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Sample records for interv barbara hanson

  1. Fluvial Tufa Evidence of Late Pleistocene Wet Intervals from Santa Barbara, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Past pluvials in the western United States provide valuable context for understanding regional hydroclimate variability. Here we report evidence of conditions substantially wetter than today from fluvial tufa deposits located near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara County, California that have been dated by radiocarbon (14C) and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL). Two successions of tufa deposition occur within a small catchment that drains Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock: 1) a fluvial deposit (0-0.5 m thick, 200 m in extent) that formed along a narrow valley below a modern spring, and 2) a perched deposit about 10 m higher (2 m thick, 15 m in extent). IRSL and radiocarbon dating of the perched carbonates suggests at least two episodes of carbonate growth: one at 19.4 ± 2.4 (1σ) through 17.8 ± 2.8 (1σ) ka and another at 11.9 ± 1.5 (1σ) ka verified with a charcoal 14C age of 10.95 ± 0.12 (2σ) cal ka BP. The relationship between the perched and fluvial spring deposits is inferred to represent a drop in the water table of more than 10 m associated with a transition from a wet climate in the late glacial to a dry Holocene today. The wet period indicated by tufa growth between 19.4 and 17.8 ka is relatively consistent with other California climate records both north and south of Zaca Lake. However, tufa growth ca. 12 to 11 ka demonstrates wet conditions occurred as far south as Zaca Lake during the Younger Dryas event, in contrast to climate records farther south in Lake Elsinore indicating persistently dry conditions through this interval. A small shift north in the average position of the winter season storm track could explain wet winters at Zaca while at the same time generating dry winters at Lake Elsinore, 275 km southwest of Zaca. If true, these data indicate that rather small latitudinal shifts in the average winter season storm track can produce large changes in regional hydroclimate.

  2. Hanson receives Macelwane Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Hanson, David R.

    At the 1996 Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, David R. Hanson received the 1996 James B. Macelwane Medal, which recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability. The medal citation and Hanson's response are given here.

  3. Barbara Cooney.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Jackie C.

    2000-01-01

    Profiles the life/work of the award winning picture-book author-illustrator Barbara Cooney. Includes her early development as an artist; early attempts at the picture-book form; experimentation with different media: watercolor, pen/ink with wash, charcoal, acrylics, pastels, and collage; later work that draws upon folk-art traditions; her love of…

  4. William B. Hanson (1923-1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelis, Rod

    On September 11,1994, William B. Hanson died as a result of severe injuries received in a bicycle accident. He is survived by his wife Annelies, three sons, a daughter, two stepdaughters, and six grandchildren. In addition to his excellent research in the field of aeronomy and ionospheric physics, Hanson possessed a love of the outdoors and enjoyed the challenge of athletic competition. He will be remembered fondly by a host of friends and colleagues.

  5. 78 FR 43857 - Order Relating to Yaming Nina Qi Hanson

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699 (Aug... Hanson, 1003, 2 Unit, 40 Bldg., Xuriwan Garden, Xiangzhou District, Zhuhai, Guangdong Province, People's... Order, Qi Hanson, with a last known address of 1003, 2 Unit, 40 Bldg., Xuriwan Garden,...

  6. 10. Photocopy of lithograph (from Mrs. D. Hanson Grubb, San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of lithograph (from Mrs. D. Hanson Grubb, San Francisco) 'Moss Eng. Co., N.Y.' Date unknown 'THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. PAUL, BENICIA, CAL.' WEST SIDE - St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 120 East J Street, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  7. Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The 465-bed Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital is the largest medical facility on the California coast between Los Angeles and the San Francisco bay area. The hospital dates back to 1888, when a group of local citizens began raising funds to build a "cottage-style" hospital for the growing community. Their original plans called for a complex in which each medical specialty would be housed in a separate bungalow. Even then, however, such a decentralized plan was too costly, so work began instead on a single cottage for all hospital departments. The first Cottage Hospital opened in 1891, with 25 beds housed in a two story Victorian building. Now a hugh medical complex employing some 1,500 people, the hospital continues to be called "Cottage" after the original home-like building. Rodney J. Lamb has been Hospital Administrator for the last 30 years.

  8. The Legacy of Margie Hanson: It's All about Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The Margie R. Hanson Distinguished Service Award recognizes established professionals who have made outstanding contributions to the field of physical education for children. The 2005 recipient was Steve Sanders, former Senior Editor of "TEPE." This article contains the text of the speech Dr. Sanders made following an official NASPE awards…

  9. Another lesson from Santa Barbara.

    PubMed

    Holmquest, Donald L

    2007-01-01

    In this commentary, Don Holmquest, speaking from the perspective of a statewide regional health information organization (RHIO), responds to papers by Robert Miller and Bradley Miller and by David Brailer on lessons learned from the Santa Barbara County Care Data Exchange project and its subsequent demise. He posits that one of the critical lessons learned through the Santa Barbara experience is the need for a careful analysis of who benefits from health information exchange as part of creating a sustainable business model for health information exchange projects.

  10. Highlighting High Performance: Whitman Hanson Regional High School; Whitman, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  11. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  12. STS-118 Astronaut Barbara Morgan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Barbara R. Morgan (center), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist, dons a training version of her shuttle launch and entry suit, prior to the start of a mission training exercise in the Space Vehicle Mock Up Facility at Johnson Space Center. United Space Alliance (USA) personnel were on hand to assist Morgan. Morgan was chosen as the first educator to become a mission specialist astronaut in 2002. The Educator Astronaut Project evolved from the Teacher in Space Project. Both aimed to engage and attract students to explore the excitement and wonder of space flight and to inspire and support educators. Morgan's primary duty was the same as it is for the entire crew, accomplish the planned objectives of the station assembly mission. But she also took part in several education-related activities.

  13. ChE at UC Santa Barbara.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seborg, Dale E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the chemical engineering program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, including history of the department, faculty research interests and professional activities, graduate and undergraduate programs, and research in nuclear engineering. (SK)

  14. Water resources of Hanson and Davison Counties, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Five glacial and four bedrock aquifers were delineated in Hanson and Davison Counties. The glacial aquifers, outwash deposits confined by as much as 275 feet of glacial till, are the Floyd, Plum Creek, Ethan, Warren, and Alexandria. The bedrock aquifers are the Niobrara, Codell, Dakota, and Sioux Quartzite Wash, and may be as much as 80, 350, 700, and 500 feet below land surface, respectively. The glacial aquifers averaged 13 to 40 feet in thickness and contain about 670,000 acre-feet of water in storage. Recharge to the Floyd and Plum Creek aquifers is from the Sioux Quartzite Wash aquifer and from fractures in the Sioux Quartzite. Recharge to the Ethan and Warren aquifers is from the Niobrara aquifer. Reported yield to wells from the Floyd and Plum Creek aquifers was as much as 1,000 gallons per minute. Predominant chemical constituents in water from the glacial aquifers are sulfate, calcium, and sodium. The bedrock aquifers averaged 40 to 110 feet in the thickness and contain about 11.3 million acre-feet of water in storage. The direction of water movement in the aquifers is to the northeast. The average reported yield from wells in the bedrock aquifers ranged from 1 to 75 gallons per minute. Reported yield from wells in the Niobrara aquifer was as much as 1,000 gallons per minute. Predominant chemical constituents in water from the Niobrara and Codell aquifers were sulfate, sodium, and calcium. Predominant chemical constituents in water from the Dakota and Sioux Quartzite wash were sulfate and calcium. (USGS)

  15. 33 CFR 80.1126 - Santa Barbara Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. 80.1126 Section 80.1126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1126 Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Santa Barbara Harbor Light 4...

  16. Rapid Response to the Howard Hanson Dam Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, F. M.; Carter, G.; White, A.; Neiman, P. J.; King, C.; Jankov, I.; Colman, B.; Cook, K.; Buehner, T.

    2010-12-01

    Dedicated in 1962, the Howard A. Hanson Dam (HHD) brought necessary flood relief to the Green River Valley in the Metropolitan Area of Seattle, Washington, and opened the way for increased valley development. For example, the flood damage prevented by HHD during the extreme precipitation event in early January 2009 is estimated to be about $4 billion. However, following the record high level of water behind HHD caused by this event, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) became concerned about the Dam’s safety. Despite short-term measures to improve HHD during 2009, the chance for a significant Green River Valley flood event was estimated by the ACE to be 1 in 25 for the 2009/10 winter season. In response to this elevated risk, NOAA organized a coordinated effort across research and forecast operations to implement new observations, modeling and dissemination tools, and knowledge of the role of atmospheric rivers (ARs) in producing extreme precipitation, prototyped in California within NOAA’s Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT; hmt.noaa.gov). Fortunately, although seasonal observed precipitation (October 2009 through March 2010) in the Seattle area was slightly greater than normal (e.g., 112% of normal at the Seattle National Weather Service Forecast Office), there were no threatening floods observed along the Green River. This outcome was influenced by a synoptic pattern that was progressive, i.e., storms did not stall over this vulnerable watershed, which reduced the chance for an extensive (time and space) extreme event. More than a decade of West Coast winter storm research conducted primarily in California by NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory/Physical Sciences Division (ESRL/PSD) has identified atmospheric rivers (ARs), narrow regions of enhanced water vapor transport, as the culprits that cause extreme precipitation events, such as the January 2009 event that stressed HHD. ESRL/PSD extended this AR research to the coast of Washington by deploying a

  17. Radon mapping - Santa Barbara and Ventura counties

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, R.

    1997-11-01

    Since 1990, the Department of Conservation`s Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) has provided geologic information and conducted several research projects on geology and radon for the California Department of Health Services (DHS) Radon Program. This article provides a brief overview of radon`s occurrence and impact on human health, and summarizes a recent DMG project for DHS that used geologic, geochemical, and indoor radon measurement data to produce detailed radon potential zone maps for Santa Barbara and Ventura counties.

  18. Book Review: "Educational Reform and Administrative Development: The Cases of Columbia and Venezuela," by E. Mark Hanson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Patrick D.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews "Educational Reform and Administrative Development: The Cases of Colombia and Venezuela," by E. Mark Hanson, which relates the policy-making and administrative structures of these two countries to their political, historical, and cultural contexts. (TE)

  19. 77 FR 65621 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara Harbor, Santa Barbara, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... the Federal Register on June 20, 2012 (77 FR 36955). Previously, temporary security zones had been... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara Harbor,...

  20. Preliminary geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Stone, Paul; Powell, Charles L.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Selting, Amy J.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new geologic digital map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. This preliminary map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Santa Barbara and Goleta 7.5' quadrangles. A planned second version will extend the mapping westward into the adjoining Dos Pueblos Canyon quadrangle and eastward into the Carpinteria quadrangle. The mapping presented here results from the collaborative efforts of geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP) (Minor, Kellogg, Stanley, Stone, and Powell) and the tectonic geomorphology research group at the University of California at Santa Barbara (Gurrola and Selting). C.L. Powell, II, performed all new fossil identifications and interpretations reported herein. T.R. Brandt designed and edited the GIS database,performed GIS database integration and created the digital cartography for the map layout. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along a west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The coastal plain region, which extends from the Santa Ynez Mountains on the north to the Santa Barbara Channel on the south, is underlain by numerous active and potentially active folds and partly buried thrust faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt. Strong earthquakes that occurred in the region in 1925 (6.8 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude) are evidence that such structures pose a significant earthquake hazard to the approximately 200,000 people living within the major coastal population centers of Santa Barbara and Goleta. Also, young landslide deposits along the steep lower flank of the Santa

  1. Geologic Map of the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain Area, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Keller, Edward A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a newly revised and expanded digital geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground)1 and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Dos Pueblos Canyon, Goleta, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria 7.5' quadrangles. The new map supersedes an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002; revised 2006) that provided coastal coverage only within the Goleta and Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping to the west and east, geologic mapping in parts of the central map area has been significantly revised from the preliminary map compilation - especially north of downtown Santa Barbara in the Mission Ridge area - based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units, including several new units recognized in the areas of expanded mapping, are described in detail in the accompanying pamphlet. Abundant new biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault kinematic observations embedded in the digital map database are more complete owing to the addition of slip-sense determinations. Finally, the pamphlet accompanying the present report includes an expanded and refined summary of stratigraphic and structural observations and interpretations that are based on the composite geologic data contained in the new map compilation. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest

  2. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  3. 27 CFR 9.217 - Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Geological Survey 1:24,000 scale topographic maps used to determine the boundary of the Happy Canyon of Santa... Cachuma, CA, 1995; and (4) Santa Ynez, CA, 1995. (c) Boundary. The Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara viticultural area is located in Santa Barbara County, California. The boundary of the Happy Canyon of...

  4. 27 CFR 9.217 - Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Geological Survey 1:24,000 scale topographic maps used to determine the boundary of the Happy Canyon of Santa... Cachuma, CA, 1995; and (4) Santa Ynez, CA, 1995. (c) Boundary. The Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara viticultural area is located in Santa Barbara County, California. The boundary of the Happy Canyon of...

  5. Barbara Grier and the world she built.

    PubMed

    Passet, Joanne E

    2014-01-01

    Mentored in the art of lesbian literary detection by Jeannette Howard Foster, Barbara Grier became part of a vibrant print-based network of lesbians through her involvement with The Ladder. Building on that foundation, she developed Naiad Press into a successful lesbian business, one that opened doors for lesbian writers and preserved lesbian classics for new generations of readers. Shaped by her class and the times in which she came of age, Grier understood the power of print to change women's lives. Some challenged her commitment to lesbian feminism, but few questioned her dedication to building Naiad into a press that heightened lesbian visibility, fostered self-understanding, and contributed to the creation of community. PMID:25298096

  6. Barbara Grier and the world she built.

    PubMed

    Passet, Joanne E

    2014-01-01

    Mentored in the art of lesbian literary detection by Jeannette Howard Foster, Barbara Grier became part of a vibrant print-based network of lesbians through her involvement with The Ladder. Building on that foundation, she developed Naiad Press into a successful lesbian business, one that opened doors for lesbian writers and preserved lesbian classics for new generations of readers. Shaped by her class and the times in which she came of age, Grier understood the power of print to change women's lives. Some challenged her commitment to lesbian feminism, but few questioned her dedication to building Naiad into a press that heightened lesbian visibility, fostered self-understanding, and contributed to the creation of community.

  7. Environmental Law Series Links Campus and Community in Santa Barbara.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnes, J. Marc

    1981-01-01

    Describes a three-course series in environmental law developed at the University of California, Santa Barbara as part of the undergraduate Environmental Studies Program. The series progresses from theory to simulation to field experience. (Author/WB)

  8. Monterey fractured reservoir, Santa Barbara Channel, California

    SciTech Connect

    Belfield, W.C.; Helwig, J.; La Pointe, P.R.; Dahleen, W.K.

    1983-03-01

    The South Elwood field in the Santa Barbara Channel is a faulted anticline with cumulative production of 14.5 million bbl from the Monterey Formation as of September 1, 1982. The distributions of pressure, flow rates, and oil-water contacts and the low average matrix permeability of 0.2 md require a fractured reservoir. Core and outcrop studies show a dominant fracture set characterized by vertical, lithologically controlled fractures oriented across strike, and breccias controlled by lithology and structure. Generally, the fracture intensity is unaffected by structural position or bed curvature but is controlled by lithology and bed thickness. Other varieties of fracturing in the Monterey are related to a protracted history of diagenesis, deformation, and fluid injection. Three types of tar-bearing breccias occur in the Monterey Formation: stratigraphic breccia, coalescent-fracture breccia, and fault-related breccia. Formation of breccias probably involves high pore pressures. Because of their polygenetic origin, breccia masses have diverse orientations paralleling bedding or fracture/fault systems. In conclusions, fracturing and brecciation of the Monterey Formation reflect the interplay between processes of diagenesis, deformation, and fluid dynamics. The most important features of the reservoir in the area of the present study are: (1) vertical fractures oriented normal to the structural trends and inferred to be favorably oriented (to remain open) with respect to the regional minimum horizontal stress; and (2) breccias that are both stratigraphically and structurally controlled and inferred to be related to the interaction of rock stress and fluid dynamics.

  9. Santa Barbara Cluster Comparison Test with DISPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-06-01

    The Santa Barbara cluster comparison project revealed that there is a systematic difference between entropy profiles of clusters of galaxies obtained by Eulerian mesh and Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes: mesh codes gave a core with a constant entropy, whereas SPH codes did not. One possible reason for this difference is that mesh codes are not Galilean invariant. Another possible reason is the problem of the SPH method, which might give too much “protection” to cold clumps because of the unphysical surface tension induced at contact discontinuities. In this paper, we apply the density-independent formulation of SPH (DISPH), which can handle contact discontinuities accurately, to simulations of a cluster of galaxies and compare the results with those with the standard SPH. We obtained the entropy core when we adopt DISPH. The size of the core is, however, significantly smaller than those obtained with mesh simulations and is comparable to those obtained with quasi-Lagrangian schemes such as “moving mesh” and “mesh free” schemes. We conclude that both the standard SPH without artificial conductivity and Eulerian mesh codes have serious problems even with such an idealized simulation, while DISPH, SPH with artificial conductivity, and quasi-Lagrangian schemes have sufficient capability to deal with it.

  10. 76 FR 31242 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations... Identification of plan. * * * * * (c) * * * (359) * * * (i) * * * (E) Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County...

  11. Santa Barbara City College: 1999-02 College Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Barbara City Coll., CA.

    This document presents Santa Barbara City College's 1999-2002 College Plan. It is intended to be used as the central organizing document for decision making, planning, and budgeting throughout the College during the 1999-2002 period. This plan is the result of thoughtful and substantive dialogue involving individuals and groups throughout the…

  12. The Quintessential Searcher: The Wit & Wisdom of Barbara Quint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Marylaine, Ed.

    This book presents selected writings by Barbara Quint (BQ) on online searching. The selections are organized into the following chapters: (1) "The Art of Searching," including finding out what the patron wants, preparing for the search, knowing when the search is done, search styles, rules of online searching, cost issues, Quint's Laws, and…

  13. Santa Barbara City College: 2002-05 College Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Barbara City Coll., CA.

    This document summarizes the Santa Barbara City College 2002-2005 College Plan. The plan's goals are: (1) to develop and implement strategies to increase assistance to students in identifying learning needs and defining educational, career, and life goals; (2) to increase the percentage of students attaining educational goals; (3) to increase…

  14. Remembering Barbara Wootton's Contribution to Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Yvonne M.

    2008-01-01

    Barbara Wootton, a prominent British social scientist and educator of social workers, examined the status of social work in the 1950s. Wootton argued iconoclastically that the social work literature presented a profession that was arrogant and far removed from the common concerns of the populations served. In addition, Wootton felt that the social…

  15. Barbara Thayer-Bacon on Knowers and the Known

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Barbara Thayer-Bacon (1999) objects to the minimum proficiency examinations that are mandated for school students in Ohio. Similar tests are required by, or are under consideration by, governments in many other parts of the world. Various writers have objected to one or other of these tests by arguing that they are crude, invalid, unreliable,…

  16. Barbara Bodichon's Travel Writing: Her Epistolary Articulation of "Bildung"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Martin, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    English painter Barbara Bodichon received a dynamic home education, consisting of engaging lessons, reading sessions, family discussions, sketching excursions, and trips at home and abroad. As an adult, Bodichon led a nomadic life, living between Algeria and England and travelling across Europe and America. Seeking to unpack travelling and travel…

  17. Biotic response to late Quaternary rapid climate switches in Santa Barbara Basin: Ecological and evolutionary implications

    SciTech Connect

    Cannariato, K.G.; Kennett, J.P.; Behl, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages from Santa Barbara Basin exhibit major faunal and ecological switches associated with late Quaternary millennial- to decadal-scale global climate oscillations. Repeated turnovers of entire faunas occurred rapidly (<40--400 yr) without extinction or speciation in conjunction with Dansgaard-Oeschger shifts in thermohaline circulation, ventilation, and climate, confirming evolutionary model predictions of Roy et al. Consistent faunal successions of dysoxic taxa during successive interstadials reflect the extreme sensitivity and adaptation of the benthic ecosystem to the rapid environmental changes that marked the late Quaternary and possibly other transitional intervals in the history of the Earth`s ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system. These data support the hypothesis that broad segments of the biosphere are well adapted to rapid climate change.

  18. Groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California established the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Santa Barbara Coastal Plain is one of the study units.

  19. Lesbis sustineo! Naiad press authors remember Barbara Grier.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from semi-structured interviews with some of Naiad Press's most celebrated women, including Katherine V. Forrest, Barbara's supervising editor at Naiad from 1983-1993; Sheila Ortiz Taylor, author of what is considered by many to be the first lesbian novel with a Chicana heroine; and the incomparable Lee Lynch, this work aims to sustain an ongoing remembrance of Grier's life and work by encouraging memory exploration--a symphonic blending of the printed and spoken word. PMID:25298097

  20. Lesbis sustineo! Naiad press authors remember Barbara Grier.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from semi-structured interviews with some of Naiad Press's most celebrated women, including Katherine V. Forrest, Barbara's supervising editor at Naiad from 1983-1993; Sheila Ortiz Taylor, author of what is considered by many to be the first lesbian novel with a Chicana heroine; and the incomparable Lee Lynch, this work aims to sustain an ongoing remembrance of Grier's life and work by encouraging memory exploration--a symphonic blending of the printed and spoken word.

  1. Groundwater Quality in the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, T.A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California established the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Santa Barbara Coastal Plain is one of the study units.

  2. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  3. Santa Barbara Basin diatom and silicoflagellate response to global climate anomalies during the past 2200 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, J.A.; Bukry, D.; Field, D.

    2010-01-01

    Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages are quantified from a box core record spanning AD 1940-2001 and an Ocean Drilling Program Hole 893A record from ???220 BC to AD 1880. The combined relative abundance of the diatoms Fragilariopsis doliolus and Nitzschia interrupteseriata from continuous two-year sampling intervals in the box core varies with sea surface temperature (SST), suggesting its utility in SST reconstruction. The assemblage data from the ODP 893A record indicate a broad interval of generally cooler SSTs between ???AD 800 and 1350, which corresponds to the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), a period of generally warmer temperatures across other regions of the northern hemisphere. The assemblages also indicate an interval of generally warmer SSTs between ???AD 1400 and 1800, a period of otherwise global cooling referred to as the Little Ice Age (LIA). The changes in assemblages of diatoms and silicoflagellates support the hypothesis that the widespread droughts of the Medieval Climate Anomaly in the Western US were associated with cooler eastern North Pacific SST. The box core assemblages have higher percentages of tropical and subtropical compared to temperate and subpolar species than the ODP samples, reflecting a response of phytoplankton communities to an unusual 20th century warming. Pseudonitzschia australis, a diatom linked with domoic acid production, begins to become more common (>3% of the diatom assemblage) in the box core only after AD 1985, suggesting a link to anthropogenic activity. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  4. Interval Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    Regardless of the type of physical activity used, interval training is simply repeated periods of physical stress interspersed with recovery periods during which activity of a reduced intensity is performed. During the recovery periods, the individual usually keeps moving and does not completely recover before the next exercise interval (e.g.,…

  5. Geologic Map of the Goleta Quadrangle, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2007-01-01

    This map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying those parts of the Santa Barbara coastal plain and adjacent southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains within the Goleta 7 ?? quadrangle at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The Goleta map overlaps an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002) that provided coverage within the coastal, central parts of the Goleta and contiguous Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping in the northern part of the Goleta quadrangle, geologic mapping in other parts of the map area has been revised from the preliminary map compilation based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units are described in detail in the accompanying map pamphlet. Abundant biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault-kinematic observations (including slip-sense determinations) are embedded in the digital map database. The Goleta quadrangle is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The Santa Barbara coastal plain surface, which spans the central part of the quadrangle, includes several mesas and hills that are geomorphic expressions of underlying, potentially active folds and partly buried oblique and reverse faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt (SBFFB). Strong earthquakes have occurred offshore within 10 km of the Santa Barbara coastal plain in 1925 (6.3 magnitude), 1941 (5.5 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude). These and numerous smaller seismic events

  6. Status of groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Study Unit, 2011: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated in 2011 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study unit is mostly in Santa Barbara County and is in the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer system of California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Santa Barbara study unit. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Santa Barbara study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.The status assessment for the Santa Barbara study unit was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey from 23 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database for January 24, 2008–January 23, 2011. The data used for the assessment included volatile organic compounds; pesticides; pharmaceutical compounds; two constituents of special interest, perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used to evaluate groundwater quality for those constituents that have federal or California regulatory and non

  7. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  8. Barbara McClintock and the transposition concept.

    PubMed

    Barahona, A

    1997-12-01

    Barbara McClintock was awarded Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for the discovery and characterization of jumping genes or transposons. In 1948 she described for the first time maize controlling elements. She proposed 'transposition' as a mechanism that relates phenotypic characteristics with the presence of unstable genes. This discovery was 'ignored' even though she was recognized as a brilliant cytogeneticist. In this paper I approach the matter of the maize research groups within which McClintock developed all of her work, and the problem of variegation in relation to unstable genes and transposition. PMID:11619571

  9. Introduction: the influence and legacy of Barbara Grier.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, Danielle M

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies focuses on the life and legacy of the lesbian publisher, editor, and author Barbara Grier. Through Grier's "Lesbiana" column in Daughters of Bilitis's magazine The Ladder, three editions of The Lesbian in Literature (1967, 1975, 1985), to her role as publisher of the Naiad Press from 1973-2003, Grier introduced hundreds of new lesbian books to readers and kept several lesbian classics on the literary horizon. The articles in this issue focus on Grier's biography, history, and impact through archival analysis, interviews, and content analysis. This introduction contextualizes and outlines the articles in this special issue.

  10. Introduction: the influence and legacy of Barbara Grier.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, Danielle M

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies focuses on the life and legacy of the lesbian publisher, editor, and author Barbara Grier. Through Grier's "Lesbiana" column in Daughters of Bilitis's magazine The Ladder, three editions of The Lesbian in Literature (1967, 1975, 1985), to her role as publisher of the Naiad Press from 1973-2003, Grier introduced hundreds of new lesbian books to readers and kept several lesbian classics on the literary horizon. The articles in this issue focus on Grier's biography, history, and impact through archival analysis, interviews, and content analysis. This introduction contextualizes and outlines the articles in this special issue. PMID:25298095

  11. Barbara McClintock and the transposition concept.

    PubMed

    Barahona, A

    1997-12-01

    Barbara McClintock was awarded Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for the discovery and characterization of jumping genes or transposons. In 1948 she described for the first time maize controlling elements. She proposed 'transposition' as a mechanism that relates phenotypic characteristics with the presence of unstable genes. This discovery was 'ignored' even though she was recognized as a brilliant cytogeneticist. In this paper I approach the matter of the maize research groups within which McClintock developed all of her work, and the problem of variegation in relation to unstable genes and transposition.

  12. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Barbara study unit, 2011: results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from January to February 2011, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Santa Barbara study unit was the thirty-fourth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Santa Barbara study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the Santa Barbara study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the Santa Barbara study unit located in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, groundwater samples were collected from 24 wells. Eighteen of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and six wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds); constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]); naturally occurring inorganic constituents (trace

  13. Funds from telethon stay at home. Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital with Children's Miracle Network.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, California, works with the nonprofit Children's Miracle Network in fund raising efforts, and all money raised through its telethon remains in the local community. Volunteer efforts and donations form the core of Santa Barbara's financial support. PMID:11552593

  14. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Barbara Island, Calif. (a) The anchorage grounds. Shoreward of a line beginning at the Santa Barbara Island Light on the northeast end of the island and bearing 23° true a distance of 1.515 nautical...

  15. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Barbara Island, Calif. (a) The anchorage grounds. Shoreward of a line beginning at the Santa Barbara Island Light on the northeast end of the island and bearing 23° true a distance of 1.515 nautical...

  16. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Barbara Island, Calif. (a) The anchorage grounds. Shoreward of a line beginning at the Santa Barbara Island Light on the northeast end of the island and bearing 23° true a distance of 1.515 nautical...

  17. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Barbara Island, Calif. (a) The anchorage grounds. Shoreward of a line beginning at the Santa Barbara Island Light on the northeast end of the island and bearing 23° true a distance of 1.515 nautical...

  18. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Barbara Island, Calif. (a) The anchorage grounds. Shoreward of a line beginning at the Santa Barbara Island Light on the northeast end of the island and bearing 23° true a distance of 1.515 nautical...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Cruise Ships... § 165.1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location. The following areas are... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Cruise Ships... § 165.1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location. The following areas are... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light...

  1. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  2. Status of groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Study Unit, 2011: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated in 2011 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study unit is mostly in Santa Barbara County and is in the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer system of California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Santa Barbara study unit. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Santa Barbara study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.The status assessment for the Santa Barbara study unit was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey from 23 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database for January 24, 2008–January 23, 2011. The data used for the assessment included volatile organic compounds; pesticides; pharmaceutical compounds; two constituents of special interest, perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used to evaluate groundwater quality for those constituents that have federal or California regulatory and non

  3. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Barbara study unit, 2011: results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from January to February 2011, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Santa Barbara study unit was the thirty-fourth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Santa Barbara study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the Santa Barbara study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the Santa Barbara study unit located in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, groundwater samples were collected from 24 wells. Eighteen of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and six wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds); constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]); naturally occurring inorganic constituents (trace

  4. Coastal Processes Study of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Revell, David L.; Hoover, Dan; Warrick, Jon; Brocatus, John; Draut, Amy E.; Dartnell, Pete; Elias, Edwin; Mustain, Neomi; Hart, Pat E.; Ryan, Holly F.

    2009-01-01

    The Santa Barbara littoral cell (SBLC) is a complex coastal system with significant management challenges. The coastline ranges broadly in exposure to wave energy, fluvial inputs, hard structures, and urbanization. Geologic influence (structural control) on coastline orientation exerts an important control on local beach behavior, with anthropogenic alterations and the episodic nature of sediment supply and transport also playing important roles. Short- and long-term temporal analyses of shoreline change, beach width, and volume change show no obvious trends in regional beach behavior. Extensive armoring along the SBLC has accreted the back beach, narrowing beach widths and in some cases increasing sediment transport. Unarmored beaches have exhibited mild erosion while maintaining similar widths. Harbor constructions have had notable impacts on downdrift beaches, but once the coastal system has equilibrated the signal becomes strongly dampened and littoral-drift gradients driven by natural shoreline orientation again become dominant. Sediment inputs from the Santa Clara River dominate sediment processes on beaches to the south. The SBLC is dominated by episodic flood and storm-wave events. Exceptionally large accretion signals along this stretch of coastline are closely tied to major flood events when large amounts of sediment are deposited in deltas. These deltas decay over time, supplying downdrift beaches with sediment. Storm-wave impacts and gradients in alongshore transport can lead to beach rotations and migrating erosion hotspots when geological controls are weak. Annual and seasonal rates of cross-shore and alongshore transport are at least 2-3 times higher for the more west- and southwest-facing beaches south of the Ventura River as compared to the more sheltered beaches to the west/north. Gross littoral transports are good approximations of net littoral transports for beaches west/north of Ventura as transport is almost purely unidirectional. However

  5. 78 FR 53680 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portions of the California...

  6. Water-resources optimization model for Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of the city of Santa Barbara's water resources during a drought. The model, which links groundwater simulation with linear programming, has a planning horizon of 5 years. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply subject to: water demand constraints, hydraulic head constraints to control seawater intrusion, and water capacity constraints. The decision variables are montly water deliveries from surface water and groundwater. The state variables are hydraulic heads. The drought of 1947-51 is the city's worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. The simulation-optimization model was applied using three reservoir operation rules. In addition, the model's sensitivity to demand, carry over [the storage of water in one year for use in the later year(s)], head constraints, and capacity constraints was tested.

  7. Metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with Santa Barbara seep oil.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Erik R; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; Foster, Brian; Copeland, Alexander; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Pati, Amrita; Jansson, Janet R; Gilbert, Jack A; Tringe, Susannah Green; Lorenson, Thomas D; Hess, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with natural oils seeping into the Pacific Ocean offshore the coast of Santa Barbara (California, USA) were determined to complement already existing metagenomes generated from microbial communities associated with hydrocarbons that pollute the marine ecosystem. This genomics resource article is the first of two publications reporting a total of four new metagenomes from oils that seep into the Santa Barbara Channel. PMID:24958360

  8. Validation and Application of PHYDOTax In The Santa Barbara Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, C. B.; Palacios, S. L.; Broughton, J.; Kudela, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Phytoplankton Functional Types(PFTs) are conceptual groupings of phytoplankton based on physical or functional characteristics. Understanding phytoplankton is essential in our study of how ecosystems function and in monitoring carbon flow. PHYDOTax is a PFT algorithm that discriminates taxon-specific biomass in images from airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral sensors. The PHYDOTax algorithm uses a spectral library and an inverse matrix approach to deconvolve pure phytoplankton spectral end-members from spectra of natural waters. The spectral library used in development was created from phytoplankton taxa found in Monterey Bay, CA and the California Current System (CCS). PHYDOTax has only been validated in Monterey Bay and for only one airborne sensor, Spectroscopic Aerial Mapping System with On-board Navigation (SAMSON). The objectives of this research were to apply PHYDOTax to a different region of the CCS, Santa Barbara Channel (SBC), and to test the usability of PHYDOTax with a different airborne imager, Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). PHYDOTax was modified to accommodate the reduced spectral resolution of AVIRIS, which has fewer wavelengths than the SAMSON imagery that was used to validate the model for Monterey Bay. PHYDOTax's predictions were consistent with cell-count data from whole water samples on June 5, 2013, courtesy of the Plumes and Blooms Cruise (UCSB). PHYDOTax's ability to perform in another area of the CCS shows promise that it may be accurately applied to the west coast of the US. PHYDOTax's ability to perform with lower spectral resolution imagery, suggests that it may it may be robust enough to be down-sampled to multi-spectral resolution inputs. This opens the possibility of applying PHYDOTax to historical (SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS), existing (VIIRS, HICO), and future (PACE, GEO-CAPE) sensors to describe temporal trends in phytoplankton distribution and carbon flow in the ocean and to build continuity among the sensor

  9. The helminth fauna of the barbary partridge Alectoris barbara in Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Foronda, P; Casanova, J C; Figueruelo, E; Abreu, N; Feliu, C

    2005-06-01

    The helminth fauna of the barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara) in Tenerife Island (Canary Archipelago) was studied from 2001 to 2002, as there were no records of helminths from this host in the Canary Islands. Seven helminth species were identified: two cestodes Choanotaenia infundibulum and Lyruterina nigropunctata, and five nematodes Aonchotheca caudinflata, Baruscapillaria obsignata, Eucoleus annulatus, Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum. Lyruterina nigropunctata, A. galli and E. annulatus are recorded for first time in A. barbara. An analysis of available data on Alectoris spp. reveals the importance of intermediate hosts such as arthropods and earthworms in the diet of partridges. Terrestrial helminths are dominant species, with monoxenous and heteroxenous species being present in similar numbers in different Alectoris species along their geographical distribution. Helminth species found in Tenerife from A. barbara are poor indicators of the host colonization from North Africa because these helminths are species that are commonly found in fowl with a cosmopolitan distribution. PMID:15946395

  10. A Brief Review of Barbara K. Townsend's Contributions to the Literature of Community College and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    Barbara K. Townsend's faculty profile on the Web site of the University of Missouri-Columbia lists three areas of inquiry: access to and attainment of the baccalaureate, community college faculty, and teacher education in the community college. Many people who knew Barbara are well aware that her interests were far wider and more expansive. This…

  11. 78 FR 53711 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and Ventura County...

  12. Santa Barbara City College Institutional Effectiveness Annual Report, 2001-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Barbara City Coll., CA.

    This document contains a comprehensive assessment institutional effectiveness at Santa Barbara City College (SBCC), California, during 2001-02. The report is divided into the following seven major areas related to SBCC's mission, function, and resources: (1) Student Learning; (2) Achievement and Development; (3) Student Outreach and Responsiveness…

  13. Santa Barbara City College Faculty and Staff Resource Guide for Assisting the Emotionally Troubled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Barbara City Coll., CA.

    This faculty and staff resource guide, published by the Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) Mental Health Counseling Program, is targeted at assisting the emotionally troubled student. It is designed to give faculty and staff some techniques in dealing with distressed or difficult students. Someone needs to refer a student when: the problem or…

  14. 76 FR 5319 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District, Placer County Air Pollution Control District, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  15. 76 FR 5277 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District and Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  16. 78 FR 32274 - Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... National Park Service Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara... analysis process for the proposed replacement and potential relocation of the existing Scorpion Pier at..., Attn: Scorpion Pier Project, 1901 Spinnaker Drive, Ventura, CA 93001 or electronically to...

  17. The non-convex shape of (234) Barbara, the first Barbarian*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, P.; Carry, B.; Colas, F.; Delbo, M.; Matter, A.; Hanuš, J.; Alí Lagoa, V.; Andrei, A. H.; Assafin, M.; Audejean, M.; Behrend, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Carbognani, A.; Cedrés Reyes, M.; Conjat, M.; Cornero, N.; Coward, D.; Crippa, R.; de Ferra Fantin, E.; Devogéle, M.; Dubos, G.; Frappa, E.; Gillon, M.; Hamanowa, H.; Jehin, E.; Klotz, A.; Kryszczyńska, A.; Lecacheux, J.; Leroy, A.; Manfroid, J.; Manzini, F.; Maquet, L.; Morelle, E.; Mottola, S.; Polińska, M.; Roy, R.; Todd, M.; Vachier, F.; Vera Hernández, C.; Wiggins, P.

    2015-04-01

    Asteroid (234) Barbara is the prototype of a category of asteroids that has been shown to be extremely rich in refractory inclusions, the oldest material ever found in the Solar system. It exhibits several peculiar features, most notably its polarimetric behaviour. In recent years other objects sharing the same property (collectively known as `Barbarians') have been discovered. Interferometric observations in the mid-infrared with the ESO VLTI (Very Large Telescope Interferometer) suggested that (234) Barbara might have a bi-lobated shape or even a large companion satellite. We use a large set of 57 optical light curves acquired between 1979 and 2014, together with the timings of two stellar occultations in 2009, to determine the rotation period, spin-vector coordinates, and 3-D shape of (234) Barbara, using two different shape reconstruction algorithms. By using the light curves combined to the results obtained from stellar occultations, we are able to show that the shape of (234) Barbara exhibits large concave areas. Possible links of the shape to the polarimetric properties and the object evolution are discussed. We also show that VLTI data can be modelled without the presence of a satellite.

  18. Research that Matters: An Interview with Barbara Townsend, April 25, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Barbara Townsend, recipient of the 2009 Exemplary Research Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA), Division J, recognizing the impact of her work on the field. The "Community College Journal of Research and Practice" ("CCJRP") has been an important outlet for sharing Townsend's work…

  19. 77 FR 39638 - Safety Zone; Barbara Harder Wedding Fireworks, Lake Erie, Lake View, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Barbara Harder Wedding Fireworks, Lake Erie, Lake View, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  20. 75 FR 28056 - Cachuma Lake Resource Management Plan, Santa Barbara County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... (73 FR 43472). The written comment period on the Draft EIS ended on September 23, 2008. On October 9, 2008 a notice was published in the Federal Register (73 FR 59669) extending the comment period on the... Bureau of Reclamation Cachuma Lake Resource Management Plan, Santa Barbara County, CA AGENCY: Bureau...

  1. Senator Barbara Mikulski and the Contagious “Learning Bug” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Sen. Barbara Mikulski came to NIH on April 11 to say goodbye. Following this fall’s election, the longest-serving woman in congressional history will relinquish her Maryland Senate seat, bringing to a close a 40-year national political career in which she staunchly supported NIH and biomedical research.

  2. Values in Doing and Writing Science: The Case of Barbara McClintock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Mary

    1994-01-01

    Articulates the perspective that regards science as a form of manufactured knowledge that is not objective but, like other forms of knowledge, culture-bound and historically specific. Suggests how some communicative difficulties suffered by the scientist Barbara McClintock can be traced to her unconventional practice. (HB)

  3. 76 FR 28226 - Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander; and AIR 7 Seas... ``Complainant,'' against African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia, ALCO Logistics, LLC; Brenda Alexander; and Air 7 Seas Transport Logistics, Inc.; hereinafter ``Respondents''. Complainant asserts that she is acting agent...

  4. Geohydrology of Storage Unit III and a combined flow model of the Santa Barbara and foothill ground-water basins, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freckleton, John R.; Martin, Peter; Nishikawa, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    The city of Santa Barbara pumps most of its ground water from the Santa Barbara and Foothill ground-water basins. The Santa Barbara basin is subdivided into two storage units: Storage Unit I and Storage Unit III. The Foothill basin and Storage Unit I of the Santa Barbara basin have been studied extensively and ground-water flow models have been developed for them. In this report, the geohydrology of the Santa Barbara ground- water basin is described with a special emphasis on Storage Unit III in the southwestern part of the basin. The purposes of this study were to summarize and evaluate the geohydrology of Storage Unit III and to develop an areawide model of the Santa Barbara and Foothill basins that includes the previously unmodeled Storage Unit III. Storage Unit III is in the southwestern part of the city of Santa Barbara. It is approximately 3.5 miles long and varies in width from about 2,000 feet in the southeast to 4,000 feet in the north-west. Storage Unit III is composed of the Santa Barbara Formation and overlying alluvium. The Santa Barbara Formation (the principal aquifer) consists of Pleistocene and Pliocene(?) unconsolidated marine sand, silt, and clay, and it has a maximum saturated thickness of about 160 feet. The alluvium that overlies the Santa Barbara Formation has a maximum saturated thickness of about 140 feet. The storage unit is bounded areally by faults and low-permeability deposits and is underlain by rocks of Tertiary age. The main sources of recharge to Storage Unit III are seepage from Arroyo Burro and infiltration of precipitation. Most of the recharge occurs in the northwest part of the storage unit, and ground water flows toward the southeast along the unit's long axis. Lesser amounts of recharge may occur as subsurface flow from the Hope Ranch subbasin and as upwelling from the underlying Tertiary rocks. Discharge from Storage Unit III occurs as pumpage, flow to underground drains, underflow through alluvium in the vicinity of Arroyo

  5. Geology and tsunamigenic potential of submarine landslides in Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.; Greene, H. Gary; Lee, H.J.; Sliter, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A large submarine landslide complex and four small landslides developed under the Santa Barbara Channel, suggesting a potential hazard from landslide-generated tsunamis. We integrate offshore stratigraphy and geologic structure, multibeam bathymetric information, and several kinds of seismic-reflection data to understand how and when the submarine landslides formed. Seismic-reflection data show that mass failure along the slope began at least 200 ka ago. Landslides appear as zones of poor reflectivity having an irregular upper surface, and these zones alternate vertically with strong parallel reflections. The emplacement ages of two of the three main landslide lobes are well established at 8 and 10 ka. The source material for the youngest part of the landslide complex was sediment of probable late Pleistocene and Holocene age that accumulated in a shelf-edge delta. Directly under this delta, growth of faults and anticlines was particularly intense and tended to oversteepen the deltaic deposits. These active structures also formed migration pathways and reservoirs for aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids from the deep basin. Tsunami deposits have been described from a low-lying area near Santa Barbara, and numerical modeling of tsunamis generated by hypothetical landslides in Santa Barbara Channel indicates a moderate to severe threat [Borrero, J.C., Dolan, J.F. and Synolakis, C.E., 2001. Tsunamis within the eastern Santa Barbara Channel. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(4): 643-646.], involving wave runups of 2-20 m, for a range of assumed landslide volumes. Inundation from these waves, however, is expected to be highly focused so that only narrow (???10-km) sections of the shoreline would be affected. Crown Copyright ?? 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Deformation in the Santa Barbara Channel from GPS measurements 1987-1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Webb, Frank H.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of GPS data over the period 1987-91 confirms geologic and seismic evidence that the Santa Barbara Channel is a complicated actively deforming region. The data indicate north-south compression in the eastern channel, with little deformation in the west. Rotation may also be an important deformation mechanism. An analysis of strain rate variation over periods of 4.5, 17, and 100 yr suggests that deformation is nonuniform.

  7. Sequenced RAPD markers to detect hybridization in the barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara, Phasianidae).

    PubMed

    Barbanera, Filippo; Guerrini, Monica; Bertoncini, Franco; Cappelli, Fabio; Muzzeddu, Marco; Dini, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In the Alectoris partridges (Phasianidae), hybridization occurs occasionally as a result of the natural breakdown of isolating mechanisms but more frequently as a result of human activity. No genetic record of hybridization is known for the barbary partridge (A. barbara). This species is distributed mostly in North Africa and, in Europe, on the island of Sardinia (Italy) and on Gibraltar. The risk of hybridization between barbary and red-legged partridge (A. rufa: Iberian Peninsula, France, Italy) is high in Sardinia and in Spain. We developed two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers to detect A. barbara × A. rufa hybrid partridges. We tested them on 125 experimental hybrids, sequenced the relative species-specific bands and found that the bands and their corresponding sequences were reliably transmitted through a number of generations (F1, F2, F3, BC1, BC2). Our markers represent a highly valuable tool for the preservation of the A. barbara genome from the pressing threat of A. rufa pollution.

  8. Water levels in observation wells in Santa Barbara County, California, in 1956

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, K.S.; Merritt, P.M.

    1957-01-01

    Investigation of the ground-water resources of Santa Barbara County was continued during 1956 by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Water Agency. Monthly water-level recorders were operated. Earlier measurements, covering the period 1941 through 1953, have been published in Geological Survey water-Supply Papers; those for 1954 and 1955 are in press and have been released locally in duplicated form. Water-Supply Paper 1068 contains tabulated descriptions of 2,246 wells in existence in 1942 in the various ground-water basins of the county. The same publication contains also many water-level measurements made prior to 1942 by the city of Santa Barbara, Santa Maria Valley Water Conservation District, San Joaquin Power Division of the Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Union Sugar Co., Union Oil Co., and other organizations and individuals. Comprehensive reports on the geology and ground-water resources of the Santa Ynez River basin (Upson and Thomasson, 1951), the south-coast basins (Upson, 1951), the Santa Maria Valley area (Worts, 1951), and the Cuyama Valley (Upson and Worts, 1951) have been published as Water-Supply Papers 1107, 1108, 1000, and 1110-B respectively. A report on stream runoff and ground-water storage capacity of the Santa Ynez River valley (Troxell and Wilson, 1952) was released to the open file in October 1952. A report appraising the ground-water resources of the Santa Ynez River valley (Wilson, 1957) was released to the open file in October 1956.

  9. Reconstructing Quaternary precipitation periodicities with Santa Barbara Basin sediment cores: application of the siliciclastic detrital element proxy at annual resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, T.; Hendy, I. L.; Hinnov, L.; Brown, E. T.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation patterns in Southern California directly affect water availability, and extreme weather exacerbates water stress and subsequent societal impacts in this highly populated and vital agricultural region. In the future, mean annual precipitation is predicted to decrease in California, although frequency of heavy precipitation events may increase. To reconstruct annual precipitation history in Southern California, including both the magnitude and recurrence intervals, we analyze sediment from two Late Holocene (past ~150 years and past ~2 ka) and five Pleistocene (~400-450 ka [MIS 11 and 12] and ~735 ka [MIS 18]) cores collected in Santa Barbara Basin using data from XRF core scans for elements associated with the terrigenous siliciclastic detrital fraction of core sediment (Al, Fe, K, Rb, Si, Ti, Zr). We develop a floating annual age model for each core through identification of the annual signal in the siliciclastic detrital fraction. Siliciclastic detrital element concentrations increase in sediment associated with precipitation events and floods, and decrease in sediment associated with droughts. Variability in the concentrations of these elements can thus be used as a precipitation and river runoff proxy. We investigate changes in annual detrital sediment input during glacial, deglacial, and interglacial climate states, and changes due to rapid climate change (centennial to millennial time scales). Power spectral analysis of our annually tuned time series reveals precipitation periodicities associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (15-25, 50-70 years) and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (2-7 years) that are dissimilar to common tidal perigee and nodal periods. These results provide information on the nature and response of precipitation patterns due to past changes in climate forcing, which will improve climate predictions for this region, especially interannual and decadal variability that impact climate on human timescales (i.e. <100 years).

  10. Plumes and Blooms: Modeling the Case II Waters of the Santa Barbara Channel. Chapter 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Maritorena, S.; Nelson, N. B.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Plumes and Blooms (PnB) project is to develop, validate and apply to imagery state-of-the-art ocean color algorithms for quantifying sediment plumes and phytoplankton blooms for the Case II environment of the Santa Barbara Channel. We conduct monthly to twice-monthly transect observations across the Santa Barbara Channel to develop an algorithm development and product validation data set. The PnB field program started in the summer of 1996. At each of the 7 PnB stations, a complete verification bio-geo-optical data set is collected. Included are redundant measures of apparent optical properties (remote sensing reflectance and diffuse attenuation spectra), as well as in situ profiles of spectral absorption, beam attenuation and backscattering coefficients. Water samples are analyzed for component in vivo absorption spectra, fluorometric chlorophyll, phytoplankton pigment (by the SDSU CHORS laboratory), and inorganic nutrient concentrations. A primary goal is to use the PnB field data set to objectively tune semi-analytical models of ocean color for this site and apply them using available satellite imagery (SeaWiFS and MODIS). In support of this goal, we have also been addressing SeaWiFS ocean color and AVHRR SST imagery. We also are using the PnB data set to address time/space variability of water masses in the Santa Barbara Channel and its relationship to the 1997/1998 El Nino. However, the comparison between PnB field observations and satellite estimates of primary products has been disappointing. We find that field estimates of water-leaving radiance, L(sub wN)(lambda), correspond poorly to satellite estimates for both SeaWiFS and MODIS local area coverage imagery. We believe this is due to poor atmospheric correction due to complex mixtures of aerosol types found in these near-coastal regions. Last, we remain active in outreach activities.

  11. A Wind Energy Blueprint for Policy Makers (case study: Santa Barbara County, CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prull, D. S.; Ling, F.; Valencia, A.; Kammen, D.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past 5 years wind power has been the fastest-growing energy source worldwide with an annual average growth rate exceeding 30%. In 2006, 3,400 megawatts of new capacity are expected in the United States alone, representing a 40% growth rate. At a present cost of 3-7ȩnt per kilowatt hour, wind energy has become a viable option in the energy market. Despite this rapid growth, many city and county policy makers know little about their local potential for wind development. As a case study, a wind energy blueprint was created for Santa Barbara County, California. A detailed GIS analysis shows that Santa Barbara County has a gross onshore wind resource of over 1815 MW (with a ~32% capacity factor) although only 10-12% is suitable for utility-scale development (class 3 winds or higher). This 216 MW resource represents 163 tons of avoided CO_2 emissions resulting from coal fire electrical production each year (assuming the national average of 1.5lbs CO_2 emitted per kWh). In addition, potential offshore wind sites within 50 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara County coast could supply up to 15 GW, far exceeding the energy demands of the county (~570 MW). An economic impact analysis indicates that more than 600 jobs would be created as a result of onshore development. We address concerns such as impacts on wildlife, noise, and view shed. This wind energy blueprint can serve as an example on how to effectively relate technical issues to both policy members and the public.

