts of the immunoreactive products of eNOS in the endothelial cells of the aorta and carotid, femoral and coronary arteries in the sauna group than in the control group. Western blot analysis also revealed that 4-week sauna therapy significantly increased eNOS expression in aortas by 50% in 4 series of independent experiments with an identical protocol (p<0.01). In reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay, the eNOS mRNA in aortas was greater in the sauna group than in controls, with a peak at 1-week of sauna therapy (approximately 40-fold increase). In conclusion, repeated thermal therapy upregulates eNOS expression in arterial endothelium.

  1. Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Pierre; Rabant, Marion; Labaye, Jacques; Antignac, Corinne; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Zaidan, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of hereditary chronic interstitial nephritis, described for the first time over 40 years ago. A 36-year-old woman, of Turkish origin, presented with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. She had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections but no familial history of nephropathy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory tests showed serum creatinine at 2.3 mg/dL with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 26 mL/min/1.73m2, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase at 3 and 1.5 times the upper normal limit. Urinalysis showed 0.8 g/day of nonselective proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and aseptic leukocyturia. Immunological tests and tests for human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B and C viruses were negative. Complement level and serum proteins electrophoresis were normal. Analysis of the renal biopsy showed severe interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Numerous tubular cells had nuclear enlargement with irregular outlines, hyperchromatic aspect, and prominent nucleoli. These findings were highly suggestive of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, which was further confirmed by exome sequencing of FAN1 gene showing an identified homozygous frameshift mutation due to a one-base-pair deletion in exon 12 (c.2616delA). The present case illustrates a rare but severe cause of hereditary interstitial nephritis, sometimes accompanied by subtle extrarenal manifestations. Identification of mutations in FAN1 gene underscores recent insights linking inadequate DNA repair and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:27196444

  2. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: progress in classification, diagnosis, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed Central

    King, Talmadge E.

    2004-01-01

    The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are a heterogeneous group of poorly understood diseases with often devastating consequences for those afflicted. Subclassification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonia based on clinical-radiological-pathological criteria has highlighted important pathogenic, therapeutic and prognostic implications. The most critical distinction is the presence of usual interstitial pneumonia, the histopathological pattern seen in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has a worse response to therapy and prognosis. New insight into the pathophysiology of usual interstitial pneumonia suggests a distinctly fibroproliferative process, and antifibrotic therapies show promise. While the clinical and radiographic diagnosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias can be made confidently in some cases, many patients require surgical lung biopsy to determine their underlying histopathology. A structured, clinical-radiological-pathological approach to the diagnosis of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, with particular attention to the identification of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, insures proper therapy, enhances prognostication, and allows for further investigation of therapies aimed at distinct pathophysiology. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:17060957

  3. Insights into a microwave susceptible agent for minimally invasive microwave tumor thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitang; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Li, Linlin; Tan, Longfei; Wang, Jingzhuo; Ren, Xiangling; Ren, Jun; Wang, Jianxin; Meng, Xianwei

    2015-03-01

    This work develops a kind of sodium alginate (SA) microcapsules as microwave susceptible agents for in vivo tumor microwave thermal therapy for the first time. Due to the excellent microwave susceptible properties and low bio-toxicity, excellent therapy efficiency can be achieved with the tumor inhibiting ratio of 97.85% after one-time microwave thermal therapy with ultralow power (1.8 W, 450 MHz). Meanwhile, the mechanism of high microwave heating efficiency was confirmed via computer-simulated model in theory, demonstrating that the spatial confinement efficiency of microcapsule walls endows the inside ions with high microwave susceptible properties. This strategy offers tremendous potential applications in clinical tumor treatment with the benefits of safety, reliability, effectiveness and minimally invasiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. What is interstitial fluid? Biochemical and physiological analysis of fluid obtained from tissue cages.

    PubMed

    Eickenberg, H U

    1978-01-01

    Multiperforated polypropylene balls implanted in soft-tissue and renal parenchyma deliver fluid which represents interstitial fluid, which was characterized biochemically and physiologically. In a time-concentration study, the serum antibiotic level was compared to levels in interstitial fluid of the kidney (RIF), interstitial fluid of soft-tissues of the abdominal wall (STIF) and urine, measured simultaneously after intravenous injection of six different antibiotics. A direct time-concentration relationship between the concentration of antibiotics in the serum and in the renal interstitial fluid was found. This study helps delineate the basic pharmacokinetics in renal interstitial tissue and suggests guidelines for optimal therapy in renal parenchymal infections.

  5. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis due to tuberculosis-a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Sooraj, Yesudas S; Mahaldar, Amol R; Ramakrishnan, Muthiah; Rajappannair, Ajeshkumar; Nalumakkal, Seethalekshmy V; Erode, Elango

    2009-09-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is an uncommon form of acute interstitial nephritis. We report a young male who presented to us with a rapidly progressing renal failure and massive proteinuria. A renal biopsy revealed GIN, and we were able to demonstrate the presence of tuberculous DNA in the biopsy specimen. The patient was started on anti-tuberculous therapy and steroids besides 11 sessions of hemodialysis. He recovered and is currently doing well. This case highlights an uncommon manifestation of renal tuberculosis, namely massive proteinuria, acute renal failure, and granulomatous interstitial lesions.

  6. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  7. A pilot study of the effects of mild systemic heating on human head and neck tumour xenografts: Analysis of tumour perfusion, interstitial fluid pressure, hypoxia and efficacy of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Timothy B; Eranki, Annu; Ullas, Soumya; Singh, Anurag K; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Sen, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment is frequently hypoxic, poorly perfused, and exhibits abnormally high interstitial fluid pressure. These factors can significantly reduce efficacy of chemo and radiation therapies. The present study aims to determine whether mild systemic heating alters these parameters and improves response to radiation in human head and neck tumour xenografts in SCID mice. SCID mice were injected with FaDu cells (a human head and neck carcinoma cell line), or implanted with a resected patient head and neck squamous cell carcinoma grown as a xenograft, followed by mild systemic heating. Body temperature during heating was maintained at 39.5 ± 0.5 °C for 4 h. Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), hypoxia and relative tumour perfusion in the tumours were measured at 2 and 24 h post-heating. Tumour vessel perfusion was measured 24 h post-heating, coinciding with the first dose of fractionated radiotherapy. Heating tumour-bearing mice resulted in significant decrease in intratumoural IFP, increased the number of perfused tumour blood vessels as well as relative tumour perfusion in both tumour models. Intratumoural hypoxia was also reduced in tumours of mice that received heat treatment. Mice bearing FaDu tumours heated 24 h prior to five daily radiation treatments exhibited significantly enhanced tumour response compared to tumours in control mice. Mild systemic heating can significantly alter the tumour microenvironment of human head and neck tumour xenograft models, decreasing IFP and hypoxia while increasing microvascular perfusion. Collectively, these effects could be responsible for the improved response to radiotherapy.

  8. A pilot study of the effects of mild systemic heating on human head and neck tumour xenografts: Analysis of tumour perfusion, interstitial fluid pressure, hypoxia and efficacy of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Timothy B.; Eranki, Annu; Ullas, Soumya; Singh, Anurag K.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Sen, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The tumour microenvironment is frequently hypoxic, poorly perfused, and exhibits abnormally high interstitial fluid pressure. These factors can significantly reduce efficacy of chemo and radiation therapies. The present study aims to determine whether mild systemic heating alters these parameters and improves response to radiation in human head and neck tumour xenografts in SCID mice. Materials and methods SCID mice were injected with FaDu cells (a human head and neck carcinoma cell line), or implanted with a resected patient head and neck squamous cell carcinoma grown as a xenograft, followed by mild systemic heating. Body temperature during heating was maintained at 39.5 ± 0.5 °C for 4 h. Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), hypoxia and relative tumour perfusion in the tumours were measured at 2 and 24 h post-heating. Tumour vessel perfusion was measured 24 h post-heating, coinciding with the first dose of fractionated radiotherapy. Results Heating tumour-bearing mice resulted in significant decrease in intratumoural IFP, increased the number of perfused tumour blood vessels as well as relative tumour perfusion in both tumour models. Intratumoural hypoxia was also reduced in tumours of mice that received heat treatment. Mice bearing FaDu tumours heated 24 h prior to five daily radiation treatments exhibited significantly enhanced tumour response compared to tumours in control mice. Conclusions Mild systemic heating can significantly alter the tumour microenvironment of human head and neck tumour xenograft models, decreasing IFP and hypoxia while increasing microvascular perfusion. Collectively, these effects could be responsible for the improved response to radiotherapy. PMID:25986432

  9. Microdialysis based monitoring of subcutaneous interstitial and venous blood glucose in Type 1 diabetic subjects by mid-infrared spectrometry for intensive insulin therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. Michael; Kondepati, Venkata Radhakrishna; Damm, Uwe; Licht, Michael; Feichtner, Franz; Mader, Julia Katharina; Ellmerer, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Implementing strict glycemic control can reduce the risk of serious complications in both diabetic and critically ill patients. For this purpose, many different blood glucose monitoring techniques and insulin infusion strategies have been tested towards the realization of an artificial pancreas under closed loop control. In contrast to competing subcutaneously implanted electrochemical biosensors, microdialysis based systems for sampling body fluids from either the interstitial adipose tissue compartment or from venous blood have been developed, which allow an ex-vivo glucose monitoring by mid-infrared spectrometry. For the first option, a commercially available, subcutaneously inserted CMA 60 microdialysis catheter has been used routinely. The vascular body interface includes a double-lumen venous catheter in combination with whole blood dilution using a heparin solution. The diluted whole blood is transported to a flow-through dialysis cell, where the harvesting of analytes across the microdialysis membrane takes place at high recovery rates. The dialysate is continuously transported to the IR-sensor. Ex-vivo measurements were conducted on type-1 diabetic subjects lasting up to 28 hours. Experiments have shown excellent agreement between the sensor readout and the reference blood glucose concentration values. The simultaneous assessment of dialysis recovery rates renders a reliable quantification of whole blood concentrations of glucose and metabolites (urea, lactate etc) after taking blood dilution into account. Our results from transmission spectrometry indicate, that the developed bed-side device enables reliable long-term glucose monitoring with reagent- and calibration-free operation.

  10. Two-dimensional acoustic attenuation mapping of high-temperature interstitial ultrasound lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyréus, Per Daniel; Diederich, Chris

    2004-02-01

    Acoustic attenuation change in biological tissues with temperature and time is a critical parameter for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy treatment planning and applicator design. Earlier studies have not fully explored the effects on attenuation of temperatures (75-95 °C) and times (5-15 min) common in interstitial ultrasound treatments. A scanning transmission ultrasound attenuation measurement system was devised and used to measure attenuation changes due to these types of thermal exposures. To validate the approach and to loosely define expected values, attenuation changes in degassed ex vivo bovine liver, bovine brain and chicken muscle were measured after 10 min exposures in a water bath to temperatures up to 90 °C. Maximum attenuation increases of approximately seven, four and two times the values at 37 °C were measured for the three tissue models at 5 MHz. By using the system to scan over lesions produced using interstitial ultrasound applicators, 2D contour maps of attenuation were produced. Attenuation profiles measured through the centrelines of lesions showed that attenuation was highest close to the applicator and decreased with radial distance, as expected with decreasing thermal exposure. Attenuation values measured in profiles through lesions were also shown to decrease with reduced power to the applicator. Attenuation increases in 2D maps of interstitial ultrasound lesions in ex vivo chicken breast, bovine liver and bovine brain were correlated with visible tissue coagulation. While regions of visible coagulation corresponded well to contours of attenuation increase in liver and chicken, no lesion was visible under the same experimental conditions in brain, due primarily to the heterogeneity of the tissue. Acoustic and biothermal simulations were employed to show that attenuation models taking into account these attenuation changes at higher temperatures and longer times were better able to fit experimental data than previous models. These

  11. CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy of liver malignancies alone or in combination with thermal ablation: phase I-II results of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Ricke, Jens; Wust, Peter; Stohlmann, Anna; Beck, Alexander; Cho, Chie Hee; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Spors, Birgit; Werk, Michael; Rosner, Christian; Hänninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2004-04-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy alone or in combination with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in patients with liver malignancies. Thirty-seven patients presented with 36 liver metastases and two primary liver carcinomas. Twenty-one patients were treated with CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone using a 192Ir source. Sixteen patients received brachytherapy directly after MRI-guided LITT. The indications for brachytherapy alone were a tumor size >5 cm, adjacent central bile duct or adjacent major vessels causing unfavorable cooling effects for thermal ablation, and technical failures of LITT. The dosimetry for brachytherapy was performed using three-dimensional CT data acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. On average, a minimal dose of 17 Gy inside the tumor margin was applied (range, 10-20 Gy). The mean tumor size was 4.6 cm (range, 2.5-11 cm). The mean liver volume receiving > or =5 Gy was 16% (range, 2-40%) of the total liver. Severe complications were recorded in 2 patients (5%). One patient developed acute liver failure possibly related to accidental continuation of oral capecitabine treatment. Another patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice owing to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. A commonly encountered moderate increase of liver enzymes was greatest in patients with combined treatment. The local control rate after 6 months was 73% and 87% for combined treatment and brachytherapy alone, respectively. CT-guided brachytherapy using three-dimensional CT data for dosimetry is safe and effective alone or in combination with LITT. Brachytherapy as a stand-alone treatment displayed genuine advantages over thermal tumor ablation.

  12. Optimized noninvasive monitoring of thermal changes on digital B-mode renal sonography during revascularization therapy.

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Mohammad D; Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Noninvasive real-time thermal change monitoring of human internal organs can play a critical role in diagnosis and treatment of many disorders, including reperfusion of renal arteries during anticoagulation therapy. This article focuses on tissue temperature detection using ultrasound velocity changes in different structures and their related speckle shift from their primary locations on high-quality B-mode digital sonography. We evaluated different speckle-tracking techniques and optimized them using appropriate motion estimation methods to determine the best algorithm and parameters. Performing thermal detection methods on simulated phantoms showed a good correlation between speckle shifts and the ground truth temperature. For the simulated images, average thermal error was 0.5 degrees C with an SD of 0.5 degrees C, where lower errors can be obtained in noiseless (motionless) data. The proposed technique was evaluated on real in vivo cases during surgical occlusion and reopening of the renal segmental artery and showed the potential of the algorithm for observation of internal organ changes using only digital ultrasound systems for diagnosis and therapy. The adaptive Rood pattern search proved to be the best block-matching technique, whereas the multiresolution Horn-Schunck technique was the best gradient optical flow method. The extracted thermal change during in vivo revascularization therapy is promising. In addition, we present an evaluation of several block-matching and optical flow motion estimation techniques.

  13. Heat transfer due to electroconvulsive therapy: Influence of anisotropic thermal and electrical skull conductivity.

    PubMed

    Menezes de Oliveira, Marilia; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and head models to investigate temperature profiles arising when anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivities are considered in the skull layer. The aim was to numerically investigate the threshold for which this therapy operates safely to the brain, from the thermal point of view. A six-layer spherical head model consisting of scalp, fat, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid, grey matter and white matter was developed. Later on, a realistic human head model was also implemented. These models were built up using the packages from COMSOL Inc. and Simpleware Ltd. In these models, three of the most common electrode montages used in ECT were applied. Anisotropic conductivities were derived using volume constraint and included in both spherical and realistic head models. The bio-heat transferring problem governed by Laplace equation was solved numerically. The results show that both the tensor eigenvalues of electrical conductivity and the electrode montage affect the maximum temperature, but thermal anisotropy does not have a significant influence. Temperature increases occur mainly in the scalp and fat, and no harm is caused to the brain by the current applied during ECT. The work assures the thermal safety of ECT and also provides a numerical method to investigate other non-invasive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemoradiotherapy and concurrent radiofrequency thermal therapy to treat primary rectal cancer and prediction of treatment responses

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hisanori; Motegi, Masahiko; Takakusagi, Yosuke; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Ogoshi, Kyoji

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate a previously reported predictive formula of output-limiting symptoms induced by radiofrequency (RF) to determine the efficacy of this neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NACR) and concurrent RF thermal therapy. The present study included 81 consecutive patients with confirmed diagnoses of rectal adenocarcinoma that was localized in the mid-low rectum (up to 12 cm from the anal verge) who received NACR [intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), 50 Gy/25 fractions, capecitabine 1,700 mg/m2/day for 5 days/week)] with concurrent thermal therapy (Thermotron-RF8, once a week for 5 weeks with 50 min irradiation). Patients with progressive disease (PD) did not receive RF outputs higher than the predicted value. Some patients who were predicted to receive more output in fact received more than the predicted output. In patients who were predicted to receive moderately higher outputs, 37.5% of the patients experienced pathological complete responses, which was the highest rate, while in those who did not receive more than the predicted output, 66.7% of the patients experienced PD, which was the highest rate in the present study. We speculate that RF thermal therapy may offset the chemoradiation effects in some patients. Adding thermal therapy as a multimodality therapy to NACR potentially affects patients with lower predicted outputs and actual observed outputs slightly higher than the predictive value. Our predictive equation for initial energy output, in which output-limiting symptoms can be used to predict treatment efficacy, consequently, can be used to decide whether to continue this treatment modality. PMID:27959450

  15. Functional fitting of interstitial brachytherapy dosimetry data recommended by the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 43. American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Furhang, E E; Anderson, L L

    1999-02-01

    This work was undertaken to expedite implementation of the AAPM Task Group 43 recommendations, which call for significant modifications in the way dose is calculated for interstitial sources of 192Ir, 125I, and 103Pd as well as significant changes in the dose rate constant for 125I sources. The TG43 recommendations include a new formalism for dose calculation at points defined by the radial distance, r, from the source center and the angle, theta, that such a radius makes with the source axis. For each source type, values are tabulated for the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, and the anisotropy factor. The TG43 report includes fitting functions for the radial dose function in the form of polynomials, which are poorly behaved outside the range of fitted data. No functions are offered for the anisotropy function data or the anisotropy factor data, both of which could profit from some smoothing by such functions. We have found a double exponential fit to the radial dose function that not only approximates the data adequately but also appropriately approaches zero for very large distances. The anisotropy function is conveniently fit with a form of type 1 - f(r,theta)cos(theta)e(cr), which is exactly 1 at theta=90 degrees and approaches 1 for large r (for c<0), where f(r,theta) is a selected polynomial in the two variables. The form chosen for the anisotropy factor was 1 - (a+br)e(cr), which appropriately approaches 1 for large r (and c<0). Functional fits of these types are expected to facilitate implementation of TG43 recommendations, in that they may be either incorporated into dose algorithms or used to generate lookup tables of either the x, y or the r, theta format.

  16. Development of a tissue phantom for experimental studies on laser interstitial thermotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Chapon, Pascal F.; Milne, Peter J.; Mendoza, Sergio G.; Denham, David B.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Robinson, David S.

    2000-05-01

    A tissue phantom for experimental studies in Laser Interstitial ThermoTherapy (LITT) for the treatment of small breast tumors was developed and evaluated. The tissue phantom consists of a polyacrylamide/acrylate hydrogel matrix containing various concentrations of an absorber (Nigrosin) and a scatterer (Intralipid 10% solution), allowing the optical properties to be varied in accordance to experimental need. Temperature measurements in the phantom were performed with a thermocouple array placed symmetrically around the fiber axis during laser irradiation for different output powers, treatment duration, and different concentrations of absorber. A 980 nm diode laser system was used in conjunction with an REM LightStic 360 diffusing tip fiber. The polyacrylamide/acrylate matrix tissue phantom remained stable during laser irradiation and produced reproducible results. The behavior of the temperature curves produced by the phantom during laser irradiation was similar to the behavior of the temperature curves in ex-vivo tissue. Therefore, this tissue phantom can be used as a model for the thermal response of tissue during laser interstitial thermotherapy. The phantom will be used as an experimental model to determine a set of optimum laser treatment parameters for laser interstitial thermotherapy of breast cancer.

  17. Magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring photothermal effects of interstitial laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Jessica; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Le, Kelvin; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Selective photothermal interaction using dye-assisted non-invasive laser irradiation has limitations when treating deeper tumors or when the overlying skin is heavily pigmented. We developed an interstitial laser irradiation method to induce the desired photothermal effects. An 805-nm near-infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors by placing the active tip of the fiber inside the target tumors. Three different power settings (1.0 to 1.5 watts) were applied to treat animal tumors with an irradiation duration of 10 minutes. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager using proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. Three-dimensional temperature profiles were reconstructed and assessed using PRF. This is the first time a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. This study provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside tumor using interstitial laser irradiation. It also shows that PRF can be used effectively in monitoring photothermal interaction. Our long-term goal is to develop a PRF-guided laser therapy for cancer treatment.

  18. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in thermal therapy monitoring and screening: Localization and imaging (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A method termed magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion (MSB) was developed to interrogate in vivo the microscopic environment surrounding magnetic nanoparticles. We can monitor several effects that are important in thermal therapy and screening including temperature measurement and the bound state distribution. Here we report on simulations of nanoparticle localization. Measuring the spatial distribution of nanoparticles would allow us to identify ovarian cancer much earlier when it is still curable or monitor thermal therapies more accurately. We demonstrate that with well-designed equipment superior signal to noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved using only two harmonics rather than using all the harmonics containing signal. Alternatively, smaller magnetic field amplitudes can be used to achieve the same SNR. The SNR is improved using fewer harmonics because the noise is limited.

  19. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  20. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants and children comprises a large spectrum of rare respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. These disorders are characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes that affect alveolar walls. Typical features of ILD include dyspnea, diffuse infiltrates on chest radiographs, and abnormal pulmonary function tests with restrictive ventilatory defect and/or impaired gas exchange. Many pathological situations can impair gas exchange and, therefore, may contribute to progressive lung damage and ILD. Consequently, diagnosis approach needs to be structured with a clinical evaluation requiring a careful history paying attention to exposures and systemic diseases. Several classifications for ILD have been proposed but none is entirely satisfactory especially in children. The present article reviews current concepts of pathophysiological mechanisms, etiology and diagnostic approaches, as well as therapeutic strategies. The following diagnostic grouping is used to discuss the various causes of pediatric ILD: 1) exposure-related ILD; 2) systemic disease-associated ILD; 3) alveolar structure disorder-associated ILD; and 4) ILD specific to infancy. Therapeutic options include mainly anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and/or anti-fibrotic drugs. The outcome is highly variable with a mortality rate around 15%. An overall favorable response to corticosteroid therapy is observed in around 50% of cases, often associated with sequelae such as limited exercise tolerance or the need for long-term oxygen therapy. PMID:20727133

  1. Comparison of laser- and RF-based interstitial coagulation systems for the treatment of liver tumors (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jager, Arjan A.; van Trier, Bart N.; Veenendaal, Liesbeth M.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2005-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. Surgical treatments, including hepatic resection and liver transplantation are considered as the most effective treatment of HCC. However, less than 20% of HCC patients can be treated surgically because of: multi-focal diseases, proximity of tumor to key vascular or biliary structures and inadequate functional hepatic reserve related coexistent cirrhosis. In this unfortunate groups of patients various palliative treatments modalities are being performed to extend the time of survival and quality of life. These techniques include trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) and Interstitial Thermal Therapy: laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) and radio-frequency ablation (RFA).

  2. Use of Combination Thermal Therapy and Radiation in Breast Conserving Treatment of Extensive Intraductal Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-11

    technique for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer using thermal therapy ( hyperthermia ). The contract will also support a clinical study of the safety and...no major blood vessels that carry away heat from the breast tissue, reducing the ability to deliver therapeutic heat. d. The hyperthermia target volume...the breast ultrasound applicator. Some of the results from the theoretical simulations will be presented at the North American Hyperthermia Society

  3. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT High intensity focused ultrasound ...focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation and HIFU-induced gene therapy represents a promising approach in improving the overall efficacy and quality...R3230Ac cells with concentration from 0.5x106 /ml to 5x106/ml. The speed of sound and attenuation were measured in a broadband transmission ultrasound

  4. Two-year results after convective radiofrequency water vapor thermal therapy of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Christopher M; Cedano, Edwin Rijo; Pacik, Dalibor; Vit, Vítězslav; Varga, Gabriel; Wagrell, Lennart; Larson, Thayne R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of convective radiofrequency (RF) water vapor thermal therapy in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); a pilot study design with 2-year follow-up evaluations. Patients and methods Men aged ≥45 years with an International Prostate Symptom Score ≥13, a maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) ≤15 mL/s, and prostate volume 20–120 cc were enrolled in a prospective, open-label pilot study using convective RF water vapor energy with the Rezūm System. Patients were followed up for 2 years after transurethral thermal treatment at 3 international centers in the Dominican Republic, Czech Republic, and Sweden. The transurethral thermal therapy utilizes radiofrequency to generate wet thermal energy in the form of water vapor injected through a rigid endoscope into the lateral lobes and median lobe as needed. Urinary symptom relief, urinary flow, quality of life (QOL) impact, sexual function, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed at 1 week, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results LUTS, flow rate, and QOL showed significant improvements from baseline; prostate volumes were appreciably reduced. Sexual function was maintained and no de novo erectile dysfunction occurred. The responses evident as early as 1 month after treatment remained consistent and durable over the 24 months of study. Early AEs were typically transient and mild to moderate; most were related to endoscopic instrumentation. No procedure related to late AEs were seen. Conclusion The Rezūm System convective RF thermal therapy is a minimally invasive treatment for BPH/LUTS which can be performed in the office or as an outpatient procedure with minimal associated perioperative AEs. It has no discernable effect on sexual function and provides significant improvement of LUTS that remain durable at 2 years. PMID:27921028

  5. Reduced boron diffusion under interstitial injection in fluorine implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kham, M. N.; Matko, I.; Chenevier, B.; Ashburn, P.

