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Sample records for intertidal whelks respond

  1. Experimental evidence for latent developmental plasticity: intertidal whelks respond to a native but not an introduced predator.

    PubMed

    Edgell, Timothy C; Neufeld, Christopher J

    2008-08-23

    Animals with highly inducible traits may show no inducible response when exposed to a related but wholly novel cue. This appears to be true for the intertidal whelk Nucella lamellosa faced with a voracious introduced predator. In the laboratory, we exposed whelks to effluent from two species of predatory crab, the native red rock crab Cancer productus and the invasive European green crab Carcinus maenas. Nucella and Cancer have a long shared history in the northeast Pacific, whereas potential interaction with Carcinus began here less than 10 years ago. Although Nucella responded adaptively to Cancer effluent by increasing shell thickness and decreasing somatic growth, there was no such response to Carcinus. Furthermore, thicker shelled Nucella were less likely to be eaten by Carcinus. Because Nucella produces thicker shells when exposed to Cancer cues, its ability to respond similarly to Carcinus depends only on the coupling of the Carcinus cue to the existing developmental pathways for adaptive changes in shell form. Such coupling of latent plasticity to a novel cue -- via genetic changes or associative learning -- could explain many cases of rapid phenotypic change following a sudden shift in the environment.

  2. Aggregation of whelks, Buccinum undatum, near feeding predators: the role of reproductive requirements.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Rémy; Tétreault, Françoise; Himmelman, John H.

    2001-01-01

    In the Mingan Islands, northern Gulf of St Lawrence (eastern Canada), the whelk Buccinum undatum displays a strong escape response to its predator, the asteroid Leptasterias polaris, nevertheless large sexually mature individuals occasionally approach feeding L. polaris to obtain food. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that reproductive requirements increase the tendency of sexually mature whelks to approach feeding asteroids. Prior to egg laying, females (which invest more energy than males into the production of reproductive structures) represented 72% of the adult whelks that approached feeding L. polaris, but only 36% of the adults randomly collected from the study area. Furthermore, females that were attracted to feeding asteroids had smaller reproductive organs (after accounting for body size) than females randomly collected from the study area. Similarly, prior to egg laying, females fed longer and ingested more food than males when tested in the presence of L. polaris in the laboratory. After egg laying, however, females and males displayed a similar tendency to feed in the presence of a predator, both in the field and in the laboratory. Predator-impact indices, computed by contrasting the feeding activity of whelks in the absence and presence of a predator, indicated that females (but not males) responded more boldly to predators prior to than after egg laying, despite a general decrease in feeding activity at that period. Taken together, our observations indicate that the tendency of adult whelks to approach feeding predators is influenced by potential reproductive gains. Because such gains are presumably more directly linked to a given feeding opportunity in sexually active individuals, whelks may be selected to display increased levels of boldness towards predators with the onset of sexual maturity. Thus, potential reproductive benefits may partly explain the size-dependent tendency of whelks to approach feeding asteroids. Copyright 2001 The

  3. Allozyme variation in Busycon whelks (Gastropoda: Melongenidae).

    PubMed

    Berlocher, S H

    2000-10-01

    Large Busycon whelks are used in physiological research and are key predators in shallow water marine communities in eastern North America. Allozyme analysis of 16 loci in Busycon carica (knobbed whelk), B. sinistrum (left-handed or lightning whelk), and the closely related outgroup Busycotypus spiratum (pear whelk) was performed. Striking differences in within-species genetic differentiation were observed. Geographic variation in B. carica is moderate (FST = 0.051). In B. sinistrum, however, FST is 0.625, suggesting the existence of either highly distinct subspecies or unresolved species. The pattern of genetic variation in B. sinistrum may be congruent with that in other taxa that have experienced Gulf-Atlantic and eastern-western Gulf vicariance events. The data are compatible with an evolutionary rate of 0.046 Nei D/million years.

  4. Physiological community ecology: variation in metabolic activity of ecologically important rocky intertidal invertebrates along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Stillman, Jonathon H; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    Rocky intertidal invertebrates live in heterogeneous habitats characterized by steep gradients in wave activity, tidal flux, temperature, food quality and food availability. These environmental factors impact metabolic activity via changes in energy input and stress-induced alteration of energetic demands. For keystone species, small environmentally induced shifts in metabolic activity may lead to disproportionately large impacts on community structure via changes in growth or survival of these key species. Here we use biochemical indicators to assess how natural differences in wave exposure, temperature and food availability may affect metabolic activity of mussels, barnacles, whelks and sea stars living at rocky intertidal sites with different physical and oceanographic characteristics. We show that oxygen consumption rate is correlated with the activity of key metabolic enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) for some intertidal species, and concentrations of these enzymes in certain tissues are lower for starved individuals than for those that are well fed. We also show that the ratio of RNA to DNA (an index of protein synthetic capacity) is highly variable in nature and correlates with short-term changes in food availability. We also observed striking patterns in enzyme activity and RNA/DNA in nature, which are related to differences in rocky intertidal community structure. Differences among species and habitats are most pronounced in summer and are linked to high nearshore productivity at sites favored by suspension feeders and to exposure to stressful low-tide air temperatures in areas of low wave splash. These studies illustrate the great promise of using biochemical indicators to test ecological models, which predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients. Our results also suggest that biochemical indices must be carefully validated with laboratory studies, so that the indicator selected is likely to respond to the

  5. Physiological community ecology: variation in metabolic activity of ecologically important rocky intertidal invertebrates along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Stillman, Jonathon H; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    Rocky intertidal invertebrates live in heterogeneous habitats characterized by steep gradients in wave activity, tidal flux, temperature, food quality and food availability. These environmental factors impact metabolic activity via changes in energy input and stress-induced alteration of energetic demands. For keystone species, small environmentally induced shifts in metabolic activity may lead to disproportionately large impacts on community structure via changes in growth or survival of these key species. Here we use biochemical indicators to assess how natural differences in wave exposure, temperature and food availability may affect metabolic activity of mussels, barnacles, whelks and sea stars living at rocky intertidal sites with different physical and oceanographic characteristics. We show that oxygen consumption rate is correlated with the activity of key metabolic enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) for some intertidal species, and concentrations of these enzymes in certain tissues are lower for starved individuals than for those that are well fed. We also show that the ratio of RNA to DNA (an index of protein synthetic capacity) is highly variable in nature and correlates with short-term changes in food availability. We also observed striking patterns in enzyme activity and RNA/DNA in nature, which are related to differences in rocky intertidal community structure. Differences among species and habitats are most pronounced in summer and are linked to high nearshore productivity at sites favored by suspension feeders and to exposure to stressful low-tide air temperatures in areas of low wave splash. These studies illustrate the great promise of using biochemical indicators to test ecological models, which predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients. Our results also suggest that biochemical indices must be carefully validated with laboratory studies, so that the indicator selected is likely to respond to the

  6. Host and ecology both play a role in shaping distribution of digenean parasites of New Zealand whelks (Gastropoda: Buccinidae: Cominella).

    PubMed

    Donald, Kirsten M; Spencer, Hamish G

    2016-08-01

    Digenean parasites infecting four Cominella whelk species (C. glandiformis, C. adspersa, C. maculosa and C. virgata), which inhabit New Zealand's intertidal zone, were analysed using molecular techniques. Mitochondrial 16S and cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI) and nuclear rDNA ITS1 sequences were used to infer phylogenetic relationships amongst digenea. Host species were parasitized by a diverse range of digenea (Platyhelminthes, Trematoda), representing seven families: Echinostomatidae, Opecoelidae, Microphallidae, Strigeidae and three, as yet, undetermined families A, B and C. Each parasite family infected between one and three host whelk species, and infection levels were typically low (average infection rates ranged from 1·4 to 3·6%). Host specificity ranged from highly species-specific amongst the echinostomes, which were only ever observed infecting C. glandiformis, to the more generalist opecoelids and strigeids, which were capable of infecting three out of four of the Cominella species analysed. Digeneans displayed a highly variable geographic range; for example, echinostomes had a large geographic range stretching the length of New Zealand, from Northland to Otago, whereas Family B parasites were restricted to fairly small areas of the North Island. Our results add to a growing body of research identifying wide ranges in both host specificity and geographic range amongst intertidal, multi-host parasite systems. PMID:27278710

  7. Demersal fishing disturbance increases predation risk for whelks ( Buccinum undatum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Kirsten; Kaiser, Michel J.

    1998-06-01

    Field observations by divers indicated that a high rate of predation of whelks ( Buccinum undatum) by starfish ( Asterias rubens) occurred in an area disturbed by scallop dredging, although these whelks mostly appeared to be alive and externally undamaged. The ability of whelks to escape from starfish was tested in the laboratory after they were dropped or rolled to simulate direct physical contact with bottom fishing gear. Dropping whelks did not significantly affect their escape behaviour, but whelks which had been rolled took significantly longer to right themselves and were significantly less likely to perform an escape response than whelks that had not experienced this treatment. This study suggests that demersal fishing may indirectly increase whelk mortality by increasing their risk of predation.

  8. Climate change and intertidal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pauline M; Adam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause-the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the "squeeze" experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change. PMID:24832670

  9. Climate change and intertidal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pauline M; Adam, Paul

    2013-03-19

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause-the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the "squeeze" experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change.

  10. Climate Change and Intertidal Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Pauline M.; Adam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause—the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the “squeeze” experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change. PMID:24832670

  11. Shell damage and mortality in the common whelk Buccinum undatum caused by beam trawl fishery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensink, B. P.; Fischer, C. V.; Cadée, G. C.; Fonds, M.; Ten Hallers-Tjabbes, C. C.; Boon, J. P.

    2000-02-01

    Common whelks Buccinum undatum collected from the southern North Sea were investigated to study the amount of shell damage and mortality caused by beam trawl fishery. The ability of whelks to repair their damaged shells was studied in the laboratory. Whelks ( n=876) were caught with a fine-meshed 3-m beam trawl or with commercial 4- and 12-m beam trawls, while in some areas whelks were also caught with baited traps (used as a reference). Shell damage varied considerably for the different groups. In whelks collected by beam trawling, minor shell damage was observed in 17-75%, and severe damage (when protection against predators and scavengers is lost) in 10-83%. Whelks caught with baited traps sustained only minor shell damage (0-27% of the individuals). Their damage was statistically significantly less than in beam-trawled specimens. Most whelks in all groups exhibited signs of former shell damage, which had since been repaired. Whelk survival was studied in the laboratory over a six-week period. Only 40% of the whelks caught with the 12-m beam trawl survived, irrespective of the damage suffered. Whelks that survived and recovered had repaired their shell after six weeks. More than 95% of the whelks caught with baited traps survived the six-week experimental period; this is statistically significantly higher than the survival of animals caught with the 12-m beam trawl. At five locations females were screened for the presence and stage of imposex. Mild imposex development (mostly stages 1 and 2) was observed at all locations with incidences of 32-80%. It is concluded that beam trawl fishery may be a much greater source of mortality in common whelks than previously thought.

  12. Age and growth of the knobbed whelk Busycon carica (Gmelin 1791) in South Carolina subtidal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eversole, A.G.; Anderson, W.D.; Isely, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Knobbed whelk, Busycon carica (Gmelin, 1791), age and growth were estimated using tagged and recaptured individuals (n = 396) from areas off South Carolina coastal islands. Recaptured whelks were at large an average of 298 d (4-2,640 d). Growth, an increase in shell length (SL), was evident in 24% of the recaptured whelks, whereas 29% of recaptured individuals were the same size as when released and 47% were smaller than the released size. Mean growth rate was <0.001 mm SL/d and 0.022 mm SL/d if decreases in SL were assumed to be zero. Smaller whelks (???90 mm SL) at large for over one year grew seven times faster than larger whelks. The von Bertalanffy growth model: SL1 = 159.5(1 - e-0.0765(t+0.4162)), was developed from the mark - recapture whelks exhibiting growth. Based on a South Carolina minimum legal size of 102 mm SL, whelks recruit into the fishery at 13 y of age. The longevity, large size at maturity and slow growth suggest the potential for over harvest of knobbed whelk. Future whelk management plans may wish to consider whether economically viable commercial harvest can be sustainable.

  13. Polymorphic microsatellite markers isolated from the neptune whelk Neptunea arthritica.

    PubMed

    Azuma, N; Miranda, R M; Goshima, S; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci were isolated from the neptune whelk Neptunea arthritica, which is an important fishery resource in northern Japan. The number of alleles at the loci ranged from two to six, with observed and expected heterozygosities of 0.192-0.807 and 0.233-0.738, respectively. The observed variations suggest that these loci can be used as markers for population and kinship analyses in this species.

  14. Genetic isolation by distance among populations of the netted dog whelk Nassarius reticulatus (L.) along the European Atlantic coastline.

    PubMed

    Couceiro, Lucía; Barreiro, Rodolfo; Ruiz, José M; Sotka, Erik E

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of the average distances by which marine larvae disperse are generally poorly described, despite the central role that larval dispersal plays in the demographic connectivity of populations across geographic space. Here, we describe the population genetic structure and average dispersal distance of the netted dog whelk Nassarius reticulatus (L.) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Prosobranchia), a widespread member of European intertidal communities, using DNA sequence variation in a fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). An analysis of 156 individuals from 6 locations spread across approximately 1700 km of the European Atlantic coastline revealed weak and nonsignificant population structure (overall Phi(ST) = 0.00013). However, pairwise Phi(ST) values revealed a slight but significant increase in genetic isolation with geographic distance (IBD), suggesting that populations are not panmictic across the sampled geographic range. If we assume that the isolation by distance is maintained by a stable, stepping stone model of gene flow, then the slope of the IBD is consistent with an average larval dispersal distance of approximately 70 km per generation. The spatial scale of larval dispersal in N. reticulatus is consistent with the life cycle of the species (planktotrophic veliger lasting 30-60 days before competent to settle). A mismatch analysis of the COI sequences revealed a signature of an ancient demographic expansion that began 61 500-160,000 years ago, well before the most recent Pleistocene glaciation event. The greatest levels of genetic diversity occur within the middle latitudes of the whelk's geographic range, consistent with the notion that historic populations of N. reticulatus might have expanded northward and southward from the centrally located Bay of Biscay. PMID:17728274

  15. Why the whelk ( Buccinum undatum) has become extinct in the dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadée, G. C.; Boon, J. P.; Fischer, C. V.; Mensink, B. P.; Hallers-Tjabbes, C. C. Ten

    The disappearance of the whelk from the western Dutch Wadden Sea started in the mid 1920s with a gradual decline due to overfishing and lethal shell damage by fishing gear. When fishery stopped in the early 1970s, tributylin-based (TBT) antifouling paints had become into use. Such paints caused imposex and possibly reproduction failure in the whelk leading to its local extinction. The whelk will disappear from larger parts of its present distribution area if fishery-free areas do not become effective, and if the use of TBT-based paints continues.

  16. Arsenic concentration and speciation of the marine hyperaccumulator whelk Buccinum undatum collected in coastal waters of Northern Britain.

    PubMed

    Urgast, Dagmar S; Adams, Gillian C; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    European whelks (Buccinum undatum) have shown to accumulate high levels of arsenic. Since the accumulation process is not well understood it is necessary to gain information about the geographical variability of the arsenic concentration in them. Here we show that the mean arsenic concentrations of the whelks are site specific and vary by a factor of 3.5 in ten different geographical locations. At fishing grounds where whelks exhibited low arsenic concentrations the arsenic concentration increased linearly with size, whereas the whelks with high arsenic levels from a different location showed no correlation. Although the overall arsenic concentration in the whelks differed between 45 and 655 mg kg(-1) d.w., the inorganic arsenic concentration did not exceed 0.4 mg kg(-1) d.w. The main arsenic compound is arsenobetaine, which is widely considered as non-toxic. The exposure to toxic inorganic arsenic when eating whelks cannot be estimated from their size or their total arsenic concentration.

  17. Effects of calcium ions and adenosine diphosphate on the activities of NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase from the radular muscles of the whelk and flight muscles of insects.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    1. The activity of NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase from the radular muscle of the whelk is higher than those in many vertebrate muscles and only slightly lower than in the flight muscles of insects. The enzyme activity from the whelk (Buccinum undatum) is stable for several hours after homogenization of the radular muscle, whereas that from insect flight muscle is very unstable. Consequently, the enzyme from the whelk muscle is suitable for a systematic investigation of the effects of Ca2+ and ADP. 2. The sigmoid response of the enzyme activity to isocitrate concentration is markedly increased by raising the Ca2+ concentration from 0.001 to 10 muM, but it is decreased by ADP. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ is most pronounced at pH7.1; it is not observed at pH 6.5. Similar effects are observed for the enzyme from the flight muscle of the locust (Schistocerca gregaria) and the water bug (Lethocerus cordofanus). The percentage activation by ADP of the enzyme from either the whelk or the insects is greater at 10 muM-Ca2+, and 50% of the maximum activation is obtained at 0.10 and 0.16 mM-ADP for the enzyme from whelk and locust respectively at this Ca2+ concentration. At 10 muM-Ca2+ in the absence of added ADP, the apparent Km for isocitrate is markedly higher than in other conditions. Ca2+ concentrations of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 muM cause 50% inhibition of maximum activity of the enzyme from the muscles of the whelk, locust and water bug respectively. 3. Recent work has indicated that mitochondria may play a complementary role to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the control of the distribution of Ca2+ in muscle. The opposite effects of Ca2+ on the activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase from muscle tissue are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in the intracellular distribution of Ca2+ control the activities of these two enzymes in order to stimulate energy production for the contraction process in the muscle

  18. Effects of calcium ions and adenosine diphosphate on the activities of NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase from the radular muscles of the whelk and flight muscles of insects.

    PubMed

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-03-15

    1. The activity of NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase from the radular muscle of the whelk is higher than those in many vertebrate muscles and only slightly lower than in the flight muscles of insects. The enzyme activity from the whelk (Buccinum undatum) is stable for several hours after homogenization of the radular muscle, whereas that from insect flight muscle is very unstable. Consequently, the enzyme from the whelk muscle is suitable for a systematic investigation of the effects of Ca2+ and ADP. 2. The sigmoid response of the enzyme activity to isocitrate concentration is markedly increased by raising the Ca2+ concentration from 0.001 to 10 muM, but it is decreased by ADP. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ is most pronounced at pH7.1; it is not observed at pH 6.5. Similar effects are observed for the enzyme from the flight muscle of the locust (Schistocerca gregaria) and the water bug (Lethocerus cordofanus). The percentage activation by ADP of the enzyme from either the whelk or the insects is greater at 10 muM-Ca2+, and 50% of the maximum activation is obtained at 0.10 and 0.16 mM-ADP for the enzyme from whelk and locust respectively at this Ca2+ concentration. At 10 muM-Ca2+ in the absence of added ADP, the apparent Km for isocitrate is markedly higher than in other conditions. Ca2+ concentrations of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 muM cause 50% inhibition of maximum activity of the enzyme from the muscles of the whelk, locust and water bug respectively. 3. Recent work has indicated that mitochondria may play a complementary role to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the control of the distribution of Ca2+ in muscle. The opposite effects of Ca2+ on the activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase from muscle tissue are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in the intracellular distribution of Ca2+ control the activities of these two enzymes in order to stimulate energy production for the contraction process in the muscle

  19. Food poisoning due to the consumption of red whelks (Neptunea antiqua).

    PubMed Central

    Reid, T. M.; Gould, I. M.; Mackie, I. M.; Ritchie, A. H.; Hobbs, G.

    1988-01-01

    Two incidents of toxin-type food poisoning in N.E. Scotland associated with the consumption of red whelks (Neptunea antiqua) are described. Four patients developed symptoms within 1 h of consuming whole whelks. These included visual disturbances--double vision and difficulty in focusing--tingling of the fingers, prostration and in one subject nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and ataxia. In all cases recovery was complete in 24 h. Using a newly developed analytical technique the concentration of the causative toxin, tetramine, in the salivary glands of the whelks consumed was estimated at 0.07%, equivalent to a content of 3.75 mg/100 g of the shellfish. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3181322

  20. Determination of multiple toxins in whelk and clam samples collected from the Chukchi and Bering seas.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Chen, Huidan; Qiu, Jiangbing; Lin, Heshan; Gu, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Buccinidae whelk Neptunea varicifera (Dall), Cardiidae clam Serripes laperousii (Deshayes), and two unknown species of whelk and clam were collected from the Arctic Chukchi Sea and sub-Arctic Bering Sea in July 2014. In this study, the mollusk samples were analyzed by different liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods for multiple shellfish toxins, including okadaic acid (OA), pectenotoxin (PTX), yessotoxin (YTX), azaspiracid (AZA), cyclic imines (CI), and saxitoxin (STX) groups. PTX2 (≈2.0 μg kg(-1) whole tissues) was detected exclusively in the clam S. laperousii collected from the Chukchi Sea. OA and dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1) were restricted to mollusk samples collected from the Bering Sea, and OA was the dominant component of the whelk N. varicifera (63 μg kg(-1) digestive gland) and an unknown species of whelk (6.8 μg kg(-1) digestive gland). Spirolide-1 (SPX1) was confirmed in most samples except for the whelk N. varicifera collected from the Bering Sea. The highest content of SPX1 (≈18.5 μg kg(-1) digestive gland) occurred in the whelk N. varicifera collected from the Chukchi Sea, along with the suspected presence of SPX-C, SPX-D and didesMe-SPX-C. YTX, as well as its derivatives 45-OH-YTX and 45,46,47-Trinor-YTX, were found in all samples, with the highest YTX content (66 μg kg(-1) digestive gland) present in the whelk N. varicifera collected from the Chukchi Sea. Interestingly, STX and dcSTX were measured only in the whelk N. varicifera and unknown species of clam collected from the Chukchi Sea. No AZA-group toxins, gymnodimine (GYM), or pinnatoxin G were found in any samples analyzed. Results demonstrated that the mollusk samples were contaminated by multiple shellfish toxins in the Chukchi and Bering seas. This study highlights the need to monitor potentially toxic microalgae in the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, as well as species of mollusk that may be included in future commercial or

  1. Common whelk (Buccinum undatum) allergy: identification of IgE-binding components and effects of heating and digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Jae; Park, Hae-Sim

    2004-12-01

    In Korea, common whelk (Buccinum undatum) is a popular edible shellfish. The aim of this study was to observe the sensitization rate to common whelk and to characterize its allergens. We carried out skin prick test (SPT) in 1,700 patients with various allergic diseases. Specific IgE were detected by ELISA in the patient sera and ELISA inhibition tests were conducted. IgE-binding components were identified by means of SDS-PAGE and IgE-immunoblotting. The effects of digestive enzymes were evaluated in both raw and thermally treated extracts. SPT to common whelk was positive (>/=2+) in 83 (4.9%) patients studied. Twenty-four (38.7%) out of 62 SPT positive patients had high serum specific IgE to common whelk. ELISA inhibition test showed significant inhibitions by abalone as well as by common whelk. IgE-immunoblotting demonstrated three IgE-binding components (40, 71, 82 kDa), which were digested by simulated intestinal fluid and moderately digested by simulated gastric fluid, and the digestibility of allergens remained unchanged after thermal treatment. In conclusion, IgE-sensitization rate to common whelk was 4.9% in allergy patients. IgE-immunoblotting demonstrated three IgE-binding components, which were degraded by digestive enzymes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of the sensitized patients to common whelk.

  2. Impact of a castrating trematode, Neophasis sp., on the common whelk, Buccinum undatum, in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Tétreault, F; Himmelman, J H; Measures, L

    2000-04-01

    We observed heavy trematode infections of whelks, Buccinum undatum, from the Mingan Islands, eastern Canada, by larval stages of a species of Neophasis. Only sexually mature whelks were infected, 23% of mature females and 15% of mature males, and prevalence increased rapidly with whelk size. In most cases the parasite completely occupied the gonad, causing castration. The digestive gland was also infected, although to a lesser degree (0% to 50% occupation), and a marked reduction in the mass of the penis was associated with the infection. A decrease in the proportion of whelks with a highly infected digestive gland between May and August 1994 suggested mortality of infected individuals. Whelks held for 12 to 15 months in the laboratory retained the infection but did not show significant mortalities (possibly because food was abundant and predators absent). The larval stage of Neophasis sp. found in whelks was a cercaria; however, the tail easily detached. The putative infective stage (metacercaria) was not observed but may be present in whelks in late winter and early spring. Other trematode parasites observed were adult Steringophorus furciger in the stomach and larval Renicola sp. in the digestive gland.

  3. Common Whelk (Buccinum undatum) Allergy: Identification of IgE-binding Components and Effects of Heating and Digestive Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Jae

    2004-01-01

    In Korea, common whelk (Buccinum undatum) is a popular edible shellfish. The aim of this study was to observe the sensitization rate to common whelk and to characterize its allergens. We carried out skin prick test (SPT) in 1,700 patients with various allergic diseases. Specific IgE were detected by ELISA in the patient sera and ELISA inhibition tests were conducted. IgE-binding components were identified by means of SDS-PAGE and IgE-immunoblotting. The effects of digestive enzymes were evaluated in both raw and thermally treated extracts. SPT to common whelk was positive (≥2+) in 83 (4.9%) patients studied. Twenty-four (38.7%) out of 62 SPT positive patients had high serum specific IgE to common whelk. ELISA inhibition test showed significant inhibitions by abalone as well as by common whelk. IgE-immunoblotting demonstrated three IgE-binding components (40, 71, 82 kDa), which were digested by simulated intestinal fluid and moderately digested by simulated gastric fluid, and the digestibility of allergens remained unchanged after thermal treatment. In conclusion, IgE-sensitization rate to common whelk was 4.9% in allergy patients. IgE-immunoblotting demonstrated three IgE-binding components, which were degraded by digestive enzymes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of the sensitized patients to common whelk. PMID:15608387

  4. Imposex occurrence in marine whelks at a military facility in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jakob; Glahder, Christian M; Asmund, Gert

    2006-07-01

    Imposex was found in the Arctic whelk Buccinum finmarkianum at several marine stations off Thule Air Base, an US military facility in Northwest Greenland. This indicates a widespread contamination with the antifouling agents, tributyltin (TBT) or triphenyltin (TPhT) in the area, but such contamination was not supported by the organotin analyses in sediments, whelks and clams, which in general was below the analytical detection limit. Organotin concentrations above the detection limit were found only at one station close to a quay, where the highest frequency of imposex also occurred. This suggests that imposex in B. finmarkianum is a biomarker of TBT more sensitive than the detection limits, which the analytical chemistry could achieve in this study. PMID:16280189

  5. Imposex occurrence in marine whelks at a military facility in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jakob; Glahder, Christian M; Asmund, Gert

    2006-07-01

    Imposex was found in the Arctic whelk Buccinum finmarkianum at several marine stations off Thule Air Base, an US military facility in Northwest Greenland. This indicates a widespread contamination with the antifouling agents, tributyltin (TBT) or triphenyltin (TPhT) in the area, but such contamination was not supported by the organotin analyses in sediments, whelks and clams, which in general was below the analytical detection limit. Organotin concentrations above the detection limit were found only at one station close to a quay, where the highest frequency of imposex also occurred. This suggests that imposex in B. finmarkianum is a biomarker of TBT more sensitive than the detection limits, which the analytical chemistry could achieve in this study.

  6. The hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum L. The polysaccharide sulphate component.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S; Jevons, F R

    1966-02-01

    1. A polysaccharide sulphate has been isolated from the hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum. 2. The molecular weight of this polysaccharide, which is a glucan carrying one ester sulphate group per monosaccharide residue, is 1.7x10(5). 3. Some investigations bearing on the location of the ester sulphate groups are reported. 4. The viscosity of the whole mucin has been shown to depend mainly on the glucan sulphate.

  7. The hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum L. The polysaccharide sulphate component

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, S.; Jevons, F. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. A polysaccharide sulphate has been isolated from the hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum. 2. The molecular weight of this polysaccharide, which is a glucan carrying one ester sulphate group per monosaccharide residue, is 1·7×105. 3. Some investigations bearing on the location of the ester sulphate groups are reported. 4. The viscosity of the whole mucin has been shown to depend mainly on the glucan sulphate. PMID:5941346

  8. Genetic sex determination, gender identification and pseudohermaphroditism in the knobbed whelk, Busycon carica (Mollusca: Melongenidae).

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Power, Alan J.; Walker, DeEtte

    2004-01-01

    We report perhaps the first genic-level molecular documentation of a mammalian-like 'X-linked' mode of sex determination in molluscs. From family inheritance data and observed associations between sex-phenotyped adults and genotypes in Busycon carica, we deduce that a polymorphic microsatellite locus (bc2.2) is diploid and usually heterozygous in females, hemizygous in males, and that its alleles are transmitted from mothers to sons and daughters but from fathers to daughters only. We also employ bc2.2 to estimate near-conception sex ratio in whelk embryos, where gender is indeterminable by visual inspection. Statistical corrections are suggested at both family and population levels to accommodate the presence of homozygous bc2.2 females that could otherwise be genetically mistaken for hemizygous males. Knobbed whelks were thought to be sequential hermaphrodites, but our evidence for genetic dioecy supports an earlier hypothesis that whelks are pseudohermaphroditic (falsely appear to switch functional sex when environmental conditions induce changes in sexual phenotype). These findings highlight the distinction between gender in a genetic versus phenotypic sense. PMID:15156923

  9. The whelk ( Buccinum undatum L.) in the western Dutch Wadden Sea in the period 1946-1970: Assessment of population characteristics and fishery impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vooys, C. G. N.; van der Meer, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the Dutch Wadden Sea a whelk fishery existed from 1900 to 1970. The high post-war catches, following a period without fishery, and the subsequent decrease in catches when fishery was reopened, allowed us to estimate fishery mortality and recruitment. Information on natural mortality and growth, which were required in the estimation procedure, was obtained from previous studies elsewhere. Natural mortality could be calculated from an experiment with marked whelks in the Thames estuary. Age-length relations could be used from French investigations on whelks near the Channel Islands. The size of a potential whelk population could be estimated. Effects of fishery and possible causes of the disappearance of the whelk from the Dutch Wadden Sea are discussed.

  10. Postembryonic stages of Nucellicola holmanae Lamb et al., 1996 (copepoda, poecilostomatoida), an endoparasite of the dog whelk Nucella lapillus (gastropoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, E. J.; Boxshall, G. A.; Mill, P. J.; Grahame, J.

    1998-06-01

    The external morphology of the first three larval stages of Nucellicola holmanae is described. These stages were cultured from eggs found with the adults in the viscera of dog whelks collected from Robin Hood's Bay, North Yorkshire. The nauplius develops within the whelk. It moults to a metanauplius which is released as a free-swimming stage. The metanauplius moults to a free copepodid stage which exhibits a combination of characters typical of the first, second and third copepodid stages of other poecilostomatoid copepods. The infective copepodid stage which locates and penetrates the host is visible through the integument of this free-swimming copepodid.

  11. Bioaccumulation and biotransformation of pyrene and 1-hydroxypyrene by the marine whelk Buccinum undatum.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Quilliam, Michael A; Rouleau, Claude; Croll, Roger P; Hellou, Jocelyne

    2010-04-01

    The fates of a phenolic contaminant and its hydrocarbon precursor have rarely been compared, especially in an invertebrate species. Two groups of Buccinum undatum were exposed to equimolar amounts of pyrene and 1-hydroxypyrene over 15 d through their diets. Tissue extracts from the muscle and visceral mass were analyzed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection. Nine biotransformation products were detected in animals from both exposures. These included 1-hydroxypyrene, pyrene-1-sulfate, pyrene-1-glucuronide, pyrene glucose sulfate, two isomers each of pyrenediol sulfate and pyrenediol disulfate, and one isomer of pyrenediol glucuronide sulfate. These compounds represent a more complex metabolic pathway for pyrene than is typically reported. Diconjugated metabolites were as important in animals exposed to pyrene as in those exposed to 1-hydroxypyrene. Biotransformation products represented >90% of the material detected in the animals and highlight the importance of analyzing metabolites when assessing exposure. A mean of only 2 to 3% of the body burden was present in muscle compared with the visceral mass of both groups. The analytical methods were sufficiently sensitive to detect biotransformation products both in laboratory control whelks and in those sampled offshore. The tissue distribution of [(14)C]pyrene was also studied by autoradiography. Radioactivity was present primarily in the digestive and excretory system of the whelks and not in the gonads or muscle tissue.

  12. Nurse egg consumption and intracapsular development in the common whelk Buccinum undatum (Linnaeus 1758)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Thatje, Sven

    2013-03-01

    Intracapsular development is common in marine gastropods. In many species, embryos develop alongside nurse eggs, which provide nutrition during ontogeny. The common whelk Buccinum undatum is a commercially important North Atlantic shallow-water gastropod. Development is intracapsular in this species, with individuals hatching as crawling juveniles. While its reproductive cycle has been well documented, further work is necessary to provide a complete description of encapsulated development. Here, using B. undatum egg masses from the south coast of England intracapsular development at 6 °C is described. Number of eggs, veligers and juveniles per capsule are compared, and nurse egg partitioning, timing of nurse egg consumption and intracapsular size differences through development are discussed. Total development took between 133 and 140 days, over which 7 ontogenetic stages were identified. The number of both eggs and veligers were significantly related to capsule volume, with approximately 1 % of eggs developing per capsule. Each early veliger consumed nurse eggs rapidly over just 3-7 days. Within each capsule, initial development was asynchronous, but it became synchronous during the veliger stage. No evidence for cannibalism was found during development, but large size differences between embryos developing within each capsule were observed, and occasionally `empty' veligers were seen, which had not successfully consumed any nurse eggs. These results indicate a high level of competition for nurse eggs within each capsule during development in the common whelk. The initial differences observed in nurse egg uptake may affect individual predisposition in later life.

  13. Genetic structure of the veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) populations along the coast of China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmin; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wang, Rucai

    2008-10-01

    The veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) is a valuable and important fishery resource in China. In order to provide guidelines for fisheries management, the genetics population structure was assessed using 10 polymorphic allozyme loci from seven populations of R. venosa across the species' range on the Chinese coast. The mean allele richness ranged from 1.65 to 2.13, and the mean heterozygosity ranged from 0.086 to 0.149. Significant genetic differentiation was present, and the theta value was 0.016 across all populations. The nMDS plot of pairwise theta values, UPGMA dendrogram, and AMOVA analysis were in good agreement and identified three geographic subdivision groups. We propose that the genetic structure may be due to larval dispersal barriers and localized adaptation or a combination thereof. The implications of these results for the management of R. venosa populations are discussed.

  14. Wave energy and intertidal productivity

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Egbert G.; Paine, Robert T.; Quinn, James F.; Suchanek, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    In the northeastern Pacific, intertidal zones of the most wave-beaten shores receive more energy from breaking waves than from the sun. Despite severe mortality from winter storms, communities at some wave-beaten sites produce an extraordinary quantity of dry matter per unit area of shore per year. At wave-beaten sites of Tatoosh Island, WA, sea palms, Postelsia palmaeformis, can produce > 10 kg of dry matter, or 1.5 × 108 J, per m2 in a good year. Extraordinarily productive organisms such as Postelsia are restricted to wave-beaten sites. Intertidal organisms cannot transform wave energy into chemical energy, as photosynthetic plants transform solar energy, nor can intertidal organisms “harness” wave energy. Nonetheless, wave energy enhances the productivity of intertidal organisms. On exposed shores, waves increase the capacity of resident algae to acquire nutrients and use sunlight, augment the competitive ability of productive organisms, and protect intertidal residents by knocking away their enemies or preventing them from feeding. PMID:16593813

  15. Behavioral plasticity in an invaded system: non-native whelks recognize risk from native crabs.

    PubMed

    Grason, Emily W; Miner, Benjamin G

    2012-05-01

    Inducible defenses have the potential to affect both invasion success and the structure of invaded communities. However, little is known about the cues used for risk-recognition that influence the expression of inducible defenses in invasive prey, because they involve a novel threat. In laboratory experiments, we investigated behavioral defenses induced by a native crab on two invasive oyster drills (marine whelks Urosalpinx cinerea and Ocinebrina inornata). Both drills hid more often and reduced their feeding rates when they detected predators consuming conspecific prey. Examination of the responses of U. cinerea to specific cue sources (predator kairomones, conspecific alarm cues) indicated that this species had the strongest responses to cues from injured conspecifics, but that it did recognize the novel crab predator. Our observation of native predator (per se) recognition by an invasive marine prey is novel. In addition, we observed that neither species of drill reduced their defensive behavior to reflect predation risk shared by a group of prey. The lack of density dependence in risk-assessment could cause populations of invasive prey to transmit both quantitatively and qualitatively different community effects over the course of an invasion as abundance changes. Together, these findings demonstrate several ways that the risk-assessment strategies could be important in establishment and post-establishment dynamics of invasive prey.

  16. Occurrence and effects of organotins on adult common whelk (Buccinum undatum) (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in harbours and in a simulated dredging situation.

    PubMed

    Svavarsson, J; Granmo, A; Ekelund, R; Szpunar, J

    2001-05-01

    Transplanted common whelk (Buccinum undatum) (Mollusca, Gastropoda) accumulated fairly high levels of organotins (tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT)) during exposure in three harbours with different TBT contamination. This did not though lead to an increase in imposex frequency in the adult females studied. Simulating harbour dredging in an experiment using suspended sediment from one of the harbours only resulted in a low concentration of TBT in the tissues of the common whelk and subsequently no changes in the occurrence and degree of imposex. The common whelk seemed to receive the main part of TBT from the water column and the limited bioaccumulation in the experiment indicates that desorption of TBT from the suspended sediment was slow. After TBT has been totally banned, dredging of contaminated sediments will cause increased exposure of the biota to TBT. Due to slow desorption the increase may however, be slight and temporary to pelagic and epibenthic species unless the settled particles are resuspended.

  17. No estuarine intertidal bathymetry? No worries! Estimating intertidal depth contours from readily available GIS data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance of littoral elevation to the distribution of intertidal species has long been a cornerstone of estuarine ecology and its historical importance to navigation cannot be understated. However, historically, intertidal elevation measurements have been sparse likely due ...

  18. Maternal Lipid Provisioning Mirrors Evolution of Reproductive Strategies in Direct-Developing Whelks.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sergio A; Phillips, Nicole E; Sewell, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    The energetic input that offspring receive from their mothers is a well-studied maternal effect that can influence the evolution of life histories. Using the offspring of three sympatric whelks: Cominella virgata (one embryo per capsule); Cominella maculosa (multiple embryos per capsule); and Haustrum scobina (multiple embryos per capsule and nurse-embryo consumption), we examined how contrasting reproductive strategies mediate inter- and intraspecific differences in hatchling provisioning. Total lipid content (as measured in μg hatchling(-1) ± SE) was unrelated to size among the 3 species; the hatchlings of H. scobina were the smallest but had the highest lipid content (33.8 ± 8.1 μg hatchling(-1)). In offspring of C. maculosa, lipid content was 6.6 ± 0.4 μg hatchling(-1), and in offspring of C. virgata, it was 21.7 ± 3.2 μg hatchling(-1) The multi-encapsulated hatchlings of C. maculosa and H. scobina were the only species that contained the energetic lipids, wax ester (WE) and methyl ester (ME). However, the overall composition of energetic lipid between hatchlings of the two Cominella species reflected strong affinities of taxonomy, suggesting a phylogenetic evolution of the non-adelphophagic development strategy. Inter- and intracapsular variability in sibling provisioning was highest in H. scobina, a finding that implies less control of allocation to individual hatchlings in this adelphophagic developer. We suggest that interspecific variability of lipids offers a useful approach to understanding the evolution of maternal provisioning in direct-developing species.

  19. Maternal Lipid Provisioning Mirrors Evolution of Reproductive Strategies in Direct-Developing Whelks.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sergio A; Phillips, Nicole E; Sewell, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    The energetic input that offspring receive from their mothers is a well-studied maternal effect that can influence the evolution of life histories. Using the offspring of three sympatric whelks: Cominella virgata (one embryo per capsule); Cominella maculosa (multiple embryos per capsule); and Haustrum scobina (multiple embryos per capsule and nurse-embryo consumption), we examined how contrasting reproductive strategies mediate inter- and intraspecific differences in hatchling provisioning. Total lipid content (as measured in μg hatchling(-1) ± SE) was unrelated to size among the 3 species; the hatchlings of H. scobina were the smallest but had the highest lipid content (33.8 ± 8.1 μg hatchling(-1)). In offspring of C. maculosa, lipid content was 6.6 ± 0.4 μg hatchling(-1), and in offspring of C. virgata, it was 21.7 ± 3.2 μg hatchling(-1) The multi-encapsulated hatchlings of C. maculosa and H. scobina were the only species that contained the energetic lipids, wax ester (WE) and methyl ester (ME). However, the overall composition of energetic lipid between hatchlings of the two Cominella species reflected strong affinities of taxonomy, suggesting a phylogenetic evolution of the non-adelphophagic development strategy. Inter- and intracapsular variability in sibling provisioning was highest in H. scobina, a finding that implies less control of allocation to individual hatchlings in this adelphophagic developer. We suggest that interspecific variability of lipids offers a useful approach to understanding the evolution of maternal provisioning in direct-developing species. PMID:27365414

  20. Comprehensive and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Metamorphosis-Related Proteins in the Veined Rapa Whelk, Rapana venosa

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Larval metamorphosis of the veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) is a pelagic to benthic transition that involves considerable structural and physiological changes. Because metamorphosis plays a pivotal role in R. venosa commercial breeding and natural populations, the endogenous proteins that drive this transition attract considerable interest. This study is the first to perform a comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analysis related to metamorphosis in a marine gastropod. We analyzed the proteomes of competent R. venosa larvae and post-larvae, resulting in the identification of 5312 proteins, including 470 that were downregulated and 668 that were upregulated after metamorphosis. The differentially expressed proteins reflected multiple processes involved in metamorphosis, including cytoskeleton and cell adhesion, ingestion and digestion, stress response and immunity, as well as specific tissue development. Our data improve understanding of the physiological traits controlling R. venosa metamorphosis and provide a solid basis for further study. PMID:27314339

  1. What responders need to respond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifried, Gary

    2004-12-01

    Developing equipment and instrumentation for use by first responders and HAZMAT professionals in a Homeland Defense role requires an understanding of the real needs of those responders. These needs are driven by the manner in which the incident response takes place and how the response actions occur over time. This paper describes a chemical terrorist incident, the response functions and related timelines, and the detection and identification needs during each phase. From this information, developers will be able to better understand requirements related to sensitivity, specificity, response time, weight, ruggedness, ease of use, and other design parameters.

  2. Non-linear density-dependent effects of an intertidal ecosystem engineer.

    PubMed

    Harley, Christopher D G; O'Riley, Jaclyn L

    2011-06-01

    Ecosystem engineering is an important process in a variety of ecosystems. However, the relationship between engineer density and engineering impact remains poorly understood. We used experiments and a mathematical model to examine the role of engineer density in a rocky intertidal community in northern California. In this system, the whelk Nucella ostrina preys on barnacles (Balanus glandula and Chthamalus dalli), leaving empty barnacle tests as a resource (favorable microhabitat) for other species. Field experiments demonstrated that N. ostrina predation increased the availability of empty tests of both barnacle species, reduced the density of the competitively dominant B. glandula, and indirectly increased the density of the competitively inferior C. dalli. Empty barnacle tests altered microhabitat humidity, but not temperature, and presumably provided a refuge from wave action. The herbivorous snail Littorina plena was positively associated with empty test availability in both observational comparisons and experimental manipulations of empty test availability, and L. plena density was elevated in areas with foraging N. ostrina. To explore the effects of variation in N. ostrina predation, we constructed a demographic matrix model for barnacles in which we varied predation intensity. The model predicted that number of available empty tests increases with predation intensity to a point, but declines when predation pressure was strong enough to severely reduce adult barnacle densities. The modeled number of available empty tests therefore peaked at an intermediate level of N. ostrina predation. Non-linear relationships between engineer density and engineer impact may be a generally important attribute of systems in which engineers influence the population dynamics of the species that they manipulate. PMID:21170751

  3. Butyltin species in benthic and pelagic organisms of the Saguenay Fjord (Canada) and Imposex occurrence in common whelk (Buccinum undatum).

    PubMed

    Viglino, L; Pelletier, E; Lee, L E J

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and accumulation of butyltins in various tissues of 13 benthic and pelagic species living in the sub-Arctic Saguenay Fjord (Canada) were investigated. Butyltin contamination was ubiquitous in this ecosystem with tributyltin (TBT) biota to sediment accumulation factors (BSAF) ranging between 0.22 and 11, but without any important biomagnification between trophic levels. The large range of butyltin compounds accumulating within different tissues of the species collected from all trophic levels was from 7 to 1238 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. and indicates an exceptional contamination level only found in northern coastal areas exposed to an intensive traffic of commercial ships. Results show that bioaccumulation in organisms depends on three main factors: (1) the actual contamination level in their habitat, (2) their assimilation pathway by water, sediment or diet, and (3) their ability to metabolize TBT and excrete metabolites. By their lack of an efficient TBT degradation system, bivalves are subject to accumulate more butyltins (from 890 to 993 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for TBT and from n.d to 138 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for metabolites) whereas most burrow-dwelling organisms are able to degrade TBT and their butyltin levels ranged from 86 to 239 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for TBT and from 7 to 106 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for metabolites. Acadian redfish (Sebastes fasciatus) feeding preferentially on shrimps and small crustaceans rich in TBT showed a contamination level about three times higher than eelpout (Licodes vahlii). The latter species living in contact with the sediment and feeding on worms and other burrowing species had a lower proportion of TBT in their tissues. Finally, deleterious effects of butyltins in the Saguenay Fjord were assessed by the significant occurrence of Imposex in common whelk (Bucinum undatum) in two sites from Baie des Ha! Ha!. Results revealed that the effects of Imposex were accentuated close to the source of contamination, at Port-Alfred harbour, since the

  4. Butyltin species in benthic and pelagic organisms of the Saguenay Fjord (Canada) and Imposex occurrence in common whelk (Buccinum undatum).

    PubMed

    Viglino, L; Pelletier, E; Lee, L E J

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and accumulation of butyltins in various tissues of 13 benthic and pelagic species living in the sub-Arctic Saguenay Fjord (Canada) were investigated. Butyltin contamination was ubiquitous in this ecosystem with tributyltin (TBT) biota to sediment accumulation factors (BSAF) ranging between 0.22 and 11, but without any important biomagnification between trophic levels. The large range of butyltin compounds accumulating within different tissues of the species collected from all trophic levels was from 7 to 1238 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. and indicates an exceptional contamination level only found in northern coastal areas exposed to an intensive traffic of commercial ships. Results show that bioaccumulation in organisms depends on three main factors: (1) the actual contamination level in their habitat, (2) their assimilation pathway by water, sediment or diet, and (3) their ability to metabolize TBT and excrete metabolites. By their lack of an efficient TBT degradation system, bivalves are subject to accumulate more butyltins (from 890 to 993 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for TBT and from n.d to 138 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for metabolites) whereas most burrow-dwelling organisms are able to degrade TBT and their butyltin levels ranged from 86 to 239 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for TBT and from 7 to 106 ng Sn g(-1) d.w. for metabolites. Acadian redfish (Sebastes fasciatus) feeding preferentially on shrimps and small crustaceans rich in TBT showed a contamination level about three times higher than eelpout (Licodes vahlii). The latter species living in contact with the sediment and feeding on worms and other burrowing species had a lower proportion of TBT in their tissues. Finally, deleterious effects of butyltins in the Saguenay Fjord were assessed by the significant occurrence of Imposex in common whelk (Bucinum undatum) in two sites from Baie des Ha! Ha!. Results revealed that the effects of Imposex were accentuated close to the source of contamination, at Port-Alfred harbour, since the

  5. Microbial biofilms in intertidal systems: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.

    2000-07-01

    Intertidal marine systems are highly dynamic systems which are characterized by periodic fluctuations in environmental parameters. Microbial processes play critical roles in the remineralization of nutrients and primary production in intertidal systems. Many of the geochemical and biological processes which are mediated by microorganisms occur within microenvironments which can be measured over micrometer spatial scales. These processes are localized by cells within a matrix of extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), collectively called a "microbial biofilm". Recent examinations of intertidal systems by a range of investigators using new approaches show an abundance of biofilm communities. The purpose of this overview is to examine recent information concerning the roles of microbial biofilms in intertidal systems. The microbial biofilm is a common adaptation of natural bacteria and other microorganisms. In the fluctuating environments of intertidal systems, biofilms form protective microenvironments and may structure a range of microbial processes. The EPS matrix of biofilm forms sticky coatings on individual sediment particles and detrital surfaces, which act as a stabilizing anchor to buffer cells and their extracellular processes during the frequent physical stresses (e.g., changes in salinity and temperature, UV irradiation, dessication). EPS is an operational definition designed to encompass a range of large microbially-secreted molecules having widely varying physical and chemical properties, and a range of biological roles. Examinations of EPS using Raman and Fourier-transform infared spectroscopy, and atomic-force microscopy suggest that some EPS gels possess physical and chemical properties which may hasten the development of sharp geochemical gradients, and contribute a protective effect to cells. Biofilm polymers act as a sorptive sponge which binds and concentrates organic molecules and ions close to cells. Concurrently, the EPS appear to localize

  6. Purification and molecular properties of two cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Y; Ohba, K; Yoneyama, Y

    1983-05-30

    Two cytoplasmic cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum, were purified to homogeneity by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and two DEAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatographies in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. These two cadmium-binding glycoproteins, termed FIIA and FIIB, each showed a single band after electrophoresis on 10% polyacrylamide gel at pH 8.9. The molecular weight of FIIA was estimated as 8000 and that of FIIB as 13000 by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Based on molecular weights of 6500 and 11900 for the protein moiety of FIIA and FIIB, respectively, the total number of amino acid residues was 52 in the former and 94 in the latter. Three and two cysteine residues in FIIA and FIIB, respectively, were titratable with p-chloromercuribenzoate. FIIB also contained two more half-cystine residues. The sugar contents of FIIA and FIIB were about 20.5% and 8.7% by weight, respectively, consisting of galactose, mannose, fucose and amino sugar. The purified glycoproteins FIIA and FIIB contained about 0.6% and 1.0% cadmium by weight, respectively, and both showed strong metal-binding capacity, especially for cadmium, copper and mercury. The apparent cadmium dissociation constants for FIIA and FIIB after treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol were 7.3 X 10(-6) and 9.1 X 10(-7) M, respectively. Cadmium contents at saturation were nearly 6 and 8 gatom per mole for FIIA and FIIB, respectively.

  7. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Keun; Park, Hyun Je; Choy, Eun Jung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hwang, Kangseok; Kim, Jong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB), phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (-18 to -16‰) of offshore consumers, a broad δ13C range (-18 to -12‰) of both intertidal and subtidal consumers indicated that 13C-enriched sources of organic matter are an important trophic source to coastal consumers. In the intertidal areas, δ13C of most consumers overlapped with or was 13C-enriched relative to MPB. Despite the scarcity of MPB in the subtidal, highly motile consumers in subtidal habitat had nearly identical δ13C range with many intertidal foragers (including crustaceans and fish), overlapping with the range of MPB. In contrast, δ13C values of many sedentary benthic invertebrates in the subtidal areas were similar to those of offshore consumers and more 13C-depleted than motile foragers, indicating high dependence on phytoplankton-derived carbon. The isotopic mixing model calculation confirms that the majority of motile consumers and also some of subtidal sedentary ones depend on intertidal MPB for more than a half of their tissue carbon. Finally, although further quantitative estimates are needed, these results suggest that direct foraging by motile consumers on intertidal areas, and thereby biological transport of MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal areas, may provide important trophic connection between intertidal production and the nearshore shallow subtidal food webs.

  8. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Keun; Park, Hyun Je; Choy, Eun Jung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hwang, Kangseok; Kim, Jong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB), phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (−18 to −16‰) of offshore consumers, a broad δ13C range (−18 to −12‰) of both intertidal and subtidal consumers indicated that 13C-enriched sources of organic matter are an important trophic source to coastal consumers. In the intertidal areas, δ13C of most consumers overlapped with or was 13C-enriched relative to MPB. Despite the scarcity of MPB in the subtidal, highly motile consumers in subtidal habitat had nearly identical δ13C range with many intertidal foragers (including crustaceans and fish), overlapping with the range of MPB. In contrast, δ13C values of many sedentary benthic invertebrates in the subtidal areas were similar to those of offshore consumers and more 13C-depleted than motile foragers, indicating high dependence on phytoplankton-derived carbon. The isotopic mixing model calculation confirms that the majority of motile consumers and also some of subtidal sedentary ones depend on intertidal MPB for more than a half of their tissue carbon. Finally, although further quantitative estimates are needed, these results suggest that direct foraging by motile consumers on intertidal areas, and thereby biological transport of MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal areas, may provide important trophic connection between intertidal production and the nearshore shallow subtidal food webs. PMID:26448137

  9. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Keun; Park, Hyun Je; Choy, Eun Jung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hwang, Kangseok; Kim, Jong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB), phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (-18 to -16‰) of offshore consumers, a broad δ13C range (-18 to -12‰) of both intertidal and subtidal consumers indicated that 13C-enriched sources of organic matter are an important trophic source to coastal consumers. In the intertidal areas, δ13C of most consumers overlapped with or was 13C-enriched relative to MPB. Despite the scarcity of MPB in the subtidal, highly motile consumers in subtidal habitat had nearly identical δ13C range with many intertidal foragers (including crustaceans and fish), overlapping with the range of MPB. In contrast, δ13C values of many sedentary benthic invertebrates in the subtidal areas were similar to those of offshore consumers and more 13C-depleted than motile foragers, indicating high dependence on phytoplankton-derived carbon. The isotopic mixing model calculation confirms that the majority of motile consumers and also some of subtidal sedentary ones depend on intertidal MPB for more than a half of their tissue carbon. Finally, although further quantitative estimates are needed, these results suggest that direct foraging by motile consumers on intertidal areas, and thereby biological transport of MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal areas, may provide important trophic connection between intertidal production and the nearshore shallow subtidal food webs. PMID:26448137

  10. Increasing sea surface temperature and range shifts of intertidal gastropods along the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubal, Marcos; Veiga, Puri; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    There are well-documented changes in abundance and geographical range of intertidal invertebrates related to climate change at north Europe. However, the effect of sea surface warming on intertidal invertebrates has been poorly studied at lower latitudes. Here we analyze potential changes in the abundance patterns and distribution range of rocky intertidal gastropods related to climate change along the Iberian Peninsula. To achieve this aim, the spatial distribution and range of sub-tropical, warm- and cold-water species of intertidal gastropods was explored by a fully hierarchical sampling design considering four different spatial scales, i.e. from region (100 s of km apart) to quadrats (ms apart). Variability on their patterns of abundance was explored by analysis of variance, changes on their distribution ranges were detected by comparing with previous records and their relationship with sea water temperature was explored by rank correlation analyses. Mean values of sea surface temperature along the Iberian coast, between 1949 and 2010, were obtained from in situ data compiled for three different grid squares: south Portugal, north Portugal, and Galicia. Lusitanian species did not show significant correlation with sea water temperature or changes on their distributional range or abundance, along the temperature gradient considered. The sub-tropical species Siphonaria pectinata has, however, increased its distribution range while boreal cold-water species showed the opposite pattern. The latter was more evident for Littorina littorea that was almost absent from the studied rocky shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Sub-tropical and boreal species showed significant but opposite correlation with sea water temperature. We hypothesized that the energetic cost of frequent exposures to sub-lethal temperatures might be responsible for these shifts. Therefore, intertidal gastropods at the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula coast are responding to the effect of global warming as it

  11. An ancient transpecific polymorphism shows extreme divergence in a multitrait cline in an intertidal snail (Nucella lapillus (L.)).

    PubMed

    Kirby, R R

    2000-12-01

    Clines in intraspecific genetic variation are frequently associated with an environmental transition. Here, divergence among nucleotide sequences of two nuclear loci, cytosolic and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (cMDH and mMDH, respectively), is described, in a multitrait cline over a distance of ca. 3 km where shell phenotype, allozyme, mitochondrial DNA haplotype, and centric fusion (Robertsonian translocations) frequencies covary with temperature and humidity and change abruptly in a continuous population of the dog-whelk (Nucella lapillus), a common intertidal snail of the north temperate Atlantic. Protein electrophoresis has already shown two alleles of mMDH varying from fixation of one allele to near fixation of the other, whereas cMDH appears to be monomorphic. The results of this study show a striking disparity in nucleotide sequence divergence among alleles at the two loci, with extreme molecular differentiation in one of them. Four alleles of cMDH were found to have nucleotide and amino acid sequence divergences of 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively. In contrast, the two mMDH cDNA alleles differed by 23% and 20% at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. Analysis of a 91-bp partial nucleotide sequence of mMDH from Nucella freycineti, the closest relative of N. lapillus, revealed two similar alleles and indicated that the divergence in mMDH in N. lapillus represents an ancient transpecific polymorphism in these Nucella. Together with earlier studies on variation in N. lapillus, it is argued that the polymorphism in mMDH and the clines in N. lapillus represent the presence of two persistent coadapted gene complexes, multitrait coevolving genetic solutions to environmental variation, which may presently enable this snail to exploit a diverse environment successfully. PMID:11110897

  12. Thermal insulation of the intertidal zone by the ice foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrosati, Ricardo; Eckersley, Lindsay K.

    2007-11-01

    Few studies have looked at the ecological significance of the ice foot in intertidal habitats. During the 2007 winter, we quantified the hourly variation of temperature at the intertidal zone and at the upper, dry coast on the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence (Nova Scotia, Canada) using submersible data loggers. While air temperature dropped to - 20 °C at the peak of the winter, intertidal temperature was never below - 7 °C during the winter. In fact, for almost two months when the ice foot was stable, temperature ranged only between - 2.4 °C and - 1.1 °C at the intertidal zone. The intertidal values are higher than published values of lethal temperature for cold-water intertidal invertebrates and seaweeds. Thus, the ice foot may prevent these organisms from experiencing lethal levels of thermal stress, contributing to their long-term persistence in these environmentally stressful habitats.

  13. Cadmium-binding proteins of three marine molluscs and characterization of two cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Y; Kosaka, K; Ohba, K; Yoneyama, Y

    1986-03-01

    The cadmium-binding proteins were shown to exist in the hepatopancreas of three molluscs, a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum, a turbo, Batillus cornutus, and a squid, Todarodes pacificus. Cadmium was efficiently accumulated in nature to a mean concentration of 119, 33, and 50 micrograms/g wet tissue in the hepatopancreas of three species of molluscs, and 30%, 11%, and 43% of the element in each tissue of whelk, turbo, and squid was extracted to the soluble fraction, respectively. Separation of the soluble fraction by Sephadex G-75 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol revealed that cadmium was mainly bound to the protein fraction FII of molecular weight 10,000. Two cytoplasmic cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of Buccinum tenuissimum were purified to homogeneity by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and double DEAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatographies in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. These two cadmium-binding glycoproteins, termed FIIA and FIIB, had molecular weights of 8000 and 13,000 and consisted of 52 and 94 amino acid residues, respectively. Three and two cysteine residues in FIIA and FIIB, respectively, were found and two more half-cystine were also detected in FIIB. The sugar contents of FIIA and FIIB were about 20.5% and 8.7% by weight, respectively, consisting of galactose, mannose, fucose, and amino sugar. Both showed strong metal-binding ability, especially for cadmium, copper, and mercury.

  14. Cadmium-binding proteins of three marine molluscs and characterization of two cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum.

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Y; Kosaka, K; Ohba, K; Yoneyama, Y

    1986-01-01

    The cadmium-binding proteins were shown to exist in the hepatopancreas of three molluscs, a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum, a turbo, Batillus cornutus, and a squid, Todarodes pacificus. Cadmium was efficiently accumulated in nature to a mean concentration of 119, 33, and 50 micrograms/g wet tissue in the hepatopancreas of three species of molluscs, and 30%, 11%, and 43% of the element in each tissue of whelk, turbo, and squid was extracted to the soluble fraction, respectively. Separation of the soluble fraction by Sephadex G-75 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol revealed that cadmium was mainly bound to the protein fraction FII of molecular weight 10,000. Two cytoplasmic cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of Buccinum tenuissimum were purified to homogeneity by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and double DEAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatographies in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. These two cadmium-binding glycoproteins, termed FIIA and FIIB, had molecular weights of 8000 and 13,000 and consisted of 52 and 94 amino acid residues, respectively. Three and two cysteine residues in FIIA and FIIB, respectively, were found and two more half-cystine were also detected in FIIB. The sugar contents of FIIA and FIIB were about 20.5% and 8.7% by weight, respectively, consisting of galactose, mannose, fucose, and amino sugar. Both showed strong metal-binding ability, especially for cadmium, copper, and mercury. Images FIGURE 4. PMID:3709465

  15. On inter-tidal transport equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Feng, Shizuo; Pangen, Xi

    1989-01-01

    The transports of solutes, sediments, nutrients, and other tracers are fundamental to the interactive physical, chemical, and biological processes in estuaries. The characteristic time scales for most estuarine biological and chemical processes are on the order of several tidal cycles or longer. To address the long-term transport mechanism meaningfully, the formulation of an inter-tidal conservation equation is the main subject of this paper. The commonly used inter-tidal conservation equation takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation in which the convection is represented by the Eulerian residual current, and the dispersion terms are due to the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis, unfortunately, the physical significance of this equation is not clear, and the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis is at best an ad hoc approximation. Some recent research results on the Lagrangian residual current suggest that the long-term transport problem is more closely related to the Lagrangian residual current than to the Eulerian residual current. With the aid of additional insight of residual current, the inter-tidal transport equation has been reformulated in this paper using a small perturbation method for a weakly nonlinear tidal system. When tidal flows can be represented by an M2 system, the new intertidal transport equation also takes the form of a convective-dispersion equation without the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis. The convective velocity turns out to be the first order Lagrangian residual current (the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes’ drift), and the correlation terms take the form of convection with the Stokes’ drift as the convective velocity. The remaining dispersion terms are perturbations of lower order solution to higher order solutions due to shear effect and turbulent mixing.

  16. From grazing marks to collapsed cliffs - intertidal bioerosion on all scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kázmér, Miklós; Taboroši, Danko; Hsieh, Meng-Long; Shafeea Leman, Mohd; Aziz Ali, Che; Roslan Mohamed, Kamal; Choowong, Montri

    2014-05-01

    Rocky shores - particularly in limestone areas of tropical, subtropical, and some temperate regions - are subject to intense bioerosion. Detailed field studies along the Gulf of Siam and the Andaman coast of Thailand, Langkawi Islands of Malaysia, southern Java and Bali in Indonesia, Palau Islands, and Okinawa revealed the presence of rich populations of bioeroding organisms in the intertidal zone. Molluscs capable of damaging rock (the chiton Acanthopleura, limpets, and whelks) leave grazing traces as they feed on bacterial and algal biofilms and chasmolithic and endolithic microorganisms. Boring sponges (Entobia), bivalves (Gastrochaenolites and others), boring sipunculid worms (Caulostrepsis), and sea urchins (Echinometra) drill deeper to hide from predators beneath the rock surface. Individually, members of these taxa leave marks ranging from sub-millimetre to the metre scale, but collectively, their erosion creates marine notches, several-metres-deep features extending between low and high tide marks. When cliffs overhanging these notches collapse, landscape-scale scars are left behind. The various bioeroders display a clear vertical zonation between low and high tide. These are dictated by environmental stress, food availability, competition, and predation. Typical inhabitants of present-day zones include - from top to bottom - littorinid snails, patellid limpets, chitons, boring bivalves, and boring sea urchins. Each organism leaves a characteristic mark in the bedrock. Trace fossils found in the 'wrong place' - either too high or too low compared to the present-day occurrence of the animals - suggest changes in relative sea level. Similarly, sea level changes are suggested by the presence of compound markings produced through overprinting by organisms that live in different ecological zones. Preservation and obliteration of traces depends on the rates of sea level change and coastal denudation. Morphology of bioerosional markings and their vertical zonation

  17. Features of the adsoprtion of naproxen on the chiral stationary phase (S,S)-Whelk-O1 under reversed-phase conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Asnin, Leonid; Gritti, Fabrice; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    Using elution chromatography, we studied the adsorption mechanism of the Naproxen enantiomers on the chiral stationary phase (S,S)-Whelk-O1, from buffered methanol-water solutions. We propose an adsorption mechanism that assumes monolayer adsorption of the more retained enantiomer and the associative adsorption of the less retained one. The effects of the mobile phase composition on the adsorption of Naproxen are discussed. The combination of an elevated column temperature and of the use of an acidic mobile phase led to the degradation of the column and caused a major loss of its separation ability. The use of a moderately acidic mobile phase at temperature slightly above ambient did not produce rapid severe damages but, nevertheless, hampered the experiments and caused a slow gradual deterioration of the column.