  12. Conventional U-Pb dating versus SHRIMP of the Santa Barbara Granite Massif, Rondonia, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparrenberger, I.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Santa Ba??rbara Granite Massif is part of the Younger Granites of Rondo??nia (998 - 974 Ma) and is included in the Rondo??nia Tin Province (SW Amazonian Craton). It comprises three highly fractionated metaluminous to peraluminous within-plate A-type granite units emplaced in older medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Sn-mineralization is closely associated with the late-stage unit. U-Pb monazite conventional dating of the early-stage Serra do Cicero facies and late-stage Serra Azul facies yielded ages of 993 ?? 5 Ma and 989 ?? 13 Ma, respectively. Conventional multigrain U-Pb isotope analyses of zircon demonstrate isotopic disturbance (discordance) and the preservation of inherited older zircons of several different ages and thus yield little about the ages of Sn-granite magmatism. SHRIMP U-Pb ages for the Santa Ba??rbara facies association yielded a 207Pb/206Pb weighted-mean age of 978 ?? 13 Ma. The textural complexity of the zircon crystals of the Santa Ba??rbara facies association, the variable concentrations of U, Th and Pb, as well as the mixed inheritance of zircon populations are major obstacles to using conventional multigrain U-Pb isotopic analyses. Sm-Nd model ages and ??Nd (T) values reveal anomalous isotopic data, attesting to the complex isotopic behaviour within these highly fractionated granites. Thus, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon and conventional U-Pb monazite dating methods are the most appropriate to constrain the crystallization age of the Sn-bearing granite systems in the Rondo??nia Tin Province.

  13. Santa Barbara and Ventura basins: Tectonics, structure, sedimentation, oilfields along an east-west transect

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, A.G.; Brown, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Santa Barbara and Ventura basins are tectonically active and are economically important because millions of barrels of oil were produced there since the 1800s. This guidebook focuses on structural and sedimentological aspects of two main structural tends in the basin: the Rincon-Ventura anticlinorium, and the Oakridge-South Mountain uplift. Section One of the publication is a roadlog which summarizes geologic features. Section Two focuses on the sedimentation of the principal reservoirs and source rocks in the main oil fields in the two basins. Section Three presents four original papers on the oil fields and tectonic evolution of the area.

  14. The life-cycle of the digenetic trematode, Proctoeces maculatus (Looss, 1901) Odhner, 1911 (Syn. P. rubtenuis [Linton, 1907] Hanson, 1950), and description of Cerceria adranocerca n. sp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stunkard, H.W.; Uzmann, J.R.

    1959-01-01

    ano,nalus, taken at Cerros Island, Mexico. Hanson ( 1950) identified two specimens collected from Calamus sp. at Bermuda by the late F. D. Barker as Distontuni subtenue Linton, 1907, a species described originally from Calantus calanius in the same area. Comparison of these specimens with those from Tortugas identified by Manter as P. erythraeus established their identity, and P. erythraeus was suppressed as a synonym of Proctoeces subtenue (Linton, 1907). Hanson corrected the statement of Manter (1947), noting that it is the vitellaria, not the uterus, which never extends into the post testicular region.

  15. Ground-water monitoring at Santa Barbara, California; Phase 2, Effects of pumping on water levels and on water quality in the Santa Barbara ground-water basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Peter

    1984-01-01

    From July 1978 to January 1980, water levels in the southern part of the Santa Barbara ground-water basin declined more than 100 feet. These water-level declines resulted from increases in municipal pumping since July 1978. The increase in municipal pumping was part of a basin-testing program designed to determine the usable quantity of ground water in storage. The pumping, centered in the city less than 1 mile from the coast, has caused water-level declines to altitudes below sea level in the main water-bearing zones. As a result, the ground-water basin would be subject to saltwater intrusion if the study-period pumpage were maintained or increased. Data indicate that saltwater intrusion has degraded the quality of the water yielded from six coastal wells. During the study period, the six coastal wells all yielded water with chloride concentrations in excess of 250 milligrams per liter, and four of the wells yielded water with chloride concentrations in excess of 1,000 milligrams per liter. Previous investigators believed that saltwater intrusion was limited to the shallow part of the aquifer, directly adjacent to the coast. The possibility of saltwater intrusion into the deeper water-bearing deposits in the aquifer was thought to be remote because an offshore fault truncates these deeper deposits so that they lie against consolidated rocks on the seaward side of the fault. Results of this study indicate, however, that ocean water has intruded the deeper water-bearing deposits, and to a much greater extent than in the shallow part of the aquifer. Apparently the offshore fault is not an effective barrier to saltwater intrusion. No physical barriers are known to exist between the coast and the municipal well field. Therefore, if the pumping rate maintained during the basin-testing program were continued, the degraded water along the coast could move inland and contaminate the municipal supply wells. The time required for the degraded water to move from the coast to

  16. A rapid compatibility analysis of potential offshore sand sources for beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mustain, N.; Griggs, G.; Barnard, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    The beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, which are narrow as a result of either natural and/or anthropogenic factors, may benefit from nourishment. Sand compatibility is fundamental to beach nourishment success and grain size is the parameter often used to evaluate equivalence. Only after understanding which sand sizes naturally compose beaches in a specific cell, especially the smallest size that remains on the beach, can the potential compatibility of source areas, such as offshore borrow sites, be accurately assessed. This study examines sediments on the beach and in the nearshore (5-20m depth) for the entire Santa Barbara Littoral Cell east of Point Conception. A digital bed sediment camera, the Eyeball??, and spatial autocorrelation technique were used to determine sediment grain size. Here we report on whether nearshore sediments are comparable and compatible with beach sands of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  17. Geohydrology of the Foothill ground-water basin near Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freckleton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Geohydrologic data presented in this report indicate that the East Subbasin of the Goleta groundwater basin and Storage Unit II of the Santa Barbara groundwater basin should be considered as a separate groundwater basin, which is referred to as the Foothill groundwater basin in this report. The 4.5 sq-mi Foothill groundwater basin is bordered on the north and northeast by the Santa Ynez Mountains and on three sides by faults that impede groundwater flow. Sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age underlie the groundwater basin and form its lower boundary. Unconsolidated deposits of the Santa Barbara Formation (Pliocene and Pleistocene age) form the principal aquifer of the basin. Where a zone of low permeability separates it from overlying Quaternary alluvium, the aquifer is confined. In the early 1950's, groundwater levels declined more than 60 ft during periods of heavy pumping. From the mid-1950 's to the late 1970 's, groundwater levels generally rose. Water levels during 1984-87 generally declined. Nitrate concentrations in samples from two wells exceeded the primary maximum contaminant level established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Secondary maximum contaminant levels for dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate also were exceeded in some samples. A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed for part of Foothill groundwater basin. Steady-state verification and transient-state model calibrations were used to estimate or confirm estimates of basin recharge and natural discharge. (USGS)

  18. Italy - Adriatic Sea - Barbara - A giant gas field marked by seismic velocity anomaly - A subtle trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ianniello, A.; Bolelli, W.; Di Scala, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Barbara gas field, discovered in 1971, is located in the northern sector of the Adriatic offshore. The field is a gentle anticline involving Quaternary clastic sediments and shaped by carbonate Mesozoic morphology. The presence of shallow gas pockets at the crest of the structure distort the seismic signal to such an extent that structural reconstruction using seismic data is not possible. Moreover, time delays and ray-path anomalies do not allow the use of staking velocities for the depth conversion. Seismic attribute analysis, instead of velocities, and time delays on the isochrone maps are providing a key to the understanding of seismic anomalies and are an indirect tool for reconstructing the real structural configuration of the field. The appraisal story of the field illustrates how the previously mentioned complications influenced its delineation and how an understanding of these complications helped in upgrading the reserves from an initial value of 10 billion ECM of gas to 40 billion ECM. Additional data acquired with the development wells tend to increase the estimate. Therefore, Barbara field is the most important Italian gas field of the decade. The producing formation is composed of very thin-bedded sandstone and shale intercalations, representing the peculiarity of this reservoir. Development of the field is being achieved with six production platforms and 72 wells.

  19. Littoral transport rates in the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell: a process-based model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, E. P. L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Brocatus, John

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the sediment transport patterns and pathways is essential for sustainable coastal zone management of the heavily modified coastline of Santa Barbara and Ventura County (California, USA). A process-based model application, based on Delft3D Online Morphology, is used to investigate the littoral transport potential along the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell (between Point Conception and Mugu Canyon). An advanced optimalization procedure is applied to enable annual sediment transport computations by reducing the ocean wave climate in 10 wave height - direction classes. Modeled littoral transport rates compare well with observed dredging volumes, and erosion or sedimentation hotspots coincide with the modeled divergence and convergence of the transport gradients. Sediment transport rates are strongly dependent on the alongshore variation in wave height due to wave sheltering, diffraction and focusing by the Northern Channel Islands, and the local orientation of the geologically-controlled coastline. Local transport gradients exceed the net eastward littoral transport, and are considered a primary driver for hot-spot erosion.

  20. The Impact of Climatological Variables on Kelp Canopy Area in the Santa Barbara Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigner, K.; Bausell, J.; Kudela, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Kelp canopy area (KCA), a proxy for kelp forest health, has important implications for small and large-scale processes pertaining to fisheries, near shore currents, and marine ecosystems. As part of the NASA Airborne Science Research Program (SARP), this study examines the impact of ocean chemistry and climatological variables on KCA in the Santa Barbara Channel through time series analysis. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), North Pacific Oscillation (NPO), and upwelling indices as well as sea surface temperature (SST), salinity, nitrate, and chlorophyll-a concentrations taken within the Santa Barbara channel (1990-2014) were acquired from the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigation (CalCOFI), and Di Lorenzo's NPGO websites. These data were then averaged for winter (November-January) and summer (May-August) seasons and compared to KCA measurements derived from Landsat images via unsupervised classification. Regression, cumulative sum tests, and cross-correlation coefficients revealed a two year lag between KCA and the NPGO, indicating the presence of an additional factor driving both variables. Further analyses suggests that the NPO may be this driving factor, as indicated by the correlation (lag 0) with KCA. Comparing relationships between kelp and other variables over various time periods supports the acceleration of the NPGO and other variables in more recent years. Exploring relationships between KCA, NPGO, and NPO may provide insight into potential impacts of climate change on coastal marine ecosystems.

  1. Interval neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    Traditional neural networks like multi-layered perceptrons (MLP) use example patterns, i.e., pairs of real-valued observation vectors, ({rvec x},{rvec y}), to approximate function {cflx f}({rvec x}) = {rvec y}. To determine the parameters of the approximation, a special version of the gradient descent method called back-propagation is widely used. In many situations, observations of the input and output variables are not precise; instead, we usually have intervals of possible values. The imprecision could be due to the limited accuracy of the measuring instrument or could reflect genuine uncertainty in the observed variables. In such situation input and output data consist of mixed data types; intervals and precise numbers. Function approximation in interval domains is considered in this paper. We discuss a modification of the classical backpropagation learning algorithm to interval domains. Results are presented with simple examples demonstrating few properties of nonlinear interval mapping as noise resistance and finding set of solutions to the function approximation problem.

  2. High resolution sedimentary record of dinoflagellate cysts reflects decadal variability and 20th century warming in the Santa Barbara Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringué, Manuel; Pospelova, Vera; Field, David B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a continuous record of dinoflagellate cysts from a core of laminated sediments collected in the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB), off Southern California. The core spans the last ∼260 years and is analysed at biennial (two-year) resolution. Variations in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are compared with 20th century historical changes, and are used to examine changes in primary productivity and species composition, which are bound to the variability in upwelling and sea-surface temperature (SST) in the region. Cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates dominate the assemblages. In particular, Brigantedinium spp. (on average 64.2% of the assemblages) are commonly associated with high levels of primary productivity, typically observed under active upwelling conditions, when nutrient supply is higher. Other heterotrophic taxa such as cysts of Protoperidinium americanum, Protoperidinium fukuyoi, Protoperidinium minutum and Archaeperidinium saanichi, all Echinidinium species, Quinquecuspis concreta and Selenopemphix undulata are more abundant in the early part of the record (∼1750s-1870s). These taxa are generally associated with high primary productivity and are observed predominantly during intervals marked by relatively variable conditions of SST, stratification and nutrient loading. The 20th century is marked by an increase in several species of autotrophic affinity, primarily Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Spiniferites ramosus. In recent surface sediments from the region, these species are more abundant in the Southern California Bight, and they are associated with conditions of relaxed upwelling in the SBB (typically observed during summer and fall), when SST is higher and nutrient supply is moderate. Their increasing concentrations since the early 20th century reflect warmer SST and possibly stronger stratification during the warmest season. Taken together, the changes in cyst assemblages provide further evidence that persistently warmer conditions

  3. A new record of provenance and hydroclimate in Santa Barbara Basin, California spanning the last 250 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, T.; Hendy, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation events in southern California generate enhanced sediment flux to Santa Barbara Basin (SBB), and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) influence the occurrence and intensity of these events. In order to improve understanding of how enhanced sediment flux from precipitation events affects the well known laminated sediment sequences in SBB, bulk sediment from a new SBB box core (SPR0901-04BC, 62 cm length, 588 m water depth) was analyzed at high-resolution for elemental and mineralogical content. Detrital elemental concentrations increase in samples associated with floods and strong El Niño events, however elemental enrichments vary among these event types, possibly reflecting differences in source area or fluctuations in source contribution. Calcium and sodium concentrations and enrichments oppose those of other detrital elements, suggesting a difference in source area for these two elements, likely the upper reaches of the Santa Clara River. Geochemical weathering index results indicate the sediment deposited during major flood events has undergone increased chemical weathering relative to background sediment deposition in the basin. Weathering index values and clay mineral concentrations, derived from diffractogram peak areas, follow the PDO Index and reflect the frequency of strong El Niño events. During the cool, dry PDO phase when La Nina events are prolonged, weathering index values and clay concentrations decrease, while during the warm, wet PDO phase when strong El Niño events are frequent, weathering index values and clay mineral concentrations rapidly increase with subsequent rainfall events. This pattern can be attributed to a trend of decreasing erosion during dry periods such that only the less chemically weathered soil profile surface is transported to the basin. During wet intervals increasing erosion into the soil profile releases the more intensely weathered sediment and higher clay

  4. A preliminary study of the Santa Barbara, California, earthquake of August 13, 1978, and its major aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William Hung Kan; Johnson, C.E.; Henyey, T.L.; Yerkes, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The ML5.1 Santa Barbara earthquake of August 13, 1978 occurred at lat 34 ? 22.2'N., long 119 ? 43.0' 4 km south of Santa Barbara, Calif. at a depth of 12.5 km in the northeast Santa Barbara Channel, part of the western Transverse Ranges geomorphic-structural province. This part of the province is characterized by seismically active, east-trending reverse faults and rates of coastal uplift that have averaged up to about 10 m/1000 years over the last 45,000 years. No surface rupture was detected onshore. Subsurface rupture propagated northwest from the main shock toward Goleta, 15 km west of Santa Barbara, where a maximum acceleration of 0.44 g was measured at ground level and extensive minor damage occurred; only minor injuries were reported. A fairly well-constrained fault-plane solution of the main shock and distribution of the aftershocks indicate that left-reverse-oblique slip occurred on west-northwest-trending, north-dipping reverse faults; inadequate dip control precludes good correlation with any one of several mapped faults. Had the earthquake been larger and rupture propagated to the southeast or a greater distance to the northwest, it could have posed a hazard to oilfield operations. The fault-plane solution and aftershock pattern closely fit the model of regional deformation and the solution closely resembles those of five previously mapped events located within a 15-km radius.

  5. Santa Barbara and California's Central Coast Region: Images and Encounters. A Pathways in Geography Resource Publication No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Jeanette Gardner, Ed.; Hardwick, Susan W., Ed.; Hobbs, Gail L., Ed.

    This annual meeting site guide is the fourth to be published by the National Council for Geographic Education as part of the "Pathways in Geography" series. The chapters illustrate some of the interactions between people and place that have helped shape the Santa Barbara (California) region over the centuries. The book includes an introduction by…

  6. 75 FR 76453 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., (CARE), and Barbara Durkin v. National Grid, Cape Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., (CARE), and Barbara Durkin v. National Grid, Cape Wind, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities; Notice of Complaint December 1, 2010. Take notice that on December...

  7. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for offshore structures in the Santa Barbara Channel phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W; Savy, J

    1999-08-06

    This report summarizes progress through Phase 2 of the probabilistic seismic hazards analysis (PSHA) for the Santa Barbara Channel being carried out by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the US Department of the Interior. The purpose of the PSHA is to provide a basis for development by MMS of regulations governing evaluation of applications to re-license existing oil platforms in federal waters within the Channel with respect to seismic loading. The final product of the analysis will be hazard maps of ground motion parameters at specified probability levels of exceedence. This report summarizes the characterization of local earthquake sources within the Channel and onshore areas of the Western Transverse Ranges, development of a ground motion attenuation model for the region, and presents preliminary hazard results at three selected sites.

  8. 33 CFR 167.451 - In the Santa Barbara Channel: Between Point Vicente and Point Conception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the Santa Barbara Channel....16′ W 34°04.00′ N 119°15.96′ W. 33°44.90′ N 118°35.75′ W. 33°43.20′ N 118°36.95′ W. 34°02.20′ N 119... 34°21.80′ N 120°29.96′ W. 34°04.80′ N 119°15.16′ W. 33°45.80′ N 118°35.15′ W. (c) A traffic lane...

  9. 33 CFR 167.451 - In the Santa Barbara Channel: Between Point Vicente and Point Conception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In the Santa Barbara Channel....16′ W 34°04.00′ N 119°15.96′ W. 33°44.90′ N 118°35.75′ W. 33°43.20′ N 118°36.95′ W. 34°02.20′ N 119... 34°21.80′ N 120°29.96′ W. 34°04.80′ N 119°15.16′ W. 33°45.80′ N 118°35.15′ W. (c) A traffic lane...

  10. 33 CFR 167.451 - In the Santa Barbara Channel: Between Point Vicente and Point Conception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In the Santa Barbara Channel....16′ W 34°04.00′ N 119°15.96′ W. 33°44.90′ N 118°35.75′ W. 33°43.20′ N 118°36.95′ W. 34°02.20′ N 119... 34°21.80′ N 120°29.96′ W. 34°04.80′ N 119°15.16′ W. 33°45.80′ N 118°35.15′ W. (c) A traffic lane...

  11. 33 CFR 167.451 - In the Santa Barbara Channel: Between Point Vicente and Point Conception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In the Santa Barbara Channel....16′ W 34°04.00′ N 119°15.96′ W. 33°44.90′ N 118°35.75′ W. 33°43.20′ N 118°36.95′ W. 34°02.20′ N 119... 34°21.80′ N 120°29.96′ W. 34°04.80′ N 119°15.16′ W. 33°45.80′ N 118°35.15′ W. (c) A traffic lane...

  12. 33 CFR 167.451 - In the Santa Barbara Channel: Between Point Vicente and Point Conception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In the Santa Barbara Channel....16′ W 34°04.00′ N 119°15.96′ W. 33°44.90′ N 118°35.75′ W. 33°43.20′ N 118°36.95′ W. 34°02.20′ N 119... 34°21.80′ N 120°29.96′ W. 34°04.80′ N 119°15.16′ W. 33°45.80′ N 118°35.15′ W. (c) A traffic lane...

  13. Assessing slope stability in the Santa Barbara Basin, California, using seafloor geodesy and CHIRP seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J. A.; Chadwell, C. D.; Driscoll, N.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    Seafloor slope instability in the Santa Barbara Basin, California, poses risk to the region. Two prominent landslides, the Goleta and Gaviota slides, occupy the northern flank, with a scarp-like crack extending east from the headwall of the Gaviota slide towards the Goleta complex. Downslope creep across the crack might indicate an imminent risk of failure. Sub-bottom CHIRP profiles with <1 m accuracy across the crack exhibit no evidence of internal deformation. Daily seafloor acoustic range measurements spanning the crack detected no significant motion above a 99% confidence level of ±7 mm/yr over two years of monitoring. These disparate data over different timescales suggest no active creep and that the crack is likely a relict feature that formed concomitantly with the Gaviota slide.

  14. Kirschenmann Road multi-well monitoring site, Cuyama Valley, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Everett, R.R.; Hanson, R.T.; Sweetkind, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Water Agency Division of the Santa Barbara County Department of Public Works, is evaluating the geohydrology and water availability of the Cuyama Valley, California (fig. 1). As part of this evaluation, the USGS installed the Cuyama Valley Kirschenmann Road multiple-well monitoring site (CVKR) in the South-Main subregion of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1). The CVKR well site is designed to allow for the collection of depth-specific water-level and water-quality data. Data collected at this site provides information about the geology, hydrology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the local aquifer system, thus, enhancing the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Cuyama Valley. This report presents the construction information and initial geohydrologic data collected from the CVKR monitoring site, along with a brief comparison to selected supply and irrigation wells from the major subregions of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1).

  15. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter-outer mainland shelf, eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Finlayson, David P.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Erdey, Mercedes D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 and 2011, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from the outer shelf region of the eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California. These surveys were conducted in cooperation with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). BOEM is interested in maps of hard-bottom substrates, particularly natural outcrops that support reef communities in areas near oil and gas extraction activity. The surveys were conducted using the USGS R/V Parke Snavely, outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping and real-time kinematic navigation equipment. This report provides the bathymetry and backscatter data acquired during these surveys in several formats, a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  16. Hyperpycnal plume-derived fans in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Simms, Alexander R.; Ritchie, Andy; Steel, Elisabeth; Dartnell, Pete; Conrad, James E.; Finlayson, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpycnal gravity currents rapidly transport sediment across shore from rivers to the continental shelf and deep sea. Although these geophysical processes are important sediment dispersal mechanisms, few distinct geomorphic features on the continental shelf can be attributed to hyperpycnal flows. Here we provide evidence of large depositional features derived from hyperpycnal plumes on the continental shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the combination of new sonar, lidar, and seismic reflection data. These data reveal lobate fans directly offshore of the mouths of several watersheds known to produce hyperpycnal concentrations of suspended sediment. The fans occur on an upwardly concave section of the shelf where slopes decrease from 0.04 to 0.01, and the location of these fans is consistent with wave- and auto-suspending sediment gravity current theories. Thus, we provide the first documentation that the morphology of sediment deposits on the continental shelf can be dictated by river-generated hyperpycnal flows.

  17. Soils and vegetation of Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, William L.; Fenn, Dennis B.; Allardice, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The multifaceted development of an erosion surface on Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, has led to this study of the relationship between soils and vegetation. A dry Mediterranean climate and past attempts at farming and introductions of alien species have led to vegetative degradation accompanied by both gully and surface erosion. Soil and vegetation analyses show this erosion to be in a location of transition. The soils are Typic Chromoxererts (Vertisol Order) with high clay, salinity, and sodium contents. The vegetation is ecotonal in nature, grading from a principally alien annual grassland with Avena fatua and Atriplex semibaccata to a shrub community dominated by the native Suaeda californica. Management toward revegetation and stabilization of this island ecosystem will be difficult with high clay, saline-sodic soils and disturbed vegetation.

  18. Prospective thinking in a mustelid? Eira barbara (Carnivora) cache unripe fruits to consume them once ripened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soley, Fernando G.; Alvarado-Díaz, Isaías

    2011-08-01

    The ability of nonhuman animals to project individual actions into the future is a hotly debated topic. We describe the caching behaviour of tayras ( Eira barbara) based on direct observations in the field, pictures from camera traps and radio telemetry, providing evidence that these mustelids pick and cache unripe fruit for future consumption. This is the first reported case of harvesting of unripe fruits by a nonhuman animal. Ripe fruits are readily taken by a variety of animals, and tayras might benefit by securing a food source before strong competition takes place. Unripe climacteric fruits need to be harvested when mature to ensure that they continue their ripening process, and tayras accurately choose mature stages of these fruits for caching. Tayras cache both native (sapote) and non-native (plantain) fruits that differ in morphology and developmental timeframes, showing sophisticated cognitive ability that might involve highly developed learning abilities and/or prospective thinking.

  19. Large-Scale Multi-Objective Optimization for the Management of Seawater Intrusion, Santa Barbara, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z. P.; Nishikawa, T.; Paulinski, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The City of Santa Barbara, located in coastal southern California, is concerned that excessive groundwater pumping will lead to chloride (Cl) contamination of its groundwater system from seawater intrusion (SWI). In addition, the city wishes to estimate the effect of continued pumping on the groundwater basin under a variety of initial and climatic conditions. A SEAWAT-based groundwater-flow and solute-transport model of the Santa Barbara groundwater basin was optimized to produce optimal pumping schedules assuming 5 different scenarios. Borg, a multi-objective genetic algorithm, was coupled with the SEAWAT model to identify optimal management strategies. The optimization problems were formulated as multi-objective so that the tradeoffs between maximizing pumping, minimizing SWI, and minimizing drawdowns can be examined by the city. Decisions can then be made on a pumping schedule in light of current preferences and climatic conditions. Borg was used to produce Pareto optimal results for all 5 scenarios, which vary in their initial conditions (high water levels, low water levels, or current basin state), simulated climate (normal or drought conditions), and problem formulation (objective equations and decision-variable aggregation). Results show mostly well-defined Pareto surfaces with a few singularities. Furthermore, the results identify the precise pumping schedule per well that was suitable given the desired restriction on drawdown and Cl concentrations. A system of decision-making is then possible based on various observations of the basin's hydrologic states and climatic trends without having to run any further optimizations. In addition, an assessment of selected Pareto-optimal solutions was analyzed with sensitivity information using the simulation model alone. A wide range of possible groundwater pumping scenarios is available and depends heavily on the future climate scenarios and the Pareto-optimal solution selected while managing the pumping wells.

  20. Sea Surface Temperature Variability During the Past 2000 Years in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, D. K.; Schimmelmann, A.; Hendy, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    An understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of late Holocene climate events is necessary to decipher natural climate variability from anthropogenic influence. At present, few North Pacific high-resolution marine records of the last 2000 years of temperature exist. High quality box and kasten cores from Santa Barbara Basin provide an opportunity to link foraminiferal proxy records to the instrumental sea surface temperature record over the past 200 years, to extend these proxy temperature records back over the last 2000 years, and to compare them with marine and continental records of temperature from other regions. We present an approximately annual to decadal record of planktonic foraminiferal proxies of temperature, including Mg/Ca, calcite δ18O and size-normalized shell weight of the near-subsurface dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides, and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma coiling in Santa Barbara Basin, California (34° 16.847' N, 120° 02.268' W), over the past 2000 years. G. bulloides Mg/Ca temperatures exhibit a long-term cooling trend of approximately 2°C that ended in the early 18th century. Similarly, G. bulloides calcite δ18O and shell weight gradually increased from 0 to 1000 AD indicating long-term cooling. However, the cooling trend was followed by a calcite δ18O decrease from 1000 to 1700 AD, indicating either warming or freshening of surface water through the Little Ice Age (ca. 1400 to 1850 AD). After the early nineteenth century, G. bulloides calcite δ18O, Mg/Ca and shell weight trends are again broadly similar and correlate with historical sea surface temperature since 1850, and indicate that near surface temperatures have warmed by approximately 2°C since ~1920.

  1. Dad's in the Garage: Santa Barbara Physicists in the Long 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Cyrus

    2013-03-01

    American physicists faced many challenges in the 1970s: declining research budgets; public skepticism of scientific authority; declining student enrollments; and pressure to shift to topics such as biomedicine, environmental remediation, alternative energy, public housing and transport, and disability technologies. This paper examines the responses to these challenges of a small group of Santa Barbara physicists. While this group is not representative of the American physics profession, the success and failure of their responses to changed conditions tells us something about how American physicists got through the 1970s, and about the origins of some features of American physics today. The three physicists examined here are Philip Wyatt, David Phillips, and Virgil Elings. In the late `60s, Wyatt left a defense think tank to found an instrumentation firm. The Santa Barbara oil spill and other factors pushed that firm toward civilian markets in biomedicine and pollution measurement. Phillips joined Wyatt's firm from UCSB, while also founding his own company, largely to sell electronic devices for parapsychology. Phillips was also the junior partner in a master's of scientific instrumentation degree curriculum founded by Elings in order to save UCSB Physics' graduate program. Through the MSI program, Elings moved into biomedical research and became a serial entrepreneur. By the 1990s, Wyatt, Phillips, and Elings' turn toward academic entrepreneurship, dual military-civilian markets for physics start-ups, and interdisciplinary collaborations between physicists and life scientists were no longer unusual. Together, their journey through the `70s shows how varied the physics' profession's response to crisis was, and how much it pivoted on new interactions between university and industry.

  2. Potential earthquake faults offshore Southern California, from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Sorlien, C.C.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Urban areas in Southern California are at risk from major earthquakes, not only quakes generated by long-recognized onshore faults but also ones that occur along poorly understood offshore faults. We summarize recent research findings concerning these lesser known faults. Research by the U.S. Geological Survey during the past five years indicates that these faults from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point pose a potential earthquake threat. Historical seismicity in this area indicates that, in general, offshore faults can unleash earthquakes having at least moderate (M 5-6) magnitude. Estimating the earthquake hazard in Southern California is complicated by strain partitioning and by inheritance of structures from early tectonic episodes. The three main episodes are Mesozoic through early Miocene subduction, early Miocene crustal extension coeval with rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges, and Pliocene and younger transpression related to plate-boundary motion along the San Andreas Fault. Additional complication in the analysis of earthquake hazards derives from the partitioning of tectonic strain into strike-slip and thrust components along separate but kinematically related faults. The eastern Santa Barbara Basin is deformed by large active reverse and thrust faults, and this area appears to be underlain regionally by the north-dipping Channel Islands thrust fault. These faults could produce moderate to strong earthquakes and destructive tsunamis. On the Malibu coast, earthquakes along offshore faults could have left-lateral-oblique focal mechanisms, and the Santa Monica Mountains thrust fault, which underlies the oblique faults, could give rise to large (M ??7) earthquakes. Offshore faults near Santa Monica Bay and the San Pedro shelf are likely to produce both strike-slip and thrust earthquakes along northwest-striking faults. In all areas, transverse structures, such as lateral ramps and tear faults, which crosscut the main faults, could

  3. The Santa Barbara Channel - Santa Maria Basin Study: A model for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winant, C. D.

    2002-12-01

    The need to anticipate the potential impact of oil exploration and production activities on coastal resources, and the information needs of agencies charged with responding to coastal emergencies motivated the development of the oil-spill response system for the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and the Santa Maria Basin (SMB), along the California coast, between Ventura and Morro Bay. In the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC), moorings and drifter trajectories document a persistent cyclonic circulation with a typical re-circulation period between three and five days. In the spring currents near the mainland are weaker than near the Channel Islands and the overall flow is toward the southeast. Trajectories document the possibility for water parcels to leave the channel through the inter-island passes. In the late fall and winter, a poleward flow with velocities often exceeding 0.5 m/s is confined within 20 km of the mainland. Between these two seasons, the cyclonic tendency is enhanced although most of the drifters eventually migrate westward. The trajectories of drifters released at the same time from sites only 20 km apart can be remarkably different. In the Santa Maria Basin (SMB), the direction and amplitude of the flow is strongly depth dependent. Near the surface, moorings and drifters show the flow to be equatorward except during late fall and early winter when the surface flow is poleward. Beneath the surface layer the flow is poleward except in March and April, right after the spring transition. The observations provide a basis on which several data assimilating model of the circulation are based. The models reproduce all the major observed features of the circulation, including individual drifter trajectories. With little effort these models could be used to maintain an operational predictive capability with real predictive skills over periods of a few days.

  4. A simulation-optimization model for water-resources management, Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    In times of drought, the local water supplies of the city of Santa Barbara, California, are insufficient to satisfy water demand. In response, the city has built a seawater desalination plant and gained access to imported water in 1997. Of primary concern to the city is delivering water from the various sources at a minimum cost while satisfying water demand and controlling seawater intrusion that might result from the overpumping of ground water. A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of Santa Barbara?s water resources. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply while satisfying various physical and institutional constraints such as meeting water demand, maintaining minimum hydraulic heads at selected sites, and not exceeding water-delivery or pumping capacities. The model is formulated as a linear programming problem with monthly management periods and a total planning horizon of 5 years. The decision variables are water deliveries from surface water (Gibraltar Reservoir, Cachuma Reservoir, Cachuma Reservoir cumulative annual carryover, Mission Tunnel, State Water Project, and desalinated seawater) and ground water (13 production wells). The state variables are hydraulic heads. Basic assumptions for all simulations are that (1) the cost of water varies with source but is fixed over time, and (2) only existing or planned city wells are considered; that is, the construction of new wells is not allowed. The drought of 1947?51 is Santa Barbara?s worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. Assumptions that were made for this base case include a head constraint equal to sea level at the coastal nodes; Cachuma Reservoir carryover of 3,000 acre-feet per year, with a maximum carryover of 8,277 acre-feet; a maximum annual demand of 15,000 acre-feet; and average monthly capacities for the

  5. Interval arithmetic operations for uncertainty analysis with correlated interval variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Fu, Chun-Ming; Ni, Bing-Yu; Han, Xu

    2016-08-01

    A new interval arithmetic method is proposed to solve interval functions with correlated intervals through which the overestimation problem existing in interval analysis could be significantly alleviated. The correlation between interval parameters is defined by the multidimensional parallelepiped model which is convenient to describe the correlative and independent interval variables in a unified framework. The original interval variables with correlation are transformed into the standard space without correlation, and then the relationship between the original variables and the standard interval variables is obtained. The expressions of four basic interval arithmetic operations, namely addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, are given in the standard space. Finally, several numerical examples and a two-step bar are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Multichannel interval timer (MINT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.B.

    1982-06-01

    A prototype Multichannel INterval Timer (MINT) has been built for measuring signal Time of Arrival (TOA) from sensors placed in blast environments. The MINT is intended to reduce the space, equipment costs, and data reduction efforts associated with traditional analog TOA recording methods, making it more practical to field the large arrays of TOA sensors required to characterize blast environments. This document describes the MINT design features, provides the information required for installing and operating the system, and presents proposed improvements for the next generation system.

  7. Coastal groundwater dynamics off Santa Barbara, California: combining geochemical tracers, electromagnetic seepmeters, and electrical resistivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Izbicki, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents repeat field measurements of 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra, electromagnetic seepage meter-derived advective fluxes, and multi-electrode, stationary and continuous marine resistivity surveys collected between November 2005 and April 2007 to study coastal groundwater dynamics within a marine beach in Santa Barbara, California. The study provides insight into magnitude and dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and associated nutrient loadings into near-shore coastal waters, where the predominant SGD drivers can be both spatially and temporally separated. Rn-222 and 223,224,226,228Ra were utilized to quantify the total and saline contribution, respectively, of SGD. The two short-lived 224,223Ra isotopes provided an estimate of apparent near-shore water mass age, as well as an estimate of the Ra-derived eddy diffusion coefficient, Kh (224Ra = 2.86 ?? 0.7 m2 s-1; 223Ra = 1.32 ?? 0.5 m2 s-1). Because 222Rn (t1/2 = 3.8 day) and 224Ra (t1/2 = 3.66 day) have comparable half-lives and production terms, they were used in concert to examine respective water column removal rates. Electromagnetic seepage meters recorded the physical, bi-directional exchange across the sediment/water interface, which ranged from -6.7 to 14.5 cm day-1, depending on the sampling period and position relative to the low tide line. Multi-day time-series 222Rn measurements in the near-shore water column yielded total (saline + fresh) SGD rates that ranged from 3.1 ?? 2.6 to 9.2 ?? 0.8 cm day-1, depending on the sampling season. Offshore 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 year) and 222Rn gradients were used with the calculated Kh values to determine seabed flux estimates (dpm m-2 day-1), which were then converted into SGD rates (7.1 and 7.9 cm day-1, respectively). Lastly, SGD rates were used to calculate associated nutrient loads for the near-shore coastal waters off Santa Barbara. Depending on both the season and the SGD method utilized, the following SGD-derived nutrient inputs were

  8. Coastal groundwater dynamics off Santa Barbara, California: Combining geochemical tracers, electromagnetic seepmeters, and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Izbicki, John A.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents repeat field measurements of 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra, electromagnetic seepage meter-derived advective fluxes, and multi-electrode, stationary and continuous marine resistivity surveys collected between November 2005 and April 2007 to study coastal groundwater dynamics within a marine beach in Santa Barbara, California. The study provides insight into magnitude and dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and associated nutrient loadings into near-shore coastal waters, where the predominant SGD drivers can be both spatially and temporally separated. Rn-222 and 223,224,226,228Ra were utilized to quantify the total and saline contribution, respectively, of SGD. The two short-lived 224,223Ra isotopes provided an estimate of apparent near-shore water mass age, as well as an estimate of the Ra-derived eddy diffusion coefficient, Kh ( 224Ra = 2.86 ± 0.7 m 2 s -1; 223Ra = 1.32 ± 0.5 m 2 s -1). Because 222Rn ( t½ = 3.8 day) and 224Ra ( t½ = 3.66 day) have comparable half-lives and production terms, they were used in concert to examine respective water column removal rates. Electromagnetic seepage meters recorded the physical, bi-directional exchange across the sediment/water interface, which ranged from -6.7 to 14.5 cm day -1, depending on the sampling period and position relative to the low tide line. Multi-day time-series 222Rn measurements in the near-shore water column yielded total (saline + fresh) SGD rates that ranged from 3.1 ± 2.6 to 9.2 ± 0.8 cm day -1, depending on the sampling season. Offshore 226Ra ( t½ = 1600 year) and 222Rn gradients were used with the calculated Kh values to determine seabed flux estimates (dpm m -2 day -1), which were then converted into SGD rates (7.1 and 7.9 cm day -1, respectively). Lastly, SGD rates were used to calculate associated nutrient loads for the near-shore coastal waters off Santa Barbara. Depending on both the season and the SGD method utilized, the following SGD-derived nutrient inputs

  9. Interval-valued random functions and the kriging of intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.

    1988-04-01

    Estimation procedures using data that include some values known to lie within certain intervals are usually regarded as problems of constrained optimization. A different approach is used here. Intervals are treated as elements of a positive cone, obeying the arithmetic of interval analysis, and positive interval-valued random functions are discussed. A kriging formalism for interval-valued data is developed. It provides estimates that are themselves intervals. In this context, the condition that kriging weights be positive is seen to arise in a natural way. A numerical example is given, and the extension to universal kriging is sketched.

  10. Porewater pH and authigenic phases formed in the uppermost sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Ruttenberg, Kathleen C.; Canfield, Donald E.; Christiansen, Matthew B.; Martin, Jonathan B.

    1996-11-01

    In this paper porewater and solid phase analyses are used in combination with in situ O 2 and pH microelectrode measurements to characterize early diagenetic processes in the uppermost sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California. Rapid reduction of dissolved oxygen, nitrate, solid phase manganese and iron, and dissolved sulfate is observed. Between sediment depths of 0 and 2 cm, reductive solubilization of ferric iron phases releases Fe 2+, adsorbed phosphate, and fluoride to the porewaters and contributes to a sharp increase in porewater pH. Between 2 and 4 cm, sulfate reduction rates peak, pH levels off, and acid volatile sulfides and pyrite become the dominant forms of solid phase iron. Saturation state calculations, which depend largely on pH, indicate that the porewaters of the Santa Barbara Basin become saturated with respect to carbonate fluorapatite and calcite within the first 0.25 mm of the sediment and are highly supersaturated by and below 2 cm. In spite of this result, porewater evidence of phosphate and fluoride removal into a solid phase is observed only in the first ˜5 cm of some cores, whereas dissolved Ca profiles suggest dispersed calcite precipitation throughout the sediment column. This finding is interpreted as an indication of the nonsteady state nature of the surface reactions that may, given sufficient nucleation sites and time, lead to carbonate fluorapatite genesis in anoxic sediments. Finally, microelectrode pH profiles from two other basins in the California Borderlands are presented. These demonstrate that the porewaters of the Santa Barbara Basin are more alkaline than those of other basins. This outcome is attributed to the lack of particle mixing and a unique interplay between Fe liberation and FeS precipitation reactions in the Santa Barbara Basin.

  11. Terrestrial sources homogenize bacterial water quality during rainfall in two urbanized watersheds in Santa Barbara, CA.

    PubMed

    Sercu, Bram; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Murray, Jill L S; Holden, Patricia A

    2011-10-01

    Microbiological contamination from runoff is a human health concern in urbanized coastal environments, but the contamination sources are often unknown. This study quantified fecal indicator bacteria and compared the distributions of human-specific genetic markers and bacterial community composition during dry and wet weather in urban creeks draining two neighboring watersheds in Santa Barbara, CA. In a prior study conducted during exclusively dry weather, the creeks were contaminated with human waste as indicated by elevated numbers of the human-specific Bacteroidales marker HF183 (Sercu et al. in Environ Sci Technol 43:293-298, 2009). During the storm, fecal indicator bacterial numbers and loads increased orders of magnitude above dry weather conditions. Moreover, bacterial community composition drastically changed during rainfall and differed from dry weather flow by (1) increased bacterial diversity, (2) reduced spatial heterogeneity within and between watersheds, and (3) clone library sequences more related to terrestrial than freshwater taxa. Finally, the spatial patterns of human-associated genetic markers (HF183 and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH gene) changed during wet weather, and the contribution of surface soils to M. smithii nifH gene detection was suspected. The increased fecal indicator bacteria numbers during wet weather were likely associated with terrestrial sources, instead of human waste sources that dominated during dry weather flow. PMID:21617896

  12. "The real point is control": the reception of Barbara McClintock's controlling elements.

    PubMed

    Comfort, N C

    1999-01-01

    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a classic discovery. But for McClintock, movable elements were part of an elaborate system of genetic control that she hypothesized to explain development and differentiation. This theory was highly speculative and was not widely accepted, even by those who had discovered transposition independently. When Jacob and Monod presented their alternative model for gene regulation, the operon, her controller argument was discarded as incorrect. Transposition, however, was soon discovered in microorganisms and by the late 1970s was recognized as a phenomenon of biomedical importance. For McClintock, the award of the 1983 Nobel Prize to her for the discovery of movable genetic elements, long treated as a legitimation, may well have been bittersweet. This new look at McClintock's experiments and theory has implications for the intellectual history of biology, the social history of American genetics, and McClintock's role in the historiography of women in science. PMID:11623812

  13. Microbial Oxidation of Ethane within Seep Sediment at Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, S. D.; Duncombe, R.; Scarlett, R. D.; Shaffer, J.; Lensch, S.; Valentine, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrocarbon seep field at Coal Oil Point (COP), off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, releases more than 10^10 g of thermogenic natural gas each year. Only a fraction of this methane, ethane, propane, and butane reaches the atmosphere, and is instead consumed by marine microbes in both the sediment and water column. Bacterial respiration of these gases has been observed in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with the exception of ethane (aerobic only) (Kniemeyer et. al 2007). This work seeks to quantify the rate of ethane oxidation (both aerobic and anaerobic) in marine sediment. A series of experiments, to be conducted using COP seep sediment aboard the R/V Atlantis in October 2013, will test how varying oxygen conditions impact ethane oxidation rate. Oxidation rates will be quantified using sensitive 3H-ethane tracers. Preliminary data from Shane's Seep, located within the COP seep field, indicates that ethane oxidation is restricted to the top 6 cm of sediment. This suggests that oxygen is a limiting factor, but further work is needed to establish if ethane oxidation is restricted to exclusively aerobic environments.

  14. Methane oxidation in permeable sediments at hydrocarbon seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2010-03-01

    A shallow-water area in the Santa Barbara Channel (California), known collectively as the Coal Oil Point seep field, is one the largest natural submarine oil and gas emission areas in the world. Both gas and oil are seeping constantly through a predominantly sandy seabed into the ocean. This study focused on the methanotrophic activity within the surface sediments (0-15 cm) of the permeable seabed in the so-called Brian Seep area at a water depth ~10 m. Detailed investigations of biogeochemical parameters in the sediment surrounding active gas vents indicated that methane seepage through the permeable seabed induces a convective transport of fluids within the surface sediment layer, which results in a deeper penetration of oxidants (oxygen, sulfate) into the sediment, as well as in a faster removal of potentially inhibiting reduced end products (e.g. hydrogen sulfide). Methanotrophic activity was often found close to the sediment-water interface, indicating the involvement of aerobic bacteria. However, biogeochemical data suggests that the majority of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction below the surface layer (>15 cm), where sulfate is still available in high concentrations. This subsurface maximum of AOM activity in permeable sands is in contrast to known deep-sea seep habitats, where upward fluid advection through more fine-grained sediments leads to an accumulation of AOM activity within the top 10 cm of the sediments, because sulfate is rapidly depleted.

  15. Dynamic Models of Earthquakes and Tsunamis in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglesby, David; Ryan, Kenny; Geist, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The Santa Barbara Channel and the adjacent Ventura Basin in California are the location of a number of large faults that extend offshore and could potentially produce earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7. The area is also home to hundreds of thousands of coastal residents. To properly evaluate the earthquake and tsunami hazard in this region requires the characterization of possible earthquake sources as well as the analysis of tsunami generation, propagation and inundation. Toward this end, we perform spontaneous dynamic earthquake rupture models of potential events on the Pitas Point/Lower Red Mountain faults, a linked offshore thrust fault system. Using the 3D finite element method, a realistic nonplanar fault geometry, and rate-state friction, we find that this fault system can produce an earthquake of up to magnitude 7.7, consistent with estimates from geological and paleoseismological studies. We use the final vertical ground deformation from our models as initial conditions for the generation and propagation of tsunamis to the shore, where we calculate inundation. We find that path and site effects lead to large tsunami amplitudes northward and eastward of the fault system, and in particular we find significant tsunami inundation in the low-lying cities of Ventura and Oxnard. The results illustrate the utility of dynamic earthquake modeling to produce physically plausible slip patterns and associated seafloor deformation that can be used for tsunami generation.

  16. Dissolved sulfide distributions in the water column and sediment pore waters of the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; VanGeen, A.; McCorkle, D.C.; Bernhard, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Dissolved sulfide concentrations in the water column and in sediment pore waters were measured by square-wave voltammetry (nanomolar detection limit) during three cruises to the Santa Barbara Basin in February 1995, November-December 1995, and April 1997. In the water column, sulfide concentrations measured outside the basin averaged 3 ?? 1 nM (n = 28) in the 0 to 600 m depth range. Inside the basin, dissolved sulfides increased to reach values of up to 15 nM at depths >400 m. A suite of box cores and multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the basin showed considerable range in surficial (400 ??M at 10 cm. Decreases in water-column nitrate below the sill depth indicate nitrate consumption (-55 to -137 ??mole m-2 h-1) similar to nearby Santa Monica Basin. Peaks in pore-water iron concentrations were generally observed between 2 and 5 cm depth with shallowest peaks at the 590 m site. These observations, including observations of the benthic microfauna, suggest that the extent to which the sulfide flux, sustained by elevated pore-water concentrations, reaches the water column may be modulated by the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in addition to iron redox and precipitation reactions.

  17. "The real point is control": the reception of Barbara McClintock's controlling elements.

    PubMed

    Comfort, N C

    1999-01-01

    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a classic discovery. But for McClintock, movable elements were part of an elaborate system of genetic control that she hypothesized to explain development and differentiation. This theory was highly speculative and was not widely accepted, even by those who had discovered transposition independently. When Jacob and Monod presented their alternative model for gene regulation, the operon, her controller argument was discarded as incorrect. Transposition, however, was soon discovered in microorganisms and by the late 1970s was recognized as a phenomenon of biomedical importance. For McClintock, the award of the 1983 Nobel Prize to her for the discovery of movable genetic elements, long treated as a legitimation, may well have been bittersweet. This new look at McClintock's experiments and theory has implications for the intellectual history of biology, the social history of American genetics, and McClintock's role in the historiography of women in science.

  18. A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Washburn, L.; Siegel, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ephemeral Santa Clara River delivers large amounts of freshwater and sediment to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief, episodic discharge events. This discharge into the channel was characterized here with shipboard measurements during floods of 1997 and 1998. Within approximately 1-km of the river mouth, the river discharge quickly stratifies into a freshened, turbid surface plume and a bottom nephloid layer. Observations immediately off the Santa Clara River mouth on a peak day of river discharge revealed that sediment rapidly settled from the freshened surface waters, as suspended sediment in the freshened surface plume contained only ???6% of the sediment mass expected if the sediment mixed conservatively. On the two subsequent days the reduction of sediment mass in the surface plume continued at ???50% per day. These observations suggest that river sediment undergoes rapid initial settling within ???1-km of the river mouth, followed by somewhat slower rates of settling. Although we did not measure sedimentation or bottom boundary layer processes, our mass balance results suggest that almost all of the river sediment either escapes along or deposits upon the inner shelf seabed.

  19. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  20. Effect of localizing fruit and vegetable consumption on greenhouse gas emissions and nutrition, Santa Barbara County.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, David A; Radka, Corie N; Müller, Nora M; Watson, Tyler D; Rekstein, Nicole J; Wright, Hannah Van M; Hollingshead, Sydney E

    2011-05-15

    The US agrifood system is very productive, but highly centralized and resource intensive with very weak links between production and consumption. This contributes to high levels of malnutrition and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE). A popular approach to improvement is localization-reducing direct transport (farm to retail distance, or "food miles"). We examined Santa Barbara County (SBC) California, which mirrors the high production, nutritional and environmental problems, and growing localization movement of California. SBC ranks in the top 1% of US counties in value of agricultural products, and >80% of this value is produce (fruits and vegetables). We calculated the amount of produce grown in and consumed in SBC and estimated that >99% of produce grown in SBC is exported from the county, and >95% of produce consumed in SBC is imported. If all produce consumed in SBC was grown in the county (100% localization), it would reduce GHGE from the agrifood system <1%, and not necessarily affect nutrition. While food miles capture only a portion of the environmental impact of agrifood systems, localization could be done in ways that promote synergies between improving nutrition and reducing GHGE, and many such efforts exist in SBC.

  1. Remote sensing study of historical changes in natural oil slick volumes in the Santa Barbara Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Scepan, J.; Estes, J.; Hornafius, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    Large natural oil slicks are continually forming in the Santa Barbara Channel as a result of natural hydrocarbon seeps that occur above subsurface oil accumulations. Evaporation of volatile constituents in these oil slicks is a significant source of air pollution. In this study we employed a suite of remote sensing data along with a variety of image processing and geographic information system techniques to analyze the location, extent and changes in sea surface oil slicks during the period of 1975 - present. An extensive collection of airborne and spaceborne remote sensor data was accessed and examined for this study, including aerial photography, airborne spectral and microwave data, Landsat MSS and TM data and Shuttle Imaging Radar. Areas of oil slick accumulations were identified, delineated, georeferenced, measured and mapped to a common scale using both manual and digital techniques. A Gaussian mathematical model was employed to provide quantitative estimates of surface oil accumulations identified within each image over the entire twenty year period. This study indicates that variances in mapped oil slick location and extent as well as the estimated amounts of oil present within each image may be attributed to image type and quality as well as environmental conditions.

  2. Remote sensing study of historical changes in natural oil slick volumes in the Santa Barbara Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Scepan, J.; Estes, J.; Hornafius, J.S. )

    1996-01-01

    Large natural oil slicks are continually forming in the Santa Barbara Channel as a result of natural hydrocarbon seeps that occur above subsurface oil accumulations. Evaporation of volatile constituents in these oil slicks is a significant source of air pollution. In this study we employed a suite of remote sensing data along with a variety of image processing and geographic information system techniques to analyze the location, extent and changes in sea surface oil slicks during the period of 1975 - present. An extensive collection of airborne and spaceborne remote sensor data was accessed and examined for this study, including aerial photography, airborne spectral and microwave data, Landsat MSS and TM data and Shuttle Imaging Radar. Areas of oil slick accumulations were identified, delineated, georeferenced, measured and mapped to a common scale using both manual and digital techniques. A Gaussian mathematical model was employed to provide quantitative estimates of surface oil accumulations identified within each image over the entire twenty year period. This study indicates that variances in mapped oil slick location and extent as well as the estimated amounts of oil present within each image may be attributed to image type and quality as well as environmental conditions.

  3. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U.C. Santa Barbara campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Nicholson, C.; Steidl, J.; Gurrola, L.; Alex, C.; Cochran, E.; Ely, G.; Tyler, T.