    2007-12-01

    Point defect injection studies are performed to investigate how fluorine implantation influences the diffusion of boron marker layers in both the vacancy-rich and interstitial-rich regions of the fluorine damage profile. A 185 keV, 2.3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} F{sup +} implant is made into silicon samples containing multiple boron marker layers and rapid thermal annealing is performed at 1000 deg. C for times of 15-120 s. The boron and fluorine profiles are characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and the defect structures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fluorine implanted samples surprisingly show less boron diffusion under interstitial injection than those under inert anneal. This effect is particularly noticeable for boron marker layers located in the interstitial-rich region of the fluorine damage profile and for short anneal times (15 s). TEM images show a band of dislocation loops around the range of the fluorine implant and the density of dislocation loops is lower under interstitial injection than under inert anneal. It is proposed that interstitial injection accelerates the evolution of interstitial defects into dislocation loops, thereby giving transient enhanced boron diffusion over a shorter period of time. The effect of the fluorine implant on boron diffusion is found to be the opposite for boron marker layers in the interstitial-rich and vacancy-rich regions of the fluorine damage profile. For marker layers in the interstitial-rich region of the fluorine damage profile, the boron diffusion coefficient decreases with anneal time, as is typically seen for transient enhanced diffusion. The boron diffusion under interstitial injection is enhanced by the fluorine implant at short anneal times but suppressed at longer anneal times. It is proposed that this behavior is due to trapping of interstitials at the dislocation loops introduced by the fluorine implant. For boron marker layers in the vacancy-rich region of the fluorine damage profile

  6. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  7. Systemic anti-tumour effects of local thermally sensitive liposome therapy.

    PubMed

    Viglianti, Benjamin L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Boruta, R J; Park, Ji-Young; Landon, Chelsea; Fontanella, Andrew N; Guo, Jing; Manzoor, Ashley; Hofmann, Christina L; Palmer, Gregory M

    2014-09-01

    There were two primary objectives of this study: (1) to determine whether treatment of a tumour site with systemically administered thermally sensitive liposomes and local hyperthermia (HT) for triggered release would have dual anti-tumour effect on the primary heated tumour as well as an unheated secondary tumour in a distant site, and (2) to determine the ability of non-invasive optical spectroscopy to predict treatment outcome. The optical end points studied included drug levels, metabolic markers flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H), and physiological markers (total haemoglobin (Hb) and Hb oxygen saturation) before and after treatment. Mice were inoculated with SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma in both hind legs. One tumour was selected for local hyperthermia and subsequent systemic treatment. There were four treatment groups: control, DOXIL (non-thermally sensitive liposomes containing doxorubicin), and two different thermally sensitive liposome formulations containing doxorubicin. Optical spectroscopy was performed prior to therapy, immediately after treatment, and 6, 12, and 24 h post therapy. Tumour growth delay was seen with DOXIL and the thermally sensitive liposomes in the tumours that were heated, similar to previous studies. Tumour growth delay was also seen in the opposing tumour in the thermally sensitive liposome-treated groups. Optical spectroscopy demonstrated correlation between growth delay, doxorubicin (DOX) levels, and changes of NAD(P)H from baseline levels. Hb and Hb saturation were not correlated with growth delay. The study demonstrated that thermally sensitive liposomes affect the primary heated tumour as well as systemic efficacy. Non-invasive optical spectroscopy methods were shown to be useful in predicting efficacy at early time points post-treatment.

  8. RTOG quality assurance guidelines for interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Emami, B; Stauffer, P; Dewhirst, M W; Prionas, S; Ryan, T; Corry, P; Herman, T; Kapp, D S; Myerson, R J; Samulski, T

    1991-05-01

    This document specifies the current recommendations for quality assurance for hyperthermia administration with interstitial techniques as specified by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The document begins by providing a brief description of the physical principles behind the use of the three most commonly used methods of interstitial hyperthermia: radiofrequency (RF-LCF), microwave antennas, and ferromagnetic seeds. Emphasis is placed on features that effect quality assurance. Specific recommendations are provided for: a) Pretreatment planning and equipment performance checks, b) Implant considerations and documentation, c) Thermometry, and d) Safety procedures. Specific details regarding quality assurance issues that are common to all local and regional hyperthermia methods are outlined in previous documents sponsored by the RTOG. It is anticipated that technological advances may lead to future modifications of this document.

  9. Interstitial duplication 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; DuPont, B.R.; Moore, C.M.

    1995-07-17

    We report on a 9-month-old girl with an interstitial duplication of 19p, developmental delay, and multiple anomalies including bifrontal prominence, obtuse frontonasal angle, short columella, additional midline philtral pillar, midline ridge on the tongue, vertical midline ridge at the mental symphysis, and a complex congenital heart defect including severe branch pulmonary artery stenosis, secundum atrial septal defect (ASD), and several ventricular septal defects (VSDs). Use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome 19- specific probes showed a direct duplication of bands 19p13.13 and 19p13.2. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process.

  11. Ulcerative colitis and steroid-responsive, diffuse interstitial lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Balestra, D.J.; Balestra, S.T.; Wasson, J.H.

    1988-07-01

    The authors describe a patient with ulcerative colitis and extracolonic manifestations in whom diffuse interstitial pulmonary disease developed that was responsive to glucocorticoid therapy one year after total proctocolectomy. The patient presented in December 1983 with a subacute course marked by cough and progressive exertional dyspnea, abnormal chest examination results, and a chest roentgenogram that revealed diffuse interstitital and alveolar infiltrates. A transbronchial biopsy specimen revealed a polymorphic interstitial infiltrate, mild interstitial fibrosis without apparent intraluminal fibrosis, and no vasculitis, granulomas, or significant eosinophilic infiltration. Within one week of the initiation of daily high-dose steroid therapy, the patient's symptoms dramatically improved; chest roentgenogram and forced vital capacity (60%) improved at a slower rate. All three measures deteriorated when alternate-day prednisone therapy was started but once again improved until the patient was totally asymptomatic, chest roentgenograms were normal, and forced vital capacity was 80% of the predicted value 2 1/2 years later.

  12. A controlled evaluation of thermal biofeedback and thermal biofeedback combined with cognitive therapy in the treatment of vascular headache.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, E B; Appelbaum, K A; Radnitz, C L; Morrill, B; Michultka, D; Kirsch, C; Guarnieri, P; Hillhouse, J; Evans, D D; Jaccard, J

    1990-04-01

    One-hundred-sixteen patients suffering from vascular headache (migraine or combined migraine and tension) were, after 4 weeks of pretreatment baseline headache monitoring, randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) thermal biofeedback with adjunctive relaxation training (TBF); (b) TBF plus cognitive therapy; (c) pseudomediation as an ostensible attention-placebo control; or (d) headache monitoring. The first three groups received 16 individual sessions over 8 weeks, while the fourth group continued to monitor headaches. All groups then monitored headaches for a 4-week posttreatment baseline. Analyses revealed that all treated groups improved significantly more than the headache monitoring group with no significant differences among the three treated groups. On a measure of clinically significant improvement, the two TBF groups had slightly higher (51%) degree of improvement than the meditation group (37.5%). It is argued that the attention-placebo control became an active relaxation condition.

  13. Convective Radiofrequency Water Vapor Thermal Therapy with Rezūm System.

    PubMed

    Helo, Sevann; Holland, Bradley; McVary, Kevin T

    2017-10-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are amongst the most commonly treated conditions by urologists. Minimally invasive therapies for the treatment of BPH/LUTS have garnered increased interest as new technology has emerged, improving durability, efficacy, and safety. This paper reviews the most recent literature regarding water vapor therapy, a convective thermal therapy that ablates prostatic tissue. The current literature includes a pilot study of 65 men and a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of 197 men investigating the efficacy and safety profile of water vapor therapy up to 2 years. Subjects treated with water vapor therapy demonstrated a 51% reduction in IPSS from baseline, sustained at 24 months (p < 0.0001). Durable improvements in max flow rate (Qmax) and quality of life (QoL) were also achieved, while no changes in sexual function were observed. Reporting of adverse events (AEs) reveals predominantly Clavien grade I complications that were self-limited. The clinical efficacy and safety of water vapor therapy are durable to 24 months making it an attractive alternative for patients seeking a minimally invasive treatment for LUTS due to BPH.

  14. Image-guided thermal therapy with a dual-contrast magnetic nanoparticle formulation: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Seshadri, Madhav; Mirpour, Sahar; Wabler, Michele; Marinho, Thomas; Furqan, Muhammad; Zhou, Haoming; De Paoli, Silvia; Gruettner, Cordula; Gilson, Wesley; DeWeese, Theodore; Garcia, Monica; Ivkov, Robert; Liapi, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/objective The aim of this study was to develop and investigate the properties of a magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle–ethiodised oil formulation for image-guided thermal therapy of liver cancer. Materials and methods The formulation comprises bionised nano-ferrite (BNF) nanoparticles suspended in ethiodised oil, emulsified with polysorbate 20 (BNF-lip). Nanoparticle size was measured via photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In vivo thermal therapy capability was tested in two groups of male Foxn1nu mice bearing subcutaneous HepG2 xenograft tumours. Group I (n =12) was used to screen conditions for group II (n =48). In group II, mice received one of BNF-lip (n =18), BNF alone (n =16), or PBS (n =14), followed by alternating magnetic field (AMF) hyperthermia, with either varied duration (15 or 20 min) or amplitude (0, 16, 20, or 24 kA/m). Image-guided fluoroscopic intra-arterial injection of BNF-lip was tested in New Zealand white rabbits (n =10), bearing liver VX2 tumours. The animals were subsequently imaged with CT and 3 T MRI, up to 7 days post-injection. The tumours were histopathologically evaluated for distribution of BNF-lip. Results The BNF showed larger aggregate diameters when suspended in BNF-lip, compared to clear solution. The BNF-lip formulation produced maximum tumour temperatures with AMF >20 kA/m and showed positive X-ray visibility and substantial shortening of T1 and T2 relaxation time, with sustained intratumoural retention up to 7 days post-injection. On pathology, intratumoural BNF-lip distribution correlated well with CT imaging of intratumoural BNF-lip distribution. Conclusion The BNF-lip formulation has favourable thermal and dual imaging capabilities for image-guided thermal therapy of liver cancer, suggesting further exploration for clinical applications. PMID:27151045

  15. Enhancing laser thermal-therapy using ultrasound-microbubbles and gold nanorods: In vitro investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarapacki, Christine; Kumaradas, Carl; Karshafian, Raffi

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanorods (GNR) in laser-induced thermal therapy can significantly increase light absorption, leading to a local temperature increase and causing irreversible cell damage. One of the key challenges in using GNR as a thermal therapy agent is to deliver a concentration of GNR to generate sufficient heat and cause cell death. In this study, ultrasound and microbubble induced sonoporation is used to enhance intracellular uptake of GNR and improve the therapeutic outcome of laserinduced thermal therapy. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells in suspension (0.6 mL) were treated with ultrasound and microbubbles (USMB) at 1 MHz frequency, 16 microseconds pulse duration, 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency, 1 minute insonation time, varying acoustic pressures (0, 1.26 and 1.73 MPa) and 10 μL Definity microbubble agent with and without GNR (12 nm × 48 nm) at varying concentration (1.0×1010 to 2.5×1011 GNR/mL). The GNR were manufactured through wet chemical synthesis process and measured using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) for size and concentration respectively. Following ultrasound and microbubble treatment, cells were centrifuged to remove excess gold nanorods and treated in suspension with an 810 nm laser (Diomed 60 NIR) at 4 W for 5 minutes. A thermal camera (FLIR Thermovision A40) was positioned to monitor the sample temperature throughout laser treatment and cell viability was assessed using flow cytometry with propidium iodide. Cell viability of 18±2% was achieved with GNR+USMB (1.26 MPa) compared to 72±3% with GNR alone (12 hour incubation) and 99±0.2% with USMB (1.26 MPa) alone. With increasing GNR concentration during ultrasound and microbubble treatment, laser induced sample temperature increased and consequently cell viability decreased. Cell viability decreased from 92±1% at 1.0×1011 GNR/mL to 29±5% at 1.5×1011 GNR/mL concentration with corresponding maximum temperatures of 50°C and 54°C, respectively

  16. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  17. The Feasibility of Conformal Thermal Therapy with Transurethral Ultrasound Heating Applicators and MR Temperature Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Vanessa; Tang, Kee; Wachsmuth, Jeff; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Transurethral thermal therapy offers a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of prostate diseases including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Accurate heating of a targeted region of the gland can be achieved through the use of a rotating directional heating source incorporating planar ultrasound transducers, and the implementation of active temperature feedback along the beam direction during heating provided by magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry. The performance of this control method with practical spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution (such as angular alignment, spatial resolution, update rate for temperature feedback (imaging time), and the presence of noise) for thermal feedback using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was investigated in simulations. As expected, the control algorithm was most sensitive to the presence of noise, with noticeable degradation in its performance above ±2°C of temperature uncertainty. With respect to temporal resolution, acceptable performance was achieved at update rates of 5s or faster. The control algorithm was relatively insensitive to reduced spatial resolution due to the broad nature of the heating pattern produced by the heating applicator, this provides an opportunity to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The overall simulation results confirm that existing clinical 1.5T MR imagers are capable of providing adequate temperature feedback for transurethral thermal therapy without special pulse sequences or enhanced imaging hardware.

  18. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided LITT, or MRgLITT. Although this computational framework is designed for LITT in treating prostate cancer, it is further applicable to other thermal therapies in focal lesions induced by radio-frequency (RF), microwave and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). Moreover, the model-based dynamic closed-loop predictive control algorithms in the framework, facilitated by the coupling of mathematical modelling and computer simulation with real-time imaging feedback, has great potential to enable a novel methodology in thermal medicine. Such technology could dramatically increase treatment efficacy and reduce morbidity.

  19. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided LITT, or MRgLITT. Although this computational framework is designed for LITT in treating prostate cancer, it is further applicable to other thermal therapies in focal lesions induced by radio-frequency (RF), microwave and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). Moreover, the model-based dynamic closed-loop predictive control algorithms in the framework, facilitated by the coupling of mathematical modelling and computer simulation with real-time imaging feedback, has great potential to enable a novel methodology in thermal medicine. Such technology could dramatically increase treatment efficacy and reduce morbidity. PMID:22098360

  20. [Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias in 2016].

    PubMed

    Debray, M-P; Borie, R; Danel, C; Khalil, A; Majlath, M; Crestani, B

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise 8 clinicopathological entities, most of them with a chronic course and various prognosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most frequent and most severe of these. Computed tomography has an important role for its diagnosis. It can identify the corresponding pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in about 50 percent of cases. It can suggest differential diagnosis in other cases, most frequently fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Imaging features should be integrated to clinical and available pathologic data during multidisciplinary team meetings involving physicians with a good knowledge of interstitial diseases. Some cases may be unclassifiable, but these could later be reclassified as new data may occur or imaging features may change. Surgical lung biopsy is being less frequently performed and an emerging less invasive technique, lung cryobiopsy, is under evaluation. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a distinct entity only recently described, with uncertain prevalence and prognosis that seems being quite often associated to another pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  1. [From Biological Effects of Local Cutaneous Thermal Stimulation to Moxibustion Therapy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-yu; Liang, Shuang; Hu, Guang-yong; Zou, Yang-yang; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Jian-bin

    2015-12-01

    Moxibustion is one of the major external therapies of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and exerts a definite favorable effect in the treatment of patients with different problems. In the present paper, the authors reviewed 38 papers about somatic thermal intervention therapy published in recent 15 years and analyzed its biological functions from local, distal, and whole body effects. The local effects include 1) improving cutaneous inflammatory illnesses as verruca, herpes simplex, Leishmania infection, cutaneous necrosis, wound disunion, and promoting percutaneous absorption of some medicines, swelling pain; 2) reliving sports fatigue and muscular injury, eliminating inflammation and pain reactions, probably by lowering local reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase,catalase, glutathione, etc. levels, and strengthening the flexibility of the knee-joint, and anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments; 3) increasing blood perfusion of the regional arteriola, micrangium to eliminate accumulated subcutaneous blood cells, inflammatory mediators and other metabolic products. The distal effects contain 1) increase of the distal cutaneous blood flow and suppression of the arterial stenosis; and 2) improvement of the visceral functions including the heart (ischemia), liver, gastrointestinal blood flow and smooth muscles, uterus smooth muscular tension, etc. The whole body effects include raising immunoability against cancer, and reducing tumor blood flow to damage the blood vessels in the tumor tissue, etc. In addition, the effects of thermal stimulation are affected by the temperature, stimulating duration and the stimulated positions. These research results may help us to comprehensively understand the effects and mechanisms of moxibustion therapy in the treatment of different clinical disorders.

  2. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  3. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  4. Interstitial devices for treating deep seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Cathignol, Dominique; Prat, Frédéric; Melodelima, David; Salomir, Rares; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2006-05-01

    Techniques using intracavitary or interstitial applicators have been proposed because extracorporeal HIFU techniques are not always suitable for deep-seated tumors. Bones or gaseous pockets may indeed be located in the intervening tissue. The objective is to bring the ultrasound source as close as possible to the target through natural routes in order to minimize the effects of attenuation and phase aberration along the ultrasound pathway. Under these circumstances, it becomes possible to use higher frequency, thus increasing the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and resulting in more efficient heating of the treatment region. In contrast to extra-corporeal applicators, the design of interstitial probes imposes additional constraints relative to size and ergonomy. The goal of this paper is to present the range of miniature interstitial applicators we developed at INSERM for various applications. The sources are rotating plane water-cooled transducers that operate at a frequency between 3 and 10 MHz depending on the desired therapeutic depth. The choice of a plane transducer rather than divergent sources permits to extend the therapeutic depth and to enhance the angular selectivity of the treatment Rotating single element flat transducer can also be replaced by cylindrical arrays for rotating electronically a reconstructed plane wave. When extended zone of coagulation are required, original therapeutic modalities combining cavitation and thermal effects are used. These methods consist in favoring in depth heating by increasing the acoustic attenuation away from the transducer with the presence of bubbles. When associated to modern imaging modalities, these minimally invasive therapeutic devices offer very promising options for cancer treatment. For examples, two versions of an image-guided esophageal applicator are designed: one uses a retractable ultrasound mini probe for the positioning of the applicator, while the other is MRI compatible and offers on line

  5. Future perspective of strategic non-thermal plasma therapy for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of non-thermal plasma are expected in the medical fields, including hemostasis, vascularization, prevention of organ adhesion, and cell proliferation. Cancer is an internal enemy arising from normal tissue in the body. The prognosis of metastatic and recurrent cancers is still poor despite advances in medicine. To apply non-thermal plasma in cancer treatment is now on going. The mechanism of the proliferation-inhibitory effect of plasma is reactive nitrogen oxide species/reactive oxygen species production in cells. There are a number of problems to be overcome, such as existence of intrinsic reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species scavengers and the shallow infiltration of plasma on tumor surface. The current reviews makes referral to the study results of plasma therapy clarified so far, the possibility of its application in the future. PMID:28163380

  6. Thermal analysis of the surrounding anatomy during 3-D MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous numerical simulations have shown that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can generate highly accurate volumes of thermal coagulation conforming to 3-D human prostate geometries. The goal of this work is to simulate, quantify and evaluate the thermal impact of these treatments on the rectum, pelvic bone, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and urinary sphincters. This study used twenty 3-D anatomical models of prostate cancer patients and detailed bio-acoustic simulations incorporating an active feedback algorithm which controlled a rotating, planar ultrasound transducer (17-4×3 mm elements, 4.7/9.7 MHz, 10 Wac/cm2). Heating of the adjacent surrounding anatomy was evaluated using thermal tolerances reported in the literature. Heating of the rectum poses the most important safety concern and is influenced largely by the water temperature flowing through an endorectal cooling device; temperatures of 7-37° C are required to limit potential damage to less than 10 mm3 on the outer 1 mm layer of rectum. Significant heating of the pelvic bone was predicted in 30% of the patient models with an ultrasound frequency of 4.7 MHz; setting the frequency to 9.7 MHz when the bone is less than 10 mm away from the prostate reduced heating in all cases below the threshold for irreversible damage. Heating of the NVB was significant in 75% of the patient models in the absence of treatment planning; this proportion was reduced to 5% by using treatment margins of up to 4 mm. To avoid damaging the urinary sphincters, margins from the transducer of 2-4 mm should be used, depending on the transurethral cooling temperature. Simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral therapy can treat the entire prostate accurately. Strategies have been developed which, along with careful treatment planning, can be used to avoid causing thermal injury to the rectum, pelvic bone, NVB and urinary sphincters.

  7. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin; Chen, Yue; Wu, Jing-Bo

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  8. Phase estimation for a phased array therapeutic interstitial ultrasound probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenya; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals about high intensity ultrasound interstitial therapy simulation. The simulated phased array ultrasound probe allows a dynamic electronic focusing of the therapeutic beam. In order to maximize the power deposit at the focal point we propose a method which allows to optimally defining the phase shift of the electrical control signal for each individual element.

  9. Localized interstitial granuloma annulare induced by subcutaneous injections for desensitization.

    PubMed

    Spring, Philipp; Vernez, Maxime; Maniu, Christa-Maria; Hohl, Daniel

    2013-06-15

    We describe a patient with interstitial granuloma annulare associated with subcutaneous injection therapy (SIT) for desensitization to a type I allergy. Asymptomatic, erythematous, violaceous annular patches were located at the injection sites on both her arms. Medical history revealed perennial rhinoconjonctivitis treated with SIT (Phostal Stallergen® cat 100% and D. pteronyssinus/D.farinae 50%:50%).

  10. Optimal simulations of ultrasonic fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays using the angular spectrum approach.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; McGough, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The angular spectrum approach is evaluated for the simulation of focused ultrasound fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays. For an input pressure or normal particle velocity distribution in a plane, the angular spectrum approach rapidly computes the output pressure field in a three dimensional volume. To determine the optimal combination of simulation parameters for angular spectrum calculations, the effect of the size, location, and the numerical accuracy of the input plane on the computed output pressure is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that angular spectrum calculations performed with an input pressure plane are more accurate than calculations with an input velocity plane. Results also indicate that when the input pressure plane is slightly larger than the array aperture and is located approximately one wavelength from the array, angular spectrum simulations have very small numerical errors for two dimensional planar arrays. Furthermore, the root mean squared error from angular spectrum simulations asymptotically approaches a nonzero lower limit as the error in the input plane decreases. Overall, the angular spectrum approach is an accurate and robust method for thermal therapy simulations of large ultrasound phased arrays when the input pressure plane is computed with the fast nearfield method and an optimal combination of input parameters.

  11. Real-time microwave imaging of differential temperature for thermal therapy monitoring.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Mark; Stang, John; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2014-06-01

    A microwave imaging system for real-time 3-D imaging of differential temperature has been developed for the monitoring and feedback of thermal therapy systems. Design parameters are constrained by features of a prototype-focused microwave thermal therapy system for the breast, operating at 915 MHz. Real-time imaging is accomplished with a precomputed linear inverse scattering solution combined with continuous vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements of a 36-antenna, HFSS-modeled, cylindrical cavity. Volumetric images of differential change of dielectric constant due to temperature are formed with a refresh rate as fast as 1 frame/s and 1 (°)C resolution. Procedures for data segmentation and postprocessed S-parameter error-correction are developed. Antenna pair VNA calibration is accelerated by using the cavity as the unknown thru standard. The device is tested on water targets and a simple breast phantom. Differentially heated targets are successfully imaged in cluttered environments. The rate of change of scattering contrast magnitude correlates 1:1 with target temperature.

  12. Real-time Microwave Imaging of Differential Temperature for Thermal Therapy Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Mark; Stang, John; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2014-01-01

    A microwave imaging system for real-time 3D imaging of differential temperature has been developed for the monitoring and feedback of thermal therapy systems. Design parameters are constrained by features of a prototype focused microwave thermal therapy system for the breast, operating at 915 MHz. Real-time imaging is accomplished with a precomputed linear inverse scattering solution combined with continuous Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) measurements of a 36-antenna, HFSS modeled, cylindrical cavity. Volumetric images of differential change of dielectric constant due to temperature are formed with a refresh rate as fast as 1 frame per second and 1°C resolution. Procedures for data segmentation and post-processed S-parameter error-correction are developed. Antenna pair VNA calibration is accelerated by using the cavity as the unknown thru standard. The device is tested on water targets and a simple breast phantom. Differentially heated targets are successfully imaged in cluttered environments. The rate of change of scattering contrast magnitude correlates 1:1 with target temperature. PMID:24845289

  13. Instantaneous frequency-based ultrasonic temperature estimation during focused ultrasound thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Huang, Sheng-Min; Lu, I-Yeh; Lin, Deng-Yn; Lin, Shi-Ming; Ju, Kuen-Cheng

    2009-10-01

    Focused ultrasound thermal therapy relies on temperature monitoring for treatment guidance and assurance of targeting and dose control. One potential approach is to monitor temperature change through ultrasonic-backscattered signal processing. The current approach involves the detection of echo time-shifts based on cross-correlation processing from segmented radiofrequency (RF) data. In this study, we propose a novel ultrasonic temperature-measurement approach that detects changes in instantaneous frequency along the imaging beam direction. Focused ultrasound was used as the heating source, and the 1-D beamformed RF signals provided from an ultrasound imager were used to verify the proposed algorithm for temperature change estimation. For comparison, a conventional cross-correlation technique was also evaluated. Heating experiments testing tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo porcine muscles were conducted. The results showed that temperature can be well estimated by the proposed algorithm in the temperature range, where the relationship of sound speed versus temperature is linear. Compared with the cross-correlation-based algorithm, the proposed new algorithm yields a six-fold increase in computational efficiency, along with comparable contrast-detection ability and precision. This new algorithm may serve as an alternative method for implementing temperature estimation into a clinical ultrasound imager for thermal therapy guidance.