  18. Intertidal meiofauna of Jeju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuk, Olga N.; Trebukhova, Yulia A.

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, the structure of the meiobenthos community and marine nematodes in particular was investigated in the different intertidal zones of Jeju Island (South Sea of Korea). A relationship was found between the density of meiobenthic communities and the type of the bottom sediment. In addition, in the silty sediments, nematodes were dominant, while in the sandy sediments harpacticoids and ostracods were dominant groups. Sixty eight species belonging to 60 genera and 19 families of nematodes were found in the whole area. Four different nematode taxocenosis were distinguished using a cluster analysis. Dominant feeding groups were omnivores (2B) and epistratum-feeders (2A). The highest number of non-selective deposit-feeders (1B) was detected in the lagoon with the bottom silty sediments.

  19. Redistribution of intertidal sediment contaminants by microphytobenthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Amani; Copplestone, David; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Nick; Sneddon, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Microphytobenthos (MPB) is a mixed community of microscopic algae inhabiting the top few millimetres of bottom sediment in the intertidal zone. It is a key component of the estuarine ecosystem, interacting with the sediment and fauna to influence sediment distribution and resuspension and forming the base of the estuarine food chain. Estuarine sediments, with which the MPB is closely associated, are a significant sink for contaminants from both fluvial and marine sources. Algae are known to have the capacity to take up contaminants, and the phytoplankton has been well studied in this respect, however there has been little research involving MPB. The extent to which contaminant uptake by MPB occurs and under what conditions is therefore very poorly understood. It seems probable that the paucity of research in this area is due to the complexity of the bioavailability of contaminants in the intertidal zone coupled with difficulties in separating MPB from the sediment. A series of experiments are proposed in which we will investigate (at a range of spatial scales) contaminant partitioning in the presence of MPB; the effect of changing temperatures on contaminant uptake and toxicity to MPB; effects of sediment resuspension on contaminant availability and uptake to MPB; and the uptake of contaminants from MPB to molluscs. A mesocosm (or experimental enclosure) is being constructed to replicate the natural system and enable manipulation of conditions of interest. This will attain greater realism than laboratory toxicity tests, with more statistical power than can be achieved through field studies. By gaining a better understanding of processes governing contaminant bioavailability and mechanisms for uptake by MPB it will be possible to relate these to projected climate change effects and ascertain potential consequences for contaminant redistribution.

  20. Yaquina Bay, Oregon, Intertidal Sediment Temperature Database, 1998 - 2006.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed, long term sediment temperature records were obtained and compiled in a database to determine the influence of daily, monthly, seasonal and annual temperature variation on eelgrass distribution across the intertidal habitat in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Both currently and hi...

  1. Theme and variations: amphibious air-breathing intertidal fishes.

    PubMed

    Martin, K L

    2014-03-01

    Over 70 species of intertidal fishes from 12 families breathe air while emerging from water. Amphibious intertidal fishes generally have no specialized air-breathing organ but rely on vascularized mucosae and cutaneous surfaces in air to exchange both oxygen and carbon dioxide. They differ from air-breathing freshwater fishes in morphology, physiology, ecology and behaviour. Air breathing and terrestrial activity are present to varying degrees in intertidal fish species, correlated with the tidal height of their habitat. The gradient of amphibious lifestyle includes passive remainers that stay in the intertidal zone as tides ebb, active emergers that deliberately leave water in response to poor aquatic conditions and highly mobile amphibious skipper fishes that may spend more time out of water than in it. Normal terrestrial activity is usually aerobic and metabolic rates in air and water are similar. Anaerobic metabolism may be employed during forced exercise or when exposed to aquatic hypoxia. Adaptations for amphibious life include reductions in gill surface area, increased reliance on the skin for respiration and ion exchange, high affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen and adjustments to ventilation and metabolism while in air. Intertidal fishes remain close to water and do not travel far terrestrially, and are unlikely to migrate or colonize new habitats at present, although in the past this may have happened. Many fish species spawn in the intertidal zone, including some that do not breathe air, as eggs and embryos that develop in the intertidal zone benefit from tidal air emergence. With air breathing, amphibious intertidal fishes survive in a variable habitat with minimal adjustments to existing structures. Closely related species in different microhabitats provide unique opportunities for comparative studies.

  2. Heat transport dynamics at a sandy intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2013-06-01

    Intertidal zones are spatially complex and temporally dynamic environments. Coastal groundwater discharge, including submarine groundwater discharge, may provide stabilizing conditions for intertidal zone permeable sediments. In this study, we integrated detailed time series temperature observations, porewater pressure measurements, and two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography profiles to understand the coupled hydraulic-thermal regime of a tropical sandy intertidal zone in a fringing coral reef lagoon (Rarotonga, Cook Islands). We found three heating patterns across the 15 m study transect over tidal and diel periods: (1) a highly variable thermal regime dominated by swash infiltration and changes in saturation state in the upper foreshore with net heat import into the sediment, (2) a groundwater-supported underground stable, cool region just seaward of the intertidal slope break also importing heat into the subsurface, and (3) a zone of seawater recirculation that sustained consistently warm subsurface temperatures that exported heat across the sediment-water interface. Simple calculations suggested thermal conduction as the main heat transport mechanism for the shallow intertidal sediment, but deeper and/or multidimensional groundwater flow was required to explain temperature patterns beyond 20 cm depth. Temperature differences between the distinct hydrodynamic zones of the foreshore site resulted in significant thermal gradients that persisted beyond tidal and diel periods. The thermal buffering of intertidal zones by coastal groundwater systems, both at surface seeps and in the shallow subsurface, can be responsible for thermal refugia for some coastal organisms and hotspots for biogeochemical reactions.

  3. Spatial and temporal patterns of subtidal and intertidal crabs excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. C. F.; Boaventura, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Hawkins, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Highly mobile predators such as fish and crabs are known to migrate from the subtidal zone to forage in the intertidal zone at high-tide. The extent and variation of these habitat linking movements along the vertical shore gradient have not been examined before for several species simultaneously, hence not accounting for species interactions. Here, the foraging excursions of Carcinus maenas (L.), Necora puber (Linnaeus, 1767) and Cancer pagurus (Linnaeus, 1758) were assessed in a one-year mark-recapture study on two replicated rocky shores in southwest U.K. A comparison between the abundance of individuals present on the shore at high-tide with those present in refuges exposed at low-tide indicated considerable intertidal migration by all species, showing strong linkage between subtidal and intertidal habitats. Estimates of population size based on recapture of marked individuals indicated that an average of ~ 4000 individuals combined for the three crab species, can be present on the shore during one tidal cycle. There was also a high fidelity of individuals and species to particular shore levels. Underlying mechanisms for these spatial patterns such as prey availability and agonistic interactions are discussed. Survival rates were estimated using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model from multi-recapture analysis and found to be considerably high with a minimum of 30% for all species. Growth rates were found to vary intraspecifically with size and between seasons. Understanding the temporal and spatial variations in predation pressure by crabs on rocky shores is dependent on knowing who, when and how many of these commercially important crab species depend on intertidal foraging. Previous studies have shown that the diet of these species is strongly based on intertidal prey including key species such as limpets; hence intertidal crab migration could be associated with considerable impacts on intertidal assemblages.

  4. Parasitism, community structure and biodiversity in intertidal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, K N; Poulin, R

    2002-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that parasites can influence the composition and structure of natural animal communities. In spite of this, it is difficult to assess just how important parasitism is for community structure because very few studies have been designed specifically to address the role of parasites at the community level, no doubt because it is difficult to manipulate the abundance of parasites in field experiments. Here, we bring together a large amount of published information on parasitism in intertidal communities to highlight the potential influence of parasites on the structure and biodiversity of these communities. We first review the impact of metazoan parasites on the survival, reproduction, growth and behaviour of intertidal invertebrates, from both rocky shores and soft-sediment flats. Published evidence suggests that the impact of parasites on individuals is often severe, though their effects at the population level are dependent on prevalence and intensity of infection. We then put this information together in a discussion of the impact of parasitism at the community level. We emphasize two ways in which parasites can modify the structure of intertidal communities. First, the direct impact of parasites on the abundance of key host species can decrease the importance of these hosts in competition or predator-prey interactions with other species. Second, the indirect effects of parasites on the behaviour of their hosts, e.g. burrowing ability or spatial distribution within the intertidal zone, can cause changes to various features of the habitat for other intertidal species, leading to their greater settlement success or to their local disappearance. Our synthesis allows specific predictions to be made regarding the potential impact of parasites in certain intertidal systems, and suggests that parasites must be included in future community studies and food web models of intertidal ecosystems. PMID:12396219

  5. Nonlinear forecasting of intertidal shoreface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, D. J.; Cortale, N.; Baker, K.; McNamara, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    Natural systems dominated by sediment transport are notoriously difficult to forecast. This is particularly true along the ocean coastline, a region that draws considerable human attention as economic investment and infrastructure are threatened by both persistent, long-term and acute, event driven processes (i.e., sea level rise and storm damage, respectively). Forecasting the coastline's evolution over intermediate time (daily) and space (tens of meters) scales is hindered by the complexity of sediment transport and hydrodynamics, and limited access to the detailed local forcing that drives fast scale processes. Modern remote sensing systems provide an efficient, economical means to collect data within these regions. A solar-powered digital camera installation is used to capture the coast's evolution, and machine learning algorithms are implemented to extract the shoreline and estimate the daily mean intertidal coastal profile. Methods in nonlinear time series forecasting and genetic programming applied to these data corroborate that coastal morphology at these scales is predominately driven by nonlinear internal dynamics, which partially mask external forcing signatures. Results indicate that these forecasting techniques achieve nontrivial predictive skill for spatiotemporal forecast of the upper coastline profile (as much as 43% of variance in data explained for one day predictions). This analysis provides evidence that societally relevant coastline forecasts can be achieved without knowing the forcing environment or the underlying dynamical equations that govern coastline evolution.

  6. Nonlinear forecasting of intertidal shoreface evolution.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D J; Cortale, N; Baker, K; McNamara, D E

    2015-10-01

    Natural systems dominated by sediment transport are notoriously difficult to forecast. This is particularly true along the ocean coastline, a region that draws considerable human attention as economic investment and infrastructure are threatened by both persistent, long-term and acute, event driven processes (i.e., sea level rise and storm damage, respectively). Forecasting the coastline's evolution over intermediate time (daily) and space (tens of meters) scales is hindered by the complexity of sediment transport and hydrodynamics, and limited access to the detailed local forcing that drives fast scale processes. Modern remote sensing systems provide an efficient, economical means to collect data within these regions. A solar-powered digital camera installation is used to capture the coast's evolution, and machine learning algorithms are implemented to extract the shoreline and estimate the daily mean intertidal coastal profile. Methods in nonlinear time series forecasting and genetic programming applied to these data corroborate that coastal morphology at these scales is predominately driven by nonlinear internal dynamics, which partially mask external forcing signatures. Results indicate that these forecasting techniques achieve nontrivial predictive skill for spatiotemporal forecast of the upper coastline profile (as much as 43% of variance in data explained for one day predictions). This analysis provides evidence that societally relevant coastline forecasts can be achieved without knowing the forcing environment or the underlying dynamical equations that govern coastline evolution.

  7. Assessing the response of estuarine intertidal assemblages to urbanised catchment discharge.

    PubMed

    Courtenay, Glenn Christopher; Gladstone, William; Schreider, Maria

    2005-08-01

    Measurement of intertidal rock assemblages was investigated as a potential biological indicator to provide a quantitative estimate of the impact of urbanised catchment discharge on the estuaries of Sydney, Australia, from 1995 to 1999. Based on the presence and characteristics of adjacent human activities, sampling locations were categorised as: Bush; Urban; Urban with Sewer Overflows; and Industry with Sewer Overflows. In Sydney Harbour, variation in assemblage structure was measured between most impact categories, however differences between impact categories were not consistent for each year. Nevertheless, in years of above average rainfall (1998-1999), reference assemblages adjacent to national parks and distant from urbanisation were different to all other putatively impacted assemblages. Variability within assemblages was least at reference locations in each year and greatest at locations adjacent to stormwater canals and sewer overflows, particularly in 1998-1999. Variation in assemblage structure in Sydney estuaries was most strongly correlated with chlorophyll--a concentrations. Univariate analysis also identified highly significant differences for a number of factors, however, interactions between year, impact categories and location for numerous analyses, confounded the differentiation between impact categories. The results suggest that intertidal rock assemblages in Sydney Harbour and surrounding estuaries appear to be responding to the quality and quantity of discharge from urbanised catchments and, furthermore, that assemblages are more suitable than individual taxa to indicate the difference between Bush and anthropogenically disturbed estuarine locations.

  8. Organic carbon burial in a mangrove forest, margin and intertidal mud flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Christian J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Naidu, A. Sathy; Sanders, Luciana M.; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.

    2010-12-01

    The flux of total organic carbon (TOC) to depositional facies (intertidal mud flat, margin and forest) was quantified for a tropical mangrove forest in Brazil. Results indicate that these mangrove margins and intertidal mudflats are sites of large TOC accumulation, almost four times greater than the global averages for mangrove forests. The TOC burial rates were determined from organic carbon content in sediment cores which were dated using 210Pb. Burial rates were calculated to be 1129, 949, and 353 (g m -2 yr -1), for the mud flat, margin and forest, respectively. Sediment accumulation rates (SAR) were estimated to be 7.3, 5.0 and 2.8 mm yr -1. Sediment characterization (δ 13C, δ 15N, TOC/TN and mud fraction) indicated a representative mangrove system with a record of consistent organic matter flux of up to 100 years. Because of substantial burial of organic carbon in mangrove ecosystems, their role in the global carbon budget must be considered. More importantly, as climate change influences temperature and sea level, mangrove ecosystems will respond to specific climatic conditions.

  9. Cadmium-binding proteins of three marine molluscs and characterization of two cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum

    SciTech Connect

    Dohi, Y.; Kosaka, K.; Ohba, K.; Yoneyama, Y.

    1986-03-01

    The cadmium-binding proteins were shown to exist in the hepatopancreas of three molluscs, a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum, a turbo, Batillus cornutus, and a squid, Todarodes pacificus. Cadmium was efficiently accumulated in nature to a mean concentration of 119, 33, and 50 ..mu..g/g wet tissue in the hepatopancreas of three species of molluscs. Separation of the soluble fraction by Sephadex G-75 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol revealed that cadmium was mainly bound to the protein fraction FII of molecular weight 10,000. Two cytoplasmic cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of Buccinum tenuissimum were purified to homogeneity by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and double DEAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatographies in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. These two cadmium-binding glycoproteins, termed FII/sub A/ and FII/sub B/, had molecular weights of 8000 and 13,000 and consisted of 52 and 94 amino acid residues, respectively. The sugar contents of FII/sub A/ and FII/sub B/ were about 20.5% and 8.7% by weight, respectively, consisting of galactose, mannose, fucose, and amino sugar. Both showed strong metal-binding ability, especially for cadmium, copper, and mercury.

  10. Effects of temperature and salinity on the development of embryos and larvae of the veined rapa whelk Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Shaojun; Zhang, Tao; Pan, Hengqian; Pan, Yang; Wang, Pingchuan; Xue, Dongxiu

    2014-07-01

    The major population of the veined rapa whelk Rapana venosa (Valenciennes, 1846), which is an important fishery resource, is facing a large decline in China. We studied the effects of incubation temperature (16-34°C at salinity 30) and salinity (5-45 at 25°C) on the incubation period and subsequent larval development. In the temperature experiment, the shortest incubation period was 12 days at 34°C, the lower temperature limit was 16°C, the longest mean shell length (1 193±17 μm) occurred at 25°C and the highest survival rate 72.28%±5.62% was observed at 28°C. In the salinity experiment, the shortest incubation period was 15 days at 25. The salinity tolerance range was 15-40, the longest mean shell length (855±9 μm) and the highest survival rate 72.93%±4.85% were both observed at 35. This study demonstrated that, during the egg-mass stage, temperature and salinity regimes influence later growth and survival of larvae. These observations deepen our understanding of the ecology and conservation of natural populations of Rapana venosa.

  11. A GUIDE TO MAPPING INTERTIDAL EELGRASS AND NONVEGETATED HABITATS IN ESTUARIES OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides technical guidance for planning and implementing the production of aerial photomaps of intertidal vegetative habitats in coastal estuaries of the Pacific Northwest USA (PNW). The focus is on methods of documenting the intertidal distribution of the seagras...

  12. RESPONSE OF GHOST SHRIMP (NEOTRYPAEA CALIFORNIENSIS) BIOTURBATION TO ORGANIC MATTER ENRICHMENT OF ESTUARINE INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Populations of burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia p;ugettensis) are the dominant invertebrate fauna on Pacific estuarine tide flats, occupying >80% of intertidal area in some estuaries. Burrowing shrimp are renowned for their bioturbation of intertidal sedi...

  13. Recolonization of intertidal Zostera marina L. (eelgrass) following experimental shoot removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recovery of eelgrass (Zostera marina) from physical disturbances is understudied and no attention has been given to the likely differences in damage recovery rates between the continuous lower intertidal perennial meadows and higher intertidal eelgrass patches. In the present...

  14. Growth dynamics of eelgrass, Zostera marina, in the intertidal zone of Seomjin Estuary, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Bae; Lee, Won-Chan; Lee, Kun-Seop; Park, Jung-Im

    2013-09-01

    To examine the growth dynamics of eelgrass, Zostera marina, in the intertidal zone of Seomjin Estuary, Korea, we surveyed environmental factors such as water temperature, underwater irradiance, tidal exposure, and nutrient concentrations in the water column and sediment pore water in relation to the shoot density, biomass, morphological characteristics, and growth of Z. marina inhabiting the upper and lower intertidal zones. The survey was conducted monthly from January 2003 to December 2004. The water temperature of the two areas displayed seasonal fluctuations. Underwater irradiance was significantly higher in the upper intertidal zone than in the lower intertidal zone. Tidal exposure was also markedly longer in the upper intertidal zone than in the lower intertidal zone, whereas tidal exposure was highest in the spring and lowest in the summer in both areas. Water column NH4 + and sediment pore water NO3 -+NO2 - concentrations were significantly higher in the upper intertidal zone than the lower intertidal zone. The eelgrass shoot density, biomass, morphology, and leaf productivity were significantly higher in the lower intertidal zone than in the upper intertidal zone. Both areas displayed a clear seasonal variation depending on changes in water temperature. However, leaf turnover time was significantly shorter in the upper intertidal zone than in the lower intertidal zone, with a higher turnover rate in the upper intertidal zone. Compared to the seagrasses in the lower intertidal zone, those in the upper intertidal zone showed more effective adaptations to the stress of long tidal exposure through downsizing and increased turnover time. These results suggest that tidal exposure, coupled with desiccation stress, can be a limiting factor for seagrass growth in the intertidal zone, along with underwater irradiance, water temperature, and nutrient availability.

  15. Denitrification in San Francisco Bay intertidal sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Umberger, Cindy; Culbertson, Charles W.; Smith, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    The acetylene block technique was employed to study denitrification in intertidal estuarine sediments. Addition of nitrate to sediment slurries stimulated denitrification. During the dry season, sediment-slurry denitrification rates displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and ambient NO3− + NO2− concentrations (≤26 μM) were below the apparent Km (50 μM) for nitrate. During the rainy season, when ambient NO3− + NO2− concentrations were higher (37 to 89 μM), an accurate estimate of the Km could not be obtained. Endogenous denitrification activity was confined to the upper 3 cm of the sediment column. However, the addition of nitrate to deeper sediments demonstrated immediate N2O production, and potential activity existed at all depths sampled (the deepest was 15 cm). Loss of N2O in the presence of C2H2 was sometimes observed during these short-term sediment incubations. Experiments with sediment slurries and washed cell suspensions of a marine pseudomonad confirmed that this N2O loss was caused by incomplete blockage of N2O reductase by C2H2 at low nitrate concentrations. Areal estimates of denitrification (in the absence of added nitrate) ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 μmol of N2 m−2 h−1 (for undisturbed sediments) to 17 to 280 μmol of N2 m−2 h−1 (for shaken sediment slurries).

  16. Increased anthropogenic pressure decreases species richness in tropical intertidal reefs.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Adriana Brizon; Carvalho, Fabrício Lopes; de Macedo Carneiro, Pedro Bastos; Rossi, Sergio; de Oliveira Soares, Marcelo

    2016-09-01

    Multiple human stressors affect tropical intertidal sandstone reefs, but little is known about their biodiversity and the environmental impacts of these stressors. In the present study, multiple anthropogenic pressures were integrated using the relative environmental pressure index (REPI) and related to benthic community structure across an intertidal gradient in five sandstone reefs in the tropical South Atlantic coast. Greater species richness and diversity were noted in the low intertidal zones. There was a negative relationship between REPI and species richness, suggesting that increasing anthropogenic pressure has decreased benthic richness. The factors associated with the loss of richness were jetties built to control erosion, urban areas, beachfront kiosks and restaurants, fish markets, and storm sewers with illegal sewage connections. Our results highlight the need for better infrastructure planning and rigorous monitoring of coastal urban areas, since the large influence of multiple human pressures in these reefs leads to biodiversity losses. PMID:27428738

  17. Increased anthropogenic pressure decreases species richness in tropical intertidal reefs.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Adriana Brizon; Carvalho, Fabrício Lopes; de Macedo Carneiro, Pedro Bastos; Rossi, Sergio; de Oliveira Soares, Marcelo

    2016-09-01

    Multiple human stressors affect tropical intertidal sandstone reefs, but little is known about their biodiversity and the environmental impacts of these stressors. In the present study, multiple anthropogenic pressures were integrated using the relative environmental pressure index (REPI) and related to benthic community structure across an intertidal gradient in five sandstone reefs in the tropical South Atlantic coast. Greater species richness and diversity were noted in the low intertidal zones. There was a negative relationship between REPI and species richness, suggesting that increasing anthropogenic pressure has decreased benthic richness. The factors associated with the loss of richness were jetties built to control erosion, urban areas, beachfront kiosks and restaurants, fish markets, and storm sewers with illegal sewage connections. Our results highlight the need for better infrastructure planning and rigorous monitoring of coastal urban areas, since the large influence of multiple human pressures in these reefs leads to biodiversity losses.

  18. Climate change, parasitism and the structure of intertidal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Poulin, R; Mouritsen, K N

    2006-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating rapidly showing that temperature and other climatic variables are driving many ecological processes. At the same time, recent research has highlighted the role of parasitism in the dynamics of animal populations and the structure of animal communities. Here, the likely interactions between climate change and parasitism are discussed in the context of intertidal ecosystems. Firstly, using the soft-sediment intertidal communities of Otago Harbour, New Zealand, as a case study, parasites are shown to be ubiquitous components of intertidal communities, found in practically all major animal species in the system. With the help of specific examples from Otago Harbour, it is demonstrated that parasites can regulate host population density, influence the diversity of the entire benthic community, and affect the structure of the intertidal food web. Secondly, we document the extreme sensitivity of cercarial production in parasitic trematodes to increases in temperature, and discuss how global warming could lead to enhanced trematode infections. Thirdly, the results of a simulation model are used to argue that parasite-mediated local extinctions of intertidal animals are a likely outcome of global warming. Specifically, the model predicts that following a temperature increase of less than 4 degrees C, populations of the amphipod Corophium volutator, a hugely abundant tube-building amphipod on the mudflats of the Danish Wadden Sea, are likely to crash repeatedly due to mortality induced by microphallid trematodes. The available evidence indicates that climate-mediated changes in local parasite abundance will have significant repercussions for intertidal ecosystems. On the bright side, the marked effects of even slight increases in temperature on cercarial production in trematodes could form the basis for monitoring programmes, with these sensitive parasites providing early warning signals of the environmental impacts of global warming.

  19. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project, Duxbury Reef, Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Prescutti, K.; Ball, O.; Chang, E.; Darakananda, K.; Jessup, K.; Poutian, J.; Schwalbe, H.; Storm, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B), and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will analyze the population densities of aggregating anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima, for seasonal abundance variations as well as long-term population trends. We will also follow the seasonal and long-term population fluctuations of red algal turf, Endocladia muricata and Gelidium coulteri, and black turban snails, Tegula funebralis. Comparing populations of turf algae and the herbivorous black turban snails gathered before and after the November 7, 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill shows very little impact on the Duxbury Reef intertidal inhabitants. Future analyses will

  20. Causes and consequences of thermal tolerance limits in rocky intertidal porcelain crabs, genus petrolisthes.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H

    2002-08-01

    Vertical zonation of intertidal organisms, from the shallow subtidal to the supralittoral zones, is a ubiquitous feature of temperate and tropical rocky shores. Organisms that live higher on the shore experience larger daily and seasonal fluctuations in microhabitat conditions, due to their greater exposure to terrestrial conditions during emersion. Comparative analyses of the adaptive linkage between physiological tolerance limits and vertical distribution are the most powerful when the study species are closely related and occur in discrete vertical zones throughout the intertidal range. Here, I summarize work on the physiological tolerance limits of rocky intertidal zone porcelain crab species of the genus Petrolisthes to emersion-related heat stress. In the eastern Pacific, Petrolisthes species live throughout temperate and tropical regions, and are found in discrete vertical intertidal zones in each region. Whole organism thermal tolerance limits of Petrolisthes species, and thermal limits of heart and nerve function reflect microhabitat conditions. Species living higher in the intertidal zone are more eurythermal than low-intertidal congeners, tropical species have the highest thermal limits, and the differences in thermal tolerance between low- and high-intertidal species is greatest for temperate crabs. Acclimation of thermal limits of high-intertidal species is restricted as compared to low-intertidal species. Thus, because thermal limits of high-intertidal species are near current habitat temperature maxima, global warming could most strongly impact intertidal species.

  1. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses. PMID:24212283

  2. Phylogeography and historical ecology of the North Atlantic intertidal.

    PubMed

    Wares, J P; Cunningham, C W

    2001-12-01

    Recent glaciation covered the full extent of rocky intertidal habitat along the coasts of New England and the Canadian Maritimes. To test whether this glaciation in fact caused wholesale extinction of obligate rocky intertidal invertebrates, and thus required a recolonization from Europe, we compared American and European populations using allelic diversity and techniques adapted from coalescent theory. Mitochondrial DNA sequences were collected from amphi-Atlantic populations of three cold-temperate obligate rocky intertidal species (a barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, and two gastropods, Nucella lapillus and Littorina obtusata) and three cold-temperate habitat generalist species (a seastar, Asterias rubens; a mussel, Mytilus edulis, and an isopod, Idotea balthica). For many of these species we were able to estimate the lineage-specific mutation rate based on trans-Arctic divergences between Pacific and Atlantic taxa. These data indicate that some obligate rocky intertidal taxa have colonized New England from European populations. However, the patterns of persistence in North America indicate that other life-history traits, including mech anisms of dispersal, may be more important for surviving dramatic environmental and climatic change. PMID:11831661

  3. Coastal Upwelling Drives Intertidal Assemblage Structure and Trophic Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Reddin, Carl J.; Docmac, Felipe; O’Connor, Nessa E.; Bothwell, John H.; Harrod, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Similar environmental driving forces can produce similarity among geographically distant ecosystems. Coastal oceanic upwelling, for example, has been associated with elevated biomass and abundance patterns of certain functional groups, e.g., corticated macroalgae. In the upwelling system of Northern Chile, we examined measures of intertidal macrobenthic composition, structure and trophic ecology across eighteen shores varying in their proximity to two coastal upwelling centres, in a hierarchical sampling design (spatial scales of >1 and >10 km). The influence of coastal upwelling on intertidal communities was confirmed by the stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) of consumers, including a dominant suspension feeder, grazers, and their putative resources of POM, epilithic biofilm, and macroalgae. We highlight the utility of muscle δ15N from the suspension feeding mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, as a proxy for upwelling, supported by satellite data and previous studies. Where possible, we used corrections for broader-scale trends, spatial autocorrelation, ontogenetic dietary shifts and spatial baseline isotopic variation prior to analysis. Our results showed macroalgal assemblage composition, and benthic consumer assemblage structure, varied significantly with the intertidal influence of coastal upwelling, especially contrasting bays and coastal headlands. Coastal topography also separated differences in consumer resource use. This suggested that coastal upwelling, itself driven by coastline topography, influences intertidal communities by advecting nearshore phytoplankton populations offshore and cooling coastal water temperatures. We recommend the isotopic values of benthic organisms, specifically long-lived suspension feeders, as in situ alternatives to offshore measurements of upwelling influence. PMID:26214806

  4. Ecosystem Carbon Stocks of Intertidal Wetlands in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phang, V. X. H.; Friess, D.; Chou, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove forests and seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services, with huge recent interest in their carbon sequestration and storage value. Mangrove forests and seagrass meadows as well as mudflats and sandbars form a continuum of intertidal wetlands, but studies that consider these spatially-linked habitats as a whole are limited. This paper presents the results of a field-based and remote sensing carbon stock assessment, including the first study of the ecosystem carbon stocks of these adjacent habitats in the tropics. Aboveground, belowground and soil organic carbon pools were quantified at Chek Jawa, an intertidal wetland in Singapore. Total ecosystem carbon stocks averaged 499 Mg C ha-1 in the mangrove forest and 140 Mg C ha-1 in the seagrass meadow. Soil organic carbon dominated the total storage in both habitats. In the adjacent mudflats and sandbars, soil organic carbon averaged 143 and 124 Mg C ha-1 respectively. High amount of carbon stored in soil demonstrate the role of intertidal wetlands in sequestering large amount of carbon in sediments accumulated over millennia. High-resolution remote sensing imagery was used to create spatial models that upscaled field-based carbon measurements to the national scale. Field-based data and spatial modeling of ecosystem carbon stocks to the entire island through remote sensing provides a large-scale and holistic carbon stock value, important for the understanding and management of these threatened intertidal ecosystems.

  5. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes. PMID:26883983

  6. Numerical study on inter-tidal transports in coastal seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xinyan; Jiang, Wensheng; Zhang, Ping; Feng, Shizuo

    2016-06-01

    Inter-tidal (subtidal) transport processes in coastal sea depend on the residual motion, turbulent dispersion and relevant sources/sinks. In Feng et al. (2008), an updated Lagrangian inter-tidal transport equation, as well as new concept of Lagrangian inter-tidal concentration (LIC), has been proposed for a general nonlinear shallow water system. In the present study, the LIC is numerically applied for the first time to passive tracers in idealized settings and salinity in the Bohai Sea, China. Circulation and tracer motion in the three idealized model seas with different topography or coastline, termed as `flat-bottom', `stairs' and `cape' case, respectively, are simulated. The dependence of the LIC on initial tidal phase suggests that the nonlinearities in the stairs and cape cases are stronger than that in the flat-bottom case. Therefore, the `flat-bottom' case still meets the convectively weakly nonlinear condition. For the Bohai Sea, the simulation results show that most parts of it still meet the weakly nonlinear condition. However, the dependence of the LIS (Lagrangian inter-tidal salinity) on initial tidal phase is significant around the southern headland of the Liaodong Peninsula and near the mouth of the Yellow River. The nonlinearity in the former region is mainly related to the complicated coastlines, and that in the latter region is due to the presence of the estuarine salinity front.

  7. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-02-17

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes.

  8. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-02-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes.

  9. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes. PMID:26883983

  10. Responding to Linguistic Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commins, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Second language learners arrive at every grade level with a variety of experiences and differing academic backgrounds. Responding to their learning needs means accommodating the entire range of students from monolingual English speakers to monolingual speakers of other languages, and a variety of bilingual profiles in between. This article…

  11. Responding to Tragedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coopman, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, a superintendent of Clark-Pleasant School Corporation in Whiteland, Indiana, relates how she and the school community responded to a car accident that killed two students. The author stresses the need to develop a comprehensive crisis plan. It is also important to be sensitive to the needs of family members who are…

  12. Responding to Misbehavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Kathryn; Forton, Mary Beth; Porter, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    As they learn to negotiate social expectations, children test limits, get carried away, forget, and make mistakes. In fact, having these experiences--and seeing how adults respond to them--is one way children learn about how to behave. Just as when they teach academics, teachers can use students' behavioral mistakes as opportunities for learning.…

  13. The Gesell Institute Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Responding to Dr. Meisels' article concerning the uses and abuses of the Gesell readiness tests, the Gesell Institute of Child development maintains that the Gesell series of assessments are used by schools to gain a fuller developmental understanding of the child and have been predictive of school success. (BB)

  14. Responding to Individual Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscow, Mel

    1990-01-01

    Effective teachers of students with disabilities respond successfully to students' individual needs by ensuring that students understand the purpose of their activities, by presenting students with variety and choice, by encouraging them to reflect upon and review their learning, by making flexible use of time and resources, and by implementing…

  15. The Authors Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward F.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The authors of proposals for a child care allowance for poor families, a parental leave program to ensure infant care, and a linkage of child care and public education systems respond to comments by three reviewers. The commentaries illustrate the diversity of perspectives on child care and the public sector. (SLD)

  16. Responding to Mechanical Antigravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.; Thomas, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experiences of the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project, suggestions are offered for constructively responding to proposals that purport breakthrough propulsion using mechanical devices. Because of the relatively large number of unsolicited submissions received (about 1 per workday) and because many of these involve similar concepts, this report is offered to help the would-be submitters make genuine progress as well as to help reviewers respond to such submissions. Devices that use oscillating masses or gyroscope falsely appear to create net thrust through differential friction or by misinterpreting torques as linear forces. To cover both the possibility of an errant claim and a genuine discovery, reviews should require that submitters meet minimal thresholds of proof before engaging in further correspondence; such as achieving sustained deflection of a level-platform pendulum in the case of mechanical thrusters.

  17. Intertidal resource use over millennia enhances forest productivity.

    PubMed

    Trant, Andrew J; Nijland, Wiebe; Hoffman, Kira M; Mathews, Darcy L; McLaren, Duncan; Nelson, Trisalyn A; Starzomski, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Human occupation is usually associated with degraded landscapes but 13,000 years of repeated occupation by British Columbia's coastal First Nations has had the opposite effect, enhancing temperate rainforest productivity. This is particularly the case over the last 6,000 years when intensified intertidal shellfish usage resulted in the accumulation of substantial shell middens. We show that soils at habitation sites are higher in calcium and phosphorous. Both of these are limiting factors in coastal temperate rainforests. Western redcedar (Thuja plicata) trees growing on the middens were found to be taller, have higher wood calcium, greater radial growth and exhibit less top die-back. Coastal British Columbia is the first known example of long-term intertidal resource use enhancing forest productivity and we expect this pattern to occur at archaeological sites along coastlines globally. PMID:27572157

  18. Marine biology, intertidal ecology, and a new place for biology.

    PubMed

    Benson, Keith R

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, there is considerable interest for the physical setting of science, that is, its actual 'place' of practice. Among historians of biology, place has been considered to be a crucial component for the study of ecology. Other historians have noted the 'built' environments (laboratories) for the study of biology along the seashore, even referring to these places in terms more applicable to vacation sites. In this paper, I examine the place of intertidal ecology investigations, both in terms of the physical space and the built space. Part of the examination will investigate the aesthetic aspect of the Pacific Coast, part will evaluate the unique character of the intertidal zone, and part will consider the construction of natural laboratories and built laboratories as characteristic places for biology.

  19. Intertidal resource use over millennia enhances forest productivity

    PubMed Central

    Trant, Andrew J.; Nijland, Wiebe; Hoffman, Kira M.; Mathews, Darcy L.; McLaren, Duncan; Nelson, Trisalyn A.; Starzomski, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Human occupation is usually associated with degraded landscapes but 13,000 years of repeated occupation by British Columbia's coastal First Nations has had the opposite effect, enhancing temperate rainforest productivity. This is particularly the case over the last 6,000 years when intensified intertidal shellfish usage resulted in the accumulation of substantial shell middens. We show that soils at habitation sites are higher in calcium and phosphorous. Both of these are limiting factors in coastal temperate rainforests. Western redcedar (Thuja plicata) trees growing on the middens were found to be taller, have higher wood calcium, greater radial growth and exhibit less top die-back. Coastal British Columbia is the first known example of long-term intertidal resource use enhancing forest productivity and we expect this pattern to occur at archaeological sites along coastlines globally. PMID:27572157

  20. Intertidal resource use over millennia enhances forest productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trant, Andrew J.; Nijland, Wiebe; Hoffman, Kira M.; Mathews, Darcy L.; McLaren, Duncan; Nelson, Trisalyn A.; Starzomski, Brian M.

    2016-08-01

    Human occupation is usually associated with degraded landscapes but 13,000 years of repeated occupation by British Columbia's coastal First Nations has had the opposite effect, enhancing temperate rainforest productivity. This is particularly the case over the last 6,000 years when intensified intertidal shellfish usage resulted in the accumulation of substantial shell middens. We show that soils at habitation sites are higher in calcium and phosphorous. Both of these are limiting factors in coastal temperate rainforests. Western redcedar (Thuja plicata) trees growing on the middens were found to be taller, have higher wood calcium, greater radial growth and exhibit less top die-back. Coastal British Columbia is the first known example of long-term intertidal resource use enhancing forest productivity and we expect this pattern to occur at archaeological sites along coastlines globally.

  1. An Examination of Intertidal Temperatures Through Remotely Sensed Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.

    2010-12-01

    MODIS Aqua and Terra satellites produce both land surface temperatures and sea surface temperatures using calibrated algorithms. In this study, the land surface temperatures were retrieved during clear-sky (non-cloudy) conditions at a 1 km2 resolution (overpass time at 10:30 am) whereas the sea surface temperatures are also retrieved during clear-sky conditions at approximately 4 km resolution (overpass time at 1:30 pm). The purpose of this research was to examine remotely sensed sea surface (SST), intertidal (IST), and land surface temperatures (LST), in conjunction with observed in situ mussel body temperatures, as well as associated weather and tidal data. In Strawberry Hill, Oregon, it was determined that intertidal surface temperatures are similar to but distinctly different from land surface temperatures although influenced by sea surface temperatures. The air temperature and differential heating throughout the day, as well as location in relation to the shore, can greatly influence the remotely sensed surface temperatures. Therefore, remotely sensed satellite data is a very useful tool in examining intertidal temperatures for regional climatic changes over long time periods and may eventually help researchers forecast expected climate changes and help determine associated biological implications.

  2. Groundwater flow and heat transport dynamics across an intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, K. M.; Cardenas, M. B.; Swanson, T. E.; Erler, D. V.; Santos, I. R.; Tait, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Intertidal zones mark the interface between terrestrial and marine systems. Nearshore energy and mass fluxes can be bi-directional as tidal and wave processes compete with surface water and groundwater discharges. We installed a transect of thirteen piezometers across a shoreface on Rarotonga, Cook Islands to measure vertical and horizontal water flux and temperature time series below the sediment-water interface. An array of four thermistors within each piezometer recorded temperatures ranging from the sediment-water interface to 0.2 m depth over multiple tidal cycles. Temperature time series at 0.2 m depth strongly resemble the tidal temperature signal with a variable time lag between nearly instantaneous to 11 hrs, suggesting predominance of marine influx over fresh groundwater seepage in this area. Vertical hydraulic head gradients calculated from select, deeper piezometers show downward water fluxes at all tides with lower gradients at low tides. However, horizontal gradients between piezometers are always seaward. A parallel series of two-dimensional, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys show some resistivity values that may be due to presence of fresh water near land at depth, but most values correspond to that of seawater-saturated sediment. We interpret this intertidal zone as a venue for seawater recirculation in the subsurface with minimal diffuse terrestrial groundwater discharge. Terrestrially-derived groundwater may be discharging further out in the lagoon and mostly bypassing the intertidal zone.

  3. Variable intertidal temperature explains why disease endangers black abalone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Horin, Tal; Lenihan, Hunter S.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological theory suggests that pathogens will not cause host extinctions because agents of disease should fade out when the host population is driven below a threshold density. Nevertheless, infectious diseases have threatened species with extinction on local scales by maintaining high incidence and the ability to spread efficiently even as host populations decline. Intertidal black abalone (Haliotis cracherodii), but not other abalone species, went extinct locally throughout much of southern California following the emergence of a Rickettsiales-like pathogen in the mid-1980s. The rickettsial disease, a condition known as withering syndrome (WS), and associated mortality occur at elevated water temperatures. We measured abalone body temperatures in the field and experimentally manipulated intertidal environmental conditions in the laboratory, testing the influence of mean temperature and daily temperature variability on key epizootiological processes of WS. Daily temperature variability increased the susceptibility of black abalone to infection, but disease expression occurred only at warm water temperatures and was independent of temperature variability. These results imply that high thermal variation of the marine intertidal zone allows the pathogen to readily infect black abalone, but infected individuals remain asymptomatic until water temperatures periodically exceed thresholds modulating WS. Mass mortalities can therefore occur before pathogen transmission is limited by density-dependent factors.

  4. Variation in thermal stress response in two populations of the brown seaweed, Fucus distichus, from the Arctic and subarctic intertidal

    PubMed Central

    Smolina, Irina; Kollias, Spyros; Jueterbock, Alexander; Coyer, James A.; Hoarau, Galice

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether intertidal organisms are ‘preadapted’ to cope with the increase of temperature and temperature variability or if they are currently at their thermal tolerance limits. To address the dichotomy, we focused on an important ecosystem engineer of the Arctic intertidal rocky shores, the seaweed Fucus distichus and investigated thermal stress responses of two populations from different temperature regimes (Svalbard and Kirkenes, Norway). Thermal stress responses at 20°C, 24°C and 28°C were assessed by measuring photosynthetic performance and expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes (shsp, hsp90 and hsp70). We detected population-specific responses between the two populations of F. distichus, as the Svalbard population revealed a smaller decrease in photosynthesis performance but a greater activation of molecular defence mechanisms (indicated by a wider repertoire of HSP genes and their stronger upregulation) compared with the Kirkenes population. Although the temperatures used in our study exceed temperatures encountered by F. distichus at the study sites, we believe response to these temperatures may serve as a proxy for the species’ potential to respond to climate-related stresses. PMID:26909170

  5. Photoacclimatory Responses of Zostera marina in the Intertidal and Subtidal Zones.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Rul; Kim, Sangil; Kim, Young Kyun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2016-01-01

    Photoacclimatory responses of the seagrass Zostera marina in the intertidal and subtidal zones were investigated by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic pigments, leaf δ13C values, and shoot morphology in two bay systems. Intertidal plants had higher carotenoid concentrations than subtidal plants to avoid photodamage under excess light conditions during the day. The maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax) and minimum saturation irradiance (Ek) of the intertidal plants were higher than those of the subtidal plants, whereas photosynthetic efficiency (α) and maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were higher in subtidal plants. The intertidal plants also had significantly greater Stern-Volmer non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) than that of the subtidal plants. These results suggest that the subtidal plants photoacclimated to use limited light more efficiently, and the intertidal plants exhibited photosynthetic responses to minimize photodamage at excess irradiance. The δ13C values of leaf tissues were more negative in the intertidal plants than those in the subtidal plants, suggesting that the intertidal plants used atmospheric or dissolved CO2 for photosynthesis during emersion. Effective quantum yield (ΔF/Fm´) in the intertidal plants decreased more slowly after emersion than that in the subtidal plants, indicating higher desiccation tolerance of the intertidal plants. The intertidal plants also recovered more rapidly from desiccation damage than the subtidal plants, suggesting photosynthetic adaptation to desiccation stress. The photosynthetic plasticity of Z. marina in response to variable environmental conditions most likely allows this species to occur in the intertidal and subtidal zones. PMID:27227327

  6. Photoacclimatory Responses of Zostera marina in the Intertidal and Subtidal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Rul; Kim, Sangil; Kim, Young Kyun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2016-01-01

    Photoacclimatory responses of the seagrass Zostera marina in the intertidal and subtidal zones were investigated by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic pigments, leaf δ13C values, and shoot morphology in two bay systems. Intertidal plants had higher carotenoid concentrations than subtidal plants to avoid photodamage under excess light conditions during the day. The maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax) and minimum saturation irradiance (Ek) of the intertidal plants were higher than those of the subtidal plants, whereas photosynthetic efficiency (α) and maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were higher in subtidal plants. The intertidal plants also had significantly greater Stern–Volmer non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) than that of the subtidal plants. These results suggest that the subtidal plants photoacclimated to use limited light more efficiently, and the intertidal plants exhibited photosynthetic responses to minimize photodamage at excess irradiance. The δ13C values of leaf tissues were more negative in the intertidal plants than those in the subtidal plants, suggesting that the intertidal plants used atmospheric or dissolved CO2 for photosynthesis during emersion. Effective quantum yield (ΔF/Fm´) in the intertidal plants decreased more slowly after emersion than that in the subtidal plants, indicating higher desiccation tolerance of the intertidal plants. The intertidal plants also recovered more rapidly from desiccation damage than the subtidal plants, suggesting photosynthetic adaptation to desiccation stress. The photosynthetic plasticity of Z. marina in response to variable environmental conditions most likely allows this species to occur in the intertidal and subtidal zones. PMID:27227327

  7. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats - A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-12-01

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existing baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Lastly, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.

  8. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existingmore » baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.« less

  9. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existing baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.

  10. Expanding the potential of chiral chromatography for high-throughput screening of large compound libraries by means of sub-2μm Whelk-O 1 stationary phase in supercritical fluid conditions.

    PubMed

    Sciascera, Luca; Ismail, Omar; Ciogli, Alessia; Kotoni, Dorina; Cavazzini, Alberto; Botta, Lorenzo; Szczerba, Ted; Kocergin, Jelena; Villani, Claudio; Gasparrini, Francesco

    2015-02-27

    With the aim of exploring the potential of ultra-fast chiral chromatography for high-throughput analysis, the new sub-2 micron Whelk-O 1 chiral stationary phase (CSP) has been employed in supercritical fluid conditions to screen 129 racemates, mainly of pharmaceutical interest. By using a 5-cm long column (0.46cm internal diameter), a single co-solvent (MeOH) and a 7-min gradient elution, 85% of acidic and neutral analytes considered in this work have been successfully resolved, with resolution (Rs) larger than 2 in more than 65% of cases. Moreover, almost a half of basic samples that, for their own characteristics, are known to be difficult to separate on Whelk-O 1 CSP, have shown Rs greater than 0.3. The screening of the entire library could be accomplished in less than 24h (single run) with 63% of positive score. For well-resolved enantiomers (Rs roughly included between 1 and 3), we show that method transfer from gradient to isocratic conditions is straightforward. In many cases, isocratic ultra-fast separations (with analysis time smaller than 60s) have been achieved by simply employing, as isocratic mobile phase, the eluent composition at which the second enantiomer was eluted in gradient mode. By considering the extension and variety of the library in terms of chemico-physical and structural properties of compounds and numerousness, we believe that this work demonstrates the real potential of the technique for high-throughput enantioselective screening. PMID:25650355

  11. OCCURRENCE AND ORIENTATION OF PARALICHTHID FLOUNDERS (BOTHIDAE: PARALICHTYS) ON AN INTERTIDAL BEACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Middaugh, Douglas P. and Charles L. McKenney, Jr. 2003. Occurrence and Orientation of Flounders (Bothidae: Paralichthys) on an Intertidal Beach. J. North Carol. Acad. Sci. 119(4):157-171. (ERL,GB 1172).

    The intertidal movement and burying pattern of paralichthid flounders...

  12. Community composition of the rocky intertidal at Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Katharina; Buchholz, Friedrich; Giménez, Luis

    2008-12-01

    At the rocky island of Helgoland (North Sea), the distribution and abundances of intertidal communities were assessed and the effects of wave exposure and tidal height on the spatial distribution patterns of the communities were evaluated. Macroalgae and invertebrates were sampled quantitatively along line transects in three intertidal locations, a semi-exposed, an exposed and a sheltered one. The semi-exposed location was characterised by (1) Ulva spp. at the high intertidal ( Ulva-community), (2) mussels and periwinkles at the mid intertidal ( Mytilus-community) and (3) Corallina officinalis and mainly the large brown alga Fucus serratus at the low intertidal ( Fucus-community). The exposed location encompassed the mid and low intertidal; at both zones the Fucus-community occurred. The sheltered location was characterised by (1) barnacles ( Balanus-community) and (2) bryozoans, hydrozoans and mainly the large brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum ( Ascophyllum-community). At the semi-exposed, but not at the exposed location the communities changed with the intertidal position. A relationship between wave exposure and the occurrence of specific communities was shown for the sheltered location; in contrast, communities of the semi-exposed and the exposed location appear to be little influenced by wave exposure directly. The community concept and the potential causes of distribution patterns of the defined communities are discussed and suggestions for a future monitoring are given. Variations in the communities at different spatial scales speak in favour of a multiple scale sampling design to monitor changes in the intertidal communities at Helgoland.

  13. DESICCATION AND OTHER FACTORS AFFECTING THE UPPER INTERTIDAL DISTRIBUTION OF EELGRASS IN YAQUINA BAY, OR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) in Pacific Northwest is primarily intertidal, yet little research has been done on what factors control its upper intertidal growth boundary. In July 2000 a two year study was initiated in Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR) to evaluate the effects of four factor...

  14. EFFECTS OF EROSION AND MACROALGAE ON INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) IN A NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC ESTUARY (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) in open-coast northeastern Pacific estuaries is primarily intertidal, yet little research has been done on the natural factors controlling its upper intertidal growth limits. This two-year study in the Yaquina Estuary (Newport, Oregon, USA) evaluated the...

  15. The Fate of Nitrate in Intertidal Permeable Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Hannah K.; Lavik, Gaute; Holtappels, Moritz; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal zones act as a sink for riverine and atmospheric nitrogen inputs and thereby buffer the open ocean from the effects of anthropogenic activity. Recently, microbial activity in sandy permeable sediments has been identified as a dominant source of N-loss in coastal zones, namely through denitrification. Some of the highest coastal denitrification rates measured so far occur within the intertidal permeable sediments of the eutrophied Wadden Sea. Still, denitrification alone can often account for only half of the substantial nitrate (NO3−) consumption. Therefore, to investigate alternative NO3− sinks such as dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), intracellular nitrate storage by eukaryotes and isotope equilibration effects we carried out 15NO3− amendment experiments. By considering all of these sinks in combination, we could quantify the fate of the 15NO3− added to the sediment. Denitrification was the dominant nitrate sink (50–75%), while DNRA, which recycles N to the environment accounted for 10–20% of NO3− consumption. Intriguingly, we also observed that between 20 and 40% of 15NO3− added to the incubations entered an intracellular pool of NO3− and was subsequently respired when nitrate became limiting. Eukaryotes were responsible for a large proportion of intracellular nitrate storage, and it could be shown through inhibition experiments that at least a third of the stored nitrate was subsequently also respired by eukaryotes. The environmental significance of the intracellular nitrate pool was confirmed by in situ measurements which revealed that intracellular storage can accumulate nitrate at concentrations six fold higher than the surrounding porewater. This intracellular pool is so far not considered when modeling N-loss from intertidal permeable sediments; however it can act as a reservoir for nitrate during low tide. Consequently, nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storage can add an additional 20% to

  16. Climate change and latitudinal patterns of intertidal thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, Brian; Harley, Christopher D G; Halpin, Patricia M; O'Donnell, Michael; Hofmann, Gretchen E; Blanchette, Carol A

    2002-11-01

    The interaction of climate and the timing of low tides along the West Coast of the United States creates a complex mosaic of thermal environments, in which northern sites can be more thermally stressful than southern sites. Thus, climate change may not lead to a poleward shift in the distribution of intertidal organisms, as has been proposed, but instead will likely cause localized extinctions at a series of "hot spots." Patterns of exposure to extreme climatic conditions are temporally variable, and tidal predictions suggest that in the next 3 to 5 years "hot spots" are likely to appear at several northern sites. PMID:12411702

  17. Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, C.D.

    1991-12-01

    Restoration of wetland habitats in highly urbanized areas is generally constrained by scarcity of opportunity, adverse impacts of surrounding land use, and cost. Although areal wetland losses approach 98% in Seattle's Duwamish River estuary, the system continues to support important salmonid runs, as well as a variety of bird and mammal species. Estuarine-dependent organisms are likely limited by quality and quantity of intertidal habitat in the system. Because the long-range, estuary-wide benefit of site-specific mitigation and restoration projects is limited, it is imperative to develop estuary-wide restoration plans. Towards this end, an inventory and analysis of potential intertidal habitat restoration sites has been completed for the Duwamish River estuary. Twenty-four sites, ranging in size from 0.8 to 25 acres were identified and comparative functional potential assessed. The majority of these sites (18) occur in the upper estuary. Two sites are located in Elliott Bay, and four are located near the historic mouth of the river in the vicinity of Harbor Island. Spatial data have been developed in geographic information system (GIS) format. Other site-specific data relative to habitat restoration has also been assembled.

  18. Halotaxis of cyanobacteria in an intertidal hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    An intertidal hypersaline cyanobacterial mat from Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) exhibited a reversible change in its surface colour within several hours upon changes in salinity of the overlying water. The mat surface was orange-reddish at salinities above 15% and turned dark green at lower salinities. We investigated this phenomenon using a polyphasic approach that included denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral imaging, absorption spectroscopy, oxygen microsensor measurements and modelling of salinity dynamics. Filaments of Microcoleus chthonoplastes, identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphology, were found to migrate up and down when salinity was decreased below or increased above 15%, respectively, causing the colour change of the mat uppermost layer. Migration occurred in light and in the dark, and could be induced by different salts, not only NaCl. The influence of salinity-dependent and independent physico-chemical parameters, such as water activity, oxygen solubility, H2S, gravity and light, was excluded, indicating that the observed migration was due to a direct response to salt stress. We propose to term this salinity-driven cyanobacterial migration as 'halotaxis', a process that might play a vital role in the survival of cyanobacteria in environments exposed to continuous salinity fluctuations such as intertidal flats.

  19. Host partitioning by parasites in an intertidal crustacean community.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Anson V; Poulin, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Patterns of host use by parasites throughout a guild community of intermediate hosts can depend on several biological and ecological factors, including physiology, morphology, immunology, and behavior. We looked at parasite transmission in the intertidal crustacean community of Lower Portobello Bay, Dunedin, New Zealand, with the intent of: (1) mapping the flow of parasites throughout the major crustacean species, (2) identifying hosts that play the most important transmission role for each parasite, and (3) assessing the impact of parasitism on host populations. The most prevalent parasites found in 14 species of crustaceans (635 specimens) examined were the trematodes Maritrema novaezealandensis and Microphallus sp., the acanthocephalans Profilicollis spp., the nematode Ascarophis sp., and an acuariid nematode. Decapods were compatible hosts for M. novaezealandensis, while other crustaceans demonstrated lower host suitability as shown by high levels of melanized and immature parasite stages. Carapace thickness, gill morphology, and breathing style may contribute to the differential infection success of M. novaezealandensis and Microphallus sp. in the decapod species. Parasite-induced host mortality appears likely with M. novaezealandensis in the crabs Austrohelice crassa, Halicarcinus varius, Hemigrapsus sexdentatus, and Macrophthalmus hirtipes, and also with Microphallus sp. in A. crassa. Overall, the different parasite species make different use of available crustacean intermediate hosts and possibly contribute to intertidal community structure.

  20. Additive effects of physical stress and herbivores on intertidal seaweed biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Bracken, Matthew E S; Jones, Emily

    2013-05-01

    Patterns in rocky intertidal seaweed biodiversity influence the resilience and functioning of these important primary producer communities. In turn, seaweed biodiversity patterns are the result of many ecological factors. We determined the influences of thermal and desiccation stress, herbivory, and nutrients on seaweed biodiversity on a northern California rocky shoreline. In a fully crossed design at two tidal heights at wave-protected and exposed sites, we deployed screens to reduce stress, removed herbivores, and added nutrients for 18 months. The treatments reduced temperature, increased relative humidity, decreased herbivore abundances, and increased nitrogen in both seawater and seaweeds. Seaweed abundance and biodiversity (cover, biomass, species richness, diversity, evenness, and community composition) were influenced by tidal height, physical stress, and herbivores. Wave exposure affected all response variables except biomass and evenness. Stress and herbivores had independent additive effects on seaweed abundance and diversity. Physical stress did not make the community as a whole more susceptible to herbivores, and screens had overarching positive effects on seaweed biodiversity even though they also had positive effects on herbivore abundance. Nutrients had virtually no effect on seaweed biodiversity, and we observed no bottom-up effects of nutrient addition on herbivore density or biomass. Small green algae and diatoms were important contributors to overall algal cover and to changes in composition across treatments, but larger macroalgae dominated the species richness response. The striking absence of interactions between stress and herbivory highlights how seaweed communities can respond independently to important drivers of biodiversity. Thus, nonadditive, potentially synergistic effects do not necessarily complicate the understanding of how seaweed biodiversity responds to environmental change.

  1. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broad, C.; Soave, K.; Ericson, W.; Raabe, B.; Glazer, R.; Ahuatzi, A.; Pereira, M.; Rainsford, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 100 m2 areas, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima and Fucus spp. We will continue to closely monitor algal population densities in within our site in light of the November 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill that leaked heavy bunker fuel into intertidal habitats around the SF Bay. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef

  2. Can upwelling signals be detected in intertidal fishes of different trophic levels?

    PubMed

    Pulgar, J; Poblete, E; Alvarez, M; Morales, J P; Aranda, B; Aldana, M; Pulgar, V M

    2013-11-01

    For intertidal fishes belonging to three species, the herbivore Scartichthys viridis (Blenniidae), the omnivore Girella laevifrons (Kyphosidae) and the carnivore Graus nigra (Kyphosidae), mass and body size relationships were higher in individuals from an upwelling zone compared with those from a non-upwelling zone. RNA:DNA were higher in the herbivores and omnivores from the upwelling zone. Higher biomass and RNA:DNA in the upwelling intertidal fishes may be a consequence of an increased exposure to higher nutrient availability, suggesting that increased physiological conditioning in vertebrates from upwelling areas can be detected and measured using intertidal fishes of different trophic levels.

  3. Exceptional Responders Initial Feasibility Results

    Cancer.gov

    A pilot study evaluating identification of cancer patients who respond to treatment that is ineffective in at least 90 percent of patients found that it was indeed able to confirm a majority of proposed patients as exceptional responders based on clinical

  4. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  5. Metal contamination of estuarine intertidal sediments of Moreton Bay, Australia.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Guia; Gasparon, Massimo

    2014-12-15

    Trace element concentrations in surface intertidal sediments were analyzed to assess the level of contamination along the western side of Moreton Bay (Australia). The environmental risks posed by metals were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines, the Risk Assessment Code (RAC) and enrichment relative to background levels. Chromium, Ni, and Cu are the main contributors to sediment pollution. Sediments are also enriched in Zn, Cd and Pb by 1.5-3 times the regional background. Zinc, Cd and Co may pose high to very high risk to the aquatic biota due to their potential bioavailability, while Ni, As, Cu, Pb and Cr may pose medium risk at some of the investigated sites. Results emphasize the importance of using different methods for the assessment of sediment pollution at an estuarine site.

  6. Assessment of Jessica oil spill impacts on intertidal invertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Agnès; Gravez, Vincent; Edgar, Graham J

    2003-11-01

    The impact of the Jessica oil-spill on intertidal macroinvertebrate communities was studied using a reference-impact design at three tidal levels at sites where oil deposits had been reported by a shoreline assessment team, and adjacent reference sites. Faunal relationships between the various sites did not show any clear pattern related to oil exposure at the time of sampling (4-11 months post-spill). Similarly, no significant differences associated with oiling were detected for total animal density nor species richness data, nor for the abundances of common taxa. We note that post-hoc studies such as this are limited by a failure to recognise different levels of oiling impacts at different sites (oiling-site interactions). Baseline information is critical if subtle effects of oiling are to be distinguished.

  7. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  8. Emergency responders' critical infrared (ERCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsin, Larry S.

    2004-08-01

    Emergency Responders (Fire, Police, Medical, and Emergency Management) face a high risk of injury or death. Even before September 11, 2001, public and private organizations have been driven to better protect Emergency Responders through education, training and improved technology. Recent research on Emergency Responder safety, health risks, and personal protective requirements, shows infrared (IR) imaging as a critical need. Today"s Emergency Responders are increasingly challenged to do more, facing demands requiring technological assistance and/or solutions. Since the introduction of Fire Service IR imaging in the mid 1990s, applications have increased. Emergency response IR is no longer just seeing through smoke to find victims or the seat of a fire. Many more mission critical needs now exist across the broad spectrum of emergency response. At the same time, Emergency Responder injuries and deaths are increasing. The Office of Domestic Preparedness (ODP) has also recognized IR imaging as critical in protecting our communities -- and in preventing many of the injuries and deaths of Emergency Responders. Currently, only 25% of all fire departments (or less than 7% of individual firefighters) have IR imaging. Availability to Police, EMS and Emergency Management is even lower. Without ERCI, Emergency Responders and our communities are at risk.

  9. Impact of ocean acidification on metabolism and energetics during early life stages of the intertidal porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Hayley A; Ceballos-Osuna, Lina; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2013-04-15

    Absorption of elevated atmospheric CO2 is causing surface ocean pH to decline, a process known as ocean acidification (OA). To date, few studies have assessed the physiological impacts of OA on early life-history stages of intertidal organisms, which transition from habitats with fluctuating pH (intertidal zone) to relatively stable (pelagic zone) pH environments. We used the intertidal crab Petrolisthes cinctipes to determine whether metabolic responses to year 2300 predictions for OA vary among early developmental stages and to examine whether the effects were more pronounced in larval stages developing in the open ocean. Oxygen consumption rate, total protein, dry mass, total lipids and C/N were determined in late-stage embryos, zoea I larvae and newly settled juveniles reared in ambient pH (7.93 ± 0.06) or low pH (7.58 ± 0.06). After short-term exposure to low pH, embryos displayed 11% and 6% lower metabolism and dry mass, respectively, which may have an associated bioenergetic cost of delayed development to hatching. However, metabolic responses appeared to vary among broods, suggesting significant parental effects among the offspring of six females, possibly a consequence of maternal state during egg deposition and genetic differences among broods. Larval and juvenile metabolism were not affected by acute exposure to elevated CO2. Larvae contained 7% less nitrogen and C/N was 6% higher in individuals reared at pH 7.58 for 6 days, representing a possible switch from lipid to protein metabolism under low pH; the metabolic switch appears to fully cover the energetic cost of responding to elevated CO2. Juvenile dry mass was unaffected after 33 days exposure to low pH seawater. Increased tolerance to low pH in zoea I larvae and juvenile stages may be a consequence of enhanced acid-base regulatory mechanisms, allowing greater compensation of extracellular pH changes and thus preventing decreases in metabolism after exposure to elevated PCO2. The observed

  10. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-04-10

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  11. The bathymetric distribution of intertidal eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three coastal estuaries of Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native eelgrass Zostera marina L. within the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of three Oregon coastal estuaries (Tillamook, Yaquina, and Alsea) were determined by digital classification of aerial color infrared (CIR) orthophotographs. Stratified random surv...

  12. Distribution of intertidal eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) with bathymetry in three Pacific Northwest estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native intertidal eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) and non-vegetated substrates in three coastal estuaries of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) were determined using color infrared (CIR) aerial orthophotography during daylight low tides. Comparison of the digital classif...

  13. Predation on barnacles of intertidal and subtidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschbaum, Christian

    2002-04-01

    Balanids are the numerically dominant epibionts on mussel beds in the Wadden Sea. Near the island of Sylt (German Bight, North Sea), Semibalanus balanoides dominated intertidally and Balanus crenatus subtidally. Field experiments were conducted to test the effects of predation on the density of barnacle recruits. Subtidally, predator exclusion resulted in significantly increased abundances of B. crenatus, while predator exclusion had no significant effects on the density of S. balanoides intertidally. It is suggested that recruitment of B. crenatus to subtidal mussel beds is strongly affected by adult shore crabs ( Carcinus maenas) and juvenile starfish ( Asterias rubens), whereas recruits of S. balanoides in the intertidal zone are mainly influenced by grazing and bulldozing of the very abundant periwinkle Littorina littorea, which is rare subtidally. Thus, not only do the barnacle species differ between intertidal and subtidal mussel beds, but the biotic control factors do so as well.

  14. Estuarine intertidal sediment temperature variability in Zoster marina and Z. japonica habitats in Yaquina Bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical characterization of intertidal estuarine plant habitats over time may reveal distribution-limiting thresholds. Temperature data from loggers embedded in sediment in transects crossing Zostera marina and Z. japonica habitats in lower Yaquina Bay, Oregon display signific...