    1997-12-01

    The University of California Campus-Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is an integrated 3 year effort involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and four UC campuses - Los Angeles (UCLA), Riverside (UCR), Santa Barbara (UCSB), and San Diego (UCSD) - plus additional collaborators at San Diego State University (SDSU), at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in industry. The primary purpose of the project is to estimate potential ground motions from large earthquakes and to predict site-specific ground motions for one critical structure on each campus. This project thus combines the disciplines of geology, seismology, geodesy, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering into a fully integrated approach. Once completed, the CLC project will provide a template to evaluate other buildings at each of the four UC campuses, as well as provide a methodology for evaluating seismic hazards at other critical sites in California, including other UC locations at risk from large earthquakes. Another important objective of the CLC project is the education of students and other professional in the application of this integrated, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art approach to the assessment of earthquake hazard. For each campus targeted by the CLC project, the seismic hazard study will consist of four phases: Phase I - Initial source and site characterization, Phase II - Drilling, logging, seismic monitoring, and laboratory dynamic soil testing, Phase III - Modeling of predicted site-specific earthquake ground motions, and Phase IV - Calculations of 3D building response. This report cover Phase I for the UCSB campus and incudes results up through March 1997.

  4. Eustatic and structural control of submarine-fan sedimentation, Conception fan, Santa Barbara basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Thor, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    Eustatic sea level lows provide an opportunity for submarine-fan development; topography and structure, however, can control depositional-sequence geometry. Analysis of high-resolution seismic data provides a basis to evaluate to the evolution and geometry of the Pleistocene-Holocene Conception fan. The fan formed in the restricted, tectonically active Santo Barbara basin. It consists of 4 vertically stacked depositional sequences, each bounded by nondepositional unconformities. The unconformities are defined by seismic-sequence boundaries and were formed during sea-level falls that are related to Pleistocene glacioeustatic changes. Each depositional sequence consists of lowstand, sandrich facies (fan channel, levee, and lobe) topped by highstand, mud-rich facies. The geometry of the depositional sequences tends to be rectilinear, not arcuate, because lateral progradation is restricted by topographically high structures. The modern fan surface and the Holocene depositional sequence provide a good analog for the older, underlying depositional sequences. The fan surface is characterized by 4 main channels, 2 of which head into submarine canyons incised into the shelf. Submarine canyons that fed the other 2 channels are now filled and have no topographic expression. In addition, numerous partially buried channel segments occur in the interchannel areas. The Holocene depositional sequence consists of lenticular and sheet-drape deposits interpreted to be channel, levee, and lobe facies. The facies geometry suggests that Mutti's topographic compensation, channel migration, and avulsion were typical processes on Conception fan.

  5. Influence of Harbor construction on downcoast morphological evolution: Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revell, D.L.; Barnard, P.L.; Mustain, N.; Storlazzi, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Sand impoundment caused by construction of the Santa Barbara Harbor in the 1920s, created an erosion wave that impacted downcoast Carpinteria Beach. Historic beach and shoreline changes were analyzed to understand continuing erosion using a combination of historic air photos, lidar, and physical measurements. The long-term analyses show a clockwise rotation with erosion of - 0.35 m/yr at the updrift end and accretion downdrift of 0.3 m/yr. Storm impacts measured before and after the 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Ni??o events show similar rotation patterns, providing evidence that El Ni??os may be driving coastal evolution. Differences in shoreline responses between El Nino events show that the erosion hotspot migrated downdrift following construction of a revetment after the 1982-83 storms. Seasonal field measurements in the winter show beach narrowing while sediment coarsen variably alongshore. The coarsest materials and erosion hotspot are co-located at the end of the revetment on the city beach. Copyright ASCE 2008.

  6. Geologic Controls on Channel Morphology and Low-Flow Habitat; Rattlesnake Creek, Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, G.; Keller, E.

    2006-12-01

    Channel morphology and baseflow are limiting factors in sustaining low-flow habitat for the spawning and rearing of endangered southern steelhead trout in southern California. To aid the recovery of steelhead trout, it is imperative to determine how pools are formed and maintained in steep mountain streams, and what hydrogeologic factors control baseflow. Rattlesnake Creek, a steep (6 to 31%) boulder-bedrock channel in Santa Barbara, California, was investigated to determine if geologic and hydrogeologic properties, specifically rock strength and fracture density, control channel morphology and low-flow habitat. Analysis of rock strength, fracture density, and channel morphology using a single-factor analysis of variance, Kolmorgorov-Smirnov test and t-test suggest that rock strength and fracture density of the underlying lithology (bed and banks) does not significantly affect the channel morphology at the 0.05 level of significance. However, this study does show that boulder large roughness elements (LREs) armor the channel, controlling channel gradient and the location, abundance and type of pools. Step pools are the dominant pool type, found in reaches up to 18% where cascades might be expected, and steps are composed of resistant sandstone boulder LREs. Although fracture density does not influence the morphology of the channel, baseflow for low-flow habitat is predominantly supplied through fractures in the coldwater sandstone.

  7. 78 FR 43856 - Harold Hanson; Order Relating to Harold Hanson

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699 (Aug... company, stating that the autopilots would be used for research projects to record thunderstorm...

  8. Submarine landslides in the Santa Barbara Channel as potential tsunami sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Murai, L.Y.; Watts, P.; Maher, N.A.; Fisher, M.A.; Paull, C.E.; Eichhubl, P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent investigations using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institutes (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) "Ventana" and "Tiburon" and interpretation of MBARI's EM 300 30 kHz multibeam bathymetric data show that the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin has experienced massive slope failures. Of particular concern is the large (130 km2) Goleta landslide complex located off Coal Oil Point near the town of Goleta, that measures 14.6-km long extending from a depth of 90 m to nearly 574 m deep and is 10.5 km wide. We estimate that approximately 1.75 km3 has been displaced by this slide during the Holocene. This feature is a complex compound submarine landslide that contains both surfical slump blocks and mud flows in three distinct segments. Each segment is composed of a distinct head scarp, down-dropped head block and a slide debris lobe. The debris lobes exhibit hummocky topography in the central areas that appear to result from compression during down slope movement. The toes of the western and eastern lobes are well defined in the multibeam image, whereas the toe of the central lobe is less distinct. Continuous seismic reflection profiles show that many buried slide debris lobes exist and comparison of the deformed reflectors with ODP Drill Site 149, Hole 893 suggest that at least 200 000 years of failure have occurred in the area (Fisher et al., 2005a). Based on our interpretation of the multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles we modeled the potential tsunami that may have been produced from one of the three surfical lobes of the Goleta slide. This model shows that a 10 m high wave could have run ashore along the cliffs of the Goleta shoreline. Several other smaller (2 km2 and 4 km2) slides are located on the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin, both to the west and east of Goleta slide and on the Concepcion fan along the western flank of the basin. One slide, named the Gaviota slide, is 3.8 km2, 2.6 km long and 1.7 km wide. A

  9. Submarine landslides in the Santa Barbara Channel as potential tsunami sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, H. G.; Murai, L. Y.; Watts, P.; Maher, N. A.; Fisher, M. A.; Paull, C. E.; Eichhubl, P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent investigations using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institutes (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) "Ventana" and "Tiburon" and interpretation of MBARI's EM 300 30 kHz multibeam bathymetric data show that the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin has experienced massive slope failures. Of particular concern is the large (130 km2) Goleta landslide complex located off Coal Oil Point near the town of Goleta, that measures 14.6-km long extending from a depth of 90 m to nearly 574 m deep and is 10.5 km wide. We estimate that approximately 1.75 km3 has been displaced by this slide during the Holocene. This feature is a complex compound submarine landslide that contains both surfical slump blocks and mud flows in three distinct segments. Each segment is composed of a distinct head scarp, down-dropped head block and a slide debris lobe. The debris lobes exhibit hummocky topography in the central areas that appear to result from compression during down slope movement. The toes of the western and eastern lobes are well defined in the multibeam image, whereas the toe of the central lobe is less distinct. Continuous seismic reflection profiles show that many buried slide debris lobes exist and comparison of the deformed reflectors with ODP Drill Site 149, Hole 893 suggest that at least 200 000 years of failure have occurred in the area (Fisher et al., 2005a). Based on our interpretation of the multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles we modeled the potential tsunami that may have been produced from one of the three surfical lobes of the Goleta slide. This model shows that a 10 m high wave could have run ashore along the cliffs of the Goleta shoreline. Several other smaller (2 km2 and 4 km2) slides are located on the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin, both to the west and east of Goleta slide and on the Conception fan along the western flank of the basin. One slide, named the Gaviota slide, is 3.8 km2, 2.6 km long and 1.7 km wide. A

  10. Magnitude and composition of sinking particulate phosphorus fluxes in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekula-Wood, Emily; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Bennett, Melissa A.; Thunell, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The composition and bioavailability of particulate P influence marine biological community production on both modern and geologic time-scales, and continental margins play a critical role in the supply, modification, and storage of particulate P. This study examined particulate P cycling in the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) off the coast of southern California using a ˜520 m deep-moored sediment trap deployed from 1993-2006 and a sediment core collected in 2005 directly beneath the sediment trap at 590 m. Total particulate P (TPP), particulate inorganic P (PIP), and particulate organic P (POP) were quantified using a 5-step sequential extraction method (SEDEX) that chemically separates PIP into loosely bound, oxide-bound, authigenic, and detrital P phases. POP fluxes, while similar in magnitude to other coastal regions (22 ± 10 μmol m-2 d-1) were a small component of the TPP pool (15%). Seasonal trends revealed significant increases in POP fluxes during upwelling due to increased biological production in surface waters by organisms that increased mineral ballast. High particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP ratios (337 ± 18) further indicated rapid and efficient remineralization of POP relative to POC as particles sank through the oxic water column; however, further reduction of POP ceased in the deeper anoxic waters. Loosely bound, oxide-bound, and authigenic P, dominated the TPP pool, with PIP fluxes substantially higher than those measured in other coastal settings. Strong correlations between oxide-associated, authigenic, and detrital P fluxes with lithogenic material indicated a terrestrial source associated with riverine discharge. Furthermore, more than 30% of the loosely bound and oxide-bound P was remineralized prior to burial, with the magnitude of dissolution far exceeding that of POP. These results highlight the dynamic nature of the particulate P pool in coastal ecosystems and how changes in P source can alter the composition and lability of P that

  11. Sundowner Winds Contributing to Intensifying Dry Conditions in Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macarewich, S. I.; Carvalho, L. V.; Hall, T.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme downslope wind and warming events, locally termed as "sundowners," are notorious for accelerating the spread of wildfires in the vicinity of Santa Barbara, California. Unique topographic features characterize the terrain of this region: about 100 km of narrow coastal plains run approximately east-west, and are bordered by a steep mountain range (exceeding elevations of 1200 m), which runs parallel to the coastline. Named for their typical onset during the early to late afternoon, Sundowners are foehn winds associated with gusty winds down the lee slope of the mountains and canyons, abnormal rapid drop in relative humidity and rise in temperature. Some Sundowner events can exceed wind speeds of gale force and temperatures of 40°C (~100°F). Not only do these events disrupt the marine-influenced weather regime, they also cause significant damage to agriculture, threaten urban landscapes, and coincide with nearly every major wildfire. Sundowners are mesoscale phenomena that develop as a result of a north to south pressure gradient at the Santa Ynez Mountains. Here, Sundowners are identified using the Montecito remote operated weather station (MTIC1) from December 1999 to February 2014. The MTIC1 is located within a mountain pass where Sundowner winds are most significant. A Sundowner database, provided by the National Weather Service, is used to identify the events. We show that recordings of maximum temperatures, sustained wind speeds, wind gusts, and minimum relative humidity indicate that Sundowner events are increasing in frequency and intensity, particularly in spring. When compared to normal conditions, Sundowner conditions produce a significant increase in evapotranspiration and net radiation that can increase drought conditions in the region. This study examines environmental impacts and discusses potential drivers of Sundowner behavior.

  12. Quaternary conception fan, Santa Barbara, California: two distinct canyon(s)-fan systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Quaternary Conception fan forms the gentle northwestern slope of the Santa Barbara basin, California. Two distinct canyon(s)-fan systems which show conspicuous differences in growth pattern coalesced to form this sediment wedge. The older Cojo canyon-fan system fed a typical radial fan characterized by (1) a single persistent conduit, (2) rhythmic interbedded levees in the upper and mid-fan built by frequent episodic turbidity flows, (3) an apparently well-developed distributary system, and (4) distal sand deposition on the lower fan and basin plain. Subsequently, the Gaviota canyons formed a radial fan/slope apron system. Two subparallel canyons were incised along fault zones where headward erosion was enhanced by slumping and increased fluvial sediment supply during the Pleistocene due to the capture of the Santa Ynez River near Gaviota Creek. Tectonism produced channel aggradation, which resulted in a series of en echelon channels. The eastern channel is associated with slumping and numerous coalescing slope gullies. These features resulted from oversteepening of the fan slope. Due to the absence of distinct gradient breaks, recent channel morphology was used to define fan divisions: (1) upper fan, broad channel with levees, gradient range from 1:25 to 1:40, (2) middle fan, levee heights decrease and channels narrow, gradients range from 1:40 to 1:100, and (3) lower fan, relatively smooth surface morphology, gradients less than 1:100. These higher gradients on the present Conception fan are unlike radial fan systems and have resulted in (1) relatively straight incised channels, (2) no distinct distributary system with evidence of channel braiding or avulsion, and (3) no suprafan bulge despite high sand supply. Morphology of the Cojo canyon-fan system suggests gradients were lower during deposition than presently observed on the fan.

  13. Vertical distribution and phylogenetic characterization of marine planktonic Archaea in the Santa Barbara Channel.

    PubMed Central

    Massana, R; Murray, A E; Preston, C M; DeLong, E F

    1997-01-01

    Newly described phylogenetic lineages within the domain Archaea have recently been found to be significant components of marine picoplankton assemblages. To better understand the ecology of these microorganisms, we investigated the relative abundance, distribution, and phylogenetic composition of Archaea in the Santa Barbara Channel. Significant amounts of archaeal rRNA and rDNA (genes coding for rRNA) were detected in all samples analyzed. The relative abundance of archaeal rRNA as measured by quantitative oligonucleotide hybridization experiments was low in surface waters but reached higher values (20 to 30% of prokaryotic rRNA) at depths below 100 m. Probes were developed for the two major groups of marine Archaea detected. rRNA originating from the euryarchaeal group (group II) was most abundant in surface waters, whereas rRNA from the crenarchaeal group (group I) dominated at depth. Clone libraries of PCR-amplified archaeal rRNA genes were constructed with samples from 0 and 200 m deep. Screening of libraries by hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes, as well as subsequent sequencing of the cloned genes, indicated that virtually all archaeal rDNA clones recovered belonged to one of the two groups. The recovery of cloned rDNA sequence types in depth profiles exhibited the same trends as were observed in quantitative rRNA hybridization experiments. One representative of each of 18 distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism types was partially sequenced. Recovered sequences spanned most of the previously reported phylogenetic diversity detected in planktonic crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal groups. Several rDNA sequences appeared to be harbored in archaeal types which are widely distributed in marine coastal waters. In total, data suggest that marine planktonic crenarchaea and euryarchaea of temperate coastal habitats thrive in different zones of the water column. The relative rRNA abundance of the crenarchaeal group suggests that its members

  14. Development of an ultra-high temperature infrared scene projector at Santa Barbara Infrared Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Greg; Laveigne, Joe; Danielson, Tom; McHugh, Steve; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2015-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to develop correspondingly larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing needs of systems incorporating these detectors. As with most integrated circuits, fabrication yields for the read-in integrated circuit (RIIC) that drives the emitter pixel array are expected to drop dramatically with increasing size, making monolithic RIICs larger than the current 1024x1024 format impractical and unaffordable. Additionally, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than current technology can generate to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024x1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During an earlier phase of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1000K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. Also in development under the same UHT program is a 'scalable' RIIC that will be used to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon vias (TSVs) and quilt packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the inherent yield limitations of very-large-scale integrated circuits. Current status of the RIIC development effort will also be presented.

  15. Planktonic foraminiferal response to ocean acidification in the Santa Barbara Basin over the last century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, E.; Bizimis, M.; Cai, W. J.; Wang, Y.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, D.; Benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Holm, J. A.; Thunell, R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the onset of the industrial revolution, atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased by more than 40% (120 ppm) due to anthropogenic activities. While nearly half of these carbon emissions remain in the atmosphere, the ocean has absorbed approximately 30% of the excess CO2. The increase in the ocean aqueous CO2 inventory has resulted in a significant change in seawater chemistry, most notably the decline of mean seawater pH (0.1 units since 1750). Some marine calcifiers, such as planktonic foraminifera, have shown an adverse response to ocean acidification exhibited as a reduction in calcification efficiency. Estimates indicate that planktonic foraminifera are responsible for up to 55% of the total open marine calcium carbonate flux and also serve as low tropic food web members making them an important constituent for chemical and biological processes in the oceans. This study utilizes morphometric (area density) and geochemical (B/Ca) analyses of planktonic foraminifera to calibrate species-specific responses to changes in modern ocean carbonate chemistry. These proxy methods have been applied to down-core records with nearly annual to sub-annual resolution to reconstruct past changes that have occured since the onset of the Industrial Revolution. The sediments used for this study were collected in the Santa Barbara Basin within the California Current System (CSS), which has been identified as a region of rapidly increasing ocean acidification due to natural upwelling processes and increasing atmospheric CO2. This study will evaluate the effect of ocean acidification on several species of planktonic foraminifera to improve our understanding of the response of these organisms to modern changes in atmospheric CO2.

  16. Nutrient contributions to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the ephemeral Santa Clara River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Washburn, L.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Siegel, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Santa Clara River delivers nutrient rich runoff to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief (???1-3 day) episodic events. Using both river and oceanographic measurements, we evaluate river loading and dispersal of dissolved macronutrients (silicate, inorganic N and P) and comment on the biological implications of these nutrient contributions. Both river and ocean observations suggest that river nutrient concentrations are inversely related to river flow rates. Land use is suggested to influence these concentrations, since runoff from a subwatershed with substantial agriculture and urban areas had much higher nitrate than runoff from a wooded subwatershed. During runoff events, river nutrients were observed to conservatively mix into the buoyant, surface plume immediately seaward of the Santa Clara River mouth. Dispersal of these river nutrients extended 10s of km into the channel. Growth of phytoplankton and nutrient uptake was low during our observations (1-3 days following runoff), presumably due to the very low light levels resulting from high turbidity. However, nutrient quality of runoff (Si:N:P = 16:5:1) was found to be significantly different than upwelling inputs (13:10:1), which may influence different algal responses once sediments settle. Evaluation of total river nitrate loads suggests that most of the annual river nutrient fluxes to the ocean occur during the brief winter flooding events. Wet winters (such as El Nin??o) contribute nutrients at rates approximately an order-of-magnitude greater than "average" winters. Although total river nitrate delivery is considerably less than that supplied by upwelling, the timing and location of these types of events are very different, with river discharge (upwelling) occurring predominantly in the winter (summer) and in the eastern (western) channel. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Active Crustal Shortening Interpreted Through its Fluvial Signature: Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, B. L.; Keller, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    This study utilizes GIS based topographic analysis of three, ten, and 30-meter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in ArcGIS to investigate a fluvial system and determine fold growth direction, future and past channel abandonment locations, and stream incision rates. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to verify the hypothesis of westward fold growth, to test if surface uplift is occurring faster than channel denudation adjacent to faults, and to quantify maximum and minimum stream incision rates. The Santa Barbara Fold Belt (SBFB) is an area of active crustal shortening comprised of an east-west trending group of reverse faults and folds. This study focus in detail on three folds; the Mesa anticline, the Mission Ridge anticline, and More Ranch-Elwood anticline, and four streams; Atascadero Creek, Arroyo Burrow Creek, Mission Creek, and Sycamore Creek. Results demonstrate the hypothesis of westward fold propagation holds true based on westward diverted streams and increasing elevation of abandoned stream channels away from the fold nose. Three out of four streams investigated display one abrupt westward diversion along strike of Mission Ridge Fault as a response to topographic ridges located in the hanging wall adjacent the fault. Knick points found in long channel profiles also coincide with faults demonstrating present day surface uplift is greater than bedrock incision and future channel abandonment may occur at these locations. Maximum and minimum stream incision rates calculated based on previously dated debris flows and marine terraces provide rates of 5 and 0.72 mm/yr, respectively.

  18. Morphology, acoustic characteristics, and Late Quaternary growth of conception Fan, Santa Barbara basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.C.

    1986-04-01

    A radial borderland-basin fan in the western half of the Santa Barbara basin, the Conception Fan, shows characteristics of a debris slope. More than 3000 mi of closely spaced (3.5 kHz) high-resolution profiles, 270 gravity cores, and 8 borings were used to map channel and fan morphology, and channel, levee, and lobe acoustic facies. Two major unconformities are recognized on the seismic profiles. The upper unconformity represents the 10-k.y.B.P. horizon. The lower unconformity is the erosional surface of the late Wisconsinan lowstand of sea level, 18-26 k.y.B.P. Eustasy and tectonism produced two pulses of deposition, each from a different point source, during the Flandrian transgression. Prior to the late Pleistocene, the Conception Fan was fed by one major canyon/channel system, above the western part of the fan. During the late Pleistocene, two small submarine canyons were cut into the slope 7 mi east. Four major channels, smaller than the western channel system, were incised into the fan surface, indicating the eustatic decrease in sediment input. The fault-controlled western canyon (Sacate) fed all but the eastern channel. Faulting and slumping on the slope cut the eastern canyon (Gaviota) and formed the eastern channel. Numerous slope gullies influenced eastern canyon and channel development. Holocene currents rounding Point Conception have winnowed fine sediments in the western channel region, resulting in hummocky topography and the scoured appearance of the channel. Hemipelagic deposition dominates the lower-middle and lower fan of the eastern part of the fan. The western part of the fan seems to be receiving slope-like deposits over the relict fan surface.

  19. High-resolution paleoclimatology of the Santa Barbara Basin during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and early Little Ice Age based on diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages in Kasten core SPR0901-02KC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David B.; Hendy, Ingrid L.

    2015-01-01

    Diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages documented in a high-resolution time series spanning 800 to 1600 AD in varved sediment recovered in Kasten core SPR0901-02KC (34°16.845’ N, 120°02.332’ W, water depth 588 m) from the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) reveal that SBB surface water conditions during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the early part of the Little Ice Age (LIA) were not extreme by modern standards, mostly falling within one standard deviation of mean conditions during the pre anthropogenic interval of 1748 to 1900. No clear differences between the character of MCA and the early LIA conditions are apparent. During intervals of extreme droughts identified by terrigenous proxy scanning XRF analyses, diatom and silicoflagellate proxies for coastal upwelling typically exceed one standard deviation above mean values for 1748-1900, supporting the hypothesis that droughts in southern California are associated with cooler (or La Niña-like) sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Increased percentages of diatoms transported downslope generally coincide with intervals of increased siliciclastic flux to the SBB identified by scanning XRF analyses. Diatom assemblages suggest only two intervals of the MCA (at ~897 to 922 and ~1151 to 1167) when proxy SSTs exceeded one standard deviation above mean values for 1748 to 1900. Conversely, silicoflagellates imply extreme warm water events only at ~830 to 860 (early MCA) and ~1360 to 1370 (early LIA) that are not supported by the diatom data. Silicoflagellates appear to be more suitable for characterizing average climate during the 5 to 11 year-long sample intervals studied in the SPR0901-02KC core than diatoms, probably because diatom relative abundances may be dominated by seasonal blooms of a particular year.

  20. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  1. Minimax confidence intervals in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper uses theory of Donoho (1989) to find lower bounds on the lengths of optimally short fixed-length confidence intervals (minimax confidence intervals) for Gauss coefficients of the field of degree 1-12 using the heat flow constraint. The bounds on optimal minimax intervals are about 40 percent shorter than Backus' intervals: no procedure for producing fixed-length confidence intervals, linear or nonlinear, can give intervals shorter than about 60 percent the length of Backus' in this problem. While both methods rigorously account for the fact that core field models are infinite-dimensional, the application of the techniques to the geomagnetic problem involves approximations and counterfactual assumptions about the data errors, and so these results are likely to be extremely optimistic estimates of the actual uncertainty in Gauss coefficients.

  2. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  3. Southern California Educational Initiative Socioeconomics Workshop. Held in Santa Barbara, California on October 25-27, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, J.; Molotch, H.

    1991-01-01

    The report presents an overview of the Socioeconomics Workshop together with the conclusions and recommendations of the workshop organizer. It is based on three days of panel presentations, workgroup sessions, and summary discussions among participants. The workshop was held in Santa Barbara from October 25-27, 1990 with around 100 participants drawn from government agencies, academic settings, private consulting firms, and environmental advocacy groups. The meetings were intended to review and critique existing socioeconomic work on the impacts of offshore oil development and look constructively toward the future in identifying needed research.

  4. Hydrogen-isotopic variability in lipids from Santa Barbara Basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Sessions, Alex L.; Kinnaman, Franklin S.; Valentine, David L.

    2009-08-01

    We conducted an extensive survey of hydrogen-isotopic compositions (D/H ratios) of diverse sedimentary lipids from the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB), offshore southern California. The main goal of this survey was to assess the diversity of D/H ratios in lipids from marine sediments, in order to provide a more detailed understanding of relevant biological and geochemical factors impacting lipid isotopic variability. A total of 1182 individual δD values are reported from two stations in SBB, one located in the suboxic basin depocenter and the other on the fully oxic flank of the basin. Sediments collected from the basin depocenter span a depth of ˜2.5 m and reach the methanogenic zone. Lipids that were analyzed include n-alkanes, n-alkanols and alkenols, short- and long-chain fatty acids, linear isoprenoids, steroids, and hopanoids, and exhibit several systematic patterns. First, there are no significant differences in δD values between the two sampling locations, nor with increasing depth for most lipids, indicating that degradation does not influence sedimentary lipid δD values. Second, relatively large differences in δD values among differing molecular structures are observed in all samples. n-Alkyl lipids of probable marine origin have typical δD values between -150 and -200‰, those from terrestrial leaf waxes and aquatic plants range from -80 to -170‰, while petroleum n-alkanes are typically -90 to -150‰. Third, lipids inferred to derive from bacteria (branched fatty acids and hopanols) living at the sediment surface or in the water column tend to be D-enriched relative to similar algal products by 30‰ or more. At the same time, several other lipids have δD values that decrease strongly with depth, presumably as a result of in situ production by anaerobic bacteria. This dichotomy in isotopic compositions of bacterial lipids is inconsistent with a nearly constant D/H fractionation during lipid biosynthesis, and likely reflects significant variations

  5. Contaminant exposures at the 4H shell mounds in the Santa Barbara Channel.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charles R; Salazar, Michael H; Salazar, Sandra M; Snyder, Barry J

    2006-12-01

    Remobilization, bioavailability, and potential toxicity of chemical contaminants were evaluated at the 4H shell mounds - the site of abandoned offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. Evaluations used a weight-of-evidence approach based on results from bulk phase chemical analyses and laboratory toxicity testing of shell mound cores, in situ field bioassays using caged mussels, and surficial sediment chemistry. Shell mound cores contained elevated concentrations of metals associated with drilling wastes (e.g., Ba, Cr, Pb, and Zn), as well as monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The highest concentrations along with pockets of free oil were associated with the middle "cuttings" stratum. Sediments composited from all core strata caused significant acute toxicity and bioaccumulation of Ba and PAHs in test organisms during laboratory exposures. In contrast, caged mussels placed at each of the shell mounds for a period of 57-58 days had greater than 90% survival, and there were no significant differences in survival of mussels placed at the shell mounds and corresponding reference sites. While all mussel samples exhibited increases in shell length, whole animal weight, and tissue lipid content, in some cases growth metrics for the shell mound mussels were significantly higher than those for the reference sites. Concentrations of metals, PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in tissues of the shell mound mussels were not significantly different from those at reference sites. The presence of labile aromatic hydrocarbons in shell mound cores and absence of significant contaminant accumulation of tissues of caged mussels indicated that chemical contaminants are not being remobilized from the 4H shell mounds. Surficial bottom sediments near the shell mounds contained elevated Ba concentrations that probably were associated with drilling wastes. However, concentrations did not

  6. Contaminant exposures at the 4H shell mounds in the Santa Barbara Channel.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charles R; Salazar, Michael H; Salazar, Sandra M; Snyder, Barry J

    2006-12-01

    Remobilization, bioavailability, and potential toxicity of chemical contaminants were evaluated at the 4H shell mounds - the site of abandoned offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. Evaluations used a weight-of-evidence approach based on results from bulk phase chemical analyses and laboratory toxicity testing of shell mound cores, in situ field bioassays using caged mussels, and surficial sediment chemistry. Shell mound cores contained elevated concentrations of metals associated with drilling wastes (e.g., Ba, Cr, Pb, and Zn), as well as monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The highest concentrations along with pockets of free oil were associated with the middle "cuttings" stratum. Sediments composited from all core strata caused significant acute toxicity and bioaccumulation of Ba and PAHs in test organisms during laboratory exposures. In contrast, caged mussels placed at each of the shell mounds for a period of 57-58 days had greater than 90% survival, and there were no significant differences in survival of mussels placed at the shell mounds and corresponding reference sites. While all mussel samples exhibited increases in shell length, whole animal weight, and tissue lipid content, in some cases growth metrics for the shell mound mussels were significantly higher than those for the reference sites. Concentrations of metals, PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in tissues of the shell mound mussels were not significantly different from those at reference sites. The presence of labile aromatic hydrocarbons in shell mound cores and absence of significant contaminant accumulation of tissues of caged mussels indicated that chemical contaminants are not being remobilized from the 4H shell mounds. Surficial bottom sediments near the shell mounds contained elevated Ba concentrations that probably were associated with drilling wastes. However, concentrations did not

  7. Explorations in Statistics: Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This third installment of "Explorations in Statistics" investigates confidence intervals. A confidence interval is a range that we expect, with some level of confidence, to include the true value of a population parameter…

  8. Teaching Confidence Intervals Using Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagtvedt, Reidar; Jones, Gregory Todd; Jones, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Confidence intervals are difficult to teach, in part because most students appear to believe they understand how to interpret them intuitively. They rarely do. To help them abandon their misconception and achieve understanding, we have developed a simulation tool that encourages experimentation with multiple confidence intervals derived from the…

  9. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  10. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  11. Subjective probability intervals: how to reduce overconfidence by interval evaluation.

    PubMed

    Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik; Juslin, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Format dependence implies that assessment of the same subjective probability distribution produces different conclusions about over- or underconfidence depending on the assessment format. In 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that the overconfidence bias that occurs when participants produce intervals for an uncertain quantity is almost abolished when they evaluate the probability that the same intervals include the quantity. The authors successfully apply a method for adaptive adjustment of probability intervals as a debiasing tool and discuss a tentative explanation in terms of a naive sampling model. According to this view, people report their experiences accurately, but they are naive in that they treat both sample proportion and sample dispersion as unbiased estimators, yielding small bias in probability evaluation but strong bias in interval production. PMID:15521796

  12. The world's most spectacular marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara Channel, California): Quantification of emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornafius, J. Scott; Quigley, Derek; Luyendyk, Bruce P.

    1999-09-01

    We used 50 kHz sonar data to estimate natural hydrocarbon emission rates from the 18 km2 marine seep field offshore from Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara, California. The hydrocarbon gas emission rate is 1.7 ± 0.3 × 105 m3 d-1 (including gas captured by a subsea seep containment device) and the associated oil emission rate is 1.6 ± 0.2 × 104 Ld-1 (100 barrels d-1). The nonmethane hydrocarbon emission rate from the gas seepage is 35±7 td-1 and a large source of air pollution in Santa Barbara County. Our estimate is equal to twice the emission rate from all the on-road vehicle traffic in the county. Our estimated methane emission rate for the Coal Oil Point seeps (80±12 td-1) is 4 times higher than previous estimates. The most intense areas of seepage correspond to structural culminations along anticlinal axes. Seep locations are mostly unchanged from those documented in 1946, 1953, and 1973. An exception is the seepage field that once existed near offshore oil platform Holly. A reduction in seepage within a 1 km radius around this offshore platform is correlated with reduced reservoir pressure beneath the natural seeps due to oil production. Our findings suggest that global emissions of methane from natural marine seepage have been underestimated and may be decreasing because of oil production.

  13. Constraining the variability of optical properties in the Santa Barbara Channel, CA: A phytoplankton story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Rebecca Katherine

    The research presented in this dissertation evaluates the direct relationships of phytoplankton community composition and inherent optical properties (IOP); that is, the absorption and scattering of light in the ocean. Phytoplankton community composition affect IOPs in both direct and indirect ways, thus creating challenges for optical measurements of biological and biogeochemical properties in aquatic systems. Studies were performed in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC), CA where an array of optical and biogeochemical measurements were made. Phytoplankton community structure was characterized by an empirical orthogonal functional analysis (EOF) using phytoplankton accessory pigments. The results showed that phytoplankton community significantly correlated to all IOPs, e.g. phytoplankton specific absorption, detrital absorption, CDOM absorption and particle backscattering coefficients. Furthermore, the EOF analysis was unique in splitting the microphytoplankton size class into separate diatom and dinoflagellate regimes allowing for assessment optical property differences within the same size class, a technique previously not systematically achievable. The phytoplankton functional group dinoflagellates were particularly influential to IOPs in surprising ways. Dinoflagellates showed higher backscattering efficiencies than would be predicted based on Mie theory, and significantly influenced CDOM absorption via direct association with dissolved mycosproine-like amino acid absorption (MAA) peaks in CDOM spectra. A new index was developed in this work to quantify MAA absorption peaks in CDOM spectra, and was named the MAA Index. Prior to this research dissolved MAA absorption in natural waters was never quantified, and CDOM data containing these peaks were often disregarded and discarded from analysis. CDOM dynamics in the SBC were assessed for a 15-year study period, and this work shows that significantly large MAA Index values, e.g. MAA Index > 1, were present in

  14. D/H Ratios of Marine Lipids from Santa Barbara Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Sessions, A.; Kinnaman, F.; Valentine, D.

    2006-12-01

    With the early successful application of compound-specific D/H analyses to reconstructing paleoclimate records, most subsequent research has focused on understanding organic D/H fractionations in terrestrial environments. Thus we still know very little about natural D/H variations in lipids derived from marine organisms, or indeed if any such variations exist. We have therefore conducted an extensive survey of lipid δD values in two sediment cores collected in the Santa Barbara Basin. These data allow us to examine 1) variations between the lipid products of different organisms, 2) down-core variations due to diagenesis, and 3) differences between sediments deposited under oxic or anoxic bottom-water conditions. Our results show that considerable D/H variability between different marine products does exist. δD values of n-alkanes (except n-C35) ranged from -94 to -175 ‰, and exhibit a systematic offset between odd and even carbon numbers. The δD value of n-C35 is anomalous at -220‰. Isotopic compositions of n-alkanols range from -126 to -221 , with a pattern of progressive D depletion with chain length observed for free alcohols. δD values of sterols range from -215 to -309‰, and show no systematic variation with carbon number. However, offsets do exist between the saturated, monounsaturated, and diunsaturated sterols. Sterols as a group are strongly depleted in D relative to the bacterial-derived hopanols (-166 to -232‰), suggesting possible differences in biosynthetic fractionations by bacteria and eukaryotes. Phytol and phytane δD values roughly ranged from -360 to -410‰, while phytanol was systematically enriched at -300 to -340‰. Fatty acids encompassed much greater variability, with dD values ranging from -55 to -270‰. In general, saturated fatty acids are enriched in D relative to their unsaturated analogs, and long-chain (>C24) acids are enriched in D relative to short-chain (

  15. TIME-INTERVAL MEASURING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1958-04-15

    An electronic device for measuring the time interval between two control pulses is presented. The device incorporates part of a previous approach for time measurement, in that pulses from a constant-frequency oscillator are counted during the interval between the control pulses. To reduce the possible error in counting caused by the operation of the counter gating circuit at various points in the pulse cycle, the described device provides means for successively delaying the pulses for a fraction of the pulse period so that a final delay of one period is obtained and means for counting the pulses before and after each stage of delay during the time interval whereby a plurality of totals is obtained which may be averaged and multplied by the pulse period to obtain an accurate time- Interval measurement.

  16. Simple Interval Timers for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.; Burgess, G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simple interval timers for microcomputers, including (1) the Jiffy clock; (2) CPU count timers; (3) screen count timers; (4) light pen timers; and (5) chip timers. Also examines some of the general characteristics of all types of timers. (JN)

  17. Enhanced marine productivity off western North America during warm climate intervals of the past 52 k.y

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, J.D.; O'Connell, S. B.; DelViscio, J.; Dean, W.; Carriquiry, J.D.; Marchitto, T.; Zheng, Yen; VanGeen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of the Santa Barbara Basin off the coast of California have linked changes in its bottom-water oxygen content to millennial-scale climate changes as recorded by the oxygen isotope composition of Greenland ice. Through the use of detailed records from a sediment core collected off the Magdalena Margin of Baja California, Mexico, we demonstrate that this teleconnection predominantly arose from changes in marine productivity, rather than changes in ventilation of the North Pacific, as was originally proposed. One possible interpretation is that the modern balance of El Nin??o-La Nin??a conditions that favors a shallow nutricline and high productivity today and during warm climate intervals of the past 52 k.y. was altered toward more frequent, deep nutricline, low productivity, El Nin??o-like conditions during cool climate intervals. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  18. Authigenic molybdenum formation in marine sediments: A link to pore water sulfide in the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Anderson, Robert F.; VanGeen, A.; Kuwabara, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pore water and sediment Mo concentrations were measured in a suite of multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin to examine the connection between authigenic Mo formation and pore water sulfide concentration. Only at the deepest site (580 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations rise to >0.1 ??M right below the sediment water interface, was there active authigenic Mo formation. At shallower sites (550,430, and 340 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations were consistently <0.05 ??M, Mo precipitation was not occuring at the time of sampling. A sulfide concentration of ???0.1 ??M appears to be a threshold for the onset of Mo-Fe-S co-precipitation. A second threshold sulfide concentration of ???100 ??M is required for Mo precipitation without Fe, possibly as Mo-S or as particle-bound Mo. Mass budgets for Mo were constructed by combining pore water and sediment results for Mo with analyses of sediment trap material from Santa Barbara Basin as well as sediment accumulation rates derived from 210Pb. The calculations show that most of the authigenic Mo in the sediment at the deepest site is supplied by diffusion from overlying bottom waters. There is, however, a non-lithogenic particulate Mo associated with sinking particles that contributes ???15% to the total authigenic Mo accumulation. Analysis of sediment trap samples and supernant brine solutions indicates the presence of non-lithogenic particulate Mo, a large fraction of which is easily remobilized and, perhaps, associated with Mn-oxides. Our observations show that even with the very high flux of organic carbon reaching the sediment of Santa Barbara Basin, active formation of sedimentary authigenic Mo requires a bottom water oxygen concentration below 3 ??M. However, small but measurable rates of authigenic Mo accumulation were observed at sites where bottom water oxygen ranged between 5 and 23 ??M, indicating that the formation of authigenic Mo occured in the

  19. Development of Multiscale Biological Image Data Analysis: Review of 2006 International Workshop on Multiscale Biological Imaging, Data Mining and Informatics, Santa Barbara, USA (BII06)

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Manfred; Peng, Hanchuan; Singh, Ambuj

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 International Workshop on Multiscale Biological Imaging, Data Mining and Informatics was held at Santa Barbara, on Sept 7–8, 2006. Based on the presentations at the workshop, we selected and compiled this collection of research articles related to novel algorithms and enabling techniques for bio- and biomedical image analysis, mining, visualization, and biology applications. PMID:17634090

  20. A Womb with a Political View: Barbara Park's "MA! There's Nothing to Do Here!" Prenatal Parenting, and the Battle over Personhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abate, Michelle Ann

    2013-01-01

    This essay makes the case that Barbara Park's picture book "MA! There's Nothing to Do Here!: A Word from Your Baby-in-Waiting" (2008) adds another equal-parts absurdist and alarming item to the ever-growing responsibilities of expecting mothers: ensuring that their fetus is entertained. The messages that Park's narrative…

  1. MINUTES AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE CALIFORNIA COUNCIL ON THE EDUCATION OF TEACHERS (SANTA BARBARA, MARCH 30 - APRIL 1, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    THIS REPORT CONTAINS THE MINUTES AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1967 SANTA BARBARA CONFERENCE ON THE PREPARATION OF TEACHERS FOR CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED YOUTH. INCLUDED ARE (1) REPORTS FROM THE COMMISSIONS ON ACCREDITATION, CERTIFICATION, AND LEGISLATION, (2) REPORTS OF THE FIVE GENERAL SESSIONS HELD UNDER THE TOPIC HEADINGS (A) "A SCHOOL BOARD…

  2. The Santa Barbara Assets and Risks Assessment to Predict Recidivism among Male and Female Juveniles: An Investigation of Inter-Rater Reliability and Predictive Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Sharkey, Jill D.; O'Brien, Kathryn M.; Furlong, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to advance our understanding of the assessment of numerous factors associated with recidivism among females and males involved in the juvenile justice system. In particular, this study examined the reliability (i.e., inter-rater) and validity (i.e., construct, criterion, and predictive) of the Santa Barbara Assets and Risks…

  3. Evaluation of Ocean Color Scanner (OCS) photographic and digital data: Santa Barbara Channel test site, 29 October 1975 overflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, S. P.; Estes, J. E.; Kronenberg, M. R.; Hajic, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    A summary of Ocean Color Scanner data was examined to evaluate detection and discrimination capabilities of the system for marine resources, oil pollution and man-made sea surface targets of opportunity in the Santa Barbara Channel. Assessment of the utility of OCS for the determination of sediment transport patterns along the coastal zone was a secondary goal. Data products provided 1975 overflight were in digital and analog formats. In evaluating the OCS data, automated and manual procedures were employed. A total of four channels of data in digital format were analyzed, as well as three channels of color combined imagery, and four channels of black and white imagery. In addition, 1:120,000 scale color infrared imagery acquired simultaneously with the OCS data were provided for comparative analysis purposes.

  4. Radiolarian indicators of El Nino and anti-El Nino events in Holocene sediments of Santa Barbara basin

    SciTech Connect

    Weinheimer, A.L.

    1986-04-01

    Radiolarian distributions and physical oceanographic data from the Santa Barbara basin indicate the following. Strong anti-El Nino periods can be characterized by (1) intermediate radiolarian density, (2) high percentage of transition-central radiolarian fauna, and (3) low percentage and number of warm-water radiolarian fauna. This distribution pattern is attributed to strong wind-driven upwelling and reduced northward transport by the California Countercurrent during anti-El Nino periods. Strong El Nino periods are typically (1) high in radiolarian density, and (2) low in percentage but high in number of warm-water fauna. This distribution is attributed to reduced wind-driven upwelling, enhanced northward countercurrent transport, and geostrophic doming of the cold-water masses in the shear zone between the California Current and California Countercurrent.

  5. An endobiont-bearing allogromiid from the Santa Barbara Basin: Implications for the early diversification of foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Habura, Andrea; Bowser, Samuel S.

    2006-09-01

    Our current understanding of paleoecology and paleoceanography is largely based on the superb Phanerozoic fossil record of foraminiferan protists. The early history of the group is unresolved, however, because basal foraminiferans (allogromiids) are unmineralized and thus fossilize poorly. Molecular-clock studies date foraminiferal origins to the Neoproterozoic, but the deep sea, one of Earth's most extensive habitats and presently hosting a significant fraction of basal foraminiferal diversity, was probably anoxic at that time and, until now, anaerobic allogromiids were unknown. Molecular, cell, and ecological analyses reveal the presence of a previously unknown allogromiid inhabiting anoxic, sulfidic deep-sea sediments (Santa Barbara Basin, California). The fact that the new foraminifer harbors prokaryotic endobionts implicates symbiogenesis as a driving force in early foraminiferal diversification.

  6. Subjective Probability Intervals: How to Reduce Overconfidence by Interval Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik; Juslin, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Format dependence implies that assessment of the same subjective probability distribution produces different conclusions about over- or underconfidence depending on the assessment format. In 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that the overconfidence bias that occurs when participants produce intervals for an uncertain quantity is almost…

  7. Generalized Confidence Intervals and Fiducial Intervals for Some Epidemiological Measures

    PubMed Central

    Bebu, Ionut; Luta, George; Mathew, Thomas; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    For binary outcome data from epidemiological studies, this article investigates the interval estimation of several measures of interest in the absence or presence of categorical covariates. When covariates are present, the logistic regression model as well as the log-binomial model are investigated. The measures considered include the common odds ratio (OR) from several studies, the number needed to treat (NNT), and the prevalence ratio. For each parameter, confidence intervals are constructed using the concepts of generalized pivotal quantities and fiducial quantities. Numerical results show that the confidence intervals so obtained exhibit satisfactory performance in terms of maintaining the coverage probabilities even when the sample sizes are not large. An appealing feature of the proposed solutions is that they are not based on maximization of the likelihood, and hence are free from convergence issues associated with the numerical calculation of the maximum likelihood estimators, especially in the context of the log-binomial model. The results are illustrated with a number of examples. The overall conclusion is that the proposed methodologies based on generalized pivotal quantities and fiducial quantities provide an accurate and unified approach for the interval estimation of the various epidemiological measures in the context of binary outcome data with or without covariates. PMID:27322305

  8. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  9. Sedimentary pyrite δ34S differs from porewater sulfide in Santa Barbara Basin: Proposed role of organic sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, Morgan Reed; Sessions, Alex L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Adkins, Jess F.

    2016-08-01

    Santa Barbara Basin sediments host a complex network of abiotic and metabolic chemical reactions that knit together the carbon, sulfur, and iron cycles. From a 2.1-m sediment core collected in the center of the basin, we present high-resolution profiles of the concentrations and isotopic compositions of all the major species in this system: sulfate, sulfide (∑H2S), elemental sulfur (S0), pyrite, extractable organic sulfur (OS), proto-kerogen S, total organic and dissolved inorganic carbon, and total and reducible iron. Below 10 cm depth, the core is characterized by low apparent sulfate reduction rates (<0.01 mM/yr) except near the sulfate-methane transition zone. Surprisingly, pyrite forming in shallow sediments is ∼30‰ more 34S-depleted than coexisting ∑H2S in porewater. S0 has the same strongly 34S-depleted composition as pyrite where it forms near the sediment-water interface, though not at depth. This pattern is not easily explained by conventional hypotheses in which sedimentary pyrite derives from abiotic reactions with porewater ∑H2S or from the products of S0 disproportionation. Instead, we propose that pyrite formation in this environment occurs within sulfate reducing microbial aggregates or biofilms, where it reflects the isotopic composition of the immediate products of bacterial sulfate reduction. Porewater ∑H2S in Santa Barbara Basin may be more 34S-enriched than pyrite due to equilibration with relatively 34S-enriched OS. The difference between OS and pyrite δ34S values would then reflect the balance between microbial sulfide formation and the abundance of exchangeable OS. Both OS and pyrite δ34S records thus have the potential to provide valuable information about biogeochemical cycles and redox structure in sedimentary paleoenvironments.

  10. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings.

  11. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings. PMID:26303026

  12. Developmental plasticity in fat patterning of Ache children in response to variation in interbirth intervals: a preliminary test of the roles of external environment and maternal reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jack; Hurtado, Ana Magdalena; Pearson, Osbjorn M; Hill, Kim R; Jones, Troy; Frey, M Anderson

    2009-01-01

    A firm link between small size at birth and later more centralized fat patterning has been established in previous research. Relationships between shortened interbirth intervals and small size at birth suggest that maternal energetic prioritization may be an important, but unexplored determinant of offspring fat patterning. Potential adaptive advantages to centralized fat storage (Baker et al., 2008: In: Trevathan W, McKenna J, Smith EO, editors. Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives. New York: Oxford) suggest that relationships with interbirth intervals may reflect adaptive responses to variation in patterns of maternal reproductive effort. Kuzawa (2005: Am J Hum Biol 17:5-21; 2008: In: Trevathan W, McKenna J, Smith EO, editors. Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives. New York: Oxford) has argued that maternal mediation of the energetic quality of the environment is a necessary component of developmental plasticity models invoking predictive adaptive responses (Gluckman and Hanson 2004: Trends Endocrinol Metab 15:183-187). This study tested the general hypothesis that shortened interbirth intervals would predict more centralized fat patterning in offspring. If long-term maternally mediated signals are important determinants of offspring responses, then we expected to observe a relationship between the average interbirth interval of mothers and offspring adiposity, with no relationship with the preceding interval. Such a finding would suggest that maternal, endogenous resource allocation decisions are related to offspring physiology in a manner consistent with Kuzawa's description. We observed exactly such a relationship among the Ache of Paraguay, suggesting that maternally mediated in utero signals of postnatal environments may be important determinants of later physiology. The implications of these findings are reviewed in light of life history and developmental plasticity theories and ourability to generalize the results to other

  13. The PDO and Infaunal Foraminfera Isotopic Values: Multi-Decadal Variations in Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, W.; Stott, L.

    2002-12-01

    Laminated sediments within Santa Monica, Santa Barbara and Soledad (Mexico) Basins provide an opportunity to study carbon export at sites dominated by coastal upwelling. Multi-cores were collected in 2001 and sampled with mm scale resolution for both solid phase and pore water investigations. The infaunal foram, B. tenuata was analyzed for its del13C value; this down-core record indicates systematic changes in pore water del13C, reflecting differences in the amount of organic carbon oxidation occurring on the sea floor. Two cores collected from Santa Monica Basin, one in the 1980's and the second in 2001 show identical trends and structure in B. tenuata del13C values between 1700 AD and the present. Because B. tenuata is recording pore water del13CO2, it becomes a sensitive proxy for the benthic organic carbon oxidation rate, which in-turn relates to the amount of organic carbon delivered to the sea floor. In Santa Monica Basin we see a trend from 1700 AD to the present toward greater carbon oxidation. This trend is consistent with the observation that the extent of laminated sediments has expanded within this basin over the past 300 years. Within this general trend there are some very well defined patterns and reversals, most notably is the trend toward lower rates of carbon oxidation between 1980 and the present; the documented PDO phase-shift that occurs around 1980 shows up clearly in this analyses. Other similar shifts in `carbon production' have occurred since 1700 AD, notably one occurred in the late 1800's and another around 1800. These both mark periods when there was a reversal from increasing inputs of organic carbon to decreasing inputs. The increase in organic carbon delivery to the sea floor of Santa Monica Basin since 1700 has been quantified by deriving estimates of carbon oxidation rates and combining them with measurements of carbon burial rates. The range in carbon oxidized has fluctuated from about 1 to 3 mmolC m-2 day-1 and the overall carbon

  14. Post-Last Glacial Maximum (Latest Pleistocene to Holocene) geology of the Santa Barbara shelf, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Ritchie, A. C.; Conrad, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Phillips, E.; Sliter, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetric and seismic-reflection data collected for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/mapping/csmp/) provide new insights for understanding the post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) evolution of the Santa Barbara shelf, highlighting relationships between tectonics, eustasy, and sediment supply. The west-trending shelf extends offshore for 5 to 7 km and is bounded on the south by the deep Santa Barbara basin and on the north by a narrow coastal zone and the steep, rapidly uplifting Santa Ynez Mountains. The active, west-trending, north-dipping Ventura-Pitas Point-North Channel and Red Mountain fault systems form the structural boundary between two distinct shelf domains. The smooth, gently sloping, southern shelf is flooded by thick (35 to 40 m), prograding Santa Clara and Ventura River deltaic deposits. These thick strata drape the shelfbreak and fill the accommodation space created by rising sea level, largely masking the influence of active tectonics. In contrast, the northern shelf has complex bathymetry and a well-defined, sharp shelfbreak at ~90 m water depth. The northern shelf is relatively sediment starved (mean sediment thickness is 3 to 4 m), with thickest accumulations (up to ~18 m) forming shallow (< 30 m), discontinuous to laterally coalescing, inner-shelf bars that are best developed at the mouths of steep coastal watersheds. These watersheds also feed several distinct, coarse-grained sediment lobes (as large as ~1.5 km2, extending to 3 km offshore and depths of 70 m) that probably formed during massive flood events. The relative lack of offshore deposits on the northern shelf suggests sediment transport is dominated by easterly nearshore drift. Faulting and folding on the northern shelf are significant controls on sediment distribution and thickness, the occurrence of bedrock uplifts, and common hydrocarbon-associated seeps, pockmarks, and mounds. Bedrock, typically "soft" Neogene strata, is especially

  15. Prokaryotic diversity associated with high rate of organic matter mineralization in continental margin sediments in Santa Barbara Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Berelson, W.; Sansone, F.; Orphan, V. J.