  14. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  15. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-06-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers.

  16. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung disease Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Patient Instructions Eating extra calories when sick - adults ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Interstitial Lung Diseases Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  17. Interstitial lung disease associated with amrubicin chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer: a single institutional study.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yukiko; Saito, Yoshinobu; Atsumi, Kenichiro; Takeuchi, Susumu; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Mizutani, Hideaki; Minegishi, Yuji; Noro, Rintaro; Seike, Masahiro; Shinobu, Kunugi; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    Amrubicin, which is used as a chemotherapeutic agent for lung cancer, can induce interstitial lung disease. There is insufficient evidence on the incidence of amrubicin-associated interstitial lung disease under practical use settings. We therefore investigated the occurrence of interstitial lung disease in the patients with lung cancer who received amrubicin in our institution. We reviewed the data of all patients with lung cancer who received amrubicin at the Nippon Medical School Hospital from March 2002 to April 2015. Interstitial lung disease was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, radiographic findings and the exclusion of other diseases. We reviewed 92 consecutive patients with lung cancer. Amrubicin-associated interstitial lung disease occurred in 3 of the 92 patients (3.3%): 2 were definite interstitial lung disease and 1 was possible interstitial lung disease. The severity of interstitial lung disease was mild to moderate, and interstitial lung disease improved with or without corticosteroid therapy in all cases. The findings in a computed tomography image analysis showed preexisting pulmonary fibrosis (n = 13), including interstitial pneumonitis (n = 10) and radiation fibrosis (n = 3). No patients showed the presence of honeycomb lung. Among the 13 patients, 1 (7.7%) developed interstitial lung disease after amrubicin chemotherapy. Interstitial lung disease occurred in 3.3% of the patients in our study; this appeared to be less frequent than the rates in previous reports. Preexisting pulmonary fibrosis may be a risk factor for interstitial lung disease; however, no fatal cases were found among the patients with asymptomatic pulmonary fibrosis without honeycomb lung. It is thus considered to be necessary to carefully assess the possibility of preexisting pulmonary fibrosis and clarify the presence or absence of honeycomb lung before starting amrubicin chemotherapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  18. [Interstitial Pneumonia and Emphysema].

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Kato, Yuko; Ishii, Sachiyo

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial pneumonia (IP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are representative diseases of restrictive pulmonary dysfunction and obstructive pulmonary dysfunction, respectively. In the preoperative anesthesia clinic, anesthesiologists are frequently asked to assess the anesthesia management of patients with these diseases. In respiratory function tests, IP is detected as a decrease in % vital capacity (< 80%), and COPD as a decrease in % FEV1.0 (< 70%). Other key factors which affect the assessment are; 1) severity assessment that affects the safety of anesthesia management, 2) prognostic evaluation including the acute exacerbation in the postoperative period, and 3) patient-related factors (age, life degree of autonomy, other comorbidities, surgery-related factors, and anesthesia method). In the patients in the disease stage I or II, anesthesia management is relatively safe. On the other hand, the patients in the disease stage IV have no surgical indication except life-saving emergent situation. In another words, anesthesiologists are required to make the judgment for the anesthesia management of the patient in the disease stage III, based on the assessment of patient-related factors, surgery-related factors, and prognosis.

  19. A Model Evaluation Study for Treatment Planning of Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenholtz, S.; Moon, T.; Franco, M.; Medina, D.; Danish, S.; Gowda, A.; Shetty, A.; Maier, F.; Hazle, J. D.; Stafford, R. J.; Warburton, T.; Fuentes, D.

    2016-01-01

    A cross validation analysis evaluating computer model prediction accuracy for a priori planning magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) procedures in treating focal diseased brain tissue is presented. Two mathematical models are considered. (1) A spectral element discretization of the transient Pennes bioheat transfer equation is implemented to predict the laser induced heating in perfused tissue. (2) A closed-form algorithm for predicting the steady state heat transfer from a linear superposition of analytic point source heating functions is also considered. Prediction accuracy is retrospectively evaluated via leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV). Modeling predictions are quantitatively evaluated in terms of a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the simulated thermal dose and thermal dose information contained within N = 22 MR thermometry datasets. During LOOCV analysis, the transient model’s DSC mean and median is 0.7323 and 0.8001, respectively, with 15 of 22 DSC values exceeding the success criterion of DSC ≥ 0.7. The steady state model’s DSC mean and median is 0.6431 and 0.6770, respectively, with 10 of 22 passing. A one-sample, one-sided Wilcoxon signed rank test indicates that the transient FEM model achieves the prediction success critera, DSC ≥ 0.7, at a statistically significant level. PMID:26368014

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal injury in humans.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, V M; Borgen, A E; Jansen, E C; Rotbøll Nielsen, P H; Werner, M U

    2015-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2 ) treatment has in animal experiments demonstrated antinociceptive effects. It was hypothesized that these effects would attenuate secondary hyperalgesia areas (SHAs), an expression of central sensitization, after a first-degree thermal injury in humans. Seventeen healthy volunteers were examined during two sessions using a randomized crossover design. Volunteers were studied during control conditions (ambient pressure, FI O2  = 0.21) and during HBO2 (2.4 standard atmosphere, FI O2  = 1.0, 90 min) conditions in a pressure chamber. Quantitative sensory testing, including assessment of SHAs was performed. A statistically significant overall attenuation of SHAs was seen during the HBO2 sessions compared with the control-sessions (P = 0.011). In the eight volunteers starting with the HBO2 session, no difference in SHAs compared with control was demonstrated. However, in the nine volunteers starting with the control session, a statistical significant attenuation of SHAs was demonstrated in the HBO2 session (P = 0.004). The results indicate that HBO2 therapy in humans attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal skin injury, compared with control. These new and original findings in humans corroborate animal experimental data. The thermal injury model may give impetus to future human neurophysiological studies exploring the central effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comparison of cryotherapy and thermal therapy for breast cancer treatment simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.

    2001-05-01

    Breast cancer presents an ongoing challenge in regard to treatment efficacy and successful clinical outcomes. There has been a challenge to increase the survival rate over the past 50 years and only recently have clinical outcomes improved, although slightly. Thermal treatment regimes have been evolving and most recently, have been applied in situ. A standalone treatment for malignancies is challenging due to the rigor in achieving homogeneity in the distribution of therapeutic temperatures in the tumor and the lack of therapy in the adjacent normal tissue. Although initial work used lasers, contemporary work utilizes radiofrequency (RF) or cryotherapy as a treatment modality. Both monopolar and bipolar RF devices were modeled for the RF treatments in the breast. Using finite element techniques, these two modalities were simulated in breast tissue and the results of the bioheat equation compared for similar sized devices. The model incorporated changing electrical and thermal properties of tissue with temperature, as well as blood flow changes. For thermal treatment, the isotherm of +55 degree(s)C was considered the margin of coagulation necrosis, while for cryotreatment, the -40 degree(s)C isotherm was used. The comparison aids in the selection of the best method to improve clinical outcomes, while paying attention to the size of the applicator and time length of treatment.

  2. Declining interstitial transsudation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarchin, P.; Lagneaux, D.; Lecomte, J.

    1980-01-01

    Results and methodology of experimentation dealing with declining interstitial transsudation are discussed. Concepts of the formation of interstitial fluids are in agreement with measurements of calf volume in normal young women, in horizontal recumbency or after horizontal immersion. The volume of the calf is reduced when the hydrostatic pressure of the blood column is diminished under the phlebostatic level and when the external pressure is increased by the hydrostatic pressure of a water bath.

  3. Interstitial Cystitis and Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain Complementary Therapies Complementary vs. Alternative Herbs, Dietary Supplements, & Biologicals Mind-body Medicine Massage, Manipulation, & Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider ...

  4. Interstitial Cystitis Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management of IC Pain Complementary Therapies Complementary vs. Alternative Herbs, Dietary Supplements, & Biologicals Mind-body Medicine Massage, Manipulation, & Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider ...

  5. Similarities between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and vulvodynia: implications for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Moldwin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and vulvodynia are chronic pain syndromes that appear to be intertwined from the perspectives of embryology, pathology and epidemiology. These associations may account for similar responses to various therapies. PMID:26816866

  6. How does interstitial cystitis begin?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Interstitial cystitis (IC) does not start as an endstage disease, it has a beginning when symptoms are milder, intermittent and the disease is misdiagnosed. To determine how IC develops patients were interviewed on when their symptoms began, what they were and are now as well as the various diagnoses that they received before they were determined to have IC. Methods One hundred female IC patients were screened. They filled out a questionnaire asking about the age their disease presented, their initial and current symptoms, what their original diagnoses were, effect of the menstrual cycle and sexual activity on their symptoms and about any relatives with bladder symptoms or a current diagnosis of IC. Results By age 30, 81% of patients had bladder symptoms, 21% before age 10. The first symptom was frequency in 81%, pain present in 59% and the symptoms were intermittent in 64%. Most common early misdiagnosis was UTI in 74% with 93% reporting negative urine cultures. Sex was painful and causes symptom flares in 82%, symptoms flared the week before the menses in 75%. Most common gynecologic diagnosis was yeast vaginitis, 42%. Urge incontinence was present in 33%. There were 51% that reported bladder symptoms in a first degree female relative. Conclusions IC begins primarily with frequency and is intermittent in most patients with symptom flares associated with sexual activity. Pain and urgency incontinence tend to be a later symptoms. When IC flares the most common misdiagnosis is UTI. Symptoms begin before age 30 in most but an IC diagnosis is often not made until age 40. Genetics appear to play a significant role. It is important to consider these facts when evaluating women with “early IC” because correct diagnosis will result in proper therapy and reduced health care costs. PMID:26816860

  7. [Acute interstitial nephritis induced by loratadine].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Navascués, R; Bastardo, Z; Fernández Díaz, M; Guerediaga, J; Quiñones, L; Pinto, J

    2003-01-01

    Loratadine is a second generation histamine H1 receptor antagonist, that has high potency antiallergic properties and is associated with low adverse effects compared with other antihistamines. Acute interstitial nephritis is a cause of acute renal failure that is most often induced by drugs or, less frequently, infection or sarcoidosis. Although the number of drugs associated with acute intersticial nephritis is too large, the antihistaminic loratadine have never been reported before. We report a case of an interstitial nephritis with acute renal failure that suggesting hypersensitivity reaction in a 77 old man who had received loratadine (10 mg/day) during ten days before his assessment to our hospital by disseminated pruritic syndrome. The initial suspect was rapidly progressive glomerulonephitis and renal biopsy was practice and treatment with corticosteroids were initiated (prednisone bolus of 500 mg three days and 1 mg/kg/day/later). The loratadine therapy was cessation. He exhibiting a slow and progressive improvement on renal function and one month later, urea and creatinine levels was normal and hematuria and proteinuria had disappeared. The corticosteroids therapy were progressive decreased until withdrawal. We think that this is an interesting case, basing in its clinical presentation and that it had never been reported before.

  8. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  9. Migration processes of the As interstitial in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. F.; Modine, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal migration processes of the As interstitial in GaAs were investigated using density-functional theory and the local-density approximation for exchange and correlation. The lowest-energy processes were found to involve the -1, 0, and +1 charge states, and to produce migration along ⟨110⟩-type directions. In the -1 and 0 charge states, migration proceeds via hops between split-interstitial stable configurations at bulk As sites through bridging saddle-point configurations in which the interstitial atom is equidistant from two adjacent bulk As sites. In the +1 charge state, the roles of these two configurations are approximately reversed and migration proceeds via hops between bridging stable configurations through higher-energy split-interstitial stable configurations bounded by a pair of distorted split-interstitial saddle-point configurations. The predicted activation energies for migration in the 0 and +1 charge states agree well with measurements in semi-insulating and p-type material, respectively. Also consistent with experiments, the approximate reversal of the stable and saddle-point configurations between the 0 and +1 charge states is predicted to enable carrier-induced migration with a residual activation energy of 0.05 eV.

  10. CT guided interstitial therapy of pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Haaga, J.R.; Owens, D.B.; Kellermeyer, R.W.; Shina, D.; Pilai, K.; Began, N.

    1987-11-01

    We describe the use of percutaneous CT guidance for localization and placement of /sup 192/Ir sources into a patient with pancreatic carcinoma. We have shown the feasibility of this procedure and the lack of complications which are probably due to minimal damage to tissue involved. Computed tomography is ideally suited for percutaneous implantation because it provides the most accurate method for needle placement within the abdomen.

  11. Practical evaluations on heating characteristics of thin microwave antenna for intracavitary thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuyuki; Tsubouchi, Kousuke; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Microwave thermal therapy is one of the modalities for cancer treatment. There are several schemes of microwave heating. The authors have been studying thin coaxial antenna for intracavitary microwave heating aiming at the treatment of bile duct carcinoma. Up to now, the heating characteristics of the antenna are investigated by numerical simulation and experiment for finding a possibility of the treatment. In this study, in order to consider practical situations of the treatment, heating characteristics of the antenna inserted into a metallic stent is evaluated by numerical simulations. Moreover, the relation between coagulation size of the tissue and the radiation power from the antenna is investigated experimentally. It must be considered, when the input power of the antenna is high (around several tens of watts). From these investigations, some useful results for practical treatments were found.

  12. Patterns of interstitial lung disease during everolimus treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ryuichi; Asano, Koichiro; Mikami, Shuji; Nagata, Hirohiko; Kaneko, Gou; Oya, Mototsugu

    2012-05-01

    To elucidate the patterns of interstitial lung disease during everolimus treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, we reviewed seven cases of everolimus-induced interstitial lung disease. Seven patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which continued to progress despite treatment with sunitinib or sorafenib, developed interstitial lung disease after treatment with everolimus. Chest X-ray demonstrated diffuse infiltrates in lung fields, and chest computed tomography showed bilateral reticular and ground-glass opacities. Serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (7/7), C-reactive protein (6/7), pulmonary surfactant associated protein D (1/7) and Krebs von den Lungen 6 (5/7) were elevated. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from four patients with Grade 3 interstitial lung disease showed lymphocytosis. The transbronchial lung biopsy specimens showed interstitial lymphocytic infiltration and septal thickening of alveolar walls. In two cases with mild interstitial lung disease, the everolimus therapy was successfully continued. In four cases with Grade 3 interstitial lung disease, the drug was discontinued and steroid therapy was initiated. Pulmonary symptoms and radiological abnormalities resolved within 2 months. Serum Krebs von den Lungen 6 was elevated compared with baseline in all cases with interstitial lung disease. Some patients who developed mild interstitial lung disease during everolimus treatment could continue to receive the treatment. Even when severe interstitial lung disease developed, withdrawal of the drug and short-term use of high-dose steroids resulted in rapid recovery. Prompt recognition of interstitial lung disease exacerbation as well as exclusion of progressive disease or infection is of primary importance.

  13. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) for thermal therapy dosimetry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of tissues have been utilized for disease detection, diagnosis, and progression, however they have not been extensively utilized for therapy dosimetry. Magnetic hyperthermia aims to kill cells and ablate tumors using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) either injected in or targeted to tumors. Upon application of an appropriate AC magnetic field, MNPs can heat target tissue while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of magnetic hyperthermia is needed to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. During hyperthermia treatments, the viscoelastic properties of tissues are altered due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration, making these properties candidates for dosimetry. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the biomechanical properties of tissues. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the hyperthermia dose based on the elastic changes revealed by MM-OCE. In this study, MNPs embedded in tissues were utilized for both hyperthermia and MM-OCE measurements. Tissue temperature and elastic modulus were obtained, where the elastic modulus was extracted from the resonance frequency detected by MM-OCE. Results showed a correlation between stiffness and temperature change following treatment. To investigate the thermal-dose-dependent changes, intervals of hyperthermia treatment were repeatedly performed on the same tissue sequentially, interspersed with MM-OCE. With increasing times of treatment, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results suggest that MM-OCE may potentially identify reversible and irreversible tissue changes during thermal therapy, supporting the use of MM-OCE for dosimetric control of hyperthermia in future applications.

  14. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  15. Interstitial pneumonitis induced by bicalutamide given for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Masago, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Takeshi; Nemoto, Ryosuke; Motoda, Kinya

    2011-12-01

    We describe interstitial pneumonitis induced by bicalutamide prescribed to treat prostate cancer. A 78-year-old man with severe lower paralysis and a bladder/rectal disorder was referred to our hospital. Prostate-specific antigen was elevated to 1418 ng/mL at that time and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple bone metastases. A rectal examination revealed hard nodules in the bilateral lobes of the prostate. We diagnosed prostate cancer without a biopsy, and then maximally blockaded androgens by castration and bicalutamide administration. Eight months later, he was admitted to a local hospital with breathing difficulties, and a computed tomography scan revealed interstitial pneumonitis. A physician concluded that the cause of the interstitial pneumonitis was bicalutamide, which was immediately withdrawn and replaced with prednisolone. The patient recovered over a period of 3 months. Bicalutamide-induced interstitial pneumonitis is quite rare. However, adverse reactions to maximal androgen blockade therapy should be considered and appropriate treatment for interstitial pneumonitis should be promptly initiated, as this condition is reversible.

  16. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  17. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  18. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  19. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  20. Interstitial Functionalization in elemental Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, Edwin

    Societies in the 21st century will face many challenges. Materials science and materials design will be essential to address and master some if not all of these challenges. Semiconductors are among the most important technological material classes. Properties such as electrical transport are strongly affected by defects and a central goal continues to be the reduction of defect densities as much as possible in these compounds. Here we present results of interstitial Fe doping in elemental Si using first-principles DFT calculations. The preliminary results show that Fe will only occupy octahedral interstitial sites. The analysis of the electronic structure shows that the compounds are ferromagnetic and that a bandgap opens as interstitial Fe concentrations decrease, with a possible intermittent semi-metallic phase. The formation energy for interstitial Fe is unfavorable, as expected, by ~1.5 eV but becomes favorable as the chemical potential of Fe increases. Therefore, we expect that biasing the system with an external electrical field will lead to the formation of these materials. Thus, our results show that interstitial defects can be beneficial for the design of functionalities that differ significantly from those of the host material.

  1. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  2. Methotrexate conjugated magnetic nanoparticle for targeted drug delivery and thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Jagriti; Bhargava, Parag; Bahadur, D.

    2014-05-01

    A simple soft chemical approach is used for the preparation of citrate functionalized iron oxide (Fe3O4) aqueous colloidal magnetic nanoparticles (CA-MNPs) of average size ˜10 nm. The CA-MNPs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with strong field dependent magnetic responsivity. The CA-MNPs can be conjugated with Methotrexate (MTX) drug through amide bonds between the carboxylic group on the surface of MNPs and amine group of MTX. The surface functionalization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with citric acid and conjugation of MTX drug is evident from FTIR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurement, and elemental and thermal analyses. From the drug release study, it has been observed that this bonding of MTX conjugated MNPs (MTX-MNPs) is cleaved by the intracellular enzymes in lysosome, and MTX is delivered largely inside target cancerous cells at lower pH, thereby reducing toxicity to normal cells. Also, it has been observed that the intercellular uptake of MTX-MNPs is higher compared to CA-MNPs. In addition, the aqueous colloidal stability, optimal magnetization, and good specific absorption rate (under external AC magnetic field) of CA-MNPs act as effective heating source for thermal therapy. Cytotoxicity study of MTX-MNPs shows the reduction of cellular viability for human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Further, a synergistic effect of MTX-MNPs shows a more effective tumor cell death due to the combined effect of thermo-chemotherapy.

  3. Injury depth control from combined wavelength and power tuning in scanned beam laser thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Martin; Soroka, Andrew; Tearney, Guillermo J; Bouma, Brett E; Vakoc, Benjamin J

    2011-11-01

    Laser thermal therapy represents a possible method to treat premalignant epithelial lesions of the esophagus. Dynamically conforming the thermal injury profile to a specific lesion boundary is expected to improve the efficacy of such a treatment and avoid complications. In this work, we investigated wavelength tuning as a mechanism to achieve this aimed control over injury depth by using the strong variation of water absorption close to 1900 nm. We developed a numerical model simulating in steps the photon propagation in the tissue, the diffusion of the absorbed heat, and the resulting tissue damage. The model was compared with experimental results on porcine esophageal specimens ex vivo and showed good agreement. Combined with power tuning, the wavelength agility in the range of 1860 to 1895 nm extends the injury range compared to a fixed wavelength source beyond 1 mm, while at the same time improving control over shallow depths and avoiding vaporization at the tissue surface. The combination of two or three discrete wavelengths combined at variable ratios provides similar control, and may provide an improved strategy for the treatment of endothelial lesions.

  4. Multi-Channel RF System for MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Thermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yak, Nicolas; Asselin, Matthew; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy is an approach to treating localized prostate cancer which targets precise deposition of thermal energy within a confined region of the gland. This treatment requires a system incorporating a heating applicator with multiple planar ultrasound transducers and associated RF electronics to control individual elements independently in order to achieve accurate 3D treatment. We report the design, construction, and characterization of a prototype multi-channel system capable of controlling 16 independent RF signals for a 16-element heating applicator. The main components are a control computer, microcontroller, and a 16-channel signal generator with 16 amplifiers, each incorporating a low-pass filter and transmitted/reflected power detection circuit. Each channel can deliver from 0.5 to 10 W of electrical power and good linearity from 3 to 12 MHz. Harmonic RF signals near the Larmor frequency of a 1.5 T MRI were measured to be below -30 dBm and heating experiments within the 1.5 T MR system showed no significant decrease in SNR of the temperature images. The frequency and power for all 16 channels could be changed in less than 250 ms, which was sufficiently rapid for proper performance of the control algorithms. A common backplane design was chosen which enabled an inexpensive, modular approach for each channel resulting in an overall system with minimal footprint.

  5. Lesion Optimization for Laser Ablation: Fluid Evacuation Prior to Laser-Induced Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Timothy; Patel, Nitesh V; Feiteiro, Filipe; Danish, Shabbar F; Hanft, Simon

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure for ablating intracranial lesions. The presence of a fluid body can sequester thermal energy generated by the laser catheter, which compromises the performance of MRgLITT, resulting in suboptimal ablation of cystic lesions. We report our use of stereotactic fluid evacuation followed by MRgLITT in 2 patients with cystic brain tumors. This is the first report on lesion optimization by fluid aspiration before MRgLITT. Two cystic tumors in 2 patients were treated. In 1 patient, an external ventricular drain was placed stereotactically to allow drainage of cystic fluid 1 day before laser ablation. In the second patient, a stereotactic biopsy needle was used to aspirate the cystic fluid immediately before laser ablation. The remaining solid portions of the both tumors were ablated using the Visualase system. Both patients were followed clinically and radiologically after the procedures. Stereotactic placement of an external ventricular drain and a biopsy needle both successfully resulted in fluid evacuation. MRgLITT was performed without any complications in both patients after fluid evacuation. Both patients demonstrated clinical and radiologic improvement after the procedure. Cystic fluid evacuation is a promising strategy for optimizing intracranial cystic lesions for MRgLITT. This novel approach may broaden the utility of MRgLITT in the management of various technically demanding lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal responsive micelles for dual tumor-targeting imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan; Li, Bowen; Qiu, Jiadan; Li, Jiangyu; Jin, Jing; Dai, Shuhang; Ma, Yuxiang; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-11-01

    Two kinds of thermally responsive polymers P(FAA-NIPA-co-AAm-co-ODA) and P(FPA-NIPA-co-AAm-co-ODA) containing folate, isopropyl acrylamide and octadecyl acrylate were fabricated through free radical random copolymerization for targeted drug delivery. Then the micelles formed in aqueous solution by self-assembly and were characterized in terms of particle size, lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and a variety of optical spectra. MTT assays demonstrated the low cytotoxicity of the control micelle and drug-loaded micelle on A549 cells and Bel 7402 cells. Then fluorescein and cypate were used as model drugs to optimize the constituents of micelles for drug entrapment efficiency and investigate the release kinetics of micelles in vitro. The FA and thermal co-mediated tumor-targeting efficiency of the two kinds of micelles were verified and compared in detail at cell level and animal level, respectively. These results indicated that the dual-targeting micelles are promising drug delivery systems for tumor-targeting therapy.

