Science.gov

Sample records for interventional robotics part

  1. Telepresence and Intervention Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO10628 TITLE: Telepresence and Intervention Robotics DISTRIBUTION...comprise the compilation report: ADPO10609 thru ADP010633 UNCLASSIFIED 20-1 TELEPRESENCE AND INTERVENTION ROBOTICS Nathalie Cislo Laboratoire de...Robotique de Paris 10-12, Avenue de 1’Europe 78140 VWlizy-Villacoublay, FRANCE cislo@robot.uvsq.fr ABSTRACT In the field of Mobile Robotics applications

  2. Preparedness in robotically assisted interventions.

    PubMed

    Coste-Manière, Eve; Adhami, Louaï; Antiphon, Patrick; Abbou, Clément-Claude

    2003-04-01

    For many years, robots have been used in manufacturing to perform a variety of delicate tasks. Their use is now being generalized to other fields, such as biology, domestic applications, and especially medicine, in which they are poised to make a significant contribution. This evolution comes from the progress made in the field of robotics and from recent changes in medical and surgical techniques, namely, developments in medical imaging and a new desire for minimally invasive interventions. This emerging combination of high-precision robotic manipulators, new medical diagnostic techniques, and efficient minimally invasive surgery has not yet been perfected. After a brief discussion of state-of-the-art robotic systems used in urology, this article discusses new challenges presented by robotic minimally invasive surgery. A computer-integrated approach aimed at increasing the efficiency of such interventions through better preparedness is presented. This approach is illustrated by a case study in human nephrectomy and a cardiac animal experiment.

  3. Remote-controlled vascular interventional surgery robot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianmiao; Zhang, Dapeng; Da, Liu

    2010-06-01

    Conventional vascular interventional surgery (VIS) is manually performed under fluoroscopic guidance, requiring lead protection for the surgeons. A remote-control vascular interventional surgery robot (VISR) which can remotely, safely and precisely perform VIS would have clear advantages. Our robot adopts a master-slave structure. The surgeon sits at the master site, sending controlling instructions to the robot fixed at the slave site, then the robot translates these instructions into catheter motion. The robotic mechanism consists of a supporting manipulator and a catheter navigator; the former adjusts the robot's spatial position, while the latter controls the translation and rotation of the catheter. A 3D vascular model is reconstructed so that the surgeon can perform surgical planning easily. In addition, the tactile force between catheter tip and blood vessel is measured, which prevents the surgeon damaging delicate vessels. In glass model and animal experiments, the surgeon remotely controlled VISR, which inserted a catheter into predefined targets, and the robotic surgery time was measured. The robot was initially tested on a transparent glass vascular model. Under robotic manipulation, the catheter can enter an arbitrary branch of the vascular model and catheter motion can meet the requirements of clinical VIS. Then robotic surgery was performed successfully in an adult dog. Surgery time to access each of the five targets, viz. renal artery, left atrium, right atrium, left ventricle and right ventricle, was measured. Compared with conventional manual surgery, robotic surgery time is a little longer. The experiments show the feasibility and safety of the VISR to facilitate navigation, position precisely and control catheters to specific regions. The VISR system offers surgeon radiation safety and minimizes surgeon-based error. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Robotic systems for percutaneous needle-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Kettenbach, Joachim; Kronreif, Gernot

    2015-02-01

    Several groups have developed robotic systems for invasive medical procedures. In this article we will focus on selected robotic systems for percutaneous needle-guided interventions using CT or MR imaging. We present six interventional robotic systems designed to work with imaging modalities such as CT, Cone-beam CT and MRI. The details of each system are given along with any phantom, animal, or human trials performed with each particular robot. Although each of these systems has specific features, they are all of great clinical value since they provide very stable needle guidance -- even for angulated approaches, they may allow access to lesions when the width of the CT- or MR- gantry would limit the access for a biopsy needle or other interventional tools such as thermal ablation probes. Then, such a robot may be able to guide the needle into the most promising region of the lesion without the need for a second contrast injection. Thus, more efficacious characterization and treatment, particularly for lesions that are difficult to target, can be anticipated. Although more research and clinical trials are certainly needed, it is, however, our belief that robotic systems will be an important part of future interventions.