  15. A history of intertidal flat area in south San Francisco Bay, California: 1858 to 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, Bruce; Foxgrover, Amy

    2006-01-01

    A key question in salt pond restoration in South San Francisco Bay is whether sediment sinks created by opening ponds will result in the loss of intertidal flats. Analyses of a series of bathymetric surveys of South San Francisco Bay made from 1858 to 2005 reveal changes in intertidal flat area in both space and time that can be used to better understand the pre-restoration system. This analysis also documents baseline conditions of intertidal flats that may be altered by restoration efforts. From 1858 to 2005, intertidal flat area decreased by about 25% from 69.2 +6.4/-7.6 km2 to 51.2 +4.8/-5.8 km2. Intertidal flats in the north tended to decrease in area during the period of this study whereas those south of Dumbarton Bridge were either stable or increased in area. From 1983 to 2005, intertidal flats south of Dumbarton Bridge increased from 17.6 +1.7/-2.5 km2 to 24.2 +1.0/-1.8 km2. Intertidal flats along the east shore of the bay tended to be more erosional and decreased in area while those along the west shore of the bay did not significantly change in area. Loss of intertidal flats occurred intermittently along the eastern shore of the bay north of the Dumbarton Bridge. There was little or no loss from 1931 to 1956 and from 1983 to 2005. Predictions of future change in intertidal flat area that do not account for this spatial and temporal variability are not likely to be accurate. The causes of the spatial and temporal variability in intertidal flat area in South San Francisco Bay are not fully understood, but appear related to energy available to erode sediments, sediment redistribution from north to south in the bay, and sediment available to deposit on the flats. Improved understanding of sediment input to South San Francisco Bay, especially from Central Bay, how it is likely to change in the future, the redistribution of sediment within the bay, and ultimately its effect on intertidal flat area would aid in the management of restoration of South San

  16. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Yang, G.; Solli, E.; Dattels, C.; Wallace, K.; Boesel, A.; Steiger, C.; Buie, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B) and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high intertidal zone which experiences the greatest amount of human impacts.

  17. Inter-Tidal Flats Segmentation Of SAR Images Using A Waterfall Hierarchical Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, F.; Catalao, J.; Nico, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a scheme to identify 1D structures in SAR images and applied it to a dataset consisting of two TerraSAR-X images acquired over the region of Lisbon with a temporal baseline of 22 days. The aim of this application it to identify the inter-tidal flats along the south bank of the Tagus river. First results show that a proper recognition of the inter-tidal zone is achieved.

  18. Respondent Learning and Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roden, Aubrey H.; Hapkiewicz, Walter G.

    1973-01-01

    This discussion is based on the premise that a significant proportion of school learning is emotional or affective and that much of this learning is in the form of classical conditioning or respondent learning. (Authors/JA)

  19. Macroalgal fouling on the intertidal mole crab Emerita analoga facilitates bird predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Fernando J.; Firstater, Fausto N.; Lomovasky, Betina J.; Gallegos, Percy; Gamero, Patricia; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we studied the effects of predation by birds on the intertidal mole crab Emerita analoga fouled by macroalgae in a sandy beach of central Peru (11° S). The epibiosis affected mostly the larger animals, especially adult females. Epibiosis prevalence for the entire intertidal population was relatively low (1-2%), however, within the size range affected by epibiosis in the intertidal zone (18-23 mm in carapace length), 20-38% of the animals were fouled. Focal observations of birds showed that fouled animals are preferred over those non-fouled of the same size class and hence the same sex, being consumed at a higher rate than their proportion in the intertidal (Chesson’s alpha index of prey selection >0.96), and estimations of mortality rates indicated that more than 35% of the intertidal fouled animals are removed everyday by birds. The effect of epibiosis may be mainly attributed to a higher burrowing time or an increased visual attractive effect of the algae, which make fouled animals more conspicuous to predatory birds, or because of fouling enhances profitability of the animals. The results show that epibiosis has negative effects on E. analoga through increasing predation by birds, which in turn restricts the distribution and abundance of fouled E. analoga in the intertidal zone.

  20. Physiologically grounded metrics of model skill: a case study estimating heat stress in intertidal populations

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Nicole E.; Helmuth, Brian; Wethey, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Models of ecological responses to climate change fundamentally assume that predictor variables, which are often measured at large scales, are to some degree diagnostic of the smaller-scale biological processes that ultimately drive patterns of abundance and distribution. Given that organisms respond physiologically to stressors, such as temperature, in highly non-linear ways, small modelling errors in predictor variables can potentially result in failures to predict mortality or severe stress, especially if an organism exists near its physiological limits. As a result, a central challenge facing ecologists, particularly those attempting to forecast future responses to environmental change, is how to develop metrics of forecast model skill (the ability of a model to predict defined events) that are biologically meaningful and reflective of underlying processes. We quantified the skill of four simple models of body temperature (a primary determinant of physiological stress) of an intertidal mussel, Mytilus californianus, using common metrics of model performance, such as root mean square error, as well as forecast verification skill scores developed by the meteorological community. We used a physiologically grounded framework to assess each model's ability to predict optimal, sub-optimal, sub-lethal and lethal physiological responses. Models diverged in their ability to predict different levels of physiological stress when evaluated using skill scores, even though common metrics, such as root mean square error, indicated similar accuracy overall. Results from this study emphasize the importance of grounding assessments of model skill in the context of an organism's physiology and, especially, of considering the implications of false-positive and false-negative errors when forecasting the ecological effects of environmental change. PMID:27729979

  1. Seascape-dependent subtidal-intertidal trophic linkages.

    PubMed

    Rilov, Gil; Schiel, David R

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we test in southern New Zealand a conceptual model of food web linkage that is seascape dependent, which can explain some of the variability in rocky shore community structure among sites and coasts. Using a comparative-experimental approach at local and distant sites we demonstrate that mobile subtidal predators (fish and crabs) can exert strong predation pressure on small mussels in the low tidal zone, but only in sites where the seascape includes subtidal reefs. On intertidal benches with adjacent subtidal reefs (+SR), 60-100% of small (5-15 mm) transplanted mussels were removed within a day from experimental tiles on the low shore when unprotected from predation, compared to fully caged controls that had approximately 100% survival over several months. In partial cages that exclude fish but not crabs, survivorship was intermediate. In contrast, on benches without subtidal reefs (-SR) 40-100% of mussels survived for months, even if unprotected. This difference is expressed in lower cover (0-60%) of mussels on rocks at +SR benches compared to -SR benches (70-99%). The central to northern west coast of the South Island is composed mostly of -SR benches, and predation on small mussels there was low and similar to the -SR benches on the east coast, whereas the +SR benches on the east coast had much greater predation. This contrasts to other studies in New Zealand that examined only predation on larger mussels by seastars and concluded that predation is strong on the west coast and weak on the east coast. Excluding large predators from low-shore areas with new recruits for a year in one +SR site showed longer-term predation effects on their abundance and cover. Short-term sampling at the east coast sites showed that mussel settlement was greater in -SR compared to +SR sites, providing some evidence that seascapes may also affect settlement. Overall, predation depended on the local seascape and ultimately affected community structure via suppression of

  2. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainsford, A.; Soave, K.; Gerraty, F.; Jung, G.; Quirke-Shattuck, M.; Kudler, J.; Hatfield, J.; Emunah, M.; Dean, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Each fall student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 200 m2 areas, in fall, winter, and late spring. Using data from the previous years, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima, Cladophora sp. and Fucus sp.. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature, pH and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the greatest amount of human impacts.

  3. Breeding biology of the intertidal sand crab, Emerita (Decapoda: Anomura).

    PubMed

    Subramoniam, T; Gunamalai, V

    2003-01-01

    Emerita is a burrowing mole crab or sand crab, adapted to life in wave-washed sandy beaches of temperate and tropical seas. The reproductive biology of this anomuran crab presents several peculiarities, all contributing to its adaptation to this harsh environmental niche. We discuss the following aspects: 1) sex ratio and size at sexual maturity, 2) neoteny and protandric hermaphroditism, 3) mating behaviour and sperm transfer strategy, 4) synchronisation of moulting and reproduction, 5) environmental impact on reproductive cycle and egg production, 6) biochemistry of yolk utilisation and energetics, 7) larval development, dispersal and settlement and 8) the value of Emerita as indicator species. These aspects are discussed in the light of the life history pattern, comprising a sedentary adult and pelagic larval phases. The successful colonisation of the physically challenging habitat of the sandy beach by Emerita is attributable largely to reproductive strategy and the larval developmental and recruitment pattern. Sensitivity to changing environmental conditions, including pollution, make this intertidal crab an indicator species for monitoring anthropogenic impact. PMID:14601412

  4. Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate in marine intertidal sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Kiene, R.P.; Taylor, B.F.

    1994-01-01

    Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was measured in three different types of,intertidal marine sediments: a cyanobacterial mat, a diatom-covered tidal flat and a carbonate sediment. Consumption rates of added DMSP were highest in cyanobacterial mat slurries (59 ?? mol DMSP l-1 slurry h-1) and lower in slurries from a diatom mat and a carbonate tidal sediment (24 and 9 ??mol DMSP l-1 h-1, respectively). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and 3-mercaptopropionate (MPA) were produced simultaneously during DMSP consumption, indicating that cleavage and demethylation occurred at the same time. Viable counts of DMSP-utilizing bacteria revealed a population of 2 x 107 cells cm-3 sediment (90% of these cleaved DMSP to DMS, 10% demethylated DMSP to MPA) in the cyanobacterial mat, 7 x 105 cells cm-3 in the diatom mat (23% cleavers, 77% demethylators), and 9 x 104 cells cm-3 (20% cleavers and 80% demethylators) in the carbonate sediment. In slurries of the diatom mat, the rate of MPA production from added 3-methiolpropionate (MMPA) was 50% of the rate of MPA formation from DMSP. The presence of a large population of demethylating bacteria and the production of MPA from DMSP suggest that the demethylation pathway, in addition to cleavage, contributes significantly to DMSP consumption in coastal sediments.

  5. Homing abilities of the Australian intertidal ant Polyrhachis sokolova.

    PubMed

    Narendra, Ajay; Raderschall, Chloé A; Robson, Simon K A

    2013-10-01

    The pressure of returning to and locating the nest after a successful foraging trip is immense in ants. To find their way back home, ants use a number of different strategies (e.g. path integration, trail following) and rely on a range of cues (e.g. pattern of polarised skylight, landmark panorama) available in their environment. How ants weigh different cues has been a question of great interest and has primarily been addressed in the desert ants from Africa and Australia. We here identify the navigational abilities of an intertidal ant, Polyrhachis sokolova, that lives on mudflats where nests and foraging areas are frequently inundated with tidal water. We find that these solitary foraging ants rely heavily on visual landmark information for navigation, but they are also capable of path integration. By displacing ants with and without vector information at different locations within the local familiar territory, we created conflicts between information from the landmarks and information from the path integrator. The homing success of full-vector ants, compared with the zero-vector ants, when displaced 5 m behind the feeder, indicate that vector information had to be coupled with landmark information for successful homing. To explain the differences in the homing abilities of ants from different locations we determined the navigational information content at each release station and compared it with that available at the feeder location. We report here the interaction of multiple navigation strategies in the context of the information content in the environment.

  6. Single cell visualization of sulfur cycling in intertidal microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K.; Green, A.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemoautrophic microbial mats form in shallow intertidal pools adjacent to sulfidic hydrothermal vents in San Pedro, CA. Sulfide is primarily geologically derived. However, microscopy revealed deltaproteobacteria closely associated with Beggiatoa -like filaments, indicating an additional biogenic sulfide source, derived from sulfate reduction or sulfur disproportionation. At small scales the intercellular interaction of sulfide producing and sulfide consuming bacteria may play a important role in biogeochemical sulfur cycling. We explored the intracellular transfer of biologically derived sulfide in this system with triple and quadruple stable isotope labeling experiments: 13C, 15N, 33S, and 34S. Silicon wafers colonized by microbial mats in situ, were then incubated with 34SO42- or 34SO42- and 33S0 as well as 13C-acetate and 15NH4+and analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) coupled to nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). We observed enrichment of 34S and 33S in both deltaproteobacteria and sulfide oxidizing gammaproteobacteria. Greater enrichment relative to killed controls occurred in deltaproteobacteria than the sulfide oxidizers during both sulfate reducing (Δ34Sdelta-killed = 240‰, Δ34Sgamma-killed = 40‰) and sulfur disproportionating incubations (Δ33Sdelta-killed = 1730‰, Δ33Sgamma-killed = 1050‰). These results provide a direct visualization of interspecies sulfur transfer and indicate that biogenic sulfide derived from either sulfate or intermediate oxidation state sulfur species plays a role in sulfur cycling in this system.

  7. Responding to the Invisible Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Investigates what constitutes good reflection. Describes how one instructor used the Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI) to explore her responses to the reflective writing produced by preservice English teachers. Concludes that the MBTI can provide insight into and improve how instructors assign, respond to, and evaluate student reflection.…

  8. Babies: Responding Appropriately to Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn; Linke, Pam

    1999-01-01

    This issue of the Australian Early Childhood Association Research in Practice Series discusses how educators can observe and respond appropriately to the infants in their care. The booklet examines the two major opportunities for early childhood educators that have been shown to influence outcomes for infants: (1) the opportunity to help infants…

  9. A New Rhythm for Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Jackie Acree; Sattes, Beth Dankert

    2015-01-01

    The authors have seen an inspiring phenomenon in certain classrooms--students thinking through their answers to teacher questions, responding thoughtfully to other students' answers, even self-correcting or providing more information after they've answered a teacher aloud. The strategy behind these student actions is a skillful use of "wait…

  10. Responding to Hate at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Tolerance, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes a publication from Teaching Tolerance that is designed to help schools prepare for and respond effectively to bias incidents so that they can become catalysts for positive change. Presents two of the guidelines: (1) create an unwelcome environment for hate speech and symbols; and (2) put the lid on graffiti and other vandalism. (SLD)

  11. Learning as Calling and Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jons, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    According to Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue, our being-in-the-world is to be conceived of as an existential dialogue. Elsewhere, I have conceptualized the teacher-student-relation accordingly (see Jons 2008), as a matter of calling and responding. The conceptualization rests on a secularised notion of vocation, paving way for…

  12. Sixty years of lithium responders.

    PubMed

    Grof, Paul

    2010-01-01

    It has been 60 years since Cade first described patients who responded to antimanic lithium treatment. Two decades later, responders to lithium stabilization emerged in larger numbers. The responses of many severely ill bipolar patients to lithium were striking and called for an explanation. Remarkable reactions to a simple ion generated hope for an uncomplicated laboratory test of response and an extensive search for suitable biological markers ensued. But despite promising reports, particularly from molecular genetics, we are still waiting for a biological elucidation of the stabilizing effects of lithium. The most useful predictor of lithium stabilization has to date been the patient's clinical profile, based on a comprehensive clinical assessment: complete remissions and other characteristics of episodic clinical course, bipolar family history, low psychiatric comorbidity and a characteristic presenting psychopathology. In brief, the responders approximate the classical Kraepelinian description of a manic-depressive patient. But the most intriguing findings have recently emerged from prospective observations of the next generation: the children of lithium responders, their counterparts coming from parents who did not respond to lithium and controls. Overall, they indicate that parents and offspring suffer from a comparable brain dysfunction that manifests clinically in distinct stages. If the child's predicament starts early in childhood, it presents with varied, nonaffective or subclinical manifestations that are usually nonresponsive to standard treatments prescribed according to the symptoms. The next stage then unfolds in adolescence, first with depressive and later with activated episodes. The observations have a potential to markedly enrich the prevailing understanding and management of mood disorders. PMID:20453530

  13. A Community-based Education Project: Intertidal Surveys With Student and Adult Volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Parker, G.; Bingham, B. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Fidalgo Learning about the Intertidal Project (FLIP) brought together scientists, educators, students and adult volunteers (20-30 total individuals) to conduct studies of the intertidal zone of a section of Fidalgo Island, Wa. in 2003 and 2004. The project goals were to: 1) obtain basic data on diversity and abundance of intertidal species in different habitats, 2) promote public awareness and appreciation of the intertidal zone, and 3) develop a model program for volunteer participation in scientific surveys. The 2-week program began with 2 days of workshops on local intertidal organisms to teach the FLIP participants how to classify and identify the different organisms and substrates they were likely to encounter in the surveys. We provided general lectures on intertidal habitats and on the importance of the intertidal zone to coastal resources. The FLIP participants worked together on identifying organisms, practicing the use of quadrats and data collection before the surveys began. Following 4 days of field surveys, the participants signed up for workshops that included compilation and analysis of the data, photography, nature writing and algae pressing. The final activity was a public tour of the intertidal day held at a local park. 50-60 people of all ages participated. The goal was to educate the public in plant and animal identification and habitat variability as well as "beach etiquette." Successful model program elements included self-selected volunteers and attention to the composition of each survey team, with one scientist/leader per team and one adult and two students or two adults and one student per team (4-5 teams, each completing one transect per site). Program flexibility was also crucial; FLIP volunteers were not required to attend every single day and post-survey workshops were optional. Volunteers participated to different extents and for different lengths of time depending on their abilities and interests. Project ownership was important

  14. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, A.; Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Salmi, I.; Tillapaugh, J.; Broad, C.; Raabe, B.; Ericson, W.

    2012-12-01

    Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Andrew Buie, Isabella Salmi, Joey Tillapaugh, Cory Broad, Brooke Raabe, Whitney Ericson The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 100 m2 areas, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima and Fucus spp.. We will continue to closely monitor algal population densities in within our site in light of the November 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill that leaked heavy bunker fuel into intertidal habitats around the SF Bay. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic

  15. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Darakananda, K.; Ball, O.; Butti, C.; Yang, G.; Vetter, M.; Grimaldi, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Olivia Ball, Karin Darakananda, Matt Vetter, Grant Yang, Charlotte Butti, Zoe Grimaldi The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B) and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will analyze the population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high intertidal zone which experiences the greatest amount of human

  16. DESICCATION INDEX: A MEASURE OF DAMAGE CAUSED BY ADVERSE AERIAL EXPOSURE ON INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) IN AN OREGON (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) blade necrosis resulting from intertidal aerial exposure is describe. A desiccation index was developed to quantitatively assess this damage. This index was then used to evaluate the extent of desiccation damage across intertidal bathymetric slopes (st...

  17. Introduced rats indirectly change marine rocky intertidal communities from algae- to invertebrate-dominated

    PubMed Central

    Kurle, Carolyn M.; Croll, Donald A.; Tershy, Bernie R.

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that trophic interactions structure ecological communities, but their effects are usually only demonstrated on a small scale. As a result, landscape-level documentations of trophic cascades that alter entire communities are scarce. Islands invaded by animals provide natural experiment opportunities both to measure general trophic effects across large spatial scales and to determine the trophic roles of invasive species within native ecosystems. Studies addressing the trophic interactions of invasive species most often focus on their direct effects. To investigate both the presence of a landscape-level trophic cascade and the direct and indirect effects of an invasive species, we examined the impacts of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) introduced to the Aleutian Islands on marine bird densities and marine rocky intertidal community structures through surveys conducted on invaded and rat-free islands throughout the entire 1,900-km archipelago. Densities of birds that forage in the intertidal were higher on islands without rats. Marine intertidal invertebrates were more abundant on islands with rats, whereas fleshy algal cover was reduced. Our results demonstrate that invasive rats directly reduce bird densities through predation and significantly affect invertebrate and marine algal abundance in the rocky intertidal indirectly via a cross-community trophic cascade, unexpectedly changing the intertidal community structure from an algae- to an invertebrate-dominated system. PMID:18308929

  18. Immediate ecological impacts of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami on intertidal flat communities.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Jotaro; Suzuki, Takao; Nishita, Tatsuki; Makino, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, a large tsunami developed and struck the Pacific coast of eastern Japan. To assess the immediate impacts of the tsunami on coastal communities, changes in taxon composition and richness of macrobenthic animals before and after the tsunami were examined at nine intertidal flats in Sendai Bay and the Sanriku Ria coast. The results showed that 30-80% of taxa indigenously inhabiting intertidal flats disappeared after the tsunami. Among animal types, endobenthic and sessile epibenthic animals were more vulnerable to the tsunami than mobile epibenthic animals like shore crabs and snails. For all the intertidal flats examined, animals that were originally dwellers in lower tidal zones and not recorded before the tsunami were also found right after the tsunami, indicating that the tsunami not only took away many benthic taxa from the intertidal flats but also brought in some taxa from elsewhere. However, overall changes in taxon community composition were greater for intertidal flats that experienced larger inundation heights. These results showed that the ecological impacts of the tsunami were proportional to the physical impacts as gauged by wave height and that mobile epibenthic animals were less vulnerable to the tsunami.

  19. Immediate Ecological Impacts of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami on Intertidal Flat Communities

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, Jotaro; Suzuki, Takao; Nishita, Tatsuki; Makino, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, a large tsunami developed and struck the Pacific coast of eastern Japan. To assess the immediate impacts of the tsunami on coastal communities, changes in taxon composition and richness of macrobenthic animals before and after the tsunami were examined at nine intertidal flats in Sendai Bay and the Sanriku Ria coast. The results showed that 30–80% of taxa indigenously inhabiting intertidal flats disappeared after the tsunami. Among animal types, endobenthic and sessile epibenthic animals were more vulnerable to the tsunami than mobile epibenthic animals like shore crabs and snails. For all the intertidal flats examined, animals that were originally dwellers in lower tidal zones and not recorded before the tsunami were also found right after the tsunami, indicating that the tsunami not only took away many benthic taxa from the intertidal flats but also brought in some taxa from elsewhere. However, overall changes in taxon community composition were greater for intertidal flats that experienced larger inundation heights. These results showed that the ecological impacts of the tsunami were proportional to the physical impacts as gauged by wave height and that mobile epibenthic animals were less vulnerable to the tsunami. PMID:23650529

  20. Immediate ecological impacts of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami on intertidal flat communities.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Jotaro; Suzuki, Takao; Nishita, Tatsuki; Makino, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, a large tsunami developed and struck the Pacific coast of eastern Japan. To assess the immediate impacts of the tsunami on coastal communities, changes in taxon composition and richness of macrobenthic animals before and after the tsunami were examined at nine intertidal flats in Sendai Bay and the Sanriku Ria coast. The results showed that 30-80% of taxa indigenously inhabiting intertidal flats disappeared after the tsunami. Among animal types, endobenthic and sessile epibenthic animals were more vulnerable to the tsunami than mobile epibenthic animals like shore crabs and snails. For all the intertidal flats examined, animals that were originally dwellers in lower tidal zones and not recorded before the tsunami were also found right after the tsunami, indicating that the tsunami not only took away many benthic taxa from the intertidal flats but also brought in some taxa from elsewhere. However, overall changes in taxon community composition were greater for intertidal flats that experienced larger inundation heights. These results showed that the ecological impacts of the tsunami were proportional to the physical impacts as gauged by wave height and that mobile epibenthic animals were less vulnerable to the tsunami. PMID:23650529

  1. Impact of boat-generated waves on intertidal estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanpain, O.; Deloffre, J.; Lafite, R.; Gomit, G.; Calluaud, D.; David, L.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrodynamics in the macrotidal Seine estuary (France) are controlled by the semi-diurnal tidal regime modulated seasonally by the fluvial discharge. Wind effect on sediment transport (through wind waves and swell) is observed at the mouth of the estuary. Over the last century, authorities have put emphasis on facilitating economic exchanges by means of embankment building and increased dredging activity. These developments led to allow and secure sea vessel traffic in the Seine estuary (from its mouth to the port of Rouen, 125 km upstream) but they also resulted in a change of estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport features. A riversides restoration policy has been recently started by port authorities. In this context, the objective of the field-based study presented is to connect vessel characteristics (i.e. speed, draft...), boat-generated waves and their sedimentary impacts. Such information will be used by stakeholders to manage riverside. The natural intertidal site of interest is located in the fluvial freshwater part of the Seine estuary characterized by a 4.5 m maximum tidal range. The foreshore slope is gently decreasing and surface sediments are composed of fine to coarse sand with occasional mud drapes. In order to decipher boat-generated events, the sampling strategy is based on continuous ADV measurements coupled with a turbidimeter and an altimeter to study sediment dynamics. These instruments are settled in the lower part of the foreshore (i) to obtain a significant dataset (i.e. oceanic instruments are not measuring in air) on a zone statically affected by boat waves and (ii) because most of boat traffic occurs during early flood or late ebb period. Spatial variations are assessed along a cross-section through grain-size analysis of surface sediments and topography measurements using pole technique. Results enhance hydrodynamic and sedimentary impacts of boat-generated waves compared respectively to tidal and wind effects. Long

  2. High-Resolution Characterization of Intertidal Geomorphology by TLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, A.; Vettore, A.; Marani, M.

    2007-12-01

    Observational fluvial geomorphology has greatly benefited in the last decades from the wide availability of digital terrain data obtained by orthophotos and by means of accurate airborne laser scanner data (LiDAR). On the contrary, the spatially-distributed study of the geomorphology of intertidal areas, such as tidal flats and marshes, remains problematic owing to the small relief characterizing such environments, often of the order of a few tens of centimetres, i.e. comparable to the accuracy of state-of-the-art LiDAR data. Here we present the results of Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) acquisitions performed within a tidal marsh in the Venice lagoon. The survey was performed using a Leica HDS 3000 TLS, characterized by a large Field of View (360 deg H x 270 deg V), a low beam divergence (< 6 mm at 50 m) and a nominal accuracy of 6 mm at 50 m. The acquisition was performed at low tide to avoid interferences due to water on the marsh surface and, to minimize shadowing effects due to the tilting of the laser beam (especially in the channel network), the scanner was mounted on a custom-built tripod 3 m above the marsh surface. The area of the marsh, about 100m x 150m, was fully surveyed by just 2 scans. A total amount of about 3 million points was acquired, with an average measurement density of 200 points/m2. In order to reconstruct the geometry of the marsh, the two scans were co-registered using 8 reflective targets as matching points. Such targets were placed within the area of interest and surveyed with high accuracy (2 mm), while their position in the Italian national grid was determined with a double-frequency GPS receiver, in order to georeference the point clouds within an absolute framework. Post-processing of the very high resolution data obtained shows that the laser returns coming from the low vegetation present (about 0.5-1.0 m high) can be satisfactorily separated from those coming from the marsh surface, allowing the construction of a DSM and a DTM

  3. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Alexandra M F; Malkin, Sairah Y; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J R

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  4. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  5. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer.

  6. Macrobenthic diversity in protected, disturbed, and newly formed intertidal wetlands of a subtropical estuary in China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Weiwei; Ma, Chang-an; Huang, Youhui; Yang, Yang; Yu, Ji; Zhang, Mingqing; Zhao, Yunlong

    2014-12-15

    In this study, intertidal macrobenthic diversity in protected, disturbed, and newly formed wetlands of Yangtze estuary was assessed using PRIMER 5.2 based on species diversity and species relatedness. We observed high diversity in nature reserves and low diversity in adjacent disturbed and newly formed wetlands. These diversity data were then integrated with historical data to detect the variation in macrobenthic diversity over the past two decades. The integrated data indicated that the intertidal macrobenthic diversity sharply decreased in heavy reclamation tidal flats whereas markedly increased in non-disturbed nature reserve and newly formed wetland. Benthic health was observed with the departure degree of average taxonomic distinctness (Δ(+)) and variation in taxonomic distinctness (Λ(+)) from the simulated 95% confidence funnel. All the habitats were subjected to different levels of human interference, except Jiuduansha and Beigangbeisha. The degradation of intertidal wetland in Yangtze estuary was mainly attributed to land reclamation, overgrazing, and overfishing. PMID:25319191

  7. Differential recolonization of Atlantic intertidal habitats after disturbance reveals potential bottom-up community regulation

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Willy; Scrosati, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 2014, abundant sea ice that drifted out of the Gulf of St. Lawrence caused extensive disturbance in rocky intertidal habitats on the northern Atlantic coast of mainland Nova Scotia, Canada. To monitor recovery of intertidal communities, we surveyed two wave-exposed locations in the early summer of 2014. Barnacle recruitment and the abundance of predatory dogwhelks were low at one location (Tor Bay Provincial Park) but more than 20 times higher at the other location (Whitehead). Satellite data indicated that the abundance of coastal phytoplankton (the main food source for barnacle larvae) was consistently higher at Whitehead just before the barnacle recruitment season, when barnacle larvae were in the water column. These observations suggest bottom-up forcing of intertidal communities. The underlying mechanisms and their intensity along the NW Atlantic coast could be investigated through studies done at local and regional scales. PMID:26213609

  8. On the morphodynamic stability of intertidal environments and the role of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakeh, Nabil; Coco, Giovanni; Marani, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We describe the coupled biotic and abiotic dynamics in intertidal environments using a point model that includes suspended sediment deposition, wave- and current-driven erosion, biofilm sediment stabilization, and sediment production and stabilization by vegetation. We explore the effects of two widely different types of vegetation: salt-marsh vegetation and mangroves. These two types of vegetation, which colonize distinct geographical areas, are characterized by different biomass productivities and stabilization mechanisms. We show that changing vegetation and biofilm properties result in differing stable states, both in their type and number. The presence of the biofilm exerts a dominant control on the tidal flat (lower intertidal) equilibrium elevation and stability. Vegetation controls the elevation of the marsh platform (i.e., the upper intertidal equilibrium). The two types of vegetation considered lead to similar effects on the stability of the system despite their distinct biophysical interactions.

  9. Differential recolonization of Atlantic intertidal habitats after disturbance reveals potential bottom-up community regulation.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Willy; Scrosati, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 2014, abundant sea ice that drifted out of the Gulf of St. Lawrence caused extensive disturbance in rocky intertidal habitats on the northern Atlantic coast of mainland Nova Scotia, Canada. To monitor recovery of intertidal communities, we surveyed two wave-exposed locations in the early summer of 2014. Barnacle recruitment and the abundance of predatory dogwhelks were low at one location (Tor Bay Provincial Park) but more than 20 times higher at the other location (Whitehead). Satellite data indicated that the abundance of coastal phytoplankton (the main food source for barnacle larvae) was consistently higher at Whitehead just before the barnacle recruitment season, when barnacle larvae were in the water column. These observations suggest bottom-up forcing of intertidal communities. The underlying mechanisms and their intensity along the NW Atlantic coast could be investigated through studies done at local and regional scales.

  10. Macrobenthic diversity in protected, disturbed, and newly formed intertidal wetlands of a subtropical estuary in China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Weiwei; Ma, Chang-an; Huang, Youhui; Yang, Yang; Yu, Ji; Zhang, Mingqing; Zhao, Yunlong

    2014-12-15

    In this study, intertidal macrobenthic diversity in protected, disturbed, and newly formed wetlands of Yangtze estuary was assessed using PRIMER 5.2 based on species diversity and species relatedness. We observed high diversity in nature reserves and low diversity in adjacent disturbed and newly formed wetlands. These diversity data were then integrated with historical data to detect the variation in macrobenthic diversity over the past two decades. The integrated data indicated that the intertidal macrobenthic diversity sharply decreased in heavy reclamation tidal flats whereas markedly increased in non-disturbed nature reserve and newly formed wetland. Benthic health was observed with the departure degree of average taxonomic distinctness (Δ(+)) and variation in taxonomic distinctness (Λ(+)) from the simulated 95% confidence funnel. All the habitats were subjected to different levels of human interference, except Jiuduansha and Beigangbeisha. The degradation of intertidal wetland in Yangtze estuary was mainly attributed to land reclamation, overgrazing, and overfishing.

  11. The impact of rising sea temperature on innate immune parameters in the tropical subtidal sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus and the intertidal sea urchin Echinometra lucunter.

    PubMed

    Branco, Paola Cristina; Borges, João Carlos Shimada; Santos, Marinilce Fagundes; Jensch Junior, Bernard Ernesto; da Silva, José Roberto Machado Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Ocean temperatures are rising throughout the world, making it necessary to evaluate the impact of these temperature changes on sea urchins, which are well-known bioindicators. This study evaluated the effect of an increase in temperature on the immune response of the subtidal Lytechinus variegatus and the intertidal Echinometra lucunter sea urchins. Both species were exposed to 20 (control), 25 and 30 °C temperatures for 24 h, 2, 7 and 14 days. Counting of coelomocytes and assays on the phagocytic response, adhesion and spreading of coelomocytes were performed. Red and colorless sphere cells were considered biomarkers for heat stress. Moreover, a significant decrease in the phagocytic indices and a decrease in both cell adhesion and cell spreading were observed at 25 and 30 °C for L. variegatus. For E. lucunter, the only alteration observed was for the cell proportions. This report shows how different species of sea urchins respond immunologically to rising temperatures.

  12. Factors limiting the intertidal distribution of the mangrove species Xylocarpus granatum.

    PubMed

    Allen, James A; Krauss, Ken W; Hauff, Robert D

    2003-03-01

    The tree species Xylocarpus granatum is commonly described as occurring in the upper intertidal zone of mangrove forests, but mature trees are occasionally found at lower elevations. In the Utwe River basin, on the Pacific island of Kosrae, we investigated the relative importance of several biotic and abiotic factors that may control the intertidal distribution of X. granatum. Factors we evaluated included differential seed predation across the lower, mid, and upper intertidal zones and seedling responses to salinity, tidal flooding, and shade. Seed predation was 22.4% over the first 34 days and varied little among zones or in gaps versus under the forest canopy. By day 161, there were still no differences in seed mortality, but a significant difference was found in seedling establishment, with much greater establishment in the upper intertidal plots. X. granatum seedlings in a greenhouse experiment exhibited greater growth in freshwater than seedlings in 23 ppt salinity, which is typical of salinity levels found in the mid intertidal zone in our field study sites in Micronesia, where mature X. granatum trees are generally absent. Seedlings grown in 23 ppt salinity, however, exhibited few visible signs of stress associated with patterns in growth. Seedlings grown in a simulated tidal flooding treatment (with 23 ppt salinity) also showed few signs of stress. Growth declined dramatically under 80% shade cloths, but there were few interactions of shading with either 23 ppt salinity or simulated tidal flooding. Differential seed predation is not likely to be the primary factor responsible for the intertidal distribution of X. granatum on Kosrae. However, seedling tolerance of flooding or salinity may be more important, especially relative to a potential contribution to secondary stress mortality. Other factors may ultimately prove to be more critical, such as physiological effects of salinity on seed germination, effects of tides on seed dispersal and rooting, or

  13. Factors limiting the intertidal distribution of the mangrove species Xylocarpus granatum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.A.; Krauss, K.W.; Hauff, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The tree species Xylocarpus granatum is commonly described as occurring in the upper intertidal zone of mangrove forests, but mature trees are occasionally found at lower elevations. In the Utwe River basin, on the Pacific island of Kosrae, we investigated the relative importance of several biotic and abiotic factors that may control the intertidal distribution of X. granatum. Factors we evaluated included differential seed predation across the lower, mid, and upper intertidal zones and seedling responses to salinity, tidal flooding, and shade. Seed predation was 22.4% over the first 34 days and varied little among zones or in gaps versus under the forest canopy. By day 161, there were still no differences in seed mortality, but a significant difference was found in seedling establishment, with much greater establishment in the upper intertidal plots. X. granatum seedlings in a greenhouse experiment exhibited greater growth in freshwater than seedlings in 23 ppt salinity, which is typical of salinity levels found in the mid intertidal zone in our field study sites in Micronesia, where mature X. granatum trees are generally absent. Seedlings grown in 23 ppt salinity, however, exhibited few visible signs of stress associated with patterns in growth. Seedlings grown in a simulated tidal flooding treatment (with 23 ppt salinity) also showed few signs of stress. Growth declined dramatically under 80% shade cloths, but there were few interactions of shading with either 23 ppt salinity or simulated tidal flooding. Differential seed predation is not likely to be the primary factor responsible for the intertidal distribution of X. granatum on Kosrae. However, seedling tolerance of flooding or salinity may be more important, especially relative to a potential contribution to secondary stress mortality. Other factors may ultimately prove to be more critical, such as physiological effects of salinity on seed germination, effects of tides on seed dispersal and rooting, or

  14. Conserving intertidal habitats: What is the potential of ecological engineering to mitigate impacts of coastal structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Matthew J.; Ng, Terence P. T.; Dudgeon, David; Bonebrake, Timothy C.; Leung, Kenneth M. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, coastlines are under pressure as coastal human population growth and urbanization continues, while climatic change leads to stormier seas and rising tides. These trends create a strong and sustained demand for land reclamation and infrastructure protection in coastal areas, requiring engineered coastal defence structures such as sea walls. Here, we review the nature of ecological impacts of coastal structures on intertidal ecosystems, seek to understand the extent to which ecological engineering can mitigate these impacts, and evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation as a tool to contribute to conservation of intertidal habitats. By so doing, we identify critical knowledge gaps to inform future research. Coastal structures alter important physical, chemical and biological processes of intertidal habitats, and strongly impact community structure, inter-habitat linkages and ecosystem services while also driving habitat loss. Such impacts occur diffusely across localised sites but scale to significant regional and global levels. Recent advances in ecological engineering have focused on developing habitat complexity on coastal structures to increase biodiversity. 'Soft' engineering options maximise habitat complexity through inclusion of natural materials, species and processes, while simultaneously delivering engineering objectives such as coastal protection. Soft options additionally sustain multiple services, providing greater economic benefits for society, and resilience to climatic change. Currently however, a lack of inclusion and economic undervaluation of intertidal ecosystem services may undermine best practice in coastline management. Importantly, reviewed evidence shows mitigation and even restoration do not support intertidal communities or processes equivalent to pre-disturbance conditions. Crucially, an absence of comprehensive empirical baseline biodiversity data, or data comprising additional ecological parameters such as ecosystem functions

  15. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesel, A.; Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Grimaldi, Z.; Buie, A.; Dattels, C.; Steiger, C.; Wallace, K.; Salmi, I.; Tillapaugh, J.

    2011-12-01

    Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Alexa Boesel, Andrew Buie, Celia Dattels, Zoe Grimaldi, Isabella Salmi, Cameryn Steiger, Joey Tillapaugh, Kathleen Wallace The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis and Anthopluera elegantissima. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the

  16. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Seiner, Derrick R.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2012-10-24

    In a white powder scenario, there are a large number of field-deployable assays that can be used to determine if the suspicious substance contains biological material and warrants further investigation. This report summarizes commercially available technologies that are considered hand portable and can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor do the authors endorse any of the technologies described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use.

  17. Characterising the short-term sensitivity of Californian intertidal community calcification to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 and invasion of part of this CO2 into the oceans results in a decrease in seawater pH and a lowering of the calcium carbonate saturation state. The historic and projected decrease of the calcium carbonate saturation state of seawater has the potential to compromise the ability of many marine calcifying organisms to form their calcium carbonate shells or skeletons and is likely to have significant ocean ecosystem impacts over the 21st Century. In laboratory manipulations temperate calcifying organisms have been shown to exhibit reduced calcification as a result of CO2 addition. However, very few experiments have observed how calcification in temperate systems responds to natural variations in seawater carbonate chemistry. We assess the community level sensitivity of Californian tidal pool calcification rates to variability in the calcium carbonate saturation state. Our tidal pool study sites at Bodega Bay in Northern California experience extreme variation in low tide carbonate saturation state due to photosynthetic activity and the time at which the pools are isolated from the open ocean. During our study period, we observed aragonite saturation levels ranging from 0.5 to 9. Photosynthetic activity is largely dependent on temperature and photosynthetic active radiation which vary on a diurnal timescale whereas the time at which pools are isolated from open seawater, and thus the amount by which tide pool carbonate chemistry differs from that of open ocean waters, is largely a consequence of tidal period which varies on a lunar cycle. Because there are substantial uncorrelated components of light, temperature, and seawater carbonate chemistry in our data, one can separate the influence of carbonate saturation state on calcification from the influence of temperature and PAR. This provides an opportunity to characterise the short-timescale sensitivity of tidal pool calcification rates to changes in carbonate saturation state. We show

  18. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  19. Distinction and grain-size characteristics of intertidal heterolithic deposits in the middle Qiantang Estuary (East China Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Daidu; Shang, Shuai; Cai, Guofu; Tu, Junbiao

    2015-06-01

    The routine sampling procedure for grain-size analysis of intertidal heterolithic deposits runs a high risk of inadvertent mixing of two or more different sedimentation units, which would consequently complicate data interpretation. Traditionally, sedimentologists pay less attention to muddy layers due to a lack of internal structures, although the grain-size populations of such layers should encode more information on fine-mud flocculation processes than sandy layers. In this paper, individual muddy and sandy layers of nine short cores from the Da-Jian-Shan tidal flats of the middle Qiantang Estuary in the East China Sea, which experiences tidal bores, were sampled separately for grain-size analysis. A core taken at Huang-Jia-Yan from the lower estuary, not affected by tidal bores, served for comparison. A curve-fitting method was employed to decompose each grain-size distribution into two Gaussian populations. Cumulative plots indicate that intertidal sediments are mostly dispersed as intermittent and uniform suspension loads, traction loads being absent or very subordinate. This is conceivably linked to flows agitated by tidal bores, and to the highly dynamic nature of fine sand and coarse silt particles. Selective transport and deposition have produced three distinct sedimentation units, namely, tidal-bore deposits, tidal sandy deposits, and tidal muddy deposits. These can also be discriminated on bivariate plots of any two textural parameters. Shoreward attenuation of tidal flows is reflected in the gradual fining and thinning of sandy layers from lower-flat massive sands, through middle-flat hybrid deposits (alternations of massive sands and tidal rhythmites), to upper-flat tidal rhythmites. This gradient is also well represented in slightly decreasing (increasing) sorting and decreasing (increasing) proportions of the coarser (finer) hydraulic populations in the muddy layers. Although no corresponding trends are discernible in the hydraulic populations of

  20. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  1. Temporal and spatial dynamics of a lower-intertidal lancelet population in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hidetoshi; Mimura, Keisuke; Kawai, Koichiro; Lmabayashi, Hiromichi

    2009-08-01

    The population dynamics of Branchiostoma japonicum, formerly known as B. belcheri, were Investigated from September 2003 to August 2005 in the intertidal zone at Takehara (Hiroshima Prefecture), Seto Inland Sea, Japan. The intertidal population appeared from spring to autumn and disappeared during winter. A laboratory experiment showed that exposure to temperatures below 1 degree C for 2 hours resulted in severe mortality. This low temperature corresponds to the minimum temperature in sediments in the study area. This result suggested either that the intertidal population collapses in winter because of low temperature, or that the lancelets escape from the intertidal to the subtidal zone. Throughout the research period, no lancelets smaller than 10 mm in body length were found, indicating that no larvae settled in the intertidal zone. The intertidal population is probably maintained by the influx of individuals from the neighboring subtidal population. The mean annual density of the lancelets was greatest (10.6 individuals/m(2)) at station 1 nearest the low water mark, and lowest (0.3 Individuals/m(2)) at station 3 furthest from the low water mark. In summer, the water content of the sediments was remarkably lower at station 3 (20.2%) than at station 1 (25.8%). Another laboratory experiment showed that higher mortality occurred from exposure to sediments with a water content less than 25% for 2 hours, comparable to the water content at station 3, suggesting that the spatial distribution of the lancelets upward in the intertidal is restricted by sediment dryness.

  2. NUTRIENT FLUXES IN THE MICROALGAL-DOMINATED INTERTIDAL REGIONS OF THE LOWER YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of benthic microalgae on sediment nutrient fluxes were investigated at three sites across the intertidal zone of lower Yaquina Bay. Study sites were selected where microalgae were present but where seagrass and mud shrimp were absent. Sediment columns were collected...

  3. DOCUMENTING THE INTERTIDAL COMPONENT OF EELGRASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES USING COLOR INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to develop and test a rapid, cost-effective method of mapping the intertidal (and surface-visible subtidal) distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) meadows and patches in the turbid coastal estuaries of the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Initial co...

  4. Utilization Patterns of Intertidal Habitats by Birds in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bird utilization patterns were assessed in five types of intertidal soft sediment and low marsh habitat in the Yaquina estuary, Oregon. Censuses were designed to determine the spatial and seasonal utilization patterns of birds in Zostera marina (eelgrass), Upogebia (mud shrimp)/...

  5. Intertidal habitat utilization patterns of birds in a Northeast Pacific estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    A habitat-based framework is a practical method for developing models (or, ecological production functions, EPFs) to describe the spatial distribution of ecosystem services. To generate EPFs for Yaquina estuary, Oregon, USA, we compared bird use patterns among intertidal habitats...

  6. Intertidal assemblage variation across a subtropical estuarine gradient: How good conceptual and empirical models are?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Gisele C.; Camargo, Maurício G.; Lana, Paulo

    2016-03-01

    Variation of intertidal macrobenthic structure at multiple spatial scales is still poorly known in tropical and subtropical estuaries. We have assessed the structural responses of intertidal benthic assemblages, expressed by variation in number of species, abundance and assemblage composition, to key environmental drivers in a subtropical estuary from southern Brazil. We have applied a hierarchical sampling design to assess benthic variation at each of several spatial scales, from meters to kilometers, along a marked estuarine gradient. The hypothesis that many benthic variables vary at the largest spatial scale, corresponding to the salinity gradient, was refuted for number of species but not for total abundance and species composition. However, physiological stress to salinity variation, an important environmental driver in estuaries, could not explain by itself macrobenthic distribution along local intertidal flats. Nutrient, organic matter, photosynthetic pigments contents, pH, grain size, silt-clay content and the redox discontinuity layer also varied at the largest spatial scale acting as confounding factors. Thus, overall distribution patterns of intertidal benthic assemblages resulted from a complex interaction among environmental drivers, including salinity.

  7. Evidence of salt accumulation in beach intertidal zone due to evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Jackson, Nancy L.

    2016-08-01

    In coastal environments, evaporation is an important driver of subsurface salinity gradients in marsh systems. However, it has not been addressed in the intertidal zone of sandy beaches. Here, we used field data on an estuarine beach foreshore with numerical simulations to show that evaporation causes upper intertidal zone pore-water salinity to be double that of seawater. We found the increase in pore-water salinity mainly depends on air temperature and relative humidity, and tide and wave actions dilute a fraction of the high salinity plume, resulting in a complex process. This is in contrast to previous studies that consider seawater as the most saline source to a coastal aquifer system, thereby concluding that seawater infiltration always increases pore-water salinity by seawater-groundwater mixing dynamics. Our results demonstrate the combined effects of evaporation and tide and waves on subsurface salinity distribution on a beach face. We anticipate our quantitative investigation will shed light on the studies of salt-affected biological activities in the intertidal zone. It also impacts our understanding of the impact of global warming; in particular, the increase in temperature does not only shift the saltwater landward, but creates a different salinity distribution that would have implications on intertidal biological zonation.

  8. Evidence of salt accumulation in beach intertidal zone due to evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Jackson, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    In coastal environments, evaporation is an important driver of subsurface salinity gradients in marsh systems. However, it has not been addressed in the intertidal zone of sandy beaches. Here, we used field data on an estuarine beach foreshore with numerical simulations to show that evaporation causes upper intertidal zone pore-water salinity to be double that of seawater. We found the increase in pore-water salinity mainly depends on air temperature and relative humidity, and tide and wave actions dilute a fraction of the high salinity plume, resulting in a complex process. This is in contrast to previous studies that consider seawater as the most saline source to a coastal aquifer system, thereby concluding that seawater infiltration always increases pore-water salinity by seawater-groundwater mixing dynamics. Our results demonstrate the combined effects of evaporation and tide and waves on subsurface salinity distribution on a beach face. We anticipate our quantitative investigation will shed light on the studies of salt-affected biological activities in the intertidal zone. It also impacts our understanding of the impact of global warming; in particular, the increase in temperature does not only shift the saltwater landward, but creates a different salinity distribution that would have implications on intertidal biological zonation. PMID:27511713

  9. [Macrobenthic community structure of intertidal zone of Rushan Bay in spring].

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying-lu; Zhao, Ning; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Ji, Xiang-xing; Yang, Chuan-ping; Yu, Zi-shan

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative study on macrobenthos was carried out in 8 transects along intertidal zone of Rushan Bay in May, 2011. In total, 116 macrobenthic species were identified, among which 58 were polychaetes, 15 were mollusks, 27 were crustaceans, 3 were echinoderms and 13 were other groups. The average abundance and biomass of macrobenthos were 872.6 ind · m(-2) and 9.37 g · M(-2), respectively. By IRI index, Mediomastus sp., Helice sheni, Nemertinea and Neanthes sp. were ranked as the top 4 dominant species in the study area. Average Margalef's species richness diversity (d), Shannon diversity (H) and Pielou's evenness index (J) of macrobenthos were 2.119, 2.384 and 0.608, respectively, indicating slight pollution in the study area. Based on 30% similarity level, 8 transects could be grouped into 3 different communities. Compared with other intertidal zones in similar latitude, macrobenthos of Rushan Bay intertidal zone were characterized by higher species number, smaller body size and higher abundance. Besides the macrobenthic community structure and diversities, more exhaustive studies were needed to reveal the possible influence of shellfish culture on intertidal macrobenthic community.

  10. Estuarine intertidal habitat use by birds in a Pacific Northwest coastal estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of a year long study of the distribution of birds across five intertidal estuarine habitats reveal that tide level largely controls use of the habitats by birds. A total census of all birds observed from shoreline observation locations was made at five tide levels over s...

  11. Intertidal coarse woody debris: A spatial subsidy as shelter or feeding habitat for gastropods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storry, Kristin A.; Weldrick, Christine K.; Mews, Malte; Zimmer, Martin; Jelinski, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) in the intertidal region of rocky shores serves as a potential source of nutrients as well as habitat or refugia from predation, ecologically linking the adjacent marine and terrestrial habitats. In a series of field and laboratory experiments, the affinity of slow-moving motile intertidal gastropods to CWD either as food source or as shelter that increases habitat complexity was tested. In intertidal pools, CWD did not increase colonization by Littorina spp., while it did so in supratidal pools. Habitat complexity, brought about by algal cover and barnacles, was apparently sufficient in intertidal pools without woody debris, while the increase in habitat complexity by CWD increased the attractiveness of supratidal pools with little natural complexity to Littorina spp. Overall, however, comparison of pools containing woody debris and those containing artificial shelter provided evidence for CWD, and/or its biofilm, serving as food source rather than refugium per se. Similarly, Tegula funebralis chose CWD as food source rather than as shelter as indicated by comparison of autoclaved and unmanipulated woody debris. Further, both unfed and fed snails from a site where CWD was present significantly preferred CWD over macroalgae. Among snails from a site without woody debris, fed individuals showed no preference, while unfed snails significantly preferred macroalgae. From this, experience appears to be a factor that mediates the role of CWD. Overall, however, CWD appears to provide supplementary food to snails in the inter- and supratidal zone.

  12. Patterns of intertidal habitat use by birds in an Oregon Coastal Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore approaches for habitat based ecosystem services, birds in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon were censused in five intertidal habitats at five tide levels. The overall most important habitats (MIHs) in terms of total number of birds were mudflat (colonized by mudshrimp Upogebia ...

  13. Intertidal estuarine habitat utilization by birds in a Pacific Northwest coastal estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of a year long study of the distribution of birds across five intertidal estuarine habitats reveal that tide level largely controls use of the habitats by birds. A total census of all birds observed from shoreline locations was made at five tide levels over six, 2-month ...

  14. Evidence of salt accumulation in beach intertidal zone due to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Jackson, Nancy L

    2016-01-01

    In coastal environments, evaporation is an important driver of subsurface salinity gradients in marsh systems. However, it has not been addressed in the intertidal zone of sandy beaches. Here, we used field data on an estuarine beach foreshore with numerical simulations to show that evaporation causes upper intertidal zone pore-water salinity to be double that of seawater. We found the increase in pore-water salinity mainly depends on air temperature and relative humidity, and tide and wave actions dilute a fraction of the high salinity plume, resulting in a complex process. This is in contrast to previous studies that consider seawater as the most saline source to a coastal aquifer system, thereby concluding that seawater infiltration always increases pore-water salinity by seawater-groundwater mixing dynamics. Our results demonstrate the combined effects of evaporation and tide and waves on subsurface salinity distribution on a beach face. We anticipate our quantitative investigation will shed light on the studies of salt-affected biological activities in the intertidal zone. It also impacts our understanding of the impact of global warming; in particular, the increase in temperature does not only shift the saltwater landward, but creates a different salinity distribution that would have implications on intertidal biological zonation. PMID:27511713

  15. Morphology and sedimentation on open-coast intertidal flats of the Changjiang Delta, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, D.; Li, C.; Wang, D.; Wang, P.; Archer, A.W.; Greb, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    On many intertidal flats, lateral aggradation and reworking by large tidal channels is the dominant sedimentary process. On the open-coast intertidal flats of the Changjiang Delta large laterally migrating tidal channels are absent. Instead, numerous shallow tidal creeks cut across the intertidal flats. On these flats, vertical rather than lateral migration dominates sedimentation. Observations over semidiurnal tidal cycles show that both flood and ebb tides have the potential to deposit their own mud-sand couplets, but four couplets per day are rarely preserved. Reworking by tidal currents and/or weak waves results in loss of tidal couplets or amalgamation of two or more thin couplets into a single thick couplet. Measurements of preserved couplets show that they can represent a single flooding or ebbing event (half day) to a period of several neap-spring cycles. Diastems within amalgamated couplets are generally not distinguishable. The key agent for reworking open-coast intertidal flat deposits is not tidal creek migration but seasonal storm waves. Seasonal storm deposits consist of a basal scour and sand-dominant laminae with mud pebbles, grading upward to mud-dominated layers of fair-weather deposits. Sand-dominated layers are also reworked.

  16. Flexibility of Physiological Traits Underlying Inter-Individual Growth Differences in Intertidal and Subtidal Mussels Mytilusgalloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Reiriz, María José; Irisarri, Jade; Labarta, Uxio

    2016-01-01

    Mussel seed (Mytilusgalloprovincialis) gathered from the intertidal and subtidal environments of a Galician embayment (NW, Spain) were maintained in the laboratory during five months to select fast (F) and slow (S) growing mussels. The physiological basis underlying inter-individual growth variations were compared for F and S mussels from both origins. Fast growing seemed to be a consequence of greater energy intake (20% higher clearance and ingestion rate) and higher food absorption rate coupled with low metabolic costs. The enhanced energy absorption (around 65% higher) resulted in 3 times higher Scope for Growth in F mussels (20.5±4.9 J h−1) than S individuals (7.3±1.1 J h−1). The higher clearance rate of F mussels appears to be linked with larger gill filtration surface compared to S mussels. Intertidal mussels showed higher food acquisition and absorption per mg of organic weight (i.e. mass-specific standardization) than subtidal mussels under the optimal feeding conditions of the laboratory. However, the enhanced feeding and digestive rates were not enough to compensate for the initial differences in tissue weight between mussels of similar shell length collected from the intertidal and subtidal environments. At the end of the experiment, subtidal individuals had higher gill efficiency, which probably lead to higher total feeding and absorption rates relative to intertidal individuals. PMID:26849372

  17. Persisting intertidal seagrass beds in the northern Wadden Sea since the 1930s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Tobias; Buschbaum, Christian; Reise, Karsten

    2013-09-01

    In contrast to the global crisis of seagrass ecosystems, intertidal Zostera-beds in the Northfrisian Wadden Sea (coastal North Sea) have recovered recently. Present areal extent resembles that of the mid 1930s. In spite of an intermittent loss in area by about 60% in the 1970s to 1990s, beds have maintained their general spatial distribution pattern. Aerial photographs from parts of the region in 1935-37, and the total region in 1958-59 and 2005 were visually analysed, and seagrass beds were recorded and quantified with a geographic information system (GIS). Data from direct aerial mapping were added to extend the survey until 2010. From the mid 2000s to 2010, intertidal seagrass areas estimated from these records range between 84 and 142 km2 (10-16% of the intertidal area), while records from the 1970 to 90s merely range between 30 and 40 km2 (3-5%) (Reise and Kohlus, 2008). Despite variation in size, core positions of individual seagrass beds were identified and they shifted very little over the last decades. Most beds occur in the upper intertidal zone and where barrier islands offer shelter against swell from the open sea. While land claim activities since the 1930s have irreversibly eliminated at least 11 km2 of seagrass beds, we suggest that intermittent losses of seagrass area were mainly caused by sediment dynamics and a phase of elevated eutrophication.

  18. Evidence of salt accumulation in beach intertidal zone due to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Jackson, Nancy L

    2016-08-11

    In coastal environments, evaporation is an important driver of subsurface salinity gradients in marsh systems. However, it has not been addressed in the intertidal zone of sandy beaches. Here, we used field data on an estuarine beach foreshore with numerical simulations to show that evaporation causes upper intertidal zone pore-water salinity to be double that of seawater. We found the increase in pore-water salinity mainly depends on air temperature and relative humidity, and tide and wave actions dilute a fraction of the high salinity plume, resulting in a complex process. This is in contrast to previous studies that consider seawater as the most saline source to a coastal aquifer system, thereby concluding that seawater infiltration always increases pore-water salinity by seawater-groundwater mixing dynamics. Our results demonstrate the combined effects of evaporation and tide and waves on subsurface salinity distribution on a beach face. We anticipate our quantitative investigation will shed light on the studies of salt-affected biological activities in the intertidal zone. It also impacts our understanding of the impact of global warming; in particular, the increase in temperature does not only shift the saltwater landward, but creates a different salinity distribution that would have implications on intertidal biological zonation.

  19. Diversity and Transport of Microorganisms in Intertidal Sands of the California Coast

    PubMed Central

    Yamahara, Kevan M.; Sassoubre, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    Forced by tides and waves, large volumes of seawater are flushed through the beach daily. Organic material and nutrients in seawater are remineralized and cycled as they pass through the beach. Microorganisms are responsible for most of the biogeochemical cycling in the beach; however, few studies have characterized their diversity in intertidal sands, and little work has characterized the extent to which microbes are transported between different compartments of the beach. The present study uses next-generation massively parallel sequencing to characterize the microbial community present at 49 beaches along the coast of California. In addition, we characterize the transport of microorganisms within intertidal sands using laboratory column experiments. We identified extensive diversity in the beach sands. Nearly 1,000 unique taxa were identified in sands from 10 or more unique beaches, suggesting the existence of a group of “cosmopolitan” sand microorganisms. A biogeographical analysis identified a taxon-distance relationship among the beaches. In addition, sands with similar grain size, organic carbon content, exposed to a similar wave climate, and having the same degree of anthropogenic influence tended to have similar microbial communities. Column experiments identified microbes readily mobilized by seawater infiltrating through unsaturated intertidal sands. The ease with which microbes were mobilized suggests that intertidal sands may represent a reservoir of bacteria that seed the beach aquifer where they may partake in biogeochemical cycling. PMID:24747906

  20. Macrofaunal communities in the habitats of intertidal marshes along the salinity gradient of the Schelde estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Henrietta; Elliott, M.; Cattrijsse, A.

    2009-08-01

    The macrobenthos is important in benthic remineralization processes; it represents a trophic link and is also often used as a bio-indicator in monitoring programs. Variations of the environmental parameters strongly influence the structure of the macrobenthic communities in the marshes and since macrobenthos is the most important food item for marsh-visiting fish species in the Schelde, the variation in food resources can have a strong effect on the higher trophic level. The present study deals with the variation in macrobenthic communities in different habitats of intertidal marshes along the salinity gradient and the differences between the marsh creeks and the intertidal part of the estuary. The study measured density and species richness together with the biomass, and sampled a large intertidal channel and a smaller creek within five marshes along the salinity gradient of the Schelde estuary every six weeks between May and October in 2000. The small creeks had a smaller grain size and higher organic matter content than those in the large channel although the differences in the environmental parameters did not explain the different communities in the two habitats. Marshes had distinct macrobenthic communities but the abundance of macrofauna fluctuated along the estuary without an identifiable spatial trend. In contrast, the total biomass increased towards the euhaline area due to the domination of Nereis diversicolor. Diversity showed a significant positive correlation with the salinity. Comparison of the macrofaunal communities in the marsh with those on the intertidal flats of the estuary indicated similar trends in density, biomass and diversity along the salinity gradient. The density was similar in both habitats whereas biomass was much higher in the intertidal habitats of the estuary, partly due to the higher biomass of molluscs and annelids. Diversity indices were higher in the marsh, and the freshwater area had more species than in the estuary.

  1. Habitat-Associations of Turban Snails on Intertidal and Subtidal Rocky Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Smoothey, Amy F.

    2013-01-01

    Patchiness of habitat has important influences on distributions and abundances of organisms. Given the increasing threat of loss and alteration of habitats due to pressures associated with humans, there is a need for ecologists to understand species' requirements for habitat and to predict changes to taxa under various future environmental conditions. This study tested hypotheses about the generality of patterns described for one species of marine intertidal turban snail for a different, yet closely-related species in subtidal habitats along the coast of New South Wales, Australia. These two closely-related species live in similar habitats, yet under quite different conditions, which provided an opportunity to investigate how similar types of habitats influence patterns of distribution, abundance and size-structure in intertidal versus subtidal environments. For each species, there were similar associations between biogenically structured habitat and densities. The intertidal species, Turbo undulates, were more abundant, with greater proportions of small individuals in habitats formed by the canopy-forming alga, Hormosira banksii, the solitary ascidian, Pyura stolonifera or the turfing red alga, Corallina officinalis compared to simple habitat (bare rock). Similarly, more Turbo torquatus were found in biogenically structured subtidal habitat, i.e. canopy-forming algae, Ecklonia radiata, mixed algal communities (‘fringe’), or turfing red algae (Corallina officinalis and Amphiroa aniceps) than where habitat is simple (barrens). Small T. torquatus were more abundant in areas of turf and ‘fringe’, while large snails were more abundant in areas of kelp and barrens. These patterns were found at each location sampled (i.e. eight intertidal and two subtidal rocky reefs) and at all times of sampling, across each environment. This study highlighted the consistent influence of biogenically structured habitats on the distribution, abundance and size-structure of

  2. Habitat-associations of turban snails on intertidal and subtidal rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Smoothey, Amy F

    2013-01-01

    Patchiness of habitat has important influences on distributions and abundances of organisms. Given the increasing threat of loss and alteration of habitats due to pressures associated with humans, there is a need for ecologists to understand species' requirements for habitat and to predict changes to taxa under various future environmental conditions. This study tested hypotheses about the generality of patterns described for one species of marine intertidal turban snail for a different, yet closely-related species in subtidal habitats along the coast of New South Wales, Australia. These two closely-related species live in similar habitats, yet under quite different conditions, which provided an opportunity to investigate how similar types of habitats influence patterns of distribution, abundance and size-structure in intertidal versus subtidal environments. For each species, there were similar associations between biogenically structured habitat and densities. The intertidal species, Turbo undulates, were more abundant, with greater proportions of small individuals in habitats formed by the canopy-forming alga, Hormosira banksii, the solitary ascidian, Pyura stolonifera or the turfing red alga, Corallina officinalis compared to simple habitat (bare rock). Similarly, more Turbo torquatus were found in biogenically structured subtidal habitat, i.e. canopy-forming algae, Ecklonia radiata, mixed algal communities ('fringe'), or turfing red algae (Corallina officinalis and Amphiroa aniceps) than where habitat is simple (barrens). Small T. torquatus were more abundant in areas of turf and 'fringe', while large snails were more abundant in areas of kelp and barrens. These patterns were found at each location sampled (i.e. eight intertidal and two subtidal rocky reefs) and at all times of sampling, across each environment. This study highlighted the consistent influence of biogenically structured habitats on the distribution, abundance and size-structure of intertidal and

  3. Anthropogenic influence on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablo Bay, California: 1856-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, B.E.; Smith, R.E.; Foxgrover, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric surveys has revealed large changes in morphology and sedimentation from 1856 to 1983 in San Pablo Bay, California. In 1856, the morphology of the bay was complex, with a broad main channel, a major side channel connecting to the Petaluma River, and an ebb-tidal delta crossing shallow parts of the bay. In 1983, its morphology was simpler because all channels except the main channel had filled with sediment and erosion had planed the shallows creating a uniform gently sloping surface. The timing and patterns of geomorphic change and deposition and erosion of sediment were influenced by human activities that altered sediment delivery from rivers. From 1856 to 1887, high sediment delivery (14.1 ?? 106 m3/yr) to San Francisco Bay during the hydraulic gold-mining period in the Sierra Nevada resulted in net deposition of 259 ?? 14 ?? 106 m3 in San Pablo Bay. This rapid deposition filled channels and increased intertidal mudflat area by 60% (37.4 ?? 3.4 to 60.6 ?? 6.2 km2). From 1951 to 1983, 23 ?? 3 ?? 106 m3 of sediment was eroded from San Pablo Bay as sediment delivery from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers decreased to 2.8 ?? 106 m3/yr because of damming of rivers, riverbank protection, and altered land use. Intertidal mudflat area in 1983 was 31.8 ?? 3.9 km2, similar to that in 1856. Intertidal mudflat distribution in 1983, however, was fairly uniform whereas most of the intertidal mudflats were in the western part of San Pablo Bay in 1856. Sediment delivery, through its affect on shallow parts of the bay, was determined to be a primary control on intertidal mudflat area. San Pablo Bay has been greatly affected by human activities and will likely continue to erode in the near term in response to a diminished sediment delivery from rivers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing respondent-driven sampling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sharad; Salganik, Matthew J

    2010-04-13

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based technique for estimating traits in hard-to-reach populations, for example, the prevalence of HIV among drug injectors. In recent years RDS has been used in more than 120 studies in more than 20 countries and by leading public health organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Despite the widespread use and growing popularity of RDS, there has been little empirical validation of the methodology. Here we investigate the performance of RDS by simulating sampling from 85 known, network populations. Across a variety of traits we find that RDS is substantially less accurate than generally acknowledged and that reported RDS confidence intervals are misleadingly narrow. Moreover, because we model a best-case scenario in which the theoretical RDS sampling assumptions hold exactly, it is unlikely that RDS performs any better in practice than in our simulations. Notably, the poor performance of RDS is driven not by the bias but by the high variance of estimates, a possibility that had been largely overlooked in the RDS literature. Given the consistency of our results across networks and our generous sampling conditions, we conclude that RDS as currently practiced may not be suitable for key aspects of public health surveillance where it is now extensively applied. PMID:20351258

  5. Basic and applied research on choice responding.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, W W; Mazur, J E

    1997-01-01

    Choice responding refers to the manner in which individuals allocate their time or responding among available response options. In this article, we first review basic investigations that have identified and examined variables that influence choice responding, such as response effort and reinforcement rate, immediacy, and quality. We then describe recent bridge and applied studies that illustrate how the results of basic research on choice responding can help to account for human behavior in natural environments and improve clinical assessments and interventions. PMID:9316255

  6. 34 CFR 85.1000 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respondent. 85.1000 Section 85.1000 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.1000 Respondent. Respondent means a person against whom an agency has initiated a...