  7. Injury depth control from combined wavelength and power tuning in scanned beam laser thermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Martin; Soroka, Andrew; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Laser thermal therapy represents a possible method to treat premalignant epithelial lesions of the esophagus. Dynamically conforming the thermal injury profile to a specific lesion boundary is expected to improve the efficacy of such a treatment and avoid complications. In this work, we investigated wavelength tuning as a mechanism to achieve this aimed control over injury depth by using the strong variation of water absorption close to 1900 nm. We developed a numerical model simulating in steps the photon propagation in the tissue, the diffusion of the absorbed heat, and the resulting tissue damage. The model was compared with experimental results on porcine esophageal specimens ex vivo and showed good agreement. Combined with power tuning, the wavelength agility in the range of 1860 to 1895 nm extends the injury range compared to a fixed wavelength source beyond 1 mm, while at the same time improving control over shallow depths and avoiding vaporization at the tissue surface. The combination of two or three discrete wavelengths combined at variable ratios provides similar control, and may provide an improved strategy for the treatment of endothelial lesions. PMID:22112139

  8. Microdefects and self-interstitial diffusion in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, W.B.

    1998-05-01

    In this thesis, a study is presented of D-defects and self-interstitial diffusion in silicon using Li ion (Li{sup +}) drifting in an electric field and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Obstruction of Li{sup +} drifting has been found in wafers from certain but not all FZ p-type Si. Incomplete Li{sup +} drifting always occurs in the central region of the wafers. This work established that interstitial oxygen is not responsible for hindering Li{sup +} drifting. TEM was performed on a samples from the partially Li{sup +} drifted area and compared to regions without D-defects. Precipitates were found only in the region containing D-defects that had partially Li{sup +} drifted. This result indicates D-defects are responsible for the precipitation that halts the Li{sup +} drift process. Nitrogen (N) doping has been shown to eliminate D-defects as measured by conventional techniques. Li{sup +} drifting and D-defects provide a useful means to study Si self-interstitial diffusion. The process modeling program SUPREM-IV was used to simulate the results of Si self-interstitial diffusion obtained from Li{sup +} drifting experiments. Anomalous results from the Si self-interstitial diffusion experiments forced a re-examination of the possibility of thermal dissociation of D-defects. Thermal annealing experiments that were performed support this possibility. A review of the current literature illustrates the need for more research on the effects of thermal processing on FZ Si to understand the dissolution kinetics of D-defects.

  9. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy.

  10. Integrated microwave thermal imaging system with mechanically steerable HIFU therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian; Meaney, Paul M.; Fanning, Margaret W.; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    We are developing a microwave tomographic imaging system for non-invasive monitoring of temperature changes during thermal therapy, based on the known tissue conductivity temperature dependence. As with any monitoring system, the actual integration with a therapy device is a significant challenge. The combined high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)/microwave imaging approach is intriguing because the necessary characteristics for the microwave data gathering (highly EM attenuating coupling liquid) are not compromised by the HIFU requirements (low ultrasound attenuating coupling liquid) since the physics of the two wave propagations are quite different. We have previously reported results for a configuration for use in breast cancer treatment where the HIFU transducer was positioned within the array of coaxial support rods of the antennas which surrounded the breast while the ultrasound beam propagated towards the breast without being obstructed by the antennas. For our new implementation, we have positioned the heating device outside the antenna array and aimed the beam directly past the monopole antennas to the target tissue within. This configuration is particularly useful for various other anatomical sites where it is not possible to position the transducer inside the antenna array, such as for vital organs in the torso. Our initial results illustrate that the ultrasound beam is not significantly impaired by the presence of the microwave antennas and that the beam is readily steerable to desired locations. Additional dynamic experiments demonstrate good correlation between actual temperature rise and conductivity decreases in targeted positions. These results set the stage for actual animal experiments.

  11. Immunosuppressive agents and interstitial lung disease: what are the risks?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith C

    2014-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is unlikely to respond to immunosuppressive therapies, and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may be harmed by such therapy. In contrast, some forms of interstitial lung disease can respond well to treatment with immunosuppressive drug therapies. Such agents can, however, be associated with significant risk of adverse effects such as infection, diabetes, osteoporosis, myopathy, bone marrow suppression, hepatitis, urinary tract injury, and drug-induced pneumonitis. Treating clinicians must be aware of potential adverse reactions to any immunosuppressive drug that they prescribe for their patients, and they should implement appropriate pre-therapy screening (e.g., tuberculosis, hepatitis, renal insufficiency) and monitoring that is recommended to avoid/minimize risk during the treatment period. Some disorders (e.g., cellular non-specific interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, or sarcoidosis) may respond very well to immunosuppressive therapies including corticosteroids as monotherapy, and the use of steroid-sparing agents can minimize corticosteroid side effects and may enhance treatment efficacy for disorders such as sarcoidosis or connective tissue disease-associated forms of interstitial lung disease.

  12. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  13. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  14. Experimental investigations of an endoluminal ultrasound applicator for MR-guided thermal therapy of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter; Plata, Juan; Chen, Henry; Pauly, Kim Butts; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris

    2017-03-01

    An MR-guided endoluminal ultrasound applicator has been proposed for palliative and potential curative thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. Minimally invasive ablation or hyperthermia treatment of pancreatic tumor tissue would be performed with the applicator positioned in the gastrointestinal (GI) lumen, and sparing of the luminal tissue would be achieved with a water-cooled balloon surrounding the ultrasound transducers. This approach offers the capability of conformal volumetric therapy for fast treatment times, with control over the 3D spatial deposition of energy. Prototype endoluminal ultrasound applicators have been fabricated using 3D printed fixtures that seat two 3.2 or 5.6 MHz planar or curvilinear transducers and contain channels for wiring and water flow. Spiral surface coils have been integrated onto the applicator body to allow for device localization and tracking for therapies performed under MR guidance. Heating experiments with a tissue-mimicking phantom in a 3T MR scanner were performed and demonstrated capability of the prototype to perform volumetric heating through duodenal luminal tissue under real-time PRF-based MR temperature imaging (MRTI). Additional experiments were performed in ex vivo pig carcasses with the applicator inserted into the esophagus and aimed towards liver or soft tissue surrounding the spine under MR guidance. These experiments verified the capacity of heating targets up to 20-25 mm from the GI tract. Active device tracking and automated prescription of imaging and temperature monitoring planes through the applicator were made possible by using Hadamard encoded tracking sequences to obtain the coordinates of the applicator tracking coils. The prototype applicators have been integrated with an MR software suite that performs real-time device tracking and temperature monitoring.

  15. Interstitial brines in playa sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Van Denburgh, A.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Rettig, S.L.

    1969-01-01

    Study of several closed drainages in the Great Basin has shown that the interstitial solutions of shallow, fine-grained playa deposits store a large quantity of dissolved solids and are often more concentrated than associated lakes and ponds, except in peripheral zones of stream or ground-water inflow. These interstitial fluids, when compared with local runoff, impoundments, or spring waters, commonly have a distinctive ionic composition which sometimes cannot be explained by either simple mixing of surface and subsurface inflow or by evaporative concentration. At Abert Lake, Oregon, the interstitial solute concentrations increased with depth to values as much as five times greater than the lake, except where springs indicate significant ground-water input. Where Na+, Cl, and CO2 species constitute more than 90% of the solutes, Na+ Cl- ratios in the lake water are lower than in interstitial solutions of bottom cores and higher than in playa fluids. At the same time, Na+ K+ ratios are highest in the fluids of lake bottom muds and lowest in playa interstitials. In deeper playa profiles, interstitial Na+ Cl- tended to decrease with depth (5 ft. maximum). In the Abert Lake area, as in other parts of the western Great Basin, Na+ Cl- ratios are indicative of total CO2 in solution and the effects of organic decay in surficial sediments. These ratios, coupled with data on silica and bulk density, show that higher PCO2 accompanying decay promotes silicate dissolution and hydrogen ion exchange, stripping alkalis from sediment which had preferentially adsorbed K+ when entering the lake. On subsequent loss of pore fluid in the playa regime, silica initially released to solution in the lake environment is readsorbed on dissolution products. ?? 1969.

  16. Interstitial nephritis. A brief review.

    PubMed Central

    Heptinstall, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common condition, which in spite of a relatively constant pathologic picture has different etiologic agents and pathogenetic mechanisms. Failure to appreciate this, particularly in the chronic group, has led to considerable confusion and has been largely responsible for the overdiagnosis of chronic pyelonephritis. Although we are still largely ignorant of the causes of interstitial nephritis, it is now possible to define many of them. While experimental studies have not made spectacular contributions to our understanding, an attempt is now being made to develop appropriate models, and we hope these will enable us to still further clarify our understanding of other entities. PMID:776003

  17. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-07

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (I(spta); 35, 133 and 240 W cm(-2)) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure.

  18. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (Ispta; 35, 133 and 240 W cm-2) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure.

  19. Interstitial lung diseases in the hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Disayabutr, Supparerk; Calfee, Carolyn S; Collard, Harold R; Wolters, Paul J

    2015-09-25

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are disorders of the lung parenchyma. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and prognosis of ILDs vary depending on the underlying disease. The onset of most ILDs is insidious, but they may also present subacutely or require hospitalization for management. ILDs that may present subacutely include acute interstitial pneumonia, connective tissue disease-associated ILDs, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced ILDs, and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Prognosis and response to therapy depend on the type of underlying ILD being managed. This opinion piece discusses approaches to differentiating ILDs in the hospitalized patient, emphasizing the role of bronchoscopy and surgical lung biopsy. We then consider pharmacologic treatments and the use of mechanical ventilation in hospitalized patients with ILD. Finally, lung transplantation and palliative care as treatment modalities are considered. The diagnosis of ILD in hospitalized patients requires input from multiple disciplines. The prognosis of ILDs presenting acutely vary depending on the underlying ILD. Patients with advanced ILD or acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis have poor outcomes. The mainstay treatment in these patients is supportive care, and mechanical ventilation should only be used in these patients as a bridge to lung transplantation.

  20. Manual Khalifa Therapy in Patients with Completely Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament in the Knee: First Preliminary Results from Thermal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Litscher, Gerhard; Ofner, Michael; Litscher, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background: This preliminary publication describes acute temperature effects after manual Khalifa therapy. Aims: The goal of this study was to describe temperature distribution and the effects on surface temperature of the knees and feet in patients with completely ruptured anterior cruciate ligament before and immediately after the manual therapy. Materials and Methods: Ten male patients were investigated with thermal imaging. An infrared camera operating at a wavelength range of 7.5-13 μm was used. Temperature was analyzed at three locations on both knees and in addition on both feet. Results: The study revealed that baseline temperature of the injured knee differed from that of the untreated control knee. After the therapy on the injured knee, the surface temperature was significantly increased on both knees (injured and control). There were no significant changes in the temperature of the feet. Conclusions: Further studies using continuous thermal image recording may help to explain the details concerning the temperature distribution. PMID:24083223

  1. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  2. In vitro and in vivo mapping of drug release after laser ablation thermal therapy with doxorubicin-loaded hollow gold nanoshells using fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah J; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Min; Bouchard, Richard R; Mitcham, Trevor; Wallace, Michael; Stafford, R Jason; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay; Melancon, Marites P

    2013-11-28

    Doxorubicin-loaded hollow gold nanoshells (Dox@PEG-HAuNS) increase the efficacy of photothermal ablation (PTA) not only by mediating efficient PTA but also through chemotherapy, and therefore have potential utility for local anticancer therapy. However, in vivo real-time monitoring of Dox release and temperature achieved during the laser ablation technique has not been previously demonstrated before. In this study, we used fluorescence optical imaging to map the release of Dox from Dox@PEG-HAuNS and photoacoustic imaging to monitor the tumor temperature achieved during near-infrared laser-induced photothermal heating in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, treatment with a 3-W laser was sufficient to initiate the release of Dox from Dox@PEG-HAuNS (1:3:1 wt/wt, 1.32 × 10(12)particles/mL). Laser powers of 3 and 6W achieved ablative temperatures of more than 50°C. In 4T1 tumor-bearing nude mice that received intratumoral or intravenous injections of Dox@PEG-HAuNS, fluorescence optical imaging (emission wavelength = 600 nm, excitation wavelength = 500 nm) revealed that the fluorescence intensity in surface laser-treated tumors 24h after treatment was significantly higher than that in untreated tumors (p = 0.015 for intratumoral, p = 0.008 for intravenous). Similar results were obtained using an interstitial laser to irradiate tumors following the intravenous injection of Dox@PEG-HAuNS (p = 0.002 at t = 24h). Photoacoustic imaging (acquisition wavelength = 800 nm) revealed that laser treatment caused a substantial increase in tumor temperature, from 37 °C to ablative temperatures of more than 50 °C. Ex vivo analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity of laser-treated tumors was twice as high as that of untreated tumors (p = 0.009). Histological analysis confirmed that intratumoral injection of Dox@PEG-HAuNS and laser treatment caused significantly more tumor necrosis compared to tumors that were not treated with laser (p<0.001). On the basis of these findings, we

  3. In vitro and in vivo mapping of drug release after laser ablation thermal therapy with doxorubicin-loaded hollow gold nanoshells using fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hannah J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Min; Bouchard, Richard R.; Mitcham, Trevor; Wallace, Michael; Stafford, R. Jason; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay; Melancon, Marites P.

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin-loaded hollow nanoshells (Dox@PEG-HAuNS) increases the efficacy of photothermal ablation (PTA) by not only mediating efficient PTA but also through chemotherapy, and therefore have potential utility for local anticancer therapy. However, in vivo real-time monitoring of Dox release and temperature achieved during the laser ablation technique has not been previously demonstrated before. In this study, we used fluorescence optical imaging to map the release of Dox from Dox@PEG-HAuNS and photoacoustic imaging to monitor the tumor temperature achieved during near-infrared laser–induced photothermal heating in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, treatment with a 3-W laser was sufficient to initiate the release of Dox from Dox@PEG-HAuNS (1:3:1 wt/wt, 1.32×1012 particles/mL). Laser powers of 3 and 6 W achieved ablative temperatures of more than 50 °C. In 4T1 tumor–bearing nude mice that received intratumoral or intravenous injections of Dox@PEG-HAuNS, fluorescence optical imaging (emission wavelength = 600 nm, excitation wavelength = 500 nm) revealed that the fluorescence intensity in surface laser–treated tumors 24 h after treatment was significantly higher than that in untreated tumors (p=0.015 for intratumoral, p=0.008 for intravenous). Similar results were obtained using an interstitial laser to irradiate tumors following the intravenous injection of Dox@PEG-HAuNS (p=0.002 at t=24h). Photoacoustic imaging (acquisition wavelength = 800 nm) revealed that laser treatment caused a substantial increase in tumor temperature, from 37 °C to ablative temperatures of more than 50 °C. Ex vivo analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity of laser-treated tumors was twice as high as that of untreated tumors (p=0.009). Histological analysis confirmed that intratumoral injection of Dox@PEG-HAuNS and laser treatment caused significantly more tumor necrosis compared to tumors that were not treated with laser (p<0.001). On the basis of these findings, we conclude

  4. [Observation on curative effect of thermal acupuncture needle muscular stimulation therapy for knee osteoarthritis patients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Chu; He, Shao-Feng; Wang, Ren-Can; Zhou, Yong-Mei

    2012-06-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of thermal acupuncture needle muscular stimulation for treatment of knee osteoarthritis patients. A total of 120 outpatients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly and equally divided into control and treatment groups. Patients of the treatment group were treated by inserting the acupuncture needles into the attached sites of the quadriceps femoris, musculus vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, etc. around the knee joint. The needles were manipulated repeately till "Deqi", followed by attaching a piece of ignited moxa-roll (about 2 cm length) to the needle handle. The treatment was conducted once a week, 4 weeks altogether. Patients of the control group were treated by oral administration of Celebrex (a specific inhibitor of COX-2, 200 mg/time, once daily, 4 weeks together). The therapeutic effect was evaluated by using visual analogue scale (VAS), Lequesne Index (Chinese Version) of osteoarthritis after 4 weeks' treatment and 3 months after the treatment. After 4 weeks' treatment and 3 months after the treatment, the effective rates were 78.3% (47/60) and 81.7% (49/60) in the control group, and 96.6% (58/60) and 96.6% (58/60) in the treatment group, respectively, being significantly higher in the treatment group (P<0.05). Both VAS scores and Lequesne Indexes in the treatment group, and VAS scores in the control group were decreased significantly after 4 weeks' treatment and 3 months' follow-up (P<0.05). The effects of the treatment group were considerably superior to those of the control group (P<0.05). Thermal needle muscular stimulation therapy is effective for relieving knee osteoarthritis patients' symptoms of pain, knee-joint stiffness, swelling, walking capability, etc.

  5. Interstitial-phase precipitation in iron-base alloys: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, A.R.

    1982-06-01

    Recent developments have elucidated the atomistic mechanisms of precipitation of interstitial elements in simple alloy systems. However, in the more technologically important iron base alloys, interstitial phase precipitation is generally not well understood. The present experimental study was therefore designed to test the applicability of these concepts to more complex ferrous alloys. Hence, a comparative study was made of interstitial phase precipitation in ferritic Fe-Si-C and in austenitic phosphorus-containing Fe-Cr-Ni steels. These systems were subjected to a variety of quench-age thermal treatments, and the microstructural development was subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Assessment of irrigation dynamics in magnetic-resonance guided laser induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT).

    PubMed

    Sinha, Saurabh; Hargreaves, Eric; Patel, Nitesh V; Danish, Shabbar F

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic-Resonance Guided Laser-Induced Thermal Therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally-invasive ablation procedure for treating intracranial pathology using laser energy delivered through a fiber-optic. Saline irrigation is used to cool the fiber-optic, but factors affecting irrigation efficacy are not well studied, and quantitative information regarding irrigation speed and volume during MRgLITT procedures have not been reported. Here, we aimed to characterize variables affecting irrigation efficacy in MRgLITT. We investigated the irrigation setup of the Visualase thermal therapy system during MRgLITT procedures (Visualase Inc., Houston, TX). Using the system's peristaltic pump, irrigation flow rate was quantitated by measuring volume over five one-minute intervals. Pump settings 1-10 were assessed with and without the position-locking, resistance-imparting bone anchor in both single and double-catheter setups. Multiple tightness settings of the bone anchor were tested, and flow rates were analyzed. Rate of flow increased non-linearly with pump setting (F(1,4) = 2168.86; P < 0.001) in both single and double catheter setups. The lowest pump setting had a flow rate of 24 cc/min, while the highest setting was 36 cc/min. The rate of change in flow successively decreased without plateau. Tightness setting of the bone anchor affected flow in a reverse sigmoid pattern, with no impact on rate until after two quarter-turns, which produced a marked decrease in flow up to one-half of the initial rate (F(1,4) = 12818.96; P < 0.001). Flow rate through the cooling catheter in MRgLITT follows a non-linear pattern with increasing peristaltic pump speed. This rate is subject to significant changes when the bone anchor is tightened more than two quarter-turns. These findings serve as a foundation for future studies aimed at understanding the effect of irrigation speeds in achieving optimal ablation volumes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laria, A.; Lurati, A.; Scarpellini, M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  8. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy—A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Shafirstein, Gal; Bellnier, David; Oakley, Emily; Hamilton, Sasheen; Potasek, Mary; Beeson, Karl; Parilov, Evgueni

    2017-01-01

    Multiple clinical studies have shown that interstitial photodynamic therapy (I-PDT) is a promising modality in the treatment of locally-advanced cancerous tumors. However, the utilization of I-PDT has been limited to several centers. The objective of this focused review is to highlight the different approaches employed to administer I-PDT with photosensitizers that are either approved or in clinical studies for the treatment of prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, head and neck cancer, and brain cancer. Our review suggests that I-PDT is a promising treatment in patients with large-volume or thick tumors. Image-based treatment planning and real-time dosimetry are required to optimize and further advance the utilization of I-PDT. In addition, pre- and post-imaging using computed tomography (CT) with contrast may be utilized to assess the response. PMID:28125024

  9. Outcomes of endoscopic treatment of gastroduodenal Dieulafoy's lesion with rubber band ligation and thermal/injection therapy.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Rushda; Shaukat, Masud; Ramirez, Francisco C

    2003-04-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion is a rare but important cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Current endoscopic methods used to treat Dieulafoy's lesion include injection, with or without thermal methods, and mechanical methods. The latter include variceal ligation and hemoclips. There are no studies comparing the outcomes of rubber band ligation and injection with or without thermal therapy. To report the outcomes of Dieulafoy's lesion treated endoscopically with rubber band ligation and injection with or without thermal therapy at a single institution. Patients with the diagnosis of Dieulafoy's lesion treated endoscopically at the Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center in Phoenix, between August 1994 and August 2002 were analyzed. Demographic data, mode of presentation, risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, hemodynamic parameters, blood transfusion requirements, endoscopic findings, details of endoscopic therapy, length of stay in ICU/hospital, complications, recurrence of bleeding, and mortality rates were collected and compared between those receiving endoscopic band ligation (EBL group) and those receiving injection with or without thermal therapy (non-EBL group). Twenty-three patients with Dieulafoy's lesion (14 in the EBL group and nine in the non-EBL group) were studied. All patients were men. The mean age, hemoglobin levels on admission, and the transfusion requirements before therapy were similar in both groups. Fourteen patients (eight in the EBL- and six in the non-EBL groups) presented with hematemesis and the remaining with melena. The majority of Dieulafoy's lesions (91.3%) were located in the stomach and two in the duodenum. Active bleeding at the time of endoscopy was seen in 61% of cases, and immediate hemostasis was achieved with either method in 100% of patients. Early rebleeding (within 72 hours of endoscopic therapy) occurred in only one patient treated with epinephrine plus heater probe therapy. The length of stay in ICU was longer in the non

  10. Microwave imaging for thermal therapy monitoring: temperature accuracy and image reconstruction time improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meaney, Paul M.; Fanning, Margaret W.; Li, Dun; Fang, Qianqian; Pendergrass, Sarah; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2003-06-01

    Microwave imaging has been investigated as a method of non-invasively estimating tissue electrical properties especially the conductivity, which is highly temperature dependent, as a means of monitoring thermal therapy. The technique we have chosen utilizes an iterative Gauss-Newton approach to converge on the correct property distribution. A previous implementation utilizing the complex form (CF) of the electric fields along with a sub-optimal phantom experimental configuration resulted in imaging temperature accuracy of only 1.6°C. Applying the log-magnitude/phase form (LMPF) of the algorithm has resulted in imaging accuracy on the order of 0.3°C which is a significant advance for the area of treatment monitoring. The LMPF algorithm was originally introduced as a way to reconstruct images of large, high-contrast scatterers as is the case in breast imaging. However, recent analysis of the Jacobian matrices for the comparable implementations has shown that the reconstruction problem in the new formulation more closely resembles a linear task as is the case in x-ray computed tomography. The comparisons were performed by examining plots of the Jacobian matrix terms for fixed transmit and receive antennas which demonstrated higher sensitivity in the center of the imaging zone along with narrower paths of senstivity between the atnenna pair for the LMPF algorithm. Animal model experiments have also been performed to validate these capabilities in a more realistic setting. Finally, the overall computational efficiency has been significantly enhanced through the use of the adjoint image reconstruction approach. This enables us to reconstruct images in roughly one minute which is essential if the approach is to be used as a therapy feedback mechanism.

  11. Experimental verification of improved depth-dose distribution using hyper-thermal neutron incidence in neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed the utilization of 'hyper-thermal neutrons' for neutron capture therapy (NCT) from the viewpoint of the improvement in the dose distribution in a human body. In order to verify the improved depth-dose distribution due to hyper-thermal neutron incidence, two experiments were carried out using a test-type hyper-thermal neutron generator at a thermal neutron irradiation field in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR), which is actually utilized for NCT clinical irradiation. From the free-in-air experiment for the spectrum-shift characteristics, it was confirmed that the hyper-thermal neutrons of approximately 860 K at maximum could be obtained by the generator. From the phantom experiment, the improvement effect and the controllability for the depth-dose distribution were confirmed. For example, it was found that the relative neutron depth-dose distribution was about 1 cm improved with the 860 K hyper-thermal neutron incidence, compared to the normal thermal neutron incidence.

  12. Design and realisation of tissue-equivalent dielectric simulators for dosimetric studies on microwave antennas for interstitial ablation.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, V; Pinto, R; Lodato, R; Lovisolo, G A; Cavagnaro, M

    2012-07-01

    Thermal ablation therapies, based on electromagnetic field sources (interstitial or intracavitary antennas) at radio and microwave frequencies, are increasingly used in medicine due to their proven efficacy in the treatment of many diseases (tumours, stenosis, etc). Such techniques need standardized procedures, still not completely consolidated, as to analyze the behaviour of antennas for treatment optimisation. Several tissue-equivalent dielectric simulators (also named phantoms) have been developed to represent human head tissues, and extensively used in the analysis of human exposure to the electromagnetic emissions from hand-held devices; yet, very few studies have considered other tissues, as those met in ablation therapies. The objective of this study was to develop phantoms of liver and kidney tissue to experimentally characterise interstitial microwave antennas in reference conditions. Phantom properties depend on the simulated target tissue (liver or kidney) and the considered frequency (2.45 GHz in this work), addressing the need for a transparent liquid to easily control the positioning of the probe with respect to the antenna under test. An experimental set-up was also developed and used to characterise microwave ablation antenna performances. Finally, a comparison between measurements and numerical simulations was performed for the cross-validation of the experimental set-up and the numerical model. The obtained results highlight the fundamental role played by dielectric simulators in the development of microwave ablation devices, representing the first step towards the definition of a procedure for the ablation treatment planning.