  5. "MRI Stealth" robot for prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Song, Danny; Petrisor, Doru; Ursu, Daniel; Mazilu, Dumitru; Muntener, Michael; Mutener, Michael; Schar, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports an important achievement in MRI instrumentation, a pneumatic, fully actuated robot located within the scanner alongside the patient and operating under remote control based on the images. Previous MRI robots commonly used piezoelectric actuation limiting their compatibility. Pneumatics is an ideal choice for MRI compatibility because it is decoupled from electromagnetism, but pneumatic actuators were hardly controllable. This achievement was possible due to a recent technology breakthrough, the invention of a new type of pneumatic motor, PneuStep 1, designed for the robot reported here with uncompromised MRI compatibility, high-precision, and medical safety. MrBot is one of the "MRI stealth" robots today (the second is described in this issue by Zangos et al.). Both of these systems are also multi-imager compatible, being able to operate with the imager of choice or cross-imaging modalities. For MRI compatibility the robot is exclusively constructed of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, crystals, rubbers and is electricity free. Light-based encoding is used for feedback, so that all electric components are distally located outside the imager's room. MRI robots are modern, digital medical instruments in line with advanced imaging equipment and methods. These allow for accessing patients within closed bore scanners and performing interventions under direct (in scanner) imaging feedback. MRI robots could allow e.g. to biopsy small lesions imaged with cutting edge cancer imaging methods, or precisely deploy localized therapy at cancer foci. Our robot is the first to show the feasibility of fully automated in-scanner interventions. It is customized for the prostate and operates transperineally for needle interventions. It can accommodate various needle drivers for different percutaneous procedures such as biopsy, thermal ablations, or brachytherapy. The first needle driver is customized for fully automated low

  6. Application Study of Vascular Interventional Robotic Mechanism for Remote Steering

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zengmin; Jia, Bo; Lu, Wangsheng; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recently, robotic systems have been introduced as a useful method for surgical procedures. But in the field of vascular interventional therapy, the development of robotic system is slower. Objective: The purpose of the study is to verify the reliability and safety of vascular interventional robotic system used in angiography, by the way of in vitro preliminary experiments and animal experiments. Method: The approach is to employ a proprietary vascular interventional robot system to complete glass vessel models and animal angiogram experiments. This robot system consists of a console port (remote steering system), an assistant port (propelled and rotation system) and a hydraulic fixing device, upon which surgeons control remotely to make go forward and rotate in the glass vessel models and animal vessels, on the 3D operation interface. Consequently, the operation time and success rate are counted and evaluated. Result: In the glass vessel model experiments, the Catheter can enter various kinds of vessel models with inside diameter length greater than 3mm and angle less than 90o. In the animal (adult dogs) experiments, surgeons can accomplish smoothly the angiogram of the renal artery, the vertebral renal and the arteria carotis communis, without any complications of surgery. Conclusion: The angiogram by using vascular interventional robot system is safe and reliable. Surgeons can finish the angiogram in part by remote operation, and the result of angiogram can meet a number of simple expectations. However without wire control and force feedback systems, the applicability of this kind of robot system is not flexible enough and need to be improved in the future. PMID:21892373

  7. MRI-powered Actuators for Robotic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vartholomeos, Panagiotis; Qin, Lei; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The design concept and performance limits are described and derived analytically. Simulation and experiments in a clinical MR scanner are used to validate the analysis and to demonstrate the capability of the approach for needle biopsies. The concepts of actuator locking mechanisms and multi-axis control are also introduced. PMID:22287082

  8. Robotic-assisted percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Daniel R; Giri, Jay; Hirshfeld, John; Wilensky, Robert L

    2017-07-19

    Performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with several occupational hazards including radiation exposure and musculoskeletal injury. Current methods to mitigate these risks range from suspended radiation suits to adjustable lead-lined glass shields. Robotic-assisted PCI is a novel approach to PCI that utilizes remote-controlled technology to manipulate catheters thereby significantly reducing radiation exposure to the operator and catheterization laboratory staff. Although limited, current evidence indicates that robotic-assisted PCI is associated with a high technical success rate and may have additional advantages over conventional PCI, such as a decreased incidence of geographical miss. However, as the technology is nascent, further studies including larger, randomized controlled trials are needed to expand on the long-term clinical and safety outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Marking parts to aid robot vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, J. W.; Barker, L. K.