  7. Let's Get Personal: Responding to Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Suzanne

    In hopes of discovering how to respond to her students' work in a way that heads them toward meaningful revision, a creative writing teacher singles out several categories of student fiction she has trouble responding to and pinpoints common shortcomings of students' early drafts, the way students respond to comments regarding revisions, and genre…

  8. What Respondents Really Expect from Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, Tomaz; Kolar, Iztok

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of falling response rates in telephone surveys. To better understand and maintain respondent goodwill, concepts of psychological contract and respondent expectations are introduced and explored. Results of the qualitative study show that respondent expectations are not only socially contingent but also…

  9. 37 CFR 41.68 - Respondent's brief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 41.66, file a respondent brief and serve the brief on all parties in accordance with § 1.903 of this... in any proceeding identified pursuant to paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section. (x) Certificate of... period within which to file an amended brief. If respondent does not file an amended respondent...

  10. Morphodynamics of intertidal bars near a seawall on a macrotidal beach, Wissant Bay, northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrati, M.; Anthony, E.

    2009-04-01

    Several studies on beaches with intertidal bar-trough (ridge-and-runnel) systems in settings with relatively large tidal ranges (> 3 m) have focused on cross-shore bar mobility; however a few recent studies have drawn attention to the potential role of longshore transport induced by a mix of wave-tide and wind-forced longshore currents in the morphodynamics of the bars and troughs. The aim of this paper is to briefly highlight the relationship between wind-forced currents on the shallow intertidal zone and rapid intertidal bar-trough morphological response on a macrotidal beach. Fieldwork was conduced on Wissant beach, Wissant Bay, northern France, from 7 to 23 March, 2006. During the experiment, the beach (oriented NE-SW) exhibited three intertidal bar-trough systems and the upper bar was directly attached to a seawall. Seven digital elevation models (DEMs) were generated from high-resolution topographic surveys. Hydrodynamic measurements were obtained from five currentmeters (2 S4 and 3 ADCP) deployed on the bars crests and on the upper beach trough. Wave characteristics were obtained from the measured time series by spectral analysis using Fast Fourier Transforms. Wind speed and direction on the beach were measured using a portable weather station. The mean wind speed and directions averaged every three hours highlight closely-spaced high-energy events during the experiment, with long phases of significant lateral wind stress (NE to ENE). The measured waves and currents showed rapid and strong response to both the changes in wind speed and direction. Longshore currents measured during the experiment on the upper intertidal bar-trough system showed a clear SW flow pattern in response to NE to ENE wind approach directions while the currents in the lower intertidal zone flowed northeastward during the flood, following the coastline, and southwestward during the ebb in response to the tidal current modulation. Strong longshore migration of the upper intertidal bar

  11. Rocky Intertidal Zonation Pattern in Antofagasta, Chile: Invasive Species and Shellfish Gathering

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Juan Carlos; Manríquez, Patricio H.; Delgado, Alejandro; Ortiz, Verónica; Jara, María Elisa; Varas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological invasions affecting rocky intertidal zonation patterns, yield information on species interactions. In the Bay of Antofagasta, northern Chile, the non-indigenous tunicate Pyura praeputialis, originally from Australia, has invaded (in the past century or so) and monopolized a major portion of the mid-intertidal rocky shore, displacing upshore the native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus. In Antofagasta the tunicate is subjected to intensive exploitation. Monitoring protocols show that in the past 10 years Antofagasta's tunicate population has experienced a drastic decline, affecting the intertidal zonation pattern. Methodology/Principal Findings A 12.5 km of coastline, on the southern eastern shore of the Bay of Antofagasta, was studied. Eight sites were systematically (1993–1994) or sporadically (2003–2014) monitored for the seaward-shoreward expansion or reduction of the tunicate Pyura praeputialis, and native mussel and barnacle bands. A notable reduction in the mid-intertidal band of P. praeputialis and a seaward expansion of the mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, and barnacle bands was observed. We suggest that the major cause for the decline in the tunicate is due to its intensive exploitation by rocky shore Pyura-gathers. The rate of extraction of tunicates by professional Pyura-gathers ranged between 256–740 tunicates hour−1. Between 2009–2014 the density of professional Pyura-gather ranged between 0.5–4.5 km−1 per low tide. Hence, 10 professional Pyura-gathers working 1 h for 10 low tides per month, during 6 months, will remove between 307–888 m2 of tunicates. A drastic decline in tunicate recruitment was observed and several P. praeputialis ecosystems services have been lost. Conclusion and Significance In Antofagasta, the continuous and intensive intertidal gathering of the invasive tunicate Pyura praeputialis, has caused a drastic reduction of its population modifying the zonation pattern. Thereby, native mussel Perumytilus

  12. Regulation of intertidal food webs by avian predators on New England rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Julie C; Shulman, Myra J; Wood, Megan; Witman, Jon D; Lozyniak, Sara

    2007-04-01

    Although there is a large body of research on food webs in rocky intertidal communities, most of the emphasis has been on the marine benthic components. Effects of avian predation on highly mobile predators such as crabs, remains practically unstudied in rocky shore ecosystems. The crab, Cancer borealis, is an important component of the diet of gulls (Larus marinus, L. argentatus) at the Isles of Shoals, Maine, USA. C. borealis prey include the predatory gastropod Nucella lapillus L., the herbivore Littorina littorea, and mussels Mytilus edulis L. We hypothesized that gulls reduce abundance of C. borealis in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal, thereby allowing C. borealis prey to persist in high numbers. A study of crab tidal migration showed that C. borealis density nearly doubled at high tide compared to low tide; thus, crabs from a large subtidal source population migrate into the intertidal zone during high tides and either emigrate or are removed by gulls during low tides. Results from a small-scale (1 m2) predator caging experiment in the low intertidal zone indicated that enclosed crabs significantly reduced L. littorea abundance when protected from gull predation. In a much larger-scale gull exclusion experiment, densities of C. borealis increased significantly during low and high tides in exclosures relative to the controls. C. borealis density was inversely correlated with changes in the abundance of two mesopredators Carcinus maenas and Nucella lapillus, and with the space-occupier M. edulis. There was a similar negative correlation between abundance of C. borealis and the change in abundance of the herbivore L. littorea, but the trend was not significant. Mortality of tethered L. littorea was associated with C. borealis density across sites. However, preferred algae did not change in response to L. littorea density during the experiment. Thus, we found suggestive, but not conclusive, evidence for a three-level cascade involving gulls, crabs, and L

  13. Regulation of intertidal food webs by avian predators on New England rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Julie C; Shulman, Myra J; Wood, Megan; Witman, Jon D; Lozyniak, Sara

    2007-04-01

    Although there is a large body of research on food webs in rocky intertidal communities, most of the emphasis has been on the marine benthic components. Effects of avian predation on highly mobile predators such as crabs, remains practically unstudied in rocky shore ecosystems. The crab, Cancer borealis, is an important component of the diet of gulls (Larus marinus, L. argentatus) at the Isles of Shoals, Maine, USA. C. borealis prey include the predatory gastropod Nucella lapillus L., the herbivore Littorina littorea, and mussels Mytilus edulis L. We hypothesized that gulls reduce abundance of C. borealis in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal, thereby allowing C. borealis prey to persist in high numbers. A study of crab tidal migration showed that C. borealis density nearly doubled at high tide compared to low tide; thus, crabs from a large subtidal source population migrate into the intertidal zone during high tides and either emigrate or are removed by gulls during low tides. Results from a small-scale (1 m2) predator caging experiment in the low intertidal zone indicated that enclosed crabs significantly reduced L. littorea abundance when protected from gull predation. In a much larger-scale gull exclusion experiment, densities of C. borealis increased significantly during low and high tides in exclosures relative to the controls. C. borealis density was inversely correlated with changes in the abundance of two mesopredators Carcinus maenas and Nucella lapillus, and with the space-occupier M. edulis. There was a similar negative correlation between abundance of C. borealis and the change in abundance of the herbivore L. littorea, but the trend was not significant. Mortality of tethered L. littorea was associated with C. borealis density across sites. However, preferred algae did not change in response to L. littorea density during the experiment. Thus, we found suggestive, but not conclusive, evidence for a three-level cascade involving gulls, crabs, and L

  14. Hydrogen Safety Training for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies is emerging in the U.S. through vehicle demonstration programs and early deployments of fuel cells for onsite power generation, materials handling, and other applications. To help first responders prepare for hydrogen and fuel cell use in their communities, the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has developed hydrogen safety training for first responders. A web-based awareness-level course, 'Introduction to Hydrogen Safety for First Responders,' launched in 2007, is available at http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/FirstResponders/. Approximately 17,000 first responders have accessed the online training.

  15. Growth dynamics of the seagrass Zostera japonica at its upper and lower distributional limits in the intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Hyeob; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Kim, Young Kyun; Park, Jung-Im; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2016-06-01

    The seagrass Zostera japonica occurs mainly in the intertidal zone and is thus exposed to widely varying environmental conditions affecting its growth and distribution compared to subtidal seagrasses. The growth dynamics of Z. japonica at its upper and lower distributional limits in the intertidal zone were investigated in Koje Bay on the southern coast of Korea to examine the environmental stresses and limiting factors on the growth of intertidal seagrasses. The shoot density and morphology, biomass, and leaf productivity of Z. japonica were measured in relation to coincident measurements of environmental factors at its upper and lower distributional limits and in an intermediate zone of the intertidal area. The mean exposure time to the atmosphere during low tide in the upper intertidal zone was approximately 1.5- and 1.9-fold longer than that in the intermediate and lower intertidal zones, respectively. Shoot density and biomass were significantly higher in the intermediate zone than at the upper and lower distributional limits. Longer emersion leading to a various of environmental stresses appeared to reduce Z. japonica growth in the upper intertidal zone, whereas interspecific competitive interactions related to irradiance seemed to affect Z. japonica growth in the lower intertidal zone. Shoot size, density, biomass, and leaf productivity were lower in the upper than in the lower zone, implying that emersion-associated stresses in the upper zone had a greater detrimental effect on Z. japonica growth than did stresses occurring in the lower zone. The productivity of Z. japonica showed strong positive correlations with air and water temperature, suggesting enhancement of Z. japonica production at higher temperatures. Thus, the predicted increases in air and water temperature associated with global climate change might have positive effects on the growth and extension in distributional range of this species.

  16. From Space to the Rocky Intertidal: Measuring the Body Temperature of the Intertidal Mussel Species, Mytilus californianus using NASA MODIS Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J.; Lakshmi, V.; Menge, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, is an ecologically important species in the rocky intertidal ecosystems of the U.S. Pacific coast. During low tides, times of emersion, Mytilus californianus is exposed to aerial conditions and its body temperature can vary drastically depending on the amount of solar radiation they experience. Thermal stress from high temperatures during emersion sometimes can lead to mortality of individuals. Conversely, during high tides, times of submersion, body temperatures depend on the temperature of the water that surrounds them. This study used remotely sensed surface temperature observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua and Terra to predict the body temperatures of Mytilus californianus. Mussel body temperatures were provided by the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO) and de-tided. This technique divided the mussel body temperatures into times of emersion and times of submersion. During times of emersion, mussel body temperatures were compared to remotely sensed land surface temperatures (LST) and in-situ air temperatures. During times of submersion, mussel body temperatures were compared to remotely sensed sea surface temperatures (SST) and in-situ water temperatures. To identify spatial variation in temperatures, eight different study sites ranging in latitude along the coast of Oregon were analyzed. Additionally, to better understand the temporal variation in temperatures, fourteen years (2000-2013) were analyzed for each study site. Sea surface temperature collected during the Aqua overpass and Terra overpass were strongly correlated with mussel body temperatures but varied by study site. Our results show that remotely sensed temperature could predict average daily mussel temperature within 1°C on average during times of submersion. Being able to use remotely sensed surface temperatures to predict the body

  17. Surviving in a semi-marine habitat: Dietary salt exposure and salt secretion of a New Zealand intertidal skink.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Jordi; Towns, David R; Duxbury, Mark; Heitkönig, Ignas M A

    2015-11-01

    Species that inhabit marine and intertidal ecosystems face osmoregulatory challenges, risking dehydration and increased ion concentrations in the body. Lizards need to either tolerate or regulate these increased ion concentrations. In this study, we aim to understand how Suter's skink (Oligosoma suteri), an intertidal skink restricted to shoreline habitats, is able to cope with the physiological stress of living in an extreme salt environment. We determined the diet, prey species' salt content, and nasal and cloacal salt excretion on Rangitoto and Motutapu Islands in northern New Zealand, where the skinks have contrasting access to terrestrial invertebrates. Analysis of stable isotopes suggests inter- and intra-population variability in Suter's skink diets. Intertidal invertebrates under washed up seaweed appear to compose a major part of the diet of the Rangitoto population, while the Motutapu population showed evidence for a mixed diet of terrestrial and intertidal invertebrates. Sodium content of prey species decreased with an increasing distance from the seawater. Field secretion of cations through nasal glands consisted primarily of Na(+), which is consistent with other marine and intertidal species. Sodium was also the primary cation in urine. In contrast, fecal cations consisted primarily of K(+). This first study into the salt secretion of an intertidal skink species provides evidence of Suter's skink's plasticity in secreting excess ions through nasal salt glands. This likely enables it to deal with the challenges of living in a semi-marine habitat.

  18. Evidence of Nitrogen Loss from Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled with Ferric Iron Reduction in an Intertidal Wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv; Li, Ye; Hu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction is an important microbial pathway of nitrogen removal in intertidal wetlands. However, little is known about the role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction (termed Feammox) in intertidal nitrogen cycling. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were combined with an isotope-tracing technique to examine the dynamics of Feammox and its association with tidal fluctuations in the intertidal wetland of the Yangtze Estuary. Feammox was detected in the intertidal wetland sediments, with potential rates of 0.24-0.36 mg N kg(-1) d(-1). The Feammox rates in the sediments were generally higher during spring tides than during neap tides. The tidal fluctuations affected the growth of iron-reducing bacteria and reduction of ferric iron, which mediated Feammox activity and the associated nitrogen loss from intertidal wetlands to the atmosphere. An estimated loss of 11.5-18 t N km(-2) year(-1) was linked to Feammox, accounting for approximately 3.1-4.9% of the total external inorganic nitrogen transported into the Yangtze Estuary wetland each year. Overall, the co-occurrence of ferric iron reduction and ammonium oxidation suggests that Feammox can act as an ammonium removal mechanism in intertidal wetlands.

  19. Evidence of Nitrogen Loss from Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled with Ferric Iron Reduction in an Intertidal Wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv; Li, Ye; Hu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction is an important microbial pathway of nitrogen removal in intertidal wetlands. However, little is known about the role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction (termed Feammox) in intertidal nitrogen cycling. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were combined with an isotope-tracing technique to examine the dynamics of Feammox and its association with tidal fluctuations in the intertidal wetland of the Yangtze Estuary. Feammox was detected in the intertidal wetland sediments, with potential rates of 0.24-0.36 mg N kg(-1) d(-1). The Feammox rates in the sediments were generally higher during spring tides than during neap tides. The tidal fluctuations affected the growth of iron-reducing bacteria and reduction of ferric iron, which mediated Feammox activity and the associated nitrogen loss from intertidal wetlands to the atmosphere. An estimated loss of 11.5-18 t N km(-2) year(-1) was linked to Feammox, accounting for approximately 3.1-4.9% of the total external inorganic nitrogen transported into the Yangtze Estuary wetland each year. Overall, the co-occurrence of ferric iron reduction and ammonium oxidation suggests that Feammox can act as an ammonium removal mechanism in intertidal wetlands. PMID:26360245

  20. Subsurface Intertidal Microbes: A Cryptic Source Of Organic Carbon For Beach Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Giver, Lorraine J.; Alvarez, Teresa (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Some freshwater, marine or hotspring beaches have no visible source of primary production, yet beneath the surface is an interstitial photosynthetic microbial community. To assess the significance of this source of organic carbon, we measured in situ carbon fixation rates in an intertidal marine beach through a diurnal cycle. Gross fixation for a transect (99 x 1 m) perpendicular to the shore was approx. 4041 mg C fixed/ day, or approx. 41 mg C fixed/ sq m day. In contrast, an adjacent well-established cyanobacterial (Lyngbya) mat was approx. 12 x as productive (approx. 490 mg C fixed/sq m day). Thus, subsurface sand mats may be an overlooked, yet important, endogenous source of organic carbon for intertidal ecosystems, as well as a sink in the global carbon cycle.

  1. Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, Brian; Choi, Francis; Matzelle, Allison; Torossian, Jessica L; Morello, Scott L; Mislan, K A S; Yamane, Lauren; Strickland, Denise; Szathmary, P Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E; Tockstein, Alyson; Hilbish, Thomas J; Burrows, Michael T; Power, Anne Marie; Gosling, Elizabeth; Mieszkowska, Nova; Harley, Christopher D G; Nishizaki, Michael; Carrington, Emily; Menge, Bruce; Petes, Laura; Foley, Melissa M; Johnson, Angela; Poole, Megan; Noble, Mae M; Richmond, Erin L; Robart, Matt; Robinson, Jonathan; Sapp, Jerod; Sones, Jackie; Broitman, Bernardo R; Denny, Mark W; Mach, Katharine J; Miller, Luke P; O'Donnell, Michael; Ross, Philip; Hofmann, Gretchen E; Zippay, Mackenzie; Blanchette, Carol; Macfarlan, J A; Carpizo-Ituarte, Eugenio; Ruttenberg, Benjamin; Peña Mejía, Carlos E; McQuaid, Christopher D; Lathlean, Justin; Monaco, Cristián J; Nicastro, Katy R; Zardi, Gerardo

    2016-10-11

    At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10-30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements of mussel tissue temperature indicated errors of ~2.0-2.5 °C, during daily fluctuations that often exceeded 15°-20 °C. Geographic patterns in thermal stress based on biomimetic logger measurements were generally far more complex than anticipated based only on 'habitat-level' measurements of air or sea surface temperature. This unique data set provides an opportunity to link physiological measurements with spatially- and temporally-explicit field observations of body temperature.

  2. Investigating spatial resolutions of imagery for intertidal sediment characterization using geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Elsy; Adam, Stefanie; De Wever, Aaike; Govaerts, Annelies; Vervoort, Andre; Monbaliu, Jaak

    2014-08-01

    To investigate bio-chemical processes of intertidal sediments, variations in sediment properties such as moisture content, mud content, and chlorophyll a content need to be understood. Remote sensing has been an efficient alternative to traditional data collection methods for such properties. Yet, with the availability of various types of useful sensors, choosing a suitable spatial resolution is challenging, especially that each type has its own cost, availability, and data specifications. This paper investigates the losses in spatial information of sediment properties on the Molenplaat, an intertidal flat on the Western-Scheldt estuary, upon the use of various resolutions. This was carried out using a synergy between remote sensing and geostatistics. The results showed that for the Molenplaat, chlorophyll a content can be well represented by low to medium resolutions. Yet, for moisture and mud content, spatial structures would be lost upon any decrease of resolution from a 4 m×4 m pixel size.

  3. Numerical density and biomass of macrobenthic animals living in the intertidal zone of Surinam, South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swennen, C.; Duiven, P.; Spaans, A. L.

    The macrobenthic fauna of all types of intertidal area of the Surinam coast, mainly mud flats, were briefly studied by coring. Crustaceans dominated; polychaetes and molluscs were poorly represented. The highest biomass values (32 to 37 g · m -2 ADW, mainly contributed by Uca maracoani) were found around high tide level, at the border of the mangrove forest. Just outside the Uca zone, on sheltered places also high values ( ca 20 g · m -2 ADW, mainly contributed by Tanaidacea) were found. In the middle and lower parts of the flats biomass was low (only a few g · m -2 or less), probably a result of the instability of the sediment. The following crustaceans not recorded previously for Surinam were found living in the intertidal clay and mud: Hexapanopeus schmitti, Cycloplax pinnotheroides, Pinnixa sayana (Brachyura), and Upogebia brasiliensis (Macrura).

  4. Impacts of the Jessica oil spill on intertidal and shallow subtidal plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Graham J; Kerrison, Linda; Shepherd, Scoresby A; Veronica Toral-Granda, M

    2003-01-01

    Densities of fishes, invertebrates and plants at rocky intertidal and shallow subtidal sites were censused 1-2 days prior to the Jessica oil spill and compared with information obtained for the same sites one month after the spill, both for sites impacted by oil and unaffected reference sites. While the availability of pre-spill data made this analysis one of the most powerful to date for testing impacts of oil on shoreline environments, no clear changes attributable to oiling could be identified. Discharged oil appeared to cause very little impact in the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones, with such impacts lying within the range of natural spatial and temporal variation at sites investigated. Factors considered to minimize impact in Galápagos included paucity of fully sheltered shores in spill path, moderate wave action, warm temperature, high levels of sunlight, and mixing of bunker oil with diesel.

  5. Modeling and predicting intertidal variations of the salinity field in the Bay/Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowles, Noah; Uncles, Reginald J.

    1995-01-01

    One approach to simulating daily to monthly variability in the bay is the development of intertidal model using tidally-averaged equations and a time step on the order of the day.  An intertidal numerical model of the bay's physics, capable of portraying seasonal and inter-annual variability, would have several uses.  Observations are limited in time and space, so simulation could help fill the gaps.  Also, the ability to simulate multi-year episodes (eg, an extended drought) could provide insight into the response of the ecosystem to such events.  Finally, such a model could be used in a forecast mode wherein predicted delta flow is used as model input, and predicted salinity distribution is output with estimates days and months in advance.  This note briefly introduces such a tidally-averaged model (Uncles and Peterson, in press) and a corresponding predictive scheme for baywide forecasting.

  6. Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Gail V; Shelly, Alice

    2013-08-01

    Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ≤30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of "vertical" line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills.

  7. Larval behaviours and their contribution to the distribution of the intertidal coral reef sponge Carteriospongia foliascens.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, Muhammad Azmi; de Nys, Rocky; Webster, Nicole; Whalan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Sponges (Phylum Porifera) are an evolutionary and ecologically significant group; however information on processes influencing sponge population distributions is surprisingly limited. Carteriospongia foliascens is a common Indo-Pacific sponge, which has been reported from the intertidal to the mesophotic. Interestingly, the distribution of C. foliascens at inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef is restricted to the intertidal with no individuals evident in adjacent subtidal habitats. The abundance of C. foliascens and substrate availability was first quantified to investigate the influence of substrate limitation on adult distribution. Pre-settlement processes of larval spawning, swimming speeds, phototaxis, vertical migration, and settlement to intertidal and subtidal substrate cues were also quantified. Notably, suitable settlement substrate (coral rubble) was not limiting in subtidal habitats. C. foliascens released up to 765 brooded larvae sponge(-1) day(-1) during the day, with larvae (80%±5.77) being negatively phototactic and migrating to the bottom within 40 minutes from release. Subsequently, larvae (up to 58.67%±2.91) migrated to the surface after the loss of the daylight cue (nightfall), and after 34 h post-release >98.67% (±0.67) of larvae had adopted a benthic habit regardless of light conditions. Intertidal and subtidal biofilms initiated similar settlement responses, inducing faster (as early 6 h post-release) and more successful metamorphosis (>60%) than unconditioned surfaces. C. foliascens has a high larval supply and larval behaviours that support recruitment to the subtidal. The absence of C. foliascens in subtidal habitats at inshore reefs is therefore proposed to be a potential consequence of post-settlement mortalities. PMID:24853091

  8. Pyropia plicata sp. nov. (Bangiales, Rhodophyta): naming a common intertidal alga from New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A commonly found red alga of the upper intertidal zone of New Zealand rocky coasts is described for the first time as Pyropia plicata sp. nov. This species has been incorrectly known as Porphyra columbina Mont. (now Pyropia columbina (Mont.) W.A.Nelson) for many years. Pyropia plicata is widespread and common, and it is readily distinguished from other species of bladed Bangiales in New Zealand by its distinctive morphology, with pleated blades attached by a central rhizoidal holdfast. PMID:23794933

  9. Larval Behaviours and Their Contribution to the Distribution of the Intertidal Coral Reef Sponge Carteriospongia foliascens

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Wahab, Muhammad Azmi; de Nys, Rocky; Webster, Nicole; Whalan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Sponges (Phylum Porifera) are an evolutionary and ecologically significant group; however information on processes influencing sponge population distributions is surprisingly limited. Carteriospongia foliascens is a common Indo-Pacific sponge, which has been reported from the intertidal to the mesophotic. Interestingly, the distribution of C. foliascens at inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef is restricted to the intertidal with no individuals evident in adjacent subtidal habitats. The abundance of C. foliascens and substrate availability was first quantified to investigate the influence of substrate limitation on adult distribution. Pre-settlement processes of larval spawning, swimming speeds, phototaxis, vertical migration, and settlement to intertidal and subtidal substrate cues were also quantified. Notably, suitable settlement substrate (coral rubble) was not limiting in subtidal habitats. C. foliascens released up to 765 brooded larvae sponge−1 day−1 during the day, with larvae (80%±5.77) being negatively phototactic and migrating to the bottom within 40 minutes from release. Subsequently, larvae (up to 58.67%±2.91) migrated to the surface after the loss of the daylight cue (nightfall), and after 34 h post-release >98.67% (±0.67) of larvae had adopted a benthic habit regardless of light conditions. Intertidal and subtidal biofilms initiated similar settlement responses, inducing faster (as early 6 h post-release) and more successful metamorphosis (>60%) than unconditioned surfaces. C. foliascens has a high larval supply and larval behaviours that support recruitment to the subtidal. The absence of C. foliascens in subtidal habitats at inshore reefs is therefore proposed to be a potential consequence of post-settlement mortalities. PMID:24853091

  10. Return rates from intertidal foraging from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point: Understanding early human economies.

    PubMed

    De Vynck, Jan C; Anderson, Robert; Atwater, Chloe; Cowling, Richard M; Fisher, Erich C; Marean, Curtis W; Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The south coast of South Africa provides the earliest evidence for Middle Stone Age (MSA) coastal resource exploitation by early Homo sapiens. In coastal archaeology worldwide, there has been a debate over the general productivity of intertidal foraging, leading to studies that directly measure productivity in some regions, but there have been no such studies in South Africa. Here we present energetic return rate estimates for intertidal foraging along the southern coast of South Africa from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point. Foraging experiments were conducted with Khoi-San descendants of the region, and hourly caloric return rates for experienced foragers were measured on 41 days near low tide and through three seasons over two study years. On-site return rates varied as a function of sex, tidal level, marine habitat type and weather conditions. The overall energetic return rate from the entire sample (1492 kcal h(-1)) equals or exceeds intertidal returns reported from other hunter-gatherer studies, as well as measured return rates for activities as diverse as hunting mammals and plant collecting. Returns are projected to be exceptionally high (∼ 3400 kcal h(-1) for men, ∼ 1900 kcal h(-1) for women) under the best combination of conditions. However, because of the monthly tidal cycle, high return foraging is only possible for about 10 days per month and for only 2-3 h on those days. These experiments suggest that while intertidal resources are attractive, women and children could not have subsisted independently, nor met all their protein-lipid needs from marine resources alone, and would have required substantial additional energy and nutrients from plant gathering and/or from males contributing game.

  11. Carbon budget of leaves of the tropical intertidal seagrass Thalassia hemprichii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Shih-Han; Huang, Yen-Hsun; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2013-07-01

    The question of whether seagrass beds are effective carbon sinks has recently attracted much attention. Leaf production and consumption, and detrital export and decomposition were determined to quantify the carbon budget of leaf production in a southern Taiwan seagrass bed composed of the tropical intertidal seagrass Thalassia hemprichii, which is widely distributed in intertidal zones of the western Pacific. The influence of elevation in the intertidal zone on these processes was also investigated. Leaf production and consumption, and export of leaf detritus showed seasonal variations, with higher rates in the wet season (summer and autumn) and lower rates in the dry season (winter and spring). At the high-elevation site, leaf consumption by fish was significantly higher than that by sea urchins. At the low-elevation site, however, the proportion of leaves consumed by sea urchins was equivalent to that by fish. Leaf detritus decomposed rapidly within the first 9 days, then gradually slowed down, and stabilised after 212 days, at which only 8.7% of dry weight remained in the litterbags. The carbon budget of seagrass leaves demonstrated that 20% of leaf production was grazed by fish and sea urchins and 80% flowed to detritus. This suggests that seagrass leaves are important food sources for inhabiting herbivores. Most of the detritus decomposed (44% of leaf production) or was exported (32% of leaf production), and only 4% of leaf production or 22 g C m-2 yr-1 was stored in this tropical intertidal seagrass bed. Mass balance calculations support this tropical seagrass bed acting as a carbon sink and an outwelling system which exports organic detritus to neighboring coral reefs.

  12. Variations in phytodetritus derived carbon uptake of the intertidal foraminifera Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukovits, Julia; Bukenberger, Patrick; Enge, Annekatrin; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Heinz, Petra

    2016-04-01

    Phytodetritus represents a major component of particulate organic carbon in intertidal mudflats. Estuaries and tidal currents yield an extensive amount of these particles that display a substantial nutrient source for littoral food webs. For benthic foraminifera, a group of marine protists, phytodetritus serves as the main food source. Foraminifera are considered to play a significant role in marine carbon turnover processes and show seasonally very high population densities in intertidal sediments. Therefore, it is important to gather explicit data about the specific carbon uptake behavior of intertidal foraminiferal species. In this study, laboratory feeding experiments were carried out to observe phytodetrital carbon uptake of foraminiferal specimen collected in the German Wadden Sea. Artificially produced phytodetritus was labelled with 13C to follow carbon ingestion into foraminiferal cytoplasm over time at different simulated conditions. The experiments were performed with monocultures under exclusion of other meiofauna. Chlorophyte detritus (Dunaliella tertiolecta) was fed to the two common species Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica. Ammonia tepida showed a significantly higher affinity to this food source than H. germanica. Testing the effect of temperature revealed a significant decrease of carbon ingestion with increasing temperature in H. germanica. Observations focusing on A. tepida showed a rising phytodetrital carbon content in the biomass of juvenile individuals in contrast to adult foraminifera. In general, carbon uptake reaches saturation levels a few hours after food supply. Furthermore, A. tepida benefits from constant availability of fresh food rather than from a high amount of phytodetritus derived from a single food pulse. Our investigations showed that the foraminiferal impact on intertidal processing of phytodetrital carbon sources is species specific, temperature related and depends on developmental stage and input dynamics

  13. Return rates from intertidal foraging from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point: Understanding early human economies.

    PubMed

    De Vynck, Jan C; Anderson, Robert; Atwater, Chloe; Cowling, Richard M; Fisher, Erich C; Marean, Curtis W; Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The south coast of South Africa provides the earliest evidence for Middle Stone Age (MSA) coastal resource exploitation by early Homo sapiens. In coastal archaeology worldwide, there has been a debate over the general productivity of intertidal foraging, leading to studies that directly measure productivity in some regions, but there have been no such studies in South Africa. Here we present energetic return rate estimates for intertidal foraging along the southern coast of South Africa from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point. Foraging experiments were conducted with Khoi-San descendants of the region, and hourly caloric return rates for experienced foragers were measured on 41 days near low tide and through three seasons over two study years. On-site return rates varied as a function of sex, tidal level, marine habitat type and weather conditions. The overall energetic return rate from the entire sample (1492 kcal h(-1)) equals or exceeds intertidal returns reported from other hunter-gatherer studies, as well as measured return rates for activities as diverse as hunting mammals and plant collecting. Returns are projected to be exceptionally high (∼ 3400 kcal h(-1) for men, ∼ 1900 kcal h(-1) for women) under the best combination of conditions. However, because of the monthly tidal cycle, high return foraging is only possible for about 10 days per month and for only 2-3 h on those days. These experiments suggest that while intertidal resources are attractive, women and children could not have subsisted independently, nor met all their protein-lipid needs from marine resources alone, and would have required substantial additional energy and nutrients from plant gathering and/or from males contributing game. PMID:26989020

  14. Catastrophic decline of a top carnivore in the gulf of california rocky intertidal zone.

    PubMed

    Dungan, M L; Miller, T E; Thomson, D A

    1982-05-28

    The predatory sun star, Heliaster kubiniji, once the commonest rocky intertidal asteroid of the Gulf of California, has been rare throughout this region since summer 1978 when a devastating disease outbreak occurred. This unprecedented phenomenon and several other exceptional ecological events in marine communities of the northeastern Pacific appear to be linked to large-scale climatic changes that occurred during 1977 and 1978. Implications of the decline in Heliaster kubiniji are discussed.

  15. Effect of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on intertidal fish: A field study

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, W.E.; McDonald, L.L.; Erickson, W.P.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the March 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill and subsequent cleanup activities on density, biomass, and species diversity of intertidal fishes in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Intertidal fish were sampled in a quasi-experimental, matched-pairs (oiled-cleaned versus reference sites) design stratified by three habitat types with random selection of oiled-cleaned (O-C) sites. Site pairs were sampled twice in 1990 and in 1991. Of 21 fish taxa, 5 made up 98% and 1 made up 74% of total abundance. There were no significant differences in species diversity between reference and O-C sites. Density, however, was significantly greater at reference sites for all habitats combined for both visits in 1990. In contrast, density in 1991 was about equal at reference and O-C sites. Total biomass for all habitats combined was greater at reference than O-C sites during both visits in 1990, but differences were not statistically significant. In 1991, however, the total biomass at reference and O-C sites was about equal. Forward stepwise multiple logistic regression models indicated that presence of oil was a significant predictor of reduced density at mid-intertidal levels in 1990 but not in 1991. From the general pattern of lower density and biomass on O-C sites in 1990 followed by no significant differences in 1991 and corroborating evidence of multiple-regression modeling, we conclude that the presence of oil and subsequent cleanup activities had a negative impact on intertidal fishes in 1990 and that there was evidence that recovery was underway in 1991. 50 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Sampling design for long-term regional trends in marine rocky intertidal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Gail V.; Shelley, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Probability-based designs reduce bias and allow inference of results to the pool of sites from which they were chosen. We developed and tested probability-based designs for monitoring marine rocky intertidal assemblages at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA), Alaska. A multilevel design was used that varied in scale and inference. The levels included aerial surveys, extensive sampling of 25 sites, and more intensive sampling of 6 sites. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope ≤30° was rare. This unexpected finding illustrated one value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to include steeper, more mixed rocky habitat. Subsequently, we evaluated the statistical power of different sampling methods and sampling strategies to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus, and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. There was greatest power to detect trends in Mytilus and lesser power for barnacles and Fucus. Because of its greater power, the extensive, coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years over the intensive, fine-grained scheme. The sampling attributes that had the largest effects on power included sampling of “vertical” line transects (vs. horizontal line transects or quadrats) and increasing the number of sites. We also evaluated the power of several management-set parameters. Given equal sampling effort, sampling more sites fewer times had greater power. The information gained through intertidal monitoring is likely to be useful in assessing changes due to climate, including ocean acidification; invasive species; trampling effects; and oil spills.

  17. Functional conservation of clock output signaling between flies and intertidal crabs.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Esteban J; Lelito, Katherine R; Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Medina, Billie M; Shafer, Orie; Ceriani, M Fernanda; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2011-12-01

    Intertidal species have both circadian and circatidal clocks. Although the behavioral evidence for these oscillators is more than 5 decades old, virtually nothing is known about their molecular clockwork. Pigment-dispersing hormones (PDHs) were originally described in crustaceans. Their insect homologs, pigment-dispersing factors (PDFs), have a prominent role as clock output and synchronizing signals released from clock neurons. We show that gene duplication in crabs has led to two PDH genes (β-pdh-I and β-pdh-II). Phylogenetically, β-pdh-I is more closely related to insect pdf than to β-pdh-II, and we hypothesized that β-PDH-I may represent a canonical clock output signal. Accordingly, β-PDH-I expression in the brain of the intertidal crab Cancer productus is similar to that of PDF in Drosophila melanogaster, and neurons that express PDH-I also show CYCLE-like immunoreactivity. Using D. melanogaster pdf-null mutants (pdf(01)) as a heterologous system, we show that β-pdh-I is indistinguishable from pdf in its ability to rescue the mutant arrhythmic phenotype, but β-pdh-II fails to restore the wild-type phenotype. Application of the three peptides to explanted brains shows that PDF and β-PDH-I are equally effective in inducing the signal transduction cascade of the PDF receptor, but β-PDH-II fails to induce a normal cascade. Our results represent the first functional characterization of a putative molecular clock output in an intertidal species and may provide a critical step towards the characterization of molecular components of biological clocks in intertidal organisms.

  18. Cross-habitat interactions among bivalve species control community structure on intertidal flats.

    PubMed

    Donadi, Serena; van der Heide, Tjisse; van der Zee, Els M; Eklöf, Johan S; van de Koppel, Johan; Weerman, Ellen J; Piersma, Theunis; Olff, Han; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that spatial interactions between sedentary organisms can structure communities and promote landscape complexity in many ecosystems. Here we tested the hypothesis that reef-forming mussels (Mytilus edulis L.), a dominant intertidal ecosystem engineer in the Wadden Sea, promote abundances of the burrowing bivalve Cerastoderma edule L. (cockle) in neighboring habitats at relatively long distances coastward from mussel beds. Field surveys within and around three mussel beds showed a peak in cockle densities at 50-100 m toward the coast from the mussel bed, while cockle abundances elsewhere in the study area were very low. Field transplantation of cockles showed higher survival of young cockles (2-3 years old) and increased spat fall coastward of the mussel bed compared to within the bed and to areas without mussels, whereas growth decreased within and coastward of the mussel bed. Our measurements suggest that the observed spatial patterns in cockle numbers resulted from (1) inhibition effects by the mussels close to the beds due to preemptive algal depletion and deteriorated sediment conditions and (2) facilitation effects by the mussels farther away from the beds due to reduction of wave energy. Our results imply that these spatial, scale-dependent interactions between reef-forming ecosystem engineers and surrounding communities of sedentary benthic organisms can be an important determinant of the large-scale community structure in intertidal ecosystems. Understanding this interplay between neighboring communities of sedentary species is therefore essential for effective conservation and restoration of soft-bottom intertidal communities.

  19. The bioaccumulation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by benthic invertebrates in an intertidal marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Maruya, K.A.; Risebrough, R.W.; Horne, A.J.

    1997-06-01

    Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF; concentration in organism lipid/concentration in sediment on an organic carbon basis) of polyaromatic hydrocarbons varied with season and along an intertidal gradient in a coastal marsh in San Francisco Bay. The BSAFs were lowest during the local rainy season. During the dry season, BSAFs were lowest in the high intertidal zone closest to shore. Significant differences among species groups were also observed; BSAFs were lowest in polychaetes and highest in the Asian clam (Potamocorbula amurensis), varying over almost three orders of magnitude. The BSAFs decreased with increasing percent fines in the sediments and with PAH concentrations on an organic carbon basis. The authors suggest that a determining variable is the content of highly aromatic soot particles, which increases during periods of surface runoff and which is expected in the dry season to be highest in the high intertidal zone where these finer particles preferentially accumulate. Correlations of BSAFs with the ratio of the logarithm of the activity coefficients in porewaters to those in sediments were generally stronger than with log K{sub ow}, indicating a limitation of octanol as a surrogate for sediment organic carbon or organism lipid. These observations qualify but also strengthen the concept of equilibrium partitioning as the determining factor in bioaccumulation by benthic organisms of nonpolar organic compounds for sediments; the assumption that organic carbon can be considered in generic terms without allowance for aromaticity and probably other factors as well, must, however, be reconsidered.

  20. Preliminary Evidence for the Amplification of Global Warming in Shallow, Intertidal Estuarine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Oczkowski, Autumn; McKinney, Richard; Ayvazian, Suzanne; Hanson, Alana; Wigand, Cathleen; Markham, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, mean annual water temperature in northeastern U.S. estuaries has increased by approximately 1.2°C, with most of the warming recorded in the winter and early spring. A recent survey and synthesis of data from four locations in Southern Rhode Island has led us to hypothesize that this warming may be amplified in the shallow (<1 m), nearshore portions of these estuaries. While intertidal areas are not typically selected as locations for long-term monitoring, we compiled data from published literature, theses, and reports that suggest that enhanced warming may be occurring, perhaps at rates three times higher than deeper estuarine waters. Warmer spring waters may be one of the factors influencing biota residing in intertidal regions both in general as well as at our specific sites. We observed greater abundance of fish, and size of Menidia sp., in recent (2010–2012) seine surveys compared to similar collections in 1962. While any linkages are speculative and data are preliminary, taken together they suggest that shallow intertidal portions of estuaries may be important places to look for the effects of climate change. PMID:26510009

  1. Effects of beach replenishment on intertidal invertebrates: A 15-month, eight beach study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, Tyler; Henter, Heather J.; Kohn, Joshua R.

    2016-06-01

    Beach replenishment is an increasingly popular means to remediate coastal erosion, but no consensus exists regarding how long replenishment affects sandy beach intertidal invertebrates, key components of beach ecosystems. We monitored the intertidal invertebrate community for fifteen months following a replenishment project at eight beaches, each with replenished and control sections, across San Diego County. Nearly all taxa showed major declines in abundance immediately following replenishment. Populations of talitrid amphipods and the bean clam Donax gouldii recovered within one year, sooner than in previous studies. On some beaches, populations of the mole crab Emerita analoga bloomed four months after replenishment and were more numerous on replenished portions of beaches at that time. Mole crab populations subsequently declined and no longer differed by treatment. The polychaete community, composed of Scolelepis sp. and several other numerically important taxa, showed a strong replenishment-induced reduction in abundance that persisted through the end of the study. The large negative effect of replenishment on polychaetes, coupled with their overall importance to the invertebrate community, resulted in a more than twofold reduction in overall invertebrate abundance on replenished beaches at 15 months. Such reductions may have far reaching consequences for sandy beach ecosystems, as community declines can reduce prey availability for shorebirds and fish. As this and other recent studies have revealed longer times for the recovery of intertidal invertebrates than previously observed, longer study periods and more cautious estimates regarding the magnitude, variability, and duration of impacts of beach replenishment for management decision-making are warranted.

  2. Preliminary Evidence for the Amplification of Global Warming in Shallow, Intertidal Estuarine Waters.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Autumn; McKinney, Richard; Ayvazian, Suzanne; Hanson, Alana; Wigand, Cathleen; Markham, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, mean annual water temperature in northeastern U.S. estuaries has increased by approximately 1.2°C, with most of the warming recorded in the winter and early spring. A recent survey and synthesis of data from four locations in Southern Rhode Island has led us to hypothesize that this warming may be amplified in the shallow (<1 m), nearshore portions of these estuaries. While intertidal areas are not typically selected as locations for long-term monitoring, we compiled data from published literature, theses, and reports that suggest that enhanced warming may be occurring, perhaps at rates three times higher than deeper estuarine waters. Warmer spring waters may be one of the factors influencing biota residing in intertidal regions both in general as well as at our specific sites. We observed greater abundance of fish, and size of Menidia sp., in recent (2010-2012) seine surveys compared to similar collections in 1962. While any linkages are speculative and data are preliminary, taken together they suggest that shallow intertidal portions of estuaries may be important places to look for the effects of climate change.

  3. High-resolution analysis of metabolic cycles in the intertidal mussel Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Connor, Kwasi M; Gracey, Andrew Y

    2012-01-01

    Inhabitants of the marine rocky intertidal live in an environment that alternates between aquatic and terrestrial due to the rise and fall of the tide. The tide creates a cyclical availability of oxygen with animals having access to oxygenated water during episodes of submergence, while access to oxygen is restricted during aerial emergence. Here we performed liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry enabled metabolomic profiling of gill samples isolated from the California ribbed mussel, Mytilus californianus, to investigate how metabolism is orchestrated in this variable environment. We created a simulated intertidal environment in which mussels were acclimated to alternating high and low tides of 6 h duration, and samples were taken every 2 h for 72 h to capture reproducible changes in metabolite levels over six high and six low tides. We quantified 169 named metabolites of which 24 metabolites cycled significantly with a 12-h period that was linked to the tidal cycle. These data confirmed the presence of alternating phases of fermentation and aerobic metabolism and highlight a role for carnitine-conjugated metabolites during the anaerobic phase of this cycle. Mussels at low tide accumulated eight carnitine-conjugated metabolites, arising from the degradation of fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, and mitochondrial β-oxidation end products. The data also implicate sphingosine as a potential signaling molecule during aerial emergence. These findings identify new levels of metabolic control whose role in intertidal adaptation remains to be elucidated.

  4. Temperature and acidification variability reduce physiological performance in the intertidal zone porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Adam W; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-11-15

    We show here that increased variability of temperature and pH synergistically negatively affects the energetics of intertidal zone crabs. Under future climate scenarios, coastal ecosystems are projected to have increased extremes of low tide-associated thermal stress and ocean acidification-associated low pH, the individual or interactive effects of which have yet to be determined. To characterize energetic consequences of exposure to increased variability of pH and temperature, we exposed porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes, to conditions that simulated current and future intertidal zone thermal and pH environments. During the daily low tide, specimens were exposed to no, moderate or extreme heating, and during the daily high tide experienced no, moderate or extreme acidification. Respiration rate and cardiac thermal limits were assessed following 2.5 weeks of acclimation. Thermal variation had a larger overall effect than pH variation, though there was an interactive effect between the two environmental drivers. Under the most extreme temperature and pH combination, respiration rate decreased while heat tolerance increased, indicating a smaller overall aerobic energy budget (i.e. a reduced O2 consumption rate) of which a larger portion is devoted to basal maintenance (i.e. greater thermal tolerance indicating induction of the cellular stress response). These results suggest the potential for negative long-term ecological consequences for intertidal ectotherms exposed to increased extremes in pH and temperature due to reduced energy for behavior and reproduction.

  5. Habitats of Culicoides spp. in an intertidal zone of southeast Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hagan, C E; Kettle, D S

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of immature Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in the intertidal zone was investigated at Redland Bay near Brisbane, southeast Queensland. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of Culicoides immatures and to identify environmental factors influencing these distributions. Light trapping of adult midges indicated that C.subimmaculatus Lee & Reye, C.marmoratus (Skuse), C.longior Hagan & Reye, C.henryi Lee & Reye, C.cordiger Macfie, may have been breeding in the study site. Soil sampling on six transects traversing mangrove and salt-marsh revealed the breeding habitats from which immature stages of the first four species were obtained. The elevation, vegetation and soils of positive sites were recorded and analysed for each species of Culicoides. The distribution of intertidal vegetation (mangroves and salt-marsh plants) was compared to MacNae's (1966) system of mangrove zonation for eastern Australia. The distribution of immature Culicoides did not correspond with mangrove zones, but was related to the presence or absence of intertidal vegetation. C.subimmaculatus was closely associated with a particular substrate and the presence of burrowing crabs.

  6. Competition among marsh macrophytes by means of geomorphological displacement in the intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, James T.

    2006-09-01

    Competitive interactions among marsh plant species are mediated by the influence of the vegetation on sediment accretion and modifications of the relative elevation of the marsh surface. A model described here demonstrates some of the feedbacks between physical processes like sediment accretion and biological processes such as those that determine species zonation patterns. Changes in geomorphology, primary productivity and the spatial distribution of plant species are explained by competitive interactions and by interactions among the tides, biomass density, and sediment accretion that regulate the elevation of intertidal wetlands toward an equilibrium with mean sea level (MSL). This equilibrium is affected positively (relative elevation of the marsh surface increases) by the biomass density of emergent, salt marsh macrophytes and negatively by the rate of sea-level rise (SLR). It was demonstrated that a dominant, invading species is able to modify its environment, raising the elevation of the habitat, to exclude competitively inferior species, a process I refer to as geomorphological displacement. However, the outcome depends on a number of variables including the rate of sea-level rise and the distributions of the species across the intertidal gradient. The model predicts that a marsh will evolve toward alternative stable states, depending on the rate of sea-level rise and the species' fundamental and realized distributions within the intertidal zone.

  7. One solution for two challenges: the lizard Microlophus atacamensis avoids overheating by foraging in intertidal shores.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maritza; Sabat, Pablo; Porter, Warren P; Fariña, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    In lizards, one of the most important behavioral mechanisms to cope with spatial and temporal variations in thermal resources observed is activity time. The longer a lizard can maintain activity, the more time it has to forage and reach larger adult body size. We studied the behavioral adjustments to different climatic regimens on daily and seasonal scales in three natural populations of the lizard Microlophus atacamensis along a latitudinal temperature and rainfall gradient. We also used Niche Mapper to determinate the amount of thermally suitable time for activity for this species. Abundance and daily activity patterns varied greatly over the year for the three populations. In summer and spring, the daily activity times were greater, and were reduced in fall and winter seasons. In summer, when stressful heat loads should prohibit activity over a midday gap, lizards did not show bimodal patterns of activity. Instead, they move to the cooler intertidal habitat. Abundance and thermal quality in the southernmost coolest site was lower, and the potential annual activity time decreases with latitude. Contrary to expectations, lizards from this locality showed the largest body sizes possibly due to diet and/or time to sexual maturation. Our results indicate that the intertidal habitat is a key factor that influences daily and seasonal activity of M. atacamensis lizards. While this habitat is not climatically optimal for lizards, it allows them to behaviorally extend their activity window and gain access to food in the intertidal areas.

  8. Temporal patterns in the intertidal faunal community at the mouth of a tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, C H F; Barletta, M; Dantas, D V

    2014-11-01

    The use of intertidal sandy beaches by fish and macrocrustaceans was studied at different temporal scales at the mouth of a tropical estuary. Samples were taken along the lunar and diel cycles in the late dry and rainy seasons. Fish assemblage (number of species, density and biomass), crustaceans and wrack biomass, showed significant interactions among all studied factors, and the combination of moon phase and diel cycle, resulting in different patterns of environmental variables (depth, water temperature and dissolved oxygen), affected habitat use by the different species. Variances in faunal community were detected between seasons, stimulated by salinity fluctuations from freshwater input during the rainy season. These differences suggest an important cycling of habitats and an increase in connectivity between adjacent habitats (estuary and coastal waters). Moreover, the results showed that this intertidal sandy beach also provides an alternative nursery and protected shallow-water area for the initial development phase of many marine and estuarine species. In addition, this intertidal habitat plays an important role in the maintenance of the ecological functioning of the estuarine-coastal ecosystem continuum.

  9. Temperature and acidification variability reduce physiological performance in the intertidal zone porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Adam W; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-11-15

    We show here that increased variability of temperature and pH synergistically negatively affects the energetics of intertidal zone crabs. Under future climate scenarios, coastal ecosystems are projected to have increased extremes of low tide-associated thermal stress and ocean acidification-associated low pH, the individual or interactive effects of which have yet to be determined. To characterize energetic consequences of exposure to increased variability of pH and temperature, we exposed porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes, to conditions that simulated current and future intertidal zone thermal and pH environments. During the daily low tide, specimens were exposed to no, moderate or extreme heating, and during the daily high tide experienced no, moderate or extreme acidification. Respiration rate and cardiac thermal limits were assessed following 2.5 weeks of acclimation. Thermal variation had a larger overall effect than pH variation, though there was an interactive effect between the two environmental drivers. Under the most extreme temperature and pH combination, respiration rate decreased while heat tolerance increased, indicating a smaller overall aerobic energy budget (i.e. a reduced O2 consumption rate) of which a larger portion is devoted to basal maintenance (i.e. greater thermal tolerance indicating induction of the cellular stress response). These results suggest the potential for negative long-term ecological consequences for intertidal ectotherms exposed to increased extremes in pH and temperature due to reduced energy for behavior and reproduction. PMID:25392458

  10. Testing the relative contribution of positive and negative interactions in rocky intertidal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Bertness, M.D.; Leonard, G.H.; Levine, J.M.; Schmidt, P.R.; Ingraham, A.O.

    1999-12-01

    In contrast to many other biotic forces, such as competition and predation, the role played by habitat modification by plants and sessile animals in natural communities has not been given the experimental attention it deserves. To test the hypothesis that habitat modification by seaweed canopies can have direct positive effects on rocky intertidal communities, the authors quantified habitat amelioration by Ascophyllum nodosum canopies and its consequences on understory organisms in the Gulf of Maine, USA. At the upper and lower elevational borders of the algal canopy, the authors examined the recruitment, growth, and survivorship of common benthic organisms in canopy removal, and shaded canopy removal plots intended to mimic canopy habitat modifications. The algal canopy greatly reduced potential physical stresses, particularly at high tidal heights. Maximum daily rock temperatures were 5--10 C lower and evaporative water loss was in order of magnitude less under the canopy than in canopy removal plots. The response of understory organisms to canopy removal, however, was species specific and somewhat idiosyncratic. Nonetheless, in general, at the high intertidal border of the canopy the recruitment, growth, and survival of understory organisms were enhanced by the canopy, whereas at the low intertidal border canopy effects were negative or neutral. nearly half of the interactions the authors studied were positive in the high zone.

  11. Proliferation of Purple Sulphur Bacteria at the Sediment Surface Affects Intertidal Mat Diversity and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M.; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink. PMID:24340018

  12. Clear regression of harvested intertidal mollusks. A 20-year (1994-2014) comparative study.

    PubMed

    Riera, Rodrigo; Pérez, Óscar; Álvarez, Omar; Simón, David; Díaz, Dácil; Monterroso, Óscar; Núñez, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    Intertidal mollusks are subjected to an intense environmental pressure, from human-induced stressors, mainly harvesting, to competition for food and space with other species. Here we used mollusk shell size as a measure of size distribution and reproductive potential of intertidal limpets. Two species of exploited limpets (Patella candei crenata and Patella aspera) were monitored throughout the littoral of Tenerife (Canary Islands, NE Atlantic Ocean), an overpopulated island with a high coastal pressure. The exploitation of these two limpet species is controlled by regional legislation, with seasonal closures and limits of harvest for professional (10 kg) and recreational harvesters (3-5 kg). A long-term comparison (1994-2014) of limpet size has been conducted as a surrogate of the state of conservation of these two limpets. Both species showed populations dominated largely by small-sized individuals (<30 mm) and a lack of large adults (>60 mm). The proximity to coastal settlements was not a factor to explain limpet assemblage structure. The temporal (1994-2014) comparative study showed a sharp decrease in the mean size of both limpet species (7 mm in P. aspera and 5 mm in P. candei crenata). These results might be indicative of overharvesting of both species in Tenerife. The conservation of the two studied species needs to be accomplished by the strict fulfillment of current protective strategies, as well as the creation of marine protected areas where intertidal harvesting is totally banned all over the year.

  13. One Solution for Two Challenges: The Lizard Microlophus atacamensis Avoids Overheating by Foraging in Intertidal Shores

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Maritza; Sabat, Pablo; Porter, Warren P.; Fariña, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    In lizards, one of the most important behavioral mechanisms to cope with spatial and temporal variations in thermal resources observed is activity time. The longer a lizard can maintain activity, the more time it has to forage and reach larger adult body size. We studied the behavioral adjustments to different climatic regimens on daily and seasonal scales in three natural populations of the lizard Microlophus atacamensis along a latitudinal temperature and rainfall gradient. We also used Niche Mapper to determinate the amount of thermally suitable time for activity for this species. Abundance and daily activity patterns varied greatly over the year for the three populations. In summer and spring, the daily activity times were greater, and were reduced in fall and winter seasons. In summer, when stressful heat loads should prohibit activity over a midday gap, lizards did not show bimodal patterns of activity. Instead, they move to the cooler intertidal habitat. Abundance and thermal quality in the southernmost coolest site was lower, and the potential annual activity time decreases with latitude. Contrary to expectations, lizards from this locality showed the largest body sizes possibly due to diet and/or time to sexual maturation. Our results indicate that the intertidal habitat is a key factor that influences daily and seasonal activity of M. atacamensis lizards. While this habitat is not climatically optimal for lizards, it allows them to behaviorally extend their activity window and gain access to food in the intertidal areas. PMID:24839969

  14. Dynamics of intertidal foraging by coastal brown bears in Southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, T.S.; Partridge, S.T.

    2004-01-01

    Shoreline areas provide early season foraging opportunities for coastal bears in Alaska. We investigated use by brown bears (Ursus arctos) of soft-shelled (Mya arenaria) and Pacific razor (Siliqua patula) clams at Katmai National Park, Alaska, USA, to identify the potential importance of these clams to bears. We used direct observations of bear foraging behavior in the summers of 1998, 1999, and 2001 to model the nutritional importance of clamming behavior. We also used previously described models to estimate the relative importance of clamming and vegetative foraging in meeting the maintenance requirements of bears. At the harvest rate that we observed (0.69 ?? 0.46 clams/min), bears achieved higher rates of digestible energy intake than those foraging on vegetation. Although clams are available for only a few hours per day, bears could significantly reduce their total daily foraging time by utilizing clams. Smaller single bears and females with dependent young were the most represented groups of bears using intertidal areas. Large male bears, faced with higher energy requirements, likely are unable to efficiently exploit these intertidal resources. Depending on the relationship between clam size and tissue mass, the relative quality of clams differed by species. Bears foraging on Pacific razor clams required the fewest hours to meet maintenance, followed by bears consuming soft-shelled clams. Our findings highlight the significance of intertidal habitats for coastal bears, especially females.

  15. Cross-habitat interactions among bivalve species control community structure on intertidal flats.

    PubMed

    Donadi, Serena; van der Heide, Tjisse; van der Zee, Els M; Eklöf, Johan S; van de Koppel, Johan; Weerman, Ellen J; Piersma, Theunis; Olff, Han; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that spatial interactions between sedentary organisms can structure communities and promote landscape complexity in many ecosystems. Here we tested the hypothesis that reef-forming mussels (Mytilus edulis L.), a dominant intertidal ecosystem engineer in the Wadden Sea, promote abundances of the burrowing bivalve Cerastoderma edule L. (cockle) in neighboring habitats at relatively long distances coastward from mussel beds. Field surveys within and around three mussel beds showed a peak in cockle densities at 50-100 m toward the coast from the mussel bed, while cockle abundances elsewhere in the study area were very low. Field transplantation of cockles showed higher survival of young cockles (2-3 years old) and increased spat fall coastward of the mussel bed compared to within the bed and to areas without mussels, whereas growth decreased within and coastward of the mussel bed. Our measurements suggest that the observed spatial patterns in cockle numbers resulted from (1) inhibition effects by the mussels close to the beds due to preemptive algal depletion and deteriorated sediment conditions and (2) facilitation effects by the mussels farther away from the beds due to reduction of wave energy. Our results imply that these spatial, scale-dependent interactions between reef-forming ecosystem engineers and surrounding communities of sedentary benthic organisms can be an important determinant of the large-scale community structure in intertidal ecosystems. Understanding this interplay between neighboring communities of sedentary species is therefore essential for effective conservation and restoration of soft-bottom intertidal communities. PMID:23691667

  16. Recolonization of the intertidal and shallow subtidal community following the 2008 eruption of Alaska's Kasatochi Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, S. C.; Drew, G. S.

    2014-03-01

    The intertidal and nearshore benthic communities of Kasatochi Island are described following a catastrophic volcanic eruption in 2008. Prior to the eruption, the island was surrounded by a dense bed of canopy-forming dragon kelp Eualaria fistulosa which supported a productive nearshore community. The eruption extended the coastline of the island approximately 400 m offshore to roughly the 20 m isobath. One year following the eruption a reconnaissance survey found the intertidal zone devoid of life. Subtidally, the canopy kelp, as well as limited understory algal species and associated benthic fauna on the hard substratum, were buried by debris from the eruption. The resulting substrate was comprised almost entirely of medium and coarse sands with a depauperate benthic community. Comparisons of habitat and biological communities with other nearby Aleutian Islands and the Icelandic submarine volcanic eruption of Surtsey confirm dramatic reductions in flora and fauna consistent with the initial stages of recovery from a large-scale disturbance event. Four and five years following the eruption brief visits revealed dramatic intertidal and subtidal recolonization of the flora and fauna in some areas. Signs of nesting and fledging of young pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba suggest that the recovery of the nearshore biota may have begun affecting higher trophic levels. Recolonization or lack thereof was tied to bathymetric changes from coastal and nearshore erosion over the study period.

  17. Novel nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes sequenced from intertidal mudflat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tambadou, Fatoumata; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Sablé, Sophie; Klein, Géraldine L; Doghri, Ibtissem; Sopéna, Valérie; Didelot, Sandrine; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Thiéry, Valérie; Chevrot, Romain

    2014-08-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) are actively sought out, due to pharmacologically important activities of their metabolites. In marine environment, the most prevalent nonribosomal peptide antibiotic producers are sponges inhabiting microorganisms. Conversely, strains from marine sediments and more especially from intertidal mudflats have not been extensively screened for the presence of new NRPS. In this study, for the first time, a collection of one hundred intertidal mudflat bacterial isolates (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) was assessed for (1) the presence of NRPS genes by degenerated PCR targeting conserved adenylation domains and (2) for their production of antimicrobial molecules. (1) Bacteria with adenylation domains (14 strains) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and grouped into Firmicutes (one strain) and Proteobacteria (13 strains). In silico analysis of the NRPS amino acid sequences (n = 7) showed 41-58% ID with sequences found in the NCBI database. Three new putative adenylation domain signatures were found. (2) The culture supernatant of one of these strains, identified as a Bacillus, was shown to strongly inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis. This study portends that the intertidal mudflat niche could be of interest for the discovery of new NRPS genes and antimicrobial producing strains. PMID:25039651

  18. Short-term dynamics of intertidal microphytobenthic biomass. Mathematical modelling [La dynamique a court terme de la biomasse du microphytobenthos intertidal. Formalisation mathematique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guarini, J.-M.; Gros, P.; Blanchard, G.F.; Bacher, C.

    1999-01-01

    We formulate a deterministic mathematical model to describe the dynamics of the microphytobenthos of intertidal mudflats. It is 'minimal' because it only takes into account the essential processes governing the functioning of the system: the autotrophic production, the active upward and downward migrations of epipelic microalgae, the saturation of the mud surface by a biofilm of diatoms and the global net loss rates of biomass. According to the photic environment of the benthic diatoms inhabiting intertidal mudflats, and to their migration rhythm, the model is composed of two sub-systems of ordinary differential equations; they describe the simultaneous evolution of the biomass 'S' concentrated in the mud surface biofilm - the photic layer - and of the biomass 'F' diluted in the topmost centimetre of the mud - the aphotic layer. Qualitatively, the model solutions agree fairly well with the in situ observed dynamics of the S + F biomass. The study of the mathematical properties of the model, under some simplifying assumptions, shows the convergence of solutions to a stable cyclic equilibrium, whatever the frequencies of the physical synchronizers of the production. The sensitivity analysis reveals the necessity of a better knowledge of the processes of biomass losses, which so far are uncertain, and may further vary in space and time.