  13. Transurethral ultrasound applicators with directional heating patterns for prostate thermal therapy: in vivo evaluation using magnetic resonance thermometry.

    PubMed

    Diederich, C J; Stafford, R J; Nau, W H; Burdette, E C; Price, R E; Hazle, J D

    2004-02-01

    A catheter-based transurethral ultrasound applicator with angularly directional heating patterns has been designed for prostate thermal therapy and evaluated in canine prostate in vivo using MRI to monitor and assess performance. The ultrasound transducer array (3.5 mm diameter tubular transducers, 180 degrees active sectors, approximately 7.5 MHz) was integrated to a flexible delivery catheter (4 mm OD), and encapsulated within an expandable balloon (35 mm x 10 mm OD, 80 ml min(-1) ambient water) for coupling and cooling of the prostatic urethra. These devices were used to thermally coagulate targeted portions of the canine prostate (n = 2) while using MR thermal imaging (MRTI) to monitor the therapy. MRI was also used for target definition, positioning of the applicator, and evaluation of target viability post-therapy. MRTI was based upon the complex phase-difference mapping technique using an interleaved gradient echo-planar imaging sequence with lipid suppression. MRTI derived temperature distributions, thermal dose exposures, T1-contrast enhanced MR images, and histology of sectioned prostates were used to define destroyed tissue zones and characterize the three-dimensional heating patterns. The ultrasound applicators produced approximately 180 degrees directed zones of thermal coagulation within targeted tissue which extended 15-20 mm radially to the outer boundary of the prostate within 15 min. Transducer activation lengths of 17 mm and 24 mm produced contiguous zones of coagulation extending axially approximately 18 mm and approximately 25 mm from base to apex, respectively. Peak temperatures around 90 degrees C were measured, with approximately 50 degrees C-52 degrees C corresponding to outer boundary t43 = 240 min at approximately 15 min treatment time. These devices are MRI compatible, and when coupled with multiplanar MRTI provide a means for selectively controlling the length and sector angle of therapeutic thermal treatment in the prostate.

  14. A Preclinical System Prototype for Focused Microwave Thermal Therapy of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Stang, John; Haynes, Mark; Carson, Paul; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2016-01-01

    A preclinical prototype of a transcutaneous thermal therapy system has been developed for the targeted treatment of breast cancer cells using focused microwaves as an adjuvant to radiation, chemotherapy, and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The prototype system employs a 2D array of tapered microstrip patch antennas operating at 915 MHz to focus continuous-wave microwave energy transcutaneously into the pendent breast suspended in a coupling medium. Prior imaging studies are used to ascertain the material properties of the breast tissue, and this data is incorporated into a multiphysics model. Time-reversal techniques are employed to find a solution (relative amplitudes and phase) for focusing at a given location. Modeling tests of this time-reversal focusing method have been performed which demonstrate good targeting accuracy within heterogeneous breast tissue. Experimental results using the laboratory prototype to perform focused heating in tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms have demonstrated 1.5 cm diameter focal spot sizes and differential heating at the desired focus sufficient to achieve an antitumor effect confined to the target region. PMID:22614518

  15. Combined chemo- and photo-thermal therapy delivered by multifunctional theranostic gold nanorod-loaded microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan; di, Yingfeng; Chen, Dan; Madrid, Kyle; Zhang, Min; Tian, Caiping; Tang, Liping; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-05-01

    A polyelectrolyte microcapsule-based, cancer-targeting, and controlled drug delivery system has been developed as a multifunctional theranostic agent for synergistic cancer treatment. This new system, called FA-MC@GNR, is composed of folic acid (FA)-modified, multi-layered, hollow microcapsules loaded with gold nanorods (GNRs), and undergoes thermal degradation under near infrared (NIR) light. Either an NIR dye (MPA) or anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) was loaded into the microcapsules via physical adsorption, yielding FA-MC@GNRs/MPA or FA-MC@GNRs/DOX, both of which exhibit no obvious toxicity, high stability, and remarkably improved tumor-targeting capabilities in vivo. Utilizing the strong NIR absorption of FA-MC@GNRs/DOX, we demonstrate the system's ability to simultaneously elicit photothermal therapy and controlled chemotherapy, achieving synergistic cancer treatment both in vitro cellular and in vivo animal experiments. Our study presents a new type of multifunctional micro-carrier for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and photothermal agents, which has been shown to be an effective therapeutic approach for combined cancer treatment.

  16. A preclinical system prototype for focused microwave thermal therapy of the breast.

    PubMed

    Stang, John; Haynes, Mark; Carson, Paul; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2012-09-01

    A preclinical prototype of a transcutaneous thermal therapy system has been developed for the targeted treatment of breast cancer cells using focused microwaves as an adjuvant to radiation, chemotherapy, and high-intensity-focused ultrasound. The prototype system employs a 2-D array of tapered microstrip patch antennas operating at 915 MHz to focus continuous-wave microwave energy transcutaneously into the pendent breast suspended in a coupling medium. Prior imaging studies are used to ascertain the material properties of the breast tissue, and these data are incorporated into a multiphysics model. Time-reversal techniques are employed to find a solution (relative amplitudes and phase) for focusing at a given location. Modeling tests of this time-reversal focusing method have been performed, which demonstrate good targeting accuracy within heterogeneous breast tissue. Experimental results using the laboratory prototype to perform focused heating in tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms have demonstrated 1.5-cm-diameter focal spot sizes and differential heating at the desired focus sufficient to achieve an antitumor effect confined to the target region.

  17. Fast-pressure field calculations applied to large spherical ultrasound phased arrays designed for thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Wu, Liyong; McGough, Robert J.

    2005-04-01

    Large spherical ultrasound phased arrays are ideal for simulation studies of thermal therapy devices designed for noninvasive breast cancer treatments. In a spherical array, circular sources packed in a dense hexagonal arrangement facilitate the most efficient use of the available aperture. Circular sources are also preferred for simulations of large phased arrays because pressure fields are computed more rapidly for circular pistons than for any other transducer geometry. The computation time is further reduced for circular transducers with grid sectoring. With this approach, the grid of computed pressures is divided into several regions, and then grid sectoring applies more abscissas in regions where the pressure integral converges slowly and fewer abscissas where the integral converges rapidly. As a result, the peak value of the numerical error is roughly the same in each sector, so the maximum numerical error in the computed field is maintained while the computation time is significantly reduced. The grid sectoring approach is extended to three dimensions (3D) for pressure field calculations with spherical arrays. In 3D calculations, the sectors are represented by cones, and the intersections between the computational grid and these cones define the boundaries required for grid sectoring. When these cone structures are applied to spherical phased arrays, 3D grid sectoring calculations rapidly compute the pressure fields so that the time required for array design and evaluation is substantially reduced.

  18. Simeprevir with peginterferon and ribavirin induced interstitial pneumonitis: first case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Katsuyoshi; Okubo, Akihiko

    2015-01-21

    The effectiveness of hepatitis C treatment has improved with the development of interferon (IFN), and it has drastically improved with the development of peg-interferon-α (PEG-IFN) in combination with ribavirin (RBV) and, more recently, with the addition of a protease inhibitor. Simeprevir, which is a second-generation protease inhibitor, has shown clinically favorable safety and tolerability profiles. Simeprevir received its first global approval in Japan in September 2013 for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C in combination with PEG-IFN and RBV. One serious adverse event associated with IFN therapy is interstitial pneumonitis, which can be fatal. We experienced a patient with interstitial pneumonitis that was induced by simeprevir with PEG-IFN and RBV therapy for chronic hepatitis C in the early stages of therapy (8 wk after initiating therapy). This is the first case report of interstitial pneumonitis with simeprevir with PEG-IFN and RBV in the world. In addition, it is very interesting that the onset of interstitial pneumonitis was earlier than that in conventional PEG-IFN and RBV therapy. This finding suggests that simeprevir augments the adverse event. We present this case report in light of relevant literature on interstitial pneumonitis with conventional PEG-IFN and RBV therapy.

  19. Phentermine induced acute interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Emily Ximin; Wilson, Gregory John; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan

    2017-03-09

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) has a number of medication-related aetiologies. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes; however, any medication has the potential to cause drug-induced AIN. We report the first case of phentermine-induced AIN. A Caucasian woman aged 43 years presented with a 5-week history of lethargy, left-sided lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She had been taking phentermine for weight loss for 9 months and had recently ceased the medication. The patient underwent a renal biopsy that showed a predominantly lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate with a moderate number of eosinophils consistent with AIN. Phentermine is increasingly used for weight loss in obese patients. This is the first case implicating phentermine as the causative agent for drug-induced AIN. While rare, phentermine-induced AIN is a possible adverse reaction of phentermine. Physicians and patients need to be aware of this risk.

  20. Interstitial lung disease in children.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Salvatore; di Palmo, Emanuela; Ragazzo, Vincenzo; Ghione, Silvia

    2013-10-01

    Children's interstitial lung disease (ILD) includes a wide range of rare respiratory disorders associated with high morbidity and mortality. Genetic factors, systemic disease processes, nonspecific inflammatory or fibrotic patterns of repair seen in a number of clinical settings are involved in the ILD pathogenesis. Specific disorders more prevalent in young children include diffuse developmental disorders, alveolar growth abnormalities, genetic surfactant disorders, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy. It may be difficult to recognize these entities and this can lead to delayed treatment. The diagnostic approach is based on a combination of history/physical examinations, imaging studies, pulmonary function testing, genetic testing, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and in most cases an open lung biopsy. Although some disease types overlap with those seen in adults, in this review emphasis is placed on entities unique to the pediatric population focusing on clinical characteristics, histologic definitions, radiologic-pathologic correlation and therapeutic strategies. © 2013.

  1. Smoking and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Margaritopoulos, George A; Vasarmidi, Eirini; Jacob, Joseph; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M

    2015-09-01

    For many years has been well known that smoking could cause lung damage. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer have been the two most common smoking-related lung diseases. In the recent years, attention has also focused on the role of smoking in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Indeed, there are three diseases, namely respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, that are currently considered aetiologically linked to smoking and a few others which are more likely to develop in smokers. Here, we aim to focus on the most recent findings regarding the role of smoking in the pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of ILDs. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  2. MRI-compatible ultrasound heating system with ring-shaped phased arrays for breast tumor thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Nien; Chen, Guan-Ming; Lin, Bo-Sian; Lien, Pi-Hsien; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Chen, Gin-Shin; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound transducers can carry out precise and efficient power deposition for tumor thermal therapy under the guidance of magnetic resonance imaging. For a better heating, organ-specific ultrasound transducers with precision location control system should be developed for tumors located at various organs. It is feasible to perform a better heating for breast tumor thermal therapy with a ring-shaped ultrasound phased-array transducer. In this study, we developed ring-shaped phased-array ultrasound transducers with 1.0 and 2.5 MHz and a precision location control system to drive the transducers to the desired location to sonicate the designated region. Both thermo-sensitive hydrogel phantom and ex vivo fresh pork were used to evaluate the heating performance of the transducers. The results showed that the ring-shaped phased array ultrasound transducers were very promising for breast tumor heating with the variation of heating patterns and without overheating the ribs.

  3. Pulmonary gas conducting interstitial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Gunnar; Jorulf, Håkan; Farkas, Árpád; Eden-Strindberg, Jerker; Gennser, Mikael; Jókay, Ágnes; Krebsz, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the growing efforts oriented towards revealing different aspects of emphysema, the persistence of the emphysematous or emphysema-like changes (ELCs) is not explored yet in the open literature. In this study we demonstrate the persistence of an ELC for 22 years in a spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) patient which indicates a hitherto unknown gas supply to the ELC. For this purpose we used high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images processed into three-dimensional (3D) geometry. By the same token, not only a long persistence but also the volume increase of this ELC between 2002 and 2010 was demonstrated. The 3D geometry visualized an aerated interstitial structure between the sites of supposed gas leakage at the wall of the third generation airways and the ELC. This potential gas conducting interstitial pathway is not a continuation and has neither the form nor the structure of a bronchus. The finding suggests that in this patient the intrabronchial gas passes through the bronchial wall and via a gas conducting interstitial pathway reaches the ELC. Despite the availability of the presently employed techniques for at least 15 years, such case and phenomenon have not been described previously. The retrieval of the patient suggests that the findings could be relevant for a considerable proportion of the population. PMID:26500785

  4. SU-E-J-161: Inverse Problems for Optical Parameters in Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenholtz, SJ; Stafford, RJ; Fuentes, DT

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is investigated as a neurosurgical intervention for oncological applications throughout the body by active post market studies. Real-time MR temperature imaging is used to monitor ablative thermal delivery in the clinic. Additionally, brain MRgLITT could improve through effective planning for laser fiber's placement. Mathematical bioheat models have been extensively investigated but require reliable patient specific physical parameter data, e.g. optical parameters. This abstract applies an inverse problem algorithm to characterize optical parameter data obtained from previous MRgLITT interventions. Methods: The implemented inverse problem has three primary components: a parameter-space search algorithm, a physics model, and training data. First, the parameter-space search algorithm uses a gradient-based quasi-Newton method to optimize the effective optical attenuation coefficient, μ-eff. A parameter reduction reduces the amount of optical parameter-space the algorithm must search. Second, the physics model is a simplified bioheat model for homogeneous tissue where closed-form Green's functions represent the exact solution. Third, the training data was temperature imaging data from 23 MRgLITT oncological brain ablations (980 nm wavelength) from seven different patients. Results: To three significant figures, the descriptive statistics for μ-eff were 1470 m{sup −1} mean, 1360 m{sup −1} median, 369 m{sup −1} standard deviation, 933 m{sup −1} minimum and 2260 m{sup −1} maximum. The standard deviation normalized by the mean was 25.0%. The inverse problem took <30 minutes to optimize all 23 datasets. Conclusion: As expected, the inferred average is biased by underlying physics model. However, the standard deviation normalized by the mean is smaller than literature values and indicates an increased precision in the characterization of the optical parameters needed to plan MRg

  5. A Numerical Investigation of the Electric and Thermal Cell Kill Distributions in Electroporation-Based Therapies in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation-based therapies are powerful biotechnological tools for enhancing the delivery of exogeneous agents or killing tissue with pulsed electric fields (PEFs). Electrochemotherapy (ECT) and gene therapy based on gene electrotransfer (EGT) both use reversible electroporation to deliver chemotherapeutics or plasmid DNA into cells, respectively. In both ECT and EGT, the goal is to permeabilize the cell membrane while maintaining high cell viability in order to facilitate drug or gene transport into the cell cytoplasm and induce a therapeutic response. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) results in cell kill due to exposure to PEFs without drugs and is under clinical evaluation for treating otherwise unresectable tumors. These PEF therapies rely mainly on the electric field distributions and do not require changes in tissue temperature for their effectiveness. However, in immediate vicinity of the electrodes the treatment may results in cell kill due to thermal damage because of the inhomogeneous electric field distribution and high current density during the electroporation-based therapies. Therefore, the main objective of this numerical study is to evaluate the influence of pulse number and electrical conductivity in the predicted cell kill zone due to irreversible electroporation and thermal damage. Specifically, we simulated a typical IRE protocol that employs ninety 100-µs PEFs. Our results confirm that it is possible to achieve predominant cell kill due to electroporation if the PEF parameters are chosen carefully. However, if either the pulse number and/or the tissue conductivity are too high, there is also potential to achieve cell kill due to thermal damage in the immediate vicinity of the electrodes. Therefore, it is critical for physicians to be mindful of placement of electrodes with respect to critical tissue structures and treatment parameters in order to maintain the non-thermal benefits of electroporation and prevent unnecessary damage to

  6. Biological Effects Induced by Non-thermal Ultrasound and Implications for Cancer Therapy: A Review of the Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Tang, Justin; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2015-04-01

    Recent advancements in imaging and targeting have expanded the utility of ultrasound therapy with increasing attention being paid to the application of ultrasound in cancer therapy. We present in this article a review of the biological effects of non-thermal ultrasound that could find application in cancer treatment in the near and long term. A careful examination of the ultrasound parameters that elicited these observed effects is needed so that one may refine and apply these results for clinical application. Reported biological effects from non-thermal ultrasound have been categorized into mechanical and chemical means of action. Cavitation and acoustic radiation force are the main contributors to sonomechanical effects of ultrasound while reactive oxygen species contribute to its sonochemical effects. These two categories are responsible for observations such as induction of apoptosis in cancer cells, disturbance of the cytoskeleton, enhancement of gene transfection and chemotherapeutic potency, and modulation of cellular proliferation and protein synthesis. In this review we have considered the biological effects of non-thermal ultrasound, the range of parameters at which these biological effects are observed, and the applicability of the observed biological effects to cancer therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Temperature mapping and thermal dose calculation in combined radiation therapy and 13.56 MHz radiofrequency hyperthermia for tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Kyung; Prasad, Bibin; Kim, Suzy

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the synergistic effect of radiotherapy and radiofrequency hyperthermia therapy in the treatment of lung and liver cancers, we studied the mechanism of heat absorption and transfer in the tumor using electro-thermal simulation and high-resolution temperature mapping techniques. A realistic tumor-induced mouse anatomy, which was reconstructed and segmented from computed tomography images, was used to determine the thermal distribution in tumors during radiofrequency (RF) heating at 13.56 MHz. An RF electrode was used as a heat source, and computations were performed with the aid of the multiphysics simulation platform Sim4Life. Experiments were carried out on a tumor-mimicking agar phantom and a mouse tumor model to obtain a spatiotemporal temperature map and thermal dose distribution. A high temperature increase was achieved in the tumor from both the computation and measurement, which elucidated that there was selective high-energy absorption in tumor tissue compared to the normal surrounding tissues. The study allows for effective treatment planning for combined radiation and hyperthermia therapy based on the high-resolution temperature mapping and high-precision thermal dose calculation.

  8. Speed of sound estimation for thermal monitoring using an active ultrasound element during liver ablation therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Audigier, Chloé; Dillow, Austin; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal monitoring for ablation therapy has high demands for preserving healthy tissues while removing malignant ones completely. Various methods have been investigated. However, exposure to radiation, cost-effectiveness, and inconvenience hinder the use of X-ray or MRI methods. Due to the non-invasiveness and real-time capabilities of ultrasound, it is widely used in intraoperative procedures. Ultrasound thermal monitoring methods have been developed for affordable monitoring in real-time. We propose a new method for thermal monitoring using an ultrasound element. By inserting a Lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) element to generate the ultrasound signal in the liver tissues, the single travel time of flight is recorded from the PZT element to the ultrasound transducer. We detect the speed of sound change caused by the increase in temperature during ablation therapy. We performed an ex vivo experiment with liver tissues to verify the feasibility of our speed of sound estimation technique. The time of flight information is used in an optimization method to recover the speed of sound maps during the ablation, which are then converted into temperature maps. The result shows that the trend of temperature changes matches with the temperature measured at a single point. The estimation error can be decreased by using a proper curve linking the speed of sound to the temperature. The average error over time was less than 3 degrees Celsius for a bovine liver. The speed of sound estimation using a single PZT element can be used for thermal monitoring.

  9. Treatment of malignant melanoma by selective thermal neutron capture therapy using melanoma-seeking compound

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Tsuji, M.; Hatta, S.; Ueda, M.; Honda, C.; Suzuki, T.

    1989-05-01

    As pigment cells undergo melanoma genesis, accentuated melanogenesis concurrently occurs in principle. Subsequent to the understanding of intrinsic factors controlling both processes, we found our selective melanoma neutron capture therapy (NCT) using 10B-dopa (melanin substrate) analogue, 10B1-p-boronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA), followed by 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction, induced by essentially harmless thermal neutrons, which releases energy of 2.33 MeV to 14 mu, the diameter of melanoma cells. In vitro/in vivo radiobiological analysis revealed the highly enhanced melanoma killing effect of 10B1-BPA. Chemical and prompt gamma ray spectrometry assays of 10B accumulated within melanoma cells after 10B1-BPA administration in vitro and in vivo show high affinity, e.g., 10B melanoma/blood ratio of 11.5. After successfully eradicating melanoma transplanted into hamsters with NCT, we advanced to preclinical studies using spontaneously occurring melanoma in Duroc pig skin. We cured three melanoma cases, 4.6 to 12 cm in diameter, by single neutron capture treatment. Complete disappearance of melanoma was obtained without substantial side effects. Acute and subacute toxicity as well as pharmacodynamics of 10B1-BPA have been studied in relation to therapeutic dosage requirements. Clinical radiation dosimetry using human phantom has been carried out. Further preclinical studies using human melanoma transplanted into nude mouse have been a useful model for obtaining optimal results for each melanoma type. We recently treated the first human melanoma patient with our NCT, using essentially the method for Duroc pig melanoma, and obtained similar regression time course leading to cure.

  10. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  11. Bronchoscopic thermal vapour ablation therapy in the management of heterogeneous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Snell, Gregory; Herth, Felix J F; Hopkins, Peter; Baker, Kimberley M; Witt, Christian; Gotfried, Mark H; Valipour, Arschang; Wagner, Manfred; Stanzel, Franz; Egan, Jim J; Kesten, Steven; Ernst, Armin

    2012-06-01

    The need for a less invasive procedure than surgical lung volume reduction that can produce consistent improvements with reduced morbidity remains a medical goal in patients with emphysema. We sought to determine the effect of bronchoscopic thermal vapour ablation (BTVA) on lung volumes and outcomes in patients with emphysema. 44 patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema were treated unilaterally with BTVA. Entry criteria included: age 40-75 yrs, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) 15-45% predicted, previous pulmonary rehabilitation and a heterogeneity index (tissue/air ratio of lower lobe/upper lobe) from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) ≥ 1.2. Changes in FEV(1), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), 6-min walk distance (6 MWD), modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnoea score, and hyperinflation were measured at baseline, and 3 and 6 months post-BTVA. At 6 months, mean ± SE FEV(1) improved by 141 ± 26 mL (p<0.001) and residual volume was reduced by 406 ± 113 mL (p<0.0001). SGRQ total score improved by 14.0 ± 2.4 points (p<0.001), with 73% improving by ≥ 4 points. Improvements were observed in 6 MWD (46.5 ± 10.6 m) and mMRC dyspnoea score (0.9 ± 0.2) (p<0.001 for both). Lower respiratory events (n=11) were the most common adverse event and occurred most often during the initial 30 days. BTVA therapy results in clinically relevant improvements in lung function, quality of life and exercise tolerance in upper lobe predominant emphysema.

  12. A Multifunctional Platform for Tumor Angiogenesis-Targeted Chemo-Thermal Therapy Using Polydopamine-Coated Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Su, Huilan; Cai, Jiali; Cheng, Dengfeng; Ma, Yongjie; Zhang, Jianping; Zhou, Chuanqing; Liu, Shiyuan; Shi, Hongcheng; Zhang, Yingjian; Zhang, Chunfu

    2016-11-22

    Image-guided combined chemo-thermal therapy assists in optimizing treatment time, enhancing therapeutic efficiency, and circumventing side effects. In the present study, we developed a chemo-photothermal theranostic platform based on polydopamine (PDA)-coated gold nanorods (GNRs). The PDA coating was thin; however, it significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template and allowed high cisplatin loading efficiency, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide (c(RGDyC)) conjugation, and chelator-free iodine-125 labeling (RGD-(125)IPt-PDA@GNRs). While loaded cisplatin was released in a pH-sensitive manner, labeled (125)I was outstandingly stable under biological conditions. RGD-(125)IPt-PDA@GNRs had a high specificity for αvβ3 integrin, and consequently, they could selectively accumulate in tumors, as revealed by single photon emission computed tomography/CT imaging, and in target tumor angiogenic vessels, as shown by high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. As RGD-(125)IPt-PDA@GNRs targets tumor angiogenesis, it is a highly potent tumor therapy. Combined chemo-photothermal therapy with probes could thoroughly ablate tumors and inhibit tumor relapse via a synergistic antitumor effect. Our studies demonstrated that RGD-(125)IPt-PDA@GNRs is a robust platform for image-guided, chemo-thermal tumor therapy with outstanding synergistic tumor killing and relapse inhibition effects.

  13. Transurethral ultrasound applicators with dynamic multi-sector control for prostate thermal therapy: In vivo evaluation under MR guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Nau, William H.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Bouley, Donna; Sommer, Graham

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and performance of a multi-sectored tubular array transurethral ultrasound applicator for prostate thermal therapy, with potential to provide dynamic angular and length control of heating under MR guidance without mechanical movement of the applicator. Test configurations were fabricated, incorporating a linear array of two multi-sectored tubular transducers (7.8-8.4 MHz, 3 mm OD, 6 mm length), with three 120 deg. independent active sectors per tube. A flexible delivery catheter facilitated water cooling (100 ml min{sup -1}) within an expandable urethral balloon (35 mm longx10 mm diameter). An integrated positioning hub allows for rotating and translating the transducer assembly within the urethral balloon for final targeting prior to therapy delivery. Rotational beam plots indicate {approx}90 deg. - 100 deg. acoustic output patterns from each 120 deg. transducer sector, negligible coupling between sectors, and acoustic efficiencies between 41% and 53%. Experiments were performed within in vivo canine prostate (n=3), with real-time MR temperature monitoring in either the axial or coronal planes to facilitate control of the heating profiles and provide thermal dosimetry for performance assessment. Gross inspection of serial sections of treated prostate, exposed to TTC (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) tissue viability stain, allowed for direct assessment of the extent of thermal coagulation. These devices created large contiguous thermal lesions (defined by 52 deg. C maximum temperature, t{sub 43}=240 min thermal dose contours, and TTC tissue sections) that extended radially from the applicator toward the border of the prostate ({approx}15 mm) during a short power application ({approx}8-16 W per active sector, 8-15 min), with {approx}200 deg. or 360 deg. sector coagulation demonstrated depending upon the activation scheme. Analysis of transient temperature profiles indicated progression of lethal temperature

  14. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Matsumura, A; Yamamoto, K; Kumada, H; Shibata, Y; Nose, T

    2002-07-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours.