    2005-12-01

    In Santa Barbara Basin sediments, sulfate and total carbon dioxide profiles (TCO2) define a 'hot zone' where sulfate concentrations go to 0 and TCO2 gradients decline dramatically. The average linear gradient of sulfate as it approaches the 'hot zone' defines the sulfate flux of 0.426 ? 0.036 mmol-S per m2 per day. The average linear gradient of TCO2 defines diffusion away from this zone = 0.615 ? 0.077 mmol-C per m2 per day. The difference between the sulfate flux to the zone and the TCO2 flux away from the zone requires a source of TCO2 generated within the 'hot zone' which does not involve the simple reaction stoichiometry of anaerobic methane oxidation. Little is known about the diversity and distribution of prokaryotic community in the 'hot zone'. In the present study, a gravity core (1.7 m in length) was collected at a continental margin site in Santa Barbara Basin (water depth of 591 m). The prokaryotic diversity was analyzed for four sediment horizons that are within, above, and below the 'hot zone', Genomic DNA was extracted and amplified using 16S rDNA primers targeting Bacteria and Archaea. Screening of more than 300 colonies from these 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed a diversity of bacterial species, including members from Proteobacteria, Green-Non-Sulfur bacteria, Planctomycetes, and Candidate division JS1. The detection of sequences related to uncultured Desulfobacter sp. suggests that sulfate reduction is one of the electron-accepting processes. Archaeal populations were affiliated with members from the Crenarchaeota marine benthic group B, the Euryarchaeota marine benthic group D, the Terrestrial Miscellaneous Euryarchaeotal Group (TMEG), and other uncultured relatives of the Thermoplasmatales. Preliminary findings suggest the abundance of marine benthic group B Crenarchaeota decreased with depth, while marine benthic group D Euryarchaeota populations increased with depth. The detection of marine benthic group B and D was consistent with previous

  16. An Event Restriction Interval Theory of Tense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Brandon Robert

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents a novel theory of tense and tense-like constructions. It is named after a key theoretical component of the theory, the event restriction interval. In Event Restriction Interval (ERI) Theory, sentences are semantically evaluated relative to an index which contains two key intervals, the evaluation interval and the event…

  17. Submarine fan facies of Upper Cretaceous Strata, Southern San Rafael Mountains, Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Toyne, C.D.

    1986-04-01

    A 2900-m thick Campanian-Maestrichtian(.) turbidite sequence in Upper Mono Creek Canyon is interpreted to be a progradational submarine fan complex comprised of outer fan, middle fan, inner fan, and slope facies. The basal 600 m of the section consists of thinly bedded, laterally continuous fine sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones (mainly Mutti and Ricci Lucci facies D), interpreted to be outer fan interlobe and lobe-fringe deposits. These are punctuated by infrequent medium to very thickly bedded, flat-based, fine to coarse sandstones (facies C and B), which commonly coarsen and thicken upward, and are interpreted to be depositional lobes. Overlying these deposits are approximately 1400 m of middle fan deposits composed of frequent lenticular, commonly channelized and amalgamated, thickly bedded, fine to very coarse sandstones (facies C and B) organized in fining- and thinning-upward sequences, interpreted to be braided-channel deposits. These alternate with less common nonchannelized coarsening- and thickening-upward sequences suggestive of lobe-apical cycles. These multistory sand deposits are nested within thick intervals of fine sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones (facies C and D), interpreted to be levee, crevasse-splay, and interchannel deposits. Interfingered with and overlying these deposits are approximately 500 m of fining- and thinning-upward or noncyclic, erosionally based, commonly amalgamated, very thickly bedded, medium to very coarse sandstones, pebbly sandstones, and conglomerates (facies A and B), interpreted to be inner fan deposits. Intercalated within this facies, infrequent, laterally discontinuous, thin to thickly bedded, fine to coarse sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones exist, interpreted to be interchannel, levee, and possibly channel-fill deposits.

  18. Facts relating to Well No. 5, Lease OCS-P 0234, Pitas Point Unit area, and the earthquake of August 13, 1978, Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wayland, Russell G.; Acuff, A. Dewey; McCulloh, Thane M.; Raleigh, C. Barry; Vedder, John G.; Yenne, Keith A.

    1978-01-01

    A build-up of pressures developed in an exploratory well being drilled in the Santa Barbara Channel during the period August 9 to 15, 1978. Nearly coincidentally, a sharp earthquake occurred 2 miles south of the city of Santa Barbara at 3:55 p.m. PDT on August 13, 1978. A task group was formed by the Director, Geological Survey, on August 14, mainly because of concern over the high down-hole pressures in the well. The charge to the task group was to study the situation fully in order that appropriate and immediate measures could be directed to protect against a fracturing of rock formations in the vicinity of the hole that might permit the escape of gas or oil to the surface. The task group was also asked to look into the possibility of any relationship between the well problems and the earthquake.

  19. Chaotic dynamics from interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, A N; Sosnovtseva, O V; Mosekilde, E; Anishchenko, V S

    2001-03-01

    Considering two different mathematical models describing chaotic spiking phenomena, namely, an integrate-and-fire and a threshold-crossing model, we discuss the problem of extracting dynamics from interspike intervals (ISIs) and show that the possibilities of computing the largest Lyapunov exponent (LE) from point processes differ between the two models. We also consider the problem of estimating the second LE and the possibility to diagnose hyperchaotic behavior by processing spike trains. Since the second exponent is quite sensitive to the structure of the ISI series, we investigate the problem of its computation. PMID:11308739

  20. Chaotic dynamics from interspike intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Alexey N.; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik; Anishchenko, Vadim S.

    2001-03-01

    Considering two different mathematical models describing chaotic spiking phenomena, namely, an integrate-and-fire and a threshold-crossing model, we discuss the problem of extracting dynamics from interspike intervals (ISIs) and show that the possibilities of computing the largest Lyapunov exponent (LE) from point processes differ between the two models. We also consider the problem of estimating the second LE and the possibility to diagnose hyperchaotic behavior by processing spike trains. Since the second exponent is quite sensitive to the structure of the ISI series, we investigate the problem of its computation.

  1. Landslides: Geomorphology and Sea Cliff Hazard Potential, Santa Barbara - Isla Vista, California J.F. Klath and E.A. Keller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klath, J. F.; Keller, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal areas are often characterized by high population densities in an ever changing, dynamic environment. The world's coasts are often dominated by steeply sloping sea cliffs, the morphology of which reflects rock type, wave erosion, and surface erosion, as well as human activities such changing vegetation, urban runoff, and construction of coastal defenses. The Santa Barbara and Goleta area, with over 17 km of sea cliffs and beaches, extends from Santa Barbara Point west to the hamlet of Isla Vista. A deeper understanding of the local geology and the physical processes generating slope failure and, thus, landward cliff retreat is important for general public safety, as well as future development and planning. Our research objective includes assessment of landslide hazard potential through investigation of previous landslides and how these events relate to various physical variables and characteristics within the surrounding bedrock. How does landslide frequency, volume, and type relate to varying local bedrock and structure? Two geologic formations dominate the sea cliffs of the Santa Barbara area: Monterey shale (upper, middle, and lower) and Monterey Sisquoc shale. Geology varies from hard cemented shale and diatomaceous, low specific gravity shale to compaction shale. Variations in landslide characteristics are linked closely to the geology of a specific site that affects how easily rock units are weathered and eroded by wave erosion, naturally occurring oil and water seeps, burnt shale events, and landslide type and frequency on steeply dipped bedding planes/daylighting beds. Naturally occurring features linked to human processes often weaken bedrock and, thus, increase the likelihood of landslides. We categorize landslide frequency, type, and triggers; location of beach access, drainage pipes, and water; and oil and tar seeps in order to develop suggestions to minimize landslide potential. Lastly, using previously published erosion cliff retreat rates and

  2. Survey for least bell's vireo in riparian habitat on Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1988-01-01

    The least bell's vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) was listed in 1986 as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Because of the possibility of the species existing on Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), this survey was conducted to determine if they exist, and if so to prepare a distribution map of the species on the base. Major riparian areas were surveyed on foot for 17 days in April, May, and July 1987. No least bell's vireo were sighted; based on past studies, it is unlikely that there is a significant population on VAFB. There are, however, at least 13 other species of special concern that inhabit VAFB riparian woodlands. Most of these species have declined along the south coast of Santa Barbara County, and many have declined in much of the southern half of California. Riparian areas on VAFB are an important environmental resource for the southern half of California; many of these areas, however, show signs of degradation.

  3. Calcification of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and carbonate ion concentration: Results from the Santa Barbara Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Emily B.; Thunell, Robert C.; Marshall, Brittney J.; Holm, Jessica A.; Tappa, Eric J.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Cai, Wei-Jun; Chen, Baoshan

    2016-08-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal calcification intensity, reflected by shell wall thickness, has been hypothesized to covary with the carbonate chemistry of seawater. Here we use both sediment trap and box core samples from the Santa Barbara Basin to evaluate the relationship between the calcification intensity of the planktonic foraminifera species Globigerina bulloides, measured by area density (µg/µm2), and the carbonate ion concentration of seawater ([CO32-]). We also evaluate the influence of both temperature and nutrient concentration ([PO43-]) on foraminiferal calcification and growth. The presence of two G. bulloides morphospecies with systematically different calcification properties and offset stable isotopic compositions was identified within sampling populations using distinguishing morphometric characteristics. The calcification temperature and by extension calcification depth of the more abundant "normal" G. bulloides morphospecies was determined using δ18O temperature estimates. Calcification depths vary seasonally with upwelling and were used to select the appropriate [CO32-], temperature, and [PO43-] depth measurements for comparison with area density. Seasonal upwelling in the study region also results in collinearity between independent variables complicating a straightforward statistical analysis. To address this issue, we use additional statistical diagnostics and a down core record to disentangle the respective roles of each parameter on G. bulloides calcification. Our results indicate that [CO32-] is the primary variable controlling calcification intensity while temperature influences shell size. We report a modern calibration for the normal G. bulloides morphospecies that can be used in down core studies of well-preserved sediments to estimate past [CO32-].

  4. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in turbid coastal waters of the Santa Barbara Channel with SeaWiFS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Siegel, D.A.; Mackenzie, C.

    2004-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimating suspended sediment concentrations of turbid coastal waters with remotely sensed multi-spectral data. The method improves upon many standard techniques, since it incorporates analyses of multiple wavelength bands (four for Sea-viewing Wide Field of view Sensor (SeaWiFS)) and a nonlinear calibration, which produce highly accurate results (expected errors are approximately ±10%). Further, potential errors produced by erroneous atmospheric calibration in excessively turbid waters and influences of dissolved organic materials, chlorophyll pigments and atmospheric aerosols are limited by a dark pixel subtraction and removal of the violet to blue wavelength bands. Results are presented for the Santa Barbara Channel, California where suspended sediment concentrations ranged from 0–200+ mg l−1 (±20 mg l−1) immediately after large river runoff events. The largest plumes were observed 10–30 km off the coast and occurred immediately following large El Niño winter floods.

  5. Phytoplankton primary productivity in the Santa Barbara Channel: Effects of wind-driven upwelling and mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Mark A.; Washburn, Libe

    2011-12-01

    The patterns and drivers of phytoplankton primary productivity in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) were examined on 16 cruises conducted 3 times each year from 2001 to 2006. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis revealed 3 modes of variability that explained 89% of the variance in the productivity data set. The first mode, strongest during spring, describes seasonal productivity changes driven by coastal upwelling. The second mode, largest in spring and fall, describes productivity changes over the western SBC associated with cyclonic eddies. Eddy-enhanced productivity changes were superimposed on variable levels of channel-wide productivity caused by upwelling within the SBC. The cyclonic eddies influenced productivity through enhanced nutrient supply associated with the uplift of isopycnal surfaces and through the occasional entrainment of phytoplankton and nutrients from water upwelled north of Point Conception. The third EOF mode describes productivity gradients on the continental shelf along the mainland coast with enhanced productivity in the east during spring and fall. Overall, our analysis shows that coastal upwelling combined with the effects of cyclonic circulation on particle retention and vertical nutrient supply combine to enhance phytoplankton biomass and productivity in the western SBC.

  6. Holocene dinoflagellate cyst record of climate and marine primary productivity change in the Santa Barbara Basin, southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelova, Vera; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Hendy, Ingrid, L.; Pedersen, Thomas F.

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution sedimentary records of dinoflagellate cysts and other marine palynomorphs from the Santa Barbara Basin (Ocean Drilling Program Hole 893A) demonstrate large variability of primary productivity during the Holocene, as the California Current System responded to climate change. Throughout the sequence, dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are characterized by the dominance of cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, and particularly by Brigantedinium, accompanied by other upwelling-related taxa such as Echinidinium and cysts of Protoperidinium americanum. During the early Holocene (~12-7 ka), the species richness is relatively low (16 taxa) and genius Brigantedinium reaches the highest relative abundance, thus indicating nutrient-rich and highly productive waters. The middle Holocene (~7-3.5 ka) is characterized by relatively constant cyst concentrations, and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are indicative of a slight decrease in sea-surface temperature. A noticeable increase and greater range of fluctuations in the cyst concentrations during the late Holocene (~3.5-1 ka) indicate enhanced marine primary productivity and increased climatic variability, most likely related to the intensification of El Niño-like conditions. Keywords: dinoflagellate cysts, Holocene, North Pacific, climate, primary productivity.

  7. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  8. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  9. Postexercise Hypotension After Continuous, Aerobic Interval, and Sprint Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Siddhartha S; Bhammar, Dharini M; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-10-01

    We examined the effects of 3 exercise bouts, differing markedly in intensity, on postexercise hypotension (PEH). Eleven young adults (age: 24.6 ± 3.7 years) completed 4 randomly assigned experimental conditions: (a) control, (b) 30-minute steady-state exercise (SSE) at 75-80% maximum heart rate (HRmax), (4) aerobic interval exercise (AIE): four 4-minute bouts at 90-95% HRmax, separated by 3 minutes of active recovery, and (d) sprint interval exercise (SIE): six 30-second Wingate sprints, separated by 4 minutes of active recovery. Exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer. Blood pressure (BP) was measured before exercise and every 15-minute postexercise for 3 hours. Linear mixed models were used to compare BP between trials. During the 3-hour postexercise, systolic BP (SBP) was lower (p < 0.001) after AIE (118 ± 10 mm Hg), SSE (121 ± 10 mm Hg), and SIE (121 ± 11 mm Hg) compared with control (124 ± 8 mm Hg). Diastolic BP (DBP) was also lower (p < 0.001) after AIE (66 ± 7 mm Hg), SSE (69 ± 6 mm Hg), and SIE (68 ± 8 mm Hg) compared with control (71 ± 7 mm Hg). Only AIE resulted in sustained (>2 hours) PEH, with SBP (120 ± 9 mm Hg) and DBP (68 ± 7 mm Hg) during the third-hour postexercise being lower (p ≤ 0.05) than control (124 ± 8 and 70 ± 7 mm Hg). Although all exercise bouts produced similar reductions in BP at 1-hour postexercise, the duration of PEH was greatest after AIE.

  10. Orders on Intervals Over Partially Ordered Sets: Extending Allen's Algebra and Interval Graph Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Francisco; Kreinovich, Vladik; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.

    2013-08-01

    To make a decision, we need to compare the values of quantities. In many practical situations, we know the values with interval uncertainty. In such situations, we need to compare intervals. Allen’s algebra describes all possible relations between intervals on the real line, and ordering relations between such intervals are well studied. In this paper, we extend this description to intervals in an arbitrary partially ordered set (poset). In particular, we explicitly describe ordering relations between intervals that generalize relation between points. As auxiliary results, we provide a logical interpretation of the relation between intervals, and extend the results about interval graphs to intervals over posets.

  11. Pigeons' Choices between Fixed-Interval and Random-Interval Schedules: Utility of Variability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E.; Cardinal, Claudia D.; Field, Douglas P.; Flannery, Barbara A.; Johnson, Michael; Bailey, Kathleen; Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    Pigeons' choosing between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules of reinforcement was investigated in three experiments using a discrete-trial procedure. In all three experiments, the random-interval schedule was generated by sampling a probability distribution at an interval (and in multiples of the interval) equal to that of the…

  12. Scaling of light and dark time intervals.

    PubMed

    Marinova, J

    1978-01-01

    Scaling of light and dark time intervals of 0.1 to 1.1 s is performed by the mehtod of magnitude estimation with respect to a given standard. The standards differ in duration and type (light and dark). The light intervals are subjectively estimated as longer than the dark ones. The relation between the mean interval estimations and their magnitude is linear for both light and dark intervals.

  13. Permutations and topological entropy for interval maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2003-05-01

    Recently Bandt, Keller and Pompe (2002 Entropy of interval maps via permutations Nonlinearity 15 1595-602) introduced a method of computing the entropy of piecewise monotone interval maps by counting permutations exhibited by initial pieces of orbits. We show that for topological entropy this method does not work for arbitrary continuous interval maps. We also show that for piecewise monotone interval maps topological entropy can be computed by counting permutations exhibited by periodic orbits.

  14. 3D Structural and Stratigraphic Architecture of the Northwest Santa Barbara Channel and Implications for Submarine Landslide Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A.; Kluesner, J. W.; Brothers, D. S.; Johnson, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple submarine landslides have been previously documented on the north flank of the Santa Barbara Channel, and such failures are considered capable of generating local tsunamis. 2D seismic-reflection datasets provide a general view of regional framework geology, including faulting and folding associated with north-south compression. However, better understanding of the relationships between faults, folds, stratigraphic architecture, and submarine landslides can be obtained with 3D seismic datasets. In this study we use an industry 3D seismic-reflection volume that encompasses the slope and shelfbreak surrounding the Gaviota submarine landslide (3.8 km2) to investigate structural and stratigraphic controls on slope failure in this region. The depth-migrated seismic volume shows a network of stacked thrust faults, backthrusts, and splays that results in both broad and local zones of compression and folding along the slope and shelf. One localized zone of enhanced folding associated with small-offset thrust faults is located directly beneath the Gaviota landslide headwall, while another zone is located directly below an imaged seafloor fissure. In addition, 3D seismic attribute analysis provides insight into the shallow sedimentary section of the failed and non-failed sedimentary packages. Calculation of RMS amplitude and dominant frequency within a windowed region below the seafloor horizon delineates an apparent zone of gas-charged strata that onlaps onto older folded sediments. The up-dip limit of these gas-charged sediments aligns with the location of a seafloor fissure that extends westward from the Gaviota landslide headwall. We propose that the combination of deformation and fluid charging acted to pre-condition and trigger the failure of the Gaviota landslide, and as a result, the presence of these conditions along the fissure adjacent to the Gaviota landslide suggests this area should be considered landslide prone.

  15. Organic matter cycling across the sulfate-methane transition zone of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, Tomoko; Burdige, David J.; Li, Huan-Lei; Magen, Cédric; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Cada, Abraham K.

    2016-03-01

    Consumption of sulfate (SO42-) in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) has often been considered to be due solely to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). However, recent studies show SO42- fluxes into the SMTZ that exceed methane (CH4) fluxes, thereby challenging this conceptual model. Co-occurrence of organoclastic SO42- reduction (oSR) with AOM in the SMTZ has been hypothesized to be the cause for this flux imbalance, but conclusive evidence is lacking. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated organic matter cycling in the SMTZ of the organic-rich sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland, and examined the occurrence of oSR within this zone using bulk solute profiles and Δ14C and δ13C values of selected carbon pools. We also tested the hypothesis that the SMTZ acts as an oxidation front not just for CH4, but also for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that is produced below the SMTZ and migrates upward. Mass balance calculations for the SMTZ based on reaction stoichiometry and Δ14C and δ13C values of associated carbon fluxes indicate that ∼35-45% of total SO42- reduction in the SMTZ occurs via oSR, with the remainder attributable to AOM. The δ13C value of net DOC production is distinct from that of the fraction of bulk POC undergoing degradation, suggesting that pore-water DOC represents a compositionally unique slice of the metabolizable POC pool. DOC diffusing upward at 450 cm is virtually free of 14C and contain low levels of short-chain organic acids. Radiocarbon mass balance shows that >30% of this pre-aged, and presumably refractory, DOC is removed from the pore waters within or immediately below the SMTZ. Although the SMTZ does not appear to be a major net DOC oxidation front, these results show that DOC dynamics provide unique insights into organic matter processing in these subsurface sediments.

  16. Integration of sequence stratigraphy and process sedimentology: Miocene Rincon and Topanga Formations, Santa Barbara basin near Point Mugu, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.W.; Marquard, R.S. )

    1990-05-01

    The Miocene Rincan and Topanga formations exposed at Point Mugu comprise over 1,200 ft of interbedded sandstones, siltstones, claystones, and clay shales that were deposited in a tectonically active marine basin adjacent to the present Santa Monica Mountains. Integration of sequence stratigraphic interpretation techniques and process sedimentology demonstrates that this section originated as shelfal deposits during sea level rise that were cut by a submarine canyon during subsequent sea level lowstand. The base of the sequence contains a bioturbated silty sandstone indicative of a transgressive deposit within the sequence stratigraphic framework. Upsection, dark clay shales of a condensed section contain fish fragments and sponge progradational highstand shelf sandstones. An erosional surface flooring a deep-water canyon cuts the highstand deposits and marks a sequence boundary. Within the submarine canyon fill, deep-water deposits represent at least two episodes of sediment gravity flows. A predominantly deformed lower section is cut by an erosional surface (another sequence boundary ) overlain by undeformed strata. The deformed section was caused by slumping of a canyon wall within a slope environment and deposition of high-density turbidites and debris flows. The undeformed section contains Bouma sequences, graded beds, dish structures, and biogenic structures. Interstratified bed-thinning and bed-thickening sequences suggest minor progradational events and small feeder channels within the undeformed section. These relationships demonstrate that not all sequences comprising deep-water deposits can be easily assigned to facies, such as channels and lobes, based on vertical and lateral profiles. This integration of sequence stratigraphy and sedimentology has assisted in understanding the vertical and lateral heterogeneities present within exploration and production areas in the adjacent Santa Barbara Channel.

  17. Interval approach to braneworld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon

    2005-10-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds may exhibit extra scalar degrees of freedom with problematic features, including kinetic ghosts and strong coupling behavior. Analysis of such effects is hampered by the standard heuristic approaches to braneworld gravity, which use the equations of motion as the starting point, supplemented by orbifold projections and junction conditions. Here we develop the interval approach to braneworld gravity, which begins with an action principle. This shows how to implement general covariance, despite allowing metric fluctuations that do not vanish on the boundaries. We reproduce simple Z2 orbifolds of gravity, even though in this approach we never perform a Z2 projection. We introduce a family of “straight gauges”, which are bulk coordinate systems in which both branes appear as straight slices in a single coordinate patch. Straight gauges are extremely useful for analyzing metric fluctuations in braneworld models. By explicit gauge-fixing, we show that a general AdS5/AdS4 setup with two branes has at most a radion, but no physical “brane-bending” modes.

  18. Ground-water monitoring at Santa Barbara, California; Phase 3, development of a three-dimensional digital ground-water flow model for storage unit I of the Santa Barbara ground-water basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Peter; Berenbrock, Charles

    1986-01-01

    Water-bearing rocks within the 7 sq mi of Storage Unit I of the Santa Barbara Groundwater Basin, consist of unconsolidated deposits that range in thickness from < 300 ft along the north perimeter of the unit to > 1,000 ft near the Pacific Ocean. The groundwater system was simulated as two horizontal layers separated by a confining bed. The model boundaries coincide with mapped faults on all sides. The faults were considered no-flow boundaries except for the offshore fault that forms the south boundary. This boundary was simulated as a general-head boundary , which allows water to move into and out of the modeled area. The model was calibrated by simulating both steady-state conditions (approximated by July 1978 and February 1983 water levels) and transient-state conditions (represented by May 1978 through December 1979 water level changes). The calibrated model was then used to simulate the period from January 1980 through December 1983 in order to verify the model. Model results generally closely matched measured data throughout Storage Unit I. During the transient and verification simulations, 9,980 acre-ft of groundwater was pumped from Storage Unit I for municipal use. Results of the model indicate that 42% (4,190 acre-ft) of the water pumped from the system was withdrawn from storage, 33% (3,290 acre-ft) was derived from changes in underflow across the offshore fault, and 25% (2,500 acre-ft) was derived from decreased groundwater discharge to drains. The model simulated that municipal pumpage induced about 1,380 acre-ft of water to move across the offshore fault toward Storage Unit I. Several model simulations were used to estimate aquifer response to different municipal pumpage patterns that could be used as management alternatives. Results of the simulations indicate that spreading municipal pumpage more evenly throughout Storage Unit I, by increasing the number of wells while reducing the pumping rate at the individual wells to maintain the same total

  19. Variations in archaeal and bacterial diversity associated with the sulfate-methane transition zone in continental margin sediments (Santa Barbara Basin, California).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Benjamin K; Zhang, Husen; Berelson, Will; Orphan, Victoria J

    2009-03-01

    The sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) is a widespread feature of continental margins, representing a diffusion-controlled interface where there is enhanced microbial activity. SMTZ microbial activity is commonly associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), which is carried out by syntrophic associations between sulfate-reducing bacteria and methane-oxidizing archaea. While our understanding of the microorganisms catalyzing AOM has advanced, the diversity and ecological role of the greater microbial assemblage associated with the SMTZ have not been well characterized. In this study, the microbial diversity above, within, and beneath the Santa Barbara Basin SMTZ was described. ANME-1-related archaeal phylotypes appear to be the primary methane oxidizers in the Santa Barbara Basin SMTZ, which was independently supported by exclusive recovery of related methyl coenzyme M reductase genes (mcrA). Sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria phylotypes affiliated with the Desulfobacterales and Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus clades were also enriched in the SMTZ, as confirmed by analysis of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) gene diversity. Statistical methods demonstrated that there was a close relationship between the microbial assemblages recovered from the two horizons associated with the geochemically defined SMTZ, which could be distinguished from microbial diversity recovered from the sulfate-replete overlying horizons and methane-rich sediment beneath the transition zone. Comparison of the Santa Barbara Basin SMTZ microbial assemblage to microbial assemblages of methane seeps and other organic matter-rich sedimentary environments suggests that bacterial groups not typically associated with AOM, such as Planctomycetes and candidate division JS1, are additionally enriched within the SMTZ and may represent a common bacterial signature of many SMTZ environments worldwide.

  20. Intervals in evolutionary algorithms for global optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    Optimization is of central concern to a number of disciplines. Interval Arithmetic methods for global optimization provide us with (guaranteed) verified results. These methods are mainly restricted to the classes of objective functions that are twice differentiable and use a simple strategy of eliminating a splitting larger regions of search space in the global optimization process. An efficient approach that combines the efficient strategy from Interval Global Optimization Methods and robustness of the Evolutionary Algorithms is proposed. In the proposed approach, search begins with randomly created interval vectors with interval widths equal to the whole domain. Before the beginning of the evolutionary process, fitness of these interval parameter vectors is defined by evaluating the objective function at the center of the initial interval vectors. In the subsequent evolutionary process the local optimization process returns an estimate of the bounds of the objective function over the interval vectors. Though these bounds may not be correct at the beginning due to large interval widths and complicated function properties, the process of reducing interval widths over time and a selection approach similar to simulated annealing helps in estimating reasonably correct bounds as the population evolves. The interval parameter vectors at these estimated bounds (local optima) are then subjected to crossover and mutation operators. This evolutionary process continues for predetermined number of generations in the search of the global optimum.

  1. Modeling of depth to base of Last Glacial Maximum and seafloor sediment thickness for the California State Waters Map Series, eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Sliter, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    Models of the depth to the base of Last Glacial Maximum and sediment thickness over the base of Last Glacial Maximum for the eastern Santa Barbara Channel are a key part of the maps of shallow subsurface geology and structure for offshore Refugio to Hueneme Canyon, California, in the California State Waters Map Series. A satisfactory interpolation of the two datasets that accounted for regional geologic structure was developed using geographic information systems modeling and graphics software tools. Regional sediment volumes were determined from the model. Source data files suitable for geographic information systems mapping applications are provided.

  2. Planktonic foraminiferal shell weight reflects sea surface temperature over the past 150 years in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, D. K.; Clayman, L.; Weaver, J.; Schimmelmann, A.; Hendy, I. L.

    2011-12-01

    Size-normalized foraminiferal shell weight has been used as a proxy for past carbonate ion concentration in seawater, assuming that reduced carbonate ion concentration and pH lead to lower calcification rates and lighter, thinner shells. Previous research suggested that the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and ocean acidification over the last century has resulted in lower shell weight, but this has not yet been documented at high resolution. Here, we present an approximately annual record of size-normalized shell weight and Mg/Ca of the near-surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides to investigate the relationship between shell weight and sea surface temperature in Santa Barbara Basin, California (34° 16.847' N, 120° 02.268' W), over the last 150 years. Results indicate that foraminiferal shell weight is inversely correlated with instrumental sea surface temperature since 1850. Foraminiferal shell weights were highest between 1900 and 1920, corresponding to the lowest instrumental and Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures. Shell weights gradually decreased to their lowest values after the mid-1970s, coincident with northeast Pacific warming as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation shifted from cool to warm phase. G. bulloides Mg/Ca temperatures also gradually increased after 1970, from 13 ± 1°C to 14.5 ± 1°C. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the lowest shell-weight foraminifera, those deposited since the mid-1970s shift, exhibit a distinctive smooth shell texture devoid of spine bases, in contrast with higher shell-weight foraminifera, which have numerous spine bases and large pores. The smooth-shell surface morphology is replicated in laboratory dissolution experiments, consistent with removal of an outer layer of calcite during shell thinning and partial dissolution of G. bulloides. These results suggest that G. bulloides calcification rates were related to sea surface temperatures over the last 150 years, and that shells deposited

  3. The interval order polytope of a digraph

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.; Schulz, A.

    1994-12-31

    Interval orders and their cocomparability graphs, the interval graphs, are of significant importance as structures of solutions for several combinatorial optimization problems. This is due to the fact that each element is associated with an interval, which may be interpreted as a time interval, for example in a schedule, or as a substring in a string of items, for example, a substring of a DNA string in molecular biology. In the talk we show that the interval order polytope of a digraph may serve as a basis for a polyhedral combinatorial approach to this class of problems. We present results on odd cycle and clique based valid inequalities and discuss the complexity of their separation problem. We show that well-known valid inequalities of the linear ordering polytope, as, e.g., Mobius ladder inequalities and fence inequalities obtain a natural interpretation in terms of these inequalities of the interval order polytope.

  4. Stimulus properties of fixed-interval responses.

    PubMed

    Buchman, I B; Zeiler, M D

    1975-11-01

    Responses in the first component of a chained schedule produced a change to the terminal component according to a fixed-interval schedule. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval determined whether a variable-interval schedule of food presentation or extinction prevailed in the terminal component. In one condition, the variable-interval schedule was in effect only if the number of responses during the fixed interval was less than that specified; in another condition, the number of responses had to exceed that specified. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval did not shift markedly in the direction required for food presentation. Instead, responding often tended to change in the opposite direction. Such an effect indicated that differential food presentation did not modify the reference behavior in accord with the requirement, but it was consistent with other data on fixed-interval schedule performance. Behavior in the terminal component, however, did reveal sensitivity to the relation between total responses emitted in the fixed interval and the availability of food. Response rate in the terminal component was a function of the proximity of the response number emitted in the fixed interval to that required for food presentation. Thus, response number served as a discriminative stimulus controlling subsequent performance.

  5. A note on the path interval distance.

    PubMed

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important. PMID:27040521

  6. A note on the path interval distance.

    PubMed

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important.

  7. Interval and Contour Processing in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    High functioning children with autism and age and intelligence matched controls participated in experiments testing perception of pitch intervals and musical contours. The finding from the interval study showed superior detection of pitch direction over small pitch distances in the autism group. On the test of contour discrimination no group…

  8. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  9. The marine geology of the eastern Santa Barbara Channel, with particular emphasis on the ground water basins offshore from the Oxnard Plain, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Wolf, Stephen C.; Blom, Ken G.

    1978-01-01

    Marine geophysical investigations provide new data concerning the stratigraphy, tectonic and sedimentary history, and the ground water geology of the southeastern Santa Barbara Channel region. The offshore stratigraphy identified in seismic reflection profiles includes a succession of Neogene to Quaternary strata. The middle Miocene Conejo volcanics form an acoustical basement and the overlying late Cenozoic sedimentary rocks attain a thickness greater than 2,500 m. These sedimentary deposits fill a structurally controlled, physiographic and depositional depression called the Ventura Basin. Structure consists generally of a gently folded, east-trending Tertiary synclinorium bordered on the north by a regional thrust fault and on the south by a steep asymmetrical anticlinal ridge. Most structures show evidence of north-south compression that occurred during early Pleistocene time. Three well-defined unconformities represent widespread erosion in late Miocene, early to middle Pleistocene, and late Pleistocene time. The boundaries of Miocene, Pliocene, and lower Pleistocene strata continue uninterrupted eastward along the southern part of Santa Barbara basin to Hueneme Canyon, where they turn northeast and can be traced to the coast near Port Hueneme. These limits probably represent the south edge of the Santa Barbara basin during Pliocene and Pleistocene time. Fresh water-bearing materials of the Oxnard plain are unconsolidated Quaternary sediment laid down on more consolidated Tertiary rocks. Offshore, the total fresh water-bearing materials distinguished in the seismic reflection profiles attain a thickness of about 356 m and have an areal extent of over 760 km2. Strata that contain the offshore continuation of the five major on-land aquifers (Grimes Canyon, Fox Canyon, Hueneme, Mugu, and Oxnard aquifers) are identified in the seismic reflection profiles. These strata make up the two offshore ground-water basins, the Mound and Oxnard plain ground-water basins

  10. Interval colorectal carcinoma: An unsolved debate

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Mark; Neto, Antonio Galvao; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC), as the third most common new cancer diagnosis, poses a significant health risk to the population. Interval CRCs are those that appear after a negative screening test or examination. The development of interval CRCs has been shown to be multifactorial: location of exam-academic institution versus community hospital, experience of the endoscopist, quality of the procedure, age of the patient, flat versus polypoid neoplasia, genetics, hereditary gastrointestinal neoplasia, and most significantly missed or incompletely excised lesions. The rate of interval CRCs has decreased in the last decade, which has been ascribed to an increased understanding of interval disease and technological advances in the screening of high risk individuals. In this article, we aim to review the literature with regard to the multifactorial nature of interval CRCs and provide the most recent developments regarding this important gastrointestinal entity. PMID:26668498

  11. Constructing Confidence Intervals for Qtl Location

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B.; Goffinet, B.; Rebai, A.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for constructing the confidence interval of the QTL location parameter. This method is developed in the local asymptotic framework, leading to a linear model at each position of the putative QTL. The idea is to construct a likelihood ratio test, using statistics whose asymptotic distribution does not depend on the nuisance parameters and in particular on the effect of the QTL. We show theoretical properties of the confidence interval built with this test, and compare it with the classical confidence interval using simulations. We show in particular, that our confidence interval has the correct probability of containing the true map location of the QTL, for almost all QTLs, whereas the classical confidence interval can be very biased for QTLs having small effect. PMID:7896108

  12. Tracking Identity: Opportunity, Success, and Affiliation with Science among Fifth-Grade Latina/o Youth of Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Grayson Ford

    This dissertation is an investigation into the American public education system at the elementary school level. It highlights important factors that shape the organizational structure of schools and classrooms, and in turn, how they engender disparities in the ways students experience education, namely, in the opportunities made available to them to achieve and succeed at a high level. This dissertation operates at the confluence of notions about class, gender, language, and race, especially as they revolve around public education and the hegemonic meritocratic discourse on which it is founded. This dissertation engages and contributes to scholarship within the following areas: The political economy of education; discourse and the dialectical relationship between agency and structure; cultural perspectives on identity, voice, and learning; and, Latinas/os in science education. The data that serve as the basis for the findings presented in this dissertation were collected throughout a three-phase yearlong ethnographic study of the two tracked fifth-grade classrooms at Amblen Elementary School, serving a socioeconomically disadvantaged Latina/o student population in Santa Barbara, California. In classrooms all across the nation, while it remains true that Latina/o students disproportionally take up space in the lower-tracked courses and not in the higher ones, this study does not examine inequality in tracking assignments made along ethnic/racial lines (as 100% of the students that participated in this research identify as Latina/o), rather, it investigates the consequences of what happens when Latina/o students are tracked according to symbolic markers of their ethnic/racial identity, that is, their varying levels of English language competency. Using data from participant observation, semi-structured interviews, students' drawings, as well as free-list and rank-order exercises, I was able to answer the following central research questions: In what ways do the

  13. Sampling Theory and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Using ESCI To Illustrate "Bouncing"; Confidence Intervals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Yunfei

    This paper discusses the impact of sampling error on the construction of confidence intervals around effect sizes. Sampling error affects the location and precision of confidence intervals. Meta-analytic resampling demonstrates that confidence intervals can haphazardly bounce around the true population parameter. Special software with graphical…

  14. Assessing uncertainty in reference intervals via tolerance intervals: application to a mixed model describing HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Katki, Hormuzd A; Engels, Eric A; Rosenberg, Philip S

    2005-10-30

    We define the reference interval as the range between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of a random variable. We use reference intervals to compare characteristics of a marker of disease progression between affected populations. We use a tolerance interval to assess uncertainty in the reference interval. Unlike the tolerance interval, the estimated reference interval does not contains the true reference interval with specified confidence (or credibility). The tolerance interval is easy to understand, communicate and visualize. We derive estimates of the reference interval and its tolerance interval for markers defined by features of a linear mixed model. Examples considered are reference intervals for time trends in HIV viral load, and CD4 per cent, in HIV-infected haemophiliac children and homosexual men. We estimate the intervals with likelihood methods and also develop a Bayesian model in which the parameters are estimated via Markov-chain Monte Carlo. The Bayesian formulation naturally overcomes some important limitations of the likelihood model. PMID:16189804

  15. Acceleration-induced electrocardiographic interval changes.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, C C; Whinnery, J E

    1988-02-01

    The electrocardiographic intervals (PR, QRS, QT, and RR) before, during, and post +Gz stress were measured in 24 healthy male subjects undergoing +Gz centrifuge exposure. The PR and QRS intervals responded in a predictable manner, shortening during stress and returning to baseline resting values post-stress. The QT interval, however, was not observed to be dependent solely on heart rate. Bazett's formula, which was developed to correct for heart rate variability, did not adequately result in a homogeneous correction of the QT interval for each stress-related period. During +Gz stress, the QT was shortened, and the QTc prolonged. The QT interval remained shortened even though the heart rate returned to baseline (with the QTc undercorrected) in the post-stress period. The QT (QTc) interval variations probably reflect the effects of both heart rate and autonomic balance during and after +Gz stress, and may provide a measure of the prevailing autonomic (sympathetic or parasympathetic) tone existing at a given point associated with +Gz stress. These electrocardiographic interval changes define the normal response for healthy individuals. Individuals with exaggerated autonomic responses could be identified by comparing their responses to these normal responses resulting from +Gz stress. PMID:3345170

  16. Interval modeling of dynamics for multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Ekaterina

    2007-02-01

    Modeling of multibody systems is an important though demanding field of application for interval arithmetic. Interval modeling of dynamics is particularly challenging, not least because of the differential equations which have to be solved in the process. Most modeling tools transform these equations into a (non-autonomous) initial value problem, interval algorithms for solving of which are known. The challenge then consists in finding interfaces between these algorithms and the modeling tools. This includes choosing between "symbolic" and "numerical" modeling environments, transforming the usually non-autonomous resulting system into an autonomous one, ensuring conformity of the new interval version to the old numerical, etc. In this paper, we focus on modeling multibody systems' dynamics with the interval extension of the "numerical" environment MOBILE, discuss the techniques which make the uniform treatment of interval and non-interval modeling easier, comment on the wrapping effect, and give reasons for our choice of MOBILE by comparing the results achieved with its help with those obtained by analogous symbolic tools.

  17. The microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, G. David; Weiss, Bernard; Laties, Victor G.

    1983-01-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation in shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. PMID:16812324

  18. Microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Weiss, B.; Laties, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation is shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. 31 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Advanced Interval Management: A Benefit Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timer, Sebastian; Peters, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This document is the final report for the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)- sponsored task order 'Possible Benefits for Advanced Interval Management Operations.' Under this research project, Architecture Technology Corporation performed an analysis to determine the maximum potential benefit to be gained if specific Advanced Interval Management (AIM) operations were implemented in the National Airspace System (NAS). The motivation for this research is to guide NASA decision-making on which Interval Management (IM) applications offer the most potential benefit and warrant further research.

  20. Importance of QT interval in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ambhore, Anand; Teo, Swee-Guan; Bin Omar, Abdul Razakjr; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2014-12-01

    Long QT interval is an important finding that is often missed by electrocardiogram interpreters. Long QT syndrome (inherited and acquired) is a potentially lethal cardiac channelopathy that is frequently mistaken for epilepsy. We present a case of long QT syndrome with multiple cardiac arrests presenting as syncope and seizures. The long QTc interval was aggravated by hypomagnesaemia and drugs, including clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Multiple drugs can cause prolongation of the QT interval, and all physicians should bear this in mind when prescribing these drugs.

  1. Globally convergent autocalibration using interval analysis.

    PubMed

    Fusiello, Andrea; Benedetti, Arrigo; Farenzena, Michela; Busti, Alessandro

    2004-12-01

    We address the problem of autocalibration of a moving camera with unknown constant intrinsic parameters. Existing autocalibration techniques use numerical optimization algorithms whose convergence to the correct result cannot be guaranteed, in general. To address this problem, we have developed a method where an interval branch-and-bound method is employed for numerical minimization. Thanks to the properties of Interval Analysis this method converges to the global solution with mathematical certainty and arbitrary accuracy and the only input information it requires from the user are a set of point correspondences and a search interval. The cost function is based on the Huang-Faugeras constraint of the essential matrix. A recently proposed interval extension based on Bernstein polynomial forms has been investigated to speed up the search for the solution. Finally, experimental results are presented. PMID:15573823

  2. Efficient Computation Of Confidence Intervals Of Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.

    1992-01-01

    Study focuses on obtaining efficient algorithm for estimation of confidence intervals of ML estimates. Four algorithms selected to solve associated constrained optimization problem. Hybrid algorithms, following search and gradient approaches, prove best.

  3. Predictive intervals for age-specific fertility.

    PubMed

    Keilman, N; Pham, D Q

    2000-03-01

    A multivariate ARIMA model is combined with a Gamma curve to predict confidence intervals for age-specific birth rates by 1-year age groups. The method is applied to observed age-specific births in Norway between 1900 and 1995, and predictive intervals are computed for each year up to 2050. The predicted two-thirds confidence intervals for Total Fertility (TF) around 2010 agree well with TF errors in old population forecasts made by Statistics Norway. The method gives useful predictions for age-specific fertility up to the years 2020-30. For later years, the intervals become too wide. Methods that do not take into account estimation errors in the ARIMA model coefficients underestimate the uncertainty for future TF values. The findings suggest that the margin between high and low fertility variants in official population forecasts for many Western countries are too narrow. PMID:12158991

  4. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  5. Almost primes in almost all short intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TERÄVÄINEN, JONI

    2016-09-01

    Let $E_k$ be the set of positive integers having exactly $k$ prime factors. We show that almost all intervals $[x,x+\\log^{1+\\varepsilon} x]$ contain $E_3$ numbers, and almost all intervals $[x,x+\\log^{3.51} x]$ contain $E_2$ numbers. By this we mean that there are only $o(X)$ integers $1\\leq x\\leq X$ for which the mentioned intervals do not contain such numbers. The result for $E_3$ numbers is optimal up to the $\\varepsilon$ in the exponent. The theorem on $E_2$ numbers improves a result of Harman, which had the exponent $7+\\varepsilon$ in place of $3.51$. We will also consider general $E_k$ numbers, and find them on intervals whose lengths approach $\\log x$ as $k\\to \\infty$.

  6. Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas City

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas City Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.

  7. SOPIE: Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Willem D.

    2016-07-01

    SOPIE (Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation) provides functions to non-parametrically estimate the off-pulse interval of a source function originating from a pulsar. The technique is based on a sequential application of P-values obtained from goodness-of-fit tests for the uniform distribution, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramér-von Mises, Anderson-Darling and Rayleigh goodness-of-fit tests.

  8. Response of diatoms and silicoflagellates to climate change in the Santa Barbara Basin during the past 250 years and the rise of the toxic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia australis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David; Field, David B.; Finney, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms and silicoflagellate assemblages were examined in two year-increments of varved samples spanning the interval from 1748 through 2007 in Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) box core SBBC0806 to determine the timing and impact of possible 20th century warming on several different components of the plankton. Diatoms (Thalassionema nitzschioides =TN) and silicoflagellates (Distephanus speculum s.l. =DS) indicative of cooler waters and a shallow thermocline begin to decline in the 1920s and persistently compose a lower percentage of the assemblage in the SBB by about 1940. Prior to 1940, TN constituted on average ~30% of the Chaetoceros-free diatom sediment assemblage and DS on average ~36% of the silicoflagellate assemblage. Between 1940 and 1996 these relative abundances were ~20% (TN) and ~8% (DS). These results are consistent with results from planktonic foraminifera and radiolarians that indicate an influence of 20th century warming on marine ecosystems before most scientific observations began. Cooling of surface waters coincident with the one of the strongest La Niña events of the 20th century (and a return to negative PDO conditions) in late 1998 brought about a return to pre-1940 values of these cool water taxa (TN ~31%, DS ~25%). However, this recent regional cooling appears to have been accompanied by profound changes in the diatom assemblage. Pseudo-nitzschia australis, and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries, diatom species associated with domoic acid, a neurotoxin that causes shellfish poisoning and marine mammal deaths, rapidly became dominant in the SBB sediment record at the time of the regional cooling (1999) and increased substantially in numbers as a bloom-forming taxon (relative to Chaetoceros spores) in 2003. Prior to 2003 diatom blooms recorded in the SBB sediment record consisted predominantly of Chaetoceros spores and less commonly of Rhizosolenia-related species (Neocalyptrella robusta and R. setigera). Fecal pellets dominated by valves of P. australis

  9. Probability Distribution for Flowing Interval Spacing

    SciTech Connect

    S. Kuzio

    2004-09-22

    Fracture spacing is a key hydrologic parameter in analyses of matrix diffusion. Although the individual fractures that transmit flow in the saturated zone (SZ) cannot be identified directly, it is possible to determine the fractured zones that transmit flow from flow meter survey observations. The fractured zones that transmit flow as identified through borehole flow meter surveys have been defined in this report as flowing intervals. The flowing interval spacing is measured between the midpoints of each flowing interval. The determination of flowing interval spacing is important because the flowing interval spacing parameter is a key hydrologic parameter in SZ transport modeling, which impacts the extent of matrix diffusion in the SZ volcanic matrix. The output of this report is input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, the analysis of data and development of a data distribution reported herein is used to develop the uncertainty distribution for the flowing interval spacing parameter for the SZ transport abstraction model. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this report to other model reports that also pertain to flow and transport in the SZ. Figure 1-1 also shows the flow of key information among the SZ reports. It should be noted that Figure 1-1 does not contain a complete representation of the data and parameter inputs and outputs of all SZ reports, nor does it show inputs external to this suite of SZ reports. Use of the developed flowing interval spacing probability distribution is subject to the limitations of the assumptions discussed in Sections 5 and 6 of this analysis report. The number of fractures in a flowing interval is not known. Therefore, the flowing intervals are assumed to be composed of one flowing zone in the transport simulations. This analysis may overestimate the flowing interval spacing because the number of fractures that contribute to a flowing interval cannot be

  10. WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara

    DOE Data Explorer

    Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

  11. Prehistoric fires and the shaping of colonial transported landscapes in southern California: A paleoenvironmental study at Dune Pond, Santa Barbara County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejarque, Ana; Anderson, R. Scott; Simms, Alexander R.; Gentry, Beau J.

    2015-03-01

    Using a novel combination of paleoecologic proxies including pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs), macroscopic charcoal, and Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles (SCPs), 5000 years of landscape change, fire history and land-use have been reconstructed from Dune Pond, Santa Barbara County, California. The pond was sensitive to Holocene regional climatic variability, showing different phases of lower (4600-3700 cal yr BP, 2100-700 cal yr BP, historical period) and higher (3700-2100 cal yr BP, 700-150 cal yr BP) local moisture availability. During this period the landscape was dominated by a coastal mosaic vegetation including dune mats, coastal scrub and salt marshes on the dunes and backdunes, with chaparral and oak woodland growing in the valley plains and foothills. Fire was intimately linked with such dominating mosaic vegetation, and the combination of wet conditions and the presence of nearby human settlement were a trigger favoring coastal fires for at least two periods: from 3100 to 1500 cal yr BP and from 650 cal yr BP until the 18th century. In both cases fire was an important tool to keep an open coastal landscape attractive to hunting wildlife. Finally, matching this varied range of high-resolution paleoecological proxies with historical records we could characterize the development of colonial transported landscapes following the Euro-American settlement of Santa Barbara. The introduction of livestock grazing by Spanish colonists favored erosive processes and the introduction of fecal-borne parasites in freshwater bodies, negatively impacted salt and brackish coastal marshes, and promoted the invasion of alien grasses and ruderals. This agro-pastoral landscape was consolidated during the American period, with a greater role for cultivation, the development of industrial activities and increased population. Despite negative environmental consequences such as the loss of native habitats, exotic land-uses and plants introduced during the historical period

  12. Musical intervals and relative pitch: Frequency resolution, not interval resolution, is special

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Josh H.; Keebler, Michael V.; Micheyl, Christophe; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Pitch intervals are central to most musical systems, which utilize pitch at the expense of other acoustic dimensions. It seemed plausible that pitch might uniquely permit precise perception of the interval separating two sounds, as this could help explain its importance in music. To explore this notion, a simple discrimination task was used to measure the precision of interval perception for the auditory dimensions of pitch, brightness, and loudness. Interval thresholds were then expressed in units of just-noticeable differences for each dimension, to enable comparison across dimensions. Contrary to expectation, when expressed in these common units, interval acuity was actually worse for pitch than for loudness or brightness. This likely indicates that the perceptual dimension of pitch is unusual not for interval perception per se, but rather for the basic frequency resolution it supports. The ubiquity of pitch in music may be due in part to this fine-grained basic resolution. PMID:20968366

  13. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  14. Dietary reference intervals for vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin D

    2012-01-01

    Dietary reference intervals relate to the distribution of dietary requirement for a particular nutrient as defined by the distribution of physiological requirement for that nutrient. These have more commonly been called Dietary Reference Values (DRV) or Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI), amongst other names. The North American DRI for vitamin D are the most current dietary reference intervals and arguably arising from the most comprehensive evaluation and report on vitamin D nutrition to date. These are a family of nutrient reference values, including the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR), the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), the Adequate Intake, and Tolerable Upper Intake Level. In particular, the EAR is used for planning and assessing diets of populations; it also serves as the basis for calculating the RDA, a value intended to meet the needs of nearly all people. The DRVs for vitamin D in the UK and the European Community have been in existence for almost two decades, and both are currently under review. The present paper briefly overviews these three sets of dietary reference intervals as case studies to highlight both the similarities as well as possible differences that may exist between reference intervals for vitamin D in different countries/regions. In addition, it highlights the scientific basis upon which these are based, which may explain some of the differences. Finally, it also overviews how the dietary reference intervals for vitamin D may be applied, and especially in terms of assessing the adequacy of vitamin D intake in populations. PMID:22536775

  15. Pigeons' choices between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules: utility of variability?

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Cardinal, Claudia D; Field, Douglas P; Flannery, Barbara A; Johnson, Michael; Bailey, Kathleen; Hineline, Philip N

    2005-03-01

    Pigeons' choosing between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules of reinforcement was investigated in three experiments using a discrete-trial procedure. In all three experiments, the random-interval schedule was generated by sampling a probability distribution at an interval (and in multiples of the interval) equal to that of the fixed-interval schedule. Thus the programmed delays to reinforcement on the random alternative were never shorter and were often longer than the fixed interval. Despite this feature, the fixed schedule was not strongly preferred. Increases in the probability used to generate the random interval resulted in decreased preferences for the fixed schedule. In addition, the number of consecutive choices on the preferred alternative varied directly with preference, whereas the consecutive number of choices on the nonpreferred alternative was fairly constant. The probability of choosing the random alternative was unaffected by the immediately prior interval encountered on that schedule, even when it was very long relative to the average value. The results loosely support conceptions of a "preference for variability" from foraging theory and the "utility of behavioral variability" from human decision-making literatures.