  19. Multiscale patterns in the diversity and organization of benthic intertidal fauna among French Atlantic estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Hugues; Gouillieux, Benoît; Alizier, Sandrine; Amouroux, Jean-Michel; Bachelet, Guy; Barillé, Anne-Laure; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Derolez, Valérie; Desroy, Nicolas; Grall, Jacques; Grémare, Antoine; Hacquebart, Pascal; Jourde, Jérôme; Labrune, Céline; Lavesque, Nicolas; Meirland, Alain; Nebout, Thiebaut; Olivier, Frédéric; Pelaprat, Corine; Ruellet, Thierry; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Thorin, Sébastien

    2014-07-01

    Based on a parallel sampling conducted during autumn 2008, a comparative study of the intertidal benthic macrofauna among 10 estuarine systems located along the Channel and Atlantic coasts of France was performed in order to assess the level of fauna similarity among these sites and to identify possible environmental factors involved in the observed pattern at both large (among sites) and smaller (benthic assemblages) scales. More precisely this study focused on unraveling the observed pattern of intertidal benthic fauna composition and diversity observed at among-site scale by exploring both biotic and abiotic factors acting at the among- and within-site scales. Results showed a limited level of similarity at the among-site level in terms of intertidal benthic fauna composition and diversity. The observed pattern did not fit with existing transitional water classification methods based on fish or benthic assemblages developed in the frame of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). More particularly, the coastal plain estuaries displayed higher among-site similarity compared to ria systems. These coastal plain estuaries were characterized by higher influence of river discharge, lower communication with the ocean and high suspended particulate matter levels. On the other hand, the ria-type systems were more dissimilar and different from the coastal plain estuaries. The level of similarity among estuaries was mainly linked to the relative extent of the intertidal “Scrobicularia plana-Cerastoderma edule” and “Tellina tenuis” or “Venus” communities as a possible consequence of salinity regime, suspended matter concentrations and fine particles supply with consequences on the trophic functioning, structure and organization of benthic fauna. Despite biogeographical patterns, the results also suggest that, in the context of the WFD, these estuaries should only be compared on the basis of the most common intertidal habitat occurring throughout all

  20. 8 CFR 1240.4 - Incompetent respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1240.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Removal Proceedings § 1240.4 Incompetent respondents. When it is impracticable for the respondent to be present at...

  1. 8 CFR 1240.4 - Incompetent respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1240.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Removal Proceedings § 1240.4 Incompetent respondents. When it is impracticable for the respondent to be present at...

  2. 8 CFR 1240.4 - Incompetent respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1240.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Removal Proceedings § 1240.4 Incompetent respondents. When it is impracticable for the respondent to be present at...

  3. 8 CFR 1240.4 - Incompetent respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1240.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Removal Proceedings § 1240.4 Incompetent respondents. When it is impracticable for the respondent to be present at...

  4. 8 CFR 1240.4 - Incompetent respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1240.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Removal Proceedings § 1240.4 Incompetent respondents. When it is impracticable for the respondent to be present at...

  5. Evaluation of Respondent-Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Nicky; Frost, Simon; Seeley, Janet; Katongole, Joseph; Tarsh, Matilda Ndagire; Ndunguse, Richard; Jichi, Fatima; Lunel, Natasha L; Maher, Dermot; Johnston, Lisa G; Sonnenberg, Pam; Copas, Andrew J; Hayes, Richard J; White, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Background Respondent-driven sampling is a novel variant of link-tracing sampling for estimating the characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as HIV prevalence in sex-workers. Despite its use by leading health organizations, the performance of this method in realistic situations is still largely unknown. We evaluated respondent-driven sampling by comparing estimates from a respondent-driven sampling survey with total-population data. Methods Total-population data on age, tribe, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual activity and HIV status were available on a population of 2402 male household-heads from an open cohort in rural Uganda. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey was carried out in this population, employing current methods of sampling (RDS sample) and statistical inference (RDS estimates). Analyses were carried out for the full RDS sample and then repeated for the first 250 recruits (small sample). Results We recruited 927 household-heads. Full and small RDS samples were largely representative of the total population, but both samples under-represented men who were younger, of higher socioeconomic status, and with unknown sexual activity and HIV status. Respondent-driven-sampling statistical-inference methods failed to reduce these biases. Only 31%-37% (depending on method and sample size) of RDS estimates were closer to the true population proportions than the RDS sample proportions. Only 50%-74% of respondent-driven-sampling bootstrap 95% confidence intervals included the population proportion. Conclusions Respondent-driven sampling produced a generally representative sample of this well-connected non-hidden population. However, current respondent-driven-sampling inference methods failed to reduce bias when it occurred. Whether the data required to remove bias and measure precision can be collected in a respondent-driven sampling survey is unresolved. Respondent-driven sampling should be regarded as a (potentially superior) form of convenience

  6. The effect of life-history variation on the population size structure of a rocky intertidal snail ( Littorina sitkana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, Rémy; Dunmall, Karen; Dill, Lawrence M.

    2003-03-01

    On wave-sheltered shores of the northeastern Pacific, the population size structure of Littorina sitkana varies with intertidal height, as larger snails are mostly found only in the upper intertidal. This pattern has been attributed to high predation rates by crabs (and perhaps fish) on large snails inhabiting low-intertidal areas; i.e., large snails are presumed to be rare there simply because predators kill them. In this study we investigate the hypothesis that predation contributes to the shore-level size gradient displayed by L. sitkana by selecting for (or inducing) earlier sexual maturation and reduced somatic growth in low-shore snails relative to high-shore individuals. In the first part of our study, we carried out laboratory dissections, field experiments (mark-release-recapture and caging), and field surveys on a wave-protected shore in Bamfield Inlet, Barkley Sound (British Columbia, Canada). The principal results were: (1) adult survivorship was greater at higher, than at lower, intertidal level, (2) snails displayed a preference for their shore level of origin, (3) immature adults from the high intertidal displayed greater rates of somatic growth relative to immature adults from the low intertidal, and (4) low-shore snails matured at a smaller size than high-shore individuals. In the second part of the study, a large-scale survey showed intra-specific variation in size at sexual maturity (point 4 above) to be relatively consistent over time (winter of 1999 and 2001 for snails from our main study site) and space (13 different sites in winter 2001), although the magnitude of these differences varied greatly from shore to shore. Our results indicate that L. sitkana individuals inhabiting upper and lower parts of their intertidal range allocate resources differently to somatic and gonadal growth, an intra-specific difference that is best interpreted as a response to spatial and size-dependent variation in predation pressure. Taken together, results of

  7. Development of a Monitoring Protocol to Detect Ecological Change in the Intertidal Zone of Sitka National Historical Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Gail V.; Madison, Erica N.

    2008-01-01

    A pilot study to develop and test a probability-based intertidal monitoring protocol for Sitka National Historical Park was conducted from 1999 to 2003. In 1999, the basic design, with a focus on sampling the whole of the designated intertidal was created, and sampling was conducted for sessile species and large mobile invertebrates by point-intercept sampling of vertical transects and band surveys along transects, respectively. In 2002 and 2003, the same types of sampling were conducted, but quadrat sampling for small mobile invertebrates was added and then modified. This project has produced basic data on the presence, abundance, and spatial distribution of substrates and intertidal biota. Additionally, statistical power analyses conducted on the biological data have allowed assessment of the ability of the sampling to detect trends in the abundance of the predominant species. Current sampling has an 80 percent probability to detect +10 percent annual changes in abundance of all targeted species with an a = 0.05; the ability to detect -10 percent trends is not as uniformly high. Various options are discussed for decreasing the spatial variance of the data. The information presented provides a basis for discussion of the major questions being asked, how the sampling design might be reconfigured to be consistent in approach, and how the intertidal monitoring should interface with other potential intertidal monitoring.

  8. Kite Aerial Photography for Low-Cost, Ultra-high Spatial Resolution Multi-Spectral Mapping of Intertidal Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Mitch; Johnson-Roberson, Matthew; Murphy, Richard J.; Bongiorno, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time that could complement field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at limited spatial and temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecologically-focussed studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric/mapping procedure that was developed for constructing high-resolution, three-dimensional, multi-spectral terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing procedure uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine imagery at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an intertidal shoreline 200 m long, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rocky shore at Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:24069206

  9. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  10. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (December 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-13

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  11. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (January 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  12. Enhancing Academic Engagement: Providing Opportunities for Responding and Influencing Students to Choose to Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Pappas, Danielle N.; Davis, Kai A.

    2005-01-01

    Although educators often provide opportunities for students to engage in active academic responding, in many situations, students either cannot or will not respond. In the current article, we analyze the reasons students fail to respond. Practical procedures educators can use to prevent "can't do" problems are provided. "Won't do" problems are…

  13. DESICCATION IS A LIMITING FACTOR FOR EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA L.) DISTRIBUTION IN THE INTERTIDAL ZONE OF A NORTHEASTERN P{ACIFIC (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intertidal irradiance, temperature, and aerial exposure were measured for two years in intertidal Zostera marina beds located in Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR, USA). These physical data were correlated with plant growth and other metrics measured at intervals during the study. Pho...

  14. Are all intertidal wetlands naturally created equal? Bottlenecks, thresholds and knowledge gaps to mangrove and saltmarsh ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Horstman, Erik M.; Balke, Thorsten; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Galli, Demis; Webb, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands such as saltmarshes and mangroves provide numerous important ecological functions, though they are in rapid and global decline. To better conserve and restore these wetland ecosystems, we need an understanding of the fundamental natural bottlenecks and thresholds to their establishment and long-term ecological maintenance. Despite inhabiting similar intertidal positions, the biological traits of these systems differ markedly in structure, phenology, life history, phylogeny and dispersal, suggesting large differences in biophysical interactions. By providing the first systematic comparison between saltmarshes and mangroves, we unravel how the interplay between species-specific life-history traits, biophysical interactions and biogeomorphological feedback processes determine where, when and what wetland can establish, the thresholds to long-term ecosystem stability, and constraints to genetic connectivity between intertidal wetland populations at the landscape level. To understand these process interactions, research into the constraints to wetland development, and biological adaptations to overcome these critical bottlenecks and thresholds requires a truly interdisciplinary approach.

  15. Effects of predation by sea ducks on clam abundance in soft-bottom intertidal habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Tyler; Esler, Daniel N.; Boyd, W. Sean

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have documented strong, top-down predation effects of sea ducks on mussel populations in rocky intertidal communities. However, the impact of these gregarious predators in soft-bottom communities has been largely unexplored. We evaluated effects of predation by wintering surf scoters Melanitta perspicillata and white-winged scoters M. fusca on clam populations in soft-bottom intertidal habitats of the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia. Specifically, we documented spatial and temporal variation in clam density (clams m–2), scoter diet composition, and the consequences of scoter predation on clam abundance. Of the 3 most numerous clams, Manila clams Venerupis philippinarum and varnish clams Nuttallia obscurata were the primary prey items of both scoter species, while clams of the genus Macoma were rarely consumed by scoters. Between scoter arrival in the fall and departure in the spring, Manila clams decreased in density at most sample sites, while varnish clam densities did not change or declined slightly. Our estimates of numbers of clams consumed by scoters accounted for most of the observed declines in combined abundance of Manila and varnish clams, despite the presence of numerous other vertebrate and invertebrate species known to consume clams. For Macoma spp., we detected an over-winter increase in density, presumably due to growth of clams too small to be retained by our sieve (<5 mm) during fall sampling, in addition to the lack of predation pressure by scoters. These results illustrate the strong predation potential of scoters in soft-bottom intertidal habitats, as well as their potentially important role in shaping community structure.

  16. Hydrogeochemical zonation in intertidal salt marsh sediments: evidence of positive plant-soil feedback?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, K. B.; Dittmar, J.; Seyfferth, A.; Fendorf, S.; Gorelick, S.

    2012-12-01

    Surface and subsurface environments are linked by the biogeochemical activity in near-surface sediment and by the hydrological fluxes that mobilize its reagents and products. A particularly dynamic and interesting setting to study near-surface hydrogeochemistry is the intertidal zone. Here, the very strong tidal hydraulic forcing is often thought to dominate water and solute transport. However, we demonstrated the importance of two additional subsurface drivers: groundwater flow and plant root water uptake. A high-resolution, coupled surface water-groundwater model of an intertidal salt marsh in San Francisco Bay, CA showed that these three drivers vary over different spatial scales: tidal flooding varies over 10's of meters; groundwater flow varies over meters, particularly within channel banks; and plant root water uptake varies in 3D at the sub-meter scale. Expanding on this third driver, we investigated whether the spatial variations in soil-water-plant hydraulic interactions that occur due to vegetation zonation also cause distinct geochemical zonation in salt marsh sediment pore waters. The existence of such geochemical zonation was verified and mapped by detailed field observations of the chemical composition of sediments, pore waters, surface waters, and vegetation. The field data and the coupled hydrologic model were then further analyzed to evaluate potential causal mechanisms for the geochemical zonation, including testing the hypothesis that the vegetation affects pore water geochemistry via a positive feedback beneficial to itself. If further supported by future studies, this geochemical feedback may complement known physical ecosystem engineering mechanisms to help stabilize and organize intertidal wetlands.

  17. Natural disturbance shapes benthic intertidal macroinvertebrate communities of high latitude river deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchwell, Roy T.; Kendall, Steve J.; Blanchard, Amy L.; Dunton, Kenneth H.; Powell, Abby N.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike lower latitude coastlines, the estuarine nearshore zones of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea are icebound and frozen up to 9 months annually. This annual freezing event represents a dramatic physical disturbance to fauna living within intertidal sediments. The main objectives of this study were to describe the benthic communities of Beaufort Sea deltas, including temporal changes and trophic structure. Understanding benthic invertebrate communities provided a baseline for concurrent research on shorebird foraging ecology at these sites. We found that despite continuous year-to-year episodes of annual freezing, these estuarine deltas are populated by a range of invertebrates that represent both marine and freshwater assemblages. Freshwater organisms like Diptera and Oligochaeta not only survive this extreme event, but a marine invasion of infaunal organisms such as Amphipoda and Polychaeta rapidly recolonizes the delta mudflats following ice ablation. These delta sediments of sand, silt, and clay are fine in structure compared to sediments of other Beaufort Sea coastal intertidal habitats. The relatively depauperate invertebrate community that ultimately develops is composed of marine and freshwater benthic invertebrates. The composition of the infauna also reflects two strategies that make life on Beaufort Sea deltas possible: a migration of marine organisms from deeper lagoons to the intertidal and freshwater biota that survive the 9-month ice-covered period in frozen sediments. Stable isotopic analyses reveal that both infaunal assemblages assimilate marine and terrestrial sources of organic carbon. These results provide some of the first quantitative information on the infaunal food resources of shallow arctic estuarine systems and the long-term persistence of these invertebrate assemblages. Our data help explain the presence of large numbers of shorebirds in these habitats during the brief summer open-water period and their trophic importance to migrating

  18. Sediment dynamics within the intertidal floodplain of the lower Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, A. T.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Asp, N. E.; Souza Filho, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal influence extends ~800 kilometers upstream of the Amazon River mouth, producing semidiurnal oscillations in water elevation and slowing or reversing the flow of the world's largest river. This tidally influenced reach, known as the tidal river, is flanked by an expansive intertidal floodplain, and includes confluences with two large tributaries, the Xingu and Tapajós. The relative magnitude of the seasonal and tidal signals changes along the length of the tidal river, yielding diverse floodplain environments that span a range of seasonal and tidal influence. Near the upstream limit of tides, natural levees isolate the river from the floodplain during low to moderate flows, while in the lower tidal river, natural levees are absent and river-floodplain exchange is dominated by the tides rather than seasonal variation in river stage. This difference between fluvial and tidal systems strongly affects the nature of sediment exchange between the channel and floodplain, including frequency, duration, and depth of inundation. Here we present data on the impact of this fluvial-tidal continuum on sedimentary processes in the floodplain and resultant depositional signatures. Changes in levee prominence, grain size, and sediment accumulation combine to produce the distinct morphologies of floodplain lakes, intertidal backswamps, and intertidal flats. In addition to sediment accumulation on the periodically exposed floodplain, Amazon River sediment accumulates within the drowned tributary confluences of the Xingu and Tapajós Rivers. Here seasonal and tidal changes in water temperature, discharge, and suspended-sediment concentration drive barotropic and baroclinic flows that transport Amazon River sediment into tributary basins. These findings help to constrain the fate of sediment within the ungauged Amazon tidal river, and will help in understanding the response of the lower Amazon River to changes in accommodation space associated with rising sea level, and changes

  19. Differences in Intertidal Microbial Assemblages on Urban Structures and Natural Rocky Reef

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Elisa L.-Y.; Mayer-Pinto, Mariana; Johnston, Emma L.; Dafforn, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Global seascapes are increasingly modified to support high levels of human activity in the coastal zone. Modifications include the addition of defense structures and boating infrastructure, such as seawalls and marinas that replace natural habitats. Artificial structures support different macrofaunal communities to those found on natural rocky shores; however, little is known about differences in microbial community structure or function in urban seascapes. Understanding how artificial constructions in marine environments influence microbial communities is important as these assemblages contribute to many basic ecological processes. In this study, the bacterial communities of intertidal biofilms were compared between artificial structures (seawalls) and natural habitats (rocky shores) within Sydney Harbour. Plots were cleared on each type of habitat at eight locations. After 3 weeks the newly formed biofilm was sampled and the 16S rRNA gene sequenced using the Illumina Miseq platform. To account for differences in orientation and substrate material between seawalls and rocky shores that might have influenced our survey, we also deployed recruitment blocks next to the habitats at all locations for 3 weeks and then sampled and sequenced their microbial communities. Intertidal bacterial community structure sampled from plots differed between seawalls and rocky shores, but when substrate material, age and orientation were kept constant (with recruitment blocks) then bacterial communities were similar in composition and structure among habitats. This suggests that changes in bacterial communities on seawalls are not related to environmental differences between locations, but may be related to other intrinsic factors that differ between the habitats such as orientation, complexity, or predation. This is one of the first comparisons of intertidal microbial communities on natural and artificial surfaces and illustrates substantial ecological differences with potential

  20. Sea otters homogenize mussel beds and reduce habitat provisioning in a rocky intertidal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gerald G; Markel, Russell W; Martone, Rebecca G; Salomon, Anne K; Harley, Christopher D G; Chan, Kai M A

    2013-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are keystone predators that consume a variety of benthic invertebrates, including the intertidal mussel, Mytilus californianus. By virtue of their competitive dominance, large size, and longevity, M. californianus are ecosystem engineers that form structurally complex beds that provide habitat for diverse invertebrate communities. We investigated whether otters affect mussel bed characteristics (i.e. mussel length distributions, mussel bed depth, and biomass) and associated community structure (i.e. biomass, alpha and beta diversity) by comparing four regions that varied in their histories of sea otter occupancy on the west coast of British Columbia and northern Washington. Mussel bed depth and average mussel lengths were 1.5 times lower in regions occupied by otters for >20 years than those occupied for <5 yrs. Diversity of mussel bed associated communities did not differ between regions; however, the total biomass of species associated with mussel beds was more than three-times higher where sea otters were absent. We examined alternative explanations for differences in mussel bed community structure, including among-region variation in oceanographic conditions and abundance of the predatory sea star Pisaster ochraceus. We cannot discount multiple drivers shaping mussel beds, but our findings indicate the sea otters are an important one. We conclude that, similar to their effects on subtidal benthic invertebrates, sea otters reduce the size distributions of intertidal mussels and, thereby, habitat available to support associated communities. Our study indicates that by reducing populations of habitat-providing intertidal mussels, sea otters may have substantial indirect effects on associated communities.

  1. Comparing quality of estuarine and nearshore intertidal habitats for Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Jenkins, Stuart; Hawkins, Stephen; Paula, José

    2009-06-01

    Estuarine and nearshore marine areas are vital habitats for several fish and benthic invertebrates. The shore crab Carcinus maenas (Crustacea: Brachyura: Portunidae) inhabits a variety of coastal, estuarine and lagoon habitats. At low tide, habitat structural complexity may be most important for crabs in the intertidal, providing refuge from predation and desiccation. The quality of different vegetated and nonvegetated estuarine and rocky shore habitats in SW Portugal and SW England was evaluated for intertidal C. maenas populations. We estimated population density, size-structure, and potential growth (RNA/DNA ratios) to investigate habitat quality. Vegetated estuarine habitats supported higher crab densities, than nonvegetated estuarine and rocky shore habitats. Investigation of population size-structure revealed that all habitats seem important recruitment and nursery areas although estuarine habitats in SW Portugal appeared to support higher densities of new recruits than equivalent habitats in SW England. Significant variation was found in RNA/DNA ratios among habitats. Ratios were highest in the rocky shore suggesting a high quality habitat where growth potential is high. We speculate that competition from other top-predators ( Pachygrapsus spp.) rather than low habitat quality may limit the occurrence of C. maenas in intertidal rocky shore habitats in SW Portugal. In estuarine environments RNA/DNA ratios were significantly higher in the vegetated than in the nonvegetated estuarine habitats in SW Portugal but not in SW England, suggesting geographic differences in the extent to which highly structure habitats represent high quality. Our results challenge the current paradigm that structured habitats are necessarily those of higher quality for C. maenas.

  2. Sea Otters Homogenize Mussel Beds and Reduce Habitat Provisioning in a Rocky Intertidal Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gerald G.; Markel, Russell W.; Martone, Rebecca G.; Salomon, Anne K.; Harley, Christopher D. G.; Chan, Kai M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are keystone predators that consume a variety of benthic invertebrates, including the intertidal mussel, Mytilus californianus. By virtue of their competitive dominance, large size, and longevity, M. californianus are ecosystem engineers that form structurally complex beds that provide habitat for diverse invertebrate communities. We investigated whether otters affect mussel bed characteristics (i.e. mussel length distributions, mussel bed depth, and biomass) and associated community structure (i.e. biomass, alpha and beta diversity) by comparing four regions that varied in their histories of sea otter occupancy on the west coast of British Columbia and northern Washington. Mussel bed depth and average mussel lengths were 1.5 times lower in regions occupied by otters for >20 years than those occupied for <5 yrs. Diversity of mussel bed associated communities did not differ between regions; however, the total biomass of species associated with mussel beds was more than three-times higher where sea otters were absent. We examined alternative explanations for differences in mussel bed community structure, including among-region variation in oceanographic conditions and abundance of the predatory sea star Pisaster ochraceus. We cannot discount multiple drivers shaping mussel beds, but our findings indicate the sea otters are an important one. We conclude that, similar to their effects on subtidal benthic invertebrates, sea otters reduce the size distributions of intertidal mussels and, thereby, habitat available to support associated communities. Our study indicates that by reducing populations of habitat-providing intertidal mussels, sea otters may have substantial indirect effects on associated communities. PMID:23717697

  3. Ecological roles and biotechnological applications of marine and intertidal microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayani; Sana, Barindra; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    This review is a retrospective of ecological effects of bioactivities produced by biofilms of surface-dwelling marine/intertidal microbes as well as of the industrial and environmental biotechnologies developed exploiting the knowledge of biofilm formation. Some examples of significant interest pertaining to the ecological aspects of biofilm-forming species belonging to the Roseobacter clade include autochthonous bacteria from turbot larvae-rearing units with potential application as a probiotic as well as production of tropodithietic acid and indigoidine. Species of the Pseudoalteromonas genus are important examples of successful surface colonizers through elaboration of the AlpP protein and antimicrobial agents possessing broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against medical and environmental isolates. Further examples of significance comprise antiprotozoan activity of Pseudoalteromonas tunicata elicited by violacein, inhibition of fungal colonization, antifouling activities, inhibition of algal spore germination, and 2-n-pentyl-4-quinolinol production. Nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse gas, emanates from surface-attached microbial activity of marine animals. Marine and intertidal biofilms have been applied in the biotechnological production of violacein, phenylnannolones, and exopolysaccharides from marine and tropical intertidal environments. More examples of importance encompass production of protease, cellulase, and xylanase, melanin, and riboflavin. Antifouling activity of Bacillus sp. and application of anammox bacterial biofilms in bioremediation are described. Marine biofilms have been used as anodes and cathodes in microbial fuel cells. Some of the reaction vessels for biofilm cultivation reviewed are roller bottle, rotating disc bioreactor, polymethylmethacrylate conico-cylindrical flask, fixed bed reactor, artificial microbial mats, packed-bed bioreactors, and the Tanaka photobioreactor. PMID:24817086

  4. Effect of crab bioturbation on organic matter processing in South West Atlantic intertidal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul, Eugenia; Escapa, Mauricio; Montemayor, Diana; Addino, Mariana; Alvarez, María Fernanda; Grela, María A.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) remineralization plays a key role in controlling the biogeochemistry of marine sediments. Through their burrowing activities, bioturbating macrofauna not only induces physical, chemical and biological modifications, which can affect microbial communities responsible for organic matter remineralization, but it could also directly affect the distribution and bioavailability of sedimentary organic matter. Through in situ experiments manipulating crab and burrow density in intertidal soft-bottoms, we assessed if crab-bioturbation affects benthic metabolism, and the amount, distribution, and bioavailability of sedimentary OM. Crab-bioturbation enhanced overall benthic metabolism and benthic flux of dissolved OM toward the water column at both mudflat and saltmarsh zones. Moreover, our results revealed that bioturbation also changes the quality, bioavailability and distribution of sedimentary OM in mudflats and saltmarshes. Overall, bioturbation enhanced the proportion of labile organic carbon of bioturbated sediments and homogenized the sediment column in terms of their proportion of labile organic carbon. However, crabs also generated biogenic structures (e.g., mounds) that could promote spatial heterogeneity of high nutritional-value OM. Bioturbation-induced changes on benthic metabolism and on OM availability would result in a reduction of the storage capacity of carbon in our intertidal systems. Previous works indicated that crab-burrows trap detritus and OM-rich sediments. Our results suggest that detritus are efficiently remineralized at bioturbated sediment, and finally they are quickly exported to the water column as CO2 and DOC. Thus, crabs are modifying the OM processing at intertidal soft bottoms, and the ways in which carbon is exported to coastal waters.

  5. A multilocus molecular phylogeny of combtooth blennies (Percomorpha: Blennioidei: Blenniidae): multiple invasions of intertidal habitats.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Peter J; Iglésias, Samuel P; Hoey, Andrew S; Simons, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    The combtooth blennies (f. Blenniidae) is a diverse family of primarily marine fishes with approximately 387 species that inhabit subtidal, intertidal, supralittoral habitats in tropical and warm temperate regions throughout the world. The Blenniidae has typically been divided into six groups based on morphological characters: Blenniini, Nemophini, Omobranchini, Phenablenniini, Parablenniini, and Salariini. There is, however, considerable debate over the validity of these groups and their relationships. Since little is known about the relationships in this group, other aspects of their evolutionary history, such as habitat evolution and remain unexplored. Herein, we use Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of four nuclear loci (ENC1, myh6, ptr, and tbr1) from 102 species, representing 41 genera, to resolve the phylogeny of the Blenniidae, determine the validity of the previously recognized groupings, and explore the evolution of habitat association using ancestral state reconstruction. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of the resulting 3100bp of DNA sequence produced nearly identical topologies, and identified many well-supported clades. Of these clades, Nemophini was the only traditionally recognized group strongly supported as monophyletic. This highly resolved and thoroughly sampled blenniid phylogeny provides strong evidence that the traditional rank-based classification does not adequately delimit monophyletic groups with the Blenniidae. This phylogeny redefines the taxonomy of the group and supports the use of 13 unranked clades for the classification of blenniids. Ancestral state reconstructions identified four independent invasions of intertidal habitats within the Blenniidae, and subsequent invasions into supralittoral and freshwater habitats from these groups. The independent invasions of intertidal habitats are likely to have played an important role in the evolutionary history of blennies.

  6. Mapping intertidal surface sediment type distribution with retrieved sedimental components using EO-1 Hyperion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Yong

    2010-11-01

    Sediment type was one of the most important parameters of intertidal zone. The hydrodynamics and morphological changes could be indicated by sediment types very well, and the understanding of their distribution and stability could provide an important insight into littoral marine ecology. The way of conventional survey for sediment types was expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this study was to develop a method to distinguish sediment types using remote sensing, and enable which to be an alternative to traditional methods. Intertidal zone sediments were sampled at the south of Dafeng port, Yancheng city, Jiangsu province, China. Samples were collected from the upper 3cm surface of intertidal zone. The laboratory spectral reflectance data were obtained using a spectrometer. Particle-size of sediment samples were measured by Mastersizer 2000. Through analyzing characteristics of spectral reflectance for sediment samples, we found that two bands were sensitive to content of sediment components (sand, silt and clay) with central wavelengths at 864 and 1034 nm. However, the position of sensitive bands changed as moisture varied. In order to eliminate the impact of moisture on sediment spectral reflectance, moisture was introduced as a crucial factor to build regression equations with reflectance of sensitive bands to get contents of different sediment components, and then Shepard classification system was applied to acquire spatial distribution of sediment types. This way provided a quick, non-destructive and nonpolluting survey method. Meanwhile, this intelligent way of extracting information from muddy coastal zone will contribute to constructing digital earth, the huge system which benefits human beings.

  7. Mapping intertidal surface sediment type distribution with retrieved sedimental components using EO-1 Hyperion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Yong

    2009-09-01

    Sediment type was one of the most important parameters of intertidal zone. The hydrodynamics and morphological changes could be indicated by sediment types very well, and the understanding of their distribution and stability could provide an important insight into littoral marine ecology. The way of conventional survey for sediment types was expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this study was to develop a method to distinguish sediment types using remote sensing, and enable which to be an alternative to traditional methods. Intertidal zone sediments were sampled at the south of Dafeng port, Yancheng city, Jiangsu province, China. Samples were collected from the upper 3cm surface of intertidal zone. The laboratory spectral reflectance data were obtained using a spectrometer. Particle-size of sediment samples were measured by Mastersizer 2000. Through analyzing characteristics of spectral reflectance for sediment samples, we found that two bands were sensitive to content of sediment components (sand, silt and clay) with central wavelengths at 864 and 1034 nm. However, the position of sensitive bands changed as moisture varied. In order to eliminate the impact of moisture on sediment spectral reflectance, moisture was introduced as a crucial factor to build regression equations with reflectance of sensitive bands to get contents of different sediment components, and then Shepard classification system was applied to acquire spatial distribution of sediment types. This way provided a quick, non-destructive and nonpolluting survey method. Meanwhile, this intelligent way of extracting information from muddy coastal zone will contribute to constructing digital earth, the huge system which benefits human beings.

  8. Regional Failure of Intertidal Mussel Mg/Ca as an Independent Temperature Proxy: A Cautionary Tale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. L.; Schellenberg, S. A.; Becker, B. J.; Deutschman, D.; Koch, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    Paleoceanographic reconstructions depend upon accurate estimations of mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual range in temperature (MART). Mollusk shells may offer an archive of seasonal to decadal data on environmental conditions. However, a suite of factors (e.g., biologic, metabolic, kinetic) may confound interpretations of mollusk records. Mytilus californianus shell chemistry was directly compared to in situ environmental data to inspect the influence of intertidal position and growth rate (ontogeny) on δ18O and Mg/Ca. M. californianus specimens from an ontogenetic spectrum were outplanted from 31 Aug 04 to 17 Sept 05 at low (-0.2 m MLLW) and high (1.1 m MLLW) intertidal positions within Cabrillo National Monument at San Diego, California. Ambient temperature was recorded in situ and water samples were collected at ~2-3 week intervals. After the outplant interval, the prismatic calcite layer of eight specimens spanning the ontogenetic spectrum at each intertidal position were serially microsampled and analyzed for stable-isotope and minor-elemental variations. Average intra-specimen Mg/Ca values for specimens show a strong and significant positive correlation with accretion rate (i.e., younger, faster-growing specimens have higher Mg/Ca). This ontogenetic effect weakens the potential of average intra-specimen Mg/Ca an accurate MAT proxy. In contrast, average intra-specimen. δ18O provided a relatively accurate temperature proxy regardless of ontogenetic stage. To assess the utility of intraskeletal δ18O and Mg/Ca variation as a MART proxy, the observed δ18O record from each specimen was ordinated in the time-domain of the outplant interval and compared to the predicted equilibrium δ18O inorganic calcite record calculated from ambient seawater temperature and δ18O. Observed specimen δ&&18O is well-correlated (r2 = 0.50, p<0.001) with predicted δ18O, but shows an ~+1.05‰ 18O-enrichment relative to inorganic calcite equilibrium precipitation. In

  9. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowlton, A.L.; Pierson, B. J.; Talbot, S.L.; Highsmith, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    GA- and CA-enriched genomic libraries were constructed for the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea. Unique repeat motifs identified varied from the expected simple dinucleotide repeats to more complex repeat units. All sequences tended to be highly repetitive but did not necessarily contain the targeted motifs. Seven microsatellite loci were evaluated on sponges from the clone source population. All seven were polymorphic with 5.43??0.92 mean number of alleles. Six of the seven loci that could be resolved had mean heterozygosities of 0.14-0.68. The loci identified here will be useful for population studies.

  10. Trematodes indicate animal biodiversity in the Chilean intertidal and Lake Tanganyika.

    PubMed

    Hechinger, Ryan F; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M

    2008-08-01

    Trematode communities in populations of estuarine snails can reflect surrounding animal diversity, abundance, and trophic interactions. We know less about the potential for trematodes to serve as bioindicators in other habitats. Here, we reanalyze data from 2 published studies concerning trematodes, 1 in the Chilean rocky intertidal zone and the other from the East African rift lake, Lake Tanganyika. Our analyses indicate that trematodes are more common in protected areas and that in both habitats they are directly and positively related to surrounding host abundance. This further supports the notion that trematodes in first intermediate hosts can serve as bioindicators of the condition of free-living animal communities in diverse ecosystems.

  11. Impact of industrial effluents on geochemical association of metals within intertidal sediments of a creek.

    PubMed

    Volvoikar, Samida P; Nayak, G N

    2015-10-15

    Metal speciation studies were carried out on three intertidal core sediments of the industrially impacted Dudh creek located along west coast of India. Metals indicated a drastic increase in the bioavailable fraction towards the surface of the cores, suggesting an increase in anthropogenic metal input in recent years as compared to the past. Also, when compared with Vaitarna estuary and Khonda creek of Thane district, the speciation of metals in Dudh creek sediments was observed to have been highly modified in recent years. High concentrations of metals associated with bioavailable fractions therefore suggested a risk of toxicity to sediment associated biota of Dudh creek.

  12. The tidal slug test: estimating intertidal sediment hydraulic conductivity twice-per-tide from passive monitoring of shallow piezometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, K. B.; Gorelick, S.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment hydraulic properties is necessary to understand groundwater dynamics. In coastal settings, however, the corrosive and frequently flooded intertidal environment has historically hindered extensive hydraulic characterization. We present a method to easily and inexpensively quantify the hydraulic conductivity of fine intertidal sediments based on analysis of shallow piezometer response to tidal flooding. Specifically, we make use of the lag between surface water and groundwater tidal responses: during the flood (or ebb) tide, the surface water floods (or exposes) the intertidal sediment surface nearly instantaneously compared to the slower groundwater response. We analyze these tidal impulses as slug tests by extending the classic Bouwer and Rice [1976] slug test method to apply to the intertidal data. We test the 'tidal slug test' method using two sets of water level data from intertidal salt marshes in southern San Francisco Estuary: (i) two weeks of data from more than three-dozen piezometers in which manual slug tests were also conducted and (ii) three years of data from more than four-dozen piezometers at a site also characterized by inverse modeling and laboratory hydraulic tests. The method yields numerous comparable estimates of hydraulic conductivity, temporally-distributed twice per flooding tide (e.g., 14-28 times per spring tidal phase). We find good agreement among the conductivity values from the passive 'tidal slug tests' and the other methods. The simplicity and repeatability of the 'tidal slug test' method recommend it as a useful tool to aid in characterizing intertidal sediment heterogeneity and near-surface flow dynamics.

  13. Concentrations of Cu and Pb in the offshore and intertidal sediments of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yap, C K; Ismail, A; Tan, S G; Omar, H

    2002-12-01

    Malaysia is now a developing country and on her way towards being an industrialised one by the year 2020. Most of her industries and urban areas are located on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. In addition, the offshore area of the west coast is now one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. These two phenomena make the intertidal and offshore areas of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia interesting for scientific studies. Therefore, this study focused on both the offshore and intertidal sediments of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Sampling for sediment samples were done from the northern to the southern ends of the peninsula and these sediment samples were analysed for Cu and Pb. It was found that total Cu concentrations ranged from 0.25 to 13.8 and 0.40 to 315 microg/g dry weight (dw) for offshore and intertidal sediments, respectively. For Pb, it ranged from 3.59 to 25.4 and 0.96 to 69.8 microg/g dw for the offshore and intertidal sediments, respectively. The ranges of Cu and Pb found from the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia were low in comparison to regional data. However, some intertidal areas were identified as receiving anthropogenic Cu and Pb. Geochemical studies revealed that the 'nonresistant' fraction for Pb contributed about 70.0% to 75.0% and 54.0% of the total Pb concentration in the offshore and intertidal sediments, respectively. As for Cu, the 'nonresistant' fraction contributed about 46.2% to 60.4% and 46.3% of the total Cu concentration in the offshore and intertidal sediments, respectively. The 'nonresistant' fraction contained mostly of anthropogenic metals besides natural origins. These 'nonresistant' percentages indicated that both the offshore and intertidal areas could have received anthropogenic-derived metals, which could be influenced by physico-chemical properties of the sediments. Although the present data indicated that contamination due to Cu and Pb in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia especially in the

  14. Extinguished operant responding shows stimulus specificity.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, Frances K; Murphy, Eric S; Kowal, Benjamin P

    2004-03-31

    The experiment tested for stimulus specificity in extinguished operant responding. Eight pigeons pecked keys for food reinforcers delivered by a variable interval (VI) 60-s schedule. The key was illuminated with red light during some sessions and white light during others. Then, responding was placed on extinction. During some sessions of extinction, the color of the key light remained constant throughout the session (red or white). During other sessions the color changed at 30 min into the session (red to white or white to red). Response rate increased after the change of key color in extinction. If it is assumed that key color is part of the stimulus to which subjects habituate, then these results are consistent with McSweeney and Swindell's [J. Gen. Psychol. 129 (2002) 364] suggestion that responding declines in extinction partly because subjects habituate to the stimuli that support conditioned responding. Habituation is relatively specific to the exact nature of the stimulus presented. Therefore, changes in the stimulus violate stimulus specificity and restore habituated responding. The results are also consistent with other theories that attribute extinction to a reduction of stimulus control [e.g., Psychol. Bull. 114 (1993) 80; J. Exp. Psychol.: Anim. Behav. Process. 16 (1990) 235], but considerations such as parsimony and testability favor the habituation hypothesis over these theories.

  15. Intertidal epilithic bacteria diversity changes along a naturally occurring carbon dioxide and pH gradient.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joe D; Ellis, Rebecca; Milazzo, Marco; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Cunliffe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Intertidal epilithic bacteria communities are important components of coastal ecosystems, yet few studies have assessed their diversity and how it may be affected by changing environmental parameters. Submarine CO2 seeps produce localised areas of CO2-enriched seawater with reduced pH levels. We utilised the seawater pH/CO2 gradient at Levante Bay (Italy) to test the hypothesis that epilithic bacteria communities are modified by exposure to seawater with the varying chemical parameters. Biofilms were sampled from three sites exposed to seawater with different pH/CO2 levels and diversity determined using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Seawater pCO2 concentrations were increased from ambient at site 1 to 621 μatm at site 2 and 1654 μatm site 3, similar to the predicated future oceans beyond 2050 and 2150, respectively. Alpha diversity of total bacteria communities and Cyanobacteria communities was significantly different between sites (anova P < 0.05). Comparison between sites showed that bacteria communities and Cyanobacteria communities were significantly different (anosim P < 0.01; permanova P < 0.01). Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria dominated all communities; however, there were differences between sites in the relative abundance of specific orders. This study provides the most detailed assessment of intertidal epilithic bacteria diversity and shows that diversity is significantly different along a seawater pH/CO2 gradient. This information supports the evaluation of the impacts of future ocean acidification on coastal marine ecosystems.

  16. Temporal distribution of intertidal macrozoobenthic assemblages in a Nanozostera noltii-dominated area (Lagoon of Venice).

    PubMed

    Tagliapietra, D; Pessa, G; Cornello, M; Zitelli, A; Magni, P

    2016-03-01

    We describe the temporal distribution of intertidal macrozoobenthic assemblages in a small marsh pond of the Lagoon of Venice colonized by the seagrass Nanozostera noltii (Hornemman) Tomlinson et Posluzny. Three stations ranging in the degree of N. noltii cover were selected about 100 m apart and sampled 9 times at regular intervals from March 1996 to March 1997. We applied the concepts of resistance and resilience to "natural stress" (e.g. extent of protection from seagrass meadows, exposure of macrozoobenthic assemblages to high temperatures in summer) with the aim to assess the stability of a community along a gradient of seagrass coverage. Results showed that the most structured and taxa-rich macrozoobenthic assemblage occurred at the station covered by a continuous stand of N. noltii, where permanent taxa (i.e. found in 100% of samples) were almost double than those found at the other stations. During the annual cycle, the macrozoobenthic assemblages showed a cyclical pattern, with temporal fluctuations increasing as they moved further away from the seagrass beds. We propose the role of N. noltii offering structural complexity and stability as the more probable explanation to the observed differences between stations in the intertidal assemblages. PMID:26748407

  17. Effects of environmental stress on intertidal mussels and their sea star predators.

    PubMed

    Petes, Laura E; Mouchka, Morgan E; Milston-Clements, Ruth H; Momoda, Tracey S; Menge, Bruce A

    2008-06-01

    Consumer stress models of ecological theory predict that predators are more susceptible to stress than their prey. Intertidal mussels, Mytilus californianus, span a vertical stress gradient from the low zone (lower stress) to the high zone (higher thermal and desiccation stress), while their sea star predators, Pisaster ochraceus, range from the low zone only into the lower edge of the mussel zone. In summer 2003, we tested the responses of sea stars and mussels to environmental stress in an experiment conducted on the Oregon coast. Mussels were transplanted from the middle of the mussel bed to cages in the low and high edges of the mussel bed. Sea star predators were added to half of the mussel cages. Mussels and sea stars were sampled between June and August for indicators of sublethal stress. Mussel growth was measured, and tissues were collected for heat shock protein (Hsp70) analyses and histological analyses of reproduction. Sea stars were weighed, and tissues were sampled for Hsp70 analyses. Mussels in high-edge cages had higher levels of total Hsp70 and exhibited spawning activity earlier in the summer than mussels in the low-edge cages. Sea stars suffered high mortality in the high edge, and low-edge sea stars lost weight but showed no differences in Hsp70 production. These results suggest that stress in the intertidal zone affected the mobile predator more than its sessile prey, which is consistent with predictions of consumer stress models.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity among intertidal habitats in the flat periwinkle, Littorina obtusata.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Paul S; Phifer-Rixey, Megan; Taylor, Graeme M; Christner, John

    2007-06-01

    Comparisons among patterns exhibited by functionally distinct genetic markers have been widely used to infer the impacts of demography and selection in structuring genetic variation in natural populations. However, such multilocus comparisons remain an indirect evaluation of selection at particular candidate loci; ideally, the identification of a candidate gene by comparative genetic methodologies should be complemented by functional analyses and experimental manipulations of genotypes in the laboratory or field. We examined genotype frequency variation among replicated intertidal habitats at two spatial scales in the grazing snail Littorina obtusata. Both of the candidate allozyme markers varied predictably with environment, and these patterns were consistent at both spatial scales. Three of four reference loci were spatially homogeneous, but one microsatellite exhibited significant structure at both geographical and mesoscales. To initiate a direct examination of whether the observed genotype frequency variation at one of the candidate markers, mannose-6-phosphate isomerase (MPI), was impacted by differential survivorship of genotypes, we conducted a series of laboratory-based thermal stress assays using snails from two geographically disparate source populations. When snails were exposed to bouts of thermal/desiccation stress, patterns of mortality were nonrandom with respect to MPI genotype. Furthermore, patterns of mortality in the laboratory manipulation coincided with the observed distribution of genotypes in the field. The data suggest the operation of selection at the Mpi or a linked locus, but functional studies and further experimentation are required to establish the relationship between MPI genotype and fitness across heterogeneous intertidal environments. PMID:17561900

  19. Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors

    PubMed Central

    Helmuth, Brian; Choi, Francis; Matzelle, Allison; Torossian, Jessica L.; Morello, Scott L.; Mislan, K.A.S.; Yamane, Lauren; Strickland, Denise; Szathmary, P. Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E.; Tockstein, Alyson; Hilbish, Thomas J.; Burrows, Michael T.; Power, Anne Marie; Gosling, Elizabeth; Mieszkowska, Nova; Harley, Christopher D.G.; Nishizaki, Michael; Carrington, Emily; Menge, Bruce; Petes, Laura; Foley, Melissa M.; Johnson, Angela; Poole, Megan; Noble, Mae M.; Richmond, Erin L.; Robart, Matt; Robinson, Jonathan; Sapp, Jerod; Sones, Jackie; Broitman, Bernardo R.; Denny, Mark W.; Mach, Katharine J.; Miller, Luke P.; O’Donnell, Michael; Ross, Philip; Hofmann, Gretchen E.; Zippay, Mackenzie; Blanchette, Carol; Macfarlan, J.A.; Carpizo-Ituarte, Eugenio; Ruttenberg, Benjamin; Peña Mejía, Carlos E.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Lathlean, Justin; Monaco, Cristián J.; Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10–30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements of mussel tissue temperature indicated errors of ~2.0–2.5 °C, during daily fluctuations that often exceeded 15°–20 °C. Geographic patterns in thermal stress based on biomimetic logger measurements were generally far more complex than anticipated based only on ‘habitat-level’ measurements of air or sea surface temperature. This unique data set provides an opportunity to link physiological measurements with spatially- and temporally-explicit field observations of body temperature. PMID:27727238

  20. Disturbance of intertidal soft-sediment benthic communities by cockle hand raking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. J.; Broad, G.; Hall, S. J.

    2001-05-01

    Recent awareness of the ecosystem effects of fishing activities on the marine environment means that there is a pressing need to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of those activities that may have negative effects on non-target species and habitats. The cockle, Cerastoderma edule (L.) is the target of a commercial and artisanal fishery that occurs in intertidal and estuarine habitats across Northern Europe. Cockles are harvested either mechanically using tractor dredges or suction dredges or by large numbers of individual fishers using hand rakes. This study examined the effects of hand raking on the non-target species and under-sized cockles associated with intertidal cockle beds and the effects of size of the patch of sediment disturbed on subsequent recolonisation. Hand raking led to an initial three-fold increase in the damage rate of under-sized cockles compared with control plots. The communities in both small and large raked plots showed community changes relative to control plots 14 days after the initial disturbance. The small raked plots had recovered 56 days after the initial disturbance whereas the large raked plots remained in an altered state. Samples collected over a year later indicated that small-scale variations in habitat heterogeneity had been altered and suggest that while effects of hand raking may be significant within a year, they are unlikely to persist beyond this time-scale unless there are larger long-lived species present within the community.

  1. Thermal stress and predation risk trigger distinct transcriptomic responses in the intertidal snail Nucella lapillus.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Miller, Luke P; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Vollmer, Steven V

    2014-12-01

    Thermal stress and predation risk have profound effects on rocky shore organisms, triggering changes in their feeding behaviour, morphology and metabolism. Studies of thermal stress have shown that underpinning such changes in several intertidal species are specific shifts in gene and protein expression (e.g. upregulation of heat-shock proteins). But relatively few studies have examined genetic responses to predation risk. Here, we use next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine the transcriptomic (mRNA) response of the snail Nucella lapillus to thermal stress and predation risk. We found that like other intertidal species, N. lapillus displays a pronounced genetic response to thermal stress by upregulating many heat-shock proteins and other molecular chaperones. In contrast, the presence of a crab predator (Carcinus maenas) triggered few significant changes in gene expression in our experiment, and this response showed no significant overlap with the snail's response to thermal stress. These different gene expression profiles suggest that thermal stress and predation risk could pose distinct and potentially additive challenges for N. lapillus and that genetic responses to biotic stresses such as predation risk might be more complex and less uniform across species than genetic responses to abiotic stresses such as thermal stress.

  2. Food sources of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in intertidal areas: evidence from stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng

    2013-07-01

    Based on stable isotope analysis, we characterized the dietary regime of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum inhabiting intertidal areas along the Liaodong Peninsula, Northern China. Samples, including particulate organic matter (POM; n =30), benthic microalgae (BMI; n =30) and R. philippinarum ( n =60), were collected from six sampling sites displaying the same ecological conditions. Of the two primary food sources, POM was more depleted in δ 13C (-20.61‰ to -22.89‰) than BMI was (-13.90‰ to -16.66‰). With respect to 15N, BMI was more enriched (2.90‰ to 4.07‰) than POM was (4.13‰ to 5.12‰). The δ 13C values of R. philippinarum ranged from -18.78‰ to -19.35‰ and the δ 15N values from 7.96‰ to 8.63‰, which were intermediate between the POM and BMI values. In a two-source isotope mixing model, we estimated the relative contributions of POM and BMI to the diet of R. philippinarum to be 74.2% and 25.8%, respectively. We conclude that R. philippinarum feeds mainly on POM, and BMI is also an important supplemental food source in intertidal areas.

  3. The ecology of intertidal oyster reefs of the South Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Leonard M.; Lanier, William P.

    1981-01-01

    The functional role of the intertidal oyster reef community in the southeastern Atlantic coastal zone is described. This description is based on a compilation of published data, as well as some unpublished information presented as hypotheses. The profile is organized in a hierarchical manner, such that relevant details of reef oyster biology (autecology) are presented, followed by a description of the reef community level of organization. Then the reef community is described as a subsystem of the coastal marsh-ecosystem (synecoloqy). This information is also synthesized in a series of nested conceptual models of oyster reefs at the regional level, the drainage basin level, and the individual reef level. The final chapter includes a summary overview and a section on management implications and guidelines. Intertidal oyster reefs are relatively persistent features of the salt marsh estuarine ecosystem in the southeastern Atlantic coastal zone. The average areal extent of the oyster reef subsystem in this larger ecosystem is relatively small (about 0.05%). This proportion does not reflect, however, the functional importance of the reef subsystem in stablizing the marsh, providing food for estuarine consumers, mineralizing organic matter, and providing firm substrates in this otherwise soft environment.

  4. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores.

  5. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores. PMID:27109165

  6. Homing behaviour and individual identification of the pipefish Nerophis lumbriciformis (Pisces; Syngnathidae): a true intertidal resident?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Nuno Miguel; Vieira, Maria da Natividade; Almada, Vitor

    2005-04-01

    Syngnathids have been the focus of growing interest due to their peculiar reproductive biology and vulnerability to environmental degradation and overcollecting. In this study, near the south limit of the species' geographic distribution, a description of the homing behaviour of the worm pipefish, Nerophis lumbriciformis, based on the unique facial pigmentation patterns, is presented. Even though the amount of facial pigmentation was substantially higher in larger adult females, suggesting that it can be part of the secondary sexual repertoire of this sex role reversed species, this technique allowed for the positive identification of adult individuals (males and females) during at least 19 months. Recaptures showed that this pipefish shows a strong homing behaviour, with individuals being regularly captured within less than 2 m of the original identification event. The absence of horizontal migrations to adjacent areas and the observation of adults in the subtidal, together with the overall low number of recaptures (even though some individuals were cyclically resighted) highlighted the fact that the intertidal is not N. lumbriciformis' permanent residence. This observation also demonstrates that the estimation of the population size, important for conservation purposes, based solely on intertidal data can be misleading because captured individuals are only a fraction of a larger, mainly subtidal, population.

  7. Sediment-porewater-biota partitioning of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban intertidal marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Maruya, K.A.; Home, A.J.; Risebrough, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Quantifying the distribution of these hydrophobic organic compounds in situ is key to understanding their fate and effects in aquatic ecosystems. In particular, field data are needed to assess/validate/invalidate the relevance of chemical-specific sediment quality criteria which are derived from equilibrium partitioning models. A field-based study in San Francisco Bay designed to investigate seasonal and spatial variations has revealed that the in situ partitioning of pyrogenically-derived PAHs between sediments and porewaters as measured by K{sub oc}{prime} was an order of magnitude higher during the wet season than during the dry season. Moreover, K{sub oc}{prime} increased along an intertidal gradient accompanied by a corresponding increase in sediment fines, organic carbon and PAH concentration. In addition, BSAFs for two species of bivalves and a composite of polychaetes collected in the marsh were negatively correlated with log K{sub ow}. Moreover, BSAFs were consistently less during the wet season and also decreased along the same intertidal gradient providing further evidence that both partitioning and bioavailability are affected by a heterogeneous interaction between PAHs and sediments contaminated with urban runoff and/or depositional sources which are suspected to be enriched with a highly aromatic soot-like organic matrix. These findings suggest that simple equilibrium models may not accurately predict the partitioning and bioavailability of combustion-source PAHs in sediments which are contaminated primarily via an urban landscape.

  8. Micro-spatial distribution of two sibling periwinkle species across the intertidal indicates hybrdization.

    PubMed

    Granovitch, Andrei I; Maximovich, Alexei N; Avanesyan, Alina V; Starunova, Zinaida I; Mikhailova, Natalia A

    2013-09-01

    Populations of periwinkles Littorina saxatilis (Olivi 1792) and L. arcana Hannaford Ellis, 1978 are well suited for microevolutionary studies, being at the same time closely related and intraspecifically diverse. The divergence between these two sibling species, sympatric over large parts of their distribution areas, is small, the only morphological difference being the pallial gland complex structure in females. Molecular identification is possible with the use of a RAPD nuclear marker (cloned A2.8 DNA fragment) typical for L. arcana. However, in some individuals from sympatric populations molecular and morphological criteria suggest conflicting species affiliation, which may be explained either by hybridization or by shared ancestral polymorphism. We tested the hybridization hypotheses examining the micro-spatial distribution of these two species across the intertidal zone in two distant sites at the Barents Sea. We found that (a) the frequency of putative hybrids in sympatric populations was proportional to the frequency of L. arcana; (b) L. saxatilis bearing A2.8 DNA fragment were almost absent in the lower part of the intertidal zone, where L. arcana was absent too; (c) there was a close positive correlation between the distribution of potential parent molluscs and putative hybrids. Moreover, logistic regression models showed a good agreement between the distribution of putative hybrid frequencies and that of parental species frequencies. All our observations taken together support the hypothesis of hybridization between L. saxatilis and L. arcana. Elucidating the mechanisms that support the species status of these sympatric populations is necessary. PMID:23887893

  9. Effects of Fucus vesiculosus covering intertidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    The brown alga Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (Nienburg) Nienhuis covered about 70% of mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis) surface area in the lower intertidal zone of Königshafen, a sheltered sandy bay near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. Mean biomass in dense patches was 584 g ash-free dry weight m-2 in summer. On experimental mussel beds, fucoid cover enhanced mud accumulation and decreased mussel density. The position of mussels underneath algal canopy was mainly endobenthic (87% of mussels with >1/3 of shell sunk into mud). In the absence of fucoids, mussels generated epibenthic garlands (81% of mussels with <1/3 of shell buried in mud). Mussel density underneath fucoid cover was 40 to 73% of mussel density without algae. On natural beds, barnacles (Balanidae), periwinkles ( Littorina littorea) and crabs (particularly juveniles of Carcinus maenas) were significantly less abundant in the presence of fucoids, presumably because most of the mussels were covered with sediment, whereas in the absence of fucoids, epibenthic mussel clumps provided substratum as well as interstitial hiding places. The endobenthic macrofauna showed little difference between covered and uncovered mussel beds. On the other hand, grazing herbivores — the flat periwinkle Littorina mariae, the isopod Jaera albifrons and the amphipods Gammarus spp. — were more abundant at equivalent sites with fucoid cover. The patchy growth of Fucus vesiculosus on mussel beds in the intertidal Wadden Sea affects mussels and their epibionts negatively, but supports various herbivores and increases overall benthic diversity.

  10. Biogeophysical interactions between behavior of crabs, bivalves and birds and intertidal geoenvironmental variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassa, S.; Watabe, Y.; Yang, S.; Kuwae, T.

    2011-12-01

    Tidal flats and beaches are vital elements in the sustainability of coastal environments since they foster rich natural ecosystems. Previous research in the fields of oceanology and ecology has been directed to understanding the diversity of ecosystems and their linkage with oceanic environments involving waves and tides. Here, we show that such oceanic environments yield marked geoenvironmental changes at the edge of the ocean where the diversity of creatures live. Our series of field observations/surveys and controlled laboratory experiments demonstrated that the tide and swash induced dynamics of suction, i.e. negative pore water pressure relative to atmospheric pressure, bring about a variety of changes in behavior, in terms of both burrowing and foraging, of crabs, bivalves and birds, and were responsible for the suitable and critical conditions for their survival and adaptations. The present results reveal and highlight the importance of the biogeophysical interactions between such diverse creatures and intertidal geoenvironmental variability at the edge of the ocean, and may thus facilitate conservation and restoration of habitats with rich natural ecosystems in intertidal zones.

  11. Ecological convergence in a rocky intertidal shore metacommunity despite high spatial variability in recruitment regimes

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andrés U.; Navarrete, Sergio A.; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In open ecological systems, community structure can be determined by physically modulated processes such as the arrival of individuals from a regional pool and by local biological interactions. There is debate centering on whether niche differentiation and local interactions among species are necessary to explain macroscopic community patterns or whether the patterns can be generated by the neutral interplay of dispersal and stochastic demography among ecologically identical species. Here we evaluate how much of the observed spatial variation within a rocky intertidal metacommunity along 800 km of coastline can be explained by drift in the structure of recruits across 15 local sites. Our results show that large spatial changes in recruitment do not explain the observed spatial variation in adult local structure and that, in comparison with the large drift in structure of recruits, local adult communities converged to a common, although not unique, structure across the region. Although there is no unique adult community structure in the entire region, the observed variation represents only a small subset of the possible structures that would be expected from passive recruitment drift. Thus, in this diverse system our results do not support the idea that rocky intertidal metacommunities are structured by neutral mechanisms. PMID:20937867

  12. Exposure to solar radiation drives organismal vulnerability to climate: Evidence from an intertidal limpet.

    PubMed

    Chapperon, Coraline; Volkenborn, Nils; Clavier, Jacques; Séité, Sarah; Seabra, Rui; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the physiological abilities of organisms to cope with heat stress is critical for predictions of species' distributions in response to climate change. We investigated physiological responses (respiration and heart beat rate) of the ectotherm limpet Patella vulgata to heat stress events during emersion and the role of seasonal and microclimatic acclimatization for individual thermal tolerance limits. Individuals were collected from 5 microhabitats characterized by different exposure to solar radiation in the high intertidal zone of a semi-exposed rocky shore in winter and summer of 2014. Upper thermal tolerance limits (heat coma temperatures - HCTs, and heart rate Arrhenius break temperatures - ABTs) were determined for individuals from each microhabitat in both seasons under laboratory conditions. While we found a clear seasonal acclimatization, i.e., higher HCTs and ABTs in summer than in winter, we did not find evidence for microhabitat-specific responses that would suggest microclimatic acclimatization. However, operative limpet temperatures derived from in-situ temperature measurements suggest that individuals from sun exposed microhabitats have a much narrower thermal safety margins than those from less exposed surfaces or within crevices. Microhabitat specific thermal safety margins caused by high thermal heterogeneity at small spatial scales and the lack of short term acclimatization will likely shape small scale distribution patterns of intertidal species in response to the predicted increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves.

  13. Precisely proportioned: intertidal barnacles alter penis form to suit coastal wave action.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Christopher J; Palmer, A Richard

    2008-05-01

    For their size, barnacles possess the longest penis of any animal (up to eight times their body length). However, as one of few sessile animals to copulate, they face a trade-off between reaching more mates and controlling ever-longer penises in turbulent flow. We observed that penises of an intertidal barnacle (Balanus glandula) from wave-exposed shores were shorter than, stouter than, and more than twice as massive for their length as, those from nearby protected bays. In addition, penis shape variation was tightly correlated with maximum velocity of breaking waves, and, on all shores, larger barnacles had disproportionately stouter penises. Finally, field experiments confirmed that most of this variation was due to phenotypic plasticity: barnacles transplanted to a wave-exposed outer coast produced dramatically shorter and wider penises than counterparts moved to a protected harbour. Owing to the probable trade-off between penis length and ability to function in flow, and owing to the ever-changing wave conditions on rocky shores, intertidal barnacles appear to have acquired the capacity to change the size and shape of their penises to suit local hydrodynamic conditions. This dramatic plasticity in genital form is a valuable reminder that factors other than the usual drivers of genital diversification--female choice, sexual conflict and male-male competition--can influence genital form.

  14. Thermal stress and predation risk trigger distinct transcriptomic responses in the intertidal snail Nucella lapillus.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Miller, Luke P; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Vollmer, Steven V

    2014-12-01

    Thermal stress and predation risk have profound effects on rocky shore organisms, triggering changes in their feeding behaviour, morphology and metabolism. Studies of thermal stress have shown that underpinning such changes in several intertidal species are specific shifts in gene and protein expression (e.g. upregulation of heat-shock proteins). But relatively few studies have examined genetic responses to predation risk. Here, we use next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine the transcriptomic (mRNA) response of the snail Nucella lapillus to thermal stress and predation risk. We found that like other intertidal species, N. lapillus displays a pronounced genetic response to thermal stress by upregulating many heat-shock proteins and other molecular chaperones. In contrast, the presence of a crab predator (Carcinus maenas) triggered few significant changes in gene expression in our experiment, and this response showed no significant overlap with the snail's response to thermal stress. These different gene expression profiles suggest that thermal stress and predation risk could pose distinct and potentially additive challenges for N. lapillus and that genetic responses to biotic stresses such as predation risk might be more complex and less uniform across species than genetic responses to abiotic stresses such as thermal stress. PMID:25377436

  15. Climate change impact on seaweed meadow distribution in the North Atlantic rocky intertidal.

    PubMed

    Jueterbock, Alexander; Tyberghein, Lennert; Verbruggen, Heroen; Coyer, James A; Olsen, Jeanine L; Hoarau, Galice

    2013-05-01

    The North-Atlantic has warmed faster than all other ocean basins and climate change scenarios predict sea surface temperature isotherms to shift up to 600 km northwards by the end of the 21st century. The pole-ward shift has already begun for many temperate seaweed species that are important intertidal foundation species. We asked the question: Where will climate change have the greatest impact on three foundational, macroalgal species that occur along North-Atlantic shores: Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, and Ascophyllum nodosum? To predict distributional changes of these key species under three IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) climate change scenarios (A2, A1B, and B1) over the coming two centuries, we generated Ecological Niche Models with the program MAXENT. Model predictions suggest that these three species will shift northwards as an assemblage or "unit" and that phytogeographic changes will be most pronounced in the southern Arctic and the southern temperate provinces. Our models predict that Arctic shores in Canada, Greenland, and Spitsbergen will become suitable for all three species by 2100. Shores south of 45° North will become unsuitable for at least two of the three focal species on both the Northwest- and Northeast-Atlantic coasts by 2200. If these foundational species are unable to adapt to the rising temperatures, they will lose their centers of genetic diversity and their loss will trigger an unpredictable shift in the North-Atlantic intertidal ecosystem. PMID:23762521

  16. Patterns of Spatial Variation of Assemblages Associated with Intertidal Rocky Shores: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Miloslavich, Patricia; Palomo, Gabriela; Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Pohle, Gerhard; Trott, Tom; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Herrera, César; Hernández, Alejandra; Sardi, Adriana; Bueno, Andrea; Castillo, Julio; Klein, Eduardo; Guerra-Castro, Edlin; Gobin, Judith; Gómez, Diana Isabel; Riosmena-Rodríguez, Rafael; Mead, Angela; Bigatti, Gregorio; Knowlton, Ann; Shirayama, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Assemblages associated with intertidal rocky shores were examined for large scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends of species richness and taxonomic distinctiveness. Seventy-two sites distributed around the globe were evaluated following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). There were no clear patterns of standardized estimators of species richness along latitudinal gradients or among Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs); however, a strong latitudinal gradient in taxonomic composition (i.e., proportion of different taxonomic groups in a given sample) was observed. Environmental variables related to natural influences were strongly related to the distribution patterns of the assemblages on the LME scale, particularly photoperiod, sea surface temperature (SST) and rainfall. In contrast, no environmental variables directly associated with human influences (with the exception of the inorganic pollution index) were related to assemblage patterns among LMEs. Correlations of the natural assemblages with either latitudinal gradients or environmental variables were equally strong suggesting that neither neutral models nor models based solely on environmental variables sufficiently explain spatial variation of these assemblages at a global scale. Despite the data shortcomings in this study (e.g., unbalanced sample distribution), we show the importance of generating biological global databases for the use in large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages to stimulate continued sampling and analyses. PMID:21179546

  17. Evidence of unique and generalist microbes in distantly related sympatric intertidal marine sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae).