  15. Non-thermal High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Several in vitro studies have demonstrated the non-thermal (< 42 ºC) cell killing effect of HIFU...radiation resistance. However, there have been no in vivo animal studies performed on non-thermal HIFU to demonstrate its therapeutic potential. This...associated with non-thermal HIFU treatment for breast cancer. Extensive phantom studies have been completed to determine suitable ultrasound parameters for

  16. [Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Marten, Katharina

    2007-03-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Clinical evaluation of a third-generation thermal uterine balloon therapy system for menorrhagia coupled with curettage.

    PubMed

    Garza-Leal, Jose; Pena, Alex; Donovan, Arthur; Cash, Charles; Romanowski, Christine; Ilie, Bogdan; Lin, Linda

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of amenorrhea 12 months after treatment with a third-generation thermal uterine balloon therapy (UBT) system. Secondary objectives were to compare the incidence of amenorrhea observed with this third-generation system with that of a first-generation system, to estimate the effect of postprocedure curettage on patient outcome, and to evaluate the workings of this new system. Multicenter, controlled study (Canadian Task Force classification I). Thirteen hospitals: 12 in the United States and 1 in Mexico. Two hundred fifty premenopausal women aged 30 years or older with menorrhagia not responsive to previous medical therapy for at least 3 months. After treatment with a third-generation thermal UBT system, patients were randomly assigned to receive postprocedure curettage or no further treatment. The rate of amenorrhea 12 months after treatment with the third-generation thermal UBT system was similar in patients receiving postprocedure curettage (33.3%) and those receiving no further treatment (37.1%; p=.53). In addition, postprocedure curettage did not have any significant effect on any other patient outcome, for example, pain. Patients who were matched to historic control patients treated with the original first-generation system demonstrated a significantly greater success rate (amenorrhea) at 12 months (32.6%) compared with those treated with the first-generation system (13.7%). The third-generation thermal UBT instrument functioned as designed, with no unanticipated adverse device effects. The third-generation thermal UBT system shows greater efficacy in producing amenorrhea than the original first-generation system, with no significant safety issues. Postprocedural curettage did not alter amennorhea rates. Copyright (c) 2010 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A.M.E.G.; Christiaans, Maarten H.L.; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G.M.C.; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  19. Contribution of interstitial solute strengthening in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Isao; Ono, Satoshi; Hanaoka, Yudai; Uesugi, Tokuteru; Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Enthalpies of solutions and misfit strains for the Al-X (X = H, B, C, N, and O) binary alloys were determined by first-principles calculations to estimate the strengthening of solid solutions caused by interstitial atoms. The results indicate that interstitial solute atoms produced large misfit strains. Electrodeposited Al containing 0.12-1.32 at.% C was used to assess the validity of solid-solution strengthening by interstitial solute atoms. The role that interstitial carbon plays in strengthening electrodeposited Al is discussed.

  20. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Caminati, A; Graziano, P; Sverzellati, N; Harari, S

    2010-12-01

    In pulmonary pathology, a wide spectrum of morphological changes is related to the consequences of smoking, and recognizing them on surgical specimens and on small transbronchial biopsies represents a challenge for the pathologist. Respiratory bronchiolitis, also referred to as smoker's bronchiolitis, is a common histologic feature found in the lung tissue of cigarette smokers. When identified as the sole histopathologic finding in the clinical setting of symptomatic interstitial lung disease, a diagnosis of respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease is made. Since smoking is recognized to cause a variety of histologic patterns encompassing respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell hystiocytosis, smoking-related interstitial lung disease may be a useful concept to keep in mind for the pathologists. The relationship of smoking with each of these entities has been largely established on the basis of epidemiologic evidence. Although they have been retained as distinct and separate conditions in various classifications of interstitial lung diseases, these entities share a number of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features suggesting that they represent a spectrum of patterns of interstitial lung disease occurring in predisposed individuals who smoke. Evaluation of histologic features, particularly in surgical lung biopsy samples, is important in making the distinction between these disorders. However, even after tissue biopsy, it may sometimes be difficult to clearly separate these entities. Recently, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease with fibrosis has been described and postulated that this is a smoking-related condition distinct from fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging driven by an interstitial irradiation source

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, Trevor; Dextraze, Katherine; Taghavi, Houra; Melancon, Marites; Bouchard, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has shown tremendous promise in providing valuable diagnostic and therapy-monitoring information in select clinical procedures. Many of these pursued applications, however, have been relatively superficial due to difficulties with delivering light deep into tissue. To address this limitation, this work investigates generating a PA image using an interstitial irradiation source with a clinical ultrasound (US) system, which was shown to yield improved PA signal quality at distances beyond 13 mm and to provide improved spectral fidelity. Additionally, interstitially driven multi-wavelength PA imaging was able to provide accurate spectra of gold nanoshells and deoxyhemoglobin in excised prostate and liver tissue, respectively, and allowed for clear visualization of a wire at 7 cm in excised liver. This work demonstrates the potential of using a local irradiation source to extend the depth capabilities of future PA imaging techniques for minimally invasive interventional radiology procedures. PMID:26236640

  2. Interstitial Cystitis: Characterization and Management of an Enigmatic Urologic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. Curtis

    2002-01-01

    The enigmatic urologic condition known as interstitial cystitis has an estimated prevalence of 0.01% to 0.50% of the female population. Its etiology is unknown but may involve microbiologic, immunologic, mucosal, neurogenic, and/or other, as yet undefined, agents. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of interstitial cystitis; rather, it is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is impossible to provide a purely evidence-based treatment strategy, but review of available evidence suggests that conservative supportive therapy (including diet modification); oral treatment with pentosan polysulfate, amitriptyline, hydroxyzine, or cimetidine; and intravesical treatments with heparinoids, dimethyl sulfoxide, alkalized lidocaine, or bacille Calmette-Guérin may be effective in some patients. PMID:16985667

  3. Interstitial leukocyte migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Pui-ying; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Rapid leukocyte motility is essential for immunity and host defense. There has been progress in understanding the molecular signals that regulate leukocyte motility both in vitro and in vivo. However, a gap remains in understanding how complex signals are prioritized to result in directed migration, which is critical for both adaptive and innate immune function. Here we focus on interstitial migration and how external cues are translated into intracellular signaling pathways that regulate leukocyte polarity, directional sensing and motility in three-dimensional spaces. PMID:23797028

  4. The difference of the PDT's effects between interstitial lighting and continuous lighting in low oxygen density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiumin; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Tiegen; Xu, Tao

    2008-02-01

    Tumor oxygen depletion plays an important role in the process of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). The paper focuses on the improvement of the lighting mode to carry out this cancer therapy more effectively in low oxygen content. The effect of interstitial lighting was compared with that of continuous lighting in different oxygen density measured with a homemade device in PDT. 90 mice were divided into 3 groups: the contrast group, the continuous lighting group and the interstitial lighting group. The initial oxygen content was measured with a homemade device before the treatment. To examine the different effects, both the interstitial lighting and the continuous lighting have the same fluent rates (30mW/cm2, 32.4J/ cm2). The continuous lighting lasted 18 minutes while the interstitial lighting lasted 36 minutes with 1 second's idle time and 1 second's effective time of each pulse. The result shows that the volume of tumor doubling duration in interstitial lighting group is longer in the condition of low initial oxygen content. Thus with low initial oxygen content, the interstitial lighting is more effective than the continuous lighting during PDT.

  5. Interstitial fluid flow in cancer: implications for disease progression and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Jennifer M; Shieh, Adrian C

    2014-01-01

    As cancer progresses, a dynamic microenvironment develops that creates and responds to cellular and biophysical cues. Increased intratumoral pressure and corresponding increases in interstitial flow from the tumor bulk to the healthy stroma is an observational hallmark of progressing cancers. Until recently, the role of interstitial flow was thought to be mostly passive in the transport and dissemination of cancer cells to metastatic sites. With research spanning the past decade, we have seen that interstitial flow has a promigratory effect on cancer cell invasion in multiple cancer types. This invasion is one mechanism by which cancers can resist therapeutics and recur, but the role of interstitial flow in cancer therapy is limited to the understanding of transport of therapeutics. Here we outline the current understanding of the role of interstitial flow in cancer and the tumor microenvironment through cancer progression and therapy. We also discuss the current role of fluid flow in the treatment of cancer, including drug transport and therapeutic strategies. By stating the current understanding of interstitial flow in cancer progression, we can begin exploring its role in therapeutic failure and treatment resistance. PMID:25170280

  6. Multiscale measurements distinguish cellular and interstitial hindrances to diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vikash P; Lanning, Ryan M; Diop-Frimpong, Benjamin; Mok, Wilson; Brown, Edward B; Padera, Timothy P; Boucher, Yves; Jain, Rakesh K

    2009-07-08

    Molecular cancer therapy relies on interstitial diffusion for drug distribution in solid tumors. A mechanistic understanding of how tumor components affect diffusion is necessary to advance cancer drug development. Yet, because of limitations in current techniques, it is unclear how individual tissue components hinder diffusion. We developed multiscale fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (MS-FRAP) to address this deficiency. Diffusion measurements facilitated by MS-FRAP distinguish the diffusive hindrance of the interstitial versus cellular constituents in living tissue. Using multiscale diffusion measurements in vivo, we resolved the contributions of these two major tissue components toward impeding diffusive transport in solid tumors and subcutaneous tissue in mice. We further used MS-FRAP in interstitial matrix-mimetic gels and in vivo to show the influence of physical interactions between collagen and hyaluronan on diffusive hindrance through the interstitium. Through these studies, we show that interstitial hyaluronan paradoxically improves diffusion and that reducing cellularity enhances diffusive macromolecular transport in solid tumors.

  7. Ultrasound-induced thermal therapy of hyperplasia in ringed expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (eptfe) access grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Query, Michael Earl

    Hemodialysis vascular access, the interface between a dialysis patient and a dialysis machine, is quite literally the lifeblood of a patient's health. Vascular access dysfunction is the leading cause of hospitalization in hemodialysis patients. The occlusive growth of neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) ringed grafts is the primary cause of failure. To further develop a proposed thermal ultrasound treatment to reduce or prevent NH in arteriovenous vascular grafts, the acoustic properties of ePTFE were studied in water and alcohol solutions. Previous reports of ePTFE acoustic properties are critiqued. It was found that the acoustic transmission and attenuation through ePTFE, and therefore the potential for an ultrasound-based therapy for NH, are heavily dependent on the medium in which the graft is immersed, suggesting that the acoustic properties of implanted grafts will change as grafts mature in vivo. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of water-soaked ePTFE were 0.478 +/- 1.43 x 10-2 MRayl and 1.78 +/- 0.111 Np/cm*MHz, respectively, while the acoustic impedance and attenuation of ePTFE in alcohol were 1.49 +/- 0.149 MRayl and 0.77 +/- 1.1 x 10-2 Np/cm*MHz, respectively. The use of focused ultrasound to heat implanted ringed ePTFE grafts was numerically modeled from 1.35- and 1.443-MHz transducers for in vitro geometries. Power deposition and heating, in turn, differed by an order of magnitude between various graft acoustic properties. Graft rings were predicted to be substantial absorbing and scattering features. In vitro phantom models were constructed: one with and one without thermocouples. At 1 W of acoustic power, the maximum temperature rise was 8˚ C. The thermocouple model containing a water-soaked graft did not experience heating in the far graft wall. The MRTI model confirmed that the graft rings are an absorbing/scattering feature. Heating was not prevented in the presence of water flow through the graft. Water

  8. [Natural gas-steam-thermal springs in combined therapy of osteomuscular system diseases].

    PubMed

    Badretdinov, R R; Fomin, A A; Badretdinova, L M

    2006-01-01

    The article describes effects of unique thermal springs of Yangan-Tau mountain in patients with locomotor diseases. Effects of gas, steam and thermal factors of the water from the above springs were studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who took baths in the sanatorium Yangan-Tau. Changes in the cytokine profile of the patients were analysed.

  9. Microdefects and self-interstitial diffusion in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, William Barthelemy

    results of Si self-interstitial diffusion obtained from Lisp+ drifting experiments. Anomalous results from the Si self-interstitial diffusion experiments forced a re-examination of the possibility of thermal dissociation of D-defects. Thermal annealing experiments that were performed support this possibility. A review of the current literature illustrates the need for more research on the effects of thermal processing on FZ Si to understand the dissolution kinetics of D-defects.

  10. Multifunctional near-infrared light-triggered biodegradable micelles for chemo- and photo-thermal combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shanshan; Deng, Dawei; Tang, Liping; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    A combination of chemo- and photo-thermal therapy (PTT) has provided a promising efficient approach for cancer therapy. To achieve the superior synergistic chemotherapeutic effect with PTT, the development of a simple theranostic nanoplatform that can provide both cancer imaging and a spatial-temporal synchronism of both therapeutic approaches are highly desired. Our previous study has demonstrated that near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered biodegradable chitosan-based amphiphilic block copolymer micelles (SNSC) containing light-sensitive 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol and NIR dye cypate on the hydrophobic block could be used for fast light-triggered drug release. In this study, we conjugated the SNSC micelles with tumor targeting ligand c(RGDyK) and also encapsulated antitumor drug Paclitaxel (PTX). The results show that c(RGDyK)-modified micelles could enhance the targeting and residence time in tumor site, as well as be capable performing high temperature response for PTT on cancer cells and two-photon photolysis for fast release of anticancer drugs under NIR irradiation. In vitro release profiles show a significant controlled release effort that the release concentration of PTX from micelles was significantly increased with the exposure of NIR light. In vitro and in vivo antitumor studies demonstrate that, compared with chemo or PTT treatment alone, the combined treatment with the local exposure of NIR light exhibited significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficiency. These findings indicate that this system exhibited great potential in tumor-targeting imaging and synchronous chemo- and photo-thermal therapy. PMID:27366951

  11. Sub-100nm gold nanomatryoshkas improve photo-thermal therapy efficacy in large and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Urban, Cordula; Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-10-10

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or necrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000mm(3)) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5× accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy.

  12. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  13. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  14. Adaptive Real-Time Bioheat Transfer Models for Computer Driven MR-guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, D.; Feng, Y.; Elliott, A.; Shetty, A.; McNichols, R. J.; Oden, J. T.; Stafford, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment times of laser induced thermal therapies (LITT) guided by computational prediction are determined by the convergence behavior of PDE constrained optimization problems. In this work, we investigate the convergence behavior of a bioheat transfer constrained calibration problem to assess the feasibility of applying to real-time patient specific data. The calibration techniques utilize multi-planar thermal images obtained from the non-destructive in vivo heating of canine prostate. The calibration techniques attempt to adaptively recover the bio-thermal heterogeneities within the tissue on a patient specific level and results in a formidable PDE constrained optimization problem to be solved in real time. A comprehensive calibration study is performed with both homogeneous and spatially heterogeneous bio-thermal model parameters with and without constitutive nonlinearities. Initial results presented here indicate that the calibration problems involving the inverse solution of thousands of model parameters can converge to a solution within three minutes and decrease the ‖·‖L2(0,T;L2(Ω))2 norm of the difference between computational prediction and the measured temperature values to a patient specific regime. PMID:20142153

  15. Computational characterization and experimental validation of the thermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy research at the University of Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Broekman, J. D.; Nigg, D. W.; Hawthorne, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline constructed for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. Validation protocols based on neutron activation spectrometry measurements and rigorous least-square adjustment techniques show that the beam produces a neutron spectrum that has the anticipated level of thermal neutron flux and a somewhat higher than expected, but radio-biologically insignificant, epithermal neutron flux component. (authors)

  16. Analysis of thermal effects in endoscopic nanocarriers-based photodynamic therapy applied to esophageal diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Wilfert, O.; Hudcova, L.; Poliak, J.; Barcik, P.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we propose a predictive model that allows the study of thermal effects produced when the optical radiation interacts with an esophageal or stomach disease with gold nanoparticles embedded. The model takes into account light distribution in the tumor tissue by means of a Monte Carlo method. Mie theory is used to obtain the gold nanoparticles optical properties and the thermal model employed is based on the bio-heat equation. The complete model was applied to two types of tumoral tissue (squamous cell carcinoma located in the esophagus and adenocarcinoma in the stomach) in order to study the thermal effects induced by the inclusion of gold nanoparticles.

  17. Interstitial laser photocoagulation of uterine leimyoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alastair D.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Patel, Bipin L.; Broadbent, Jeff J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Bown, Stephen G.

    1996-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are common benign tumors which may cause heavy or painful periods, may present as a pelvic mass and are associated with infertility. Local excision of symptomatic lesions can be difficult and hazardous, and the alternative is hysterectomy. We are investigating interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) as a less invasive alternative. Initial experiments were undertaken on 40 fibroids after surgical removal. One or two bare tipped, precharred fibers from a 25 W semiconductor laser (805 nm) were inserted into the center of the fibroid and treatment delivered with 2 - 10 W for 100 - 1000 sec. Specimens were subsequently sectioned perpendicular to the fiber track. Fibroids are very pale and apart from occasional charred tracts there was little evidence of thermal coagulation macroscopically or after haematoxylon and eosin staining. However, using a diaphorase stain technique we were able to demonstrate ellipsoid zones of devitalized tissue up to 20 mm across (15 mm for single fibers). These results suggest that ILP is producing gentle, uniform coagulation which could lead to resorption of treated areas. With appropriate numbers of treatment sites, this could permit minimally invasive management of clinically significant lesions. Clinical studies have commenced treating fibroids with ILP at the time of surgical excision by myomectomy or hysterectomy.

  18. Non-thermal ablation technology for arrhythmia therapy: acute and chronic electrical conduction block with photosensitization reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Arisa; Matsuo, Hiroki; Suenari, Tsukasa; Kajihara, Takuro; Kimura, Takehiro; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Arai, Tsunenori

    2010-02-01

    We have examined the possibility of non-thermal ablation technology for arrhythmia therapy with photosensitization reaction, in which photochemically generated singlet molecular oxygen may induce myocardial electrical conduction block. In the most popular energy source for arrhythmia catheter ablation; radiofrequency current, the thermal tissue injury causes electrophysiological disruption resulting in electrical isolation of ectopic beats. The temperature-mediated tissue disruption is difficult to control because the tissue temperature is determined by the heating and thermal conduction process, so that severe complications due to excessive heat generation have been the problem in this ablation. We demonstrated the electrical conduction block of surgically exposed porcine heart tissue in vivo with photosensitization reaction. The acute myocardial electrical conduction block was examined by the stimulation and propagation set-up consisting of a stimulation electrode and two bipolar measurement electrodes. Fifteen to thirty minutes after the injection of 5-10 mg/kg water-soluble chlorine photosensitizer, Talaporfin sodium (NPe6, LS11), the laser light at the wavelength of 663 nm with the total energy density of 50-200 J/cm2 was irradiated several times with 3- 7 mm in spot-size to make electrical block line in myocardial tissue across the conduction pathway between the bipolar measurement electrodes. The propagation delay time of the potential waveform increased with increasing the irradiated line length. The observation of Azan-stained specimens in the irradiated area two weeks after the procedure showed that the normal tissue was replaced to the scar tissue, which might become to be permanent tissue insulation. These results demonstrated the possibility of non-thermal electrical conduction block for arrhythmia therapy by the photosensitization reaction.

  19. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease The broad term "childhood interstitial lung disease" (chILD) ... therapeutic intervention Lung and bone marrow transplant-associated lung diseases Diffuse alveolar damage of unknown cause The various types ...

  20. Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Thermal-Responsive Gatekeeper for NIR Light-Triggered Chemo/Photothermal-Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Qi; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Hu, Jing-Jing; Cao, Peng-Xi; Zhu, Cheng-Hui; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-triggered tumor targeted mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) is designed to realize near-infrared (NIR) photothermal-responsive drug release and combined chemo/photothermal tumor therapy. Indocyanine green (ICG) and doxorubicin (DOX) are both loaded in the MSN modified with thermal-cleavable gatekeeper (Azo-CD), which can be decapped by ICG-generated hyperthermia under NIR illumination. A peptidic sequence containing a short PEG chain, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) substrate (PLGVR) and tumor cell targeting motif (RGD) are further decorated on the MSN via a host-guest interaction. The PEG chain can protect the MSN during the circulation and be cleaved off in the tumor tissues with overexpressed MMP, and then the RGD motif is switched on to target tumor cells. After the tumor-triggered targeting process, the NIR irradiation guided by ICG fluorescence can trigger cytosol drug release and realize combined chemo/photothermal therapy.

  1. [Chemical and thermal eye burns. Conservatíve and surgical options of a stage-dependent therapy].

    PubMed

    Struck, H G; Schrage, N F

    2011-10-01

    The basic principles of first aid for chemical and thermal burns are discussed. In the acute phase the primary goal of all measurements is the prevention or limitation of tissue destruction. The further therapeutic care is focused on the modulation of the inflammatory response, the prevention of a bacterial infection and secondary glaucoma and the stimulation of wound healing. The individual concept of measures to be taken is recruited from the careful identification of necrotic tissue, the eye burn classification of severity and on the basis of all described medical and surgical therapy options. In the case of severe and very severe ocular burns a comprehensive surgical reconstruction is included. All outpatient departments and eye clinics taking part on the treatment have to ensure a standardized complete and scientifically valid therapy regime to restore vision.

  2. Packaging of microfluidic chips via interstitial bonding technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunmeng; Lee, L James; Juang, Yi-Je

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we describe an interstitial bonding technique for packaging of microfluidic chips. The cover plate is first placed on top of the microfluidic chip, followed by dispensing the UV-curable resin into the resin-loading reservoirs. With the interstitial space between the cover plate and the microfluidic chip connecting to the loading reservoirs, the UV-curable resin wicks through capillary force action and hydrostatic pressure generated by the liquid level in the resin-loading reservoirs. When reaching the microchannels, the UV-curable resin stops flowing into the microchannels due to the force balance between the surface tension and hydrostatic pressure. The assembly is then placed under the UV light, followed by further curing in the thermal oven. It is found that there is no leakage from the bonded microfluidic chips and a good DNA separation result was obtained by using the microfluidic chips as fabricated. This bonding technique is relatively simple and fast, which can be applied to the packaging of microfluidic chips made from hybrid materials with complicated designs as long as the interstitial space connects to the loading reservoirs.

  3. Acute interstitial nephritis induced by Dioscorea quinqueloba

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of herbal medicine may be a risk factor for the development of kidney injury, as it has been reported to cause various renal syndromes. Dioscorea quinqueloba is a medicinal herb that is used as an alternative therapy for cardiovascular disease and various medical conditions. Case presentation A 52-year-old man was admitted with complaints of skin rash and burning sensation. He had ingested a raw extract of D. quinqueloba as a traditional remedy. Laboratory tests revealed the following values: absolute eosinophil count, 900/mm3; serum creatinine level, 2.7 mg/dL; and blood urea nitrogen, 33.0 mg/dL. The immunoglobulin E level was markedly increased at 1320.0 IU/mL. Urinalysis revealed a fractional excretion of sodium of 3.77%, protein 1+, and blood 3+. Histological examination of the renal biopsy specimen showed a diffusely edematous interstitium with infiltrates composed of eosinophils, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Conclusion Here, we present the first reported case of biopsy-proven acute interstitial nephritis following ingestion of D. quinqueloba associated with skin rash, eosinophilia, and increased plasma immunoglobulin E level. PMID:25186588

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Caminati, Antonella; Cassandro, Roberto; Harari, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. The degree of PH in ILDs is typically mild-to-moderate. However, some of these patients may develop a disproportionate increase in PH that cannot be justified solely by hypoxia and parenchymal injury: this condition has been termed "out-of-proportion" PH. The pathogenesis of PH in these diseases is various, incompletely understood and may be multifactorial. The clinical suspicion (i.e. increased dyspnoea, low diffusion capacity) and echocardiographic assessment are the first steps towards proper diagnosis of PH; however, right heart catheterisation remains the current gold standard for diagnosis of PH. At present, no specific therapies have been approved for the treatment of PH in patients with ILDs.