  16. Statistics of return intervals between long heartbeat intervals and their usability for online prediction of disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kireenkov, Igor S.; Nifontov, Eugene M.; Bunde, Armin

    2009-06-01

    We study the statistics of return intervals between large heartbeat intervals (above a certain threshold Q) in 24 h records obtained from healthy subjects. We find that both the linear and the nonlinear long-term memory inherent in the heartbeat intervals lead to power-laws in the probability density function PQ(r) of the return intervals. As a consequence, the probability WQ(t; Δt) that at least one large heartbeat interval will occur within the next Δt heartbeat intervals, with an increasing elapsed number of intervals t after the last large heartbeat interval, follows a power-law. Based on these results, we suggest a method of obtaining a priori information about the occurrence of the next large heartbeat interval, and thus to predict it. We show explicitly that the proposed method, which exploits long-term memory, is superior to the conventional precursory pattern recognition technique, which focuses solely on short-term memory. We believe that our results can be straightforwardly extended to obtain more reliable predictions in other physiological signals like blood pressure, as well as in other complex records exhibiting multifractal behaviour, e.g. turbulent flow, precipitation, river flows and network traffic.

  17. Radial basis function networks with linear interval regression weights for symbolic interval data.

    PubMed

    Su, Shun-Feng; Chuang, Chen-Chia; Tao, C W; Jeng, Jin-Tsong; Hsiao, Chih-Ching

    2012-02-01

    This paper introduces a new structure of radial basis function networks (RBFNs) that can successfully model symbolic interval-valued data. In the proposed structure, to handle symbolic interval data, the Gaussian functions required in the RBFNs are modified to consider interval distance measure, and the synaptic weights of the RBFNs are replaced by linear interval regression weights. In the linear interval regression weights, the lower and upper bounds of the interval-valued data as well as the center and range of the interval-valued data are considered. In addition, in the proposed approach, two stages of learning mechanisms are proposed. In stage 1, an initial structure (i.e., the number of hidden nodes and the adjustable parameters of radial basis functions) of the proposed structure is obtained by the interval competitive agglomeration clustering algorithm. In stage 2, a gradient-descent kind of learning algorithm is applied to fine-tune the parameters of the radial basis function and the coefficients of the linear interval regression weights. Various experiments are conducted, and the average behavior of the root mean square error and the square of the correlation coefficient in the framework of a Monte Carlo experiment are considered as the performance index. The results clearly show the effectiveness of the proposed structure.

  18. Geological map and digital database of the San Rafael Mtn. 7.5-minute quadrangle, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vedder, John G.; Stanley, Richard G.; Graham, S.E.; Valin, Z.C.

    2001-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the San Rafael Primitive Area (now the San Rafael Wilderness) by Gower and others (1966) and Vedder and others (1967) did not include all of the San Rafael Mtn. quadrangle, and the part that was mapped was done in reconnaissance fashion. To help resolve some of the structural and stratigraphic ambiguities of the earlier mapping and to complete the mapping of the quadrangle, additional field work was done during short intervals in 1980 and 1981 and from 1996 to 1998. Contacts within the belt of Franciscan rocks at the southwestern corner of the quadrangle were generalized from the detailed map by Wahl (1998). Because extensive areas were inaccessible owing to impenetrable chaparral, observations from several helicopter overflights (1965, 1980, 1981) and interpretations from aerial photographs were used as compilation aids. Consequently, some of the depicted contacts and faults are highly inferential, particularly within the Upper Cretaceous rocks throughout the middle part of the quadrangle.

  19. Perceptual interference decays over short unfilled intervals.

    PubMed

    Schulkind, M D

    2000-09-01

    The perceptual interference effect refers to the fact that object identification is directly related to the amount of information available at initial exposure. The present article investigated whether perceptual interference would dissipate when a short, unfilled interval was introduced between exposures to a degraded object. Across three experiments using both musical and pictorial stimuli, identification performance increased directly with the length of the unfilled interval. Consequently, significant perceptual interference was obtained only when the interval between exposures was relatively short (< 500 msec for melodies; < 300 msec for pictures). These results are consistent with explanations that attribute perceptual interference to increased perceptual noise created by exposures to highly degraded objects. The data also suggest that perceptual interference is mediated by systems that are not consciously controlled by the subject and that perceptual interference in the visual domain decays more rapidly than perceptual interference in the auditory domain. PMID:11105520

  20. Atomic momentum patterns with narrower intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoguo; Jin, Shengjie; Dong, Xiangyu; Liu, Zhe; Yin, Lan; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-10-01

    We studied the atomic momentum distribution of a superposition of Bloch states in the lowest band of an optical lattice after the action of the standing-wave pulse. By designing the imposing pulse on this superposed state, an atomic momentum pattern appears with a narrow interval between the adjacent peaks that can be far less than double recoil momentum. The patterns with narrower interval come from the effect of the designed pulse on the superposition of many Bloch states with quasimomenta throughout the first Brillouin zone. Our experimental result of narrow interval peaks is consistent with the theoretical simulation. The patterns of multiple modes with different quasimomenta may be helpful for precise measurement and atomic manipulation.

  1. New delay-interval stability condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Fernando O.; Palhares, Reinaldo M.

    2014-03-01

    The delay-dependent stability problem for systems with time-delay varying in an interval is addressed in this article. The new idea in this article is to connect two very efficient approaches: the discretised Lyapunov functional for systems with pointwise delay and the convex analysis for systems with time-varying delay. The proposed method is able to check the stability interval when the time-varying delay d(t) belongs to an interval [r, τ]. The case of unstable delayed systems for r = 0 is also treatable. The resulting criterion, expressed in terms of a convex optimisation problem, outperforms the existing ones in the literature, as illustrated by the numerical examples.

  2. Interval prediction in structural dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, Timothy K.; Chrostowski, Jon D.; Ross, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Methods for assessing the predictive accuracy of structural dynamic models are examined with attention given to the effects of modal mass, stiffness, and damping uncertainties. The methods are based on a nondeterministic analysis called 'interval prediction' in which interval variables are used to describe parameters and responses that are unknown. Statistical databases for generic modeling uncertainties are derived from experimental data and incorporated analytically to evaluate responses. Covariance matrices of modal mass, stiffness, and damping parameters are propagated numerically in models of large space structures by means of three methods. The test data tend to fall within the predicted intervals of uncertainty determined by the statistical databases. The present findings demonstrate the suitability of using data from previously analyzed and tested space structures for assessing the predictive accuracy of an analytical model.

  3. Intervality and coherence in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Johnson, Samuel; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2016-06-01

    Food webs-networks of predators and prey-have long been known to exhibit "intervality": species can generally be ordered along a single axis in such a way that the prey of any given predator tend to lie on unbroken compact intervals. Although the meaning of this axis-usually identified with a "niche" dimension-has remained a mystery, it is assumed to lie at the basis of the highly non-trivial structure of food webs. With this in mind, most trophic network modelling has for decades been based on assigning species a niche value by hand. However, we argue here that intervality should not be considered the cause but rather a consequence of food-web structure. First, analysing a set of 46 empirical food webs, we find that they also exhibit predator intervality: the predators of any given species are as likely to be contiguous as the prey are, but in a different ordering. Furthermore, this property is not exclusive of trophic networks: several networks of genes, neurons, metabolites, cellular machines, airports, and words are found to be approximately as interval as food webs. We go on to show that a simple model of food-web assembly which does not make use of a niche axis can nevertheless generate significant intervality. Therefore, the niche dimension (in the sense used for food-web modelling) could in fact be the consequence of other, more fundamental structural traits. We conclude that a new approach to food-web modelling is required for a deeper understanding of ecosystem assembly, structure, and function, and propose that certain topological features thought to be specific of food webs are in fact common to many complex networks. PMID:27368797

  4. Intervality and coherence in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Johnson, Samuel; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2016-06-01

    Food webs—networks of predators and prey—have long been known to exhibit "intervality": species can generally be ordered along a single axis in such a way that the prey of any given predator tend to lie on unbroken compact intervals. Although the meaning of this axis—usually identified with a "niche" dimension—has remained a mystery, it is assumed to lie at the basis of the highly non-trivial structure of food webs. With this in mind, most trophic network modelling has for decades been based on assigning species a niche value by hand. However, we argue here that intervality should not be considered the cause but rather a consequence of food-web structure. First, analysing a set of 46 empirical food webs, we find that they also exhibit predator intervality: the predators of any given species are as likely to be contiguous as the prey are, but in a different ordering. Furthermore, this property is not exclusive of trophic networks: several networks of genes, neurons, metabolites, cellular machines, airports, and words are found to be approximately as interval as food webs. We go on to show that a simple model of food-web assembly which does not make use of a niche axis can nevertheless generate significant intervality. Therefore, the niche dimension (in the sense used for food-web modelling) could in fact be the consequence of other, more fundamental structural traits. We conclude that a new approach to food-web modelling is required for a deeper understanding of ecosystem assembly, structure, and function, and propose that certain topological features thought to be specific of food webs are in fact common to many complex networks.

  5. Intervality and coherence in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Johnson, Samuel; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2016-06-01

    Food webs-networks of predators and prey-have long been known to exhibit "intervality": species can generally be ordered along a single axis in such a way that the prey of any given predator tend to lie on unbroken compact intervals. Although the meaning of this axis-usually identified with a "niche" dimension-has remained a mystery, it is assumed to lie at the basis of the highly non-trivial structure of food webs. With this in mind, most trophic network modelling has for decades been based on assigning species a niche value by hand. However, we argue here that intervality should not be considered the cause but rather a consequence of food-web structure. First, analysing a set of 46 empirical food webs, we find that they also exhibit predator intervality: the predators of any given species are as likely to be contiguous as the prey are, but in a different ordering. Furthermore, this property is not exclusive of trophic networks: several networks of genes, neurons, metabolites, cellular machines, airports, and words are found to be approximately as interval as food webs. We go on to show that a simple model of food-web assembly which does not make use of a niche axis can nevertheless generate significant intervality. Therefore, the niche dimension (in the sense used for food-web modelling) could in fact be the consequence of other, more fundamental structural traits. We conclude that a new approach to food-web modelling is required for a deeper understanding of ecosystem assembly, structure, and function, and propose that certain topological features thought to be specific of food webs are in fact common to many complex networks.

  6. Optimal Colonoscopy Surveillance Interval after Polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Oh

    2016-01-01

    The detection and removal of adenomatous polyps and postpolypectomy surveillance are considered important for the control of colorectal cancer (CRC). Surveillance using colonoscopy is an effective tool for preventing CRC after colorectal polypectomy, especially if compliance is good. In current practice, the intervals between colonoscopies after polypectomy are variable. Different recommendations for recognizing at risk groups and defining surveillance intervals after an initial finding of colorectal adenomas have been published. However, high-grade dysplasia and the number and size of adenomas are known major cancer predictors. Based on this, a subgroup of patients that may benefit from intensive surveillance colonoscopy can be identified. PMID:27484812

  7. Feedback precision and postfeedback interval duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Precision of feedback gain was manipulated in a simple positioning task. An optimum was found; an increase in precision past that optimum produced deleterious effects upon rate of acquisition. In a second study, increasing postfeedback interval removed that optimum. The feedback precision effects were then replicated in a timing task. The combined results of the 3 studies were interpreted as supportive of an information-processing approach to the study of postfeedback interval events for simple motor skills. The findings additionally supported specific predictions by Bilodeau and deductions from Adams' 1971 theory of motor learning.

  8. An Empirical Method for Establishing Positional Confidence Intervals Tailored for Composite Interval Mapping of QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved genetic resolution and availability of sequenced genomes have made positional cloning of moderate-effect QTL (quantitative trait loci) realistic in several systems, emphasizing the need for precise and accurate derivation of positional confidence intervals (CIs). Support interval (SI) meth...

  9. Happiness Scale Interval Study. Methodological Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmijn, W. M.; Arends, L. R.; Veenhoven, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Happiness Scale Interval Study deals with survey questions on happiness, using verbal response options, such as "very happy" and "pretty happy". The aim is to estimate what degrees of happiness are denoted by such terms in different questions and languages. These degrees are expressed in numerical values on a continuous [0,10] scale, which are…

  10. Duration perception in crossmodally-defined intervals.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Katja M; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-03-01

    How humans perform duration judgments with multisensory stimuli is an ongoing debate. Here, we investigated how sub-second duration judgments are achieved by asking participants to compare the duration of a continuous sound to the duration of an empty interval in which onset and offset were marked by signals of different modalities using all combinations of visual, auditory and tactile stimuli. The pattern of perceived durations across five stimulus durations (ranging from 100 ms to 900 ms) follows the Vierordt Law. Furthermore, intervals with a sound as onset (audio-visual, audio-tactile) are perceived longer than intervals with a sound as offset. No modality ordering effect is found for visualtactile intervals. To infer whether a single modality-independent or multiple modality-dependent time-keeping mechanisms exist we tested whether perceived duration follows a summative or a multiplicative distortion pattern by fitting a model to all modality combinations and durations. The results confirm that perceived duration depends on sensory latency (summative distortion). Instead, we did not find evidence for multiplicative distortions. The results of the model and the behavioural data support the concept of a single time-keeping mechanism that allows for judgments of durations marked by multisensory stimuli. PMID:23953664

  11. Computation of confidence intervals for Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.

    2000-07-01

    We present an algorithm which allows a fast numerical computation of Feldman-Cousins confidence intervals for Poisson processes, even when the number of background events is relatively large. This algorithm incorporates an appropriate treatment of the singularities that arise as a consequence of the discreteness of the variable.

  12. Confidence Trick: The Interpretation of Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The frequent misinterpretation of the nature of confidence intervals by students has been well documented. This article examines the problem as an aspect of the learning of mathematical definitions and considers the tension between parroting mathematically rigorous, but essentially uninternalized, statements on the one hand and expressing…

  13. Interval scanning photomicrography of microbial cell populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A single reproducible area of the preparation in a fixed focal plane is photographically scanned at intervals during incubation. The procedure can be used for evaluating the aerobic or anaerobic growth of many microbial cells simultaneously within a population. In addition, the microscope is not restricted to the viewing of any one microculture preparation, since the slide cultures are incubated separately from the microscope.

  14. Equidistant Intervals in Perspective Photographs and Paintings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human vision is extremely sensitive to equidistance of spatial intervals in the frontal plane. Thresholds for spatial equidistance have been extensively measured in bisecting tasks. Despite the vast number of studies, the informational basis for equidistance perception is unknown. There are three possible sources of information for spatial equidistance in pictures, namely, distances in the picture plane, in physical space, and visual space. For each source, equidistant intervals were computed for perspective photographs of walls and canals. Intervals appear equidistant if equidistance is defined in visual space. Equidistance was further investigated in paintings of perspective scenes. In appraisals of the perspective skill of painters, emphasis has been on accurate use of vanishing points. The current study investigated the skill of painters to depict equidistant intervals. Depicted rows of equidistant columns, tiles, tapestries, or trees were analyzed in 30 paintings and engravings. Computational analysis shows that from the middle ages until now, artists either represented equidistance in physical space or in a visual space of very limited depth. Among the painters and engravers who depict equidistance in a highly nonveridical visual space are renowned experts of linear perspective.

  15. Equidistant Intervals in Perspective Photographs and Paintings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human vision is extremely sensitive to equidistance of spatial intervals in the frontal plane. Thresholds for spatial equidistance have been extensively measured in bisecting tasks. Despite the vast number of studies, the informational basis for equidistance perception is unknown. There are three possible sources of information for spatial equidistance in pictures, namely, distances in the picture plane, in physical space, and visual space. For each source, equidistant intervals were computed for perspective photographs of walls and canals. Intervals appear equidistant if equidistance is defined in visual space. Equidistance was further investigated in paintings of perspective scenes. In appraisals of the perspective skill of painters, emphasis has been on accurate use of vanishing points. The current study investigated the skill of painters to depict equidistant intervals. Depicted rows of equidistant columns, tiles, tapestries, or trees were analyzed in 30 paintings and engravings. Computational analysis shows that from the middle ages until now, artists either represented equidistance in physical space or in a visual space of very limited depth. Among the painters and engravers who depict equidistance in a highly nonveridical visual space are renowned experts of linear perspective. PMID:27698983

  16. Precise Interval Timer for Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A precise digital fractional interval timer for software defined radios which vary their waveform on a packet-by-packet basis. The timer allows for variable length in the preamble of the RF packet and allows to adjust boundaries of the TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) Slots of the receiver of an SDR based on the reception of the RF packet of interest.

  17. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  18. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  19. Toward Using Confidence Intervals to Compare Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Guang Yong

    2007-01-01

    Confidence intervals are widely accepted as a preferred way to present study results. They encompass significance tests and provide an estimate of the magnitude of the effect. However, comparisons of correlations still rely heavily on significance testing. The persistence of this practice is caused primarily by the lack of simple yet accurate…

  20. MEETING DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES WITH INTERVAL INFORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunoassay test kits are promising technologies for measuring analytes under field conditions. Frequently, these field-test kits report the analyte concentrations as falling in an interval between minimum and maximum values. Many project managers use field-test kits only for scr...

  1. A prospective evaluation of non-interval- and interval-based exercise training progressions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2011-10-01

    Non-interval and interval training progressions were used to determine (i) the mean rate at which treadmill speed could be incremented daily using a non-interval training progression to train rats to run continuously at different intensities and (ii) the number of training days required for rats to run continuously at different exercise intensities with non-interval- and interval-based training progressions to establish methods of progressive overload for rodent exercise training studies. Rats were randomly assigned to mild-intensity (n = 5, 20 m·min(-1), 5% grade), moderate-intensity (n = 5, 30 m·min(-1), 5% grade), and heavy-intensity non-interval groups (n = 5, 40 m·min(-1), 5% grade) or a heavy-intensity interval (n = 5, 40 m·min(-1), 5% grade) group and ran 5 days·week(-1) for 6 weeks. Non-interval training involved a daily increase of treadmill speed, whereas interval training involved a daily increase of interval time, until the animal could run continuously at a prescribed intensity. In mild-, moderate-, and heavy-intensity non-interval-trained rats, treadmill speed was increased by 0.6 ± 0.7 m·min(-1)·day(-1), 0.6 ± 0.2 m·min(-1)·day(-1), and 0.8 ± 0.1 m·min(-1)·day(-1), respectively. Target training intensity and duration were obtained following 0.4 ± 0.5 days, 17 ± 3 days, and 23 ± 3 training days (p < 0.05) in mild-, moderate-, and heavy-intensity groups, respectively. In contrast, interval-trained rodents required 11 ± 1 training days. These data demonstrate that rodents will tolerate an increase in treadmill speed of ∼0.7 ± 0.1 m·min(-1)·day(-1) and that this progression enables rats to run continuously at moderate and heavy intensities with 3-4 weeks of progressive overload. Interval training significantly reduces the number of training days required to attain a target intensity.

  2. Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning (CAIP), a paradigm for representing and reasoning about plans. The paradigm enables the description of planning domains with time, resources, concurrent activities, mutual exclusions among sets of activities, disjunctive preconditions and conditional effects. We provide a theoretical foundation for the paradigm, based on temporal intervals and attributes. We then show how the plans are naturally expressed by networks of constraints, and show that the process of planning maps directly to dynamic constraint reasoning. In addition, we de ne compatibilities, a compact mechanism for describing planning domains. We describe how this framework can incorporate the use of constraint reasoning technology to improve planning. Finally, we describe EUROPA, an implementation of the CAIP framework.

  3. Efficient computation of parameter confidence intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.

    1987-01-01

    An important step in system identification of aircraft is the estimation of stability and control derivatives from flight data along with an assessment of parameter accuracy. When the maximum likelihood estimation technique is used, parameter accuracy is commonly assessed by the Cramer-Rao lower bound. It is known, however, that in some cases the lower bound can be substantially different from the parameter variance. Under these circumstances the Cramer-Rao bounds may be misleading as an accuracy measure. This paper discusses the confidence interval estimation problem based on likelihood ratios, which offers a more general estimate of the error bounds. Four approaches are considered for computing confidence intervals of maximum likelihood parameter estimates. Each approach is applied to real flight data and compared.

  4. Temporal control in fixed-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, M D; Powell, D G

    1994-01-01

    The peak procedure was used to study temporal control in pigeons exposed to seven fixed-interval schedules ranging from 7.5 to 480 s. The focus was on behavior in individual intervals. Quantitative properties of temporal control depended on whether the aspect of behavior considered was initial pause duration, the point of maximum acceleration in responding, the point of maximum deceleration, the point at which responding stopped, or several different statistical derivations of a point of maximum responding. Each aspect produced different conclusions about the nature of temporal control, and none conformed to what was known previously about the way ongoing responding was controlled by time under conditions of differential reinforcement. Existing theory does not explain why Weber's law so rarely fit the results or why each type of behavior seemed unique. These data fit with others suggesting that principles of temporal control may depend on the role played by the particular aspect of behavior in particular situations.

  5. The Rotator Interval of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Taylor, Dean; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Mologne, Timothy S.; Provencher, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical studies have shown that repair or plication of rotator interval (RI) ligamentous and capsular structures decreases glenohumeral joint laxity in various directions. Clinical outcomes studies have reported successful outcomes after repair or plication of these structures in patients undergoing shoulder stabilization procedures. Recent studies describing arthroscopic techniques to address these structures have intensified the debate over the potential benefit of these procedures as well as highlighted the differences between open and arthroscopic RI procedures. The purposes of this study were to review the structures of the RI and their contribution to shoulder instability, to discuss the biomechanical and clinical effects of repair or plication of rotator interval structures, and to describe the various surgical techniques used for these procedures and outcomes. PMID:26779554

  6. Partitioned-Interval Quantum Optical Communications Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The proposed quantum receiver in this innovation partitions each binary signal interval into two unequal segments: a short "pre-measurement" segment in the beginning of the symbol interval used to make an initial guess with better probability than 50/50 guessing, and a much longer segment used to make the high-sensitivity signal detection via field-cancellation and photon-counting detection. It was found that by assigning as little as 10% of the total signal energy to the pre-measurement segment, the initial 50/50 guess can be improved to about 70/30, using the best available measurements such as classical coherent or "optimized Kennedy" detection.

  7. One-way ANOVA based on interval information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesamian, Gholamreza

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with extending the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to the case where the observed data are represented by closed intervals rather than real numbers. In this approach, first a notion of interval random variable is introduced. Especially, a normal distribution with interval parameters is introduced to investigate hypotheses about the equality of interval means or test the homogeneity of interval variances assumption. Moreover, the least significant difference (LSD method) for investigating multiple comparison of interval means is developed when the null hypothesis about the equality of means is rejected. Then, at a given interval significance level, an index is applied to compare the interval test statistic and the related interval critical value as a criterion to accept or reject the null interval hypothesis of interest. Finally, the method of decision-making leads to some degrees to accept or reject the interval hypotheses. An applied example will be used to show the performance of this method.

  8. Systolic Time Intervals and New Measurement Methods.

    PubMed

    Tavakolian, Kouhyar

    2016-06-01

    Systolic time intervals have been used to detect and quantify the directional changes of left ventricular function. New methods of recording these cardiac timings, which are less cumbersome, have been recently developed and this has created a renewed interest and novel applications for these cardiac timings. This manuscript reviews these new methods and addresses the potential for the application of these cardiac timings for the diagnosis and prognosis of different cardiac diseases.

  9. Psychophysical basis for consonant musical intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, L.

    1981-06-01

    A suggestion is made to explain the acceptance of certain musical intervals as consonant and others as dissonant. The proposed explanation involves the relation between the time required to perceive a definite pitch and the period of a complex tone. If the former time is greater than the latter, the tone is consonant; otherwise it is dissonant. A quantitative examination leads to agreement with empirical data.

  10. Quantifying chaotic dynamics from interspike intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Pavlova, O. N.; Mohammad, Y. K.; Shihalov, G. M.

    2015-03-01

    We address the problem of characterization of chaotic dynamics at the input of a threshold device described by an integrate-and-fire (IF) or a threshold crossing (TC) model from the output sequences of interspike intervals (ISIs). We consider the conditions under which quite short sequences of spiking events provide correct identification of the dynamical regime characterized by the single positive Lyapunov exponent (LE). We discuss features of detecting the second LE for both types of the considered models of events generation.

  11. Fluctuations of healthy and unhealthy heartbeat intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Toda, Mikito

    2013-04-01

    We show that the RR-interval fluctuations, defined as the difference between successive natural-logarithm of the RR interval, for healthy, congestive-heart-failure (CHF) and atrial-fibrillation (AF) subjects are well modeled by non-Gaussian stable distributions. Our results suggest that healthy or unhealthy RR-interval fluctuation can generally be modeled as a sum of a large number of independent physiological effects which are identically distributed with infinite variance. Furthermore, we show for the first time that one indicator —the scale parameter of the stable distribution— is sufficient to robustly distinguish the three groups of subjects. The scale parameters for healthy subjects are smaller than those for AF subjects but larger than those for CHF subjects —this ordering suggests that the scale parameter could be used to objectively quantify the severity of CHF and AF over time and also serve as an early warning signal for a healthy person when it approaches either boundary of the healthy range.

  12. Hyperplane arrangements, interval orders, and trees.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, R P

    1996-01-01

    A hyperplane arrangement is a finite set of hyperplanes in a real affine space. An especially important arrangement is the braid arrangement, which is the set of all hyperplanes xi - xj = 1, 1 interval orders and with the enumeration of trees. For instance, the number of labeled interval orders that can be obtained from n intervals I1,..., In of generic lengths is counted. There is also discussed an arrangement due to N. Linial whose number of regions is the number of alternating (or intransitive) trees, as defined by Gelfand, Graev, and Postnikov [Gelfand, I. M., Graev, M. I., and Postnikov, A. (1995), preprint]. Finally, a refinement is given, related to counting labeled trees by number of inversions, of a result of Shi [Shi, J.-Y. (1986), Lecture Notes in Mathematics, no. 1179, Springer-Verlag] that a certain deformation of the braid arrangement has (n + 1)n-1 regions. PMID:11607643

  13. Report on the Program “Fluid-mediated particle transport in geophysical flows” at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, UC Santa Barbara, September 23 to December 12, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James T.; Meiburg, Eckart; Valance, Alexandre

    2015-09-15

    The Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics (KITP) program held at UC Santa Barbara in the fall of 2013 addressed the dynamics of dispersed particulate flows in the environment. By focusing on the prototypes of aeolian transport and turbidity currents, it aimed to establish the current state of our understanding of such two-phase flows, to identify key open questions, and to develop collaborative research strategies for addressing these questions. Here, we provide a brief summary of the program outcome.

  14. Brief communication: Additional cases of maxillary canine-first premolar transposition in several prehistoric skeletal assemblages from the Santa Barbara Channel Islands of California.

    PubMed

    Sholts, Sabrina B; Clement, Anna F; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S

    2010-09-01

    This article identifies and discusses seven new cases of complete maxillary canine-premolar transposition in ancient populations from the Santa Barbara Channel region of California. A high frequency of this tooth transposition has been previously documented within a single prehistoric cemetery on one of the Channel Islands. A total of 966 crania representing 30 local sites and about 7,000 years of human occupation were examined, revealing an abnormally high prevalence of this transposition trait among islanders during the Early period of southern California prehistory ( approximately 5500-600 B.C.). One of the affected crania is from a cemetery more than 7,000-years-old and constitutes the earliest case of tooth transposition in humans so far reported. The results are consistent with findings by other studies that have indicated inbreeding among the early Channel Islands groups. Together with the normal transposition rates among mainland populations, the decreasing prevalence of maxillary canine-first premolar transposition among island populations across the Holocene suggests that inbreeding on the northern Channel Islands had all but ceased by the end of the first millennium B.C., most likely as a result of increased cross-channel migration and interaction.

  15. Ground-water quality in the Santa Rita, Buellton, and Los Olivos hydrologic subareas of the Santa Ynez River basin, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the upper Santa Ynez River Valley in Santa Barbara County has degraded due to both natural and anthropogenic causes. The semiarid climate and uneven distribution of rainfall has limited freshwater recharge and caused salt buildup in water supplies. Tertiary rocks supply mineralized water. Agricultural activities (irrigation return flow containing fertilizers and pesticides, cultivation, feedlot waste disposal) are a primary cause of water quality degradation. Urban development, which also causes water quality degradation (introduced contaminants, wastewater disposal, septic system discharge, and land fill disposal of waste), has imposed stricter requirements on water supply quality. A well network was designed to monitor changes in groundwater quality related to anthropogenic activities. Information from this network may aid in efficient management of the groundwater basins as public water supplies, centered around three basic goals. First is to increase freshwater recharge to the basins by conjunctive surface/groundwater use and surface-spreading techniques. Second is to optimize groundwater discharge by efficient timing and spacing of pumping. Third is to control and reduce sources of groundwater contamination by regulating wastewater quality and distribution and, preferably, by exporting wastewaters from the basin. (USGS)

  16. Geochemical characterization of tarballs on beaches along the California coast. Part I - Shallow seepage impacting the Santa Barbara Channel Islands, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Lorenson, T.D.; Dougherty, J.

    2004-01-01

    Tarballs are common along the southern California coastline. This study investigates tarballs from beaches along this coastline, with a focus on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and San Miquel Islands in the Santa Barbara Channel. The tarballs were fingerprinted using biomarker and stable carbon isotope parameters, and then grouped according to genetic similarities. The data show that the tarballs are of natural and not anthropogenic origin and that all originate from source rock within the Miocene Monterey Formation via shallow seeps offshore. Sterane biomarker parameters were found to vary widely in the sample set. Biodegradation, especially of the regular steranes, is the primary process impacting the biomarker distributions in a large group of samples. The most common tarball occurrences appear to come from offshore seepage near the west end of Santa Cruz Island. Another major group most likely was transported north from near Santa Monica Bay. Several individual occurrences of some of these tarball groups also were found on beaches as far north as Pt. Reyes and as far south as San Diego, indicating significant long-distance dispersal by ocean currents. This study begins a library of tarball fingerprints to be used as a database to help distinguish between natural and anthropogenic tar occurrences all along the California coast, and to compare shallow seepage with future samples of deeper production oils from the same area.

  17. Easy identification of generalized common and conserved nested intervals.

    PubMed

    de Montgolfier, Fabien; Raffinot, Mathieu; Rusu, Irena

    2014-07-01

    In this article we explain how to easily compute gene clusters, formalized by classical or generalized nested common or conserved intervals, between a set of K genomes represented as K permutations. A b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval I of size |I| is either an interval of size 1 or a common (resp. conserved) interval that contains another b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval of size at least |I|-b. When b=1, this corresponds to the classical notion of nested interval. We exhibit two simple algorithms to output all b-nested common or conserved intervals between K permutations in O(Kn+nocc) time, where nocc is the total number of such intervals. We also explain how to count all b-nested intervals in O(Kn) time. New properties of the family of conserved intervals are proposed to do so.

  18. Easy identification of generalized common and conserved nested intervals.

    PubMed

    de Montgolfier, Fabien; Raffinot, Mathieu; Rusu, Irena

    2014-07-01

    In this article we explain how to easily compute gene clusters, formalized by classical or generalized nested common or conserved intervals, between a set of K genomes represented as K permutations. A b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval I of size |I| is either an interval of size 1 or a common (resp. conserved) interval that contains another b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval of size at least |I|-b. When b=1, this corresponds to the classical notion of nested interval. We exhibit two simple algorithms to output all b-nested common or conserved intervals between K permutations in O(Kn+nocc) time, where nocc is the total number of such intervals. We also explain how to count all b-nested intervals in O(Kn) time. New properties of the family of conserved intervals are proposed to do so. PMID:24650221

  19. Multiple interval mapping for quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, C H; Zeng, Z B; Teasdale, R D

    1999-01-01

    A new statistical method for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL), called multiple interval mapping (MIM), is presented. It uses multiple marker intervals simultaneously to fit multiple putative QTL directly in the model for mapping QTL. The MIM model is based on Cockerham's model for interpreting genetic parameters and the method of maximum likelihood for estimating genetic parameters. With the MIM approach, the precision and power of QTL mapping could be improved. Also, epistasis between QTL, genotypic values of individuals, and heritabilities of quantitative traits can be readily estimated and analyzed. Using the MIM model, a stepwise selection procedure with likelihood ratio test statistic as a criterion is proposed to identify QTL. This MIM method was applied to a mapping data set of radiata pine on three traits: brown cone number, tree diameter, and branch quality scores. Based on the MIM result, seven, six, and five QTL were detected for the three traits, respectively. The detected QTL individually contributed from approximately 1 to 27% of the total genetic variation. Significant epistasis between four pairs of QTL in two traits was detected, and the four pairs of QTL contributed approximately 10.38 and 14.14% of the total genetic variation. The asymptotic variances of QTL positions and effects were also provided to construct the confidence intervals. The estimated heritabilities were 0.5606, 0.5226, and 0. 3630 for the three traits, respectively. With the estimated QTL effects and positions, the best strategy of marker-assisted selection for trait improvement for a specific purpose and requirement can be explored. The MIM FORTRAN program is available on the worldwide web (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/chkao/). PMID:10388834

  20. Computing confidence intervals for standardized regression coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2013-12-01

    With fixed predictors, the standard method (Cohen, Cohen, West, & Aiken, 2003, p. 86; Harris, 2001, p. 80; Hays, 1994, p. 709) for computing confidence intervals (CIs) for standardized regression coefficients fails to account for the sampling variability of the criterion standard deviation. With random predictors, this method also fails to account for the sampling variability of the predictor standard deviations. Nevertheless, under some conditions the standard method will produce CIs with accurate coverage rates. To delineate these conditions, we used a Monte Carlo simulation to compute empirical CI coverage rates in samples drawn from 36 populations with a wide range of data characteristics. We also computed the empirical CI coverage rates for 4 alternative methods that have been discussed in the literature: noncentrality interval estimation, the delta method, the percentile bootstrap, and the bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap. Our results showed that for many data-parameter configurations--for example, sample size, predictor correlations, coefficient of determination (R²), orientation of β with respect to the eigenvectors of the predictor correlation matrix, RX--the standard method produced coverage rates that were close to their expected values. However, when population R² was large and when β approached the last eigenvector of RX, then the standard method coverage rates were frequently below the nominal rate (sometimes by a considerable amount). In these conditions, the delta method and the 2 bootstrap procedures were consistently accurate. Results using noncentrality interval estimation were inconsistent. In light of these findings, we recommend that researchers use the delta method to evaluate the sampling variability of standardized regression coefficients.

  1. Feedback functions for variable-interval reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A.; Baum, William M.

    1980-01-01

    On a given variable-interval schedule, the average obtained rate of reinforcement depends on the average rate of responding. An expression for this feedback effect is derived from the assumptions that free-operant responding occurs in bursts with a constant tempo, alternating with periods of engagement in other activities; that the durations of bursts and other activities are exponentially distributed; and that the rates of initiating and terminating bursts are inversely related. The expression provides a satisfactory account of the data of three experiments. PMID:16812187

  2. Optimal ABC inventory classification using interval programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Jafar; Salimi, Negin

    2015-08-01

    Inventory classification is one of the most important activities in inventory management, whereby inventories are classified into three or more classes. Several inventory classifications have been proposed in the literature, almost all of which have two main shortcomings in common. That is, the previous methods mainly rely on an expert opinion to derive the importance of the classification criteria which results in subjective classification, and they need precise item parameters before implementing the classification. While the problem has been predominantly considered as a multi-criteria, we examine the problem from a different perspective, proposing a novel optimisation model for ABC inventory classification in the form of an interval programming problem. The proposed interval programming model has two important features compared to the existing methods: it provides optimal results instead of an expert-based classification and it does not require precise values of item parameters, which are not almost always available before classification. Finally, by illustrating the proposed classification model in the form of numerical example, conclusion and suggestions for future works are presented.

  3. Multiple-interval timing in rats: Performance on two-valued mixed fixed-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, S; Lowe, C F; Wearden, J H

    2003-10-01

    Three experiments studied timing in rats on 2-valued mixed-fixed-interval schedules, with equally probable components, Fixed-Interval S and Fixed-Interval L (FI S and FI L, respectively). When the L:S ratio was greater than 4, 2 distinct response peaks appeared close to FI S and FI L, and data could be well fitted by the sum of 2 Gaussian curves. When the L:S ratio was less than 4, only 1 response peak was usually visible, but nonlinear regression often identified separate sources of behavioral control, by FI S and FI L, although control by FI L dominated. Data were used to test ideas derived from scalar expectancy theory, the behavioral theory of timing, and learning to time.

  4. Natural Offshore Oil Seepage and Related Tarball Accumulation on the California Coastline - Santa Barbara Channel and the Southern Santa Maria Basin: Source Identification and Inventory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Gutmacher, Christina E.; Wong, Florence L.; Normark, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Oil spillage from natural sources is very common in the waters of southern California. Active oil extraction and shipping is occurring concurrently within the region and it is of great interest to resource managers to be able to distinguish between natural seepage and anthropogenic oil spillage. The major goal of this study was to establish the geologic setting, sources, and ultimate dispersal of natural oil seeps in the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Basins. Our surveys focused on likely areas of hydrocarbon seepage that are known to occur between Point Arguello and Ventura, California. Our approach was to 1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seep oils or tar; 2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential tar sources in this region, both onshore and offshore; 3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; 4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; and 5) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. To document the location of sub-sea oil seeps, we first looked into previous studies within and near our survey area. We measured the concentration of methane gas in the water column in areas of reported seepage and found numerous gas plumes and measured high concentrations of methane in the water column. The result of this work showed that the seeps were widely distributed between Point Conception east to the vicinity of Coal Oil Point, and that they by in large occur within the 3-mile limit of California State waters. Subsequent cruises used sidescan and high resolution seismic to map the seafloor, from just south of Point Arguello, east to near Gaviota, California. The results of the methane survey guided the exploration of the area west of Point Conception east to Gaviota using a combination of seismic instruments. The

  5. Physiological Responses to High-Intensity Interval Exercise Differing in Interval Duration.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Wesley J; Sawyer, Brandon J; Jarrett, Catherine L; Bhammar, Dharini M; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-12-01

    We determined the oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), heart rate (HR), and blood lactate responses to 2 high-intensity interval exercise protocols differing in interval length. On separate days, 14 recreationally active males performed a 4 × 4 (four 4-minute intervals at 90-95% HRpeak, separated by 3-minute recovery at 50 W) and 16 × 1 (sixteen 1-minute intervals at 90-95% HRpeak, separated by 1-minute recovery at 50 W) protocol on a cycle ergometer. The 4 × 4 elicited a higher mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (2.44 ± 0.4 vs. 2.36 ± 0.4 L·min) and "peak" V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (90-99% vs. 76-85% V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) and HR (95-98% HRpeak vs. 81-95% HRpeak) during the high-intensity intervals. Average power maintained was higher for the 16 × 1 (241 ± 45 vs. 204 ± 37 W), and recovery interval V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and HR were higher during the 16 × 1. No differences were observed for blood lactate concentrations at the midpoint (12.1 ± 2.2 vs. 10.8 ± 3.1 mmol·L) and end (10.6 ± 1.5 vs. 10.6 ± 2.4 mmol·L) of the protocols or ratings of perceived exertion (7.0 ± 1.6 vs. 7.0 ± 1.4) and Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale scores (91 ± 15 vs. 93 ± 12). Despite a 4-fold difference in interval duration that produced greater between-interval transitions in V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and HR and slightly higher mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 during the 4 × 4, mean HR during each protocol was the same, and both protocols were rated similarly for perceived exertion and enjoyment. The major difference was that power output had to be reduced during the 4 × 4 protocol to maintain the desired HR.

  6. Radiocarbon Evidence for Active Turnover of Pore-Water Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Methanogenic and Sulfate-Methane-Transition Zones of Santa Barbara Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, T.; Li, H. L.; Cada, A. K.; Burdige, D.; Magen, C.; Chanton, J.; Grose, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Diverse metabolic activities have been documented in the deep biosphere. However, how these activities affect carbon cycling in the subsurface, and how they in turn affect the marine and global cycles of carbon are still unclear. Here we present natural-abundance 14C and 13C data from the uppermost 4.5 m of the sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland, showing active turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within, and immediately below, the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ; ~1.25 m). DOC concentrations increased with depth throughout the core, indicating net production within the sediment column. Enhanced DOC production was observed near the sediment-water interface, and also at ~30 cm below the SMTZ (~1.55 m). ∆14C values of DOC increased across the sediment-water interface, then decreased with depth, consistent with net production of modern DOC near the sediment-water interface, and input of 14C-depleted DOC from deeper horizons. An isotope mixing plot constructed with these data shows that the DOC diffusing upward at the base of the core is devoid of 14C, yet the DOC diffusing into and out of the SMTZ is relatively enriched (-460‰ and -300‰, respectively). This difference in 14C content of the DOC flux can only be reconciled if the following two are occurring within, and immediately below, the SMTZ: (1) >90% of the 14C-dead basal DOC flux is removed from the pore water (by, e.g., oxidation, fermentation, methanogenesis, precipitation), and (2) this DOC is replaced by material produced in this region at a rate that exceeds the upward basal flux. The 14C and 13C signatures suggest sedimentary organic matter to be the dominant source of DOC in process (2). Our data provide a unique insight into the active transformation of DOC and sedimentary organic matter in the subsurface.

  7. A History of Warming Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Acidification Recorded by Planktonic Foraminifera Geochemistry from the Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, E.; Thunell, R.; Bizimis, M.; Buckley, W. P., Jr.; benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Chartier, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry of foraminiferal shells has been widely used to reconstruct past conditions of the ocean and climate. Since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenically produced CO2 has resulted in an increase in global temperatures and a decline in the mean pH of the world's oceans. The California Current System is a particularly susceptible region to ocean acidification due to natural upwelling processes that also cause a reduction in seawater pH. The trace element concentration of magnesium and boron in planktonic foraminiferal shells are used here as proxies for temperature and carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]), respectively. Newly developed calibrations relating Mg/Ca ratios to temperature (R2 0.91) and B/Ca ratios to [CO32-] (R2 0.84) for the surface-mixed layer species Globogerina bulloides were generated using material collected in the Santa Barbara Basin sediment trap time-series. Using these empirical relationships, temperature and [CO32-] are reconstructed using a 0.5 meter long multi-core collected within the basin. 210Pb activities were used to determine a sedimentation rate for the core to estimate ages for core samples (sedimentation rate: 0.341 cm/yr). A spike in 137Cs activity is used as a tie-point to the year 1965 coinciding with the peak of nuclear bomb testing. Our down-core record extends through the mid-19th century to create a history of rising sea surface temperatures and declining [CO32-] as a result of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  8. Sources of phytoplankton to the inner continental shelf in the Santa Barbara Channel inferred from cross-shelf gradients in biological, physical and chemical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jo; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Halewood, Elisa R.; Carlson, Craig A.

    2012-10-01

    Phytoplankton are a major food resource for filter-feeding organisms occupying intertidal and subtidal habitats of the inner continental shelf. Phytoplankton in these nearshore waters experience different anthropogenic and natural forcing compared to those offshore such that cross-shelf exchange would allow phytoplankton that were produced offshore to serve as a subsidy to inner shelf consumers when phytoplankton production on the shelf is negatively impacted. In the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) the continental shelf is only a few kilometers wide facilitating exchange with offshore waters. Physical, chemical and biological gradients were examined monthly along a 3-km cross-shelf transect in the SBC from January, 2008 through April, 2009. Chemical and biological distributions followed temporal changes in physical forcing with higher nutrient concentrations and a more intense period of biological production associated with spring upwelling. Chlorophyll was relatively evenly distributed across the shelf during upwelling, but was present at higher concentrations on the inner shelf under stratified conditions. Similarly, cross-shelf gradients in the distribution of dominant phytoplankton genera were weakest during upwelling when blooms of the prymnesiophyte, Phaeocystis, and the diatoms, Eucampia spp. and Thalassiosira spp. occurred across most of the shelf. Upon stratification, blooms were largely confined to the inner shelf within 0.75 km of the shoreline with an initial bloom of the diatom Leptocylindrus spp. followed by Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and series of dinoflagellate blooms with Prorocentrum spp. and Lingulodinium spp. attaining the highest abundances. Phytoplankton taxonomic similarity decreased with increasing distance separating stations along the transect and was inversely related to stratification intensity. The observed distribution patterns and the trends in taxonomic similarity imply that for most of the year consumers within rocky intertidal and subtidal

  9. An investigation of diel synchronicity between water column marine snow concentration and the flux of organic matter in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldthwait, Sarah A.; Alldredge, Alice L.

    2006-03-01

    Diel variation in the concentration of marine snow (detrital aggregates >0.5 mm) in the surface ocean has been documented at several locations, but it is not clear whether this water column signal translates into a diel pulse in particle flux out of the upper mixed layer. In this field study we investigated the temporal relationship between the concentration of marine snow in the upper water column and carbon (C) flux as measured by a sediment trap at 100 m in the Santa Barbara Channel, CA. Camera profiles of marine snow displayed two opposing patterns: (1) higher nighttime total (i.e. cumulative) aggregate volume and (2) higher midday total aggregate volume. Increased nighttime total aggregate volume was only observed during a brief study in 1999 and was associated with increased daytime C flux. For the remaining deployments midday increases in total aggregate volume were observed but, depending on the deployment, were associated with (a) higher nighttime C flux, (b) higher daytime C flux, or (c) no diel pattern. Correspondence between water column aggregate concentration and sediment trap flux increased when average aggregate size exceeded a threshold volume of 0.5 mm 3 (1.0 mm in diameter). Particles caught in sediment traps generally accounted for a small percentage of decreased marine snow particulate organic carbon (POC) in the upper 100 m. Other aggregate loss terms such as macrozooplankton grazing may dominate. When diel patterns in particle flux did occur, changes between day and night samples ranged from small (14%) to large (>200%). Diel variations in particle flux may impact mid-water and benthic ecology particularly animal grazing strategies, waste production, and reproductive cycles. Pulsed sedimentation may also create patchy vertical distributions of particle-associated biota and remineralization products and pulsed food delivery to the benthos.

  10. A primer on confidence intervals in psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-01

    Research papers and research summaries frequently present results in the form of data accompanied by 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Not all students and clinicians know how to interpret CIs. This article provides a nontechnical, nonmathematical discussion on how to understand and glean information from CIs; all explanations are accompanied by simple examples. A statistically accurate explanation about CIs is also provided. CIs are differentiated from standard deviations, standard errors, and confidence levels. The interpretation of narrow and wide CIs is discussed. Factors that influence the width of a CI are listed. Explanations are provided for how CIs can be used to assess statistical significance. The significance of overlapping and nonoverlapping CIs is considered. It is concluded that CIs are far more informative than, say, mere P values when drawing conclusions about a result.

  11. The effect of instrumental timbre on interval discrimination.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Jean Mary; Ritson, Caroline R; Poeppel, David

    2013-01-01

    We tested non-musicians and musicians in an auditory psychophysical experiment to assess the effects of timbre manipulation on pitch-interval discrimination. Both groups were asked to indicate the larger of two presented intervals, comprised of four sequentially presented pitches; the second or fourth stimulus within a trial was either a sinusoidal (or "pure"), flute, piano, or synthetic voice tone, while the remaining three stimuli were all pure tones. The interval-discrimination tasks were administered parametrically to assess performance across varying pitch distances between intervals ("interval-differences"). Irrespective of timbre, musicians displayed a steady improvement across interval-differences, while non-musicians only demonstrated enhanced interval discrimination at an interval-difference of 100 cents (one semitone in Western music). Surprisingly, the best discrimination performance across both groups was observed with pure-tone intervals, followed by intervals containing a piano tone. More specifically, we observed that: 1) timbre changes within a trial affect interval discrimination; and 2) the broad spectral characteristics of an instrumental timbre may influence perceived pitch or interval magnitude and make interval discrimination more difficult. PMID:24066179

  12. The Effect of Instrumental Timbre on Interval Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Jean Mary; Ritson, Caroline R.; Poeppel, David

    2013-01-01

    We tested non-musicians and musicians in an auditory psychophysical experiment to assess the effects of timbre manipulation on pitch-interval discrimination. Both groups were asked to indicate the larger of two presented intervals, comprised of four sequentially presented pitches; the second or fourth stimulus within a trial was either a sinusoidal (or “pure”), flute, piano, or synthetic voice tone, while the remaining three stimuli were all pure tones. The interval-discrimination tasks were administered parametrically to assess performance across varying pitch distances between intervals (“interval-differences”). Irrespective of timbre, musicians displayed a steady improvement across interval-differences, while non-musicians only demonstrated enhanced interval discrimination at an interval-difference of 100 cents (one semitone in Western music). Surprisingly, the best discrimination performance across both groups was observed with pure-tone intervals, followed by intervals containing a piano tone. More specifically, we observed that: 1) timbre changes within a trial affect interval discrimination; and 2) the broad spectral characteristics of an instrumental timbre may influence perceived pitch or interval magnitude and make interval discrimination more difficult. PMID:24066179

  13. Pigeons' Memory for Number of Events: Effects of Intertrial Interval and Delay Interval Illumination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Chris; Santi, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained at a 0-s baseline delay to discriminate sequences of light flashes (illumination of the feeder) that varied in number but not time (2f/4s and 8f/4s). During training, the intertrial interval was illuminated by the houselight for Group Light, but it was dark for Group Dark. Testing conducted with dark delay…

  14. Confidence Intervals Make a Difference: Effects of Showing Confidence Intervals on Inferential Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Rink; Johnson, Addie; Kiers, Henk A. L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of confidence intervals (CIs) as an addition or as an alternative to null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) has been promoted as a means to make researchers more aware of the uncertainty that is inherent in statistical inference. Little is known, however, about whether presenting results via CIs affects how readers judge the…

  15. Application of Sequential Interval Estimation to Adaptive Mastery Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yuan-chin Ivan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we apply sequential one-sided confidence interval estimation procedures with beta-protection to adaptive mastery testing. The procedures of fixed-width and fixed proportional accuracy confidence interval estimation can be viewed as extensions of one-sided confidence interval procedures. It can be shown that the adaptive mastery…

  16. Exact Confidence Intervals in the Presence of Interference

    PubMed Central

    Rigdon, Joseph; Hudgens, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    For two-stage randomized experiments assuming partial interference, exact confidence intervals are proposed for treatment effects on a binary outcome. Empirical studies demonstrate the new intervals have narrower width than previously proposed exact intervals based on the Hoeffding inequality. PMID:26190877

  17. Calculating Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes Using Noncentral Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah

    This paper provides a brief review of the concepts of confidence intervals, effect sizes, and central and noncentral distributions. The use of confidence intervals around effect sizes is discussed. A demonstration of the Exploratory Software for Confidence Intervals (G. Cuming and S. Finch, 2001; ESCI) is given to illustrate effect size confidence…

  18. About Hemispheric Differences in the Processing of Temporal Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grondin, S.; Girard, C.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify differences between cerebral hemispheres for processing temporal intervals ranging from .9 to 1.4s. The intervals to be judged were marked by series of brief visual signals located in the left or the right visual field. Series of three (two standards and one comparison) or five intervals (four…

  19. 30 CFR 75.360 - Preshift examination at fixed intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preshift examination at fixed intervals. 75.360... examination at fixed intervals. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a certified... added and revised text is set forth as follows: § 75.360 Preshift examination at fixed intervals....