    PubMed

    Alex, Anoop; Silva, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and specificity of microbial communities in marine environments is a key aspect of the ecology and evolution of both the eukaryotic hosts and their associated prokaryotes. Marine sponges harbor phylogenetically diverse and complex microbial lineages. Here, we investigated the sponge bacterial community and distribution patterns of microbes in three sympatric intertidal marine demosponges, Hymeniacidon perlevis, Ophlitaspongia papilla and Polymastia penicillus, from the Atlantic coast of Portugal using classical isolation techniques and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Microbial composition assessment, with nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1400 bp) from the isolates (n = 31) and partial sequences (ca. 280 bp) from clone libraries (n = 349), revealed diverse bacterial communities and other sponge-associated microbes. The majority of the bacterial isolates were members of the order Vibrionales and other symbiotic bacteria like Pseudovibrio ascidiaceiocola, Roseobacter sp., Hahellaceae sp. and Cobetia sp. Extended analyses using ecological metrics comprising 142 OTUs supported the clear differentiation of bacterial community profiles among the sponge hosts and their ambient seawater. Phylogenetic analyses were insightful in defining clades representing shared bacterial communities, particularly between H. perlevis and the geographically distantly-related H. heliophila, but also among other sponges. Furthermore, we also observed three distinct and unique bacterial groups, Betaproteobactria (~81%), Spirochaetes (~7%) and Chloroflexi (~3%), which are strictly maintained in low-microbial-abundance host species O. papilla and P. penicillus. Our study revealed the largely generalist nature of microbial associations among these co-occurring intertidal marine sponges.

  18. Characterising the microbiome of Corallina officinalis, a dominant calcified intertidal red alga.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Juliet; Williamson, Christopher; Barker, Gary L; Walker, Rachel H; Briscoe, Andrew; Yallop, Marian

    2016-08-01

    The living prokaryotic microbiome of the calcified geniculate (articulated) red alga, Corallina officinalis from the intertidal seashore is characterised for the first time based on the V6 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA. Results revealed an extraordinary diversity of bacteria associated with the microbiome. Thirty-five prokaryotic phyla were recovered, of which Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi made up the core microbiome. Unclassified sequences made up 25% of sequences, suggesting insufficient sampling of the world's oceans/macroalgae. The greatest diversity in the microbiome was on the upper shore, followed by the lower shore then the middle shore, although the microbiome community composition did not vary between shore levels. The C. officinalis core microbiome was broadly similar in composition to those reported in the literature for crustose coralline algae (CCAs) and free-living rhodoliths. Differences in relative abundance of the phyla between the different types of calcified macroalgal species may relate to the intertidal versus subtidal habit of the taxa and functionality of the microbiome components. The results indicate that much work is needed to identify prokaryotic taxa, and to determine the nature of the relationship of the bacteria with the calcified host spatially, temporally and functionally. PMID:27222222

  19. Heavy metal in water and aquatic organisms from different intertidal ecosystems, Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Rahmanpour, Shirin; Ghorghani, Nasrin Farzaneh; Lotfi Ashtiyani, Seyede Masoumeh

    2014-09-01

    Intertidal ecosystems are being damaged by anthropogenic activities, particularly in the developing countries. In this study, the load of heavy metals was determined in water, fish, shrimp, and crab collected from four intertidal ecosystems, including coral reef, rocky shore, mangrove forest, and muddy habitat along the Persian Gulf coasts. Generally, the sequence of metal accumulation in the water of coral reef and mangrove forest was Ni > Pb > V > Cd > As > Hg, whereas in muddy habitats and rocky shores, the sequence was Ni > Pb > V > Cd > Hg > As and Ni > V > Pb > As > Hg > Cd, respectively. Water of the coral reef had the highest level of Ni (97.44 μg l(-1)), Pb (3.92 μg l(-1)), V (10.42 μg l(-1)), Cd (3.92 μg l(-1)), As (1.87 μg l(-1)), and Hg (0.74 μg l(-1)). For the most part, the highest concentrations of the studied metals were found in the liver and the gills of Johnius belangerii and the hepatopancreas of Portunus pelagicus and Metapenaus affinis collected from the coral reef ecosystem. PMID:24802589

  20. Ecosystem engineering by annual intertidal seagrass beds: Sediment accretion and modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Arthur R.; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; de Kort, Geertje L. J.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.

    2007-08-01

    Seagrasses are generally known as ecosystem engineers, as they reduce flow velocities in their canopies. In perennial subtidal meadows, this usually leads to increased net sedimentation rates and reduction of the grain size. The present study aims to describe the contribution of annual seagrass populations to these processes and elucidate the temporal dynamics. Sediment accretion and grain size modification were experimentally tested by transplanting seedlings of an annual intertidal eelgrass population to an unvegetated tidal flat. Within the planting units (79 shoots m -2) 4.7 mm of sediment accreted, whereas in the most dense parts of these units (199 shoots m -2) accretion amounted to 7.1 mm. The silt fraction (<63 μm) increased and the sand fraction (63-500 μm) decreased in the eelgrass beds, which provides evidence that higher silt content in seagrass beds is the result and not the cause of seagrass presence. Annual intertidal eelgrass beds significantly contribute to the immobilisation of sediment during the growing season with its magnitude depending on canopy density. During winter, the accumulated sediments were released again and could even induce additional erosion. Possible consequences of these sediment dynamics for the larger scale functioning of estuarine ecosystems are discussed.

  1. Intertidal Concentrations of Microplastics and Their Influence on Ammonium Cycling as Related to the Shellfish Industry.

    PubMed

    Cluzard, Melanie; Kazmiruk, Tamara N; Kazmiruk, Vasily D; Bendell, L I

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are ubiquitous within the marine environment. The last 10 years have seen research directed at understanding the fate and effect of microplastics within the marine environment; however, no studies have yet addressed how concentrations of these particles could affect sedimentary processes such as nutrient cycling. Herein we first determine the concentration and spatial distribution of microplastics within Baynes Sound, a key shellfish-growing area within coastal British Columbia (BC). We also determined sediment grain size and % organic matter (OM) such that we could relate spatial patterns in sediment microplastic concentrations to sedimentary processes that determine zones of accretion and erosion. Using field-determined concentrations of microplastics, we applied laboratory microcosms studies, which manipulated sediment concentrations of microplastics, OM, and bivalves to determine the influence of sediment microplastics on ammonium cycling within intertidal sediments. Concentrations of microplastics determined within the intertidal sediment varied spatially and were similar to those found in other coastal regions of high urban use. Concentrations were independent of grain size and OM suggesting that physical processes other than those that govern natural sediment components determine the fate of microplastics within sediments. Under laboratory conditions, concentrations of ammonium were significantly greater in the overlying water of treatments with microplastics, clams, and OM compared with treatments without microplastics. These preliminary studies suggest that high concentrations of microplastics have the potential to alter key sedimentary processes such as ammonium flux. This could have serious implications, for example, contributing to eutrophication events in regions of the coast that are highly urbanized.

  2. Use of different intertidal habitats by faunal communities in a temperate coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Cheila; Coelho, Rui; Silva, Marco; Bentes, Luís; Monteiro, Pedro; Ribeiro, Joaquim; Erzini, Karim; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.

    2008-11-01

    The faunal communities of four intertidal habitats namely sand, mud, seagrass ( Zostera noltii) and seagrass patches (mixSM) of a temperate coastal lagoon, Ria Formosa (southern Portugal), were sampled. A total of 47 species were taken in 428 bottomless drop sampler samples, with the highest number of species and the more commonly occurring species belonging to the Mollusca phylum. The dominance of these gastropod species underlines the importance of the grazing food chain in these habitats. Bittium reticulatum was the most abundant species, being especially abundant in the seagrass habitat. The most frequent and highest biomass species in the community was Carcinus maenas, a predator that makes use of the available resources and that is adapted to the highly variable intertidal environment. Pomatoschistus microps was the most abundant fish species, with highest densities in the mud habitat, which demonstrates an ability to occupy a low depth area. The seagrass habitat had the highest diversity, abundance and biomass, followed by the mixSM habitat and was different from all the others. Assemblages were highly influenced by the presence of vegetation, providing forage and refuge from predation. A well defined summer group was identified in all habitats. These results highlight the importance of seagrass beds and the idea that their decrease implies the decrease of lagoon production through the impoverishment of the trophic structure of the lagoon.

  3. Summertime community structure of intertidal macrobenthos in Changdao Archipelago, Shandong Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Xinzheng; Li, Baoquan; Wang, Hongfa

    2009-09-01

    The community structure of intertidal macrobenthos in Changdao Archipelago (north of Shandong Peninsula, between Bohai Bay and the northern Yellow Sea) was examined based on samples collected from 14 stations in five transects in June 2007. Three stations corresponding to high, medium and low tidal areas were set up for each transect. A total of 68 macrobenthic species were found in the research region, most of which belonged to Mollusca and Crustacea. The average abundance and biomass of the macrobenthos was 1 383 ind./m2 and 372.41 g/m2, respectively. The use of an arbitrary similarity level of 20% resulted in identification of five groups among the 14 stations in the research region. There were remarkable differences in the biomass, abundance and Shannon-Wiener diversity index of the different sediments. Specifically, the order of biomass was rocky shores > gravel > mud-sand > coarse sand > stiff mud, while the order of abundance was rocky shores > coarse sand > mud-sand > gravel > stiff mud, and that of the diversity index was mud-sand > gravel > stiff mud > rocky shores > coarse sand. The above results revealed that the sediment type was the most important factor affecting the structure of the macrobenthic community of the intertidal zone.

  4. Emersion Induces Nitrogen Release and Alteration of Nitrogen Metabolism in the Intertidal Genus Porphyra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang K.; Kraemer, George P.; Yarish, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N) release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate) of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion. PMID:23922872

  5. Climate change impact on seaweed meadow distribution in the North Atlantic rocky intertidal.

    PubMed

    Jueterbock, Alexander; Tyberghein, Lennert; Verbruggen, Heroen; Coyer, James A; Olsen, Jeanine L; Hoarau, Galice

    2013-05-01

    The North-Atlantic has warmed faster than all other ocean basins and climate change scenarios predict sea surface temperature isotherms to shift up to 600 km northwards by the end of the 21st century. The pole-ward shift has already begun for many temperate seaweed species that are important intertidal foundation species. We asked the question: Where will climate change have the greatest impact on three foundational, macroalgal species that occur along North-Atlantic shores: Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, and Ascophyllum nodosum? To predict distributional changes of these key species under three IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) climate change scenarios (A2, A1B, and B1) over the coming two centuries, we generated Ecological Niche Models with the program MAXENT. Model predictions suggest that these three species will shift northwards as an assemblage or "unit" and that phytogeographic changes will be most pronounced in the southern Arctic and the southern temperate provinces. Our models predict that Arctic shores in Canada, Greenland, and Spitsbergen will become suitable for all three species by 2100. Shores south of 45° North will become unsuitable for at least two of the three focal species on both the Northwest- and Northeast-Atlantic coasts by 2200. If these foundational species are unable to adapt to the rising temperatures, they will lose their centers of genetic diversity and their loss will trigger an unpredictable shift in the North-Atlantic intertidal ecosystem.

  6. Organic carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in the intertidal sediments from the Yangtze Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Hou, L J; Xu, S Y; Ou, D N; Yang, Y; Yu, J; Wang, Q

    2006-12-01

    The natural isotopic compositions and C/N elemental ratios of sedimentary organic matter were determined in the intertidal flat of the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that the ratios of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes were respectively -29.8 per thousand to -26.0 per thousand and 1.6 per thousand-5.5 per thousand in the flood season (July), while they were -27.3 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand and 1.7 per thousand-7.8 per thousand in the dry season (February), respectively. The delta(13)C signatures were remarkably higher in July than in February, and gradually increased from the freshwater areas to the brackish areas. In contrast, there were relatively complex seasonal and spatial changes in stable nitrogen isotopes. It was also reflected that delta(15)N and C/N compositions had been obviously modified by organic matter diagenesis and biological processing, and could not be used to trace the sources of organic matter at the study area. In addition, it was considered that the mixing inputs of terrigenous and marine materials generally dominated sedimentary organic matter in the intertidal flat. The contribution of terrigenous inputs to sedimentary organic matter was roughly estimated according to the mixing balance model of stable carbon isotopes.

  7. Characterising the microbiome of Corallina officinalis, a dominant calcified intertidal red alga.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Juliet; Williamson, Christopher; Barker, Gary L; Walker, Rachel H; Briscoe, Andrew; Yallop, Marian

    2016-08-01

    The living prokaryotic microbiome of the calcified geniculate (articulated) red alga, Corallina officinalis from the intertidal seashore is characterised for the first time based on the V6 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA. Results revealed an extraordinary diversity of bacteria associated with the microbiome. Thirty-five prokaryotic phyla were recovered, of which Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi made up the core microbiome. Unclassified sequences made up 25% of sequences, suggesting insufficient sampling of the world's oceans/macroalgae. The greatest diversity in the microbiome was on the upper shore, followed by the lower shore then the middle shore, although the microbiome community composition did not vary between shore levels. The C. officinalis core microbiome was broadly similar in composition to those reported in the literature for crustose coralline algae (CCAs) and free-living rhodoliths. Differences in relative abundance of the phyla between the different types of calcified macroalgal species may relate to the intertidal versus subtidal habit of the taxa and functionality of the microbiome components. The results indicate that much work is needed to identify prokaryotic taxa, and to determine the nature of the relationship of the bacteria with the calcified host spatially, temporally and functionally.

  8. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group's research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding-a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires-is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (n tot = 11,908) provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area.

  9. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group's research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding-a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires-is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (n tot = 11,908) provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area. PMID:27672496

  10. Clinical-biochemical correlates of migraine attacks in rizatriptan responders and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, P; Pini, L A; Zanchin, G; Alberti, A; Maggioni, F; Rossi, C; Floridi, A; Calabresi, P

    2006-03-01

    The present study was aimed at verifying the clinical characteristics of a typical attack in 20 migraine patients, 10 responders and 10 non-responders to rizatriptan, and at investigating any differences in the levels of neuropeptides of the trigeminovascular or parasympathetic systems [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) measured by radioimmunoassay methods in external jugular blood] between responders and non-responders. In all responders to rizatriptan, pain was unilateral, severe, and pulsating, and in five of them at least one sign suggestive of parasympathetic system activation was recorded. Five patients who were non-responders to rizatriptan referred bilateral and non-pulsating pain, even though severe in most of them. CGRP and NKA levels measured before rizatriptan administration were significantly higher in responders than in non-responders (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.002, respectively). In the five patients with autonomic signs among rizatriptan responders, detectable VIP levels were found at baseline. One hour after rizatriptan administration, a decrease in CGRP and NKA levels was evident in the external jugular venous blood of rizatriptan responders, and this corresponded to a significant pain relief and alleviation of accompanying symptoms. VIP levels were also significantly reduced at the same time in the five patients with autonomic signs. After rizatriptan administration, CGRP and NKA levels in non-responder patients showed less significant variations at all time points after rizatriptan administration compared with rizatriptan responders. The present study, although carried out on a limited number of patients, supports recent clinical evidence of increased trigeminal activation associated with a better triptan response in migraine patients accompanied by parasympathetic activation in a subgroup of patients with autonomic signs. In contrast, the poor response seems to be correlated with a

  11. Intertidal biofilm distribution underpins differential tide-following behavior of two sandpiper species (Calidris mauri and Calidris alpina) during northward migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Ariam; Elner, Robert W.; Favaro, Corinna; Rickards, Karen; Ydenberg, Ronald C.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery that some shorebird species graze heavily on biofilm adds importance to elucidating coastal processes controlling biofilm, as well as impetus to better understand patterns of shorebird use of intertidal flats. Western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) and dunlin (Calidris alpina) stopover in the hundreds of thousands on the Fraser River estuary, British Columbia, Canada, during northward migration to breeding areas. Western sandpipers show greater modification of tongue and bill morphology for biofilm feeding than dunlin, and their diet includes more biofilm. Therefore, we hypothesized that these congeners differentially use the intertidal area. A tide following index (TFI) was used to describe their distributions in the upper intertidal during ebbing tides. Also, we assessed sediment grain size, biofilm (= microphytobenthic or MPB) biomass and invertebrate abundance. Foraging dunlin closely followed the ebbing tide line, exploiting the upper intertidal only as the tide retreated through this area. In contrast, western sandpipers were less prone to follow the tide, and spent more time in the upper intertidal. Microphytobenthic biomass and sediment water content were highest in the upper intertidal, indicating greater biofilm availability for shorebirds in the first 350 m from shore. Invertebrate density did not differ between sections of the upper intertidal. Overall, western sandpiper behaviour and distribution more closely matched MPB biofilm availability than invertebrate availability. Conservation of sandpipers should consider physical processes, such as tides and currents, which maintain the availability of biofilm, a critical food source during global migration.

  12. Intraspecific Variation in Microbial Symbiont Communities of the Sun Sponge, Hymeniacidon heliophila, from Intertidal and Subtidal Habitats.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Brooke L; Erwin, Patrick M

    2015-11-13

    Sponges host diverse and complex communities of microbial symbionts that display a high degree of host specificity. The microbiomes of conspecific sponges are relatively constant, even across distant locations, yet few studies have directly examined the influence of abiotic factors on intraspecific variation in sponge microbial community structure. The contrast between intertidal and subtidal environments is an ideal system to assess the effect of environmental variation on sponge-microbe symbioses, producing two drastically different environments on a small spatial scale. Here, we characterized the microbial communities of individual intertidal and subtidal Hymeniacidon heliophila sponges, ambient seawater, and sediment from a North Carolina oyster reef habitat by partial (Illumina sequencing) and nearly full-length (clone libraries) 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Clone library sequences were compared to H. heliophila symbiont communities from the Gulf of Mexico and Brazil, revealing strong host specificity of dominant symbiont taxa across expansive geographic distances. Sediment and seawater samples yielded clearly distinct microbial communities from those found in H. heliophila. Despite the close proximity of the sponges sampled, significant differences between subtidal and intertidal sponges in the diversity, structure, and composition of their microbial communities were detected. Differences were driven by changes in the relative abundance of a few dominant microbial symbiont taxa, as well as the presence or absence of numerous rare microbial taxa. These findings suggest that extreme abiotic fluctuations, such as periodic air exposure in intertidal habitats, can drive intraspecific differences in complex host-microbe symbioses.

  13. BENTHIC MICROALGAL CONTROL ON THE NUTRIENT FLUX IN INTER-TIDAL FLATS OF THE LOWER YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three sites were selected across the intertidal zone of the lower Yaquina Bay to investigate the role of benthic microalgae in benthic nutrient fluxes. Study sites were selected where microalage were present but without seagrass or mud shrimp. Sediment columns were collected th...

  14. Positive and negative effects of mesograzers on early-colonizing species in an intertidal rocky-shore community.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Martinez, Daniela; López, Daniela N; Bonta, César C; Sepúlveda, Roger D; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    The ecological consequences of human-driven overexploitation and loss of keystone consumers are still unclear. In intertidal rocky shores over the world, the decrease of keystone macrograzers has resulted in an increase in the dominance of herbivores with smaller body (i.e., "mesograzers"), which could potentially alter community assembly and structure. Here, we experimentally tested whether mesograzers affect the structure of rocky intertidal communities during the period of early colonization after the occurrence of a disturbance. A manipulative field experiment was conducted to exclude mesograzers (i.e., juvenile chitons, small snails, amphipods, and juvenile limpets) from experimental areas in an ecosystem characterized by the overexploitation of keystone macrograzers and predators. The results of multivariate analyses suggest that mesograzers had significant effects on intertidal community structure through negative and positive effects on species abundances. Mesograzers had negative effects on filamentous algae, but positive effects on opportunistic foliose algae and barnacles. Probably, mesograzers indirectly favored the colonization of barnacles and foliose algae by removing preemptive competitors, as previously shown for other meso- and macrograzer species. These results strongly support the idea that small herbivores exert a firm controlling effect on the assembly process of natural communities. Therefore, changes in functional roles of top-down controllers might have significant implications for the structure of intertidal communities. PMID:27547352

  15. Decline in intertidal biota after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami and the Fukushima nuclear disaster: field observations

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, 2012, and 2013, in the intertidal zones of eastern Japan, we investigated the ecological effects of the severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant that accompanied the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The number of intertidal species decreased significantly with decreasing distance from the power plant, and no rock shell (Thais clavigera) specimens were collected near the plant, from Hirono to Futaba Beach (a distance of approximately 30 km) in 2012. The collection of rock shell specimens at many other sites hit by the tsunami suggests that the absence of rock shells around the plant in 2012 might have been caused by the nuclear accident in 2011. Quantitative surveys in 2013 showed that the number of species and population densities in the intertidal zones were much lower at sites near, or within several kilometers south of, the plant than at other sites and lower than in 1995, especially in the case of Arthropoda. There is no clear explanation for these findings, but it is evident that the intertidal biota around the power plant has been affected since the nuclear accident. PMID:26842814

  16. Decline in intertidal biota after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami and the Fukushima nuclear disaster: field observations.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, 2012, and 2013, in the intertidal zones of eastern Japan, we investigated the ecological effects of the severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant that accompanied the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The number of intertidal species decreased significantly with decreasing distance from the power plant, and no rock shell (Thais clavigera) specimens were collected near the plant, from Hirono to Futaba Beach (a distance of approximately 30 km) in 2012. The collection of rock shell specimens at many other sites hit by the tsunami suggests that the absence of rock shells around the plant in 2012 might have been caused by the nuclear accident in 2011. Quantitative surveys in 2013 showed that the number of species and population densities in the intertidal zones were much lower at sites near, or within several kilometers south of, the plant than at other sites and lower than in 1995, especially in the case of Arthropoda. There is no clear explanation for these findings, but it is evident that the intertidal biota around the power plant has been affected since the nuclear accident. PMID:26842814

  17. Intertidal zone management in the Western Indian Ocean: assessing current status and future possibilities using expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Lina Mtwana; de la Torre-Castro, Maricela; Erlandsson, Johan; Conand, Chantal; Muthiga, Nyawira; Jiddawi, Narriman; Gullström, Martin

    2014-12-01

    This expert opinion study examined the current status of the intertidal zone in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) and ranked and discussed future management approaches. Information was gathered from scientists, practitioners, and managers active in the WIO region through a questionnaire and a workshop. The experts stated that the productive intertidal environment is highly valuable for reasons such as recreation, erosion protection, and provision of edible invertebrates and fish. Several anthropogenic pressures were identified, including pollution, harbor activities, overexploitation, and climate change. The experts considered the WIO intertidal zone as generally understudied, undermanaged, and with poor or no monitoring. The most important management strategies according to the expert opinions are to develop and involve local people in integrated coastal zone management (ICZM), to increase knowledge on species-environment relationships, and to develop awareness campaigns and education programs. To improve coastal environmental management and conservation, we argue that the intertidal zone should be treated as one organizational management unit within the larger framework of ICZM.

  18. Positive and negative effects of mesograzers on early-colonizing species in an intertidal rocky-shore community.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Martinez, Daniela; López, Daniela N; Bonta, César C; Sepúlveda, Roger D; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    The ecological consequences of human-driven overexploitation and loss of keystone consumers are still unclear. In intertidal rocky shores over the world, the decrease of keystone macrograzers has resulted in an increase in the dominance of herbivores with smaller body (i.e., "mesograzers"), which could potentially alter community assembly and structure. Here, we experimentally tested whether mesograzers affect the structure of rocky intertidal communities during the period of early colonization after the occurrence of a disturbance. A manipulative field experiment was conducted to exclude mesograzers (i.e., juvenile chitons, small snails, amphipods, and juvenile limpets) from experimental areas in an ecosystem characterized by the overexploitation of keystone macrograzers and predators. The results of multivariate analyses suggest that mesograzers had significant effects on intertidal community structure through negative and positive effects on species abundances. Mesograzers had negative effects on filamentous algae, but positive effects on opportunistic foliose algae and barnacles. Probably, mesograzers indirectly favored the colonization of barnacles and foliose algae by removing preemptive competitors, as previously shown for other meso- and macrograzer species. These results strongly support the idea that small herbivores exert a firm controlling effect on the assembly process of natural communities. Therefore, changes in functional roles of top-down controllers might have significant implications for the structure of intertidal communities.

  19. Vertical distribution and probability of encountering intertidal Exxon Valdez oil on shorelines of three embayments within Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Short, Jeffrey W; Maselko, Jacek M; Lindeberg, Mandy R; Harris, Patricia M; Rice, Stanley D

    2006-06-15

    We examined 32 shorelines selected at random in 2003 from shorelines in Herring Bay, Lower Pass, and Bay of Isles in Prince William Sound, Alaska, to examine the vertical distribution of oil remaining from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill and to estimate the probability that sea otters and ducks would encounter oil while foraging there. On each shoreline, sampling was stratified by 1-m tide height intervals and randomly located 0.25 m2 sampling quadrats were examined for evidence of surface and subsurface oil. Oil from the T/V Exxon Valdezwasfound on 14 shorelines, mainly in Herring Bay and Lower Pass, with an estimated 0.43 ha covered by surface oil and 1.52 ha containing subsurface oil. Surface and subsurface oil were most prevalent near the middle of the intertidal and had nearly symmetrical distributions with respect to tide height. Hence, about half the oil is in the biologically rich lower intertidal, where predators may encounter it while disturbing sediments in search of prey. The overall probability of encountering surface or subsurface oil is estimated as 0.0048, which is only slightly greaterthan our estimated probability of encountering subsurface oil in the lower intertidal of Herring Bay or Lower Pass. These encounter probabilities are sufficient to ensure that sea otters and ducks that routinely excavate sediments while foraging within the intertidal would likely encounter subsurface oil repeatedly during the course of a year. PMID:16830533

  20. Vertical distribution and probability of encountering intertidal Exxon Valdez oil on shorelines of three embayments within Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Short, Jeffrey W; Maselko, Jacek M; Lindeberg, Mandy R; Harris, Patricia M; Rice, Stanley D

    2006-06-15

    We examined 32 shorelines selected at random in 2003 from shorelines in Herring Bay, Lower Pass, and Bay of Isles in Prince William Sound, Alaska, to examine the vertical distribution of oil remaining from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill and to estimate the probability that sea otters and ducks would encounter oil while foraging there. On each shoreline, sampling was stratified by 1-m tide height intervals and randomly located 0.25 m2 sampling quadrats were examined for evidence of surface and subsurface oil. Oil from the T/V Exxon Valdezwasfound on 14 shorelines, mainly in Herring Bay and Lower Pass, with an estimated 0.43 ha covered by surface oil and 1.52 ha containing subsurface oil. Surface and subsurface oil were most prevalent near the middle of the intertidal and had nearly symmetrical distributions with respect to tide height. Hence, about half the oil is in the biologically rich lower intertidal, where predators may encounter it while disturbing sediments in search of prey. The overall probability of encountering surface or subsurface oil is estimated as 0.0048, which is only slightly greaterthan our estimated probability of encountering subsurface oil in the lower intertidal of Herring Bay or Lower Pass. These encounter probabilities are sufficient to ensure that sea otters and ducks that routinely excavate sediments while foraging within the intertidal would likely encounter subsurface oil repeatedly during the course of a year.

  1. Intraspecific Variation in Microbial Symbiont Communities of the Sun Sponge, Hymeniacidon heliophila, from Intertidal and Subtidal Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Brooke L.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges host diverse and complex communities of microbial symbionts that display a high degree of host specificity. The microbiomes of conspecific sponges are relatively constant, even across distant locations, yet few studies have directly examined the influence of abiotic factors on intraspecific variation in sponge microbial community structure. The contrast between intertidal and subtidal environments is an ideal system to assess the effect of environmental variation on sponge-microbe symbioses, producing two drastically different environments on a small spatial scale. Here, we characterized the microbial communities of individual intertidal and subtidal Hymeniacidon heliophila sponges, ambient seawater, and sediment from a North Carolina oyster reef habitat by partial (Illumina sequencing) and nearly full-length (clone libraries) 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Clone library sequences were compared to H. heliophila symbiont communities from the Gulf of Mexico and Brazil, revealing strong host specificity of dominant symbiont taxa across expansive geographic distances. Sediment and seawater samples yielded clearly distinct microbial communities from those found in H. heliophila. Despite the close proximity of the sponges sampled, significant differences between subtidal and intertidal sponges in the diversity, structure, and composition of their microbial communities were detected. Differences were driven by changes in the relative abundance of a few dominant microbial symbiont taxa, as well as the presence or absence of numerous rare microbial taxa. These findings suggest that extreme abiotic fluctuations, such as periodic air exposure in intertidal habitats, can drive intraspecific differences in complex host-microbe symbioses. PMID:26567307

  2. Comparison of the fate and ecological effects of dispersed and nondispersed oil in a variety of intertidal habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.M.; Crothers, J.H.; Little, D.I.; Oldham, J.H.; Wilson, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    Field experiments were carried out to compare the littoral fate and ecological effects of chemically dispersed oil and nondispersed oil. The basic experimental design was a series of treatments applied to marked plots on rocky shores, a salt marsh, an intertidal sea-grass bed, and sand and mud flats. The treatments included a variety of oils and the dispersants BP 1100 WD, BP 1100X, Corexit 8667, and Corexit 7664, applied directly to the intertidal plots. Sediment hydrocarbon analysis indicated little long-term retention of applied oil (whether dispersanttreated or not) in the salt marsh mud and in muddy sand on a waterlogged intertidal flat. However, in the sea-grass bed sediments and in the fine sands on freely draining intertidal flats, dispersant-treated oil was, in some cases, retained at greater concentrations than untreated oil. The results are discussed with reference to the rocky shore Exposure Scale of Ballantine, to the shoreline Vulnerability Index of Gundlach and Hayes, and to factors such as the behavior of the water table, particle size, and depth of disturbance of sediments.

  3. Glacial and Intertidal Ecology: A Study Guide for the Third Grade. Alaska Sea Week Curriculum Series. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopson, Dan; And Others

    Two marine science units comprise this manual for teachers of elementary school students. Unit 1, "Shore Communities," involves mapping exercises and other investigations of the ecology of the intertidal zone. Unit 2, "The Glacier," focuses on glacial geology and the relationship of glaciers to the marine environment. Each unit contains several…

  4. Comparative study on the fauna composition of intertidal invertebrates between natural and artificial substrata in the northeastern coast of Jeju Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Bae; Song, Ji-Na; Kim, In-Soo; Seo, Jeong-Bin; Kwoun, Chul-Hwi

    2013-12-01

    This study was carried out to learn about differences in the sessile macrobenthic fauna communities between the artificial and natural habitats. There were some differences in terms of species composition and dominant species and community structure between two habitat types. The dominant species include Pollicipes mitella and Granuilittorina exigua in natural rocky intertidal zones; Monodonta labio confusa, Ligia exotica, Tetraclita japonica in the artificial rocky intertidal zones. Among all the species, L. exotica and T. japonica occurred only in the artificial rocky intertidal zone. The results of cluster analysis and nMDS analysis showed a distinct difference in community structure between artificial and natural rocky intertidal zones. The fauna in the natural rocky intertidal zones were similar to each other and the fauna in the artificial rocky intertidal zones were divided depending on the slope of the substratum. In the case of a sloping tetrapod, M. labio confusa and P. mitella were dominant, but at the vertical artificial seawall, Cellana nigrolineata, L. exotica T. japonica were dominant. The analysis of the species presented in natural and artificial rocky intertidal areas showed the exclusive presence of 10 species on natural rocks and 12 species on artificial rocks. The species in the natural rocky intertidal area included mobile gastropods and cnidarians (i.e. rock anemones), and the species in the artificial rocky intertidal area mostly included non-mobile attached animals. The artificial novel structure seems to contribute to increasing the heterogeneity of habitats for marine invertebrate species and an increase the species diversity in rocky coastal areas.

  5. Methods for Handling Missing Secondary Respondent Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Rebekah; Johnson, David

    2013-01-01

    Secondary respondent data are underutilized because researchers avoid using these data in the presence of substantial missing data. The authors reviewed, evaluated, and tested solutions to this problem. Five strategies of dealing with missing partner data were reviewed: (a) complete case analysis, (b) inverse probability weighting, (c) correction…

  6. How Teachers Respond to Children's Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Susan; Randall, Kellie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how teachers respond when children engage in inquiry-based deviations from a planned task. Thirty-one teachers each completed a brief science activity and accompanying worksheet with a student confederate. Teachers were given one of two goals for the study: help the students complete a worksheet or help the students learn more…

  7. From Recommendations to Reality: Educators Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedesco, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the 1995 report of the Institute of Medicine concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It describes the effort of the American Association of Dental Schools to systematically survey professional responses the IOM Report's recommendations. Among nine themes identified are…

  8. Responding to Children's Fears: A Partnership Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorin, Reesa

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study into children's fears and suggests that forging partnerships between parents, children, and teachers is one positive step toward addressing fear in young children. Defines partnerships and asserts that they can help in better recognizing fear displays in young children and in sharing ideas about best practice in responding to…

  9. School Principals and Racism: Responding to Aveling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Claire; Mahoney, Caroline; Fox, Brandi; Halse, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study responds to Nado Aveling's call in "Anti-racism in Schools: A question of leadership?" ("Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education," 2007, 28(1), 69-85) for further investigation into racism in Australian schools. Aveling's interview study concluded that an overwhelming number of school principals…

  10. Responding to Children Victimized by Their Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Brock, Stephen E.; Chang, Yiping; O'Malley, Meagan D.

    2006-01-01

    Because victimization results from the dynamic interplay between the victim and his or her parents, peers, and teachers, responding to this problem should involve both direct and indirect interventions. This paper describes and reviews empirically supported direct interventions with victims, as well as indirect interventions with parents, peers,…

  11. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  12. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  13. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  14. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  15. 42 CFR 93.225 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Respondent. 93.225 Section 93.225 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  16. Helping Your Children Respond to Global Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFarge, Phyllis

    1992-01-01

    Discusses what it is like for children to grow up with an awareness that they live in a world in which unrestrained technological prowess has created vulnerabilities on a global scale. The article examines how parents and teachers can help their children cope with and respond to world issues. (SM)

  17. Variations in Survey Respondent Selection by Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie

    This paper describes seven studies (all that could be found on the subject) comparing nine respondent selection procedures with regard to their potential to reduce refusal rates and to increase representativeness of samples; particular concerns are underrepresentation of men and multiple-adult households. The paper states that (1) the seven…

  18. Introduction to Hydrogen Safety for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, Linda L.; Akers, Bret M.; Cooper, Christy

    2007-08-01

    This article is intended to inform firefighters about a new web-based training course called "Introduction to Hydrogen Safety for First Responders." It provides a very brief overview of the course contents, the web address to access the online course, where to get CDs and hard copies of the course, and who to contact for further information.

  19. Cleartalk: Police Responding to Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Mark; Brennan, Roslin

    The Cleartalk project was developed in New South Wales (Australia) to help police respond to the communication needs of people with intellectual disabilities. Section 1 presents "The View from the Street: A Working Knowledge of Intellectual Disability," which discusses how individuals with intellectual disabilities are denied their right of access…

  20. Resurgence of Temporal Patterns of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancado, Carlos R. X.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2011-01-01

    The resurgence of temporal patterns of key pecking by pigeons was investigated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, positively accelerated and linear patterns of responding were established on one key under a discrete-trial multiple fixed-interval variable-interval schedule. Subsequently, only responses on a second key produced reinforcers…

  1. ASA24® Respondent Website Features

    Cancer.gov

    The ASA24 Respondent Website guides the participant through the completion of either a 24-hour recall for the previous day (from midnight-to-midnight or for the past 24-hours) or for a single or multiple day food record.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon in intertidal sediments of China coastal zones: Concentration, ecological risk, source and their relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Li, Ye; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon (BC) have attracted many attentions, especially in the coastal environments. In this study, spatiotemporal distributions of PAHs and BC, and the correlations between BC and PAHs were investigated in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. BC in sediments was measured through dichromate oxidation (BCCr) and thermal oxidation (BCCTO). The concentrations of BCCr in the intertidal sediments ranged between 0.61 and 6.32mgg(-1), while BCCTO ranged between 0.57 and 4.76mgg(-1). Spatial variations of δ(13)C signatures in TOC and BC were observed, varying from -21.13‰ to -24.87‰ and from -23.53‰ to -16.78‰, respectively. PAH contents of sediments ranged from 195.9 to 4610.2ngg(-1) in winter and 98.2 to 2796.5ngg(-1) in summer, and significantly seasonal variations were observed at most sampling sites. However, the results of potential toxicity assessment indicated low ecological risk in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Greater concentrations of PAHs measured in the sediments of estuarine environments indicated that rivers runoff may have been responsible for the higher PAH pollution levels in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Pearson's correlation analysis suggested that pyrogenic compounds of PAH were significantly related to BC, due to that both BC and these compounds derived mainly from the combustion process of fossil fuels and biomass. Overall, increasing energy consumptions caused by anthropogenic activities can contribute more emissions of BC as well as PAHs and thus improve the importance of BC in indicating pyrogenic compounds of PAHs in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. PMID:27266522

  3. Effects of ocean acidification on early life-history stages of the intertidal porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Osuna, Lina; Carter, Hayley A; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2013-04-15

    Intertidal zone organisms naturally experience daily fluctuations in pH, presently reaching values beyond what is predicted for open ocean surface waters from ocean acidification (OA) by the year 2100, and thus present an opportunity to study the pH sensitivity of organisms that are presumably adapted to an acidified environment. The intertidal zone porcelain crab, Petrolisthes cinctipes, was used to study physiological responses to low pH in embryonic, larval and newly recruited juvenile life-history stages. In these crabs, embryonic development occurs in the pH-variable intertidal zone (pH 6.9-9.5), larvae mature in the more stable pelagic environment (pH 7.9-8.2), and juvenile crabs settle back into the pH-variable intertidal zone. We examined survival, cardiac performance, energetics and morphology in embryonic, larval and juvenile crabs exposed to two pH conditions (pH 7.9 and 7.6). Embryos and larvae were split by brood between the pH treatments for 9 days to examine brood-specific responses to low pH. Hatching success did not differ between pH conditions, but ranged from 30% to 95% among broods. Larval survival was not affected by acidification, but juvenile survival was reduced by ~30% after longer (40 days) exposure to low pH. Embryonic and larval heart rates were 37% and 20% lower at low pH, and there was a brood-specific response in embryos. Embryos did not increase in volume under acidified conditions, compared with a 15% increase in ambient conditions. We conclude that sustained exposure to low pH could be detrimental to P. cinctipes embryos and larvae despite the fact that embryos are regularly exposed to naturally fluctuating hypercapnic water in the intertidal zone. Importantly, our results indicate that early life-history stage responses to OA may be brood specific through as yet undetermined mechanisms.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon in intertidal sediments of China coastal zones: Concentration, ecological risk, source and their relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Li, Ye; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon (BC) have attracted many attentions, especially in the coastal environments. In this study, spatiotemporal distributions of PAHs and BC, and the correlations between BC and PAHs were investigated in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. BC in sediments was measured through dichromate oxidation (BCCr) and thermal oxidation (BCCTO). The concentrations of BCCr in the intertidal sediments ranged between 0.61 and 6.32mgg(-1), while BCCTO ranged between 0.57 and 4.76mgg(-1). Spatial variations of δ(13)C signatures in TOC and BC were observed, varying from -21.13‰ to -24.87‰ and from -23.53‰ to -16.78‰, respectively. PAH contents of sediments ranged from 195.9 to 4610.2ngg(-1) in winter and 98.2 to 2796.5ngg(-1) in summer, and significantly seasonal variations were observed at most sampling sites. However, the results of potential toxicity assessment indicated low ecological risk in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Greater concentrations of PAHs measured in the sediments of estuarine environments indicated that rivers runoff may have been responsible for the higher PAH pollution levels in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Pearson's correlation analysis suggested that pyrogenic compounds of PAH were significantly related to BC, due to that both BC and these compounds derived mainly from the combustion process of fossil fuels and biomass. Overall, increasing energy consumptions caused by anthropogenic activities can contribute more emissions of BC as well as PAHs and thus improve the importance of BC in indicating pyrogenic compounds of PAHs in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones.

  5. Assessing a quick monitoring method using rocky intertidal communities as a bioindicator: a multivariate approach in Algeciras Bay.

    PubMed

    Guerra-García, J M; Maestre, M J; González, A R; García-Gómez, J C

    2006-05-01

    A multivariate approach was used to test the value of intertidal communities as a bioindicator of environmental conditions at Algeciras Bay, southern Spain. The study area is located in the Strait of Gibraltar and it is subjected to a variety of anthropic impacts. Eight localities (5 inside and 3 outside the bay) were selected, and four transects were undertaken in each locality to characterise the fauna and flora. The spatial distribution of the intertidal species reflected the physico-chemical conditions of Algeciras Bay. The stations located outside the bay, characterised by high hydrodynamism and dissolved oxygen and low sedimentation and turbidity, had a higher diversity and species richness than the inner stations. According to the BIO-ENV procedure and CCA, water turbidity was the factor which best correlated with the intertidal assemblages. SIMPER showed that the molluscs Chtamalus stellatus, Mytilus cf edulis, Littorina neritoides and Balanus perforatus, and the algae Gelidium pusillum, Corallina elongata, Asparagopsis armata, Colpomenia sinuosa and Fucus spiralis were the species that most contributed to the dissimilarity between internal and external sites. The present study, based on the spatial distribution of intertidal taxa, yielded similar results to those previously obtained in the area with costly physico-chemical analysis based on complex matrices of subtidal epifaunal communities. Consequently, the intertidal sampling method proposed in this study is presented here as a quick, effective alternative strategy, and can be useful in environmental monitoring programs, since these communities are easily accessible and amenable to sample, and the sessile nature of the majority of the species makes future, long-term monitoring relatively simple. PMID:16779601

  6. Detecting change in intertidal species richness on sandy beaches: calibrating across sampling designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooler, Nicholas K.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.

    2014-10-01

    Detecting changes in the biodiversity of biotic communities is fundamental to evaluating ecological responses to anthropogenic and climatic drivers at multiple scales. Species richness, the simplest measure of biodiversity, can be strongly affected by sampling design, making comparisons among results of different studies challenging. We investigated the use of extrapolative species richness estimators to address these issues in comparing species richness results from two sampling designs that differed in area sampled for intertidal macroinvertebrates on exposed sandy beaches. The area sampled by the proportional area sampling design increased with beach width (0.4 m2-3.0 m2) across our sites. The area sampled by the fixed area sampling design (3.5 m2) was independent of intertidal width. To obtain datasets for comparisons, we simultaneously used these sampling designs on nested intertidal grids at seven sandy beaches in central and southern California, USA. Observed species richness differed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) between the two sampling designs and was consistently lower (3-10 species less) for the proportional area design compared to the fixed area design (8-35 vs. 12-38 species, respectively), except at the widest beach where sampling areas were most similar (3 m2 vs. 3.5 m2). All seven non-parametric species richness estimators provided higher estimates of richness for both designs (mean = 5.4 ± 3.8 species), but only four of the richness estimators reduced differences in richness obtained by the two designs to a non-significant level (p ≥ 0.05) across the sites. The ratio of richness values (proportional area/fixed area) obtained by the two designs was strongly correlated with sampling area for observed richness and four of the seven estimators, suggesting these estimators did not uniformly correct for sampling area. When we used an extrapolation of sample-based rarefaction to adjust for sampling area, differences in species richness between sampling

  7. A new species of Strongylacron (Copepoda, Harpacticoida, Cletodidae) from intertidal mudflats in the Korean peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Guk; Jung, Tae Won; Yoon, Seong Myeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Strongylacron glabrum sp. n. is described from intertidal mudflats in the Korean peninsula. The new species is assigned to the monospecific genus Strongylacron Gee & Huys, 1996 in accordance with the generic morphological features of the rostrum, antennary exopod, and thoracic legs. However, Strongylacron glabrum sp. n. is clearly distinguished from the type species, Strongylacron buchholtzi (Boeck, 1873), by the naked anterior margin of rostrum, the elongate exopod and endopodal lobe of female P5 approximately 3.5 and 2.7 times as long as width, respectively, and the presence of 8–10 rod-like projections on prosomites. The genus Strongylacron is first recorded from Korean waters by the present study.

  8. Radionuclide monitoring in molluscs inhabiting intertidal region near a nuclear installation, Gulf of Mannar, India.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Feroz; Wesley, S Godwin

    2012-02-01

    Protection of non-human biota from ionizing contaminants, especially in the vicinity of nuclear installations is a very important aspect for nuclear engineers and ecologists. In this view, a baseline data on the activity concentration of (210)Po and (210)Pb were quantified in different tissues of molluscs inhabiting the intertidal region along the coast of Kudankulam. The activity concentration was noticed higher in the organs associated with digestion and metabolism. Filter feeding bivalve molluscs registered the maximum activity of (210)Po in their whole body compared to grazing gastropods. (210)Po:(210)Pb ratio was calculated to be greater than unity in most of the analysed tissues. The ecological sensitivity of molluscs to the radiation exposure and the safeness of the environment was analysed by calculating the external and internal dose rate. The hazard quotient for molluscs was lesser than the global bench mark dose rate of 10 μGyh(-1).

  9. An intertidal sea star adjusts thermal inertia to avoid extreme body temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sanford, Eric; Helmuth, Brian

    2009-12-01

    The body temperature of ectotherms is influenced by the interaction of abiotic conditions, morphology, and behavior. Although organisms living in different thermal habitats may exhibit morphological plasticity or move from unfavorable locations, there are few examples of animals adjusting their thermal properties in response to short-term changes in local conditions. Here, we show that the intertidal sea star Pisaster ochraceus modulates its thermal inertia in response to prior thermal exposure. After exposure to high body temperature at low tide, sea stars increase the amount of colder-than-air fluid in their coelomic cavity when submerged during high tide, resulting in a lower body temperature during the subsequent low tide. Moreover, this buffering capacity is more effective when seawater is cold during the previous high tide. This ability to modify the volume of coelomic fluid provides sea stars with a novel thermoregulatory "backup" when faced with prolonged exposure to elevated aerial temperatures.

  10. A new species of Strongylacron (Copepoda, Harpacticoida, Cletodidae) from intertidal mudflats in the Korean peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Guk; Jung, Tae Won; Yoon, Seong Myeong

    2016-01-01

    A new species, Strongylacron glabrum sp. n. is described from intertidal mudflats in the Korean peninsula. The new species is assigned to the monospecific genus Strongylacron Gee & Huys, 1996 in accordance with the generic morphological features of the rostrum, antennary exopod, and thoracic legs. However, Strongylacron glabrum sp. n. is clearly distinguished from the type species, Strongylacron buchholtzi (Boeck, 1873), by the naked anterior margin of rostrum, the elongate exopod and endopodal lobe of female P5 approximately 3.5 and 2.7 times as long as width, respectively, and the presence of 8-10 rod-like projections on prosomites. The genus Strongylacron is first recorded from Korean waters by the present study. PMID:27667951

  11. Wave energy dissipation by intertidal sand waves on a mixed-sediment Beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, P.; Ruggiero, P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the surf zone, the energy expended by wave breaking is strongly influenced by nearshore bathymetry, which is often linked to the character and abundance of local sediments. Based upon a continuous, two year record of Argus Beach Monitoring System (ABMS) data on the north shore of Kachemak Bay in southcentral Alaska, we model the enhancement of wave energy dissipation by the presence of intertidal sand waves. Comparison of model results from simulations in the presence and absence of sand waves illustrates that these ephemeral morphological features can offer significant protection to the backing beach and sea cliff through two mechanisms: (1) by moving the locus of wave breaking seaward and (2) by increasing energy expenditure associated with the turbulence of wave breaking. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  12. Are sea otters being exposed to subsurface intertidal oil residues from the Exxon Valdez oil spill?

    PubMed

    Boehm, P D; Page, D S; Neff, J M; Brown, J S

    2011-03-01

    Twenty years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, scattered patches of subsurface oil residues (SSOR) can still be found in intertidal sediments at a small number of shoreline locations in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Some scientists hypothesize that sea otters continue to be exposed to SSOR by direct contact when otters dig pits in search of clams. This hypothesis is examined through site-specific examinations where SSOR and otter-dug pits co-occur. Surveys documented the exact sediment characteristics and locations on the shore at the only three subdivisions where both SSOR and otter pits were found after 2000. Shoreline characteristics and tidal heights where SSOR have persisted are not suitable habitat for sea otters to dig pits during foraging. There is clear separation between areas containing SSOR and otter foraging pits. The evidence allows us to reject the hypothesis that sea otters encounter and are being exposed by direct contact to SSOR.

  13. Oxidative stress tolerance in intertidal red seaweed Hypnea musciformis (Wulfen) in relation to environmental components.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Dusmant; Das, Priya Brata; Verlecar, Xivanand N; Pise, Navnath M; Gauns, Manguesh

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress parameters in relation to temperature and other factors have been analysed in Hypnea musciformis, the red seaweed from Anjuna beach, Goa, with an aim to understand its susceptibility to the changing seasons. The results indicate that elevated temperature, sunshine and dessication during peak summer in May enhanced the activity of lipid peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione and ascorbic acid. Statistical tests using multivariate analysis of variance and correlation analysis showed that oxidative stress and antioxidants maintain significant relation with temperature, salinity, sunshine and pH at an individual or interactive level. The dissolved nitrates, phosphates and biological oxygen demand in ambient waters and the trace metals in seaweeds maintained sufficiently low values to provide any indication that could exert contaminant oxidative stress responses. The present field studies suggest that elevated antioxidant content in H. musciformis offer sufficient relief to sustain against harsh environmental stresses for its colonization in the rocky intertidal zone.

  14. A new species of Strongylacron (Copepoda, Harpacticoida, Cletodidae) from intertidal mudflats in the Korean peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Guk; Jung, Tae Won; Yoon, Seong Myeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Strongylacron glabrum sp. n. is described from intertidal mudflats in the Korean peninsula. The new species is assigned to the monospecific genus Strongylacron Gee & Huys, 1996 in accordance with the generic morphological features of the rostrum, antennary exopod, and thoracic legs. However, Strongylacron glabrum sp. n. is clearly distinguished from the type species, Strongylacron buchholtzi (Boeck, 1873), by the naked anterior margin of rostrum, the elongate exopod and endopodal lobe of female P5 approximately 3.5 and 2.7 times as long as width, respectively, and the presence of 8–10 rod-like projections on prosomites. The genus Strongylacron is first recorded from Korean waters by the present study. PMID:27667951

  15. Reconnaissance of intertidal and subtidal zones of Back Island, Behm Canal, Southeast Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, J.A.; Young, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    A diver reconnaissance of the intertidal and subtidal zones of Back Island, Southeast Alaska, was performed May 20-22, 1986. The specific objectives were to catalog potentially vulnerable shellfish, other invertebrates, and plant resources, and to identify potential herring spawning sites. This effort was designed to supplement the existing ecological data base for Back Island that would be used during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation process. A NEPA document will be prepared that describes the site environment and assesses impacts from the proposed construction and operation of the Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). Nine diver transects were established around Back Island. Particular attention was devoted to proposed locations for the pier and float facilities and range-operations and shore-power cable run-ups.

  16. Sulfur isotope study of a modern intertidal environment, and the interpretation of ancient sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. A.

    1982-05-01

    Extensive sulfur isotope distribution data for sulfides precipitated in an intertidal environment show no distinctive features when compared with isotope values for other marine, sedimentary sulfides. The fractionation ranges from α = 1.030 to α = 1.048. The pattern is characteristic for a system essentially open to sulfate, and isotope analyses of interstitial sulfates are corroborative. A population of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the order of 10 9 organisms per cc of interstitial water is indicated. Seasonal variation of the isotope distribution reflects a transient sulfide composition and a bacterial population in which the fractionation effect is indirectly controlled by temperature. The data presented for this modern shallow water environment are at variance with an earlier assessment of isotopic distributions in ancient sulfides which linked shallow water environments with limited fractionation (α ⩽ 1.025) in a closed system.

  17. Internal bioerosion in dead and live hard corals in intertidal zone of Hormuz Island (Persian Gulf).

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad Ali; Seyfabadi, Jafar; Shokri, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-30

    Internal macrobioeroders and their erosion rate in three live and dead coral genera (Favia, Platygyra and Porites) from the intertidal zone of the Hormuz Island were studied by collecting five live and five dead colonies from each genus, from which 4 mm cross-sections were cut and photographed. Photos were analyzed using the Coral Point Count with Excel extensions. Totally, 9 taxa were identified: four bivalve species, one sponge, three polychaetes, and one barnacle. Bioerosion rate did not significantly differ among the three live corals, but among the dead ones only Porites was significantly more eroded than Favia. Sponge had the highest role in the erosion of the dead Platygyra, while barnacles were the most effective eroding organism in the live Platygyra. Polychaetes, followed by bivalves, were the most destructive bioeroders on the dead and live Porites. Further, none of the bioeroding organisms had selectively chosen either the dead or live Favia.

  18. Pseudolella major sp. nov. (Axonolaimidae, Nematoda) from the intertidal zone of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunming; Huang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    A new species of free-living nematode, Pseudolella major sp. nov. is described from the intertidal mudflats of Ximen Island in the East China Sea. Pseudolella major sp. nov. is characterized as follows: body length ~1 300 μm; short cephalic setae, 2-3 μm long; amphidial fovea loop-shaped with elongated ventral branch; ventral branch 50-60 μm long and extending past the base of buccal cavity; buccal cavity cylindrical with arching or spherical base; three heavy outwardly-curving odontia with blunt tips located at anterior of buccal cavity; pharynx short with posterior bulb; ventral gland cell elongate oval-shaped, located posterior to pharyngo-intestinal junction; excretory pore situated at the level of the middle of buccal cavity; tail conical to cylindrical; spicules arched, with double-cephalate proximal end; gubernaculum with a strong dorsal caudal apophysis.

  19. Trematodes indicate animal biodiversity in the chilean intertidal and Lake Tanganyika

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hechinger, R.F.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Trematode communities in populations of estuarine snails can reflect surrounding animal diversity, abundance, and trophic interactions. We know less about the potential for trematodes to serve as bioindicators in other habitats. Here, we reanalyze data from 2 published studies concerning trematodes, 1 in the Chilean rocky intertidal zone and the other from the East African rift lake, Lake Tanganyika. Our analyses indicate that trematodes are more common in protected areas and that in both habitats they are directly and positively related to surrounding host abundance. This further supports the notion that trematodes in first intermediate hosts can serve as bioindicators of the condition of free-living animal communities in diverse ecosystems. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2008.

  20. Ocean acidification disrupts induced defences in the intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Bibby, Ruth; Cleall-Harding, Polly; Rundle, Simon; Widdicombe, Steve; Spicer, John

    2007-12-22

    Carbon dioxide-induced ocean acidification is predicted to have major implications for marine life, but the research focus to date has been on direct effects. We demonstrate that acidified seawater can have indirect biological effects by disrupting the capability of organisms to express induced defences, hence, increasing their vulnerability to predation. The intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea produced thicker shells in the presence of predation (crab) cues but this response was disrupted at low seawater pH. This response was accompanied by a marked depression in metabolic rate (hypometabolism) under the joint stress of high predation risk and reduced pH. However, snails in this treatment apparently compensated for a lack of morphological defence, by increasing their avoidance behaviour, which, in turn, could affect their interactions with other organisms. Together, these findings suggest that biological effects from ocean acidification may be complex and extend beyond simple direct effects. PMID:17939976

  1. Effects of an oil spill on benthic community production and respiration on subtropical intertidal sandflats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Hua; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2013-08-15

    This study determined effects of an oil spill on subtropical benthic community production and respiration by monitoring CO2 fluxes in benthic chambers on intertidal sandflats during emersion before and after an accidental spill. The oil spill decreased sediment chlorophyll a concentrations, altered benthic macrofaunal community, and affected ecological functioning by suppressing or even stopping microalgal production, increasing bacterial respiration, and causing a shift from an autotrophic system to a heterotrophic system. Effects of the oil spill on the macrofauna were more severe than on benthic microalgae, and affected sedentary infauna more than motile epifauna. Despite the oil spill's impact on the benthic community and carbon metabolism, the affected area appeared to return to normal in about 23 days. Our results suggest that the prompt response of benthic metabolism to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons can serve as a useful indicator of the impact of an oil spill.

  2. Abundance of estuarine larval and juvenile fish in a South Carolina intertidal creek

    SciTech Connect

    Bozeman, E.L. Jr.; Dean, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    The fall and winter population of larval fish in a small intertidal creek was measured. The creek was blocked at high tide, and the immature fish were captured in a channel net designed for consistent quantitative sampling as they left with the ebbing tide. A total of 573,739 individuals with a biomass (preserved wet weight) of 66.1 kg were captured during the eight month sampling period (October 1974 to May 1975). Twelve families, 13 genera, and 16 species were represented, with five species comprising 99.3% of the fish captured. The five species were: Leiostomus xanthurus (53.5%), Lagodon rhomboides (31.7%), Brevoortia tyrannus (11.9%), Micropogon undulatus (1.7%), and Myrophis punctatus (0.5%). The net was efficient, the catch was seasonal, and the greatest larval abundance occurred in February and March.

  3. Oxidative stress tolerance in intertidal red seaweed Hypnea musciformis (Wulfen) in relation to environmental components.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Dusmant; Das, Priya Brata; Verlecar, Xivanand N; Pise, Navnath M; Gauns, Manguesh

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress parameters in relation to temperature and other factors have been analysed in Hypnea musciformis, the red seaweed from Anjuna beach, Goa, with an aim to understand its susceptibility to the changing seasons. The results indicate that elevated temperature, sunshine and dessication during peak summer in May enhanced the activity of lipid peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione and ascorbic acid. Statistical tests using multivariate analysis of variance and correlation analysis showed that oxidative stress and antioxidants maintain significant relation with temperature, salinity, sunshine and pH at an individual or interactive level. The dissolved nitrates, phosphates and biological oxygen demand in ambient waters and the trace metals in seaweeds maintained sufficiently low values to provide any indication that could exert contaminant oxidative stress responses. The present field studies suggest that elevated antioxidant content in H. musciformis offer sufficient relief to sustain against harsh environmental stresses for its colonization in the rocky intertidal zone. PMID:26194236

  4. Effects of laughing gull and shorebird predation on the intertidal fauna at Cape May, New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botton, M. L.

    1984-02-01

    The intertidal flats of the Cape May, New Jersey shore of Delaware Bay are populated by large numbers of laughing gulls and migrating shorebirds during the spring and early summer. Exclusion of birds from a shallow slough and a sand bar had only minor effects on the infaunal benthic invertebrate assemblage at either site. The Cape May beaches provide a rich source of food in the form of horseshoe crab ( Limulus polyphemus) eggs; foraging on this item may be more profitable than probing the sediment for infauna. Gemma gemma, a small, thick-shelled bivalve, composed over 98% of the benthic infauna at both sites in 1980, and this species may be resistant to predation by certain shorebirds, as suggested by Schneider (1978).

  5. Internal bioerosion in dead and live hard corals in intertidal zone of Hormuz Island (Persian Gulf).

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad Ali; Seyfabadi, Jafar; Shokri, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-30

    Internal macrobioeroders and their erosion rate in three live and dead coral genera (Favia, Platygyra and Porites) from the intertidal zone of the Hormuz Island were studied by collecting five live and five dead colonies from each genus, from which 4 mm cross-sections were cut and photographed. Photos were analyzed using the Coral Point Count with Excel extensions. Totally, 9 taxa were identified: four bivalve species, one sponge, three polychaetes, and one barnacle. Bioerosion rate did not significantly differ among the three live corals, but among the dead ones only Porites was significantly more eroded than Favia. Sponge had the highest role in the erosion of the dead Platygyra, while barnacles were the most effective eroding organism in the live Platygyra. Polychaetes, followed by bivalves, were the most destructive bioeroders on the dead and live Porites. Further, none of the bioeroding organisms had selectively chosen either the dead or live Favia. PMID:26654335

  6. Are sea otters being exposed to subsurface intertidal oil residues from the Exxon Valdez oil spill?

    PubMed

    Boehm, P D; Page, D S; Neff, J M; Brown, J S

    2011-03-01

    Twenty years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, scattered patches of subsurface oil residues (SSOR) can still be found in intertidal sediments at a small number of shoreline locations in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Some scientists hypothesize that sea otters continue to be exposed to SSOR by direct contact when otters dig pits in search of clams. This hypothesis is examined through site-specific examinations where SSOR and otter-dug pits co-occur. Surveys documented the exact sediment characteristics and locations on the shore at the only three subdivisions where both SSOR and otter pits were found after 2000. Shoreline characteristics and tidal heights where SSOR have persisted are not suitable habitat for sea otters to dig pits during foraging. There is clear separation between areas containing SSOR and otter foraging pits. The evidence allows us to reject the hypothesis that sea otters encounter and are being exposed by direct contact to SSOR. PMID:21185036

  7. Status of intertidal infaunal communities following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Allan K; Shigenaka, Gary; Coats, Douglas A

    2014-07-15

    Intertidal infaunal communities were sampled in Prince William Sound, Alaska from 1990-2000 to evaluate impacts and recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Initial findings suggested that the spill and cleanup depressed abundances of all taxonomic groups. By 1992, abundances of major taxonomic categories at disturbed sites had either converged or paralleled populations at Unoiled sites. Abundances of littleneck clams, Leukoma (Protothaca) staminea, slowly increased at Treated sites and converged with Unoiled sites by 2000. Infaunal population differences positively correlated with fine-grained sediments at Treated sites. We believe that sediment fines removal during cleanup, and subsequent slow natural replenishment, impeded the return of the environment to pre-spill conditions. This suggests physical recovery of spill-affected beaches is an important precursor to biological recovery. PMID:24923812

  8. Microplastic fibers in the intertidal ecosystem surrounding Halifax Harbor, Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Mathalon, Alysse; Hill, Paul

    2014-04-15

    Humans continue to increase the use and disposal of plastics by producing over 240 million tonnes per year, polluting the oceans with persistent waste. The majority of plastic in the oceans are microplastics (<5 mm). In this study, the contamination of microplastic fibers was quantified in sediments from the intertidal zones of one exposed beach and two protected beaches along Nova Scotia's Eastern Shore. From the two protected beaches, polychaete worm fecal casts and live blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were analyzed for microplastic content. Store-bought mussels from an aquaculture site were also analyzed. The average microplastic abundance observed from 10 g sediment subsamples was between 20 and 80 fibers, with higher concentrations at the high tide line from the exposed beach and at the low tide line from the protected beaches. Microplastic concentrations from polychaete fecal casts resembled concentrations quantified from low tide sediments. In two separate mussel analyses, significantly more microplastics were enumerated in farmed mussels compared to wild ones.

  9. Status of intertidal infaunal communities following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Allan K; Shigenaka, Gary; Coats, Douglas A

    2014-07-15

    Intertidal infaunal communities were sampled in Prince William Sound, Alaska from 1990-2000 to evaluate impacts and recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Initial findings suggested that the spill and cleanup depressed abundances of all taxonomic groups. By 1992, abundances of major taxonomic categories at disturbed sites had either converged or paralleled populations at Unoiled sites. Abundances of littleneck clams, Leukoma (Protothaca) staminea, slowly increased at Treated sites and converged with Unoiled sites by 2000. Infaunal population differences positively correlated with fine-grained sediments at Treated sites. We believe that sediment fines removal during cleanup, and subsequent slow natural replenishment, impeded the return of the environment to pre-spill conditions. This suggests physical recovery of spill-affected beaches is an important precursor to biological recovery.

  10. The biosynthesis of cyanobacterial sunscreen scytonemin in intertidal microbial mat communities

    PubMed Central

    Balskus, Emily P.; Case, Rebecca J.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    We have examined the biosynthesis and accumulation of cyanobacterial sunscreening pigment scytonemin within intertidal microbial mat communities using a combination of chemical, molecular, and phylogenetic approaches. Both laminated (layered) and non-laminated mats contained scytonemin, with morphologically distinct mats having different cyanobacterial community compositions. Within laminated microbial mats, regions with and without scytonemin had different dominant oxygenic phototrophs, with scytonemin-producing areas consisting primarily of Lyngbya aestuarii and scytonemin-deficient areas dominated by a eukaryotic alga. The non-laminated mat was populated by a diverse group of cyanobacteria and did not contain algae. The amplification and phylogenetic assignment of scytonemin biosynthetic gene scyC from laminated mat samples confirmed that the dominant cyanobacterium in these areas, L. aestuarii, is likely responsible for sunscreen production. This study is the first to utilize an understanding of the molecular basis of scytonemin assembly to explore its synthesis and function within natural microbial communities. PMID:21501195

  11. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group’s research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding—a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires—is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (ntot = 11,908) provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area. PMID:27672496

  12. Mischievous responding in Internet Gaming Disorder research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The most recent update to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included Internet Gaming Disorder as a new potential psychiatric condition that merited further scientific study. The present research was conducted in response to the APA Substance-Related Disorders Working Group’s research call to estimate the extent to which mischievous responding—a known problematic pattern of participant self-report responding in questionnaires—is relevant to Internet Gaming Disorder research. In line with a registered sampling and analysis plan, findings from two studies (ntot = 11,908) provide clear evidence that mischievous responding is positively associated with the number of Internet Gaming Disorder indicators participants report. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing problem gaming research and the discussion provides recommendations for improving the quality of scientific practice in this area.