  5. Cough in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garner, Justin; George, Peter M; Renzoni, Elisabetta

    2015-12-01

    Cough in the context of interstitial lung disease (ILD) has not been the focus of many studies. However, chronic cough has a major impact on quality of life in a significant proportion of patients with ILD. For the purpose of this review, we have chosen to highlight some of the more frequently encountered diffuse lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and systemic sclerosis associated ILD. Many of the underlying mechanisms remain speculative and further research is now required to elucidate the complex pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic cough in ILD. This will hopefully pave the way for the identification of new therapeutic agents to alleviate this distressing and often intractable symptom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fission converter and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor study of thermal neutron flux distribution in an epithermal neutron therapy beam.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G I; Rosenfeld, A B; Allen, B J; Coderre, J A; Liu, H B

    1999-09-01

    The depth distribution of the thermal neutron flux is a major factor in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in determining the efficiency of cell sterilization. In this paper the fission detector method is developed and applied to measure the in-phantom thermal neutron flux depth distribution. Advantages of the fission detector include small size, direct measurement of thermal neutron flux in a mixed radiation field of BNCT beam, self-calibration, and the possibility of on-line measurement. The measurements were performed at epithermal a BNCT facility. The experimental results were compared with the thermal neutron flux calculated by the Monte Carlo method and found to be in good agreement.

  7. The multifaceted aspects of interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Lorenzo; Monti, Sara; Grosso, Vittorio; Boffini, Nicola; Scorletti, Eva; Crepaldi, Gloria; Caporali, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a relevant extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that may occur either in early stages or as a complication of long-standing disease. RA related ILD (RA-ILD) significantly influences the quoad vitam prognosis of these patients. Several histopathological patterns of RA-ILD have been described: usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the most frequent one, followed by nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP); other patterns are less commonly observed. Several factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing RA-ILD. The genetic background plays a fundamental but not sufficient role; smoking is an independent predictor of ILD, and a correlation with the presence of rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies has also been reported. Moreover, both exnovo occurrence and progression of ILD have been related to drug therapies that are commonly prescribed in RA, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, anti-TNF alpha agents, and rituximab. A greater understanding of the disease process is necessary in order to improve the therapeutic approach to ILD and RA itself and to reduce the burden of this severe extra-articular manifestation.

  8. Structure and high-temperature properties of Ti5Si3 with interstitial additions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason

    1999-12-01

    This study was motivated by the fact that previous research on the structure and properties of Ti5Si3 showed unacceptably inconsistent results. The primary reason for these inconsistencies was interstitial contamination of Ti5Si3 by carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Thus, this study measured the effects that these interstitial atoms have on some of the previously reported properties. These properties include crystalline structure, thermal expansion anisotropy, electronic structure and bonding, and high temperature oxidation resistance. In Chapter 2 of this study, the lattice parameters and atomic positions of Ti5Si3 as a function of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen content were measured via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Comparing these lattice parameters to those reported in other studies on supposedly pure Ti5Si3 confirmed that the majority of the previous studies had samples with a considerable amount of interstitial impurities. In fact, the lattice parameter trends given in Chapter 2 can be used to estimate the types and level of impurities in these studies. Furthermore, Chapter 2 discusses how atomic positions change as interstitial atoms are incorporated into the lattice. These changes in atomic separations suggest that strong bonds form between the interstitial atoms and the surrounding titanium atoms. This is in full agreement with the electronic structure calculations given in Chapter 4. These calculations show that bonding does occur between titanium d-states and interstitial atom p-states at the expense of bonding between some of the titanium and silicon atoms. In addition, carbon seems to be the most strongly bonded interstitial atom. Knowledge of the exact interstitial content and its effect on bonding is important because Chapters 3 and 5 have shown that interstitial atoms have a marked effect on the thermal expansion and oxidation resistance. As discussed in Chapter 3, all

  9. Endoscopic image-guided thermal therapy using targeted near infrared fluorescent gold nanorods (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-09-01

    We present an in vivo study of endoscopic fluorescence image-guided photothermal therapy of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma in a murine xenograft model, using intratumoural or intravenous gold nanorods functionalised with Cy5.5 and EGFR.

  10. Simulation of nanoparticle-mediated near-infrared thermal therapy using GATE

    PubMed Central

    Cuplov, Vesna; Pain, Frédéric; Jan, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Application of nanotechnology for biomedicine in cancer therapy allows for direct delivery of anticancer agents to tumors. An example of such therapies is the nanoparticle-mediated near-infrared hyperthermia treatment. In order to investigate the influence of nanoparticle properties on the spatial distribution of heat in the tumor and healthy tissues, accurate simulations are required. The Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) open-source simulation platform, based on the Geant4 toolkit, is widely used by the research community involved in molecular imaging, radiotherapy and optical imaging. We present an extension of GATE that can model nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermal therapy as well as simple heat diffusion in biological tissues. This new feature of GATE combined with optical imaging allows for the simulation of a theranostic scenario in which the patient is injected with theranostic nanosystems that can simultaneously deliver therapeutic (i.e. hyperthermia therapy) and imaging agents (i.e. fluorescence imaging). PMID:28663855

  11. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    and Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yunbo Liu...Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Yunbo Liu Pei Zhong...therapy (via the control of hsp70B-heat shock promoter) to improve the overall efficiency of breast cancer treatment . In the first year of the project

  12. SonoKnife: Feasibility of a line-focused ultrasound device for thermal ablation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Chen, Xin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.; Penagaricano, Jose A.; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E.; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of line-focused ultrasound for thermal ablation of superficially located tumors. Methods: A SonoKnife is a cylindrical-section ultrasound transducer designed to radiate from its concave surface. This geometry generates a line-focus or acoustic edge. The motivation for this approach was the noninvasive thermal ablation of advanced head and neck tumors and positive neck nodes in reasonable treatment times. Line-focusing may offer advantages over the common point-focusing of spherically curved radiators such as faster coverage of a target volume by scanning of the acoustic edge. In this paper, The authors report studies using numerical models and phantom and ex vivo experiments using a SonoKnife prototype. Results: Acoustic edges were generated by cylindrical-section single-element ultrasound transducers numerically, and by the prototype experimentally. Numerically, simulations were performed to characterize the acoustic edge for basic design parameters: transducer dimensions, line-focus depth, frequency, and coupling thickness. The dimensions of the acoustic edge as a function of these parameters were determined. In addition, a step-scanning simulation produced a large thermal lesion in a reasonable treatment time. Experimentally, pressure distributions measured in degassed water agreed well with acoustic simulations, and sonication experiments in gel phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver samples produced lesions similar to those predicted with acoustic and thermal models. Conclusions: Results support the feasibility of noninvasive thermal ablation with a SonoKnife. PMID:21859038

  13. Activatable albumin-photosensitizer nanoassemblies for triple-modal imaging and thermal-modulated photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Siu, Fungming; Liu, Chengbo; Wan, Qian; Gong, Ping; Zheng, Hairong; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive and effective approach for cancer treatment. The main bottlenecks of clinical PDT are poor selectivity of photosensitizer and inadequate oxygen supply resulting in serious side effects and low therapeutic efficiency. Herein, a thermal-modulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) strategy using activatable human serum albumin-chlorin e6 nanoassemblies (HSA-Ce6 NAs) for promoting PDT against cancer is developed. Through intermolecular disulfide bond crosslinking and hydrophobic interaction, Ce6 photosensitizer is effectively loaded into the HSA NAs, and the obtained HSA-Ce6 NAs exhibit excellent reduction response, as well as enhanced tumor accumulation and retention. By the precision control of the overall body temperature instead of local tumor temperature increasing from 37 °C to 43 °C, the photosensitization reaction rate of HSA-Ce6 NAs increases 20%, and the oxygen saturation of tumor tissue raise 52%, significantly enhancing the generation of ROS for promoting PDT. Meanwhile, the intrinsic fluorescence and photoacoustic properties, and the chelating characteristic of porphyrin ring can endow the HSA-Ce6 NAs with fluorescence, photoacoustic and magnetic resonance triple-modal imaging functions. Upon irradiation of low-energy near-infrared laser, the tumors are completely suppressed without tumor recurrence and therapy-induced side effects. The robust thermal-modulated ROS strategy combined with albumin-based activatable nanophotosensitizer is highly potential for multi-modal imaging-guided PDT and clinical translation.

  14. Model development and experimental validation for analyzing initial transients of irradiation of tissues during thermal therapy using short pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mohit; Miller, Stephanie; Mitra, Kunal

    2015-11-01

    Short pulse lasers with pulse durations in the range of nanoseconds and shorter are effective in the targeted delivery of heat energy for precise tissue heating and ablation. This photothermal therapy is useful where the removal of cancerous tissue sections is required. The objective of this paper is to use finite element modeling to demonstrate the differences in the thermal response of skin tissue to short-pulse and continuous wave laser irradiation in the initial stages of the irradiation. Models have been developed to validate the temperature distribution and heat affected zone during laser irradiation of excised rat skin samples and live anesthetized mouse tissue. Excised rat skin samples and live anesthetized mice were subjected to Nd:YAG pulsed laser (1,064 nm, 500 ns) irradiation of varying powers. A thermal camera was used to measure the rise in surface temperature as a result of the laser irradiation. Histological analyses of the heat affected zone created in the tissue samples due to the temperature rise were performed. The thermal interaction of the laser with the tissue was quantified by measuring the thermal dose delivered by the laser. Finite element geometries of three-dimensional tissue sections for continuum and vascular models were developed using COMSOL Multiphysics. Blood flow was incorporated into the vascular model to mimic the presence of discrete blood vessels and contrasted with the continuum model without blood perfusion. The temperature rises predicted by the continuum and the vascular models agreed with the temperature rises observed at the surface of the excised rat tissue samples and live anesthetized mice due to laser irradiation respectively. The vascular model developed was able to predict the cooling produced by the blood vessels in the region where the vessels were present. The temperature rise in the continuum model due to pulsed laser irradiation was higher than that due to continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation in the

  15. [A case of interstitial lung disease due to sunitinib].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Zenkichi; Takizawa, Akitoshi; Takeshima, Teppei; Tsuchiya, Futoshi; Iwasaki, Akira; Matsuyama, Shunichi; Hirooka, Nobukazu

    2012-09-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese man who presented with a left renal mass (diameter, 9 cm) and multiple lung metastases, underwent translumbar left radical nephrectomy. Histological examination revealed the presence of clear cell-type, G3, pT3b renal cell carcinoma. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was administered postoperatively. Although the lung metastases were well controlled, radiological examination showed right renal metastasis and multiple brain metastases. γKnife was performed and chemotherapy was changed to sunitinib (50 mg/day). The patient developed a high fever on day 13 ; therefore, sunitinib administration was stopped on day 15. The next day, he presented with dyspnea, and chest computed tomography (CT) showed diffuse ground-glass opacities in both lungs. Bronchioalveolar lavage showed a predominance of lymphocytes, without any evidence of infection. We diagnosed the patient with interstitial lung disease (grade 3) attributable to sunitinib administration. After cessation of sunitinib therapy, chest CT showed that the shadows had resolved. We administered half of the previous dose of sunitinib 2 weeks after cessation of sunitinib therapy for complete resolution of the lung metastases. After the 2nd course of sunitinib, radiological examination showed tumor progression. Therefore, we replaced sunitinib with everolimus. Interstitial lung disease due to sunitinib therapy may be rare ; however, its occurrence should be considered when administering sunitinib.

  16. Acute respiratory failure secondary to mesalamine-induced interstitial pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Albin; Karakurum, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonitis as an adverse effect of mesalamine therapy is a rare but potentially serious complication. Patients typically have a mild disease course with no documented cases of respiratory failure in published literature. Given its variable latent period and non-specific signs and symptoms, it may be difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with symptoms of fever, shortness of breath and a non-productive cough, 2 weeks after initiation of therapy with mesalamine. His hospital course was complicated by acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Radiographic studies revealed bilateral lower lobe infiltrates and bronchosopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsy were consistent with a diagnosis of drug-induced interstitial pneumonitis. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of considering a diagnosis of mesalamine-induced lung injury in patients presenting with respiratory symptoms while on mesalamine therapy and to review relevant literature. PMID:23964037

  17. [Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in systemic sclerosis (SSc)].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2010-01-01

    Intersitial lung disease is a frequent complication of systemic sclerosis that often has a poor pognosis and together with pulmonary arterial hypertension are the most common cause of death in scleroderma patients. For detection and evaluation of interstitial lung disease, high-resolution CT and pulmorary functional tests are pivotal. The decision about whether to start treatment is often the most difficult challenge. Patients with short duration of systemic disease with recent deterioration in DCO are the candidates for immunosupressive therapy. Best current initial treatment is intravenous monthly cyclophosphamide together with low-dose oral glucocorticoids although azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil are also widely used.

  18. Local Anesthesia During Interstitial Laser Coagulation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kedia, Kalish R

    2005-01-01

    With the emergence of minimally invasive therapies for the management of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), as well as the reality of a changing medical economic environment, there is a need for a reliable local anesthesia protocol. The protocol described here for prostate anesthetic block is a safe, economical, and effective way to perform interstitial laser coagulation and other minor endoscopic urologic procedures in the office setting. Most patients experience little discomfort and recover quickly, with prompt return to normal activities. Urologists should be aware of and comfortable with these techniques. PMID:16985900

  19. Anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 therapy in CCI neuropathy decreases thermal hyperalgesia, macrophage recruitment, and endoneurial TNF-alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Janjigian, M; Myers, R R

    1998-01-01

    The chronic constriction injury model of mononeuropathy is a direct, partial nerve injury yielding thermal hyperalgesia. The inflammation that results from this injury is believed to contribute importantly to both the neuropathological and behavioral sequelae. This study involved administering a single dose (250 ng) of interleukin-10 (IL-10), an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide, at the site and time of a chronic constriction injury (CCI) lesion to determine if IL-10 administration could attenuate the inflammatory response of the nerve to CCI and resulting thermal hyperalgesia. In IL-10-treated animals, thermal hyperalgesia was significantly reduced following CCI (days 3, 5 and 9). Histological sections from the peripheral nerve injury site of those animals had decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for ED-1, a marker of recruited macrophages, at both times studied (2 and 5 days post-CCI). IL-10 treatment also decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) at day 2, but not day 5. Qualitative light microscopic assessment of neuropathology at the lesion site did not suggest substantial differences between IL-10 and vehicle-treated sections. The authors propose that initial production of TNF-alpha and perhaps other proinflammatory cytokines at the peripheral nerve lesion site importantly influences the long-term behavioral outcome of nerve injury, and that IL-10 therapy may accomplish this by downregulating the inflammatory response of the nerve to injury.

  20. Thermal therapy for breast tumors by using a cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning: a preliminary numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Shiao; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2007-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a 1 MHz cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning to produce uniform heating for breast tumor thermal therapy. The breast was submerged in water and surrounded by the cylindrical ultrasound phased array. A multifocus pattern was generated and electrically scanned by the phased array to enlarge the treatment lesion in single heating. To prevent overheating normal tissues, a large planning target volume (PTV) would be divided into several planes with several subunits on each plane and sequentially treated with a cooling phase between two successive heatings of the subunit. Heating results for different target temperatures (T(tgt)), blood perfusion rates and sizes of the PTV have been studied. Furthermore, a superficial breast tumor with different water temperatures was also studied. Results indicated that a higher target temperature would produce a slightly larger thermal lesion, and a higher blood perfusion rate would not affect the heating lesion size but increase the heating time significantly. The acoustic power deposition and temperature elevations in ribs can be minimized by orienting the acoustic beam from the ultrasound phased array approximately parallel to the ribs. In addition, a large acoustic window on the convex-shaped breast surface for the proposed ultrasound phased array and the cooling effect of water would prevent the skin overheating for the production of a lesion at any desired location. This study demonstrated that the proposed cylindrical ultrasound phased array can provide effective heating for breast tumor thermal therapy without overheating the skin and ribs within a reasonable treatment time.

  1. Theoretical design and evaluation of endoluminal ultrasound applicators for thermal therapy of pancreatic cancer under image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew; Scott, Serena; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris

    2017-03-01

    An image-guided endoluminal ultrasound applicator has been proposed for palliative and potential curative thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. By considering a directional transducer array of planar, tubular, or curvilinear transducers, this design offers the potential for fast volumetric therapy and 3D spatial control over the energy deposition profile. Treatment of pancreatic tumor tissue would be performed in a minimally invasive fashion with the applicator positioned in the gastrointestinal (GI) lumen, and sparing of the luminal wall would be achieved with a water-cooled balloon surrounding the transducers. A theoretical evaluation of this design was performed by developing a 3D acoustic and bioheat transfer model, with temperature and thermal dose solutions obtained using a FEM solver (COMSOL Multiphysics). Parametric studies were performed on a generalized anatomical model of the pancreas, tumor, and adjacent luminal wall to determine preferred transducer configurations and frequencies for maximizing lesion volume and penetration while sparing the luminal wall. Patient-specific models of pancreatic tumors were generated from CT studies and used to assess the feasibility of performing thermal ablation or hyperthermia on small (˜2 cm diameter) pancreatic head tumors with an endoluminal applicator positioned within the duodenum. Simulation results indicate lower transducer operating frequencies (1-3 MHz) are necessary to mitigate damage to the luminal wall, and a tradeoff between penetration depth and lesion volume emerges as the degree of focusing increases. For patient-specific ablation modeling of tumors within 30 mm of the luminal wall, approximately 95% of the volume could be ablated within 15 min using a planar or lightly focused transducer configuration without duodenal damage. Over 90% of the volume could be elevated above 40°C at steady state for hyperthermia applications (e.g., radiation sensitization, drug delivery) using a tubular transducer. For

  2. Development of an endoluminal high-intensity ultrasound applicator for image-guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Plata-Camargo, Juan C.; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound applicator for endoluminal thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors has been introduced and evaluated through acoustic/biothermal simulations and ex vivo experimental investigations. Endoluminal therapeutic ultrasound constitutes a minimally invinvasive conformal therapy and is compatible with ultrasound or MR-based image guidance. The applicator would be placed in the stomach or duodenal lumen, and sonication would be performed through the luminal wall into the tumor, with concurrent water cooling of the wall tissue to prevent its thermal injury. A finite-element (FEM) 3D acoustic and biothermal model was implemented for theoretical analysis of the approach. Parametric studies over transducer geometries and frequencies revealed that operating frequencies within 1-3 MHz maximize penetration depth and lesion volume while sparing damage to the luminal wall. Patient-specific FEM models of pancreatic head tumors were generated and used to assess the feasibility of performing endoluminal ultrasound thermal ablation and hyperthermia of pancreatic tumors. Results indicated over 80% of the volume of small tumors (~2 cm diameter) within 35 mm of the duodenum could be safely ablated in under 30 minutes or elevated to hyperthermic temperatures at steady-state. Approximately 60% of a large tumor (~5 cm diameter) model could be safely ablated by considering multiple positions of the applicator along the length of the duodenum to increase coverage. Prototype applicators containing two 3.2 MHz planar transducers were fabricated and evaluated in ex vivo porcine carcass heating experiments under MR temperature imaging (MRTI) guidance. The applicator was positioned in the stomach adjacent to the pancreas, and sonications were performed for 10 min at 5 W/cm2 applied intensity. MRTI indicated over 40°C temperature rise in pancreatic tissue with heating penetration extending 3 cm from the luminal wall. PMID:26677314

  3. Development of an endoluminal high-intensity ultrasound applicator for image-guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew S.; Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Plata-Camargo, Juan C.; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-03-01

    An ultrasound applicator for endoluminal thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors has been introduced and evaluated through acoustic/biothermal simulations and ex vivo experimental investigations. Endoluminal therapeutic ultrasound constitutes a minimally invasive conformal therapy and is compatible with ultrasound or MR-based image guidance. The applicator would be placed in the stomach or duodenal lumen, and sonication would be performed through the luminal wall into the tumor, with concurrent water cooling of the wall tissue to prevent its thermal injury. A finite-element (FEM) 3D acoustic and biothermal model was implemented for theoretical analysis of the approach. Parametric studies over transducer geometries and frequencies revealed that operating frequencies within 1-3 MHz maximize penetration depth and lesion volume while sparing damage to the luminal wall. Patient-specific FEM models of pancreatic head tumors were generated and used to assess the feasibility of performing endoluminal ultrasound thermal ablation and hyperthermia of pancreatic tumors. Results indicated over 80% of the volume of small tumors (~2 cm diameter) within 35 mm of the duodenum could be safely ablated in under 30 minutes or elevated to hyperthermic temperatures at steady-state. Approximately 60% of a large tumor (~5 cm diameter) model could be safely ablated by considering multiple positions of the applicator along the length of the duodenum to increase coverage. Prototype applicators containing two 3.2 MHz planar transducers were fabricated and evaluated in ex vivo porcine carcass heating experiments under MR temperature imaging (MRTI) guidance. The applicator was positioned in the stomach adjacent to the pancreas, and sonications were performed for 10 min at 5 W/cm2 applied intensity. MRTI indicated over 400C temperature rise in pancreatic tissue with heating penetration extending 3 cm from the luminal wall.

  4. Non-Thermal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Several in vitro studies have...is not affected by the local biochemical environment and shows less radiation resistance. However, there have been no in vivo animal studies ...potential normal tissue toxicities, if any, associated with non-thermal HIFU treatment for breast cancer. Extensive phantom studies have been completed

  5. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  6. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  7. Postoperative interstitial brachytherapy in eyelid cancer: long term results and assessment of Cosmesis After Interstitial Brachytherapy scale

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Trinanjan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Chaukar, Devendra; Nadkarni, Mandar; GN, Manjunatha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyse feasibility and safety of postoperative interstitial brachytherapy (IBRT) in patients of eyelid cancer treated primarily by surgical excision. Material and methods In this series, 8 patients with eyelid cancer were treated using postoperative interstitial brachytherapy. Patients were followed up for local control, cosmetic outcome, and acute and late toxicities. Cosmetic outcome was measured using a 6 point indigenous Cosmesis After Interstitial Brachytherapy (CAIB) scale. Results The patients were between 23-82 years (median: 71 years). There were 3 females and 5 males, and 3 patients had lesions in upper eyelid. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy was used in all with 2 catheters implanted in most of them (6 out of 8). Local control was calculated from end of treatment to last follow-up. At last follow-up, all patients remained locally controlled. Two patients had nodal recurrence 6 months after interstitial brachytherapy and were salvaged effectively by external beam radiotherapy. At last follow-up, 7 patients were loco-regionally controlled and one was lost to follow up. All patients had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 1 acute toxicity and 2 had grade 1 Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version.3 late toxicities. The cosmesis score for the whole group ranged between 0-1 indicating excellent to very good cosmesis. Conclusions Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy resulted in excellent disease control and cosmesis without significant acute or late toxicities. It is an effective modality for treatment of eyelid cancers in selected patients. Future prospective studies with the validation of CAIB scale would give us more insight to this effective yet often ignored modality of IBRT. PMID:25834578

  8. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Norred, Sarah E.; Johnson, Jacqueline Anne

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermotherapy (MRgLITT) has become an increasingly relevant therapy for tumor ablation due to its minimally invasive approach and broad applicability across many tissue types. The current state of the art applies laser irradiation via cooled optical fiber applicators in order to generate ablative heat and necrosis in tumor tissue. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) is used concurrently with this therapy to plan treatments and visualize tumor necrosis. Though application in neurosurgery remains in its infancy, MRgLITT has been found to be a promising therapy for many types of brain tumors. This review examines the current use of MRgLITT with regard to the special clinical challenge of glioblastoma multiforme and examines the potential applications of next-generation nanotherapy specific to the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24527455

  9. Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia as a manifestation of SLE and secondary Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daniel; Young, Lary

    2013-08-02

    A 47-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosed at age of 35 years was admitted for dyspnoea, substernal chest pain, dry mucosas and difficulty in swallowing. Physical examination revealed vesicular breath sounds bilaterally. Laboratory work showed antinuclear antibody (ANA) (speckled pattern, 1:40), positive anti-Sjogren's syndrome antigen (SSA) and antisingle side band (SSB) and negative double-strand DNA (dsDNA), with normal C3,C4,C50. A high-resolution chest CT scan demonstrated multiple bronchial cysts and diffuse interstitial infiltrates. Surgical lung biopsy revealed emphysematous changes and mild lymphocytic infiltrate around the bronchioles compatible with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia diagnosis. This case illustrates a patient with primary SLE overlapped by initial manifestations of secondary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) presenting with associated autoimmune interstitial lung disease. Antibody markers, high-resolution chest CT scan and surgical lung biopsy were essential in evaluating this patient, confirming the interstitial lymphocytic infiltration of the lung. Primary SS (pSS) is the most commonly associated disease to lung interstitial pneumonia (LIP) (25%). High-resolution chest CT scan demonstrates areas of ground-glass attenuation, suggestive of interstitial disease. Surgical lung biopsy shows pathologic increase of mature lymphocyte cells and histiocytes. Most of the cases have a benign presentation and shortly relapse. Superimposed infection, pulmonary fibrosis and lymphoma develop in less than 20% of cases. Corticosteroids are the primary therapy. While pSS is commonly associated with interstitial lung involvement, secondary Sjogren's syndrome (sSS) is only rare. It has been described the initial sSS presentation by Sica symptoms development only, and our case is the first report of LIP presentation as initial manifestation of sSS. Our patient remained stable after corticosteroids and hydoxychloroquine therapy and no

  10. An alternating focused ultrasound system for thermal therapy studies in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Novák, Petr; Benson, Donald G.; Webber, Jessica S.; Hennings, Leah; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an alternating focused ultrasound system (AFUS) for preclinical studies of thermal and acoustic responses of tumors in small animal models. This work was motivated by the need of noninvasively creating relatively small spheroidal thermal lesions in small targets (e.g., a murine tumor) without damaging the surrounding tissues. Methods: The AFUS consists of two lead zirconate titanate (PZT-4) spherically curved ultrasound transducers with focal zones crossing each other at a 90° angle. The transducers were independently powered following a programed alternating firing scheme. Before the device design and construction, an acoustic and biothermal model was developed to simulate the ultrasound pressure field and the resulting temperature and thermal dose distributions. A shape factor, sphericity, to quantify the roundness of the lesions was calculated based on the 240 equivalent minutes at 43 °C thermal dose contours. A prototype of the AFUS was constructed with two identical transducers of an operating frequency of 2.25 MHz, 38 mm in diameter, and F-number equal to 1.33. To evaluate the performance of the AFUS experimentally, a series of heating in polyacrylamide phantoms, ex vivo porcine liver tissues, and in implanted mouse tumors fibrosarcoma (FSaII) in vivo was conducted. In these experimental cases, the sphericity was calculated and compared based on the visible lesion (a marked change in coloration). Results: As shown in the simulations, the lesions induced in polyacrylamide phantoms, ex vivo porcine liver tissues, and in vivo mouse tumors, the sphericities of the lesions yielded by AFUS heating were approximately 50% higher than those of single focused ultrasound heating as long as moderate intensities were used and the duty cycle pulses were distributed equally among the transducers. Conclusions: The AFUS is a device capable of noninvasively creating spheroidal thermal lesions in small targets such as murine tumors. PMID:21626921

  11. Thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors using endoluminal ultrasound: parametric and patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Matthew S.; Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate endoluminal ultrasound applicator configurations for volumetric thermal ablation and hyperthermia of pancreatic tumors using 3D acoustic and biothermal finite element models. Materials and Methods Parametric studies compared endoluminal heating performance for varying applicator transducer configurations (planar, curvilinear-focused, or radial-diverging), frequencies (1–5 MHz), and anatomical conditions. Patient-specific pancreatic head and body tumor models were used to evaluate feasibility of generating hyperthermia and thermal ablation using an applicator positioned in the duodenal or stomach lumen. Temperature and thermal dose were calculated to define ablation (>240 EM43°C) and moderate hyperthermia (40–45 °C) boundaries, and to assess sparing of sensitive tissues. Proportional-integral control was incorporated to regulate maximum temperature to 70–80 °C for ablation and 45 °C for hyperthermia in target regions. Results Parametric studies indicated that 1–3 MHz planar transducers are most suitable for volumetric ablation, producing 5–8 cm3 lesion volumes for a stationary 5 minute sonication. Curvilinear-focused geometries produce more localized ablation to 20–45 mm depth from the GI tract and enhance thermal sparing (Tmax<42 °C) of the luminal wall. Patient anatomy simulations show feasibility in ablating 60.1–92.9% of head/body tumor volumes (4.3–37.2 cm3) with dose <15 EM43°C in the luminal wall for 18–48 min treatment durations, using 1–3 applicator placements in GI lumen. For hyperthermia, planar and radial-diverging transducers could maintain up to 8 cm3 and 15 cm3 of tissue, respectively, between 40–45 °C for a single applicator placement. Conclusions Modeling studies indicate the feasibility of endoluminal ultrasound for volumetric thermal ablation or hyperthermia treatment of pancreatic tumor tissue. PMID:27097663

  12. Acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis in a dog after halothane anaesthesia and administration of flunixin meglumine and trimethoprim-sulphadiazine.