  20. High-intensity interval training: Modulating interval duration in overweight/obese men

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Melvin, Malia N.; Wingfield, Hailee L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient strategy shown to induce various cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations. Little is known about the optimal tolerable combination of intensity and volume necessary for adaptations, especially in clinical populations. Objectives In a randomized controlled pilot design, we evaluated the effects of two types of interval training protocols, varying in intensity and interval duration, on clinical outcomes in overweight/obese men. Methods Twenty-five men [body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg·m2] completed baseline body composition measures: fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM) and percent body fat (%BF) and fasting blood glucose, lipids and insulin (IN). A graded exercise cycling test was completed for peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and power output (PO). Participants were randomly assigned to high-intensity short interval (1MIN-HIIT), high-intensity interval (2MIN-HIIT) or control groups. 1MIN-HIIT and 2MIN-HIIT completed 3 weeks of cycling interval training, 3 days/week, consisting of either 10 × 1 min bouts at 90% PO with 1 min rests (1MIN-HIIT) or 5 × 2 min bouts with 1 min rests at undulating intensities (80%–100%) (2MIN-HIIT). Results There were no significant training effects on FM (Δ1.06 ± 1.25 kg) or %BF (Δ1.13% ± 1.88%), compared to CON. Increases in LM were not significant but increased by 1.7 kg and 2.1 kg for 1MIN and 2MIN-HIIT groups, respectively. Increases in VO2peak were also not significant for 1MIN (3.4 ml·kg−1·min−1) or 2MIN groups (2.7 ml·kg−1·min−1). IN sensitivity (HOMA-IR) improved for both training groups (Δ −2.78 ± 3.48 units; p < 0.05) compared to CON. Conclusion HIIT may be an effective short-term strategy to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and IN sensitivity in overweight males. PMID:25913937

  1. Restricted Interval Guelph permeameter: Theory andapplication

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-06-19

    A constant head permeameter system has been developed for use in small diameter boreholes with any orientation. It is based upon the original Guelph permeameter concept of using a Mariotte siphon reservoir to control the applied head. The new tool, called a Restricted Interval Guelph (RIG) permeameter uses either a single pneumatic packer or straddle packer to restrict the area through which water is allowed to flow so that the borehole wetted area is independent of the applied head. The RIG permeameter has been used at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in the nonwelded rhyolitic Paintbrush Tuff. Analysis of the acquired data is based upon saturated-unsaturated flow theory that relies upon the quasi-linear approximation to estimate field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) and the a parameter (sorptive number) of the exponential relative hydraulic conductivity pressure head relationship. These results are compared with a numerical model based upon the solution of the Richards equation using a van Genuchten capillary pressure-saturation formulation. The numerical model incorporates laboratory capillary pressure versus saturation functions measured from cores taken from nearby boreholes. Comparison between the analytical and numerical approaches shows that the simple analytic model is valid for analyzing the data collected. Sensitivity analysis performed with the numerical model shows that the RIG permeameter is an effective tool for estimating permeability and sorptive number for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff.

  2. An Investigation of Interval Management Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swieringa, Kurt A.; Wilson, Sara R.; Shay, Rick

    2015-01-01

    NASA's first Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) was created to transition the most mature ATM technologies from the laboratory to the National Airspace System. One selected technology is Interval Management (IM), which uses onboard aircraft automation to compute speeds that help the flight crew achieve and maintain precise spacing behind a preceding aircraft. Since ATD-1 focuses on a near-term environment, the ATD-1 flight demonstration prototype requires radio voice communication to issue an IM clearance. Retrofit IM displays will enable pilots to both enter information into the IM avionics and monitor IM operation. These displays could consist of an interface to enter data from an IM clearance and also an auxiliary display that presents critical information in the primary field-of-view. A human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted to examine usability and acceptability of retrofit IM displays, which flight crews found acceptable. Results also indicate the need for salient alerting when new speeds are generated and the desire to have a primary field of view display available that can display text and graphic trend indicators.

  3. Confidence intervals for ATR performance metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Timothy D.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes confidence interval (CI) estimators (CIEs) for the metrics used to assess sensor exploitation algorithm (or ATR) performance. For the discrete distributions, small sample sizes and extreme outcomes encountered within ATR testing, the commonly used CIEs have limited accuracy. This paper makes available CIEs that are accurate over all conditions of interest to the ATR community. The approach is to search for CIs using an integration of the Bayesian posterior (IBP) to measure alpha (chance of the CI not containing the true value). The CIEs provided include proportion estimates based on Binomial distributions and rate estimates based on Poisson distributions. One or two-sided CIs may be selected. For two-sided CIEs, either minimal length, balanced tail probabilities, or balanced width may be selected. The CIEs' accuracies are reported based on a Monte Carlo validated integration of the posterior probability distribution and compared to the Normal approximation and `exact' (Clopper- Pearson) methods. While the IBP methods are accurate throughout, the conventional methods may realize alphas with substantial error (up to 50%). This translates to 10 to 15% error in the CI widths or to requiring 10 to 15% more samples for a given confidence level.

  4. Statistical Properties of Extreme Solar Activity Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioznova, A. V.; Blinov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A study of long-term solar variability reflected in indirect indices of past solar activity leads to stimulating results. We compare the statistics of intervals of very low and very high solar activity derived from two cosmogenic radionuclide records and look for consistency in their timing and physical interpretation. According to the applied criteria, the numbers of minima and of maxima are 61 and 68, respectively, from the 10Be record, and 42 and 46 from the 14C record. The difference between the enhanced and depressed states of solar activity becomes apparent in the difference in their statistical distributions. We find no correlation between the level or type (minimum or maximum) of an extremum and the level or type of the predecessor. The hypothesis of solar activity as a periodic process on the millennial time scale is not supported by the existing proxies. A new homogeneous series of 10Be measurements in polar ice covering the Holocene would be of great value for eliminating the existing discrepancy in the available solar activity reconstructions.

  5. Controlling human fixed-interval performance.

    PubMed

    Weiner, H

    1969-05-01

    Both high and relatively constant rates of responding without post-reinforcement pauses and lower rates with pauses after reinforcement are produced by human subjects under fixed-interval (FI) schedules. Such FI rates and patterns may be controlled when subjects are provided with different histories of conditioning and different conditions of response cost (reinforcement penalties per response). Subjects with a conditioning history under ratio schedules typically produce high and relatively constant rates of responding under FI schedules; this responding does not change systematically with changes in FI value. In contrast, subjects with a history under schedules which produce little or no responding between reforcements [such as differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) schedules] tend to pause after reinforcement and respond at low rates under FI schedules, whether or not they also have ratio conditioning histories; cost increases the likelihood of this type of performance. For DRL-history subjects, post-reinforcement pauses increase and response rates decrease as FI values increase.

  6. Function approximation using adaptive and overlapping intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A problem common to many disciplines is to approximate a function given only the values of the function at various points in input variable space. A method is proposed for approximating a function of several to one variable. The model takes the form of weighted averaging of overlapping basis functions defined over intervals. The number of such basis functions and their parameters (widths and centers) are automatically determined using given training data and a learning algorithm. The proposed algorithm can be seen as placing a nonuniform multidimensional grid in the input domain with overlapping cells. The non-uniformity and overlap of the cells is achieved by a learning algorithm to optimize a given objective function. This approach is motivated by the fuzzy modeling approach and a learning algorithms used for clustering and classification in pattern recognition. The basics of why and how the approach works are given. Few examples of nonlinear regression and classification are modeled. The relationship between the proposed technique, radial basis neural networks, kernel regression, probabilistic neural networks, and fuzzy modeling is explained. Finally advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  7. En hommage à Barbara Kołaczek: Quelques beaux livres d'astronomie d'astronomes polonais de la Bibliothèque de l'Observatoire de Paris (XVIe et XVIIe siècles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segonds, A.; Lerner, M.-P.; Débarbat, S.

    En hommage à Barbara Kołaczek, nous présentons des ouvrages de la Bibliothèque de l'Observatoire de Paris dont les auteurs sont quatre astronomes polonais des XVIe et XVIIe siècles: Copernic (1473-1543) né à Torun et mort à Frombork, et trois astronomes du milieu de Gdansk - Peter Krüger (1580-1630) - Jean Hevelius (1611-1687), né et mort à Gdansk, et Jan Hecker (1625-1675), auteur d'éphémérides. On mentionne pour finir un ouvrage exceptionnel de Stanislas Lubieniecki.

  8. Dissimilar Physiological and Perceptual Responses Between Sprint Interval Training and High-Intensity Interval Training.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kimberly M; Olive, Brittany; LaValle, Kaylyn; Thompson, Heather; Greer, Kevin; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) elicit similar cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations vs. endurance training. No study, however, has investigated acute physiological changes during HIIT vs. SIT. This study compared acute changes in heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLa), oxygen uptake (VO2), affect, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during HIIT and SIT. Active adults (4 women and 8 men, age = 24.2 ± 6.2 years) initially performed a VO2max test to determine workload for both sessions on the cycle ergometer, whose order was randomized. Sprint interval training consisted of 8 bouts of 30 seconds of all-out cycling at 130% of maximum Watts (Wmax). High-intensity interval training consisted of eight 60-second bouts at 85% Wmax. Heart rate, VO2, BLa, affect, and RPE were continuously assessed throughout exercise. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between HIIT and SIT for VO2 (p < 0.001), HR (p < 0.001), RPE (p = 0.03), and BLa (p = 0.049). Conversely, there was no significant difference between regimens for affect (p = 0.12). Energy expenditure was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in HIIT (209.3 ± 40.3 kcal) vs. SIT (193.5 ± 39.6 kcal). During HIIT, subjects burned significantly more calories and reported lower perceived exertion than SIT. The higher VO2 and lower BLa in HIIT vs. SIT reflected dissimilar metabolic perturbation between regimens, which may elicit unique long-term adaptations. If an individual is seeking to burn slightly more calories, maintain a higher oxygen uptake, and perceive less exertion during exercise, HIIT is the recommended routine.

  9. Dissimilar Physiological and Perceptual Responses Between Sprint Interval Training and High-Intensity Interval Training.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kimberly M; Olive, Brittany; LaValle, Kaylyn; Thompson, Heather; Greer, Kevin; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) elicit similar cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations vs. endurance training. No study, however, has investigated acute physiological changes during HIIT vs. SIT. This study compared acute changes in heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLa), oxygen uptake (VO2), affect, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during HIIT and SIT. Active adults (4 women and 8 men, age = 24.2 ± 6.2 years) initially performed a VO2max test to determine workload for both sessions on the cycle ergometer, whose order was randomized. Sprint interval training consisted of 8 bouts of 30 seconds of all-out cycling at 130% of maximum Watts (Wmax). High-intensity interval training consisted of eight 60-second bouts at 85% Wmax. Heart rate, VO2, BLa, affect, and RPE were continuously assessed throughout exercise. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between HIIT and SIT for VO2 (p < 0.001), HR (p < 0.001), RPE (p = 0.03), and BLa (p = 0.049). Conversely, there was no significant difference between regimens for affect (p = 0.12). Energy expenditure was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in HIIT (209.3 ± 40.3 kcal) vs. SIT (193.5 ± 39.6 kcal). During HIIT, subjects burned significantly more calories and reported lower perceived exertion than SIT. The higher VO2 and lower BLa in HIIT vs. SIT reflected dissimilar metabolic perturbation between regimens, which may elicit unique long-term adaptations. If an individual is seeking to burn slightly more calories, maintain a higher oxygen uptake, and perceive less exertion during exercise, HIIT is the recommended routine. PMID:26691413

  10. Volatility return intervals analysis of the Japanese market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W.-S.; Wang, F. Z.; Havlin, S.; Kaizoji, T.; Moon, H.-T.; Stanley, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate scaling and memory effects in return intervals between price volatilities above a certain threshold q for the Japanese stock market using daily and intraday data sets. We find that the distribution of return intervals can be approximated by a scaling function that depends only on the ratio between the return interval τ and its mean <τ>. We also find memory effects such that a large (or small) return interval follows a large (or small) interval by investigating the conditional distribution and mean return interval. The results are similar to previous studies of other markets and indicate that similar statistical features appear in different financial markets. We also compare our results between the period before and after the big crash at the end of 1989. We find that scaling and memory effects of the return intervals show similar features although the statistical properties of the returns are different.

  11. Using Confidence Intervals and Recurrence Intervals to Determine Precipitation Delivery Mechanisms Responsible for Mass Wasting Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulizio, T. P.; Bilbrey, C.; Stoyanoff, N.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mass wasting events are geologic hazards that impact human life and property across a variety of landscapes. These movements can be triggered by tectonic activity, anomalous precipitation events, or both; acting to decrease the factor of safety ratio on a hillslope to the point of failure. There exists an active hazard landscape in the West Boulder River drainage of Park Co., MT in which the mechanisms of slope failure are unknown. It is known that region has not seen significant tectonic activity within the last decade, leaving anomalous precipitation events as the likely trigger for slope failures in the landscape. Precipitation can be delivered to a landscape via rainfall or snow; it was the aim of this study to determine the precipitation delivery mechanism most likely responsible for movements in the West Boulder drainage following the Jungle Wildfire of 2006. Data was compiled from four SNOTEL sites in the surrounding area, spanning 33 years, focusing on, but not limited to; maximum snow water equivalent (SWE) values in a water year, median SWE values on the date which maximum SWE was recorded in a water year, the total precipitation accumulated in a water year, etc. Means were computed and 99% confidence intervals were constructed around these means. Recurrence intervals and exceedance probabilities were computed for maximum SWE values and total precipitation accumulated in a water year to determine water years with anomalous precipitation. It was determined that the water year 2010-2011 received an anomalously high amount of SWE, and snow melt in the spring of this water year likely triggered recent mass waste movements. This data is further supported by Google Earth imagery, showing movements between 2009 and 2011. Return intervals for the maximum SWE value in 2010-11 for the Placer Basin SNOTEL site was 34 years, while return intervals for the Box Canyon and Monument Peak SNOTEL sites were 17.5 and 17 years respectively. Max SWE values lie outside the

  12. Multi-scale monitoring of a marine geologic methane source in the Santa Barbara Channel using imaging spectrometry, ARCTAS-CARB in situ sampling and coastal hourly total hydrocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. S.; Leifer, I.; Roberts, D.; Dennison, P. E.; Margolis, J.; Moritsch, M.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Coal Oil Point (COP) hydrocarbon seep field off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA is one of the most active and best-studied marine geologic methane sources in the world and contributes to elevated terrestrial methane concentrations downwind. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal variability of this local source and the influence of meteorological conditions on transport and concentration. A methane plume emanating from Trilogy Seep was mapped with the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer at a 7.5 m resolution with a short-wave infrared band ratio technique. This structure agrees with the local wind speed and direction and is orthogonal to the surface currents. ARCTAS-CARB aircraft in situ sampling of lower-troposphere methane is compared to sub-hour total hydrocarbon concentration (THC) measurements from the Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District (SBAPCD) station located near COP. Hourly SBAPCD THC values from 1980-2008 demonstrate a decrease in seep source strength until the late 1990s, followed by a consistent increase. The occurrence of elevated SBAPCD THC values for onshore wind conditions as well as numerous positive outliers as high as 17 ppm suggests that seep field emissions are both quasi-steady state and transient, direct (bubble) and diffuse (outgassing). As demonstrated for the COP seeps, the combination of imaging spectrometry, aircraft in situ sampling, and ground-based monitoring provides a powerful approach for understanding local methane sources and transport processes.

  13. IBM system/360 assembly language interval arithmetic software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Computer software designed to perform interval arithmetic is described. An interval is defined as the set of all real numbers between two given numbers including or excluding one or both endpoints. Interval arithmetic consists of the various elementary arithmetic operations defined on the set of all intervals, such as interval addition, subtraction, union, etc. One of the main applications of interval arithmetic is in the area of error analysis of computer calculations. For example, it has been used sucessfully to compute bounds on sounding errors in the solution of linear algebraic systems, error bounds in numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, as well as integral equations and boundary value problems. The described software enables users to implement algorithms of the type described in references efficiently on the IBM 360 system.

  14. Contrasting diversity values: statistical inferences based on overlapping confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    MacGregor-Fors, Ian; Payton, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Ecologists often contrast diversity (species richness and abundances) using tests for comparing means or indices. However, many popular software applications do not support performing standard inferential statistics for estimates of species richness and/or density. In this study we simulated the behavior of asymmetric log-normal confidence intervals and determined an interval level that mimics statistical tests with P(α) = 0.05 when confidence intervals from two distributions do not overlap. Our results show that 84% confidence intervals robustly mimic 0.05 statistical tests for asymmetric confidence intervals, as has been demonstrated for symmetric ones in the past. Finally, we provide detailed user-guides for calculating 84% confidence intervals in two of the most robust and highly-used freeware related to diversity measurements for wildlife (i.e., EstimateS, Distance).

  15. Contrasting Diversity Values: Statistical Inferences Based on Overlapping Confidence Intervals

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor-Fors, Ian; Payton, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Ecologists often contrast diversity (species richness and abundances) using tests for comparing means or indices. However, many popular software applications do not support performing standard inferential statistics for estimates of species richness and/or density. In this study we simulated the behavior of asymmetric log-normal confidence intervals and determined an interval level that mimics statistical tests with P(α) = 0.05 when confidence intervals from two distributions do not overlap. Our results show that 84% confidence intervals robustly mimic 0.05 statistical tests for asymmetric confidence intervals, as has been demonstrated for symmetric ones in the past. Finally, we provide detailed user-guides for calculating 84% confidence intervals in two of the most robust and highly-used freeware related to diversity measurements for wildlife (i.e., EstimateS, Distance). PMID:23437239

  16. Interval timing in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Higa, J J; Simm, L A

    2004-11-30

    The present study evaluated the temporal performance of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) given short-term exposure to four fixed interval (FI) schedules of reinforcement, FI 30, 60, 120, and 240 s, during which a reinforcer (mirror image) was given for the first response (swimming through a hoop) after the interval requirement had elapsed. Response levels were generally low early in an interval and increased as the interval elapsed; wait times and break points in an interval increased with increases in the FI requirement. The results were similar to that obtained with other species and different types of responses and reinforcers, and demonstrate that the procedure is a feasible method for studying interval timing in fish.

  17. Interval timing in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Higa, J J; Simm, L A

    2004-11-30

    The present study evaluated the temporal performance of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) given short-term exposure to four fixed interval (FI) schedules of reinforcement, FI 30, 60, 120, and 240 s, during which a reinforcer (mirror image) was given for the first response (swimming through a hoop) after the interval requirement had elapsed. Response levels were generally low early in an interval and increased as the interval elapsed; wait times and break points in an interval increased with increases in the FI requirement. The results were similar to that obtained with other species and different types of responses and reinforcers, and demonstrate that the procedure is a feasible method for studying interval timing in fish. PMID:15518999

  18. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  19. Interval-valued fuzzy hypergraph and fuzzy partition.

    PubMed

    Chen, S M

    1997-01-01

    This paper extends the work of H. Lee-Kwang and L.M. Lee (1995) to present the concept of the interval-valued fuzzy hypergraph. In the interval-valued fuzzy hypergraph, the concepts of the dual interval-valued fuzzy hypergraph, the crisp-valued alpha-cut hypergraph, and the interval-valued [alpha(1),alpha(2 )]-cut at beta level hypergraph are developed, where alphain [0, 1], 0

  20. Relationship between inter-stimulus-intervals and intervals of autonomous activities in a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidekatsu; Minoshima, Wataru; Kudoh, Suguru N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate relationships between neuronal network activity and electrical stimulus, we analyzed autonomous activity before and after electrical stimulus. Recordings of autonomous activity were performed using dissociated culture of rat hippocampal neurons on a multi-electrodes array (MEA) dish. Single stimulus and pared stimuli were applied to a cultured neuronal network. Single stimulus was applied every 1 min, and paired stimuli was performed by two sequential stimuli every 1 min. As a result, the patterns of synchronized activities of a neuronal network were changed after stimulus. Especially, long range synchronous activities were induced by paired stimuli. When 1 s inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) and 1.5 s ISI paired stimuli are applied to a neuronal network, relatively long range synchronous activities expressed in case of 1.5 s ISI. Temporal synchronous activity of neuronal network is changed according to inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) of electrical stimulus. In other words, dissociated neuronal network can maintain given information in temporal pattern and a certain type of an information maintenance mechanism was considered to be implemented in a semi-artificial dissociated neuronal network. The result is useful toward manipulation technology of neuronal activity in a brain system.

  1. The different effects of high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training for weightlessness countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; Cheng, Tan; Zhi-Li, Li; Hui-juan, Wang; Wen-juan, Chen; Jianfeng, Zhang; Desheng, Wang; Dongbin, Niu; Qi, Zhao; Chengjia, Yang; Yanqing, Wang

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. But the difference between high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training (MIIT) in simulated weightlessness still has not been well studied. This study sought to characterize the difference between 6 weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training under reduced weight (RW) gait training device and zero-gravity locomotion system (ZLS). Twenty-three subjects (14M/4F, 32.5±4.5 years) volunteered to participate. They were divided into three groups, that were MITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 60% VO _{2} peak for 30min, five days per week) RW group (n=8), HITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 90% VO _{2} peak for 30min, three days per week) RW group (n=8) and HITT ZLS group (n=7). The Z-axis load used in RW group was 80% body weight (BW) and in ZLS was 100% BW. Cardiopulmonary function was measured before, after 4-week training and after 6-week training. Isokinetic knee extension-flexion test at 60(°) deg/s and 180(°) deg/s were performed before and after the 6-week training, and isometric knee extension-flexion test at 180(°) deg/s was also examined at the same time. It was found that the VO _{2} peaks, metabolic equivalent (MET), Speedmax and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly increased after 4 and 6-week training in all three groups and no significant group difference were detected. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion were significantly increased after 6 week-training in all three groups, and only in HITT RW group the total power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion enhanced. The total power and average power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension decreased significantly after 6-week training in all three groups. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension in MIIT RW group was

  2. Comparing interval estimates for small sample ordinal CFA models.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2015-01-01

    Robust maximum likelihood (RML) and asymptotically generalized least squares (AGLS) methods have been recommended for fitting ordinal structural equation models. Studies show that some of these methods underestimate standard errors. However, these studies have not investigated the coverage and bias of interval estimates. An estimate with a reasonable standard error could still be severely biased. This can only be known by systematically investigating the interval estimates. The present study compares Bayesian, RML, and AGLS interval estimates of factor correlations in ordinal confirmatory factor analysis models (CFA) for small sample data. Six sample sizes, 3 factor correlations, and 2 factor score distributions (multivariate normal and multivariate mildly skewed) were studied. Two Bayesian prior specifications, informative and relatively less informative were studied. Undercoverage of confidence intervals and underestimation of standard errors was common in non-Bayesian methods. Underestimated standard errors may lead to inflated Type-I error rates. Non-Bayesian intervals were more positive biased than negatively biased, that is, most intervals that did not contain the true value were greater than the true value. Some non-Bayesian methods had non-converging and inadmissible solutions for small samples and non-normal data. Bayesian empirical standard error estimates for informative and relatively less informative priors were closer to the average standard errors of the estimates. The coverage of Bayesian credibility intervals was closer to what was expected with overcoverage in a few cases. Although some Bayesian credibility intervals were wider, they reflected the nature of statistical uncertainty that comes with the data (e.g., small sample). Bayesian point estimates were also more accurate than non-Bayesian estimates. The results illustrate the importance of analyzing coverage and bias of interval estimates, and how ignoring interval estimates can be misleading

  3. Interval Estimation of Gamma for an "RxS" Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lui, Kung-Jong; Cumberland, William G.

    2004-01-01

    When the underlying responses are on an ordinal scale, gamma is one of the most frequently used indices to measure the strength of association between two ordered variables. However, except for a brief mention on the use of the traditional interval estimator based on Wald's statistic, discussion of interval estimation of the gamma is limited.…

  4. Reporting Confidence Intervals and Effect Sizes: Collecting the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Ozel, Z. Ebrar Yetkiner; Ozel, Serkan; Allen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Confidence intervals (CIs) and effect sizes are essential to encourage meta-analytic thinking and to accumulate research findings. CIs provide a range of plausible values for population parameters with a degree of confidence that the parameter is in that particular interval. CIs also give information about how precise the estimates are. Comparison…

  5. A comparison of approximate interval estimators for the Bernoulli parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leemis, Lawrence; Trivedi, Kishor S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to compare the accuracy of two approximate confidence interval estimators for the Bernoulli parameter p. The approximate confidence intervals are based on the normal and Poisson approximations to the binomial distribution. Charts are given to indicate which approximation is appropriate for certain sample sizes and point estimators.

  6. A Note on Confidence Interval Estimation and Margin of Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Dennis; Melfi, Vince

    2010-01-01

    Confidence interval estimation is a fundamental technique in statistical inference. Margin of error is used to delimit the error in estimation. Dispelling misinterpretations that teachers and students give to these terms is important. In this note, we give examples of the confusion that can arise in regard to confidence interval estimation and…

  7. Improved central confidence intervals for the ratio of Poisson means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, R. D.

    The problem of confidence intervals for the ratio of two unknown Poisson means was "solved" decades ago, but a closer examination reveals that the standard solution is far from optimal from the frequentist point of view. We construct a more powerful set of central confidence intervals, each of which is a (typically proper) subinterval of the corresponding standard interval. They also provide upper and lower confidence limits which are more restrictive than the standard limits. The construction follows Neyman's original prescription, though discreteness of the Poisson distribution and the presence of a nuisance parameter (one of the unknown means) lead to slightly conservative intervals. Philosophically, the issue of the appropriateness of the construction method is similar to the issue of conditioning on the margins in 2×2 contingency tables. From a frequentist point of view, the new set maintains (over) coverage of the unknown true value of the ratio of means at each stated confidence level, even though the new intervals are shorter than the old intervals by any measure (except for two cases where they are identical). As an example, when the number 2 is drawn from each Poisson population, the 90% CL central confidence interval on the ratio of means is (0.169, 5.196), rather than (0.108, 9.245). In the cited literature, such confidence intervals have applications in numerous branches of pure and applied science, including agriculture, wildlife studies, manufacturing, medicine, reliability theory, and elementary particle physics.

  8. Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Applying Bootstrap Resampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banjanovic, Erin S.; Osborne, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Confidence intervals for effect sizes (CIES) provide readers with an estimate of the strength of a reported statistic as well as the relative precision of the point estimate. These statistics offer more information and context than null hypothesis statistic testing. Although confidence intervals have been recommended by scholars for many years,…

  9. Sample Size for the "Z" Test and Its Confidence Interval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2012-01-01

    The statistical power of a significance test is closely related to the length of the confidence interval (i.e. estimate precision). In the case of a "Z" test, the length of the confidence interval can be expressed as a function of the statistical power. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)

  10. [Experimental visual evoked potentials. Interstimuli interval and cortical excitability].

    PubMed

    Díaz Calavia, E; Fernández del Moral, R; Dawid-Milner, S; Jiménez Vargas, J

    1989-01-01

    The excitability of the visual system was studied in ten adult chronic cats. Visual evoked potentials were recorded, using decreasing interstimulus intervals. A decrease of the excitability of the visual system is observed when interstimulus intervals are less than 800 milliseconds. Clinical applications with regard to visual evoked potential recording on comatose patients are suggested.

  11. Computer Experience and Interval-Based Hypermedia Navigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, W. Michael; Oughton, John M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study of graduate students that focused on determining the relationship among student characteristics, including gender, learning style, and prior computer experiences, and non-linear interval-based navigation of a hypermedia program. Highlights include a literature review, interval frequencies, and suggestions for future research.…

  12. Overconfidence in Interval Estimates: What Does Expertise Buy You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Craig R. M.; Liersch, Michael J.; Yaniv, Ilan

    2008-01-01

    People's 90% subjective confidence intervals typically contain the true value about 50% of the time, indicating extreme overconfidence. Previous results have been mixed regarding whether experts are as overconfident as novices. Experiment 1 examined interval estimates from information technology (IT) professionals and UC San Diego (UCSD) students…

  13. A Model for Residence Time in Concurrent Variable Interval Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakatikyan, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    A component-functions model of choice behavior is proposed for performance on interdependent concurrent variable-interval (VI) variable-interval schedules based on the product of two component functions, one that enhances behavior and one that reduces behavior. The model is the solution to the symmetrical pair of differential equations describing…

  14. Why Aren't They Called Probability Intervals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    This article offers suggestions for teaching confidence intervals, a fundamental statistical tool often misinterpreted by beginning students. A historical perspective presenting the interpretation given by their inventor is supported with examples and the use of technology. A method for determining confidence intervals for the seldom-discussed…

  15. Min and Max Exponential Extreme Interval Values and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jance, Marsha; Thomopoulos, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The extreme interval values and statistics (expected value, median, mode, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation) for the smallest (min) and largest (max) values of exponentially distributed variables with parameter ? = 1 are examined for different observation (sample) sizes. An extreme interval value g[subscript a] is defined as a…

  16. Magnitude Estimation Reveals Temporal Binding at Super-Second Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Gruffydd R.; Buehner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies (e.g., Haggard, Aschersleben, Gehrke, & Prinz, 2002; Haggard & Clark, 2003; Haggard, Clark, & Kalogeras, 2002) have demonstrated a "Temporal Binding" effect in which the interval between an intentional action and its consequent outcome is subjectively shorter compared to equivalent intervals that do not involve intentional…

  17. Habituation in goldfish (Carassius auratus) is impaired by increased interstimulus interval, interval variability, and telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Laming, P R; McKinney, S J

    1990-12-01

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) were fitted with electrodes and buccal catheters for monitoring electrocardiograms and ventilations, respectively. A 2-s "light-on" stimulus was repeatedly presented to groups of fish at fixed interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1 or 2 min or at variable ISIs with a mean duration of 1 or 2 min. Normal fish, fish with telencephalic ablation, and fish with sham operations were compared for responsiveness and habituation to repeatedly presented stimuli. The longer the ISI, the greater the number of stimuli that were required for habituation. Increased ISI variability also decreased the rate of habituation. Furthermore, fish with telencephalic ablation had significantly slower habituation rates with both fixed and variable ISI schedules.

  18. Interval sampling methods and measurement error: a computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Oliver; Slaven, James; Taylor, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to provide a more thorough account of measurement error associated with interval sampling methods. A computer program simulated the application of momentary time sampling, partial-interval recording, and whole-interval recording methods on target events randomly distributed across an observation period. The simulation yielded measures of error for multiple combinations of observation period, interval duration, event duration, and cumulative event duration. The simulations were conducted up to 100 times to yield measures of error variability. Although the present simulation confirmed some previously reported characteristics of interval sampling methods, it also revealed many new findings that pertain to each method's inherent strengths and weaknesses. The analysis and resulting error tables can help guide the selection of the most appropriate sampling method for observation-based behavioral assessments.

  19. Order and chaos in fixed-interval schedules of reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Hoyert, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    Fixed-interval schedule performance is characterized by high levels of variability. Responding is absent at the onset of the interval and gradually increases in frequency until reinforcer delivery. Measures of behavior also vary drastically and unpredictably between successive intervals. Recent advances in the study of nonlinear dynamics have allowed researchers to study irregular and unpredictable behavior in a number of fields. This paper reviews several concepts and techniques from nonlinear dynamics and examines their utility in predicting the behavior of pigeons responding to a fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement. The analysis provided fairly accurate a priori accounts of response rates, accounting for 92.8% of the variance when predicting response rate 1 second in the future and 64% of the variance when predicting response rates for each second over the entire next interreinforcer interval. The nonlinear dynamics account suggests that even the “noisiest” behavior might be the product of purely deterministic mechanisms. PMID:16812657

  20. Plea for routinely presenting prediction intervals in meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    IntHout, Joanna; Ioannidis, John P A; Rovers, Maroeska M; Goeman, Jelle J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evaluating the variation in the strength of the effect across studies is a key feature of meta-analyses. This variability is reflected by measures like τ2 or I2, but their clinical interpretation is not straightforward. A prediction interval is less complicated: it presents the expected range of true effects in similar studies. We aimed to show the advantages of having the prediction interval routinely reported in meta-analyses. Design We show how the prediction interval can help understand the uncertainty about whether an intervention works or not. To evaluate the implications of using this interval to interpret the results, we selected the first meta-analysis per intervention review of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issues 2009–2013 with a dichotomous (n=2009) or continuous (n=1254) outcome, and generated 95% prediction intervals for them. Results In 72.4% of 479 statistically significant (random-effects p<0.05) meta-analyses in the Cochrane Database 2009–2013 with heterogeneity (I2>0), the 95% prediction interval suggested that the intervention effect could be null or even be in the opposite direction. In 20.3% of those 479 meta-analyses, the prediction interval showed that the effect could be completely opposite to the point estimate of the meta-analysis. We demonstrate also how the prediction interval can be used to calculate the probability that a new trial will show a negative effect and to improve the calculations of the power of a new trial. Conclusions The prediction interval reflects the variation in treatment effects over different settings, including what effect is to be expected in future patients, such as the patients that a clinician is interested to treat. Prediction intervals should be routinely reported to allow more informative inferences in meta-analyses. PMID:27406637

  1. Changes in QT interval before and after hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Khosoosi Niaki, Mohammad Reza; Saravi, Mehrdad; Oliaee, Farshid; Akbari, Roghayeh; Noorkhomami, Sepideh; Bozorgi Rad, Seyed Hassan; Fallahpoor, Kobra; Ramezani, Mir Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular mortality and morbidity are high in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Increased dispersion of QT intervals is known to predispose to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This study was conducted to assess the effect of hemodialysis (HD) on corrected QT (QTc) intervals and their dispersions (QTd) in chronic hemodialyzed patients. Methods: Fifty-eight patients ( mean age 54.2±15.8 years) with chronic renal disease on chronic hemodialysis (HD) were assessed by standard examination including blood pressure, body weight, heart rate, 12–lead electrocardiography and laboratory tests like electrolytes (Na +, K +, Ca ++, phosphate), urea, and creatinine 30 minutes before and after HD. The QT intervals and QTc QTc= QT √R-R/ (in milli seconds [ms]) for each lead were measured manually by one observer using calipers. The difference between the maximum and the minimum of QT interval was noted as QT dispersion (QT d). Results: The mean of pre and post dialysis R-R intervals was 859.22±96.85 ms and 870.43±91.45 ms, respectively (p>0.05). The mean of corrected QT cmax intervals increased significantly from 423.45±24.10 to 454.41±30.25 ms (p<0.05). The mean of QT dispersions and the corrected QT interval dispersions changed from 51.56±12.45 to 63.21±14.43 ms (p<0.05) from 59.40±13.58 to 68.33±14.55 ms (p<0.05), respectively. The changes in serum potassium and calcium levels were related with QT interval prolongation. Conclusion: QT and QTc interval and dispersion increase in HD patients. Prolonged QT interval indices had relation with K+ and Ca++ ions before but not after HD. PMID:24009942

  2. Modelling volatility recurrence intervals in the Chinese commodity futures market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijie; Wang, Zhengxin; Guo, Haiming

    2016-09-01

    The law of extreme event occurrence attracts much research. The volatility recurrence intervals of Chinese commodity futures market prices are studied: the results show that the probability distributions of the scaled volatility recurrence intervals have a uniform scaling curve for different thresholds q. So we can deduce the probability distribution of extreme events from normal events. The tail of a scaling curve can be well fitted by a Weibull form, which is significance-tested by KS measures. Both short-term and long-term memories are present in the recurrence intervals with different thresholds q, which denotes that the recurrence intervals can be predicted. In addition, similar to volatility, volatility recurrence intervals also have clustering features. Through Monte Carlo simulation, we artificially synthesise ARMA, GARCH-class sequences similar to the original data, and find out the reason behind the clustering. The larger the parameter d of the FIGARCH model, the stronger the clustering effect is. Finally, we use the Fractionally Integrated Autoregressive Conditional Duration model (FIACD) to analyse the recurrence interval characteristics. The results indicated that the FIACD model may provide a method to analyse volatility recurrence intervals.

  3. The Role of Higher Harmonics In Musical Interval Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Richard; Douthett, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Using an alternative parameterization of the roughness curve we make direct use of critical band results to investigate the role of higher harmonics on the perception of tonal consonance. We scale the spectral amplitudes in the complex home tone and complex interval tone to simulate acoustic signals of constant energy. Our analysis reveals that even with a relatively small addition of higher harmonics the perfect fifth emerges as a consonant interval with more, musically important, just intervals emerging as consonant as more and more energy is shifted into higher frequencies.

  4. Fixed-interval behavior maintained by conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed

    De Lorge, J

    1967-05-01

    The key-pecking of a pigeon was reinforced with grain on an 18-min second-order schedule. During the 18 min, a key peck which completed a 3-min fixed interval produced a stimulus of 0.5-sec duration. The first 3-min fixed interval completed after 18 min resulted in primary reinforcement. Behavior characteristic of fixed-interval schedules was produced on both the 3-min components and the 18-min schedule. This performance was shown to be enhanced whenever the 0.5-sec stimulus was also presented before the presentation of grain.

  5. Unpacking a time interval lengthens its perceived temporal distance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Li, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In quantity estimation, people often perceive that the whole is less than the sum of its parts. The current study investigated such an unpacking effect in temporal distance judgment. Our results showed that participants in the unpacked condition judged a given time interval longer than those in the packed condition, even the time interval was kept constant between the two conditions. Furthermore, this unpacking effect persists regardless of the unpacking ways we employed. Results suggest that unpacking a time interval may be a good strategy for lengthening its perceived temporal distance. PMID:25477854

  6. An evolutionary algorithm for interval solid transportation problems.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, F; Verdegay, J L

    1999-01-01

    The Solid Transportation Problem arises when bounds are given on three item properties. Usually, these properties are source, destination and mode of transport (conveyance), and may be given in an interval way. This paper deals with solid transportation problems in which the data in the constraint set are expressed in an interval form, i.e. when sources, destinations and conveyances have interval values instead of point values. An arbitrary linear or nonlinear objective function is also considered. To solve the problem, an Evolutionary Algorithm which extends and generalizes other approaches considering only point values, is proposed.

  7. Concept of Operations for Interval Management Arrivals and Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicok, Daniel S.; Barmore, Bryan E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of operations for interval management operations to be deployed in the US National Airspace System (NAS) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) after 2020. The use of interval management operations is described that begin in en route airspace and continue to a termination point inside the arrival terminal area, in a terminal environment that includes other arrival management tools such as arrival metering, Ground-based Interval Management - Spacing (GIM-S), and Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSAS). The roles of Air Traffic Controllers and Flight Crews and the ground automation tools that are used by Air Traffic Controllers to enable the primary operation and variations are described.

  8. Detectability of auditory signals presented without defined observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, C. S.; Nichols, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ability to detect tones in noise was measured without defined observation intervals. Latency density functions were estimated for the first response following a signal and, separately, for the first response following randomly distributed instances of background noise. Detection performance was measured by the maximum separation between the cumulative latency density functions for signal-plus-noise and for noise alone. Values of the index of detectability, estimated by this procedure, were approximately those obtained with a 2-dB weaker signal and defined observation intervals. Simulation of defined- and non-defined-interval tasks with an energy detector showed that this device performs very similarly to the human listener in both cases.

  9. Estimation of confidence intervals for federal waterfowl harvest surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    I developed methods of estimating confidence intervals for the federal waterfowl harvest surveys conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). I estimated flyway harvest confidence intervals for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) (95% CI are .+-. 8% of the estimate). Canada geese (Branta canadensis) (.+-. 11%), black ducks (Anas rubripes) (.+-. 16%), canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) (.+-. 32%), snow geese (Chen caerulescens) (.+-. 43%), and brant (Branta bernicla) (.+-. 46%). Differences between annual estimate of 10, 13, 22, 42, 43, and 58% could be detected with mallards, Canada geese, black ducks, canvasbacks, snow geese, and brant, respectively. Estimated confidence intervals for state harvests tended to be much larger than those for the flyway estimates.

  10. Unpacking a time interval lengthens its perceived temporal distance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In quantity estimation, people often perceive that the whole is less than the sum of its parts. The current study investigated such an unpacking effect in temporal distance judgment. Our results showed that participants in the unpacked condition judged a given time interval longer than those in the packed condition, even the time interval was kept constant between the two conditions. Furthermore, this unpacking effect persists regardless of the unpacking ways we employed. Results suggest that unpacking a time interval may be a good strategy for lengthening its perceived temporal distance. PMID:25477854

  11. A new method for wavelength interval selection that intelligently optimizes the locations, widths and combinations of the intervals.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bai-Chuan; Yun, Yong-Huan; Ma, Pan; Lin, Chen-Chen; Ren, Da-Bing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-03-21

    In this study, a new algorithm for wavelength interval selection, known as interval variable iterative space shrinkage approach (iVISSA), is proposed based on the VISSA algorithm. It combines global and local searches to iteratively and intelligently optimize the locations, widths and combinations of the spectral intervals. In the global search procedure, it inherits the merit of soft shrinkage from VISSA to search the locations and combinations of informative wavelengths, whereas in the local search procedure, it utilizes the information of continuity in spectroscopic data to determine the widths of wavelength intervals. The global and local search procedures are carried out alternatively to realize wavelength interval selection. This method was tested using three near infrared (NIR) datasets. Some high-performing wavelength selection methods, such as synergy interval partial least squares (siPLS), moving window partial least squares (MW-PLS), competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), genetic algorithm PLS (GA-PLS) and interval random frog (iRF), were used for comparison. The results show that the proposed method is very promising with good results both on prediction capability and stability. The MATLAB codes for implementing iVISSA are freely available on the website: .

  12. Weibull distribution based on maximum likelihood with interval inspection data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The two Weibull parameters based upon the method of maximum likelihood are determined. The test data used were failures observed at inspection intervals. The application was the reliability analysis of the SSME oxidizer turbine blades.

  13. Simulation of Interval Censored Data in Medical and Biological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Kaveh; Arasan, Jayanthi

    This research looks at the simulation of interval censored data when the survivor function of the survival time is known and attendance probability of the subjects for follow-ups can take any number between 0 to 1. Interval censored data often arise in the medical and biological follow-up studies where the event of interest occurs somewhere between two known times. Regardless of the methods used to analyze these types of data, simulation of interval censored data is an important and challenging step toward model building and prediction of survival time. The simulation itself is rather tedious and very computer intensive due to the interval monitoring of subjects at prescheduled times and subject's incomplete attendance to follow-ups. In this paper the simulated data by the proposed method were assessed using the bias, standard error and root mean square error (RMSE) of the parameter estimates where the survival time T is assumed to follow the Gompertz distribution function.

  14. Baseline Bone Mineral Density Measurements Key to Future Testing Intervals

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Research 2012 May 2012 (historical) Baseline Bone Mineral Density Measurements Key to Future Testing Intervals How often a woman should have bone mineral density (BMD) tests to track bone mass is ...

  15. Concept of Operations for Interval Management Arrivals and Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicok, Daniel S.; Barmore, Bryan E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of operations for interval management operations to be deployed in the US National Airspace System (NAS) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Interval Management Program. The arrivals and approach operations are explored in detail including the primary operation and variations. The use of interval management operations is described that begin in en route airspace and continue to a termination point inside the arrival terminal area in the highly automated terminal environment that includes other arrival management tools such as arrival metering, Ground-based Interval Management - Spacing (GIM-S), and Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSAS). The roles of Air Traffic and Pilots and the ground automation tools that are used by Air Traffic Controllers to enable the operations are explored.

  16. A new interval optimization method considering tolerance design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Xie, H. C.; Zhang, Z. G.; Han, X.

    2015-12-01

    This study considers the design variable uncertainty in the actual manufacturing process for a product or structure and proposes a new interval optimization method based on tolerance design, which can provide not only an optimal design but also the allowable maximal manufacturing errors that the design can bear. The design variables' manufacturing errors are depicted using the interval method, and an interval optimization model for the structure is constructed. A dimensionless design tolerance index is defined to describe the overall uncertainty of all design variables, and by combining the nominal objective function, a deterministic two-objective optimization model is built. The possibility degree of interval is used to represent the reliability of the constraints under uncertainty, through which the model is transformed to a deterministic optimization problem. Three numerical examples are investigated to verify the effectiveness of the present method.

  17. Symbol lock detection implemented with nonoverlapping integration intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shihabi, Mazen M. (Inventor); Hinedi, Sami M. (Inventor); Shah, Biren N. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A symbol lock detector is introduced for an incoming coherent digital communication signal which utilizes a subcarrier modulated with binary symbol data, d(sub k), and known symbol interval T by integrating binary values of the signal over nonoverlapping first and second intervals selected to be T/2, delaying the first integral an interval T/2, and either summing or multiplying the second integral with the first one that preceded it to form a value X(sub k). That value is then averaged over a number M of symbol intervals to produce a static value Y. A symbol lock decision can then be made when the static value Y exceeds a threshold level delta.

  18. Experimental uncertainty estimation and statistics for data having interval uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Kreinovich, Vladik (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Oberkampf, William Louis (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Ginzburg, Lev (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Ferson, Scott (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Hajagos, Janos (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York)

    2007-05-01

    This report addresses the characterization of measurements that include epistemic uncertainties in the form of intervals. It reviews the application of basic descriptive statistics to data sets which contain intervals rather than exclusively point estimates. It describes algorithms to compute various means, the median and other percentiles, variance, interquartile range, moments, confidence limits, and other important statistics and summarizes the computability of these statistics as a function of sample size and characteristics of the intervals in the data (degree of overlap, size and regularity of widths, etc.). It also reviews the prospects for analyzing such data sets with the methods of inferential statistics such as outlier detection and regressions. The report explores the tradeoff between measurement precision and sample size in statistical results that are sensitive to both. It also argues that an approach based on interval statistics could be a reasonable alternative to current standard methods for evaluating, expressing and propagating measurement uncertainties.

  19. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Corrected QT Interval: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Takefumi; Remington, Gary; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective: It remains unclear whether antipsychotic polypharmacy, a common clinical practice, is related to an increased risk of corrected time between start of Q wave and end of T wave (QTc) interval prolongation. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to address this important issue. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in October 2014, using MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Studies and case reports were included if they reported QTc intervals or QTc interval changes before and after antipsychotic polypharmacy or QTc intervals in both antipsychotic polypharmacy and monotherapy groups. Results: A total of 21 articles (10 clinical trials, 4 observational studies, and 7 case reports) met inclusion criteria. The clinical trials have shown that a combination treatment with risperidone or pimozide is not obviously related to an increase in QTc interval, whereas ziprasidone or sertindole combined with clozapine may prolong QTc interval. Among the 4 observational studies, antipsychotic polypharmacy was not clearly associated with QTc prolongation in 3 studies, each cross-sectional. In contrast, one prospective study showed a significant increase in QTc interval following antipsychotic coadministration. The case reports indicated an increased risk of QTc prolongation in at least some patients receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy. Conclusions: Currently available evidence fails to confirm that antipsychotic polypharmacy worsens QTc prolongation in general, although the evidence is scarce and inconsistent. Clinicians are advised to remain conservative in resorting to antipsychotic polypharmacy, as a combination of some QTc-prolongation liable antipsychotics may further prolong QTc interval, and efficacy supporting the clinical benefits of antipsychotic polypharmacy is equivocal, at best. PMID:26174525

  20. Use of systolic time intervals in studying hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, R C; Ibrahim, M M; Dustan, H P; Bravo, E L

    1976-01-01

    Systolic time intervals were measured in 54 hypertensive patients divided into three groups according to severity of hypertension, variability of blood pressure levels and presence or absence of a hyperkinetic heart. The three groups were: borderline hypertension (BLH), fixed essential hypertension (FEH) and hyperkinetic essential hypertension (HEH). Systolic time intervals (STI) provided information indicating an increased cardioadrenergic drive in BLH and HEH. This was supported by finding that propranolol abolished the increased contractility found at rest in BLH and HEH.

  1. QT interval and dispersion in primary autonomic failure.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, S. S.; Mathias, C. J.; Sutton, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of the autonomic nervous system in determining QT interval and dispersion. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 32 patients with chronic primary (idiopathic) autonomic failure (19 men, mean age 60 years) and 21 normal controls (11 men, mean age 59) without symptoms of ischaemic heart disease were studied retrospectively. Autonomic failure was diagnosed by a combination of symptomatic postural hypotension, subnormal plasma noradrenaline response to head-up tilt, and abnormal cardiovascular responses to standing, Valsalva manoeuvre, mental stress, cutaneous cold, isometric exercise, and deep breathing. QT intervals were measured from surface electrocardiograms and QT dispersion was defined as maximum QT--minimum QT occurring in any of the 12 leads. RESULTS: Mean heart rate (RR intervals) was similar in patients with autonomic failure and controls (S2 lead: 865 (132) v 857 (108) ms, P = NS; V2 lead: 865 (130) v 868 (113) ms, P = NS). QT intervals measured from electrocardiogram leads S2 and V2 were significantly longer in patients than in controls (401 (40) v 376 (16) ms, P < 0.01; and 403 (41) v 381 (20) ms, P < 0.05 respectively). The mean maximum QT interval in any lead, which is the best estimate of the maximum duration of electrical systole, was significantly longer in the patients than in controls (417 (48) v 388 (23) ms, P < 0.005). Linear regression analysis of QT and RR intervals for both groups showed a significant difference between the slopes of the two regression lines (F = 8.4, P < 0.001). However, QT dispersions were similar between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with primary autonomic failure have prolongation of QT intervals, indicating that the autonomic nervous system is an important determinant of QT interval. However, QT dispersion does not seem to be affected by chronic primary autonomic denervation. PMID:8665344

  2. Anaesthetists' knowledge of the QT interval in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S D; Myles, P S

    2005-12-01

    Many drugs used in anaesthesia may prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram (ECG), and recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines mandate monitoring of the ECG before, during and after droperidol administration. We surveyed 41 trainee and consultant anaesthetists in our Department to determine current practice and knowledge of the QT interval to investigate if this is a practical proposition. A response rate of 98% (40/41) was obtained. The majority of respondents expressed moderate to high levels of confidence in interpreting the ECG, and this was related to years of training (rho 0.36, P=0.024). A total of 27 respondents (65%) were able to correctly identify the QT interval on a schematic representation of the ECG, trainees 70% vs consultants 60%, P=0.51. When asked to name drugs that altered the QT interval, droperidol was included by 11 of the 40 respondents (28%); trainees 10% vs consultants 45%, OR 7.4 (95% CI: 1.3-41), P=0.013. Torsades de Pointes was correctly identified as a possible consequence of a prolonged QT interval by 65% of trainees and 70% of consultants, P=0.83. The results suggest that QT interval measurement is not widely practised by anaesthetists, although its clinical significance is well known, and interpretation would be unreliable without further education.

  3. Landslide occurrences and recurrence intervals of heavy rainfalls in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Uchida, T.; Matsuyama, H.; Korup, O.