  13. Temporal changes in intertidal macrofauna communities over eight decades: A result of eutrophication and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schückel, Ulrike; Kröncke, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The comparison of three different macrofauna studies from the 1930s, 1970s and 2009 conducted in the Jade Bay revealed pronounced temporal and functional changes in community structure over eight decades. We focus on species composition, abundance, community structure and spatial extent in the intertidal area of the Jade Bay (Wadden Sea Lower Saxony, southern North Sea). Species inventory increased from 65 taxa in the 1930s to 83 in the 1970s to 114 taxa in 2009 caused by cryptogenic species and immigrations by species of assumed non-native origin. On the mudflats, a strong increase of the oligochaete Tubificoides benedii was observed between the 1930s and 2009, while the abundance of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana and the amphipod Corophium volutator decreased. The mobile amphipod Bathyporeia sarsi and the tube-building polychaete Pygospio elegans, dominant species for sandflats and mixed sediments in the 1930s, had greatly decreased in numbers in the 1970s and were still low in abundance in 2009. Bivalve species standing stocks declined in 2009, compared to the 1930s and 1970s. In the 1970s, an increase in the capitellid polychaete Heteromastus filiformis abundance was noted for the whole intertidal, but declined strongly in 2009. The seagrass bed area decreased by about 50% from the 1930s to the 1970s, but increased threefold since the 1970s. Assuming that cold winters, eutrophication and pollution effects mainly contributed to these changes in community structure between the 1930s and 1970s, climate warming, decreasing nutrient loads and species introductions are more likely for the temporal changes in the macrofauna communities between the 1970s and 2009. In addition, it is suggested that in the Jade Bay a higher sediment accumulation rate outpaced the rate of rising sea level.

  14. Nearshore Satellite Data as Relative Indicators of Intertidal Organism Physiological Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzelle, A.; Helmuth, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2011-12-01

    The physiological performance of intertidal and shallow subtidal invertebrates and algae is significantly affected by water temperature, and so the ability to measure and model onshore water temperatures is critical for ecological and biogeographic studies. Because of the localized influences of processes such as upwelling, mixing, and surface heating from solar radiation, nearshore water temperatures can differ from those measured directly offshore by buoys and satellites. It remains an open question what the magnitude of the differences in these temperatures are, and whether "large pixel" measurements can serve as an effective proxy for onshore processes, particularly when extrapolating from laboratory physiological studies to field conditions. We compared 9 years of nearshore (~10km) MODIS (Terra and Aqua overpasses) SST data against in situ measurements of water temperature conducted at two intertidal sites in central Oregon- Boiler Bay and Strawberry Hill. We collapsed data into increasingly longer temporal averages to address the correlation and absolute differences between onshore and nearshore temperatures over daily, weekly and monthly timescales. Results indicate that nearshore SST is a reasonable proxy for onshore water temperature, and that the strength of the correlation increases with decreasing temporal resolution. Correlations between differences in maxima are highest, followed by average and minima, and were lower at a site with regular upwelling. While average differences ranged from ~0.199-1.353°C, absolute differences across time scales were ~0.446-6.906°C, and were highest for cold temperatures. The results suggest that, at least at these two sites, SST can be used as a relative proxy for general trends only, especially over longer time scales.

  15. Impact of intertidal oyster trestle cultivation on the Ecological Status of benthic habitats.

    PubMed

    Forde, James; O'Beirn, Francis X; O'Carroll, Jack Pj; Patterson, Adrian; Kennedy, Robert

    2015-06-15

    A considerable number of Ireland's shellfish production areas co-occur with or are adjacent to Natura 2000 sites which are protected under European legislation. To investigate the general interaction between trestle oyster cultivation and the surrounding intertidal environment, six sites were selected within designated Natura 2000 sites. At each trestle site three Treatment areas were sampled. One Treatment area corresponded to potential impacts associated with cultivation activities occurring at trestle structures (designated the Trestle Treatment) while one Treatment area corresponded to potential impacts due to cultivation activities occurring along access routes (the Access Treatment). An area not subject to any known anthropogenic activity was used as a control (the Control Treatment). Potential impacts associated with Trestle Treatment areas included changes in sediment total organic matter (TOM) levels underneath trestles due to the bio-deposition of faecal/pseudofaecal material while the predominant impact associated with Access Treatment areas was compaction of sediments due to heavy vehicle traffic. In this study, macrobenthic communities at the sites were highly variable and exhibited low levels of diversity which prevented the detection of general effects of cultivation activity on community structure, diversity and secondary production. To overcome this variability, the Infaunal Quality Index (IQI) was used to assess impacts on Ecological Status (ES) of benthic communities (sensu Water Framework Directive). Relative to Control and Trestle Treatment areas, activities occurring at Access Treatment areas had a significant negative impact on ES. This study highlights the potential of the IQI for the management of aquaculture activity and provides validation for the use of the IQI in Irish intertidal environments. This study also highlights the IQI as a potential tool for assessing the conservation status of designated habitats in Natura 2000 sites.

  16. Upstream petroleum degradation of mangroves and intertidal shores: the Niger Delta experience.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Erondu, Ebere S; Ogali, Regina E

    2010-01-01

    This article was inspired by a field reconnaissance survey of outcrops along the Nembe-Brass axis of the petroliferous Niger Delta. It reviews various tradeoffs of the impact of upstream petroleum (seismic and production) operations on the mangrove ecosystems in that region, the largest in Sub-Saharan Africa. Mangroves and intertidal shores are considered critical to the economic well-being of this region owing to the people's dual occupation in fishing and farming. The mangrove ecosystem provides a nutrient medium, which serves as a nursery and spawning ground for many fish species and other biota. Oil and gas activities might destroy these spawn areas, causing reduction in resource output and community pressure. Devegetation of the mangrove forest as a result of seismic delineation leaves the fragile soil exposed, unprotected, and susceptible to erosion. Again, loss of vegetation might discourage the natural role of plants in air purification (CO(2) utilization and O(2) production). The release of nutrients (organic N(2), NH(3), and NO$\\rm{{_{3};{-}}}$) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment, with the attendant increase in microbial load, increases biochemical O(2) demand (BOD) and depletes dissolved O(2) (DO) in H(2)O to a level that is beyond the tolerance limit of organisms. This anoxic situation leads to asphyxiation and subsequent fish kill in affected areas. In order of increasing vulnerability, the mangroves and intertidal shores of the Niger Delta fall under categories 8 to 10 on the environmental sensitivity index (ESI) scale, which predisposes the areas to serious long-term effects and clean-up complexity. Thus, there is need to monitor mangrove systems and shoreline changes in the areas of considerable seismic and production activities, especially in the coastal Niger Delta, where pipeline corrosion due to salt intrusion into the swampy environment and 'unsighted fingers' of sabotage have increased the prevalence of oil spills. PMID

  17. Patterns of parasite transmission in polar seas: Daily rhythms of cercarial emergence from intertidal snails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofiev, Vladimir V.; Galaktionov, Kirill V.; Levakin, Ivan A.

    2016-07-01

    Trematodes are common parasites in intertidal ecosystems. Cercariae, their dispersive larvae, ensure transmission of infection from the first intermediate molluscan host to the second intermediate (invertebrates and fishes) or the final (fishes, marine birds and mammals) host. Trematode transmission in polar seas, while interesting in many respects, is poorly studied. This study aimed to elucidate the patterns of cercarial emergence from intertidal snails at the White Sea and Barents Sea. The study, involving cercariae of 12 species, has provided the most extensive material obtained so far in high latitude seas (66-69° N). The experiments were conducted in situ. Multichannel singular spectral analysis (MSSA) used for processing primary data made it possible to estimate the relative contribution of different oscillations into the analysed time series and to separate the daily component from the other oscillatory components and the noise. Cercarial emergence had pronounced daily rhythms, which did not depend on the daily tidal schedule but were regulated by thermo- and photoperiod. Daily emergence maximums coincided with periods favourable for infecting the second intermediate hosts. Cercarial daily emergence rhythms differed in species using the same molluscan hosts which can be explained by cercarial host searching behaviour. Daily cercarial output (DCO) correlated negatively with larval volume and positively with that of the molluscan host except in cercariae using ambuscade behaviour. In the Barents Sea cercariae emerged from their molluscan hosts at lower temperatures than in the warmer White Sea but the daily emergence period was prolonged. Thus, DCO of related species were similar in these two seas and comparable with DCO values reported for boreal seas. Local temperature adaptations in cercarial emergence suggests that in case of Arctic climate warming trematode transmission in coastal ecosystems is likely to be intensified not because of the increased

  18. Intertidal salt marshes as an important source of inorganic carbon to the coastal ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Ganju, Neil K.; Gonneea, Meagan; Chu, Sophie N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tidal export of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the coastal ocean from highly productive intertidal marshes and its effects on seawater carbonate chemistry are thoroughly evaluated. The study uses a comprehensive approach by combining tidal water sampling of CO2parameters across seasons, continuous in situ measurements of biogeochemically-relevant parameters and water fluxes, with high-resolution modeling in an intertidal salt marsh of the U.S. northeast region. Salt marshes can acidify and alkalize tidal water by injecting CO2 (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). DIC and TA generation may also be decoupled due to differential effects of marsh aerobic and anaerobic respiration on DIC and TA. As marsh DIC is added to tidal water, the buffering capacity first decreases to a minimum and then increases quickly. Large additions of marsh DIC can result in higher buffering capacity in ebbing tide than incoming tide. Alkalization of tidal water, which mostly occurs in the summer due to anaerobic respiration, can further modify buffering capacity. Marsh exports of DIC and alkalinity may have complex implications for the future, more acidified ocean. Marsh DIC export exhibits high variability over tidal and seasonal cycles, which is modulated by both marsh DIC generation and by water fluxes. The marsh DIC export of 414 g C m−2 yr−1, based on high-resolution measurements and modeling, is more than twice the previous estimates. It is a major term in the marsh carbon budget and translates to one of the largest carbon fluxes along the U.S. East Coast.

  19. Photo-regulation in microphytobenthos from intertidal mudflats and non-tidal coastal shallows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pniewski, Filip F.; Biskup, Paulina; Bubak, Iwona; Richard, Pierre; Latała, Adam; Blanchard, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated seasonal changes in the photo-regulatory mechanisms of microphytobenthos found in intertidal mudflats (Aiguillon Bay, the Atlantic, France) and non-tidal sandy coastal shallows (Puck Bay, the Baltic, Poland) based on photosynthetic pigment characteristics and the estimates of photosynthetic parameters obtained through oxygen evolution measurements. The intertidal communities consisted of motile diatom species typical of epipelon. The non-tidal microphytobenthos was composed of epipsammic species mostly belonging to four taxonomic groups chiefly contributing to the assemblage biomass, namely cyanobacteria, euglenophytes, green algae and diatoms (comprising mainly small-sized species). The epipelon was low light acclimated as shown by the lower values of photoprotective/photosynthetic (PPC/PSC) carotenoids and diatoxanthin/diadinoxanthin (Dt/Dd) ratios. In contrast, the epipsammon exhibited features of high light acclimation (high PPC/PSC and Dt/Dd ratios). In both microphytobenthos types, the photosynthetic capacity (Pm) showed the same seasonal variation pattern and there were no statistically significant differences between the investigated sites in corresponding seasons (P > 0.05). In both assemblage types, the photosynthetic efficiency at limiting irradiance (α) decreased over time. The epipelon had higher α compared to the epipsammon. Seasonal changes of the photoacclimation index (Ek) estimated for the epipelic communities reflected variations observed in Pm, whereas in the epipsammon an increasing trend in Ek values was observed. Ek was always higher for the epipsammon when comparing analogous seasons, which further corroborated low and high light acclimation in the epipelic and epipsammic communities, respectively. The presence of the photoinhibition parameter (β) in the epipelon and the lack of it in the epipsammon suggested that the latter was resistant to high irradiance and the physiological mechanisms were sufficient to protect

  20. Evidence of Unique and Generalist Microbes in Distantly Related Sympatric Intertidal Marine Sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae)

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Anoop; Silva, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and specificity of microbial communities in marine environments is a key aspect of the ecology and evolution of both the eukaryotic hosts and their associated prokaryotes. Marine sponges harbor phylogenetically diverse and complex microbial lineages. Here, we investigated the sponge bacterial community and distribution patterns of microbes in three sympatric intertidal marine demosponges, Hymeniacidon perlevis, Ophlitaspongia papilla and Polymastia penicillus, from the Atlantic coast of Portugal using classical isolation techniques and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Microbial composition assessment, with nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1400 bp) from the isolates (n = 31) and partial sequences (ca. 280 bp) from clone libraries (n = 349), revealed diverse bacterial communities and other sponge-associated microbes. The majority of the bacterial isolates were members of the order Vibrionales and other symbiotic bacteria like Pseudovibrio ascidiaceiocola, Roseobacter sp., Hahellaceae sp. and Cobetia sp. Extended analyses using ecological metrics comprising 142 OTUs supported the clear differentiation of bacterial community profiles among the sponge hosts and their ambient seawater. Phylogenetic analyses were insightful in defining clades representing shared bacterial communities, particularly between H. perlevis and the geographically distantly-related H. heliophila, but also among other sponges. Furthermore, we also observed three distinct and unique bacterial groups, Betaproteobactria (∼81%), Spirochaetes (∼7%) and Chloroflexi (∼3%), which are strictly maintained in low-microbial-abundance host species O. papilla and P. penicillus. Our study revealed the largely generalist nature of microbial associations among these co-occurring intertidal marine sponges. PMID:24265835

  1. Genetic and Morphological Differentiation of the Indo-West Pacific Intertidal Barnacle Chthamalus malayensis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Wu, Tsz Huen; Shih, Hsi-Te; Williams, Gray A.; Chu, Ka Hou; Chan, Benny K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Chthamalus malayensis is a common intertidal acorn barnacle widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific. Analysis of sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I reveals four genetically differentiated clades with almost allopatric distribution in this region. The four clades exhibit morphological differences in arthropodal characters, including the number of conical spines and number of setules of the basal guard setae on the cirri. These characters are, however, highly variable within each clade; such that the absolute range of the number of conical spines and setules overlaps between clades, and therefore, these are not diagnostic characters for taxonomic identification. The geographic distribution of the four clades displays a strong relationship between surface temperatures of the sea and ocean-current realms. The Indo-Malay (IM) clade is widespread in the tropical, equatorial region, including the Indian Ocean, Malay Peninsula, and North Borneo. The South China (SC) and Taiwan (TW) clades are found in tropical to subtropical regions, with the former distributed along the coasts of southern China, Vietnam, Thailand, and the western Philippines under the influence of the South China Warm Current. The TW clade is endemic to Taiwan, while the Christmas Island (CI) clade is confined to CI. There was weak or no population subdivision observed within these clades, suggesting high gene flow within the range of the clades. The clades demonstrate clear signatures of recent demographic expansion that predated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but they have maintained a relatively stable effective population in the past 100,000 years. The persistence of intertidal fauna through the LGM may, therefore, be a common biogeographic pattern. The lack of genetic subdivision in the IM clade across the Indian and Pacific Oceans may be attributed to recent expansion of ranges and the fact that a mutation-drift equilibrium has not been reached, or the relaxed habitat

  2. Habitat shifts and spatial distribution of the intertidal crab Neohelice ( Chasmagnathus ) granulata Dana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casariego, Agustina Mendez; Alberti, Juan; Luppi, Tomás; Daleo, Pedro; Iribarne, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Intertidal zones of estuaries and embayments of the SW Atlantic are dominated by the semiterrestrial burrowing grapsid crab, Neohelice ( Chasmagnathus) granulata, and characterized by extensive mud flats surrounded by salt marshes. In this work we examined spatial patterns of distribution of N. granulata during two years to explain their movement patterns. The results of the population sampling showed segregation by sex and size throughout the intertidal, with seasonal variations in densities and different condition indices for adults and juveniles at the different zones. The comparison of seasonal activity (ambulatory activity outside burrows) between marshes and mudflats shows that short term (e.g. daily) variations in activity were controlled by tides. Crabs were active at high tides but increased their activity on days with higher tidal amplitude. Seasonal activity showed that at both areas, females remain with low activity except for a peak in winter, while males showed the highest activity during summer in the mudflat zone, but not so in the marsh. This pattern can be the response to differences in stress tolerance, suggesting that high temperatures are limiting the performance of adult crabs during summer, especially at the marsh where physical conditions can be more critical. The spatial size segregation can be explained by differential mortality in each zone (estimated with tethered crabs), and by the juvenile movement between these zones (estimated with movement traps). Juvenile mortality is higher at the mudflat, while adult mortality is higher in the marsh. Smaller juveniles moved to the marsh, where the mortality is lower, and the larger juveniles moved towards the mudflat. This mortality is due almost exclusively to cannibalism, so our results suggest that this movement of different size classes between zones is controlled, at least in part, by intraspecific predation.

  3. Climate and recruitment of rocky shore intertidal invertebrates in the eastern North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Broitman, Bernardo R; Mieszkowska, Nova; Helmuth, Brian; Blanchette, Carol A

    2008-11-01

    Studies of the impacts of climate and climate change on biological systems often attempt to correlate ecological responses with basin-scale indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). However, such correlations, while useful for detecting long-term trends, are unable to provide a mechanism linking the physical environment and ecological processes. Here we evaluate the effects of the NAO on recruitment variability of rocky intertidal invertebrates in the North Atlantic examining two possible climate-related pathways. Using a highly conservative test we interpret associations with the NAO integrated over a season (three months) as an indicator of atmospheric effects on newly settled recruits (NAO3), and the effects of the NAO integrated over six months (NAO6) as an indicator of changes in ocean circulation affecting patterns of larval transport. Through an extensive literature survey we found 13 time series, restricted to southwest Ireland and Britain and comprising five species, that could be used for statistical analysis. Significant correlations with NAO3, our proxy for atmospheric effects, were observed in the south-central domain of our study region (southwest Ireland and south England). Significant correlations with NAO6, the proxy for ocean circulation effects, were detected on southwest Ireland. The associations were detected for three (two barnacles and a topshell) at two sites. These results suggest that the NAO can have effects on the recruitment of intertidal invertebrates through different pathways linked to climate and be distributed heterogeneously in space. Based on previous evidence and the sign and geographic location of significant correlations, we suggest that winter NAO effects are likely to occur as a result of effects on the survival of early life stages settling during spring or through changes in phenology. Our results argue that a combination of modeling and synthesis can be used to generate hypotheses regarding the effects of

  4. Upstream petroleum degradation of mangroves and intertidal shores: the Niger Delta experience.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Erondu, Ebere S; Ogali, Regina E

    2010-01-01

    This article was inspired by a field reconnaissance survey of outcrops along the Nembe-Brass axis of the petroliferous Niger Delta. It reviews various tradeoffs of the impact of upstream petroleum (seismic and production) operations on the mangrove ecosystems in that region, the largest in Sub-Saharan Africa. Mangroves and intertidal shores are considered critical to the economic well-being of this region owing to the people's dual occupation in fishing and farming. The mangrove ecosystem provides a nutrient medium, which serves as a nursery and spawning ground for many fish species and other biota. Oil and gas activities might destroy these spawn areas, causing reduction in resource output and community pressure. Devegetation of the mangrove forest as a result of seismic delineation leaves the fragile soil exposed, unprotected, and susceptible to erosion. Again, loss of vegetation might discourage the natural role of plants in air purification (CO(2) utilization and O(2) production). The release of nutrients (organic N(2), NH(3), and NO$\\rm{{_{3};{-}}}$) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment, with the attendant increase in microbial load, increases biochemical O(2) demand (BOD) and depletes dissolved O(2) (DO) in H(2)O to a level that is beyond the tolerance limit of organisms. This anoxic situation leads to asphyxiation and subsequent fish kill in affected areas. In order of increasing vulnerability, the mangroves and intertidal shores of the Niger Delta fall under categories 8 to 10 on the environmental sensitivity index (ESI) scale, which predisposes the areas to serious long-term effects and clean-up complexity. Thus, there is need to monitor mangrove systems and shoreline changes in the areas of considerable seismic and production activities, especially in the coastal Niger Delta, where pipeline corrosion due to salt intrusion into the swampy environment and 'unsighted fingers' of sabotage have increased the prevalence of oil spills.

  5. Herbivore-Alga Interaction Strength Influences Spatial Heterogeneity in a Kelp-Dominated Intertidal Community.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Moisés A; Valdivia, Nelson; Broitman, Bernardo R

    2015-01-01

    There is a general consensus that marine herbivores can affect algal species composition and abundance, but little empirical work exists on the role of herbivores as modifiers of the spatial structure of resource assemblages. Here, we test the consumption/bulldozing effects of the molluscan grazer Enoplochiton niger and its influence on the spatial structure of a low intertidal community dominated by the bull kelp Durvillaea antarctica and the kelp Lessonia spicata. Through field experiments conducted at a rocky intertidal shore in north-central Chile (~30°-32°S), the edge of the grazer and algae geographic distributions, we estimated the strength and variability of consumptive effects of the grazer on different functional group of algae. We also used data from abundance field surveys to evaluate spatial co-occurrence patterns of the study species. Exclusion-enclosure experiments showed that E. niger maintained primary space available by preventing algal colonization, even of large brown algae species. The grazing activity of E. niger also reduced spatial heterogeneity of the ephemeral algal species, increasing bare space availability and variability through time in similar ways to those observed for the collective effect with other grazers. Overall, our result suggests that E. niger can be considered an important modifier of the spatial structure of the large brown algae-dominated community. Effects of E. niger on resource variability seem to be directly related to its foraging patterns, large body size, and population densities, which are all relevant factors for management and conservation of the large brown algae community. Our study thus highlights the importance of considering functional roles and identity of generalist consumers on spatial structure of the entire landscape. PMID:26360294

  6. Herbivore-Alga Interaction Strength Influences Spatial Heterogeneity in a Kelp-Dominated Intertidal Community

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Moisés A.; Valdivia, Nelson; Broitman, Bernardo R.

    2015-01-01

    There is a general consensus that marine herbivores can affect algal species composition and abundance, but little empirical work exists on the role of herbivores as modifiers of the spatial structure of resource assemblages. Here, we test the consumption/bulldozing effects of the molluscan grazer Enoplochiton niger and its influence on the spatial structure of a low intertidal community dominated by the bull kelp Durvillaea antarctica and the kelp Lessonia spicata. Through field experiments conducted at a rocky intertidal shore in north-central Chile (~30°-32°S), the edge of the grazer and algae geographic distributions, we estimated the strength and variability of consumptive effects of the grazer on different functional group of algae. We also used data from abundance field surveys to evaluate spatial co-occurrence patterns of the study species. Exclusion-enclosure experiments showed that E. niger maintained primary space available by preventing algal colonization, even of large brown algae species. The grazing activity of E. niger also reduced spatial heterogeneity of the ephemeral algal species, increasing bare space availability and variability through time in similar ways to those observed for the collective effect with other grazers. Overall, our result suggests that E. niger can be considered an important modifier of the spatial structure of the large brown algae-dominated community. Effects of E. niger on resource variability seem to be directly related to its foraging patterns, large body size, and population densities, which are all relevant factors for management and conservation of the large brown algae community. Our study thus highlights the importance of considering functional roles and identity of generalist consumers on spatial structure of the entire landscape. PMID:26360294

  7. Impact of intertidal oyster trestle cultivation on the Ecological Status of benthic habitats.

    PubMed

    Forde, James; O'Beirn, Francis X; O'Carroll, Jack Pj; Patterson, Adrian; Kennedy, Robert

    2015-06-15

    A considerable number of Ireland's shellfish production areas co-occur with or are adjacent to Natura 2000 sites which are protected under European legislation. To investigate the general interaction between trestle oyster cultivation and the surrounding intertidal environment, six sites were selected within designated Natura 2000 sites. At each trestle site three Treatment areas were sampled. One Treatment area corresponded to potential impacts associated with cultivation activities occurring at trestle structures (designated the Trestle Treatment) while one Treatment area corresponded to potential impacts due to cultivation activities occurring along access routes (the Access Treatment). An area not subject to any known anthropogenic activity was used as a control (the Control Treatment). Potential impacts associated with Trestle Treatment areas included changes in sediment total organic matter (TOM) levels underneath trestles due to the bio-deposition of faecal/pseudofaecal material while the predominant impact associated with Access Treatment areas was compaction of sediments due to heavy vehicle traffic. In this study, macrobenthic communities at the sites were highly variable and exhibited low levels of diversity which prevented the detection of general effects of cultivation activity on community structure, diversity and secondary production. To overcome this variability, the Infaunal Quality Index (IQI) was used to assess impacts on Ecological Status (ES) of benthic communities (sensu Water Framework Directive). Relative to Control and Trestle Treatment areas, activities occurring at Access Treatment areas had a significant negative impact on ES. This study highlights the potential of the IQI for the management of aquaculture activity and provides validation for the use of the IQI in Irish intertidal environments. This study also highlights the IQI as a potential tool for assessing the conservation status of designated habitats in Natura 2000 sites. PMID

  8. Indices, multispecies and synthesis descriptors in benthic assessments: Intertidal organic enrichment from oyster farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino, Victor; Azevedo, Ana; Magalhães, Luísa; Sampaio, Leandro; Freitas, Rosa; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Elliott, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Intertidal off-bottom oyster culture is shown to cause organic enrichment of the shore and although there are two stressors of interest (the presence of a structure, the trestles, and also the sediment and organic waste from the oysters), these can be separated and their relative impacts determined using an appropriate nested experimental design and data treatments. Although no artificial food sources are involved, the oysters feeding activity and intensity of culture enhances biodeposition and significantly increases the sediment fines content and total organic matter. This in general impoverished the benthic community in culture areas rather than a species succession with the installation of opportunists or a resulting increase in the abundance and biomass of benthic species; the findings can be a direct consequence of the intertidal situation which is less-amenable recruitment of species more common to the subtidal environment. Thus the most appropriate biological descriptors to diagnose the effects associated with the organic enrichment were the multispecies abundance data as well as the primary biological variables species richness and abundance. The effects were however spatially and statistically significantly confined to the area located directly underneath the culture bags compared to the corridors located between the trestles, which do not show such enrichment effects. Synthesis biotic indices were much less effective to diagnose the benthic alterations associated with this organic enrichment. These results show that special attention must be paid when using indices in areas where the organic enrichment induces an impoverishment of the benthic community but not necessarily a species replacement with the installation of opportunists.

  9. Biophysical control of intertidal benthic macroalgae revealed by high-frequency multispectral camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Daphne; van Dalen, Jeroen; Wielemaker-van den Dool, Annette; Dijkstra, Jasper T.; Ysebaert, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Intertidal benthic macroalgae are a biological quality indicator in estuaries and coasts. While remote sensing has been applied to quantify the spatial distribution of such macroalgae, it is generally not used for their monitoring. We examined the day-to-day and seasonal dynamics of macroalgal cover on a sandy intertidal flat using visible and near-infrared images from a time-lapse camera mounted on a tower. Benthic algae were identified using supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised classification techniques, validated with monthly ground-truthing over one year. A supervised classification (based on maximum likelihood, using training areas identified in the field) performed best in discriminating between sediment, benthic diatom films and macroalgae, with highest spectral separability between macroalgae and diatoms in spring/summer. An automated unsupervised classification (based on the Normalised Differential Vegetation Index NDVI) allowed detection of daily changes in macroalgal coverage without the need for calibration. This method showed a bloom of macroalgae (filamentous green algae, Ulva sp.) in summer with > 60% cover, but with pronounced superimposed day-to-day variation in cover. Waves were a major factor in regulating macroalgal cover, but regrowth of the thalli after a summer storm was fast (2 weeks). Images and in situ data demonstrated that the protruding tubes of the polychaete Lanice conchilega facilitated both settlement (anchorage) and survival (resistance to waves) of the macroalgae. Thus, high-frequency, high resolution images revealed the mechanisms for regulating the dynamics in cover of the macroalgae and for their spatial structuring. Ramifications for the mode, timing, frequency and evaluation of monitoring macroalgae by field and remote sensing surveys are discussed.

  10. Trace metals, PCBs, and PAHs in benthic (epipelic) diatoms from intertidal sediments; a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Stronkhorst, J.; Misdorp, R. ); Vos, P.C. )

    1994-06-01

    Intertidal sediments in many estuaries around the world have a history of contamination resulting from long term discharges of industrial, agricultural and domestic waste effluents. These contaminated sediments are now regarded as a major source of toxicants for bottom-related organisms which, in turn, may pass on certain contaminants (e.g. methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)) to organisms higher in the foodchain. Many studies have been conducted on the contamination of benthic macrofauna, estuarine fish and birds, but to our knowledge no research has yet been carried out on benthic diatoms which form the lowest trophic level of an intertidal ecosystem. Research on the effects of micro-contaminants on primary producers in marine ecosystems is mainly performed with phytoplankton. In the estuaries of temperate regions, benthic diatoms make a significant contribution to primary production in the ecosystem and are predated especially by deposit feeding Polychaete and Mollusca. Knowledge of the level of contamination in benthic diatoms is of major importance to recognize possible effects on growth rate and species composition of the benthic diatom populations and to understand the accumulation of toxicants into the foodchain. For chemical analysis it is difficult to obtain [open quote]pure[close quote] samples of benthic diatoms because they form part of the sediment. A similar problem occurs with the sampling of phytoplankton in turbid estuarine waters. The aim of this pilot study was (a) to improve a trap technique to collect pure samples of benthic diatoms of at least 2 gram dry weight for analysis of trace metals, PCBs and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and (b) to compare the concentrations in benthic diatoms with levels in sediment and some bottom-related organisms. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Interactions between wave action and grazing control the distribution of intertidal macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Per R; Granhag, Lena; Moschella, Paula S; Aberg, Per; Hawkins, Stephen J; Thompson, Richard C

    2006-05-01

    Canopy-forming macroalgae are key species on temperate rocky shores. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the relative balance of physical and biological factors controls the establishment and persistence of intertidal macroalgae. Here we present an integrated study of the relative importance of wave-induced forces and grazing for the recruitment and survival of the canopy-forming intertidal macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus and F. spiralis. A set of overtopped breakwaters provided a nearly unconfounded gradient in wave exposure between seaward and landward sides. A biomechanical analysis was performed based on empirical measurements of maximum drag forces in breaking waves, a model of long-term maximum wave height, and the breaking stress of Fucus spp. The estimated maximum flow speed (7-8 m/s) on the seaward side of the breakwaters was predicted to completely dislodge or prune Fucus spp. larger than approximately 10 cm, while dislodgment was highly unlikely on the landward side for all sizes. Experimental transplantation of Fucus spp. supported the biomechanical analysis but also suggested that mechanical abrasion may further limit survival in wave-exposed locations. Experimental removal of the limpet Patella vulgata, which was the principal grazer at this site, resulted in recruitment of Fucus spp. on the seaward side. We present a model of limpet grazing that indicates that limpet densities >5-20 individuals/m2 provide a proximate mechanism preventing establishment of Fucus spp., whereas wave action >2 m/s reduces persistence through dislodgment and battering. In a conceptual model we further propose that recruitment and survival of juvenile Fucus spp. are controlled indirectly by wave exposure through higher limpet densities at exposed locations. This model predicts that climate change, and in particular an increased frequency of storm events in the northeast Atlantic, will restrict fucoids to more sheltered locations. PMID:16761596

  12. Patterns of benthic assemblages invaded and non-invaded by Grateloupia turuturu across rocky intertidal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Cristiano; Araújo, Rita; Bertocci, Iacopo

    2016-09-01

    Intertidal benthic assemblages invaded and non-invaded by the introduced Asian red alga Grateloupia turuturu were compared at a rocky shore along the NW coast of Portugal. The structure of whole assemblages, the total richness of taxa and the abundance of individual taxa were examined as response variables in two different habitats (rock pools and emergent rock), two shore levels (low and mid intertidal) and two dates of sampling (June 2013 and June 2014). Invaded and non-invaded assemblages differed consistently across habitats and shore levels. Such differences were driven by 13 (with the green alga genus Ulva, the red alga Chondrus crispus and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis driving the total dissimilarity) out of the total 37 taxa identified. Individual taxa revealed idiosyncratic patterns, in several cases (C. crispus, M. galloprovincialis, articulated coralline algae of the genus Corallina and the crustose sporophyte of the red alga Mastocarpus stellatus) there were differences in the abundance of a taxon between invaded and non-invaded assemblages varying with levels of some other experimental factors. The total number of taxa was higher in invaded compared to non-invaded assemblages for each combination of habitat and shore level. Patterns of invasion by G. turuturu along the Portuguese continental coast were recently described in terms of its temporal and spatial distribution, but never examined in terms of differences between invaded and non-invaded assemblages. Such information is very limited for other geographic areas where this species is recorded out of its native range of distribution. Therefore, the present study provides a new contribution to the understanding of modifications of native assemblages associated with the invasion of G. turuturu, opening avenues of research aimed at specifically examining the factors and processes likely responsible for the invasion dynamics and success of this species.

  13. Foraging ecology of sanderlings Calidris alba wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine intertidal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Pedro M.; Alves, José A.; Catry, Teresa; Granadeiro, José P.

    2015-10-01

    Outside the breeding season, most shorebirds use either estuarine or non-estuarine intertidal areas as foraging grounds. The sanderling Calidris alba is mostly associated with coastal sandy beaches, a habitat which is currently at risk worldwide due to increasing coastal erosion, but may also use estuarine sites as alternative foraging areas. We aimed to compare the trophic conditions for sanderlings wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine sites within and around the Tejo estuary, Portugal, where these two alternative wintering options are available within a relatively small spatial scale. To achieve this, we analysed sanderling diet, prey availability, foraging behaviour, and time and energy budgets in the different substrates available in estuarine and non-estuarine sites. In terms of biomass, the most important sanderling prey in the estuarine sites were siphons of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana, polychaetes, staphylinids and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae. In non-estuarine sites the main prey were polychaetes, the bivalve Donax trunculus and chironomid larvae. Both food availability and energetic intake rates were higher on estuarine sites, and sanderlings spent a higher proportion of time foraging on non-estuarine sites. In the estuary, sanderlings foraged in muddy-sand substrate whenever it was available, achieving higher intake rates than in sandy substrates. In the non-estuarine sites they used both sandy and rocky substrates throughout the tidal cycle but had higher intakes rates in sandy substrate. Estuarine sites seem to offer better foraging conditions for wintering sanderlings than non-estuarine sites. However, sanderlings only use muddy-sand and sandy substrates, which represent a small proportion of the intertidal area of the estuary. The extent of these substrates and the current sanderling density in the estuary suggest it is unlikely that the estuary could provide alternative wintering habitat for sanderlings if they face habitat loss and

  14. Microphytobenthic biomass and species composition in intertidal flats of the Nakdong River estuary, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, GuoYing; Son, Moonho; Yun, Misun; An, Soonmo; Chung, Ik Kyo

    2009-05-01

    Intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) were investigated monthly from August 2006 to March 2008 at four different sites in the sand flats of Nakdong River estuary, Korea. Samples of surface sediment (ca. 1 cm) were collected, and chlorophyll a was extracted as biomass estimation. Species identification and enumeration were carried out by light microscopy, assisted where necessary by scanning electronic microscopy. Biomass varied between 0.47 and 16.58 μg cm -3, abundance changed from 5.25 to 414.75 × 10 3 cells cm -3, while the Shannon diversity indexes ranged between 0.69 and 2.35 H'. Thirty-nine MPB taxa were identified, primarily composed of epipelic diatoms, among which Amphora and Navicula were the most abundant genera. Based on the biomass, abundance, species composition and their dynamics, MPB assemblages of sampling sites were grouped into three distinct communities corresponding to their sediment composition characteristics. Multivariate correlation analysis revealed that biomass was positively related to mud and very fine sand, negatively related to fine and medium sand, but not significantly related to environmental factors such as pore water nutrients, light intensity and salinity, which fluctuated rapidly during emersion period. Cluster analysis corroborated the division of MPB communities according to site types on seasonal scales, and also showed seasonality between sites by cluster of all summer groups. Principal component analysis identified that variability in species composition was significantly affected by mud, very fine sand, fine sand, light intensity, and sediment temperature. This study suggests that sediment composition plays an important role in the functioning of intertidal MPB communities in estuarine ecosystems.

  15. Bioprotection and disturbance: Seaweed, microclimatic stability and conditions for mechanical weathering in the intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombes, Martin A.; Naylor, Larissa A.; Viles, Heather A.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-11-01

    As well as their destructive roles, plants, animals and microorganisms contribute to geomorphology and ecology via direct and indirect bioprotection, which can reduce weathering and erosion. For example, indirect bioprotection can operate via biotic influences on microclimate whereby physical decay processes associated with fluctuations in temperature and moisture (salt crystallization, thermal fatigue and wetting-drying), are limited. In the intertidal zone, the spatial and temporal distribution of macroalgae (seaweeds) is patchy, related to physical and ecological conditions for colonization and growth, and the nature and frequency of natural and anthropogenic disturbance. We examined the influence of seaweed canopies (Fucus spp.) on near-surface microclimate and, by implication, on conditions for mechanical rock decay and under-canopy ecology. Monitoring on hard artificial coastal structures in South West England, UK, built from limestone and concrete showed that both the range and maxima of daily summertime temperatures were significantly lower, by an average of 56% and 25%, respectively, in areas colonized by seaweed compared to experimentally cleared areas. Short-term microclimatic variability (minutes-hours) was also significantly reduced, by an average of 78% for temperature and 71% for humidity, under algal canopies during low-tide events. Using seaweed as an example, we develop a conceptual model of the relationship between biological cover and microclimate in the intertidal zone. Disturbance events that remove or drastically reduce seaweed cover mediate shifts between relatively stable and unstable states with respect to mechanical decay and ecological stress associated with heat and desiccation. In urban coastal environments where disturbance may be frequent, facilitating the establishment and recovery of canopy-forming species on rocks and engineered structures could enhance the durability of construction materials as well as support conservation

  16. Genetic and morphological differentiation of the Indo-West Pacific intertidal barnacle Chthamalus malayensis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Wu, Tsz Huen; Shih, Hsi-Te; Williams, Gray A; Chu, Ka Hou; Chan, Benny K K

    2012-09-01

    Chthamalus malayensis is a common intertidal acorn barnacle widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific. Analysis of sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I reveals four genetically differentiated clades with almost allopatric distribution in this region. The four clades exhibit morphological differences in arthropodal characters, including the number of conical spines and number of setules of the basal guard setae on the cirri. These characters are, however, highly variable within each clade; such that the absolute range of the number of conical spines and setules overlaps between clades, and therefore, these are not diagnostic characters for taxonomic identification. The geographic distribution of the four clades displays a strong relationship between surface temperatures of the sea and ocean-current realms. The Indo-Malay (IM) clade is widespread in the tropical, equatorial region, including the Indian Ocean, Malay Peninsula, and North Borneo. The South China (SC) and Taiwan (TW) clades are found in tropical to subtropical regions, with the former distributed along the coasts of southern China, Vietnam, Thailand, and the western Philippines under the influence of the South China Warm Current. The TW clade is endemic to Taiwan, while the Christmas Island (CI) clade is confined to CI. There was weak or no population subdivision observed within these clades, suggesting high gene flow within the range of the clades. The clades demonstrate clear signatures of recent demographic expansion that predated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but they have maintained a relatively stable effective population in the past 100,000 years. The persistence of intertidal fauna through the LGM may, therefore, be a common biogeographic pattern. The lack of genetic subdivision in the IM clade across the Indian and Pacific Oceans may be attributed to recent expansion of ranges and the fact that a mutation-drift equilibrium has not been reached, or the relaxed habitat

  17. Photosynthesis in estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos is limited by inorganic carbon availability.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sónia; Cartaxana, Paulo; Máguas, Cristina; Marques da Silva, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability on photosynthesis were studied in two estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) communities and in the model diatom species Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Kinetics of DIC acquisition, measured with a liquid-phase oxygen electrode, showed higher K(1/2)(DIC) (0.31 mM) and Vm (7.78 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)) for MPB suspensions than for P. tricornutum (K(1/2)(DIC) = 0.23 mM; Vm = 4.64 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)), suggesting the predominance of species with lower affinity for DIC and higher photosynthetic capacity in the MPB. The net photosynthetic rate of the MPB suspensions reached saturation at a DIC concentration of 1-1.5 mM. This range was lower than the concentrations found in the interstitial water of the top 5-mm sediment layer, suggesting no limitation of photosynthesis by DIC in the MPB communities. Accordingly, carbon isotope discrimination revealed a moderate activity of CO2-concentrating mechanisms in the MPB. However, addition of NaHCO3 to intact MPB biofilms caused a significant increase in the relative maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETR max) measured by imaging pulse-amplitude modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence. These results suggest local depletion of DIC at the photic layer of the sediment (the first few hundred µm), where MPB cells accumulate during diurnal low tides. This work provides the first direct experimental evidence of DIC limitation of photosynthesis in highly productive intertidal MPB communities. PMID:26546444

  18. Strategies for responding to RAC requests electronically.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Providers that would like to respond to complex RAC reviews electronically should consider three strategies: Invest in an EHR software package or a high-powered scanner that can quickly scan large amounts of paper. Implement an audit software platform that will allow providers to manage the entire audit process in one place. Use a CONNECT-compatible gateway capable of accessing the Nationwide Health Information Network (the network on which the electronic submission of medical documentation program runs).

  19. Preventing and responding to medical identity theft.

    PubMed

    Amori, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Medical identity theft is a crime with two victims: patients and providers. It is easy to commit and lucrative because healthcare record keeping and business interactions are complex and mainly electronic. Patients whose identity has been stolen are vulnerable to both medical error and financial loss. Providers may suffer both reputation loss and financial loss. There are steps to help prevent and to respond appropriately to medical identity theft.

  20. The long-term evolution of intertidal mudflats in the northern Netherlands during the Holocene; natural and anthropogenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Peter C.; van Kesteren, Wessel P.

    2000-09-01

    At present, intertidal mudflats form only a minor part of the tidal area of the Wadden Sea. During the Holocene, however, the extent of intertidal mudflats was much larger, as is indicated by abundant mud layers in the coastal sequence of the northern Netherlands. In this paper, a new model for the long-term coastal evolution of the northern Netherlands is presented and the (natural/anthropogenic) origin of the intertidal mudflats is discussed. The Fivel palaeo-tidal basin (NE Groningen) serves as foundation of this model, with time steps in reconstruction of more than 1000 years. Shorter duration events are ignored. The driving force in the coastal evolution during the early Holocene was the rapid sea-level rise. The Pleistocene valley systems of the Northern Netherlands drowned and became tidal basins. In their inner parts intertidal mudflats evolved. The coastline was situated about 10-15 km north of the present-day Wadden Sea islands and the tidal range along the coastline was smaller (microtidal, ca. 1.0 m, 7500 BP, as against mesotidal, 1.8-2.4 m, today). As energy conditions were moderate, the intertidal mudflats were partly covered by salt-marsh vegetation (`rooted mud layers'). Due to increasing tidal range, since about 6200 BP the vegetation cover disappeared from the intertidal mudflats (`non-rooted mud layers'). After 5000 BP, the marshes of the tidal basins started to prograde seaward, mainly as a result of the declining sea-level rise rate. On the other hand, the island coast retreated landward, so that the back barrier land-sea gradient became narrower and steeper. This steeping of the land-sea gradient together with the further increase in the tidal range caused an increase in energy in the tidal basins (local tidal currents and wave action). Because of this natural process, the intertidal sandflats expanded at the expense of the mudflats, and around 2000 BP the sandflats bordered the salt-marsh area. Mudflats were largely lost. Penetration of the

  1. Biological interactions and their role in community structure in the rocky intertidal of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janke, Klaus

    1990-06-01

    Over 3 successive seasonal cycles (April 1986 to October 1988), field experiments were established within 3 intertidal levels in the sheltered rocky intertidal of Helgoland (North Sea, German Bight). Competitors for space ( Mytilus edulis, macroalgae), herbivores ( Littorina spp.) and predators ( Carcinus maenas) were either excluded from areas (0.25 m2) covered by undisturbed communities or enclosed at natural densities on areas that were cleared before of animals and plants. All the experimental fields (each 0.25 m2) were covered by cages with 4 mm gauze at the sides and a plexiglas top. The results of the experiments in the upper intertidal (occupied by Littorina spp. and Enteromorpha) showed that a natural density of herbivores could not prevent algal settlement and had only little influence on algal growth. Instead abiotic factors (storms, algae washed ashore) decreased the stock of the green algae. Experiments in the mid intertidal, dominated by Mytilus (50% cover), Fucus spp. (20%) and grazing L. littorea (100 ind. m-2) showed that community structure was directly changed both by grazing periwinkles and by competition for space between mussels and macroalgae. Whenever Littorina was excluded, the canopy of Fucus spp. increased continuously and reached total cover within two years. In addition to the increase of Fucus spp., the rock surface and the mussel shells were overgrown by Ulva pseudocurvata, which covered the experimental fields during parts of the summer in the absence of herbivores. As soon as perennial species (fucoids) covered most of the experimental areas, the seasonal growth of Ulva decreased drastically. Presence and growth of macroalgae were also controlled by serious competition for space with mussels. Established Mytilus prevented the growth of all perennial and ephemeral algae on the rocks. However, the shells of the mussels provided free space for a new settlement of Fucus and Ulva. In the lower intertidal (dominated by total algal cover

  2. The microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, G. David; Weiss, Bernard; Laties, Victor G.

    1983-01-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation in shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. PMID:16812324

  3. Microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Weiss, B.; Laties, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation is shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. 31 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Agriculture emergencies: a primer for first responders.

    PubMed

    Gilpen, Johnnie L; Carabin, Hélène; Regens, James L; Burden, Ray W

    2009-06-01

    Over the past several years, the primary focus of emergency preparedness has been on terrorism, and how a CBRNE event would directly affect human health. Limited emphasis has been placed on the direct (eg, zoonotic infections) and indirect (eg, mental health, financial loss) effects that an agricultural emergency event can have on human health outcomes, and how they relate to emergency preparedness. We critically reviewed the resources and information readily accessible to our target audience, emergency responders; the resources included military and civilian books, personal communications, internet sites, GAO reports, and peer-reviewed journals. Among more than 2,000 bioterrorism-related articles, we found 51 that addressed either agroterrorism and/or veterinary public health: 2 cross-sectional studies, 28 review papers, and 21 commentary papers. In order to properly respond to future agriculture emergencies, emergency response professionals need to understand the nature and implications of the event as well as their roles and responsibilities, but the availability of educational and training opportunities is limited. The results of our review are consistent with the hypothesis that more resources, education, and training opportunities should be available to responders as well as to producers, importers and shippers, international travelers, and the general public. Increased education and training will raise awareness among these groups of the relationship between animal and human health.

  5. Agriculture Emergencies: A Primer for First Responders

    PubMed Central

    Carabin, Hélène; Regens, James L.; Burden, Ray W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, the primary focus of emergency preparedness has been on terrorism, and how a CBRNE event would directly affect human health. Limited emphasis has been placed on the direct (eg, zoonotic infections) and indirect (eg, mental health, financial loss) effects that an agricultural emergency event can have on human health outcomes, and how they relate to emergency preparedness. We critically reviewed the resources and information readily accessible to our target audience, emergency responders; the resources included military and civilian books, personal communications, internet sites, GAO reports, and peer-reviewed journals. Among more than 2,000 bioterrorism-related articles, we found 51 that addressed either agroterrorism and/or veterinary public health: 2 cross-sectional studies, 28 review papers, and 21 commentary papers. In order to properly respond to future agriculture emergencies, emergency response professionals need to understand the nature and implications of the event as well as their roles and responsibilities, but the availability of educational and training opportunities is limited. The results of our review are consistent with the hypothesis that more resources, education, and training opportunities should be available to responders as well as to producers, importers and shippers, international travelers, and the general public. Increased education and training will raise awareness among these groups of the relationship between animal and human health. PMID:19635003

  6. Criteria for oil spill recovery: a case study of the intertidal community of Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Skalski, J R; Coats, D A; Fukuyama, A K

    2001-07-01

    Marine intertidal organisms in Prince William Sound were exposed to crude oil following the TN Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. The intertidal communities were also subjected to mechanical disturbance during invasive oil spill remediation and cleanup efforts. Using monitoring data collected from 1989 to 1997, impacts and eventual recovery were assessed at oiled but uncleaned sites and oiled and cleaned study areas. A statistical model where recovery was defined as parallelism between the time profiles at control and oiled sites was evaluated. Statistical analysis and graphical presentations of the data suggest intertidal epibiota communities recovered from the oil spill by 1992 at the oiled sites and by 1994 at the oiled and remediated sites. Empirical data from the intertidal monitoring program supports the use of tests of parallelism in evaluating recovery and the need to avoid simply the comparison of sample means from control and oiled sites. PMID:11437004

  7. Criteria for oil spill recovery: a case study of the intertidal community of Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Skalski, J R; Coats, D A; Fukuyama, A K

    2001-07-01

    Marine intertidal organisms in Prince William Sound were exposed to crude oil following the TN Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. The intertidal communities were also subjected to mechanical disturbance during invasive oil spill remediation and cleanup efforts. Using monitoring data collected from 1989 to 1997, impacts and eventual recovery were assessed at oiled but uncleaned sites and oiled and cleaned study areas. A statistical model where recovery was defined as parallelism between the time profiles at control and oiled sites was evaluated. Statistical analysis and graphical presentations of the data suggest intertidal epibiota communities recovered from the oil spill by 1992 at the oiled sites and by 1994 at the oiled and remediated sites. Empirical data from the intertidal monitoring program supports the use of tests of parallelism in evaluating recovery and the need to avoid simply the comparison of sample means from control and oiled sites.

  8. Development of monitoring protocols to detect change in rocky intertidal communities of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Gail V.

    2010-01-01

    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in southeastern Alaska includes extensive coastlines representing a major proportion of all coastlines held by the National Park Service. The marine plants and invertebrates that occupy intertidal shores form highly productive communities that are ecologically important to a number of vertebrate and invertebrate consumers and that are vulnerable to human disturbances. To better understand these communities and their sensitivity, it is important to obtain information on species abundances over space and time. During field studies from 1997 to 2001, I investigated probability-based rocky intertidal monitoring designs that allow inference of results to similar habitat within the bay and that reduce bias. Aerial surveys of a subset of intertidal habitat indicated that the original target habitat of bedrock-dominated sites with slope less than or equal to 30 degrees was rare. This finding illustrated the value of probability-based surveys and led to a shift in the target habitat type to more mixed rocky habitat with steeper slopes. Subsequently, I investigated different sampling methods and strategies for their relative power to detect changes in the abundances of the predominant sessile intertidal taxa: barnacles -Balanomorpha, the mussel Mytilus trossulus and the rockweed Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. I found that lower-intensity sampling of 25 randomly selected sites (= coarse-grained sampling) provided a greater ability to detect changes in the abundances of these taxa than did more intensive sampling of 6 sites (= fine-grained sampling). Because of its greater power, the coarse-grained sampling scheme was adopted in subsequent years. This report provides detailed analyses of the 4 years of data and evaluates the relative effect of different sampling attributes and management-set parameters on the ability of the sampling to detect changes in the abundances of these taxa. The intent was to provide managers with information

  9. Intensities of drilling predation of molluscan assemblages in intertidal and subtidal soft substrates in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, Sabine M.; Albano, Paolo G.; Bentlage, Rudolf; Drummond, Hannah; García-Ramos, Diego A.; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Intensities of drilling predation of molluscan assemblages in intertidal and subtidal soft substrates in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf Sabine Maria Handler1, Paolo G. Albano1, Rudolf Bentlage2, Hannah Drummond2, D.A. García-Ramos1, Martin Zuschin1 1 Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Austria 2 St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York 13617, USA Trace fossils left by predators in the skeleton of their prey are arguably one of the most powerful sources of direct data on predator-prey interactions available in the fossil record. Drill holes, especially those attributed to naticid and muricid gastropods, are unambiguous marks of predation and allow discriminating between successful and unsuccessful predation attempts (complete and incomplete holes, respectively). Latitude and water depth influence drilling frequency. We inspected death assemblages of an intertidal flat and of two subtidal (water depth between 6 and 20 m) sandy sites in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf, off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, to determine the patterns of predation on shelled molluscs along the depth gradient. The study is based on ~7,000 and ~60,000 shells from the intertidal and subtidal, respectively. Drilling Frequency (DF, the number of drilled individuals), Incomplete Drilling Frequency (IDF, number of incomplete drill holes), and Prey Effectiveness (ratio between the number of incomplete drill holes and the total number of drilling attempts) were used as metrics of drilling intensity. We observed major differences between the intertidal and subtidal study areas. Drilling frequencies were generally remarkably low and intertidal flats showed a much lower drilling frequency than the subtidal (1.4% and 6.7%, respectively). In the subtidal, we observed significant differences of drilling intensity among bivalve species and between the two sites. However, predation metrics did not correlate with environmental factors such as substrate type and depth, nor with species life

  10. An operant analysis of human altruistic responding1

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Harold

    1977-01-01

    Human altruistic responding (called give responding), which delivered a reinforcer to someone other than the responder, was compared to responding where the responder was the recipient of the reinforcer (called earn responding). The same type of response (button pressing), the same reinforcer (a point representing a penny), and the same reinforcer contingency (a 40-response fixed-ratio schedule) were used for both give and earn responding. Since points representing pennies were used to reinforce give and earn responding, responding for points not worth money was also assessed. Give, earn, and point responding were arranged as concurrent incompatible operants. Lowest rates were obtained for point responding. Compared to earn responding, give responding occurred at lower rates, was more susceptible to cessation when point responding was possible, extinguished more rapidly in the absence of money, and produced less responding during reconditioning compared to conditioning when reconditioning followed a period of nonreinforcement. Give responding was less when it reduced the giver's opportunity to earn. Finally, histories of getting reinforcement from others were shown to determine give responding. PMID:16812010

  11. "Responding to Climate Change" Course: Research Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Bowman, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The "Responding to Climate Change" Barnard/Columbia course integrates current research as well as hands-on research-based activities modified for a classroom environment. The course covers the major response themes of adaptation, mitigation and communication. In the spring of 2015 the course was oriented around Arctic and Antarctic case studies. Each week a different theme is addressed, such as the physical setting, changing ecosystems, governance issues, perspectives of residents and indigenous peoples, geoengineering, commercial interests, security, and health and developmental issues. Frequent guest lectures from thematic experts keep the course grounded in realities and present the students with cutting edge issues. Activities match the weekly theme, for example during the week on Arctic development, students engage with the marine spatial planning simulation Arctic SMARTIC (Strategic Management of Resources in Times of Change) based on research on Arctic sea ice trends and projections coupled with current and projected developmental interests of stakeholders. Created under the Polar Learning and Responding: PoLAR Climate Change Education Partnership (thepolarhub.org), a complete set of SMARTIC resources is available on line for use by others (http://www.camelclimatechange.org/view/article/175297/). The Responding to Climate Change course is designed to be current and respond to events. For the Arctic case study, students developed proposals for the US State Department as the upcoming Chair of the Arctic Council. Student evaluations indicated that they appreciated the opportunity to connect science with policy and presentation of preliminary proposals in a workshop format was valued as a way to develop and hone their ideas. An additional finding was that students were surprisingly tolerant of technical issues when guest lecturers were linked in via Skype, allowing interaction with thematic experts across the US. Students commented positively on this exposure to

  12. Diagnostics for Respondent-driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a widely used method for sampling from hard-to-reach human populations, especially populations at higher risk for HIV. Data are collected through peer-referral over social networks. RDS has proven practical for data collection in many difficult settings and is widely used. Inference from RDS data requires many strong assumptions because the sampling design is partially beyond the control of the researcher and partially unobserved. We introduce diagnostic tools for most of these assumptions and apply them in 12 high risk populations. These diagnostics empower researchers to better understand their data and encourage future statistical research on RDS. PMID:27226702

  13. Liquid-Flow Controller Responds To Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanism controls flow of liquid in fuel-spraying head in combustion chamber responds nonlinearly to pressure of liquid. Shell of spraybar expands or contracts laterally as its internal pressure rises or falls, forcing collar down or up on entry tube. Area of window formed by slots in collar and entry tube thus increases or decreases. Drop in pressure through variable-area orifice increases much more with flow through orifice than does corresponding drop in pressure with flow through fixed-area orifice. In practical terms, lower pump pressure needed with variable orifice for given flow of liquid. Principle of operation applicable to spraying heads for other fluids.

  14. Brain Changes in Responders vs. Non-Responders in Chronic Migraine: Markers of Disease Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S.; Becerra, Lino; Smith, Jonathan H.; DeLange, Justin M.; Smith, Ryan M.; Black, David F.; Welker, Kirk M.; Burstein, Rami; Cutrer, Fred M.; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify structural and functional brain changes that accompanied the transition from chronic (CM; ≥15 headache days/month) to episodic (EM; <15 headache days/month) migraine following prophylactic treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A). Specifically, we examined whether CM patients responsive to prophylaxis (responders; n = 11), as evidenced by a reversal in disease status (defined by at least a 50% reduction in migraine frequency and <15 headache days/month), compared to CM patients whose migraine frequency remained unchanged (non-responders; n = 12), showed differences in cortical thickness using surface-based morphometry. We also investigated whether areas showing group differences in cortical thickness displayed altered resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) using seed-to-voxel analyses. Migraine characteristics measured across groups included disease duration, pain intensity and headache frequency. Patient reports of headache frequency over the 4 weeks prior to (pre-treatment) and following (post-treatment) prophylaxis were compared (post minus pre) and this measure served as the clinical endpoint that determined group assignment. All patients were scanned within 2 weeks of the post-treatment visit. Results revealed that responders showed significant cortical thickening in the right primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and anterior insula (aINS), and left superior temporal gyrus (STG) and pars opercularis (ParsOp) compared to non-responders. In addition, disease duration was negatively correlated with cortical thickness in fronto-parietal and temporo-occipital regions in responders but not non-responders, with the exception of the primary motor cortex (MI) that showed the opposite pattern; disease duration was positively associated with MI cortical thickness in responders versus non-responders. Our seed-based RS-FC analyses revealed anti-correlations between the SI seed and lateral occipital (LOC) and dorsomedial

  15. Pheophorbide and pheophytin a-like pigments as useful markers for intertidal microphytobenthos grazing by Hydrobia ulvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartaxana, P.; Jesus, B.; Brotas, V.

    2003-10-01

    Pigment degradation by Hydrobia ulvae, feeding on an intertidal mudflat dominated by diatoms, was studied in the laboratory. HPLC analysis identified significantly higher amounts of pheopigments in grazed sediment and a decrease in the concentrations of major chlorophylls ( a and c1+ c2) and carotenoides (fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, and β-carotene). Grazing by H. ulvae leads to a stronger pheophorbide a accumulation relative to pheophytin a. Dominant chlorophyll a degradation products were the less polar pheophorbide a4 and pheophytin a2. These pigments were identified in very high concentrations in H. ulvae faecal pellets. Although a major disadvantage of the HPLC method is the uncertainty regarding the extent and rate of pigment conversion into colourless products, these data strongly suggest the possible use of pheophorbide a4 and pheophytin a2 as useful markers for intertidal microphytobenthos grazing by H. ulvae.

  16. An Examination of Body Temperature for the Rocky Intertidal Mussel species, Mytilus californianus, Using Remotely Sensed Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J.; Liff, H.; Lakshmi, V.

    2012-12-01

    Temperature is considered to be one of the most important physical factors in determining organismal distribution and physiological performance of species in rocky intertidal ecosystems, especially the growth and survival of mussels. However, little is known about the spatial and temporal patterns of temperature in intertidal ecosystems or how those patterns affect intertidal mussel species because of limitations in data collection. We collected in situ temperature at Strawberry Hill, Oregon USA using mussel loggers embedded among the intertidal mussel species, Mytilus californianus. Remotely sensed surface temperatures were used in conjunction with in situ weather and ocean data to determine if remotely sensed surface temperatures can be used as a predictor for changes in the body temperature of a rocky intertidal mussel species. The data used in this study was collected between January 2003 and December 2010. The mussel logger temperatures were compared to in situ weather data collected from a local weather station, ocean data collected from a NOAA buoy, and remotely sensed surface temperatures collected from NASA's sun-synchronous Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Earth Observing System Aqua and EOS Terra satellites. Daily surface temperatures were collected from four pixel locations which included two sea surface temperature (SST) locations and two land surface temperature (LST) locations. One of the land pixels was chosen to represent the intertidal surface temperature (IST) because it was located within the intertidal zone. As expected, all surface temperatures collected via satellite were significantly correlated to each other and the associated in situ temperatures. Examination of temperatures from the off-shore NOAA buoy and the weather station provide evidence that remotely sensed temperatures were similar to in situ temperature data and explain more variability in mussel logger temperatures than the in situ temperatures. Our

  17. Trophic linkage of a temperate intertidal macrobenthic food web under opportunistic macroalgal blooms: A stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Je; Han, Eunah; Lee, Young-Jae; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2016-10-15

    The effects of blooms of opportunistic green macroalgae, Ulva prolifera, on the trophic structure of the macrobenthic food web in a temperate intertidal zone on the western coast of Korea were evaluated using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Biomasses of Ulva and microphytobenthos (MPB) increased significantly at the macroalgae-bloom and the non-bloom sites, respectively, from March to September 2011. The δ(13)C values of most the consumers were arrayed between those of MPB and Ulva at both sites, and differed according to feeding strategies at the macroalgae-bloom site. Seasonally increasing magnitudes in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of consumers were much steeper at the macroalgae-bloom site than at the non-bloom site. Our findings provide evidence that blooming green macroalgae play a significant role as a basal resource supporting the intertidal macrobenthic food web and their significance varies with feeding strategies of consumers as well as the resource availability.

  18. Sources of organic matter for intertidal consumers on Ascophyllum-shores (SW Iceland): a multi-stable isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarà, G.; de Pirro, M.; Romano, C.; Rumolo, P.; Sprovieri, M.; Mazzola, A.

    2007-12-01

    Stable isotopes were used to examine the origin of organic matter in Icelandic Ascophyllum-based habitats, the role of different organic matters in filling intertidal food webs and the food preferences of the most abundant suspension feeders, grazers and predators. We selected three intertidal sites on the SW coast of Iceland where we sampled in early September 2004, organic matter sources (POM, SOM and most abundant primary producers, A. nodosum and F. vesciculosus) and the most abundant macrofauna species (barnacles, mussels, gastropods, sponge and crabs). Even though the primary production ( Ascophyllum-based) was the same at the three study sites, the isotopic composition of common-among-sites organisms varied due to local differences in the origin of available POM and SOM and in food web structures.

  19. Larval settlement rate: a leading determinant of structure in an ecological community of the marine intertidal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, S.; Roughgarden, J.

    1985-06-01

    Field studies demonstrate that the population structure of the barnacle Balanus glandula differs between locations of high and low larval settlement rate. These observations, together with results from a model for the demography of an open, space-limited population, suggest that the settlement rate may be a more important determinant of rocky intertidal community structure than is presently realized. At the low-settlement location mortality of barnacles is independent of the area occupied by barnacles. At the high-settlement location mortality is cover-dependent due to increased predation by starfish on areas of high barnacle cover. In both locations the cover-independent component of mortality does not vary with age during the first 60 weeks. Generalizations that the highest species diversity in a rocky intertidal community is found at locations of intermediate disturbance, and that competition causes zonation between species of the barnacle genera Balanus and Chthamalus, seem to apply only to locations with high-settlement rates.

  20. Rare earth elements in intertidal sediments of Bohai Bay, China: concentration, fractionation and the influence of sediment texture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Gao, Xuelu; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung

    2014-07-01

    Surface sediments from intertidal Bohai Bay were assessed using a four-step sequential extraction procedure to determine their concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) and the chemical forms in which those elements were present. The normalized ratios La/Gd and La/Yb showed that LREE contents were not significantly higher than the middle REEs or HREE contents. A negative Ce anomaly and positive Eu were observed in sand and silty sand sediments, whereas no significant Ce or Eu anomaly was found in clayey silt sediments. Residual fraction of REEs accounted for the majority of their total concentrations. Middle REEs were more easily leached than other REEs, especially in clayey silt sediment. REEs contents in the surface sediment from the intertidal Bohai Sea were consistent with data from the upper continental crust and China shallow sea sediments, indicating that they were generally unaffected by heavily anthropogenic effects from adjacent areas.