    PubMed

    McNeil, P E

    1992-08-15

    Acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis was diagnosed post mortem when a dog died four days after surgery for a femoral head resection. Possible causative factors associated with halothane anaesthesia, flunixin meglumine analgesia and prophylactic antibiotic therapy with trimethoprim-sulphadiazine are discussed. It is concluded that death was due to renal failure associated with tubulo-interstitial nephritis as a result of a combination of ischaemic and toxic events.

  13. Proposal of thermal imaging application in photodynamic therapy-Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Cholewka, Armand; Stanek, Agata; Kwiatek, Sebastian; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Straszak, Dariusz; Gibińska, Joanna; Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina

    2016-06-01

    There are many different skin lesions that manifest a skin temperature gradient. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequently occurring type of malignant skin lesion (almost 95% of all skin tumors). BCC is sometimes treated by using photodynamic therapy which is very well tolerated by patients and provides good results, especially in superficial skin layer lesions. The results of our studies showed significant changes in the area of temperature gradient due to photodynamic therapy. It seems that the ability to acquire knowledge of such area changes may provide additional useful information to physicians. The increase of observed isotherm area in comparison to lesion size on the skin was a few times higher. It may suggest the range of areas where the metabolism processes take place. Due to the accumulation of photosensitivity only in tumor cells, we theorize that such a large region of increased metabolism observed during therapy may be connected with a larger range of tumor cells than was previously predicted through diagnosis. However, it should be noted that the region can be much bigger due to the existing heat transfer. The results obtained have a potential meaning in describing the range of chemical and physiological processes occurring during photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anomalous dynamics of interstitial dopants in soft crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, Justin; Higler, Ruben; Sprakel, Joris

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of interstitial dopants govern the properties of a wide variety of doped crystalline materials. To describe the hopping dynamics of such interstitial impurities, classical approaches often assume that dopant particles do not interact and travel through a static potential energy landscape. Here we show, using computer simulations, how these assumptions and the resulting predictions from classical Eyring-type theories break down in entropically stabilized body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals due to the thermal excitations of the crystalline matrix. Deviations are particularly severe close to melting where the lattice becomes weak and dopant dynamics exhibit strongly localized and heterogeneous dynamics. We attribute these anomalies to the failure of both assumptions underlying the classical description: (i) The instantaneous potential field experienced by dopants becomes largely disordered due to thermal fluctuations and (ii) elastic interactions cause strong dopant–dopant interactions even at low doping fractions. These results illustrate how describing nonclassical dopant dynamics requires taking the effective disordered potential energy landscape of strongly excited crystals and dopant–dopant interactions into account. PMID:27856751

  15. Anomalous dynamics of interstitial dopants in soft crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Justin; Higler, Ruben; Sprakel, Joris

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of interstitial dopants govern the properties of a wide variety of doped crystalline materials. To describe the hopping dynamics of such interstitial impurities, classical approaches often assume that dopant particles do not interact and travel through a static potential energy landscape. Here we show, using computer simulations, how these assumptions and the resulting predictions from classical Eyring-type theories break down in entropically stabilized body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals due to the thermal excitations of the crystalline matrix. Deviations are particularly severe close to melting where the lattice becomes weak and dopant dynamics exhibit strongly localized and heterogeneous dynamics. We attribute these anomalies to the failure of both assumptions underlying the classical description: (i) The instantaneous potential field experienced by dopants becomes largely disordered due to thermal fluctuations and (ii) elastic interactions cause strong dopant-dopant interactions even at low doping fractions. These results illustrate how describing nonclassical dopant dynamics requires taking the effective disordered potential energy landscape of strongly excited crystals and dopant-dopant interactions into account.

  16. Imaging of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aphorism that children are not little adults certainly applies for the imaging of interstitial lung disease. Acquiring motion-free images of fine pulmonary structures at desired lung volumes is much more difficult in children than in adults. Several forms of interstitial lung disease are unique to children, and some forms of interstitial lung disease encountered in adults rarely, if ever, occur in children. Meticulous attention to imaging technique and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies obtained for the evaluation of childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD). This review will address technique recommendations for imaging chILD, the salient imaging findings in various forms of chILD, and the efficacy of imaging in the diagnosis and management of chILD. PMID:22332031

  17. Diffuse interstitial lung disease: overlaps and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Simon L F; Hansell, David M

    2010-08-01

    Histopathological analysis of lung biopsy material allows the diagnosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias; however, the strength of this diagnosis is sometimes subverted by interobserver variation and sampling. The American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society recommendations of 2002 provide a framework for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and proposed an integrated clinical, radiological and histopathological approach. These recommendations represent a break with tradition by replacing the 'gold standard' of histopathology with the combined 'silver standards' of clinical, imaging and histopathological information. One of the pitfalls of a rigid classification system for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is its failure to accommodate the phenomenon of overlapping disease patterns. This article reviews the various ways that interstitial lung disease may be classified and discusses their applicability. In addition the issue of overlap disease patterns is considered in the context of histopathological interobserver variation and sampling error and how a pigeonhole approach to disease classification may overlook these hybrid entities.

  18. Etiology, Pathogenesis, and Diagnosis of Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Grannum R

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a bladder syndrome of unknown etiology. The cause of IC is most likely multifactorial and includes genetic and environmental factors. Various pathophysiological changes in the bladder, pelvis, and peripheral and central nervous systems have been identified, and this has led to the emergence of biologically specific treatment modalities. Interstitial cystitis is being diagnosed with increasing frequency; however, current diagnostic criteria are non-uniform, and there is significant overlap between chronic pelvic pain syndromes in men and women, interstitial cystitis, recurrent “cystitis,” and the overactive bladder syndrome. The diagnosis of interstitial cystitis can be made clinically and by cystoscopy and hydrodistension. The sensitivity and specificity of urinary markers and the potassium sensitivity test have not been prospectively studied. PMID:16986036

  19. Hybrid referenceless and multibaseline subtraction MR thermometry for monitoring thermal therapies in moving organs

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, William A.; Rieke, Viola; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Medan, Yoav; Lustig, Michael; Santos, Juan; McConnell, Michael V.; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance thermometry using the proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift is a promising technique for guiding thermal ablation. For temperature monitoring in moving organs, such as the liver and the heart, problems with motion must be addressed. Multi-baseline subtraction techniques have been proposed, which use a library of baseline images covering the respiratory and cardiac cycle. However, main field shifts due to lung and diaphragm motion can cause large inaccuracies in multi-baseline subtraction. Referenceless thermometry methods based on polynomial phase regression are immune to motion and susceptibility shifts. While referenceless methods can accurately estimate temperature within the organ, in general, the background phase at organ∕tissue interfaces requires large polynomial orders to fit, leading to increased danger that the heated region itself will be fitted by the polynomial and thermal dose will be underestimated. In this paper, a hybrid method for PRF thermometry in moving organs is presented that combines the strengths of referenceless and multi-baseline thermometry. Methods: The hybrid image model assumes that three sources contribute to image phase during thermal treatment: Background anatomical phase, spatially smooth phase deviations, and focal, heat-induced phase shifts. The new model and temperature estimation algorithm were tested in the heart and liver of normal volunteers, in a moving phantom HIFU heating experiment, and in numerical simulations of thermal ablation. The results were compared to multi-baseline and referenceless methods alone. Results: The hybrid method allows for in vivo temperature estimation in the liver and the heart with lower temperature uncertainty compared to multi-baseline and referenceless methods. The moving phantom HIFU experiment showed that the method accurately estimates temperature during motion in the presence of smooth main field shifts. Numerical simulations illustrated the method

  20. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    11. Khokhlova, V.A., et al., Effects of nonlinear propagation, cavitation , and boiling in lesion formation by high intensity focused ultrasound in...intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed as an emerging non-invasive strategy for cancer treatment by thermal ablation of tumor tissue. The...Concepts, Seattle, WA) operating at its fundamental frequency (1.1 MHz) or its third harmonics (3.3 MHz). The ultrasound imaging system was a 5/7

  1. Interstitial twin pregnancy: A unique case presentation.

    PubMed

    Garretto, Diana; Lee, Lan Na; Budorick, Nancy E; Figueroa, Reinaldo

    2015-09-01

    Early recognition and timely treatment of an interstitial pregnancy is imperative to avoid the high morbidity and mortality of this type of ectopic pregnancy. We report a case of twin interstitial pregnancy that was initially missed on initial sonogram and was subsequently recognized at our institution by transvaginal sonography. The patient underwent open laparoscopic surgery with cornual wedge resection but suffered infundibulopelvic ligament hemorrhage and subsequently required ipsilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She did well and was discharged home a day later.

  2. An inverse problem approach to recovery of in vivo nanoparticle concentrations from thermal image monitoring of MR-guided laser induced thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, D; Elliott, A; Weinberg, J S; Shetty, A; Hazle, J D; Stafford, R J

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of local variations in the optical properties of tumor tissue introduced by the presence of gold-silica nanoparticles (NP) presents significant opportunities in monitoring and control of NP-mediated laser induced thermal therapy (LITT) procedures. Finite element methods of inverse parameter recovery constrained by a Pennes bioheat transfer model were applied to estimate the optical parameters. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) acquired during a NP-mediated LITT of a canine transmissible venereal tumor in brain was used in the presented statistical inverse problem formulation. The maximum likelihood (ML) value of the optical parameters illustrated a marked change in the periphery of the tumor corresponding with the expected location of NP and area of selective heating observed on MRTI. Parameter recovery information became increasingly difficult to infer in distal regions of tissue where photon fluence had been significantly attenuated. Finite element temperature predictions using the ML parameter values obtained from the solution of the inverse problem are able to reproduce the NP selective heating within 5 °C of measured MRTI estimations along selected temperature profiles. Results indicate the ML solution found is able to sufficiently reproduce the selectivity of the NP mediated laser induced heating and therefore the ML solution is likely to return useful optical parameters within the region of significant laser fluence.

  3. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  4. Radiofrequency-induced thermal therapy: results of a European multicentre study of resistive ablation of incompetent truncal varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, B; Hnatek, L; Zierau, U; Camci, M; Akkersdijk, Gjm; Nio, D; Sarlija, M; Ajduk, M; Santoro, P; Roche, E

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermal therapy (RFITT) in a multicentre non-randomized study. Some 672 incompetent saphenous veins (85% great saphenous varicose vein, 15% short saphenous vein) in 462 patients (56.5% CEAP [clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological elements] class 3 or worse) were treated in eight European centres. Patients were assessed between 180 and 360 days postoperatively. Occlusion rates were determined by duplex ultrasound and compared with the power used for treatment, pull back rate and experience of the operating surgeon. Complete occlusion rates of 98.4% were achieved when treatments were performed by an experienced operator (more than 20 cases), when the maximum power setting on the RFITT generator was between 18 and 20 W and the applicator was withdrawn at a rate slower than 1.5 second/cm RFITT is efficacious, well tolerated by patients and has a low incidence of procedure-related post-operative complications.

  5. Interstitial thermotherapy with bipolar electrosurgical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desinger, Kai; Stein, Thomas; Boehme, A.; Mack, Martin G.; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1998-01-01

    In addition to the laser, microwave or other energy sources, interstitial thermotherapy with radio-frequency current (RFITT) in bipolar technique has already been shown in vitro to be a safe and economical alternative energy source with a comparable operating performance. The bipolar technique is, from the technical point of view, completely without risk whereas with monopolar devices, where a neutral electrode has to be applied, an uncontrolled current flow passes through the patient's body. The therapeutical application efficiency of these bipolar RF-needle applicators was evaluated using newly designed high performance flushed and cooled probes (qq 3 mm). These can be used to create large coagulation volumes in tissue such as for the palliative treatment of liver metastases or the therapy of the benign prostate hyperplasia. As a result, the achievable lesion size resulting from these flushed and internally cooled RF- probes could be increased by a factor of three compared to a standard bipolar probe. With these bipolar power RF- applicators, coagulation dimensions of 5 cm length and 4 cm diameter with a power input of 40 watt could be achieved within 20 minutes. No carbonization and electrode tissue adherence was found. Investigations in vitro with adapted RFITT-probes using paramagnetic materials such as titanium alloys and high performance plastic have shown that monitoring under MRI (Siemens Magnetom, 1.5 Tesla), allows visualization of the development of the spatial temperature distribution in tissue using an intermittent diagnostic and therapeutical application. This does not lead to a loss in performance compared to continuous application. A ratio of 1:4 (15 s Thermo Flash MRI, 60 s RF-energy) has shown to be feasible.

  6. Histological Evaluation of Prostate Tissue Response to Image-Guided Transurethral Thermal Therapy After a 48h Recovery Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, Aaron; Tang, Kee; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Image-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy shows strong potential for sparing of critical adjacent structures during prostate cancer treatment. Preclinical experiments were conducted to provide further information on the extent of the treatment margin. Four experiments were carried out in a canine model to investigate the pathology of this margin during the early stages of recovery and were compared to previous results obtained immediately post-treatment. Sedated animals were placed in a 1.5T clinical MRI, and the heating device was positioned accurately within the prostatic urethra with image guidance. Using an MRI-compatible system, the ultrasound device was rotated 365° treating a prescribed volume contained within the gland. Quantitative temperature maps were acquired throughout the treatment, providing feedback information for device control. Animals were allowed to recover and, after 48h, an imaging protocol including T2 and contrast enhanced (CE) MRI was repeated before the animals were sacrificed. Prostate sections were stained with H&E. Careful slice alignment methods during histological procedures and image registration were employed to ensure good correspondence between MR images and microscopy. Although T2 MRI revealed no lesion acutely, a hypo-intense region was clearly visible 2 days post-treatment. The lesion volume defined by CE-MRI increased appreciably during this time. Whole-mount H&E sections showed that the margin between coagulated and normal-appearing cells narrowed during recovery, typically to a width of under 1mm compared to 3mm acutely. These results illustrate the high level of precision achievable with transurethral thermal therapy and suggest methods to monitor the physiological response non-invasively.

  7. Interstitial pneumonitis associated with sirolimus in liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M J; Martín, R O; García, D M; Rey, J M Lozano; de la Cruz Lombardo, J; Rodrigo López, J M

    2007-12-01

    Sirolimus is a powerful immunosuppressive drug initially used in kidney transplant patients but now increasingly employed in recipients of other types of solid organ transplants, such as liver, heart, lung, or pancreas. Sirolimus is indicated for rescue therapy and to reduce the toxic side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. However, its use has been associated with an uncommon but important pulmonary toxicity. Reports have described interstitial pneumonitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, organizing pneumonia, and alveolar proteinosis. We present the case of a liver transplant patient with interstitial pneumonitis associated with sirolimus.

  8. Identification of the interstitial Mn site in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, T. A. L.; Augustyns, V.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Costa, A.; Correia, J. G.; Silva, D. J.; Araújo, J. P.; Houben, K.; Van Bael, M. J.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Silva, M. R. da

    2015-01-05

    We determined the lattice location of Mn in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As using the electron emission channeling technique. We show that interstitial Mn occupies the tetrahedral site with As nearest neighbors (T{sub As}) both before and after thermal annealing at 200 °C, whereas the occupancy of the tetrahedral site with Ga nearest neighbors (T{sub Ga}) is negligible. T{sub As} is therefore the energetically favorable site for interstitial Mn in isolated form as well as when forming complexes with substitutional Mn. These results shed new light on the long standing controversy regarding T{sub As} versus T{sub Ga} occupancy of interstitial Mn in (Ga,Mn)As.

  9. [Boron neutron capture therapy of human gastric cancer by boron-containing immunoliposomes under thermal neutron irradiation].

    PubMed

    Xu, L

    1991-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction yielding high LET Li-7 and alpha particles when boron-10 is irradiated with thermal neutrons. (Et4N)2(10)B10H10 was entrapped in 40 nm liposomes coating the monoclonal antibody, MGb 2, against human gastric cancer. There were 1.4 x 10(4) 10B atoms encapsulated and 20 molecules of MGb 2 incorporated per liposomes ELISA indicated that the immunoreactivity of antibodies on liposomes retained 80%. Preferred binding to human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 was observed as many as 15.1 x 10(9) 10B atoms/tumor cell, 38-fold more than that to normal human embryonic lung cell line SL 7. The fluorescent immunoliposome-stained tumor cells showed membrane-fluorescence while SL 7 cells showed no obvious fluorescence. Irradiated with thermal neutrons (0.025 eV, 3.12 x 10(11)n/cm2, gamma-ray 0.84 Gy), 10B-containing immunoliposomes pretreated SGC-7901 cells survived 27%, significantly lower than non-irradiated cells or non-pretreated cells with irradiation (P less than 0.001). The results demonstrated that boron-containing immunoliposomes could bind selectively and deliver sufficient amount of boron-10 to the target tumor cells.

  10. Adaptive real-time bioheat transfer models for computer-driven MR-guided laser induced thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, David; Feng, Yusheng; Elliott, Andrew; Shetty, Anil; McNichols, Roger J; Oden, J Tinsley; Stafford, R J

    2010-05-01

    The treatment times of laser induced thermal therapies (LITT) guided by computational prediction are determined by the convergence behavior of partial differential equation (PDE)-constrained optimization problems. In this paper, we investigate the convergence behavior of a bioheat transfer constrained calibration problem to assess the feasibility of applying to real-time patient specific data. The calibration techniques utilize multiplanar thermal images obtained from the nondestructive in vivo heating of canine prostate. The calibration techniques attempt to adaptively recover the biothermal heterogeneities within the tissue on a patient-specific level and results in a formidable PDE constrained optimization problem to be solved in real time. A comprehensive calibration study is performed with both homogeneous and spatially heterogeneous biothermal model parameters with and without constitutive nonlinearities. Initial results presented here indicate that the calibration problems involving the inverse solution of thousands of model parameters can converge to a solution within three minutes and decrease the [see text for symbol](L) (2) (2) ((0, T; L) (2) ((Omega))) norm of the difference between computational prediction and the measured temperature values to a patient-specific regime.

  11. Urine markers of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R

    2001-06-01

    This article describes the current state of the art with regard to urine markers of interstitial cystitis (IC), and describes the areas that need continuing research. Articles referenced in MEDLINE that describe urine alterations in IC were reviewed. Additional articles were identified by cross-referencing. The different marker alterations were tabulated. The relevant articles were discussed, considering different purposes for urine markers including: (1) diagnosing IC; (2) confirming a specific pathophysiology for IC; and (3) predicting or following response to a specific treatment. Currently, 2 markers (glycoprotein-51 and antiproliferative factor [APF]) clearly separate IC and control subjects, with minimal overlap. Markers that correlate with specific bladder biopsy features include 1,4-methylimidazole acetic acid and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which correlate with mast cell density, and interleukin (IL)-6, which correlates with mononuclear inflammation. Markers that changed after treatment were as follows: (1) nitric oxide synthase and cyclic guanosine monophosphate increased with oral L-arginine; (2) ECP decreased with subcutaneous heparin; (3) prostaglandin E(2) and kallikrein decreased after bladder distention; (4) neutrophil chemotactic activity decreased after dimethyl sulfoxide; (5) IL-2 inhibitor decreased after oral nifedipine; (6) IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 decreased after bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine; and (7) APF and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor changed to or toward normal levels after bladder distention or sacral nerve stimulation. A larger number of urine alterations have been reported, and a few are being pursued further by correlating with bladder biopsy findings or treatment responses. Further research is needed.

  12. Application of digital infrared thermal imaging in determining inflammatory state and follow-up effect of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tien-Chun; Hsiao, Yung-Lien; Liao, Shu-Lang

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation can cause a local increase in temperature. Digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI) has been used to monitor the temperature distribution of human skin. Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is an autoimmune disease, and patients are treated with immunosuppressive agents if the ophthalmopathy is at an inflammatory state. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of DITI in determining inflammatory state and follow-up effect of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in patients with GO. Digital infrared thermal imaging was used to measure local temperatures of lateral orbit (reference point), upper eyelid, caruncle, medial conjunctiva, lateral conjunctiva, lower eyelid, and cornea, and to make thermal density plots in 14 patients (28 eyes) with GO including inflammatory signs (mean clinical activity score 2.5), and 16 normal controls (32 eyes). We also performed methylprednisolone pulse therapy in 11 patients (22 eyes) with active GO, and measured clinical activity score and local temperatures before and after treatment. The focal change in temperature after treatment and the correlation between temperature variation and change in clinical activity score were then analyzed. Thermal density plots were also compared. Local temperatures of the caruncle, medial conjunctiva, lateral conjunctiva, and lower eyelid of the patients were significantly higher than those of normal controls. In the 11 GO patients treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, the temperatures of the caruncle, medial conjunctiva, and lower eyelid were significantly decreased after treatment. Temperature variation significantly and positively correlated with a change in clinical activity score (correlation coefficient = 0.8, n = 22, p = 0.000). The temperature decreased after treatment in patients who were responsive to methylprednisolone pulse therapy, and the thermal density plot was close to that of normal controls. Digital infrared thermal imaging might be helpful in evaluating

  13. Mechanism for the reduction of interstitial supersaturations in MeV-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Venezia, V.C.; Haynes, T.E.; Agarwal, A.; Pelaz, L.; Gossmann, H.; Jacobson, D.C.; Eaglesham, D.J.

    1999-03-01

    We demonstrate that the excess vacancies induced by a 1 MeV Si implant reduce the excess interstitials generated by a 40 keV Si implant during thermal annealing when these two implants are superimposed in silicon. It is shown that this previously observed reduction is dominated by vacancy annihilation and not by gettering to deeper interstitial-type extended defects. Interstitial supersaturations were measured using B doping superlattices (DSL) grown on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Implanting MeV and keV Si ions into the B DSL/SOI structure eliminated the B transient enhanced diffusion normally associated with the keV implant. The buried SiO{sub 2} layer in the SOI substrate isolates the deep interstitials-type extended defects of the MeV implant, thereby eliminating the possibility that these defects getter the interstitial excess induced by the keV Si implant. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}