    2015-12-01

    Dealing with predicted increases in extreme weather conditions due to climate change requires robust knowledge about controls on rainfall-triggered landslides. This study developed the probable rainfall database from weather radar data, and analyzed the potential correlation between the landslide magnitude-frequency and the recurrence interval of the heavy rainfall across Japan. We analyzed 4,744 rainfall-induced landslides (Saito et al., 2014, Geology), 1 to 72 h rainfalls, and soil water index (SWI). We then estimated recurrence intervals for these rainfall parameters using a Gumbel distribution with jackknife fitting. Results showed that the recurrence intervals of rainfall events which caused landslides (<10^3 m^3) were less than 10 yr across Japan. The recurrence intervals increased with increases in landslide volumes. With regard to the landslides larger than 10^5 m^3, recurrence intervals of the rainfall events were more than 100 yr. These results suggest that recurrence intervals of heavy rainfalls are important for assessing regional landslide hazard in Japan.

  4. Confidence Intervals for Error Rates Observed in Coded Communications Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.

    2015-05-01

    We present methods to compute confidence intervals for the codeword error rate (CWER) and bit error rate (BER) of a coded communications link. We review several methods to compute exact and approximate confidence intervals for the CWER, and specifically consider the situation in which the true CWER is so low that only a handful, if any, codeword errors are able to be simulated. In doing so, we answer the question of how long an error-free simulation must be run in order to certify that a given CWER requirement is met with a given level of confidence, and discuss the bias introduced by aborting a simulation after observing the first codeword error. Next, we turn to the lesser studied problem of determining confidence intervals for the BER of coded systems. Since bit errors in systems that use coding or higher-order modulation do not occur independently, blind application of a method that assumes independence leads to inappropriately narrow confidence intervals. We present a new method to compute the confidence interval properly, using the first and second sample moments of the number of bit errors per codeword. This is the first method we know of to compute a confidence interval for the BER of a coded or higher-order modulation system.

  5. Procrastination by pigeons with fixed-interval response requirements.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J E

    1998-03-01

    Two experiments studied the phenomenon of procrastination, in which pigeons chose a larger, more delayed response requirement over a smaller, more immediate response requirement. The response requirements were fixed-interval schedules that did not lead to an immediate food reinforcer, but that interrupted a 55-s period in which food was delivered at random times. The experiments used an adjusting-delay procedure in which the delay to the start of one fixed-interval requirement was varied over trials to estimate an indifference point--a delay at which the two alternatives were chosen about equally often. Experiment 1 found that as the delay to a shorter fixed-interval requirement was increased, the adjusting delay to a longer fixed-interval requirement also increased, and the rate of increase depended on the duration of the longer fixed-interval requirement. Experiment 2 found a strong preference for a fixed delay of 10 s to the start of a fixed-interval requirement compared to a mixed delay of either 0 or 20 s. The results help to distinguish among different equations that might describe the decreasing effectiveness of a response requirement with increasing delay, and they suggest that delayed reinforcers and delayed response requirements have symmetrical but opposite effects on choice.

  6. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities and QTc Interval in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yuxin; Zou, Jianzhou; Liang, Yixiu; Shen, Bo; Liu, Zhonghua; Cao, Xuesen; Chen, Xiaohong; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is one of the primary causes of mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Prolonged QTc interval is associated with increased rate of sudden cardiac death. The aim of this article is to assess the abnormalities found in electrocardiograms (ECGs), and to explore factors that can influence the QTc interval. Methods A total of 141 conventional HD patients were enrolled in this study. ECG tests were conducted on each patient before a single dialysis session and 15 minutes before the end of dialysis session (at peak stress). Echocardiography tests were conducted before dialysis session began. Blood samples were drawn by phlebotomy immediately before and after the dialysis session. Results Before dialysis, 93.62% of the patients were in sinus rhythm, and approximately 65% of the patients showed a prolonged QTc interval (i.e., a QTc interval above 440 ms in males and above 460ms in females). A comparison of ECG parameters before dialysis and at peak stress showed increases in heart rate (77.45±11.92 vs. 80.38±14.65 bpm, p = 0.001) and QTc interval (460.05±24.53 ms vs. 470.93±24.92 ms, p<0.001). After dividing patients into two groups according to the QTc interval, lower pre-dialysis serum concentrations of potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), phosphorus, calcium* phosphorus (Ca*P), and higher concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were found in the group with prolonged QTc intervals. Patients in this group also had a larger left atrial diameter (LAD) and a thicker interventricular septum, and they tended to be older than patients in the other group. Then patients were divided into two groups according to ΔQTc (ΔQTc = QTc peak-stress- QTc pre-HD). When analyzing the patients whose QTc intervals were longer at peak stress than before HD, we found that they had higher concentrations of Ca2+ and P5+ and lower concentrations of K+, ferritin, UA, and BNP. They were also more likely to be female. In addition, more cardiac

  7. Drug-induced QT interval prolongation and torsades de pointes

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a life-threatening arrhythmia associated with prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc) interval on the electrocardiogram. More than 100 drugs available in Canada, including widely used antibiotics, antidepressants, cardiovascular drugs and many others, may cause QTc interval prolongation and TdP. Risk factors for TdP include QTc interval >500 ms, increase in QTc interval ≥60 ms from the pretreatment value, advanced age, female sex, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, bradycardia, treatment with diuretics and elevated plasma concentrations of QTc interval–prolonging drugs due to drug interactions, inadequate dose adjustment of renally eliminated drugs in patients with kidney disease and rapid intravenous administration. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions associated with the highest risk of TdP include antifungal agents, macrolide antibiotics (except azithromycin) and drugs to treat human immunodeficiency virus interacting with amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide or pimozide. Other important pharmacokinetic interactions include antidepressants (bupropion, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine) interacting with flecainide, quinidine or thioridazine. Pharmacists play an important role in minimizing the risk of drug-induced QTc interval prolongation and TdP through knowledge of drugs that are associated with a known or possible risk of TdP, individualized assessment of risk of drug-induced QTc interval prolongation, awareness of drug interactions most likely to result in TdP and attention to dose reduction of renally eliminated QTc interval-prolonging drugs in patients with kidney disease. Treatment of hemodynamically stable TdP consists of discontinuation of the offending drug(s), correction of electrolyte abnormalities and administration of intravenous magnesium sulfate 1 to 2 g. PMID:27212965

  8. "Evolutionary Theory Seems so Easy": Reply to Lucal and Hanson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalek, Richard; Martin, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    As the authors stated early in their article (Machalek and Martin 2010), evolutionary ideas have been gaining traction in the work of a growing number of sociologists in recent years. Much of their thinking derives from work inspired by sociobiology. However, many sociologists are critical of and unreceptive to incorporating evolutionary biology…

  9. Interval timer control of puberty in photoinhibited Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ho; Kauffman, Alexander S; Paul, Matthew J; Butler, Matthew P; Beery, Annaliese K; Costantini, Ruth M; Zucker, Irving

    2006-10-01

    Puberty, which is markedly delayed in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) born into short day lengths, is controlled by an interval timer regulated by the duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion. Properties of the interval timer were assessed by perturbing normal patterns of melatonin secretion in males gestated and maintained thereafter in 1 of 2 short day lengths, 10 h light/day (10 L) or 12L. Melatonin secretion of short-day hamsters was suppressed by constant light treatment or modified by daily injection of propranolol to mimic nocturnal melatonin durations typical of long-day hamsters. Constant light treatment during weeks 3 to 5 induced early incomplete gonadal growth in 12L but not 10 L hamsters but did not affect late onset of gonadal development indicative of puberty in either photoperiod. Propranolol treatment during postnatal weeks 3 to 5 induced transient growth of the testes and ultimately delayed the timing of puberty by 3 weeks. Similar treatments between weeks 5 and 7 or on alternate weeks for 24 weeks did not affect the interval timer. The first 2 weeks after weaning may constitute a critical period during which the interval timer is highly responsive to photoperiod. Alternatively, the hamsters' photoperiodic history rather than age or developmental stage may be the critical variable. The interpolation of long-day melatonin signals at the time of weaning does not appear to reset the interval timer to its zero position but may reduce timer responsiveness to long-day melatonin signals several weeks later.

  10. A tuned-trace theory of interval-timing dynamics.

    PubMed

    Staddon, J E R; Chelaru, I M; Higa, J J

    2002-01-01

    Animals on interval schedules of reinforcement can rapidly adjust a temporal dependent variable, such as wait time, to changes in the prevailing interreinforcement interval. We describe data on the effects of impulse, step, sine-cyclic, and variable-interval schedules and show that they can be explained by a tuned-trace timing model with a one-back threshold-setting rule. The model can also explain steady-state timing properties such as proportional and Weber law timing and the effects of reinforcement magnitude. The model assumes that food reinforcers and other time markers have a decaying effect (trace) with properties that can be derived from the rate-sensitive property of habituation (the multiple-time-scale model). In timing experiments, response threshold is determined by the trace value at the time of the most recent reinforcement. The model provides a partial account for the learning of multiple intervals, but does not account for scalloping and other postpause features of responding on interval schedules and has some problems with square-wave schedules.

  11. Application of Interval Predictor Models to Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy,Daniel P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops techniques for predicting the uncertainty range of an output variable given input-output data. These models are called Interval Predictor Models (IPM) because they yield an interval valued function of the input. This paper develops IPMs having a radial basis structure. This structure enables the formal description of (i) the uncertainty in the models parameters, (ii) the predicted output interval, and (iii) the probability that a future observation would fall in such an interval. In contrast to other metamodeling techniques, this probabilistic certi cate of correctness does not require making any assumptions on the structure of the mechanism from which data are drawn. Optimization-based strategies for calculating IPMs having minimal spread while containing all the data are developed. Constraints for bounding the minimum interval spread over the continuum of inputs, regulating the IPMs variation/oscillation, and centering its spread about a target point, are used to prevent data over tting. Furthermore, we develop an approach for using expert opinion during extrapolation. This metamodeling technique is illustrated using a radiation shielding application for space exploration. In this application, we use IPMs to describe the error incurred in predicting the ux of particles resulting from the interaction between a high-energy incident beam and a target.

  12. Physiological responses to an acute bout of sprint interval cycling.

    PubMed

    Freese, Eric C; Gist, Nicholas H; Cureton, Kirk J

    2013-10-01

    Sprint interval training has been shown to improve skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and health outcomes. However, the acute physiological responses to 4-7 maximal effort intervals have not been determined. To determine the V[Combining Dot Above]O2, cardiorespiratory responses, and energy expenditure during an acute bout of sprint interval cycling (SIC), health, college-aged subjects, 6 men and 6 women, completed 2 SIC sessions with at least 7 days between trials. Sprint interval cycling was performed on a cycle ergometer and involved a 5-minute warm-up followed by four 30-second all-out sprints with 4-minute active recovery. Peak oxygen uptake (ml·kg·min) during the 4 sprints were 35.3 ± 8.2, 38.8 ± 10.1, 38.8 ± 10.6, and 36.8 ± 9.3, and peak heart rate (b·min) were 164 ± 17, 172 ± 10, 177 ± 12, and 175 ± 22. We conclude that an acute bout of SIC elicits submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses during each interval that are above 80% of estimated maximal values. Although the duration of exercise in SIC is very short, the high level of V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses are sufficient to potentially elicit adaptations to training associated with elevated aerobic energy demand.

  13. Interval Management: Development and Implementation of an Airborne Spacing Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Penhallegon, William J.; Weitz, Lesley A.; Bone, Randall S.; Levitt, Ian; Flores Kriegsfeld, Julia A.; Arbuckle, Doug; Johnson, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Interval Management is a suite of ADS-B-enabled applications that allows the air traffic controller to instruct a flight crew to achieve and maintain a desired spacing relative to another aircraft. The flight crew, assisted by automation, manages the speed of their aircraft to deliver more precise inter-aircraft spacing than is otherwise possible, which increases traffic throughput at the same or higher levels of safety. Interval Management has evolved from a long history of research and is now seen as a core NextGen capability. With avionics standards recently published, completion of an Investment Analysis Readiness Decision by the FAA, and multiple flight tests planned, Interval Management will soon be part of everyday use in the National Airspace System. Second generation, Advanced Interval Management capabilities are being planned to provide a wider range of operations and improved performance and benefits. This paper briefly reviews the evolution of Interval Management and describes current development and deployment plans. It also reviews concepts under development as the next generation of applications.

  14. Interval process model and non-random vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Ni, B. Y.; Liu, N. Y.; Han, X.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops an interval process model for time-varying or dynamic uncertainty analysis when information of the uncertain parameter is inadequate. By using the interval process model to describe a time-varying uncertain parameter, only its upper and lower bounds are required at each time point rather than its precise probability distribution, which is quite different from the traditional stochastic process model. A correlation function is defined for quantification of correlation between the uncertain-but-bounded variables at different times, and a matrix-decomposition-based method is presented to transform the original dependent interval process into an independent one for convenience of subsequent uncertainty analysis. More importantly, based on the interval process model, a non-random vibration analysis method is proposed for response computation of structures subjected to time-varying uncertain external excitations or loads. The structural dynamic responses thus can be derived in the form of upper and lower bounds, providing an important guidance for practical safety analysis and reliability design of structures. Finally, two numerical examples and one engineering application are investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of the interval process model and corresponding non-random vibration analysis method.

  15. Oxygen uptake in maximal effort constant rate and interval running.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Daniel; O'Brien, Brendan J; Clark, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in average VO2 of maximal effort interval running to maximal effort constant rate running at lactate threshold matched for time. The average VO2 and distance covered of 10 recreational male runners (VO2max: 4158 ± 390 mL · min(-1)) were compared between a maximal effort constant-rate run at lactate threshold (CRLT), a maximal effort interval run (INT) consisting of 2 min at VO2max speed with 2 minutes at 50% of VO2 repeated 5 times, and a run at the average speed sustained during the interval run (CR submax). Data are presented as mean and 95% confidence intervals. The average VO2 for INT, 3451 (3269-3633) mL · min(-1), 83% VO2max, was not significantly different to CRLT, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 84% VO2max, but both were significantly higher than CR sub-max, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 76% VO2max. The distance covered was significantly greater in CLRT, 4431 (4202-3731) metres, compared to INT and CR sub-max, 4070 (3831-4309) metres. The novel finding was that a 20-minute maximal effort constant rate run uses similar amounts of oxygen as a 20-minute maximal effort interval run despite the greater distance covered in the maximal effort constant-rate run. PMID:24288501

  16. Assessment of histological changes in antemortem gingival tissues fixed at various time intervals: A method of estimation of postmortem interval

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, V.; Gururaj, N.; Sathya, R.; Sabarinath, T. R.; Sivapathasundharam, B.; Kalaiselvan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Conventional methods to estimate the time of death are adequate, but a histological method is yet unavailable to assess postmortem interval (PMI). The autolytic changes that occur in an unfixed antemortem gingival tissue which reflects histologically at an early stage are similar to changes that occur in postmortem tissue. These histological changes can be used and applied in a postmortem tissue as a method to assess PMI. Aims: The aim of the study is to assess the histological changes in a gingival tissue left unfixed for various time intervals and to correlate the findings with duration. Materials and Methods: Sixty gingival tissues obtained from patients following therapeutic extractions, impactions, gingivectomy and crown lengthening procedures were used. Each tissue obtained was divided into two pieces and labeled as “A”, the control group and “ B” the study group. Tissues labeled “A” were fixed in 10% formalin immediately and tissues labeled“B” were placed in closed containers and fixed after 15, 30, 45 min, 1, 2, and 4 h time interval. Of the sixty tissues in the study group “ B”, ten tissues were used for each time interval under investigation. All the fixed tissues were processed, stained, assessed, and analyzed statistically using Pearson correlation and regression analysis. Results: Histological changes appear at 15 min in an unfixed antemortem tissue. At 2 h interval, all layers with few cells in basal cell layer are involved. At 4 h interval, loss of stratification and complete homogenization of cells in the superficial layers with prominent changes in basal layer is evident. There was a positive correlation (<1.0) between the time interval and the appearance of the histological changes. Conclusion: Histological changes such as complete homogenization of cells in superficial layers and loss of epithelial architecture at 4 h in unfixed antemortem tissue may be used as a criterion to estimate PMI, after further studies

  17. Short interval expansion of Rényi entropy on torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the short interval expansion of the Rényi entropy for two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) on a torus. We require the length of the interval ℓ to be small with respect to the spatial and temporal sizes of the torus. The operator product expansion of the twist operators allows us to compute the short interval expansion of the Rényi entropy at any temperature. In particular, we pay special attention to the large c CFTs dual to the AdS3 gravity and its cousins. At both low and high temperature limits, we read the Rényi entropies to order ℓ6, and find good agreements with holographic results. Moreover, the expansion allows us to read 1 /c contribution, which is hard to get by expanding the thermal density matrix. We generalize the study to the case with the chemical potential as well.

  18. Simultaneous timing of multiple intervals: implications of the scalar property.

    PubMed

    Leak, T M; Gibbon, J

    1995-01-01

    Three experiments with pigeons are reported in which the scalar property in simultaneous timing tasks was studied. According to scalar expectancy theory, the scalar property should be maintained in simultaneous timing, but the behavioral theory of timing predicts that the scalar property should be evident only in independent timing. Experiment 1 showed that the appearance of distinct peaks at reinforcement times required about a 4:1 ratio between intervals. Experiment 2 (2-interval timing task) and Experiment 3 (3-interval timing task) used an individual trial analysis technique to examine high-rate responding segments bracketing the times of reinforcement. The standard deviations of the starting and stopping times of high-rate segments were linearly related to their means and to reinforcement time, supporting the scalar property in simultaneous timing.

  19. Atomic temporal interval relations in branching time: calculation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, Frank D.; Ladkin, Peter B.; Rodriguez, Rita V.

    1991-03-01

    A practical method of reasoning about intervals in a branching-time model which is dense, unbounded, future-branching, without rejoining branches is presented. The discussion is based on heuristic constraint- propagation techniques using the relation algebra of binary temporal relations among the intervals over the branching-time model. This technique has been applied with success to models of intervals over linear time by Allen and others, and is of cubic-time complexity. To extend it to branding-time models, it is necessary to calculate compositions of the relations; thus, the table of compositions for the 'atomic' relations is computed, enabling the rapid determination of the composition of arbitrary relations, expressed as disjunctions or unions of the atomic relations.

  20. Magnitude estimation reveals temporal binding at super-second intervals.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Gruffydd R; Buehner, Marc J

    2009-10-01

    Several recent studies (e.g., Haggard, Aschersleben, Gehrke, & Prinz, 2002; Haggard & Clark, 2003; Haggard, Clark, & Kalogeras, 2002) have demonstrated a "Temporal Binding" effect in which the interval between an intentional action and its consequent outcome is subjectively shorter compared to equivalent intervals that do not involve intentional action. The bulk of the literature has relied on the "Libet Clock" (Libet, Gleason, Wright, & Pearl, 1983; but see also Engbert & Wohlschläger, 2007; Engbert, Wohlschläger, Thomas, & Haggard, 2007; Engbert, Wohlschläger, & Haggard, 2008). Here we demonstrate that Temporal Binding is a robust finding that can also be reliably achieved with a Magnitude Estimation procedure, and that occurs over intervals far greater than those previously explored. Implications for the underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  1. Is it safe to program a long tachycardia detection interval?

    PubMed

    Kühlkamp, Volker; Dörnberger, Volker; Bosch, Ralph R; Kettering, Klaus; Mewis, Christian

    2002-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy is used frequently in patients with "slow" ventricular tachycardia (VT). Hence, the tachycardia detection interval is programmed within the range of the physiologic heart rate, but this may cause serious problems. If a fast VT is converted to sinus tachycardia with a cycle length shorter than the tachycardia detection interval, the episode is not terminated and the success counter is not reset. If this happens repeatedly, therapies will be exhausted without termination of the episode. If VT recurs within such an episode, it will not be treated. This report describes a patient who died suddenly in a scenario similar to the one described. Although all documented VT/ventricular fibrillation episodes were terminated by the device, the episode was not terminated because of the ongoing supraventricular tachycardia. Therefore, no further therapies were available and the patient probably died of fast untreated VT. Programming of a long tachycardia detection interval is dangerous in currently available ICDs.

  2. Unwinding the Molecular Basis of Interval and Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    Agostino, Patricia V.; Golombek, Diego A.; Meck, Warren H.

    2011-01-01

    Neural timing mechanisms range from the millisecond to diurnal, and possibly annual, frequencies. Two of the main processes under study are the interval timer (seconds-to-minute range) and the circadian clock. The molecular basis of these two mechanisms is the subject of intense research, as well as their possible relationship. This article summarizes data from studies investigating a possible interaction between interval and circadian timing and reviews the molecular basis of both mechanisms, including the discussion of the contribution from studies of genetically modified animal models. While there is currently no common neurochemical substrate for timing mechanisms in the brain, circadian modulation of interval timing suggests an interaction of different frequencies in cerebral temporal processes. PMID:22022309

  3. Fast and Accurate Construction of Confidence Intervals for Heritability.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regev; Kaufman, Shachar; Laaksonen, Reijo; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Eskin, Eleazar; Rosset, Saharon; Halperin, Eran

    2016-06-01

    Estimation of heritability is fundamental in genetic studies. Recently, heritability estimation using linear mixed models (LMMs) has gained popularity because these estimates can be obtained from unrelated individuals collected in genome-wide association studies. Typically, heritability estimation under LMMs uses the restricted maximum likelihood (REML) approach. Existing methods for the construction of confidence intervals and estimators of SEs for REML rely on asymptotic properties. However, these assumptions are often violated because of the bounded parameter space, statistical dependencies, and limited sample size, leading to biased estimates and inflated or deflated confidence intervals. Here, we show that the estimation of confidence intervals by state-of-the-art methods is inaccurate, especially when the true heritability is relatively low or relatively high. We further show that these inaccuracies occur in datasets including thousands of individuals. Such biases are present, for example, in estimates of heritability of gene expression in the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and of lipid profiles in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health study. We also show that often the probability that the genetic component is estimated as 0 is high even when the true heritability is bounded away from 0, emphasizing the need for accurate confidence intervals. We propose a computationally efficient method, ALBI (accurate LMM-based heritability bootstrap confidence intervals), for estimating the distribution of the heritability estimator and for constructing accurate confidence intervals. Our method can be used as an add-on to existing methods for estimating heritability and variance components, such as GCTA, FaST-LMM, GEMMA, or EMMAX. PMID:27259052

  4. High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Postprandial Triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen F; Miyashita, Masashi; Stensel, David J

    2015-07-01

    This review examined if high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) reduces postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) levels. Fifteen studies were identified, in which the effect of interval exercise conducted at an intensity of >65% of maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated on postprandial TAG levels. Analysis was divided between studies that included supramaximal exercise and those that included submaximal interval exercise. Ten studies examined the effect of a single session of low-volume HIIE including supramaximal sprints on postprandial TAG. Seven of these studies noted reductions in the postprandial total TAG area under the curve the morning after exercise of between ~10 and 21% compared with rest, but three investigations found no significant difference in TAG levels. Variations in the HIIE protocol used, inter-individual variation or insufficient time post-exercise for an increase in lipoprotein lipase activity are proposed reasons for the divergent results among studies. Five studies examined the effect of high-volume submaximal interval exercise on postprandial TAG. Four of these studies were characterised by high exercise energy expenditure and effectively attenuated total postprandial TAG levels by ~15-30%, but one study with a lower energy expenditure found no effect on TAG. The evidence suggests that supramaximal HIIE can induce large reductions in postprandial TAG levels but findings are inconsistent. Submaximal interval exercise offers no TAG metabolic or time advantage over continuous aerobic exercise but could be appealing in nature to some individuals. Future research should examine if submaximal interval exercise can reduce TAG levels in line with more realistic and achievable exercise durations of 30 min per day.

  5. Persistent Fluctuations in Stride Intervals under Fractal Auditory Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Marmelat, Vivien; Torre, Kjerstin; Beek, Peter J.; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Stride sequences of healthy gait are characterized by persistent long-range correlations, which become anti-persistent in the presence of an isochronous metronome. The latter phenomenon is of particular interest because auditory cueing is generally considered to reduce stride variability and may hence be beneficial for stabilizing gait. Complex systems tend to match their correlation structure when synchronizing. In gait training, can one capitalize on this tendency by using a fractal metronome rather than an isochronous one? We examined whether auditory cues with fractal variations in inter-beat intervals yield similar fractal inter-stride interval variability as isochronous auditory cueing in two complementary experiments. In Experiment 1, participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by either an isochronous or a fractal metronome with different variation strengths between beats in order to test whether participants managed to synchronize with a fractal metronome and to determine the necessary amount of variability for participants to switch from anti-persistent to persistent inter-stride intervals. Participants did synchronize with the metronome despite its fractal randomness. The corresponding coefficient of variation of inter-beat intervals was fixed in Experiment 2, in which participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by non-isochronous metronomes with different scaling exponents. As expected, inter-stride intervals showed persistent correlations similar to self-paced walking only when cueing contained persistent correlations. Our results open up a new window to optimize rhythmic auditory cueing for gait stabilization by integrating fractal fluctuations in the inter-beat intervals. PMID:24651455

  6. Persistent fluctuations in stride intervals under fractal auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marmelat, Vivien; Torre, Kjerstin; Beek, Peter J; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Stride sequences of healthy gait are characterized by persistent long-range correlations, which become anti-persistent in the presence of an isochronous metronome. The latter phenomenon is of particular interest because auditory cueing is generally considered to reduce stride variability and may hence be beneficial for stabilizing gait. Complex systems tend to match their correlation structure when synchronizing. In gait training, can one capitalize on this tendency by using a fractal metronome rather than an isochronous one? We examined whether auditory cues with fractal variations in inter-beat intervals yield similar fractal inter-stride interval variability as isochronous auditory cueing in two complementary experiments. In Experiment 1, participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by either an isochronous or a fractal metronome with different variation strengths between beats in order to test whether participants managed to synchronize with a fractal metronome and to determine the necessary amount of variability for participants to switch from anti-persistent to persistent inter-stride intervals. Participants did synchronize with the metronome despite its fractal randomness. The corresponding coefficient of variation of inter-beat intervals was fixed in Experiment 2, in which participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by non-isochronous metronomes with different scaling exponents. As expected, inter-stride intervals showed persistent correlations similar to self-paced walking only when cueing contained persistent correlations. Our results open up a new window to optimize rhythmic auditory cueing for gait stabilization by integrating fractal fluctuations in the inter-beat intervals.

  7. Reference intervals for serum creatine kinase in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mougios, Vassilis

    2007-01-01

    Background The serum concentration of creatine kinase (CK) is used widely as an index of skeletal muscle fibre damage in sport and exercise. Since athletes have higher CK values than non‐athletes, comparing the values of athletes to the normal values established in non‐athletes is pointless. The purpose of this study was to introduce reference intervals for CK in athletes. Method CK was assayed in serum samples from 483 male athletes and 245 female athletes, aged 7–44. Samples had been obtained throughout the training and competition period. For comparison, CK was also assayed in a smaller number of non‐athletes. Reference intervals (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) were calculated by the non‐parametric method. Results The reference intervals were 82–1083 U/L (37°C) in male and 47–513 U/L in female athletes. The upper reference limits were twice the limits reported for moderately active non‐athletes in the literature or calculated in the non‐athletes in this study. The upper limits were up to six times higher than the limits reported for inactive individuals in the literature. When reference intervals were calculated specifically in male football (soccer) players and swimmers, a threefold difference in the upper reference limit was found (1492 vs 523 U/L, respectively), probably resulting from the different training and competition demands of the two sports. Conclusion Sport training and competition have profound effects on the reference intervals for serum CK. Introducing sport‐specific reference intervals may help to avoid misinterpretation of high values and to optimise training. PMID:17526622

  8. An interval logic for higher-level temporal reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. L.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Vogt, F. H.; Plaisted, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Prior work explored temporal logics, based on classical modal logics, as a framework for specifying and reasoning about concurrent programs, distributed systems, and communications protocols, and reported on efforts using temporal reasoning primitives to express very high level abstract requirements that a program or system is to satisfy. Based on experience with those primitives, this report describes an Interval Logic that is more suitable for expressing such higher level temporal properties. The report provides a formal semantics for the Interval Logic, and several examples of its use. A description of decision procedures for the logic is also included.

  9. Systolic time interval data acquisition system. Specialized cardiovascular studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a data acquisition system for noninvasive measurement of systolic time intervals is described. R-R interval from the ECG determines instantaneous heart rate prior to the beat to be measured. Total electromechanical systole (Q-S2) is measured from the onset of the ECG Q-wave to the onset of the second heart sound (S2). Ejection time (ET or LVET) is measured from the onset of carotid upstroke to the incisure. Pre-ejection period (PEP) is computed by subtracting ET from Q-S2. PEP/ET ratio is computed directly.

  10. PREDICTION INTERVALS FOR INTEGRALS OF GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELDS

    PubMed Central

    De Oliveira, Victor; Kone, Bazoumana

    2014-01-01

    Methodology is proposed for the construction of prediction intervals for integrals of Gaussian random fields over bounded regions (called block averages in the geostatistical literature) based on observations at a finite set of sampling locations. Two bootstrap calibration algorithms are proposed, termed indirect and direct, aimed at improving upon plug-in prediction intervals in terms of coverage probability. A simulation study is carried out that illustrates the effectiveness of both procedures, and these procedures are applied to estimate block averages of chromium traces in a potentially contaminated region in Switzerland. PMID:25431507

  11. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  12. Bootstrap Confidence Intervals for Ordinary Least Squares Factor Loadings and Correlations in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Luo, Shanhong

    2010-01-01

    This article is concerned with using the bootstrap to assign confidence intervals for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations in ordinary least squares exploratory factor analysis. Coverage performances of "SE"-based intervals, percentile intervals, bias-corrected percentile intervals, bias-corrected accelerated percentile intervals, and…

  13. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  14. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  15. Daily meal anticipation: interaction of circadian and interval timing.

    PubMed

    Terman, M; Gibbon, J; Fairhurst, S; Waring, A

    1984-01-01

    Both short-interval and circadian timing systems support anticipatory response accelerations prior to food reinforcement. In the first case, the behavior pattern is determined by a scalar timing process with an arbitrary-reset property. In contrast, under daily cycles of food-availability, behavior reflects a self-sustaining oscillation. With rats as subjects, the concurrent operation of timing of both kinds was studied by addition of premeal auditory cues on the circadian baseline, in the absence of a day-night illumination cycle. Cues within both minute and hour ranges served to lower the level of premeal anticipatory responding, although exponential accelerations were similar to the uncued case. Cues within the minutes range yielded interval-timing functions that reflected approximate superposition. Cues within the hours range suppressed respondings at their outset, in proportion to cue duration. When one of the shorter cues was suddenly lengthened, short-interval accelerations appeared at inappropriate circadian phases. When a premeal cue was extended through mealtime, anticipation rates increased markedly, suggesting that cue termination at the start of mealtime is a potent anchor for premeal anticipation regardless of cue duration. By use of meal-omission probes without external cues, peak rates were located after the onset of expected mealtime, often near its termination. The results suggest interactions between the scalar interval timer and the circadian anticipation timer, as modulated by the circadian free-run timer.

  16. Parametric likelihood inference for interval censored competing risks data

    PubMed Central

    Hudgens, Michael G.; Li, Chenxi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Parametric estimation of the cumulative incidence function (CIF) is considered for competing risks data subject to interval censoring. Existing parametric models of the CIF for right censored competing risks data are adapted to the general case of interval censoring. Maximum likelihood estimators for the CIF are considered under the assumed models, extending earlier work on nonparametric estimation. A simple naive likelihood estimator is also considered that utilizes only part of the observed data. The naive estimator enables separate estimation of models for each cause, unlike full maximum likelihood in which all models are fit simultaneously. The naive likelihood is shown to be valid under mixed case interval censoring, but not under an independent inspection process model, in contrast with full maximum likelihood which is valid under both interval censoring models. In simulations, the naive estimator is shown to perform well and yield comparable efficiency to the full likelihood estimator in some settings. The methods are applied to data from a large, recent randomized clinical trial for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. PMID:24400873

  17. 30 CFR 75.360 - Preshift examination at fixed intervals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of any 8-hour interval during which any person is scheduled to work or travel underground. No person... pumpers are scheduled to work or travel shall not be required prior to the pumper entering the areas if... the area where the pumper works or travels. The examination of the area must be completed before...

  18. Confidence Intervals for Gamma-Family Measures of Ordinal Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2007-01-01

    This research focused on confidence intervals (CIs) for 10 measures of monotonic association between ordinal variables. Standard errors (SEs) were also reviewed because more than 1 formula was available per index. For 5 indices, an element of the formula used to compute an SE is given that is apparently new. CIs computed with different SEs were…

  19. Mnemonic benefits of retrieval practice at short retention intervals.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Christopher A; DeLosh, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect refers to the retention benefit conferred by prior retrieval of information from memory. Although the testing effect is a robust phenomenon, a common assumption is that reliable memory benefits only emerge after long retention intervals of days or weeks. The present study focused on potential test-induced retention benefits for brief retention intervals on the order of minutes and tens of seconds. Participants in four experiments studied lists of words. Some of the items were subjected to an initial cued recall test, and others were re-presented for additional study. Free recall tests were administered in each experiment following retention intervals ranging from 30 s to 8 min. When initial retrieval practice was successful (Experiments 1 through 3), or feedback compensated for unsuccessful retrieval (Experiment 4), significant testing effects emerged at all retention intervals. Results are discussed in the context of a bifurcated item-distribution model and highlight the importance of initial test performance and the type of analysis employed when examining testing effect data. PMID:24579674

  20. Systolic time intervals in normotensive and hypertensive human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y L; Walters, W A

    1976-09-01

    Systolic time intervals were measured in 10 nonpregnant, 37 normotensive, and 18 hypertensive pregnant women in both supine and lateral positions. With all the subjects in the supine position, left ventricular ejection time (LVET) was shortened; the pre-ejection period (PEP) lengthened, and the PEP/LVET ratio increased in normotensive late pregnancy compared with the nonpregnant state. Similar alterations in systolic time intervals were observed in hypertensive women in both early and late pregnancy in the supine position. In normotensive women in early pregnancy, alterations in systolic time intervals were inconclusive. When normotensive women in late pregnancy were turned from the supine into the left lateral position, a prolongation of LVET and a decrease in the PEP/LVET ratio were observed. When hypertensive women in late pregnancy adopted the left lateral position, no significant alterations in systolic time intervals occurred. Isovolumetric contraction time (ICT) was prolonged only in the hypertensive pregnant women in the supine position. The study suggests that left ventricular performance is diminished in normotensive women in late pregnancy when supine but improves when they adopt the lateral position. In addition, hypertensive pregnant women show evidence of diminished left ventricular performance which is not improved in late pregnancy by assumption of the left lateral position.

  1. Researchers Misunderstand Confidence Intervals and Standard Error Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belia, Sarah; Fidler, Fiona; Williams, Jennifer; Cumming, Geoff

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about researchers' understanding of confidence intervals (CIs) and standard error (SE) bars. Authors of journal articles in psychology, behavioral neuroscience, and medicine were invited to visit a Web site where they adjusted a figure until they judged 2 means, with error bars, to be just statistically significantly different (p…

  2. A model of interval timing by neural integration.

    PubMed

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; de Souza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D; Holmes, Philip

    2011-06-22

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes, that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition, that neural populations can act as integrators, and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys, and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule's predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior.

  3. Constructing Approximate Confidence Intervals for Parameters with Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Mike W. -L.

    2009-01-01

    Confidence intervals (CIs) for parameters are usually constructed based on the estimated standard errors. These are known as Wald CIs. This article argues that likelihood-based CIs (CIs based on likelihood ratio statistics) are often preferred to Wald CIs. It shows how the likelihood-based CIs and the Wald CIs for many statistics and psychometric…

  4. Measurement of Phonated Intervals during Four Fluency-Inducing Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidow, Jason H.; Bothe, Anne K.; Andreatta, Richard D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Previous investigations of persons who stutter have demonstrated changes in vocalization variables during fluency-inducing conditions (FICs). A series of studies has also shown that a reduction in short intervals of phonation, those from 30 to 200 ms, is associated with decreased stuttering. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to…

  5. Covering by random intervals and one-dimensional continuum percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Domb, C. )

    1989-04-01

    A brief historical introduction is given to the problem of covering a line by random overlapping intervals. The problem for equal intervals was first solved by Whitworth in the 1890s. A brief resume is given of his solution. The advantages of the present author's approach, which uses a Poisson process, are outlined, and a solution is derived by Laplace transforms. The asymptotic behavior as the line becomes long is calculated and is related to the one-dimensional continuum percolation problem. It is shown that as long as the mean interval size is finite, the probability of complete coverage decays exponentially, so that the critical percolation probability p{sub c} = 1. However, as soon as the mean interval size becomes infinite, the critical percolation probability p{sub c} switches to 0. This is in accord with previous results for a lattice model by Chinese workers, but differs from those of Schulman. A possible reason for the discrepancy is a difference in boundary conditions.

  6. Precise time and time interval data handling and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    In the past year, the increase in Precise Time And Time Interval data to be reduced to the U.S. Naval Observatory Master Clock and the requirement for its quick dissemination has necessitated development of more efficient methods of data handling and reduction. An outline of the data involved and of the Time Service computerization of these functions is presented.

  7. A model of interval timing by neural integration

    PubMed Central

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes; that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition; that neural populations can act as integrators; and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule’s predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior. PMID:21697374

  8. [Influence of short interpregnancy interval on pregnancy outcomes].

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Beniamin

    2007-01-01

    Optimal interpregnancy interval (IPI) is an important issue affecting pregnancy results, fetal and maternal morbidity/mortality, and has economic, social and demographic significance. The definition of IPI has not yet been standardized, thereby affecting results and conclusions. It was found that pregnancies conceived 18 to 23 months after previous birth had the lowest risks of fetal complications--low birth weight, preterm birth, and small size for gestational age. Women with shorter IPI have higher risk of maternal mortality, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, bleeding and anemia. Studies conducted in developing countries suggest longer IPI-3 to 5 years as the optimal IPI. The relation between short interpregnancy intervals and adverse perinatal outcomes has been attributed to maternal nutritional depletion, the competition theory and behavioral risk factors. It was proposed that there is a J-shaped association between IPI and adverse pregnancy outcomes. This is not the effect of other common reproductive risk factors. There is a need to inform women regarding the association between adverse pregnancy outcomes and interpregnancy intervals, as well as the benefits of optimizing that interval. Public health programs could identify women with other risk factors (for example substance abuse, such as tobacco or alcohol, or a young/advanced maternal age) for interventions to improve perinatal outcomes. There is also a need for more studies to define the optimal IPI under local conditions. PMID:17294848

  9. Retention interval affects visual short-term memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Bankó, Eva M; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    Humans can efficiently store fine-detailed facial emotional information in visual short-term memory for several seconds. However, an unresolved question is whether the same neural mechanisms underlie high-fidelity short-term memory for emotional expressions at different retention intervals. Here we show that retention interval affects the neural processes of short-term memory encoding using a delayed facial emotion discrimination task. The early sensory P100 component of the event-related potentials (ERP) was larger in the 1-s interstimulus interval (ISI) condition than in the 6-s ISI condition, whereas the face-specific N170 component was larger in the longer ISI condition. Furthermore, the memory-related late P3b component of the ERP responses was also modulated by retention interval: it was reduced in the 1-s ISI as compared with the 6-s condition. The present findings cannot be explained based on differences in sensory processing demands or overall task difficulty because there was no difference in the stimulus information and subjects' performance between the two different ISI conditions. These results reveal that encoding processes underlying high-precision short-term memory for facial emotional expressions are modulated depending on whether information has to be stored for one or for several seconds.

  10. Robust Confidence Interval for a Ratio of Standard Deviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonett, Douglas G.

    2006-01-01

    Comparing variability of test scores across alternate forms, test conditions, or subpopulations is a fundamental problem in psychometrics. A confidence interval for a ratio of standard deviations is proposed that performs as well as the classic method with normal distributions and performs dramatically better with nonnormal distributions. A simple…

  11. Patterns of interval correlations in neural oscillators with adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neural firing is often subject to negative feedback by adaptation currents. These currents can induce strong correlations among the time intervals between spikes. Here we study analytically the interval correlations of a broad class of noisy neural oscillators with spike-triggered adaptation of arbitrary strength and time scale. Our weak-noise theory provides a general relation between the correlations and the phase-response curve (PRC) of the oscillator, proves anti-correlations between neighboring intervals for adapting neurons with type I PRC and identifies a single order parameter that determines the qualitative pattern of correlations. Monotonically decaying or oscillating correlation structures can be related to qualitatively different voltage traces after spiking, which can be explained by the phase plane geometry. At high firing rates, the long-term variability of the spike train associated with the cumulative interval correlations becomes small, independent of model details. Our results are verified by comparison with stochastic simulations of the exponential, leaky, and generalized integrate-and-fire models with adaptation. PMID:24348372

  12. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  13. Motor and Executive Control in Repetitive Timing of Brief Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Linus; Ullen, Fredrik; Madison, Guy

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the causal role of executive control functions in the production of brief time intervals by means of a concurrent task paradigm. To isolate the influence of executive functions on timing from motor coordination effects, we dissociated executive load from the number of effectors used in the dual task situation. In 3 experiments,…

  14. The Behavioral Economics of Choice and Interval Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozefowiez, J.; Staddon, J. E. R.; Cerutti, D. T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors propose a simple behavioral economic model (BEM) describing how reinforcement and interval timing interact. The model assumes a Weber-law-compliant logarithmic representation of time. Associated with each represented time value are the payoffs that have been obtained for each possible response. At a given real time, the response with…

  15. Response Priming Patterns Differ with Interstimulus Interval Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Kristie A.; Wiley, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Priming paradigms make it possible to study the nature of response preparation before the onset of movement. One way to examine this process is through manipulation of the interstimulus interval (ISI). The timing of the prime and target presentation has been shown to have distinct effects on reaction time patterns, in both healthy and…

  16. Earning and Obtaining Reinforcers under Concurrent Interval Scheduling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonall, James S.

    2005-01-01

    Contingencies of reinforcement specify how reinforcers are earned and how they are obtained. Ratio contingencies specify the number of responses that earn a reinforcer, and the response satisfying the ratio requirement obtains the earned reinforcer. Simple interval schedules specify that a certain time earns a reinforcer, which is obtained by the…

  17. Confidence Interval Coverage for Cohen's Effect Size Statistic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algina, James; Keselman, H. J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2006-01-01

    Kelley compared three methods for setting a confidence interval (CI) around Cohen's standardized mean difference statistic: the noncentral-"t"-based, percentile (PERC) bootstrap, and biased-corrected and accelerated (BCA) bootstrap methods under three conditions of nonnormality, eight cases of sample size, and six cases of population effect size…

  18. Confidence Intervals for Assessing Heterogeneity in Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Generalized linear mixed models are frequently applied to data with clustered categorical outcomes. The effect of clustering on the response is often difficult to practically assess partly because it is reported on a scale on which comparisons with regression parameters are difficult to make. This article proposes confidence intervals for…

  19. Likelihood-Based Confidence Intervals in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oort, Frans J.

    2011-01-01

    In exploratory or unrestricted factor analysis, all factor loadings are free to be estimated. In oblique solutions, the correlations between common factors are free to be estimated as well. The purpose of this article is to show how likelihood-based confidence intervals can be obtained for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations, by…

  20. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia - interval versus continuous mode.

    PubMed

    Kodesh, Einat; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2014-07-01

    Aerobic exercise at approximately 70% of maximal aerobic capacity moderately reduces pain sensitivity and attenuates pain, even after a single session. If the analgesic effects depend on exercise intensity, then high-intensity interval exercise at 85% of maximal aerobic capacity should further reduce pain. The aim of this study was to explore the exercise-induced analgesic effects of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise and to compare them with the analgesic effects of moderate continuous aerobic exercise. Twenty-nine young untrained healthy males were randomly assigned to aerobic-continuous (70% heart rate reserve (HRR)) and interval (4 × 4 min at 85% HRR and 2 min at 60% HRR between cycles) exercise modes, each lasting 30 min. Psychophysical pain tests, pressure and heat pain thresholds (HPT), and tonic heat pain (THP) were conducted before and after exercise sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. HPT increased (p = 0.056) and THP decreased (p = 0.013) following exercise unrelated to exercise type. However, the main time effect (pre-/postexercise) was a trend of increased HPT (45.6 ± 1.9 °C to 46.2 ± 1.8 °C; p = 0.082) and a significant reduction in THP (from 50.7 ± 25 to 45.9 ± 25.4 numeric pain scale; p = 0.043) following interval exercise. No significant change was found for the pressure pain threshold following either exercise type. In conclusion, interval exercise (85% HRR) has analgesic effects on experimental pain perception. This, in addition to its cardiovascular, muscular, and metabolic advantages may promote its inclusion in pain management programs. PMID:24773287

  1. The QT Interval and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Mandyam, Mala C.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Alonso, Alvaro; Dewland, Thomas A.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Cummings, Steven R.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Stocke, Karen; Applegate, William B.; Arking, Dan E.; Butler, Javed; Loehr, Laura R.; Magnani, Jared W.; Murphy, Rachel A.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Newman, Anne B.; Marcus, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Abnormal atrial repolarization is important in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), but no direct measurement is available in clinical medicine. OBJECTIVE To determine whether the QT interval, a marker of ventricular repolarization, could be used to predict incident AF. METHODS We examined a prolonged QT corrected by the Framingham formula (QTFram) as a predictor of incident AF in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. The Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) study were used for validation. Secondary predictors included QT duration as a continuous variable, a short QT interval, and QT intervals corrected by other formulae. RESULTS Among 14,538 ARIC participants, a prolonged QTFram predicted a roughly two-fold increased risk of AF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.42–2.96, p<0.001). No substantive attenuation was observed after adjustment for age, race, sex, study center, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, coronary disease, and heart failure. The findings were validated in CHS and Health ABC and were similar across various QT correction methods. Also in ARIC, each 10-ms increase in QTFram was associated with an increased unadjusted (HR 1.14, 95%CI 1.10–1.17, p<0.001) and adjusted (HR 1.11, 95%CI 1.07–1.14, p<0.001) risk of AF. Findings regarding a short QT were inconsistent across cohorts. CONCLUSIONS A prolonged QT interval is associated with an increased risk of incident AF. PMID:23872693

  2. Modeling stream fish distributions using interval-censored detection times.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mário; Filipe, Ana Filipa; Bardos, David C; Magalhães, Maria Filomena; Beja, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Controlling for imperfect detection is important for developing species distribution models (SDMs). Occupancy-detection models based on the time needed to detect a species can be used to address this problem, but this is hindered when times to detection are not known precisely. Here, we extend the time-to-detection model to deal with detections recorded in time intervals and illustrate the method using a case study on stream fish distribution modeling. We collected electrofishing samples of six fish species across a Mediterranean watershed in Northeast Portugal. Based on a Bayesian hierarchical framework, we modeled the probability of water presence in stream channels, and the probability of species occupancy conditional on water presence, in relation to environmental and spatial variables. We also modeled time-to-first detection conditional on occupancy in relation to local factors, using modified interval-censored exponential survival models. Posterior distributions of occupancy probabilities derived from the models were used to produce species distribution maps. Simulations indicated that the modified time-to-detection model provided unbiased parameter estimates despite interval-censoring. There was a tendency for spatial variation in detection rates to be primarily influenced by depth and, to a lesser extent, stream width. Species occupancies were consistently affected by stream order, elevation, and annual precipitation. Bayesian P-values and AUCs indicated that all models had adequate fit and high discrimination ability, respectively. Mapping of predicted occupancy probabilities showed widespread distribution by most species, but uncertainty was generally higher in tributaries and upper reaches. The interval-censored time-to-detection model provides a practical solution to model occupancy-detection when detections are recorded in time intervals. This modeling framework is useful for developing SDMs while controlling for variation in detection rates, as it

  3. Brain activity during interval timing depends on sensory structure.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Micha; Ragot, Richard; Pouthas, Viviane

    2008-04-14

    Precise timing is crucial for accurate perception and action in the range of hundreds of milliseconds. One still unresolved question concerns the influence of sensory information content on timing mechanisms. Numerous studies have converged to suggest that the CNV (Contingent Negative Variation), a slow negative wave that develops between two events, notably reflects temporal processing of the interval between these two events. The present study aimed at investigating CNV activity in duration discrimination tasks using either filled (continuous tones) or empty intervals (silent periods bounded by two brief tones). Participants had to compare a test duration with a 600-ms standard. Time perception was markedly better in the 'empty' than in the 'filled' condition. Electrophysiological analyses performed on the longest test duration (794 ms) of the comparison phase revealed an effect of the sensory structure on both the CNV amplitude and CNV time-course. The CNV amplitude was larger for filled than for empty intervals, suggesting a superimposition of timing-dependent activity and sensory sustained activity. Furthermore, the CNV time-course paralleled the temporal structure of the memorized sensory event: for filled intervals, the CNV amplitude stopped increasing at 600 ms, i.e. the expected end of the continuous tone; for empty intervals, in contrast, the CNV amplitude precisely increased at 600 ms, i.e. the expected onset of the second brief tone. These results suggest that the CNV reflects the mental rehearsal of the memorized sensory event, in line with the idea that temporal processing in the sub-second range is based on sensory information.

  4. QT Interval Variability Index and QT Interval Duration in Different Sleep Stages: Analysis of Polysomnographic Recordings in Nonapneic Male Patients

    PubMed Central

    Viigimae, Moonika; Karai, Deniss; Pirn, Peeter; Pilt, Kristjan; Meigas, Kalju; Kaik, Jyri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether different sleep stages, especially REM sleep, affect QT interval duration and variability in male patients without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Polysomnographic recordings of 30 patients were analyzed. Beat-to-beat QT interval variability was calculated using QTV index (QTVI) formula. For QTc interval calculation, in addition to Bazett's formula, linear and parabolic heart rate correction formulas with two separate α values were used. QTVI and QTc values were calculated as means of 2 awake, 3 NREM, and 3 REM sleep episodes; the duration of each episode was 300 sec. Mean QTVI values were not statistically different between sleep stages. Therefore, elevated QTVI values found in patients with OSA cannot be interpreted as physiological sympathetic impact during REM sleep and should be considered as a risk factor for potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The absence of difference of the mean QTc interval values between NREM and REM stages seems to confirm our conclusion that sympathetic surges during REM stage do not induce repolarization variability. In patients without notable structural and electrical remodeling of myocardium, physiological elevation in sympathetic activity during REM sleep remains subthreshold concerning clinically significant increase of myocardial electrical instability. PMID:26693490

  5. QT Interval Variability Index and QT Interval Duration in Different Sleep Stages: Analysis of Polysomnographic Recordings in Nonapneic Male Patients.

    PubMed

    Viigimae, Moonika; Karai, Deniss; Pirn, Peeter; Pilt, Kristjan; Meigas, Kalju; Kaik, Jyri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether different sleep stages, especially REM sleep, affect QT interval duration and variability in male patients without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Polysomnographic recordings of 30 patients were analyzed. Beat-to-beat QT interval variability was calculated using QTV index (QTVI) formula. For QTc interval calculation, in addition to Bazett's formula, linear and parabolic heart rate correction formulas with two separate α values were used. QTVI and QTc values were calculated as means of 2 awake, 3 NREM, and 3 REM sleep episodes; the duration of each episode was 300 sec. Mean QTVI values were not statistically different between sleep stages. Therefore, elevated QTVI values found in patients with OSA cannot be interpreted as physiological sympathetic impact during REM sleep and should be considered as a risk factor for potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The absence of difference of the mean QTc interval values between NREM and REM stages seems to confirm our conclusion that sympathetic surges during REM stage do not induce repolarization variability. In patients without notable structural and electrical remodeling of myocardium, physiological elevation in sympathetic activity during REM sleep remains subthreshold concerning clinically significant increase of myocardial electrical instability. PMID:26693490

  6. Relationship between the Initial Systolic Time Interval and RR-interval during an exercise stimulus measured with Impedance Cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2010-04-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and reflects an active period of the heart cycle. The relationship between ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was studied in three groups of young, healthy volunteers: low, moderately and highly trained subjects. The three groups were exposed to an exercise stimulus on a cycle ergometer with an increasing work load to increase the heart rate. ISTI was decreased with decreasing RR-interval. However, the relative proportion of ISTI, ISTI/RR, was found to increase with decreasing RR-interval. This relationship was found to be inversely proportional. The rate of this increase in ISTI/RR was significantly higher in highly trained subjects. Also, over the whole range of heart rates ISTI was longer in these subjects. It is concluded that ISTI can be used to evaluate cardiac performance during physical exercise non-invasively and in an extramural setting.