  1. Impact of prolonged storm activity on the Ecological Status of intertidal benthic habitats within oyster (Crassostrea gigas) trestle cultivation sites.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Jack P J; Quinn, Christina; Forde, James; Patterson, Adrian; O'Beirn, Francis X; Kennedy, Robert

    2016-09-15

    The Ecological Status (ES; sensu the Water Framework Directive) of intertidal benthic communities within six oyster trestle cultivation sites was found to be negatively impacted along the access routes to trestles in a 2013 study. All cultivation sites occur within Natura 2000 sites. The current study revisited four of the 2013 cultivation sites in February 2014 one month after the storm activity of winter 2013/14 to test if the compaction effect along access routes persisted after the storms. Three levels of the fixed factor treatment were sampled; immediately below the trestles, along the access route and 300m away from any anthropogenic activity. The compaction effect at the Access treatment persisted in spite of the major storm activity. The current study showed the IQI to be effective for assessing the impacts of aquaculture and highlights the IQI as a tool for monitoring Conservation Status of intertidal communities under the Habitats Directive.

  2. Impact of prolonged storm activity on the Ecological Status of intertidal benthic habitats within oyster (Crassostrea gigas) trestle cultivation sites.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Jack P J; Quinn, Christina; Forde, James; Patterson, Adrian; O'Beirn, Francis X; Kennedy, Robert

    2016-09-15

    The Ecological Status (ES; sensu the Water Framework Directive) of intertidal benthic communities within six oyster trestle cultivation sites was found to be negatively impacted along the access routes to trestles in a 2013 study. All cultivation sites occur within Natura 2000 sites. The current study revisited four of the 2013 cultivation sites in February 2014 one month after the storm activity of winter 2013/14 to test if the compaction effect along access routes persisted after the storms. Three levels of the fixed factor treatment were sampled; immediately below the trestles, along the access route and 300m away from any anthropogenic activity. The compaction effect at the Access treatment persisted in spite of the major storm activity. The current study showed the IQI to be effective for assessing the impacts of aquaculture and highlights the IQI as a tool for monitoring Conservation Status of intertidal communities under the Habitats Directive. PMID:27373942

  3. Middle Triassic chirotherid trackways on earthquake influenced intertidal limulid reproduction flats of the European Germanic Basin coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus

    2012-09-01

    Chirotherid footprints of Synaptichnium, Chirotherium and Isochirotherium appeared during the late Early (Aegean) to early Late (Carnian) Triassic in central Europe. These taxa are partly revised herein, using both perfect and variably preserved tracks, and very long trackways from an upper Pelsonian intertidal-flat megatracksite of the Germanic Basin coast Pelsonian (Karlstadt Formation). The global Middle Triassic distribution of those footprints suggests seasonal migrations across Pangaea of possible archosauriform reptile trackmakers, such as Euparkeria, Ticinosuchus, Arizonasaurus and Batrachotomus, caused by horseshoe-crab mass migrations into tidal-flat beach reproductive zones in the Germanic Basin. Such seasonal migrations may even suggest a Pangaea-wide food-chain reaction, possibly including the mobilization of fish, marine and terrestrial reptiles, and of which situation the Germanic Basin intertidal-flats is a globally unique example.

  4. 15 CFR 904.107 - Joint and several respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint and several respondents. 904.107... PROCEDURES Civil Penalties § 904.107 Joint and several respondents. (a) A NOVA may assess a civil penalty against two or more respondents jointly and severally. Each joint and several respondent is liable for...

  5. 15 CFR 904.107 - Joint and several respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint and several respondents. 904.107... PROCEDURES Civil Penalties § 904.107 Joint and several respondents. (a) A NOVA may assess a civil penalty against two or more respondents jointly and severally. Each joint and several respondent is liable for...

  6. Smart physiological monitoring of first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Anurag; Kaiser, William; Tamminedi, Tejaswi; Yadegar, Jacob

    2009-05-01

    Today's state-of-the-art medical vests and shirts for health status monitoring are inflexible and expensive. The high cost and the lack of flexibility and integral-unity of the current vests are prohibiting factors for their use in first responder applications. The vests also lack an in-built intelligence to accurately determine the health status of the person wearing the vest. We present a hardware plus software solution for monitoring the health status of first responders in pressurized and adversarial missions. The technology consists of two main components. The first component is a physiological vest consisting of a suite of physiological sensors interfaced with energy management units designed to prolong the life of the sensors. The sensors communicate wirelessly with a personal server consisting of a Decision Support Software (DSS), which forms the second major component of our technology. The DSS (1) integrates the physiologic sensors readings for global assessment of the individual's health status; (2) recommends medical Alerts and Actions based on the fusion of the sensor readings; and (3) applies cognitive computation to personalize the medical vest to the specific physiologic and motion characteristics of the individual wearing the vest, in the theater of the operation or during exercise.

  7. How tree roots respond to drought

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ivano; Herzog, Claude; Dawes, Melissa A.; Arend, Matthias; Sperisen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing climate change is characterized by increased temperatures and altered precipitation patterns. In addition, there has been an increase in both the frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events such as drought. Episodes of drought induce a series of interconnected effects, all of which have the potential to alter the carbon balance of forest ecosystems profoundly at different scales of plant organization and ecosystem functioning. During recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of how aboveground parts of trees respond to drought and how these responses affect carbon assimilation. In contrast, processes of belowground parts are relatively underrepresented in research on climate change. In this review, we describe current knowledge about responses of tree roots to drought. Tree roots are capable of responding to drought through a variety of strategies that enable them to avoid and tolerate stress. Responses include root biomass adjustments, anatomical alterations, and physiological acclimations. The molecular mechanisms underlying these responses are characterized to some extent, and involve stress signaling and the induction of numerous genes, leading to the activation of tolerance pathways. In addition, mycorrhizas seem to play important protective roles. The current knowledge compiled in this review supports the view that tree roots are well equipped to withstand drought situations and maintain morphological and physiological functions as long as possible. Further, the reviewed literature demonstrates the important role of tree roots in the functioning of forest ecosystems and highlights the need for more research in this emerging field. PMID:26284083

  8. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  9. Invasion of a rocky intertidal shore by the tunicate Pyura praeputialis in the Bay of Antofagasta, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Juan Carlos; Guiñez, Ricardo; Caro, Andrés U.; Ortiz, Verónica

    2004-01-01

    Invasion by marine nonindigenous species (NIS) is a spread phenomenon. The tunicate Pyura praeputialis shows pronounced disjoint geographical distribution: along thousands of kilometers in wave-swept headlands on the southeastern coast of Australia, from where it appears to have originated, and exclusively along 60–70 km inside the Bay of Antofagasta, Chile. mtDNA sequences suggested that the species invaded this rocky shore recently. We used field manipulations and juvenile P. praeputialis transplant techniques to test hypotheses regarding the capacity of the tunicate to survive and grow at different sites and tidal heights inside and outside Antofagasta, and its competitive performance for primary space (inside the Bay) against the native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus. We conclude that survival and growth of P. praeputialis showed no significant differences among sites inside and outside the Bay, and suggest that the restrictive distribution of the species in Chile is caused by a specific oceanographic retention mechanism and/or its brief larval dispersal. We demonstrated that, inside the Bay, P. praeputialis outcompetes Perumytilus from the Mid–Low intertidal, constraining Perumytilus to the Upper Mid-Intertidal, modifying the local pattern of intertidal zonation. We show that predation on P. praeputialis juveniles by starfish and snails constitutes a regulatory mechanism for the setting of its low intertidal limit. Major ecological impacts caused by NIS invasions to rocky shores by aggressive primary space users may result in negative aspects, but also may contribute to biodiversity enhancement. We call attention to the need for increment manipulations and testing of ecological hypotheses regarding marine NIS. PMID:15118086

  10. Habitat and transmission--effect of tidal level and upstream host density on metacercarial load in an intertidal bivalve.

    PubMed

    Thieltges, D W

    2007-04-01

    Transmission of parasites may be mediated by their habitat, consisting of abiotic and biotic components. I investigated the effect of 2 important habitat components in intertidal ecosystems, tidal level (abiotic) and density of upstream hosts (biotic), on the transmission of trematode cercariae to cockle (Cerastoderma edule) hosts. A field survey showed no general trend in metacercarial loads of cockles regarding tidal level but species-dependent reactions. Parasites originating from Littorina littorea (Himasthla elongata, Renicola roscovita) showed highest infection levels in the low intertidal while parasites originating from Hydrobia ulvae (H. continua, H. interrupta) showed highest infection levels in the mid-intertidal. This reflected the density of upstream hosts at both tidal levels and positive relationships between the density of upstream hosts and metacercarial load in cockles suggested the biotic habitat component to be the dominant factor in transmission. This was confirmed by a field experiment, manipulating tidal level and the density of infected upstream snail hosts. While tidal level had no significant effect on the number of metacercariae of H. elongata acquired by cockles, the effect of upstream host density was strong. In conclusion, although tidal level usually is a very important abiotic habitat component in intertidal ecosystems leading to conspicuous zonation patterns in free-living organisms, it seems of minor importance for trematode transmission. In contrast, the biotic component upstream host density is suggested to be the dominant predictor for trematode transmission to second intermediate hosts. Assessing the relative importance of abiotic and biotic habitat components in transmission is vital for the understanding of transmission processes in the field.

  11. Subtidal and intertidal mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis L.) in the Wadden Sea: diversity differences of associated epifauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saier, Bettina

    2002-04-01

    In 1997 and 1998, surveys were performed to compare species composition, abundance and diversity of non-attached epifauna (>1 mm) in low intertidal and adjacent shallow subtidal zones of three mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis L.) near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. The community structure was similar when compared within tidal zones: no significant differences in species numbers and abundances were recorded between locations and between years. A comparison between tidal zones, however, revealed higher diversity, species densities and total species numbers in the subtidal (per 1,000 cm2: H '=2.0±0.16; 12 ±1 species density; 22 species) than the intertidal zone (per 1,000 cm2: H '=0.7±0.27; 6±2 species density; 19 species). Abundances significantly dropped with increasing submergence from 2,052 (±468) m-2 to 1,184 (±475) m-2. This was mainly due to significantly higher densities of both juvenile periwinkles, Littorina littorea, and crabs, Carcinus maenas, in intertidal mussel beds. However, many less dominant species were significantly more abundant in subtidal mussel beds. This study revealed that in the non-attached epifaunal community of mussel beds the tidal level effect within metres was strong, whilst the spatial variability in a much wider (kilometre) range but the same tidal level was negligible. The high epifaunal diversity in the subtidal zone suggests that the protective measures for mussel beds against the effects of mussel fishery should be extended from the intertidal to the subtidal zone, if the integrity of the mussel bed community in the Wadden Sea National Park is to be maintained.

  12. Physiological, cellular and biochemical thermal stress response of intertidal shrimps with different vertical distributions: Palaemon elegans and Palaemon serratus.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Costa, Pedro M; Larguinho, Miguel; Vinagre, Catarina; Diniz, Mário S

    2015-05-01

    The ability to cope with high temperature variations is a critical factor in intertidal communities. Two species of intertidal rocky shore shrimps (Palaemon sp.) with different vertical distributions were collected from the Portuguese coast in order to test if they were differentially sensitive to thermal stress. Three distinct levels of biological organization (organismal, biochemical, and cellular) were surveyed. The shrimp were exposed to a constant rate of temperature increase of 1°C x h(-1), starting at 20°C until reaching the CTMax (critical thermal maximum). During heat stress, two biomarkers of protein damage were quantified in the muscle via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays: heat shock proteins HSP70 (hsp70/hsc70) and total ubiquitin. Muscle histopathological alterations caused by temperature were also evaluated. CTMax values were not significantly different between the congeners (P. elegans 33.4 ± 0.5 °C; P. serratus 33.0 ± 0.5 °C). Biomarker levels did not increase along the temperature trial, but P. elegans (higher intertidal) showed higher amounts of HSP70 and total ubiquitin than P. serratus (lower intertidal). HSP70 and total ubiquitin levels showed a positive significant correlation in both species, suggesting that their association is important in thermal tolerance. Histopathological observations of muscle tissue in P. serratus showed no gross alterations due to temperature but did show localized atrophy of muscle fibers at CTMax. In P. elegans, alterations occurred at a larger scale, showing multiple foci of atrophic muscular fascicles caused by necrotic or autolytic processes. In conclusion, Palaemon congeners displayed different responses to stress at a cellular level, with P. elegans having greater biomarker levels and histopathological alterations. PMID:25582544

  13. Habitat and transmission--effect of tidal level and upstream host density on metacercarial load in an intertidal bivalve.

    PubMed

    Thieltges, D W

    2007-04-01

    Transmission of parasites may be mediated by their habitat, consisting of abiotic and biotic components. I investigated the effect of 2 important habitat components in intertidal ecosystems, tidal level (abiotic) and density of upstream hosts (biotic), on the transmission of trematode cercariae to cockle (Cerastoderma edule) hosts. A field survey showed no general trend in metacercarial loads of cockles regarding tidal level but species-dependent reactions. Parasites originating from Littorina littorea (Himasthla elongata, Renicola roscovita) showed highest infection levels in the low intertidal while parasites originating from Hydrobia ulvae (H. continua, H. interrupta) showed highest infection levels in the mid-intertidal. This reflected the density of upstream hosts at both tidal levels and positive relationships between the density of upstream hosts and metacercarial load in cockles suggested the biotic habitat component to be the dominant factor in transmission. This was confirmed by a field experiment, manipulating tidal level and the density of infected upstream snail hosts. While tidal level had no significant effect on the number of metacercariae of H. elongata acquired by cockles, the effect of upstream host density was strong. In conclusion, although tidal level usually is a very important abiotic habitat component in intertidal ecosystems leading to conspicuous zonation patterns in free-living organisms, it seems of minor importance for trematode transmission. In contrast, the biotic component upstream host density is suggested to be the dominant predictor for trematode transmission to second intermediate hosts. Assessing the relative importance of abiotic and biotic habitat components in transmission is vital for the understanding of transmission processes in the field. PMID:17076926

  14. Substantial nitrous oxide emissions from intertidal sediments and groundwater in anthropogenically-impacted West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crusius, John; Baldwin, Sandy; Green, Adrian; Brooks, Thomas W.; Pugh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Large N2O emissions were observed from intertidal sediments in a coastal estuary, West Falmouth Harbor, MA, USA. Average N2O emission rates from 41 chambers during summer 2008 were 10.7 mol N2O m(-2) h(-1)±4.43 μmol N2O m(-2) h(-1) (standard error). Emissions were highest from sediments within a known wastewater plume, where a maximum N2O emission rate was 155 μmol N2O m(-2) h(-1). Intertidal N2O fluxes were positively related to porewater ammonium concentrations at 10 and 25 cm depths. In groundwater from 7 shoreline wells, dissolved N2O ranged from 488% of saturation (56 nM N2O) to more than 13000% of saturation (1529 nM N2O) and was positively related to nitrate concentrations. Fresh and brackish porewater underlying 14 chambers was also supersaturated in N2O, ranging from 2980% to 13175% of saturation. These observations support a relationship between anthropogenic nutrient loading and N2O emissions in West Falmouth Harbor, with both groundwater sources and also local N2O production within nutrient-rich, intertidal sediments in the groundwater seepage face. N2O emissions from intertidal "hotspot" in this harbor, together with estimated surface water emissions, constituted 2.4% of the average overall rate of nitrogen export from the watershed to the estuary. This suggests that N2O emissions factors from coastal ecosystems may be underestimated. Since anthropogenic nutrient loading affects estuaries worldwide, quantification of N2O dynamics is warranted in other anthropogenically-impacted coastal ecosystems.

  15. Classification and Change Detection of Yellow Sea Intertidal Sediment Using a Two-step PCA of Optical Reflectance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, D. J.; Park, W.; Won, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Grain size distributions of intertidal sediment in the Yellow Sea vary widely ranging from mud dominant to sand dominant with extensive seasonal changes. These are affected by tidal energy of the Yellow Sea, river flows, topography, shoreline gradient and human activities such as land reclamation, etc. Grain size of tidal flats are linked closely to fisheries, aquaculture and pollutant process. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor these areas continuously. It is, however, difficult to retrieve grain size information from remotely sensed data. Because the optical reflectance of intertidal sediment is not a function of single parameter but varies according to water content, grain size, topography, surface water, benthic algae and halophytes, etc. Among these parameters, grain size and water content play a key role in bare intertidal surface. Since water content of intertidal sediment are affected by tide, it is necessary to establish a water-independent grain size retrieval model. It is known that mud and sand sediment are well distinguished under dry condition on PCA (Principal Component Analysis) space but hardly distinguished under saturated condition. Here we introduce a new grain size retrieval model by removing the water content dependency from optical reflectance via a two-step PCA transform. To define the relationship between grain size, water content and optical reflectance, two different standard samples were made as per grain size by wet sieving. By exploiting simplified reflectance features of the standard samples, a two-step PCA transform model was established. This grain size retrieval model was applied to GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) images for sediment classification within the Yellow Sea. The results demonstrate it might be possible to discriminate between sand-dominant and mud-dominant areas based upon the model. Seasonal changes of sediment distribution within the tidal flats are well observed from the results.

  16. Random Forest Classification of Sediments on Exposed Intertidal Flats Using ALOS-2 Quad-Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Yang, X.; Liu, G.; Zhou, H.; Ma, W.; Yu, Y.; Li, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal zones are one of the world's most densely populated areas and it is necessary to propose an accurate, cost effective, frequent, and synoptic method of monitoring these complex ecosystems. However, misclassification of sediments on exposed intertidal flats restricts the development of coastal zones surveillance. With the advent of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) satellites, polarimetric SAR satellite imagery plays an increasingly important role in monitoring changes in coastal wetland. This research investigated the necessity of combining SAR polarimetric features with optical data, and their contribution in accurately sediment classification. Three experimental groups were set to make assessment of the most appropriate descriptors. (i) Several SAR polarimetric descriptors were extracted from scattering matrix using Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden and Yamaguchi methods; (ii) Optical remote sensing (RS) data with R, G and B channels formed the second feature combinations; (iii) The chosen SAR and optical RS indicators were both added into classifier. Classification was carried out using Random Forest (RF) classifiers and a general result mapping of intertidal flats was generated. Experiments were implemented using ALOS-2 L-band satellite imagery and GF-1 optical multi-spectral data acquired in the same period. The weights of descriptors were evaluated by VI (RF Variable Importance). Results suggested that optical data source has few advantages on sediment classification, and even reduce the effect of SAR indicators. Polarimetric SAR feature sets show great potentials in intertidal flats classification and are promising in classifying mud flats, sand flats, bare farmland and tidal water.

  17. A quantitative survey of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAS) in intertidal egg masses from temperate rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Przeslawski, R; Benkendorff, K; Davis, A R

    2005-10-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) have been reported as functional chemical sunscreens in a variety of marine organisms, but their role in development of marine embryos and larvae remains largely unexplored. In this study, we quantified MAAs from intertidal egg masses of 46 species of mollusks, two species of polychaetes, and one species of fish from southeastern Australia. We aimed to elucidate potential patterns of occurrence and variation based on egg mass maturity, adult diet, spawning habitat, phylogeny, and viability. Our analyses revealed that maturity and spawning habitat did not affect MAA composition within egg masses. In contrast, adult diet, phylogeny, and viability affected MAA composition. Herbivores had higher levels of certain MAAs than carnivores; similarly, viable egg masses had higher levels of some MAAs than inviable ones. MAA composition varied according to the taxonomic group, with nudibranchs and anaspids showing different MAA composition compared to that of neogastropods, sacoglossans, and polychaetes. Basommatophoran egg masses had more porphyra-334 than the other taxa, and anaspids had more mycosporine-2-glycine than the other groups. MAAs occurred in relatively high concentrations in intertidal molluskan egg masses when compared to adult mollusks and other common intertidal organisms. Despite the complexity of factors affecting MAA composition, the prevalence of MAAs in some species is consistent with protection afforded to offspring against negative effects of UV radiation. PMID:16195852

  18. Burrowing criteria and burrowing mode adjustment in bivalves to varying geoenvironmental conditions in intertidal flats and beaches.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Shinji; Watabe, Yoichi; Yang, Soonbo; Kuwae, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    The response of bivalves to their abiotic environment has been widely studied in relation to hydroenvironmental conditions, sediment types and sediment grain sizes. However, the possible role of varying geoenvironmental conditions in their habitats remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the hardness of the surficial intertidal sediments varies by a factor of 20-50 due to suction development and suction-induced void state changes in the essentially saturated states of intertidal flats and beaches. We investigated the response of two species of bivalves, Ruditapes philippinarum and Donax semigranosus, in the laboratory by simulating such prevailing geoenvironmental conditions in the field. The experimental results demonstrate that the bivalve responses depended strongly on the varying geoenvironmental conditions. Notably, both bivalves consistently shifted their burrowing modes, reducing the burrowing angle and burial depth, in response to increasing hardness, to compensate for the excessive energy required for burrowing, as explained by a proposed conceptual model. This burrowing mode adjustment was accompanied by two burrowing criteria below or above which the bivalves accomplished vertical burrowing or failed to burrow, respectively. The suitable and fatal conditions differed markedly with species and shell lengths. The acute sensitivities of the observed bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes revealed two distinctive mechanisms accounting for the adult-juvenile spatial distributions of Ruditapes philippinarum and the behavioral adaptation to a rapidly changing geoenvironment of Donax semigranosus. The present results may provide a rational basis by which to understand the ensuing, and to predict future, bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes in intertidal zones.

  19. Bacterial diversity patterns of the intertidal biofilm in urban beaches of Río de la Plata.

    PubMed

    Piccini, C; García-Alonso, J

    2015-02-28

    Intertidal benthic ecosystems in estuaries are productive sites where microbial processes play critical roles in nutrients mineralization, primary production and trophic web. In this groundwork study we analyzed the bacterial community of intertidal biofilms from Río de la Plata beaches with different anthropogenic impacts. Several environmental parameters were measured and bacterial assemblages were analyzed by 16S-rDNA pyrosequencing. The average OTU found per sample was 527.3±122.5, showing similar richness and diversity among them. However, sites having the highest and lowest salinity displayed higher bacterial diversity. Assemblages from a site nearby an oil refinery, showing the lowest salinity and oxygen concentration, were clearly distinct from the rest. The weight of this splitting relied on OTUs belonging to Thauera, known by its ability to metabolize aromatic compounds. Our results suggest that intertidal bacterial assemblages would be structured by major estuarine variables such as salinity, and that anthropogenic-induced environmental parameters might also be relevant.

  20. Effects of productivity, consumers, competitors, and El Nino events on food chain patterns in a rocky intertidal community

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, J.T.; Pfister, C.A.; Paine, R.T.

    1996-11-06

    We experimentally manipulated nutrient input to a rocky intertidal community, using nutrient-diffusing flowerpots, to determine (i) whether nutrients limited intertidal productivity, (ii) how a large-scale oceanographic disturbance (an El Nino event) affected patterns of nutrient limitation, (iii) the relative impacts of molluscan grazers and nutrient limitation, and (iv) if responses to experimental nutrient addition among trophic levels were more consistent with prey-dependent or ratio-dependent food chain models. Nutrients measurably increased the abundance of micrograzers (amphipods and chironomid larvae), but not algal biomass, during the summer of an El Nino years and during the autumn of an El Nino year. Adding nutrients did not affect food chain stability as assessed by temporal variation in algal biomass and micrograzer abundance. Large molluscan grazers caused large reductions in micrograzers and smaller reductions in algae, indicating consistent consumer effects. The results demonstrate that in this intertidal community, nutrient limitation can occur under conditions of nutrient stress, that top-down grazing effects are typically stronger than bottom-up nutrient effects, and that prey-dependent models are more appropriate than ratio-dependent models. 40 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Food sources of benthic animals on intertidal and subtidal bottoms in inner Ariake Sound, southern Japan, determined by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hisashi; Sakami, Tomoko; Ishihi, Yuka

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the relative importance of possible food sources, including riverine particulate organic matter, reeds, benthic microalgae, seaweeds, cultured laver ( Porphyra) and coastal phytoplankton, for commercial bivalves and co-occurring benthic animals, 73 macrofaunal species were collected from intertidal and subtidal soft bottoms in the inner part of Ariake Sound, Kyushu, southern Japan, and their isotopic compositions were analyzed. The results revealed that (1) both intertidal and subtidal food webs were constituted of 3 trophic levels, (2) suspension-feeding bivalves utilize a mixture of benthic microalgae and coastal phytoplankton, and omnivores and carnivores incorporate benthic microalgae and phytoplankton through their intermediate prey, and (3) 3 bivalves ( Scapharca kagoshimensis, Modiolus metcalfei and Atrina lischkeana) inhabiting both intertidal and subtidal bottoms showed similar seasonal fluctuations, suggesting no difference in the diet composition among the species and between the 2 habitats. We conclude that a large biomass of benthic microalgae which was approximately equal to that of phytoplankton and the strong tidal currents that would resuspend benthic microalgae and transport them to subtidal bottom areas account for the benthic microalgal and phytoplankton based trophic structure in the inner part of Ariake Sound.

  2. Community regulation: the relative importance of recruitment and predation intensity of an intertidal community dominant in a seascape context.

    PubMed

    Rilov, Gil; Schiel, David R

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the strength and context-dependency of species interactions across multiple scales is a core area in ecology. This is especially challenging in the marine environment, where populations of most predators and prey are generally open, because of their pelagic larval phase, and recruitment of both is highly variable. In this study we use a comparative-experimental approach on small and large spatial scales to test the relationship between predation intensity and prey recruitment and their relative importance in shaping populations of a dominant rocky intertidal space occupier, mussels, in the context of seascape (availability of nearby subtidal reef habitat). Predation intensity on transplanted mussels was tested inside and outside cages and recruitment was measured with standard larval settlement collectors. We found that on intertidal rocky benches with contiguous subtidal reefs in New Zealand, mussel larval recruitment is usually low but predation on recruits by subtidal consumers (fish, crabs) is intense during high tide. On nearby intertidal rocky benches with adjacent sandy subtidal habitats, larval recruitment is usually greater but subtidal predators are typically rare and predation is weaker. Multiple regression analysis showed that predation intensity accounts for most of the variability in the abundance of adult mussels compared to recruitment. This seascape-dependent, predation-recruitment relationship could scale up to explain regional community variability. We argue that community ecology models should include seascape context-dependency and its effects on recruitment and species interactions for better predictions of coastal community dynamics and structure. PMID:21887351

  3. Recolonization of the intertidal and shallow subtidal community following the 2008 eruption of Alaska’s Kasatochi Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jewett, S.C.; Drew, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The intertidal and nearshore benthic communities of Kasatochi Island are described following a catastrophic volcanic eruption in 2008. Prior to the eruption, the island was surrounded by a dense bed of canopy-forming dragon kelp Eualaria fistulosa which supported a productive nearshore community. The eruption extended the coastline of the island approximately 400 m offshore to roughly the 20 m isobath. One year following the eruption a reconnaissance survey found the intertidal zone devoid of life. Subtidally, the canopy kelp, as well as limited understory algal species and associated benthic fauna on the hard substratum, were buried by debris from the eruption. The resulting substrate was comprised almost entirely of medium and coarse sands with a depauperate benthic community. Comparisons of habitat and biological communities with other nearby Aleutian Islands and the Icelandic submarine volcanic eruption of Surtsey confirm dramatic reductions in flora and fauna consistent with the initial stages of recovery from a large-scale disturbance event. Four and five years following the eruption brief visits revealed dramatic intertidal and subtidal recolonization of the flora and fauna in some areas. Signs of nesting and fledging of young pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba suggest that the recovery of the nearshore biota may have begun affecting higher trophic levels. Recolonization or lack thereof was tied to bathymetric changes from coastal and nearshore erosion over the study period.

  4. Community Regulation: The Relative Importance of Recruitment and Predation Intensity of an Intertidal Community Dominant in a Seascape Context

    PubMed Central

    Rilov, Gil; Schiel, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the strength and context-dependency of species interactions across multiple scales is a core area in ecology. This is especially challenging in the marine environment, where populations of most predators and prey are generally open, because of their pelagic larval phase, and recruitment of both is highly variable. In this study we use a comparative-experimental approach on small and large spatial scales to test the relationship between predation intensity and prey recruitment and their relative importance in shaping populations of a dominant rocky intertidal space occupier, mussels, in the context of seascape (availability of nearby subtidal reef habitat). Predation intensity on transplanted mussels was tested inside and outside cages and recruitment was measured with standard larval settlement collectors. We found that on intertidal rocky benches with contiguous subtidal reefs in New Zealand, mussel larval recruitment is usually low but predation on recruits by subtidal consumers (fish, crabs) is intense during high tide. On nearby intertidal rocky benches with adjacent sandy subtidal habitats, larval recruitment is usually greater but subtidal predators are typically rare and predation is weaker. Multiple regression analysis showed that predation intensity accounts for most of the variability in the abundance of adult mussels compared to recruitment. This seascape-dependent, predation-recruitment relationship could scale up to explain regional community variability. We argue that community ecology models should include seascape context-dependency and its effects on recruitment and species interactions for better predictions of coastal community dynamics and structure. PMID:21887351

  5. Long-term effects of the ‘Exxon Valdez’ oil spill: sea otter foraging in the intertidal as a pathway of exposure to lingering oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, James L.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Coletti, Heather A.; Esslinger, George G.; Kloecker, Kimberly A.; Rice, Stanley D.; Reed, John A.; Monson, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    The protracted recovery of some bird and mammal populations in western Prince William Sound (WPWS), Alaska, and the persistence of spilled ‘Exxon Valdez’ oil in intertidal sediments, suggests a pathway of exposure to consumers that occupy nearshore habitats. To evaluate the hypothesis that sea otter (Enhydra lutris) foraging allows access to lingering oil, we contrast spatial relations between foraging behavior and documented oil distribution. We recovered archival time-depth recorders implanted in 19 sea otters in WPWS, where lingering oil and de­layed ecosystem recovery are well documented. Sea otter foraging dives ranged from +2.7 to −92 m below sea level (MLLW), with intertidal accounting for 5 to 38% of all foraging. On average, female sea otters made 16050 intertidal dives per year and 18% of these dives were at depths above the +0.80 m tidal elevation. Males made 4100 intertidal dives per year and 26% of intertidal foraging took place at depths above the +0.80 m tidal elevation. Estimated annual oil encounter rates ranged from 2 to 24 times yr−1 for females, and 2 to 4 times yr−1 for males. Exposure rates increased in spring when intertidal foraging doubled and females were with small pups. In summer 2008, we found sea otter foraging pits on 13.5 of 24.8 km of intertidal shoreline surveyed. Most pits (82%) were within 0.5 m of the zero tidal elevation and 15% were above 0.5 m, the level above which most (65%) lingering oil remains. In August 2008, we detected oil above background concentrations in 18 of 41 (44%) pits excavated by sea otters on beaches with prior evidence of oiling, with total PAH concentrations up to 56000 ng g−1 dry weight. Our estimates of intertidal foraging, the widespread presence of foraging pits in the intertidal, and the presence of oil in and near sea otter foraging pits documents a pathway of exposure from lingering intertidal oil to sea otters ­foraging in WPWS.

  6. Long-term effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill: sea otter foraging in the intertidal as a pathway of exposure to lingering oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, James L.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Coletti, Heather A.; Esslinger, George; Kloecker, Kim; Rice, Stanley D.; Reed, John; Monson, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    The protracted recovery of some bird and mammal populations in western Prince William Sound (WPWS), Alaska, and the persistence of spilled 'Exxon Valdez' oil in intertidal sediments, suggests a pathway of exposure to consumers that occupy nearshore habitats. To evaluate the hypothesis that sea otter (Enhydra lutris) foraging allows access to lingering oil, we contrast spatial relations between foraging behavior and documented oil distribution. We recovered archival time-depth recorders implanted in 19 sea otters in WPWS, where lingering oil and delayed ecosystem recovery are well documented. Sea otter foraging dives ranged from +2.7 to -92 m below sea level (MLLW), with intertidal accounting for 5 to 38% of all foraging. On average, female sea otters made 16050 intertidal dives per year and 18% of these dives were at depths above the +0.80 m tidal elevation. Males made 4100 intertidal dives per year and 26% of intertidal foraging took place at depths above the +0.80 m tidal elevation. Estimated annual oil encounter rates ranged from 2 to 24 times yr-1 for females, and 2 to 4 times yr-1 for males. Exposure rates increased in spring when intertidal foraging doubled and females were with small pups. In summer 2008, we found sea otter foraging pits on 13.5 of 24.8 km of intertidal shoreline surveyed. Most pits (82%) were within 0.5 m of the zero tidal elevation and 15% were above 0.5 m, the level above which most (65%) lingering oil remains. In August 2008, we detected oil above background concentrations in 18 of 41 (44%) pits excavated by sea otters on beaches with prior evidence of oiling, with total PAH concentrations up to 56000 ng g−1 dry weight. Our estimates of intertidal foraging, the widespread presence of foraging pits in the intertidal, and the presence of oil in and near sea otter foraging pits documents a pathway of exposure from lingering intertidal oil to sea otters foraging in WPWS.

  7. Populations of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas respond variably to elevated CO2 and predation by Morula marginalba.

    PubMed

    Wright, John M; Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Williams, Mark; Kube, Peter; Ross, Pauline M

    2014-06-01

    Ocean acidification is anticipated to decrease calcification and increase dissolution of shelled molluscs. Molluscs with thinner and weaker shells may be more susceptible to predation, but not all studies have measured negative responses of molluscs to elevated pCO2. Recent studies measuring the response of molluscs have found greater variability at the population level than first expected. Here we investigate the impact of acidification on the predatory whelk Morula marginalba and genetically distinct subpopulations of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Whelks and eight family lines of C. gigas were separately exposed to ambient (385 ppm) and elevated (1000 ppm) pCO2 for 6 weeks. Following this period, individuals of M. marginalba were transferred into tanks with oysters at ambient and elevated pCO2 for 17 days. The increase in shell height of the oysters was on average 63% less at elevated compared to ambient pCO2. There were differences in shell compression strength, thickness, and mass among family lines of C. gigas, with sometimes an interaction between pCO2 and family line. Against expectations, this study found increased shell strength in the prey and reduced shell strength in the predator at elevated compared to ambient pCO2. After 10 days, the whelks consumed significantly more oysters regardless of whether C. gigas had been exposed to ambient or elevated CO2, but this was not dependent on the family line and the effect was not significant after 17 days. Our study found an increase in predation after exposure of the predator to predicted near-future levels of estuarine pCO2. PMID:25070870

  8. Adhesion beyond the interface: Molecular adaptations of the mussel byssus to the intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIller, Dusty Rose

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, adheres robustly in the high-energy and oxidizing intertidal zone with a fibrous holdfast called the byssus using 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa)-containing adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps). There are many supporting roles to mussel adhesion that are intimately linked and ultimately responsible for mussel byssus's durable and dynamic adhesion. This dissertation explores these supporting mechanisms, including delivery of materials underwater, iron binding, friction, and antioxidant activity. As the outermost covering of the byssus, the cuticle deserves particular attention for its supporting roles to adhesion including the high stiffness and extensibility of the M. californianus byssal cuticle, which make it one of the most energy tolerant materials known. The cuticle's matrix-granule composite structure contributes to its toughness by microcracking between its harder granules and softer matrix. We investigated delivery of cuticular material underwater, cohesion of cuticle proteins, and surface damage mitigation by cuticle protein-based coacervates. To investigate underwater material delivery, we made cuticle matrix mimics by coacervating a key cuticular protein, Mytilus californianus foot protein 1, mfp-1, with hyaluronic acid. These matrix mimics coacervated over a wide range of solution conditions, delivered concentrated material, settled on and coated surfaces underwater. Because the granules are composed of mfp-1 condensed with iron, we used the surface forces apparatus to investigate the effects of iron on the cohesion of mfp-1 from two different species of mussels and found that subtle sequence variations modulate cohesion. Using the coacervate matrix mimics and, modeling the granules as a hard surface (mica), we investigated the wear protection of coacervated mfp-1/HA to mica under frictional shear and found that preventing wear depends critically on the presence of Dopa groups. In addition to cuticle

  9. Variability of intertidal foraminferal assemblages in a salt marsh, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Alan R.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Witter, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied 18 sampling stations along a transect to investigate the similarity between live (rose Bengal stained) foraminiferal populations and dead assemblages, their small-scale spatial variations and the distribution of infaunal foraminifera in a salt marsh (Toms Creek marsh) at the upper end of the South Slough arm of the Coos Bay estuary, Oregon, USA. We aimed to test to what extent taphonomic processes, small-scale variability and infaunal distribution influence the accuracy of sea-level reconstructions based on intertidal foraminifera. Cluster analyses have shown that dead assemblages occur in distinct zones with respect to elevation, a prerequisite for using foraminifera as sea-level indicators. Our nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance showed that small-scale spatial variability has only a small influence on live (rose Bengal stained) populations and dead assemblages. The dissimilarity was higher, however, between live (rose Bengal stained) populations in the middle marsh. We observed early diagenetic dissolution of calcareous tests in the dead assemblages. If comparable post-depositional processes and similar minor spatial variability also characterize fossil assemblages, then dead assemblage are the best modern analogs for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. The Toms Creek tidal flat and low marsh vascular plant zones are dominated by Miliammina fusca, the middle marsh is dominated by Balticammina pseudomacrescens and Trochammina inflata, and the high marsh and upland–marsh transition zone are dominated by Trochamminita irregularis. Analysis of infaunal foraminifera showed that most living specimens are found in the surface sediments and the majority of live (rose Bengal stained) infaunal specimens are restricted to the upper 10 cm, but living individuals are found to depths of 50 cm. The dominant infaunal specimens are similar to those in the corresponding surface samples and no species have been found living solely infaunally. The

  10. The role of gaping behaviour in habitat partitioning between coexisting intertidal mussels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmental heterogeneity plays a major role in invasion and coexistence dynamics. Habitat segregation between introduced species and their native competitors is usually described in terms of different physiological and behavioural abilities. However little attention has been paid to the effects of behaviour in habitat partitioning among invertebrates, partially because their behavioural repertoires, especially marine benthic taxa, are extremely limited. This study investigates the effect of gaping behaviour on habitat segregation of the two dominant mussel species living in South Africa, the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis and the indigenous Perna perna. These two species show partial habitat segregation on the south coast of South Africa, the lower and upper areas of the mussel zone are dominated by P. perna and M. galloprovincialis respectively, with overlap in the middle zone. During emergence, intertidal mussels will either keep the valves closed, minimizing water loss and undergoing anaerobic metabolism, or will periodically open the valves maintaining a more efficient aerobic metabolism but increasing the risk of desiccation. Results Our results show that, when air exposed, the two species adopt clearly different behaviours. M. galloprovincialis keeps the shell valves closed, while P. perna periodically gapes. Gaping behaviour increased water loss in the indigenous species, and consequently the risk of desiccation. The indigenous species expressed significantly higher levels of stress protein (Hsp70) than M. galloprovincialis under field conditions and suffered significantly higher mortality rates when exposed to air in the laboratory. In general, no intra-specific differences were observed in relation to intertidal height. The absence of gaping minimises water loss but exposes the invasive species to other stresses, probably related to anoxic respiration. Conclusions Gaping affects tolerance to desiccation, thus influencing the vertical

  11. Biogeochemistry of dissolved organic matter in an anoxic intertidal creek bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Michael; Beck, Melanie; Riedel, Thomas; Waska, Hannelore; Suryaputra, I. G. N. A.; Schnetger, Bernhard; Niggemann, Jutta; Simon, Meinhard; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2014-09-01

    Seawater circulation in permeable coastal sediments is driven by tidal changes in hydraulic gradients. The resulting submarine groundwater discharge is a source of nutrients and dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the water column. Yet, little is known about the cycling of DOM within tidal sediments, because the molecular DOM characterization remains analytically challenging. One technique that can dissect the multitude of molecules in DOM is ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). To aim at a high resolution DOM analysis we study the seasonal turnover and marine and terrestrial sources of DOM in an intertidal creek bank of the southern North Sea down to 3 m depth and link the biogeochemical processes to FT-ICR-MS data and the analyses of inorganic porewater chemistry, δ13C of solid-phase extracted dissolved organic carbon (SPE-DOC), dissolved black carbon (DBC) and dissolved carbohydrates (DCHO). Increasing concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, P, total alkalinity, dissolved nitrogen, DOC and a concomitant decrease of sulfate along the seawater circulation path from the upper tidal flat to the tidal flat margin indicate continuous microbial activity. The relative increase of Si concentrations, unsaturated aliphatics, peptide molecular formulae and isotopically more 13C-enriched SPE-DOC towards the tidal flat margin suggests that remineralization processes mobilize DOM from buried algal (diatoms) and microbial biomass. Porewater in sediments <100 cm depth contains 13C-depleted SPE-DOC and highly unsaturated compounds which are probably derived from eroded peats, suggesting rapid removal of bioavailable marine DOM such as DCHO from the water column and selective enrichment of terrestrial DOM. DBC concentrations are highest in the discharging porewater close to the tidal creek suggesting that the intertidal flat is an important DBC source to the coastal ocean. Porewater DOM accumulating at the low water line is

  12. Distinctly variable mudscapes: Distribution gradients of intertidal macrofauna across the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Tanya J.; Holthuijsen, Sander; Koolhaas, Anita; Dekinga, Anne; ten Horn, Job; Smith, Jeremy; Galama, Ysbrand; Brugge, Maarten; van der Wal, Daphne; van der Meer, Jaap; van der Veer, Henk W.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-09-01

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow coastal region, with a large area of sedimentary tidal flats that extends from The Netherlands to Denmark and has been declared a site of international importance in the Dutch and German parts (Ramsar status and UNESCO World Heritage Site). Benthic macrofauna are central to the ecosystem functioning of this area, as they recycle nutrients, decompose organic matter and are an important food source for many secondary consumers, like fish and waterbirds. Due to the environmental gradients characteristic of estuarine systems, it is expected that changes in assemblage composition will be observed across the physical and environmental gradients of the Wadden Sea. First, we explored the spatial variation in assemblage composition of benthic macrofauna across the intertidal part of the Dutch Wadden Sea using 3 years of biomass data. Then, we identified the relative importance of six environmental variables for explaining and predicting changes in assemblage composition across the intertidal areas of the Wadden Sea using generalised dissimilarity modelling (GDM). In accordance with the environmental gradients across this system, the biomass contributed by a few common species differed from west to east and were distinct in the Dollard. In the west, bivalves Mya arenaria, Cerastoderma edule and Ensis directus contributed a relatively large and equal share of the total biomass, whereas C. edule contributed the sole largest share of the total biomass towards the east. The polychaete Alitta succinea became a large share of the total biomass in the upper Ems and in the Dollard estuary, but contributed little elsewhere. Similar to the observed differences in species composition, the spatial patterns in assemblage composition, as predicted by the GDM models, identified the Dollard as distinct and that the prevalence of assemblage types in the west differed to the east. Median grain size, followed by microphytobenthic biomass, and exposure time were the

  13. Hazard perception in emergency medical service responders.

    PubMed

    Johnston, K A; Scialfa, C T

    2016-10-01

    The perception of on-road hazards is critically important to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, the patients they transport and the general public. This study compared hazard perception in EMS and civilian drivers of similar age and personal driving experience. Twenty-nine EMS professionals and 24 non-professional drivers were given a dynamic hazard perception test (HPT). The EMS group demonstrated an advantage in HPT that was independent of simple reaction time, another indication of the validity of the test. These results are also consistent with the view that professional driving experience results in changes in the ability to identify and respond to on-road hazards. Directions for future research include the development of a profession-specific hazard perception tool for both assessment and training purposes.

  14. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders: 2014 Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2014-03-28

    This report summarizes commercially-available, hand-portable technologies that can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, this report is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use. Information listed in this report is primarily vendor-provided; however, where possible it has been supplemented with additional information obtained from publications, reports, and websites. Manufacturers were given the chance to review summaries of their technologies from August through November 2013 to verify the accuracy of technical specifications, available references, and pricing.

  15. Space-Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigne, Jacques; Yi, Hu Chun

    2008-01-01

    Space-Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix System (SpaceDRUMS) comprises a suite of hardware that enables containerless processing (samples of experimental materials can be processed without ever touching a container wall). Using a collection of 20 acoustic beam emitters, SpaceDRUMS can completely suspend a baseball-sized solid or liquid sample during combustion or heat-based synthesis. Because the samples never contact the container walls, materials can be produced in microgravity with an unparalleled quality of shape and composition. The ultimate goal of the SpaceDRUMS hardware is to assist with the development of advanced materials of a commercial quantity and quality, using the space-based experiments to guide development of manufacturing processes on Earth. T

  16. Methods of responding to healthcare security incidents.

    PubMed

    Furnell, S; Gritzalis, D; Katsikas, S; Mavroudakis, K; Sanders, P; Warren, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers the increasing requirement for security in healthcare IT systems and, in particular, identifies the need for appropriate means by which healthcare establishments (HCEs) may respond to incidents. The main discussion focuses upon two significant initiatives that have been established in order to improve understanding and awareness of healthcare security issues. The first is the establishment of a dedicated Incident Reporting Scheme (IRS) for HCEs, enabling the level and types of security incidents faced within the healthcare community to be monitored and advice appropriately targeted. The second aspect presents a description of healthcare security World Wide Web service, which provides a comprehensive source of advice and guidance for establishments when trying to address and prevent IT security breaches. The discussion is based upon work that is currently being undertaken with the ISHTAR (Implementing Secure Healthcare Telematics Applications in Europe) project, as part of the Telematics Applications for Health programme of the European Commission.

  17. Hazard perception in emergency medical service responders.

    PubMed

    Johnston, K A; Scialfa, C T

    2016-10-01

    The perception of on-road hazards is critically important to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, the patients they transport and the general public. This study compared hazard perception in EMS and civilian drivers of similar age and personal driving experience. Twenty-nine EMS professionals and 24 non-professional drivers were given a dynamic hazard perception test (HPT). The EMS group demonstrated an advantage in HPT that was independent of simple reaction time, another indication of the validity of the test. These results are also consistent with the view that professional driving experience results in changes in the ability to identify and respond to on-road hazards. Directions for future research include the development of a profession-specific hazard perception tool for both assessment and training purposes. PMID:27415813

  18. Bats Respond to Very Weak Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth’s magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years. PMID:25922944

  19. [Temporal comparison of the composition and zonation of rocky intertidal organisms at Cocos Island National Park, Pacific, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Cortés, Jorge

    2010-12-01

    Several biological and physical factors change the rocky shore communities. The desiccation time and the tolerance of the intertidal species produce the vertical zonation. In many studies around the world, a temporal change in this zonation is presented.In Costa Rica, only studies that include temporal trends were carried out in Punta Mala and Montezuma, Pacific coast in 80's. The rocky intertidal of the Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica were surveyed photographically. The Chatham bay was sampled in three expeditions (January 2007, October 2007 and April 2008). Photos corresponding to 25x25cm quadrats were taken with the goal to determine diversity and composition differences in rocky shore organisms between sampling dates. The Wafer bay was sampled in January and October 2007. The intertidal of Chatham consists of basaltic rock, while Wafer has basaltic and ignimbrite boulders. The main difference between sites were the higher algae cover (erect-frondose forms) and number of organism bands at Chatham bay. Temporal change was not found in the total cover of sessile fauna and autotrophs. The barnacle Tetraclita stalactifera, that occurs above the algal fringe (lower intertidal), was the invertebrate with the highest coverage. The mobile fauna biodiversity presented no significant trend between sampled months. However, the identity of species, their cover and their abundance showed a moderate temporal change. In October 2007, when the sea surface temperature was 23 degrees C the infralittoral zone had an increase in green algae cover. The red algae (crust and erect-frondose forms) were dominant in January and April. The pulmonate limpet, Siphonaria gigas and a bacterial biofilm at mid littoral showed a negative association. The snails of the high littoral and the supralittoral zone showed a temporal change in their abundance, but with contrasting patterns between sites. The temporal variation in the assemblages increased from the supralittoral to the

  20. [Temporal comparison of the composition and zonation of rocky intertidal organisms at Cocos Island National Park, Pacific, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Cortés, Jorge

    2010-12-01

    Several biological and physical factors change the rocky shore communities. The desiccation time and the tolerance of the intertidal species produce the vertical zonation. In many studies around the world, a temporal change in this zonation is presented.In Costa Rica, only studies that include temporal trends were carried out in Punta Mala and Montezuma, Pacific coast in 80's. The rocky intertidal of the Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica were surveyed photographically. The Chatham bay was sampled in three expeditions (January 2007, October 2007 and April 2008). Photos corresponding to 25x25cm quadrats were taken with the goal to determine diversity and composition differences in rocky shore organisms between sampling dates. The Wafer bay was sampled in January and October 2007. The intertidal of Chatham consists of basaltic rock, while Wafer has basaltic and ignimbrite boulders. The main difference between sites were the higher algae cover (erect-frondose forms) and number of organism bands at Chatham bay. Temporal change was not found in the total cover of sessile fauna and autotrophs. The barnacle Tetraclita stalactifera, that occurs above the algal fringe (lower intertidal), was the invertebrate with the highest coverage. The mobile fauna biodiversity presented no significant trend between sampled months. However, the identity of species, their cover and their abundance showed a moderate temporal change. In October 2007, when the sea surface temperature was 23 degrees C the infralittoral zone had an increase in green algae cover. The red algae (crust and erect-frondose forms) were dominant in January and April. The pulmonate limpet, Siphonaria gigas and a bacterial biofilm at mid littoral showed a negative association. The snails of the high littoral and the supralittoral zone showed a temporal change in their abundance, but with contrasting patterns between sites. The temporal variation in the assemblages increased from the supralittoral to the

  1. Incomplete cryptic speciation between intertidal and subtidal morphs of Acrocnida brachiata (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) in the Northeast Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Muths, D; Davoult, D; Gentil, F; Jollivet, D

    2006-10-01

    The brittle-star Acrocnida brachiata (Montagu) lives in sandy-bottom habitat of both intertidal and subtidal zones along the coasts of the northwestern Europe. An allozyme frequency-based survey (five enzyme loci) was combined with a mitochondrial (mt) COI haplotype analysis (598-bp sequences) on 17 populations to trace back past colonization pathways from the actual population structure of the species. Both genetic markers display a sharp genetic break between intertidal (clade I) and subtidal populations (clade S). This break corresponds to an allele frequency inversion at three enzyme loci (Hk, Pgm and Pgi) and a deep divergence of about 20% in mtCOI sequences between most of the intertidal populations and other samples. The geographic distribution of clade I seems to be more restricted than clade S as it is absent from the intertidal of the eastern English Channel and North Sea and may be replaced by clade S in south Brittany. Applying previously published rates of mutation, divergence between the two clades is estimated to pre-date 5 million years ago and may be due to allopatric speciation processes at the Mio-Pliocene transition. The occurrence of putative hybrids in a few localities, however, suggests incomplete cryptic speciation with secondary contact zones. The relative importance of colonization history vs. habitat specialization are discussed in the light of neutral evolution as tested from mtCOI gene sequences. While differential selection seems to have contributed little to the separation of the lineages, it may have played a role in the emergence of adaptive polymorphisms in the hybrid zone. Furthermore, congruent spatial patterns of differentiation were observed in both clades suggesting a recent increase in population size. These findings are in agreement with a recent expansion of the populations during or after the formation of the English Channel, from a southern refuge for the subtidal clade whereas the intertidal clade may have persisted

  2. Surface sedimentation and sediment property of 2014~2015 years on the Dongho open-coast intertidal flat, Gochang coast of southwestern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryang, Woo Hun; Kang, Na Yeong; Kang, Sol Ip

    2016-04-01

    The Dongho intertidal flat, located on the southwestern coast of Korea, is macro-tide, open-coast, linear shoreline, and sand substrates. In the Dongho intertidal flat, this study has focused on characteristics of surface sedimentation and sediment properties during 2014~2015 years. Can cores (30×17×5 cm3) were sampled at 4 sites with 150 m interval from shoreline to lower intertidal area during the 6 seasons from spring (June) in 2014 to summer (Aug.) in 2015. The 24 can cores of the intertidal flat were analyzed for sediment texture, porosity, wet density, grain density, and shear strength at 2, 10, and 25 cm parts from the top. Sediment type is mostly sand (S) facies of the Folk scheme, and mean grain size and skewness of the sediments are 0.93~2.70 ϕ and -0.50~0.41, respectively. Sediment properties show porosity of 9~32%, wet density of 1.88~2.45 g/cm3, grain density of 2.62~3.09 g/cm3, and shear strength of 8~64 kPa. The cancore peels represent planar and inclined stratification and bioturbated faintly stratification with some shell fragments. The stratification weaken from the shoreline to the lower intertidal site. This is indicative of waning influences of sea wave in the Dongho intertidal flat. Keywords: macro-tide, open-coast, can core, intertidal flat, Gochang coast Acknowledgements: This study was supported by the research grant from the Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (PJT200538). This presentation is an interim result of the coastal research program in the study area.

  3. Nitrogenase activity and nifH expression in a marine intertidal microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Steppe, T F; Paerl, H W

    2005-02-01

    N(2) fixation, diazotrophic community composition, and organisms actively expressing genes for N(2) fixation were examined over at 3-year period (1997-1999) for intertidal microbial mats on a sand flat located in the Rachel Carson National Estuarine Research Reserve (RCNERR) (Beaufort, NC, USA). Specifically, diel variations of N(2) fixation in the mats from the RCNERR were examined. Three distinct diel patterns of nitrogenase activity (NA) were observed. NA responses to short-term inhibitions of photosynthesis corresponded to one of the three patterns. High rates of NA were observed during peak O(2) production periods for diel experiments during summer months. Different types of NA diel variations correspond to different stages of mat development. Chloramphenicol treatments indicated that the mechanism of protein synthesis supporting NA changed throughout the day. Analysis of mat DNA and RNA gave further evidence suggesting that in addition to cyanobacteria, other functional groups were responsible for the NA observed in the RCNERR mats. The role of microbial diversity in the N(2) fixation dynamics of these mats is discussed.

  4. Populations of Symbiodinium muscatinei show strong biogeographic structuring in the intertidal anemone Anthopleura elegantissima.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jon G; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2011-06-01

    Among temperate cnidarian symbioses, the partnership between the intertidal anemone Anthopleura elegantissima and its dinoflagellate and chlorophyte symbionts is one of the most well characterized. Biogeographic, reciprocal transplant, and physiological studies have convincingly demonstrated a relationship between environmental factors such as temperature and irradiance and the distribution of symbionts from both algal phyla. However, little is known about the fine-scale diversity or biogeographic distribution within symbiont lineages of this anemone. We used sequence information from the mitochondrial cytochrome b and chloroplast 23S ribosomal genes and restriction fragment length polymorphism data from the 18S nuclear ribosomal gene to characterize the Symbiodinium populations in tentacles clipped from 105 anemones at 14 sites along the entire California coast, spanning about 1200 km. Our results show the presence of at least three primary biogeographic regions with breaks around Cape Mendocino and Monterey Bay, each dominated by a different Symbiodinium muscatinei genotype. Sharp clines suggest limited gene flow between adjacent regions. Few sampling locations or individual anemones showed symbiont diversity at either organellar locus within the limits of our detection method, while sequence analysis of cloned nr18S polymerase chain reaction product suggests that nuclear pseudogenes may underlie intra-host diversity observed at that locus. PMID:21712228

  5. Seasonal and Cyclical Changes in Genetic Composition of the Marine Intertidal Rock Pool Copepod Tigriopus brevicornis.

    PubMed

    Van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Tigriopus brevicornis is a marine rock pool copepod widely distributed along Atlantic coasts. Due to the absence of a known dispersal mechanism by free swimming stages, exchanges between populations over long distances are questionable. In order to analyse the evolution of an isolated supralittoral rock pool population, sampling of the copepod was performed monthly during 1 year and compared to samplings over 5 years in the same rock pool, as well as from other rock pools. Using ITS1 analysis, cyclical changes in genetic composition were detected. Our results give clear indications concerning the segregation of the rock pool population and a lack of gene flow among outside populations. A network analysis shows the presence of several shared dominant haplotypes and also singletons differing by one mutation point. F(st) analyses indicate that the main changes occur in autumn and winter. The few analogies of ITS1 sequences with nearby populations may indicate that new migrants must re-colonise the pools from surrounding rock crevices in the intertidal habitat where they may have found a refuge after bad weather conditions. PMID:25985736

  6. Effects of freeze-thaw cycles on anaerobic microbial processes in an Arctic intertidal mud flat.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Joanna E; Robador, Alberto; Hubert, Casey; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-04-01

    Insight into the effects of repeated freezing and thawing on microbial processes in sediments and soils is important for understanding sediment carbon cycling at high latitudes acutely affected by global warming. Microbial responses to repeated freeze-thaw conditions were studied in three complementary experiments using arctic sediment collected from an intertidal flat that is exposed to seasonal freeze-thaw conditions (Ymerbukta, Svalbard, Arctic Ocean). The sediment was subjected to oscillating freeze-thaw incubations, either gradual, from -5 to 4 degrees C, or abrupt, from -20 to 10 degrees C. Concentrations of low-molecular weight carboxylic acids (volatile fatty acids) were measured and sulfate reduction was assessed by measuring (35)S sulfate reduction rates (SRRs). Gradual freeze-thaw incubation decreased microbial activity in the frozen state to 0.25 % of initial levels at 4 degrees C, but activity resumed rapidly reaching >60 % of initial activity in the thawed state. Exposure of sediments to successive large temperature changes (-20 versus 10 degrees C) decreased SRR by 80% of the initial activity, suggesting that a fraction of the bacterial community recovered rapidly from extreme temperature fluctuations. This is supported by 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles that revealed persistence of the dominant microbial taxa under repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The fast recovery of the SRRs suggests that carbon mineralization in thawing arctic sediment can resume without delay or substantial growth of microbial populations.

  7. Differential concentration of Technetium-99 (99Tc) in common intertidal molluscs with different food habits.

    PubMed

    Sjøtun, K; Heldal, H E; Brakstad, D S

    2011-11-01

    Concentration of 99Tc has been measured in fucoids and molluscs, sampled in a sheltered intertidal at the southwest coast of Norway from February to November 2006. The concentrations of 99Tc in molluscs differed significantly between species. The filtering bivalve Mytilus edulis had the lowest concentrations with averages of 2.3-5.9 Bq kg(-1) d.w., while the herbivorous gastropods Littorinalittorina, Littorina obtusata and Patella vulgata had higher concentrations. P. vulgata and L. obtusata had the highest concentrations, 40-47 and 26-30 Bq kg(-1)d.w., respectively. L. obtusata has a specialized habit of living, and prefers to feed on fucoids. P. vulgata can graze extensively on the fucoid Ascophyllum nodosum when available. Fucoids are known to have very high uptake of 99Tc, and this was also found in the present study. The high 99Tc-concentrations of L. obtusata and P. vulgata are most likely due to their habit of feeding on fucoids.

  8. Characterisation of physical environmental factors on an intertidal sandflat, Manukau Harbour, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, R.G.; Hume, T.M.; Dolphin, T.J.; Green, M.O.; Walters, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Physical environmental factors, including sediment characteristics, inundation time, tidal currents and wind waves, likely to influence the structure of the benthic community at meso-scales (1-100 m) were characterised for a sandflat off Wiroa Island (Manukau Harbour, New Zealand). In a 500 x 250 m study site, sediment characteristics and bed topography were mostly homogenous apart from patches of low-relief ridges and runnels. Field measurements and hydrodynamic modelling portray a complex picture of sediment or particulate transport on the intertidal flat, involving interactions between the larger scale tidal processes and the smaller scale wave dynamics (1-4 s; 1-15 m). Peak tidal currents in isolation are incapable of eroding bottom sediments, but in combination with near-bed orbital currents generated by only very small wind waves, sediment transport can be initiated. Work done on the bed integrated over an entire tidal cycle by prevailing wind waves is greatest on the elevated and flatter slopes of the study site, where waves shoal over a wider surf zone and water depths remain shallow e enough for wave-orbital currents to disturb the bed. The study also provided physical descriptors quantifying static and hydrodynamic (tidal and wave) factors which were used in companion studies on ecological spatial modelling of bivalve distributions and micro-scale sediment reworking and transport.

  9. Differential concentration of Technetium-99 (99Tc) in common intertidal molluscs with different food habits.

    PubMed

    Sjøtun, K; Heldal, H E; Brakstad, D S

    2011-11-01

    Concentration of 99Tc has been measured in fucoids and molluscs, sampled in a sheltered intertidal at the southwest coast of Norway from February to November 2006. The concentrations of 99Tc in molluscs differed significantly between species. The filtering bivalve Mytilus edulis had the lowest concentrations with averages of 2.3-5.9 Bq kg(-1) d.w., while the herbivorous gastropods Littorinalittorina, Littorina obtusata and Patella vulgata had higher concentrations. P. vulgata and L. obtusata had the highest concentrations, 40-47 and 26-30 Bq kg(-1)d.w., respectively. L. obtusata has a specialized habit of living, and prefers to feed on fucoids. P. vulgata can graze extensively on the fucoid Ascophyllum nodosum when available. Fucoids are known to have very high uptake of 99Tc, and this was also found in the present study. The high 99Tc-concentrations of L. obtusata and P. vulgata are most likely due to their habit of feeding on fucoids. PMID:21925686

  10. Nitrification in the intertidal zone: influence of effluent type and effect of tannin on nitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Bohlool, B B; Schmidt, E L; Beasley, C

    1977-11-01

    Nitrification by intertidal sediments was measured by using a tide simulator that approximated the cycle of seawater on tidal flats. Sediments were chosen from sites affected by industrial and municipal effluents and pastoral seepage and runoff. The ability of sediments from different sites to nitrify endogenous nitrogen varied markedly. All sites exhibited an initial lag before activity commenced. The duration of this lag and the rate of nitrate production were different at each site. The sediments were also capable of oxidizing NH3-N supplied to them in seawater. This "nitrification potential" was highest at sites receiving nitrogenous effluents (slaughterhouse and sewage), but was also substantial in sediments affected by bark extract effluent and pasture runoff. The lowest potential and the longest lag were exhibited by sediments in an apple cannery effluent area. Enrichment cultures of nitrifying microorganisms were obtained from all sites using NH4+ as a source of energy, but enrichments for nitrite oxidizers were unsuccessful. Concentrated pine bark tannins, similar in origin to those in effluents at the well-nitrifying chipmill site, were tested for toxicity to pure cultures of nitrifying bacteria. Two Nitrobacter strains and one Nitrosomonas strain were unaffected by tannins even at 5 mg/ml. A Nitrosolobus and a Nitrosospira strain were inhibited partially at 5 mg/ml and only slightly or not at all at 1 mg/ml.

  11. Spatial variation in the macrobenthic assemblages of intertidal seagrass along the long axis of an estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. S. K.; Ellwood, M. D. F.

    2012-10-01

    Invertebrate macrofaunal biodiversity within intertidal seagrass meadows was investigated over a salinity gradient of <5-35 in the Knysna estuarine system (Garden Route National Park, South Africa). Rather than the classic gradual decline in species richness with distance from the mouth there were zones of considerable faunal stability separated by relatively sharp discontinuities. At the point upstream at which salinity regularly falls below 30, the rich, diverse and highly spatially variable downstream faunal assemblage changed to a less rich, less diverse and more uniform one that dominated the upstream stretch without any further upstream reduction in richness. Nevertheless, without loss of overall richness, assemblage composition changed, again rapidly, in the upper region of the upstream stretch to a zone dominated by the microgastropod Hydrobia, which otherwise occurs in the Knysna system only in highly sheltered regions of the downstream stretch where it is also dominant. The upstream faunal assemblage was a subset of that in the marine-influenced downstream region not a different replacing one. Position along the estuarine gradient accounted for 29% of total assemblage variation. Overall faunal abundance declined with distance upstream until the Hydrobia zone where it rose sharply, but there was no evidence of increase in density of those species remaining on putative release from competition.

  12. Evaluation of sampling sizes on the intertidal macroinfauna assessment in a subtropical mudflat of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Zhenye; Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2012-08-01

    In this study, two types of sediment cores with different diameters were used to collect sediment samples from an intertidal mudflat in Hong Kong to investigate the influence of sampling unit on the quantitative assessment of benthic macroinfaunal communities. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to detect differences in sampling efficiencies by the two samplers through total abundance and biomass, species richness and diversity, community structure, relative abundance of major taxa of the infaunal community. The species-area curves were further compared to find out the influence of the sampling units