  7. Altering the rest interval during high-intensity interval training does not affect muscle or performance adaptations.

    PubMed

    Edge, Johann; Eynon, Nir; McKenna, Michael J; Goodman, Craig A; Harris, Roger C; Bishop, David J

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that exercise-induced changes in metabolites and ions are crucial in the adaptation of contracting muscle. We tested this hypothesis by comparing adaptations to two different interval-training protocols (differing only in the rest duration between intervals), which provoked different perturbations in muscle metabolites and acid-base status. Prior to and immediately after training, 12 women performed the following tests: (1) a graded exercise test to determine peak oxygen uptake (V(O2)); (2) a high-intensity exercise bout (followed 60 s later by a repeated-sprint-ability test; and (3) a repeat of the high-intensity exercise bout alone with muscle biopsies pre-exercise, immediately postexercise and after 60 s of recovery. Subjects performed 5 weeks (3 days per week) of training, with either a short (1 min; HIT-1) or a long rest period (3 min; HIT-3) between intervals; training intensity and volume were matched. Muscle [H(+)] (155 ± 15 versus 125 ± 8 nmol l(-1); P < 0.05) and muscle lactate content (84.2 ± 7.9 versus 46.9 ± 3.1 mmol (g wet weight)(-1)) were both higher after HIT-1, while muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) content (52.8 ± 8.3 versus 63.4 ± 9.8 mmol (g wet weight)(-1)) was lower. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the increases in , repeated-sprint performance or muscle Na(+),K(+)-ATPase content. Following training, both groups had a significant decrease in postexercise muscle [H(+)] and lactate content, but not postexercise ATP or PCr. Postexercise PCr resynthesis increased following both training methods. In conclusion, intense interval training results in marked improvements in muscle Na(+),K(+)-ATPase content, PCr resynthesis and . However, manipulation of the rest period during intense interval training did not affect these changes.

  8. High-Intensity Interval Training with Vibration as Rest Intervals Attenuates Fiber Atrophy and Prevents Decreases in Anaerobic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Sandro Manuel; Aguayo, David; Zuercher, Matthias; Fleischmann, Oliver; Boutellier, Urs; Auer, Maria; Jung, Hans H.; Toigo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIT) improves cardiovascular capacity but may reduce the finite work capacity above critical power (W′) and lead to atrophy of myosin heavy chain (MyHC)-2 fibers. Since whole-body vibration may enhance indices of anaerobic performance, we examined whether side-alternating whole-body vibration as a replacement for the active rest intervals during a 4x4 min HIT prevents decreases in anaerobic performance and capacity without compromising gains in aerobic function. Thirty-three young recreationally active men were randomly assigned to conduct either conventional 4x4 min HIT, HIT with 3 min of WBV at 18 Hz (HIT+VIB18) or 30 Hz (HIT+VIB30) in lieu of conventional rest intervals, or WBV at 30 Hz (VIB30). Pre and post training, critical power (CP), W′, cellular muscle characteristics, as well as cardiovascular and neuromuscular variables were determined. W′ (−14.3%, P = 0.013), maximal voluntary torque (−8.6%, P = 0.001), rate of force development (−10.5%, P = 0.018), maximal jumping power (−6.3%, P = 0.007) and cross-sectional areas of MyHC-2A fibers (−6.4%, P = 0.044) were reduced only after conventional HIT. CP, V̇O2peak, peak cardiac output, and overall capillary-to-fiber ratio were increased after HIT, HIT+VIB18, and HIT+VIB30 without differences between groups. HIT-specific reductions in anaerobic performance and capacity were prevented by replacing active rest intervals with side-alternating whole-body vibration, notably without compromising aerobic adaptations. Therefore, competitive cyclists (and potentially other endurance-oriented athletes) may benefit from replacing the active rest intervals during aerobic HIT with side-alternating whole-body vibration. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01875146 PMID:25679998

  9. Effect of clozapine on interval timing and working memory for time in the peak-interval procedure with gaps.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Meck, Warren H

    2007-02-22

    Previous research indicates that dopamine controls both the speed of an internal clock [Maricq, A.V., Church, R.M., 1983. The differential effects of haloperidol and methamphetamine on time estimation in the rat. Psychopharmacology 79, 10-15] and sharing of resources between the timer and other cognitive processes [Buhusi, C.V., 2003. Dopaminergic mechanisms of interval timing and attention. In: Meck, W.H. (Ed.), Functional and Neural Mechanisms of Interval Timing. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 317-338]. For example, dopamine agonist methamphetamine increases the speed of an internal clock and resets timing after a gap, while dopamine antagonist haloperidol decreases the speed of an internal clock and stops timing during a gap [Buhusi, C.V., Meck, W.H., 2002. Differential effects of methamphetamine and haloperidol on the control of an internal clock. Behav. Neurosci. 116, 291-297]. Using a 20-s peak-interval procedure with gaps we examined the acute effects of clozapine (2.0mg/kg i.p.), which exerts differential effects on dopamine and serotonin in the cortex and striatum, two brain areas involved in interval timing and working memory. Relative to saline, clozapine injections shifted the response functions leftward both in trials with and without gaps, suggesting that clozapine increased the speed of an internal clock and facilitated the maintenance of the pre-gap interval in working memory. These results suggest that clozapine exerts effects in different brain areas in a manner that allows for the pharmacological separation of clock speed and working memory as a function of peak trials without and with gaps.

  10. Wind Information Uplink to Aircraft Performing Interval Management Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat; Barmore, Bryan; Swieringa, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the wind information used to generate trajectories for aircraft performing Interval Management (IM) operations is critical to the success of an IM operation. There are two main forms of uncertainty in the wind information used by the Flight Deck Interval Management (FIM) equipment. The first is the accuracy of the forecast modeling done by the weather provider. The second is that only a small subset of the forecast data can be uplinked to the aircraft for use by the FIM equipment, resulting in loss of additional information. This study focuses on what subset of forecast data, such as the number and location of the points where the wind is sampled should be made available to uplink to the aircraft.

  11. Matching and maximizing with concurrent ratio-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Green, L; Rachlin, H; Hanson, J

    1983-11-01

    Animals exposed to standard concurrent variable-ratio variable-interval schedules could maximize overall reinforcement rate if, in responding, they showed a strong response bias toward the variable-ratio schedule. Tests with the standard schedules have failed to find such a bias and have been widely cited as evidence against maximization as an explanation of animal choice behavior. However, those experiments were confounded in that the value of leisure (behavior other than the instrumental response) partially offsets the value of reinforcement. The present experiment provides another such test using a concurrent procedure in which the confounding effects of leisure were mostly eliminated while the critical aspects of the concurrent variable-ratio variable-interval contingency were maintained: Responding in one component advanced only its ratio schedule while responding in the other component advanced both ratio schedules. The bias toward the latter component predicted by maximization theory was found.

  12. Reinforcer concentration effects on a fixed-interval schedule.

    PubMed

    Blomeley, Frances J; Lowe, C F; Wearden, J H

    2004-07-30

    Four rats received training on a mixed FI 30-s FI 150-s schedule, where the different FI values were associated with different levers. During baseline, the reinforcer was a 30% concentration of condensed milk. During subsequent testing sessions, the reinforcer concentration was varied within sessions over values of 10, 30, 50, and 70%. Measures of behaviour were taken from the FI 30-s lever during trials where the reinforcer was delivered for responses on the other lever. Increasing the reinforcer concentration which began the interval (a) increased the time to start responding in the interval, and (b) increased the location of the response peak on the FI 30-s lever (often to values well above 30s). Response rate at the peak, and spread of the response rate versus time function, changed much less with reinforcer concentration. The data are discussed relative to predictions derived from Scalar Expectancy Theory, the Behavioural Theory of Timing, and the Tuned-trace model.

  13. Momentary maximizing in concurrent schedules with a minimum interchangeover interval.

    PubMed

    Todorov, J C; Souza, D G; Bori, C M

    1993-09-01

    Eight pigeons were trained on concurrent variable-interval variable-interval schedules with a minimum interchangeover time programmed as a consequence of changeovers. In Experiment 1 the reinforcement schedules remained constant while the minimum interchangeover time varied from 0 to 200 s. Relative response rates and relative time deviated from relative reinforcement rates toward indifference with long minimum interchangeover times. In Experiment 2 different reinforcement ratios were scheduled in successive experimental conditions with the minimum interchangeover time constant at 0, 2, 10, or 120 s. The exponent of the generalized matching equation was close to 1.0 when the minimum interchangeover time was 0 s (the typical procedure for concurrent schedules without a changeover delay) and decreased as that duration was increased. The data support the momentary maximizing theory and contradict molar maximizing theories and the melioration theory.

  14. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues. PMID:27580530

  15. A nonparametric approach to extract information from interspike interval data.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Enrico; Feng, Jianfeng

    2006-01-15

    In this work we develop an approach to extracting information from neural spike trains. Using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, interspike interval data from experiments and simulations are fitted by mixtures of distributions, including Gamma, inverse Gaussian, log-normal, and the distribution of the interspike intervals of the leaky integrate-and-fire model. In terms of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for goodness-of-fit, our approach is proved successful (P>0.05) in fitting benchmark data for which a classical parametric approach has been shown to fail before. In addition, we present a novel method to fit mixture models to censored data, and discuss two examples of the application of such a method, which correspond to the case of multiple-trial and multielectrode array data. A MATLAB implementation of the algorithm is available for download from .

  16. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues.

  17. Realtime Multichannel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) shows clinical promise for identifying several types of cardiac pathology. However, until now, there has been no device capable of displaying, in real time on a beattobeat basis, changes in QTV in all 12 conventional leads in a continuously monitored patient. While several software programs have been designed to analyze QTV, heretofore, such programs have all involved only a few channels (at most) and/or have required laborious user interaction or offline calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. This paper describes a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV and also PQ interval variability (PQV) in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12lead conventional ECG. The system also processes certain related signals that are derived from singular value decomposition and that help to reduce the overall effects of noise on the realtime QTV and PQV results.

  18. Confidence intervals in Flow Forecasting by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagoulia, Dionysia; Tsekouras, George

    2014-05-01

    One of the major inadequacies in implementation of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for flow forecasting is the development of confidence intervals, because the relevant estimation cannot be implemented directly, contrasted to the classical forecasting methods. The variation in the ANN output is a measure of uncertainty in the model predictions based on the training data set. Different methods for uncertainty analysis, such as bootstrap, Bayesian, Monte Carlo, have already proposed for hydrologic and geophysical models, while methods for confidence intervals, such as error output, re-sampling, multi-linear regression adapted to ANN have been used for power load forecasting [1-2]. The aim of this paper is to present the re-sampling method for ANN prediction models and to develop this for flow forecasting of the next day. The re-sampling method is based on the ascending sorting of the errors between real and predicted values for all input vectors. The cumulative sample distribution function of the prediction errors is calculated and the confidence intervals are estimated by keeping the intermediate value, rejecting the extreme values according to the desired confidence levels, and holding the intervals symmetrical in probability. For application of the confidence intervals issue, input vectors are used from the Mesochora catchment in western-central Greece. The ANN's training algorithm is the stochastic training back-propagation process with decreasing functions of learning rate and momentum term, for which an optimization process is conducted regarding the crucial parameters values, such as the number of neurons, the kind of activation functions, the initial values and time parameters of learning rate and momentum term etc. Input variables are historical data of previous days, such as flows, nonlinearly weather related temperatures and nonlinearly weather related rainfalls based on correlation analysis between the under prediction flow and each implicit input

  19. Interval estimation for uncertain systems with time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Denis; Perruquetti, Wilfrid; Richard, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The estimation problem for uncertain time-delay systems is addressed. A design method of reduced-order interval observers is proposed. The observer estimates the set of admissible values (the interval) for the state at each instant of time. The cases of known fixed delays and uncertain time-varying delays are analysed. The proposed approach can be applied to linear delay systems and nonlinear time-delay systems in the output canonical form. It involves the properties of quasi-monotone/Metzler/cooperative systems. In this framework, it is shown that if under a suitable coordinate transformation the delay-free subsystem is cooperative, then the delayed estimation error dynamics inherits this property. The conditions to find the observer gains are formulated in the form of LMI. The framework efficiency is demonstrated on examples of nonlinear systems.

  20. Single-file diffusion in an interval: first passage properties.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Artem

    2013-04-21

    We investigate the long-time behavior of the survival probability of a tagged particle in a single-file diffusion in a finite interval. The boundary conditions are of two types: (1) one boundary is absorbing the second is reflecting and (2) both boundaries are absorbing. For each type of the boundary conditions we consider two types of initial conditions: (a) initial number of particles N is given and (b) initial concentration of particles is given (N is random). In all four cases the tagged-particle survival probability exhibits different asymptotic behavior. When the both boundaries are absorbing we also consider a case of a random interval length (single-file diffusion on a line with randomly distributed traps). In the latter setting, the initial concentration of particles has the same effect on the asymptotic decay of the survival probability as the concentration of traps.

  1. Determination of post-burial interval using entomology: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; Sharma, Sahil; Sharma, Arun

    2016-08-01

    Insects and other arthropods are used in different matters pertinent to the criminal justice system as they play very important role in the decomposition of cadavers. They are used as evidence in a criminal investigation to determine post mortem interval (PMI). Various researches and review articles are available on forensic entomology to determine PMI in the terrestrial environment but very less work has been reported in context to buried bodies. Burring the carcass, is one of the methods used by criminals to conceal the crime. So, to drive the attention of researchers toward this growing field and to help various investigating agencies, the present paper reviews the studies done on determination of post-burial interval (PBI), its importance and future prospective. PMID:27235895

  2. Prolonged QT interval in a man with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Robles, María Dolores; Perez-Clemente, Ana María; Maciá-Bobes, Carmen; Alvarez-Rueda, María Asunción; Pozo-Nuevo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by the avoidance of food intake, which usually leads to a weight loss. Cardiac co-morbility is common and we can find sometimes a mass loss from the left ventricle, which can be seen by echocardiography. But the commonest complications are rhythm variations, typically bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval in up to a 40% of the cases, which altogether elevates ventricular tachycardia and sudden death risk. We present the case of a male who was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and developed asthenia, a long QT interval and also a severe both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia. We intend to discuss the pathogenic paths as well as prophylactic and therapeutic measures to this potentially-lethal pathology. PMID:19646241

  3. A multivariate rate equation for variable-interval performance.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J J; Kessel, R

    1979-03-01

    A value-like parameter is introduced into a rate equation for describing variable-interval performance. The equation, derived solely from formal considerations, expresses rate of responding as a joint function of rate of reinforcement and "reinforcer power." Preliminary tests of the rate equation show that it handles univariate data as well as Herrnstein's hyperbola. In addition, a form of Herrnstein's hyperbola can be derived from the equation, and it predicts forms of matching in concurrent situations. For the multivariate case, reinforcer values scaled in concurrent situations where matching is assumed to hold are taken as determinations of reinforcer power. The multivariate rate equation is fitted to an appropriate set of data and found to provide a good description of variable-interval performance when both rate and power of reinforcement are varied. Rate and power measures completely describe reinforcement. The effects of their joint variation are not predicted and cannot be described by Herrnstein's equation.

  4. Computing connection coefficients of compactly supported wavelets on bounded intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, C.H.; Peyton, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    Daubechies wavelet basis functions have many properties that make them desirable as a basis for a Galerkin approach to solving PDEs: they are orthogonal, with compact support, and their connection coefficients can be computed. The method developed by Latto et al. to compute connection coefficients does not provide the correct inner product near the endpoints of a bounded interval, making the implementation of boundary conditions problematic. Moreover, the highly oscillatory nature of the wavelet basis functions makes standard numerical quadrature of integrals near the boundary impractical. The authors extend the method of Latto et al. to construct and solve a linear system of equations whose solution provides the exact computation of the integrals at the boundaries. As a consequence, they provide the correct inner product for wavelet basis functions on a bounded interval.

  5. Computation of robustly stabilizing PID controllers for interval systems.

    PubMed

    Matušů, Radek; Prokop, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The paper is focused on the computation of all possible robustly stabilizing Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers for plants with interval uncertainty. The main idea of the proposed method is based on Tan's (et al.) technique for calculation of (nominally) stabilizing PI and PID controllers or robustly stabilizing PI controllers by means of plotting the stability boundary locus in either P-I plane or P-I-D space. Refinement of the existing method by consideration of 16 segment plants instead of 16 Kharitonov plants provides an elegant and efficient tool for finding all robustly stabilizing PID controllers for an interval system. The validity and relatively effortless application of presented theoretical concepts are demonstrated through a computation and simulation example in which the uncertain mathematical model of an experimental oblique wing aircraft is robustly stabilized. PMID:27350931

  6. Systolic time intervals after a seven-day orbital flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Vrâncianu, R.; Lazǎr, M.; Baevski, R. M.; Funtova, V. L.

    Heart rate, systolic time intervals (pre-ejection period, left ventricular ejection time), ejection fraction, stroke volume and QT interval of two cosmonauts (Leonid Popov - L.P. and Dumitru Prunariu - D.P.) were studied before, during, and after an ergometric bicycle exercise test performed before and after the seven-day Soviet-Romanian orbital flight on the Soyuz 40 - Salyut 6 Complex in May 1981. For this purpose one precordial electrocardiogram (ecg) and the ear photodensitogram (den) were recorded stimulaneously. The method used permitted recording even during exercise, Ecg and den signals were stored on magnetic tape, processed in an analogue device and in a digital computer. The data obtained after landing suggest a slight cardiac deconditioning in L.P., demonstrated especially by augmentation of the pre-ejection period, which was unchanged in D.P. corresponding to a sympathoadrenergic hypertonia. The seven-day orbital flight has not produced important cardiovascular changes.

  7. [Recent advancement in relationship between DNA degradation and postmortem interval].

    PubMed

    Hao, Lu-gui; Deng, Shi-Xiong; Zhao, Xin-Cai

    2007-04-01

    Determination of postmortem interval (PMI) is one of the most valuable subjects in forensic practice. It, however, is often very difficult to accurately determine the PMI in daily practice. Forensic DNA technology has recently been used to estimate the PMI. It has certain advantage to traditional methods. This article reviews this technology with respect to its invention, development, advantage, disadvantage, and potential future applications with emphasis on correlation of DNA degradation and PMI. PMID:17619465

  8. Audiovisual Interval Size Estimation Is Associated with Early Musical Training

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Mary Kathryn; Li, H. Charles; Russo, Frank A.; Schlaug, Gottfried; Loui, Psyche

    2016-01-01

    Although pitch is a fundamental attribute of auditory perception, substantial individual differences exist in our ability to perceive differences in pitch. Little is known about how these individual differences in the auditory modality might affect crossmodal processes such as audiovisual perception. In this study, we asked whether individual differences in pitch perception might affect audiovisual perception, as it relates to age of onset and number of years of musical training. Fifty-seven subjects made subjective ratings of interval size when given point-light displays of audio, visual, and audiovisual stimuli of sung intervals. Audiovisual stimuli were divided into congruent and incongruent (audiovisual-mismatched) stimuli. Participants’ ratings correlated strongly with interval size in audio-only, visual-only, and audiovisual-congruent conditions. In the audiovisual-incongruent condition, ratings correlated more with audio than with visual stimuli, particularly for subjects who had better pitch perception abilities and higher nonverbal IQ scores. To further investigate the effects of age of onset and length of musical training, subjects were divided into musically trained and untrained groups. Results showed that among subjects with musical training, the degree to which participants’ ratings correlated with auditory interval size during incongruent audiovisual perception was correlated with both nonverbal IQ and age of onset of musical training. After partialing out nonverbal IQ, pitch discrimination thresholds were no longer associated with incongruent audio scores, whereas age of onset of musical training remained associated with incongruent audio scores. These findings invite future research on the developmental effects of musical training, particularly those relating to the process of audiovisual perception. PMID:27760134

  9. Opinion Paper: Deriving Harmonised Reference Intervals – Global Activities

    PubMed Central

    Koerbin, Gus; Adeli, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    Harmonisation of reference intervals (RIs) refers to use of the same or common RI across different platforms and /or assays for a specified analyte. It occurs optimally for those analytes where there is sound calibration and traceability in place and evidence from a between-method comparison shows that bias would not prevent the use of a common RI. The selection of the RI will depend on various sources of information including local formal RI studies, published studies from the literature, laboratory surveys, manufacturer’s product information, relevant guidelines, and mining of databases. Pre-analytical and partitioning issues, significant figures and flagging rates, are assessed for each analyte. Several countries and regions including the Nordic countries, United Kingdom, Japan, Turkey, and Australasia are using common RIs that have been determined either by direct studies or by a consensus process. In Canada, the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists Taskforce is assessing the feasibility of establishing common reference values using the CALIPER (Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals) and CHMS (The Canadian Health Measures Survey) databases as the basis. Development of platform-specific common reference values for each of the major analytical systems may be a more practical approach especially for the majority of analytes that are not standardised against a primary reference method and are not traceable to a primary or secondary reference material. We encourage laboratories to consider adopting reference intervals consistent with those used by other laboratories in your region where it is possible and appropriate for your local population. Local validation of the adopted reference interval is also recommended as per CLSI guidelines. PMID:27683506

  10. Opinion Paper: Deriving Harmonised Reference Intervals - Global Activities.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jillian R; Koerbin, Gus; Adeli, Khosrow

    2016-02-01

    Harmonisation of reference intervals (RIs) refers to use of the same or common RI across different platforms and /or assays for a specified analyte. It occurs optimally for those analytes where there is sound calibration and traceability in place and evidence from a between-method comparison shows that bias would not prevent the use of a common RI. The selection of the RI will depend on various sources of information including local formal RI studies, published studies from the literature, laboratory surveys, manufacturer's product information, relevant guidelines, and mining of databases. Pre-analytical and partitioning issues, significant figures and flagging rates, are assessed for each analyte. Several countries and regions including the Nordic countries, United Kingdom, Japan, Turkey, and Australasia are using common RIs that have been determined either by direct studies or by a consensus process. In Canada, the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists Taskforce is assessing the feasibility of establishing common reference values using the CALIPER (Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals) and CHMS (The Canadian Health Measures Survey) databases as the basis. Development of platform-specific common reference values for each of the major analytical systems may be a more practical approach especially for the majority of analytes that are not standardised against a primary reference method and are not traceable to a primary or secondary reference material. We encourage laboratories to consider adopting reference intervals consistent with those used by other laboratories in your region where it is possible and appropriate for your local population. Local validation of the adopted reference interval is also recommended as per CLSI guidelines. PMID:27683506

  11. Versatile all-digital time interval measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhlidal, David; Cech, Miroslav

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a design and performance of a versatile all-digital time interval measuring system. The measurement method is based on an interpolation principle. In this principle the time interval is first roughly digitized by a coarse counter driven by a high stability reference clock and the fractions between the clock periods are measured by two Time-to-Digital Converter chips TDC-GPX manufactured by Acam messelectronic. Control circuits allow programmable customization of the system to satisfy many applications such as laser range finding, event counting, or time-of-flight measurements in various physics experiments. The system has two reference clocks inputs and two independent channels for measuring start and stop events. Only one 40 MHz reference is required for the measurement. The second reference can be, for example, 1 PPS (Pulse per Second) signal from a GPS (Global Positioning System) to time tag events. Time intervals are measured using the highest resolution mode of the TDC-GPX chips. The resolution of each chip is software programmable and is PLL (Phase Locked Loop) stabilized against temperature and voltage variations. The system can achieve a timing resolution better than 15 ps rms with up to 90 kHz repetition rate. The time interval measurement range is from 0 ps up to 1 second. The power consumption of the whole system is 18 W including an embedded computer board and an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) screen. The embedded computer controls the whole system, collects and evaluates measurement data and with the display provides a user interface. The system is implemented using commercially available components.

  12. Race-specific WBC and neutrophil count reference intervals.

    PubMed

    Lim, E-M; Cembrowski, George; Cembrowski, M; Clarke, G

    2010-12-01

    Healthy African Americans are known to have reduced white blood cell counts (WBC) and absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) compared with European Americans, with little agreement about the levels in reference intervals. The objective is to establish race-specific reference intervals for WBC and ANC using US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) of 2000-2003. A total of 14,184 civilian noninstitutionalized US citizens participated in NHANES 2000-2003 had complete blood count, red cell distribution width, platelet count and automated WBC differential determined on a Coulter MAXM. The exclusion criteria were used: ferritin <12 ng/ml, pregnancy, body mass index >30, diastolic blood pressure >100 mm Hg, creatinine >2.5 mg/dl, glucose >126 mg/dl. Data were separated into six sex/race categories: female non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black (NHBF)], Mexican American; male non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black (NHBM), Mexican American and two age groupings (12-18 and >18 years). NHB 2.5-97.5 percentile WBC and (ANC) limits follow (units: × 10⁹ /l): NHBM, ages 12-18: 3.2-9.3 (1.0-6.2); NHBF, ages 12-18: 3.7-10.1 (1.2-6.6); adult NHBM: 3.1-9.9 (1.3-6.6); adult NHBF: 3.4-11 (1.4-7.5). NHB limits are significantly lower than the NHW and MA limits. In most US healthcare organizations, insufficient agreement exists because of large differences in reference intervals for different ethnicities. In areas with peoples of African descent (>10--20%), race-specific WBC and ANC reference intervals must be provided for proper diagnosis and clinical research.

  13. Stability Problem of Canard-Cycles on a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, Gennadii A.; Chumakova, Nataliya A.; Lashina, Elena A.

    2010-09-01

    A detailed study of two-variable mathematical model of a heterogeneous catalytic reaction is presented with special attention to the stability problem of canard-cycles on a finite interval. Our analysis of the global error behavior in a long-time numerical integration shows that a high sensitive dependence on the initial conditions appears due to the existence of a shower-type bundle of trajectories which is formed by stable and unstable canard solutions.

  14. Multifactor analysis of multiscaling in volatility return intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengzhong; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We study the volatility time series of 1137 most traded stocks in the U.S. stock markets for the two-year period 2001-2002 and analyze their return intervals τ , which are time intervals between volatilities above a given threshold q . We explore the probability density function of τ , Pq(τ) , assuming a stretched exponential function, Pq(τ)˜e-τγ . We find that the exponent γ depends on the threshold in the range between q=1 and 6 standard deviations of the volatility. This finding supports the multiscaling nature of the return interval distribution. To better understand the multiscaling origin, we study how γ depends on four essential factors, capitalization, risk, number of trades, and return. We show that γ depends on the capitalization, risk, and return but almost does not depend on the number of trades. This suggests that γ relates to the portfolio selection but not on the market activity. To further characterize the multiscaling of individual stocks, we fit the moments of τ , μm≡⟨(τ/⟨τ⟩)m⟩1/m , in the range of 10<⟨τ⟩⩽100 by a power law, μm˜⟨τ⟩δ . The exponent δ is found also to depend on the capitalization, risk, and return but not on the number of trades, and its tendency is opposite to that of γ . Moreover, we show that δ decreases with increasing γ approximately by a linear relation. The return intervals demonstrate the temporal structure of volatilities and our findings suggest that their multiscaling features may be helpful for portfolio optimization.

  15. Influence of the dosing interval on prolactin release after remoxipride.

    PubMed Central

    Movin-Osswald, G; Hammarlund-Udenaes, M; Von Bahr, C; Eneroth, P; Walton-Bowen, K

    1995-01-01

    1. The prolactin response following administration of the D2-dopamine receptor antagonist remoxipride was studied in eight healthy male volunteers. The purpose of the study was to investigate the duration of a refractory period of prolactin release following two doses of remoxipride. A further aim was to compare the prolactin response following remoxipride and thyrotropin release hormone (TRH) during the refractory period. The subjects received two 30 min intravenous (i.v.) infusions of remoxipride 50 mg with different time intervals between the two doses, in a randomized six period crossover design. The time intervals between the two remoxipride doses were 2, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h. On one occasion the remoxipride dose was followed by an i.v. injection of TRH after 2 h. 2. The plasma peak prolactin concentrations obtained after the first remoxipride dose correspond to a maximal release of prolactin according to earlier studies. A small second peak of prolactin was observed after 2 h. The release was gradually increased with longer time intervals between the consecutive doses. The refractory period for a second prolactin release similar to the first one after remoxipride was found to be 24 h for most of the subjects. 3. TRH resulted in a faster and higher increase in prolactin response of a shorter duration than after remoxipride administered 2 h after the first dose. PMID:7669486

  16. Perception of acoustically presented time series with varied intervals.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jiří; Pacer, Jakob; Wittmann, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Data from three experiments on serial perception of temporal intervals in the supra-second domain are reported. Sequences of short acoustic signals ("pips") separated by periods of silence were presented to the observers. Two types of time series, geometric or alternating, were used, where the modulus 1+δ of the inter-pip series and the base duration Tb (range from 1.1 to 6s) were varied as independent parameters. The observers had to judge whether the series were accelerating, decelerating, or uniform (3 paradigm), or to distinguish regular from irregular sequences (2 paradigm). "Intervals of subjective uniformity" (isus) were obtained by fitting Gaussian psychometric functions to individual subjects' responses. Progression towards longer base durations (Tb=4.4 or 6s) shifts the isus towards negative δs, i.e., accelerating series. This finding is compatible with the phenomenon of "subjective shortening" of past temporal intervals, which is naturally accounted for by the lossy integration model of internal time representation. The opposite effect observed for short durations (Tb=1.1 or 1.5s) remains unexplained by the lossy integration model, and presents a challenge for further research.

  17. Robust inter-beat interval estimation in cardiac vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Brüser, C; Winter, S; Leonhardt, S

    2013-02-01

    Reliable and accurate estimation of instantaneous frequencies of physiological rhythms, such as heart rate, is critical for many healthcare applications. Robust estimation is especially challenging when novel unobtrusive sensors are used for continuous health monitoring in uncontrolled environments, because these sensors can create significant amounts of potentially unreliable data. We propose a new flexible algorithm for the robust estimation of local (beat-to-beat) intervals from cardiac vibration signals, specifically ballistocardiograms (BCGs), recorded by an unobtrusive bed-mounted sensor. This sensor allows the measurement of motions of the body which are caused by cardiac activity. Our method requires neither a training phase nor any prior knowledge about the morphology of the heart beats in the analyzed waveforms. Instead, three short-time estimators are combined using a Bayesian approach to continuously estimate the inter-beat intervals. We have validated our method on over-night BCG recordings from 33 subjects (8 normal, 25 insomniacs). On this dataset, containing approximately one million heart beats, our method achieved a mean beat-to-beat interval error of 0.78% with a coverage of 72.69%.

  18. An uncertain multidisciplinary design optimization method using interval convex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangyi; Luo, Zhen; Sun, Guangyong; Zhang, Nong

    2013-06-01

    This article proposes an uncertain multi-objective multidisciplinary design optimization methodology, which employs the interval model to represent the uncertainties of uncertain-but-bounded parameters. The interval number programming method is applied to transform each uncertain objective function into two deterministic objective functions, and a satisfaction degree of intervals is used to convert both the uncertain inequality and equality constraints to deterministic inequality constraints. In doing so, an unconstrained deterministic optimization problem will be constructed in association with the penalty function method. The design will be finally formulated as a nested three-loop optimization, a class of highly challenging problems in the area of engineering design optimization. An advanced hierarchical optimization scheme is developed to solve the proposed optimization problem based on the multidisciplinary feasible strategy, which is a well-studied method able to reduce the dimensions of multidisciplinary design optimization problems by using the design variables as independent optimization variables. In the hierarchical optimization system, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II, sequential quadratic programming method and Gauss-Seidel iterative approach are applied to the outer, middle and inner loops of the optimization problem, respectively. Typical numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  19. long interval microtremor array survey in sedimentary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimi, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2011-12-01

    Microtremor array survey is one of the easiest passive inspection methods to estimate the subsurface velocity structure of sedimentary basin. Since the method utilizes ambient noise, of which stochastic features are not always stable both spatially and temporally, longer observation interval is necessary to obtain reliable results. We conducted microtremor array surveys each observation interval is more than ten days to test robustness of the microtoremors (frequency range: 0.1 to 1 Hz) and phase velocities estimation. Velocity seismometers with natural period more than 5 sec. are deployed connected with 24 bit A/D, GPS time-calibrated data loggers. Each observation comprises of twelve stations arranged as three regular triangle arrays with radii several hundred meters to several kilometers to enable wide-band phase velocity estimation (0.1 to 1 Hz at maximum) necessary for Vs estimation at each site (south Niigata, central Japan). Each continuous data are segmented to hourly data sets, and they are analyzed with SPAC method to obtain phase velocity estimations. Estimated phase velocities are fluctuated especially in the lower frequency range (say, below 0.3 Hz). Our observation shows importance of longer interval observation to obtain reliable phase velocity estimates with microtremor array survey.

  20. Flood frequency analysis: Confidence interval estimation by test inversion bootstrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schendel, Thomas; Thongwichian, Rossukon

    2015-09-01

    A common approach to estimate extreme flood events is the annual block maxima approach, where for each year the peak streamflow is determined and a distribution (usually the generalized extreme value distribution (GEV)) is fitted to this series of maxima. Eventually this distribution is used to estimate the return level for a defined return period. However, due to the finite sample size, the estimated return levels are associated with a range of uncertainity, usually expressed via confidence intervals. Previous publications have shown that existing bootstrapping methods for estimating the confidence intervals of the GEV yield too narrow estimates of these uncertainty ranges. Therefore, we present in this article a novel approach based on the less known test inversion bootstrapping, which we adapted especially for complex quantities like the return level. The reliability of this approach is studied and its performance is compared to other bootstrapping methods as well as the Profile Likelihood technique. It is shown that the new approach improves significantly the coverage of confidence intervals compared to other bootstrapping methods and for small sample sizes should even be favoured over the Profile Likelihood.

  1. Visual feedback for retuning to just intonation intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, R. Dean; Nordquist, Peter R.; Corn, Justin S.

    2005-04-01

    Musicians become used to equal temperament pitch intervals due to their widespread use in tuning pianos and other fixed-pitch instruments. For unaccompanied singing and some other performance situations, a more harmonious blending of sounds can be achieved by shifting to just intonation intervals. Lissajous figures provide immediate and striking visual feedback that emphasizes the frequency ratios and pitch intervals found among the first few members of a single harmonic series. Spirograph patterns (hypotrochoids) are also especially simple for ratios of small whole numbers, and their use for providing feedback to singers has been suggested previously [G. W. Barton, Jr., Am. J. Phys. 44(6), 593-594 (1976)]. A hybrid mixture of these methods for comparing two frequencies generates what appears to be a three dimensional Lissajous figure-a cylindrical wire mesh that rotates about its tilted vertical axis, with zero tilt yielding the familiar Lissajous figure. Sine wave inputs work best, but the sounds of flute, recorder, whistling, and a sung ``oo'' are good enough approximations to work well. This initial study compares the three modes of presentation in terms of the ease with which a singer can obtain a desired pattern and recognize its shape.

  2. Antimicrobial agents-associated with QT interval prolongation.

    PubMed

    Bril, Fernando; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Di Girolamo, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    QT interval prolongation is one of the most important causes of withdrawal of drugs from the market, due to its association with Torsades de Pointes (TdP), a potentially fatal arrhythmia. Although many antimicrobial drugs are capable of inducing this type of arrhythmia, the importance of this effect is usually underestimated. Macrolides, quinolones, azoles, pentamidine, protease inhibitors, antimalarial drugs and cotrimoxazole are the anti-infective agents more frequently associated with this adverse effect. Despite the fact that the risk of QT prolongation and TdP under single antimicrobial therapy is low, these drugs are so extensively used that sporadic cases of this arrhythmia are reported. Moreover, antimicrobial drugs are susceptible to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions with other drugs, which may increase the risk of this arrhythmia. Therefore, physicians must be familiar with not only the antimicrobial drugs capable of producing QT interval prolongation, but also their potential interactions. In addition, patient's specific risk factors of prolonging QT interval or producing TdP must be taken into account. This article reviews the role of anti-infective drugs in QT prolongation, focusing on QT prolongation mechanisms, potential drug interactions, and patients' predisposing factors to this arrhythmia. PMID:20210724

  3. The behavioral economics of choice and interval timing.

    PubMed

    Jozefowiez, J; Staddon, J E R; Cerutti, D T

    2009-07-01

    The authors propose a simple behavioral economic model (BEM) describing how reinforcement and interval timing interact. The model assumes a Weber-law-compliant logarithmic representation of time. Associated with each represented time value are the payoffs that have been obtained for each possible response. At a given real time, the response with the highest payoff is emitted. The model accounts for a wide range of data from procedures such as simple bisection, metacognition in animals, economic effects in free-operant psychophysical procedures, and paradoxical choice in double-bisection procedures. Although it assumes logarithmic time representation, it can also account for data from the time-left procedure usually cited in support of linear time representation. It encounters some difficulties in complex free-operant choice procedures, such as concurrent mixed fixed-interval schedules as well as some of the data on double bisection, which may involve additional processes. Overall, BEM provides a theoretical framework for understanding how reinforcement and interval timing work together to determine choice between temporally differentiated reinforcers.

  4. Nosewitness Identification: Effects of Lineup Size and Retention Interval

    PubMed Central

    Alho, Laura; Soares, Sandra C.; Costa, Liliana P.; Pinto, Elisa; Ferreira, Jacqueline H. T.; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Silva, Carlos F.; Olsson, Mats J.

    2016-01-01

    Although canine identification of body odor (BO) has been widely used as forensic evidence, the concept of nosewitness identification by human observers was only recently put to the test. The results indicated that BOs associated with male characters in authentic crime videos could later be identified in BO lineup tests well above chance. To further evaluate nosewitness memory, we assessed the effects of lineup size (Experiment 1) and retention interval (Experiment 2), using a forced-choice memory test. The results showed that nosewitness identification works for all lineup sizes (3, 5, and 8 BOs), but that larger lineups compromise identification performance in similarity to observations from eye- and earwitness studies. Also in line with previous eye- and earwitness studies, but in disagreement with some studies on odor memory, Experiment 2 showed significant forgetting between shorter retention intervals (15 min) and longer retention intervals (1-week) using lineups of five BOs. Altogether this study shows that identification of BO in a forensic setting is possible and has limits and characteristics in line with witness identification through other sensory modalities. PMID:27303317

  5. Income maximizing on concurrent ratio-interval schedules of reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Shurtleff, David; Silberberg, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effect of food availability on pigeons' choice behavior under concurrent schedules of reinforcement. In Experiment 1, 3 pigeons earned their daily food ration by choosing, in 30-min sessions, between concurrent variable-ratio 30 variable-interval 40-s schedules. Food presentations during both schedules lasted 2 or 12 s, depending upon the condition. Relative variable-ratio response rate was inversely related to hopper duration. In Experiment 2, 4 pigeons received their daily feeding by responding on the same schedule pair as in Experiment 1 (with 4-s food presentations) in sessions that varied in length from 10 to 30 min, depending on the condition. The length of a vertical slit projected on a response key increased with time so that “passage of time” might be more easily discriminable. As session duration decreased, relative variable-ratio response rate increased. In Experiment 3, 4 pigeons chose between two variable-interval 40-s schedules. One schedule operated without regard to the schedule selected, whereas the other operated only when the subject responded in its presence (dependent). Although these schedules had the same feedback function, preference for the dependent variable interval increased as session duration decreased from 30 to 10 min. The preference changes in these studies reveal the operation of an income-maximizing process in choice. PMID:16812610

  6. Age effects in discrimination of intervals within rhythmic tone sequences.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, Peter J; Gordon-Salant, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study measured listener sensitivity to increments of a target inter-onset interval (IOI) embedded within tone sequences that featured different rhythmic patterns. The sequences consisted of six 50-ms 1000-Hz tone bursts separated by silent intervals that were adjusted to create different timing patterns. Control sequences were isochronous, with all tonal IOIs fixed at either 200 or 400 ms, while other patterns featured combinations of the two IOIs arranged to create different sequential tonal groupings. Duration difference limens in milliseconds for increments of a single sequence IOI were measured adaptively by adjusting the duration of an inter-tone silent interval. Specific target IOIs within sequences differed across discrimination conditions. Listeners included younger normal-hearing adults and groups of older adults with and without hearing loss. Discrimination performance measured for each of the older groups of listeners was observed to be equivalent, with each group exhibiting significantly poorer discrimination performance than the younger listeners in each sequence condition. Additionally, the specific influence of variable rhythmic grouping on temporal sensitivity was found to be greatest among older listeners. PMID:25618068

  7. Confidence intervals for expected moments algorithm flood quantile estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.A.; Lane, W.L.; Stedinger, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Historical and paleoflood information can substantially improve flood frequency estimates if appropriate statistical procedures are properly applied. However, the Federal guidelines for flood frequency analysis, set forth in Bulletin 17B, rely on an inefficient "weighting" procedure that fails to take advantage of historical and paleoflood information. This has led researchers to propose several more efficient alternatives including the Expected Moments Algorithm (EMA), which is attractive because it retains Bulletin 17B's statistical structure (method of moments with the Log Pearson Type 3 distribution) and thus can be easily integrated into flood analyses employing the rest of the Bulletin 17B approach. The practical utility of EMA, however, has been limited because no closed-form method has been available for quantifying the uncertainty of EMA-based flood quantile estimates. This paper addresses that concern by providing analytical expressions for the asymptotic variance of EMA flood-quantile estimators and confidence intervals for flood quantile estimates. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate the properties of such confidence intervals for sites where a 25- to 100-year streamgage record is augmented by 50 to 150 years of historical information. The experiments show that the confidence intervals, though not exact, should be acceptable for most purposes.

  8. Systolic time intervals at rest and during exercise in sportsmen.

    PubMed

    Franculescu, V; Sallam, E B; Otoiu, M E

    1982-01-01

    The authors using non-invasive methods, have studied left ventricular performance at rest and during training of sportsmen, taking into consideration the period of activity (during resting, training and competition periods). The studied subjects belonged to three groups (football, basketball and athletics). They all had more than 5 years of performance training. The obtained values are compared with data obtained from a control group of untrained subjects in the same age group. Determination of systolic time intervals has been done using mechanophonocardiographic tracing, registered at rest and during various exercise intensities, measuring PEP, LVET and Weissler ratio. Obtained data have been correlated with oxygen consumption, heart rate and blood pressure. Systolic time intervals measured at rest have been compared with the values obtained by Weissler from untrained subjects. Regression equations are given for values obtained in exercise tests in the case of sportsmen as well as for sedentary persons. In conclusion the authors stress the importance of systolic time intervals determinations for indirect estimation of left ventricular performance at rest and during exercise tests. From the presented data results the importance of PEP and Weissler ratio, which parametres the authors recommend to be systematically determined in the case of performance sportsmen. The most significant modifications are recorded when values are compared for the same subject during all the three periods of activity.

  9. Delay of Feedback Interval, Postfeedback Interval, Distraction, and Task Difficulty as Factors in a Modified Concept-Identification Task with Junior High School Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, F. Michael; Beaton, Virginia L.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of delay of information feedback interval (0 or 7 seconds), postinformation feedback interval (1, 8, or 15 seconds), difficulty (one or three variable irrelevant dimensions), and presence or absence of a tractor in the postinformation feedback interval were investigated with 240 junior high school children in a modified…

  10. Exact and Best Confidence Intervals for the Ability Parameter of the Rasch Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauer, Karl Christoph

    1991-01-01

    Smallest exact confidence intervals for the ability parameter of the Rasch model are derived and compared to the traditional asymptotically valid intervals based on Fisher information. Tables of exact confidence intervals, termed Clopper-Pearson intervals, can be drawn up with a computer program developed by K. Klauer. (SLD)

  11. An Introduction to Confidence Intervals for Both Statistical Estimates and Effect Sizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Mary Margaret

    This paper summarizes methods of estimating confidence intervals, including classical intervals and intervals for effect sizes. The recent American Psychological Association (APA) Task Force on Statistical Inference report suggested that confidence intervals should always be reported, and the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual" (2001)…

  12. Bouts of Responding: The Relation between Bout Rate and the Rate of Variable-Interval Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, Richard L.; Grimes, Julie A.; Bennett, J. Adam

    2004-01-01

    By nose poking a lighted key, rats obtained food pellets on either a variable- interval schedule of reinforcement or a schedule that required an average of four additional responses after the end of the variable-interval component (a tandem variable-interval variable-ratio 4 schedule). With both schedule types, the mean variable interval was…

  13. On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the Mean of a Skewed Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, W.; Kibria, B. M. Golam

    2007-01-01

    A number of methods are available in the literature to measure confidence intervals. Here, confidence intervals for estimating the population mean of a skewed distribution are considered. This note proposes two alternative confidence intervals, namely, Median t and Mad t, which are simple adjustments to the Student's t confidence interval. In…

  14. The Prognostic Role of QTc Interval in Acute Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Wen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium. Although a fulminant course of the disease is difficult to predict, it may lead to acute heart failure and death. Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced left ventricular systolic function and prolonged QRS duration can predict the fulminant course of acute myocarditis. This study aimed to identify whether prolonged QTc interval could also be predictive of fulminant disease in this population. Methods We retrospectively included 40 patients diagnosed with acute myocarditis who were admitted to our hospital between 2002 and 2013. They were divided into the fulminant group (n = 9) and the non-fulminant group (n = 31). Clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent factors predictive of fulminant disease. Results Patients with fulminant myocarditis had a higher mortality rate than those with non-fulminant disease (55.6% vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that wider QRS durations (133.22 ± 45.85 ms vs. 92.81 ± 15.56 ms, p = 0.030) and longer QTc intervals (482.78 ± 69.76 ms vs. 412.00 ± 33.31 ms, p = 0.016) were significant predictors associated with a fulminant course of myocarditis. Conclusions Prolonged QRS duration and QTc interval, upon patient admission, may be associated with an increased risk of fulminant disease and increased in-hospital mortality. Therefore, early recognition of fulminant myocarditis and early mechanical support could provide improved patient outcomes. PMID:27122953

  15. Neural architecture of choice behaviour in a concurrent interval schedule.

    PubMed

    Kalenscher, Tobias; Diekamp, Bettina; Güntürkün, Onur

    2003-11-01

    Concurrent interval schedules are classic experimental paradigms that are traditionally employed in psychological research on choice behaviour. To analyse the neural basis of choice in a concurrent fixed interval schedule, pigeons were trained to peck on two response keys. Responses were differentially rewarded in key specific short or long time intervals (SI vs. LI). Using tetrodotoxin, we reversibly blocked the neostriatum caudolaterale (NCL, the avian functional equivalent of the prefrontal cortex), avian caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens to examine their contribution. A detailed analysis of baseline choice behaviour revealed that response distribution and key affinity were determined by cued or time-related expectancy for rewards on the SI key. The pigeons' response frequency increased on the SI key and decreased on the LI key with increasing temporal proximity to the SI reward and pigeons switched to the LI key after reward delivery. Pecking bursts on the LI key were negatively correlated with bursts on the SI key. Neostriatum caudolaterale inactivation did not affect pecking activity per se but interfered with reward-related temporal modulation of pecking frequency, switching pattern and coupling of LI to SI pecks. Blockade of caudate-putamen resulted in a complete behavioural halt, while inactivation of nucleus accumbens diminished operant behaviour without affecting consummatory responses. These data suggest that the NCL is tuned via indirect striato-pallial projections to integrate cued or time-related reward expectancy into a response selection process in order to set, maintain or shift goals. The NCL possibly feeds forward the resulting motor commands to the caudate-putamen for execution.

  16. Prospective study of birth interval dynamics in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chen, L C; Ahmed, S; Gesche, M; Henry Mosley, W

    1974-07-01

    Abstract A group of 209 married, fecund women in rural Bangladesh were studied prospectively for 24 months from 1969 to 1971 to define some of the biological and sociological factors relating to fertility performance. These women were selected from a larger study population of 112,000 that had been followed with a daily house-to-house vital registration programme since 1966. The selected women were interviewed bi-weekly and were asked questions about menstruation, pregnancy, lactation, husband's occupational absences, and monthly urine tests for pregnancy were taken. The results for 193 non-contracepting women revealed that the seasonal pattern of births previously observed in this population could be associated with a corresponding seasonal pattern of conceptions and that this was due to a seasonal trend in fecundability. The highest conception rates were in the coolest months of the year. Post-partum lactational amenorrhoea was very prolonged, averaging 17 months for women with a surviving child. The appearance of the first post-partum menstrual flow (onset of ovulation) also had a seasonal trend which could not be adequately explained. The median waiting time to conception, once menstruation had resumed was eight months. This interval was influenced by seasonal fluctuations, as well as by the age of women and by husbands' absences. The foetal wastage rate was 15·0 per 100 conceptions, with 62 per cent of the foetal losses occurring during the second month of gestation. Overall, the average birth interval was 33 months, with the prolonged lactational amenorrhoea accounting for almost 45 per cent of this interval. From the Department of Population Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205. PMID:22070207

  17. Inference by eye: reading the overlap of independent confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Geoff

    2009-01-30

    When 95 per cent confidence intervals (CIs) on independent means do not overlap, the two-tailed p-value is less than 0.05 and there is a statistically significant difference between the means. However, p for non-overlapping 95 per cent CIs is actually considerably smaller than 0.05: If the two CIs just touch, p is about 0.01, and the intervals can overlap by as much as about half the length of one CI arm before p becomes as large as 0.05. Keeping in mind this rule-that overlap of half the length of one arm corresponds approximately to statistical significance at p = 0.05-can be helpful for a quick appreciation of figures that display CIs, especially if precise p-values are not reported. The author investigated the robustness of this and similar rules, and found them sufficiently accurate when sample sizes are at least 10, and the two intervals do not differ in width by more than a factor of 2. The author reviewed previous discussions of CI overlap and extended the investigation to p-values other than 0.05 and 0.01. He also studied 95 per cent CIs on two proportions, and on two Pearson correlations, and found similar rules apply to overlap of these asymmetric CIs, for a very broad range of cases. Wider use of figures with 95 per cent CIs is desirable, and these rules may assist easy and appropriate understanding of such figures.

  18. A Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Jonsson, Ari; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we introduce Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning (CAIP), a new paradigm for representing and reasoning about plans. The paradigm enables the description of planning domains with time, resources, concurrent activities, mutual exclusions among sets of activities, disjunctive preconditions and conditional effects. We provide a theoretical foundation for the paradigm using a mapping to first order logic. We also show that CAIP plans are naturally expressed by networks of constraints, and that planning maps directly to dynamic constraint reasoning. In addition, we show how constraint templates are used to provide a compact mechanism for describing planning domains.

  19. Methodological issues for determining intervals of subsequent cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The gap between nationwide recommendations of cancer screening and the related evidences obtained from Korean adults should be filled. Estimation of the mean sojourn time (MST) in a specific cancer is important to determine the intervals of subsequent screening. This author arranged the methods for calculating MST into 5 categories based on the parameters used. Under the legal barrier for protection of individual privacy and confidentiality in a Korean academic situation, the methods involving the use of transition rates or prevalence/incidence ratio would be applicable among these methods. PMID:25078383

  20. Geometric representation of interval exchange maps over algebraic number fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggiaspalla, G.; Lowenstein, J. H.; Vivaldi, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the restriction of interval exchange transformations (IETs) to algebraic number fields, which leads to maps on lattices. We characterize renormalizability arithmetically and study its relationships with a geometrical quantity that we call the drift vector. We exhibit some examples of renormalizable IETs with zero and non-zero drift vectors and carry out some investigations of their properties. In particular we look for evidence of the finite decomposition property on a family of IETs extending the example studied in Lowenstein et al (2007 Dyn. Syst. 22 73-106).