    1981-01-01

    The premarking of parts for subsequent identification by a robot vision system appears to be beneficial as an aid in the automation of certain tasks such as construction in space. A simple, color coded marking system is presented which allows a computer vision system to locate an object, calculate its orientation, and determine its identity. Such a system has the potential to operate accurately, and because the computer shape analysis problem has been simplified, it has the ability to operate in real time.

  10. Current and emerging robotic assisted intervention for Notes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Siyang; Wang, Shuxin

    2016-12-01

    Natural orifices transluminal endoscopic surgery (notes) procedures are limited by a number of factors including closure of the internal entry point, loss of triangulation, and unstable operative platform. Areas covered: In this paper, new technical developments in different aspects of robotic assisted NOTES interventions are reviewed. We further address new research opportunities for more widespread clinical acceptance of robotic assisted NOTES procedures. Expert commentary: The application of robotics in NOTES intervention is still in its infancy. The development of more compact, smart and intuitive robotic NOTES systems holds much promise for the future of NOTES application.

  11. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  12. Robotic burnishing system for solid film lubricant coated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    A robotic burnishing system in the Painting Department reduced the operation average standard hour content by 64% and maintains a good part-to-part quality level for a group of parts coated with solid film lubricant. Required to be safe and simple to operate, the system uses a small PUMA 260 robot to process coated axisymmetrical pieceparts. Special tooling and seven pairs of robotic fingers were designed and built to handle 24 different small pieceparts. Individual robotic programs were created for each part and stored on 5-1/4 in. floppy disks with backup copies in Numerical Control. The operators and the manufacturing department readily accepted the robotic system. Additional part geometries will be developed for robotic processing. 12 figs.

  13. Application study of medical robots in vascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wang-sheng; Xu, Wu-yi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Da; Wang, Da-min; Jia, Po; Li, Zhi-cao; Wang, Tian-miao; Zhang, Da-peng; Tian, Zeng-min; Zeng, Yanjun

    2011-09-01

    Based on the background of minimally invasive surgery and applications of medical robots, a vascular interventional robotic system has been developed that can be used in the field of vascular intervention. The robotic system comprises a propulsion system, an image navigation system and a virtual surgery training system. Integration of the three systems constitutes a vascular intervention prototype robotic system used to carry out in vitro vascular intervention and animal experiments. On a transparent glass vascular model, a catheter was shown to enter an arbitrary branch of the vascular model with catheter motion meeting the requirements of clinical vascular intervention surgery (VIS); i.e. error band of catheter motion < 0.5 mm. In the animal experiments, 1.33-2.00 mm (4F-6F) diameter catheters were selectively inserted successfully into predefined targets in the animal, such as the renal, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular artery. Compared with conventional manual surgery, the time for robotic surgery is a little longer. There were no operative complications in the animal experiments. These simulation and animal study results demonstrate that this vascular interventional robotic system allows doctors to perform angiography remotely and prevents them from radiation exposure. The system may be the basis for further clinical applications of vascular intervention. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A review of surgical robots for spinal interventions.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Alvaro; Melo, Javier; Sánchez, Emilio; Borro, Diego

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to describe the state of the art in surgical robotics for spinal interventions, a challenging problem for which robots can provide valuable assistance. Multiple electronic databases were searched for articles published during the last 10 years (2002-2012). Results were refined by defined inclusion criteria. A total of 18 different robots were found. Among them, five are commercially available systems: one specifically designed for spinal surgery, one for percutaneous needle-based interventions, two are radiosurgical systems with reported applications on the spine and another is a commercial robot which has been experimentally tested on spinal surgery. The remaining projects are research prototypes which are still on validation stages. A comprehensive state of the art is presented, showing that spinal robotic surgery is still at an early stage of development but with great potential for improvement. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Interventional robotic systems: Applications and technology state-of-the-art

    PubMed Central

    CLEARY, KEVIN; MELZER, ANDREAS; WATSON, VANCE; KRONREIF, GERNOT; STOIANOVICI, DAN

    2011-01-01

    Many different robotic systems have been developed for invasive medical procedures. In this article we will focus on robotic systems for image-guided interventions such as biopsy of suspicious lesions, interstitial tumor treatment, or needle placement for spinal blocks and neurolysis. Medical robotics is a young and evolving field and the ultimate role of these systems has yet to be determined. This paper presents four interventional robotics systems designed to work with MRI, CT, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound imaging devices. The details of each system are given along with any phantom, animal, or human trials. The systems include the AcuBot for active needle insertion under CT or fluoroscopy, the B-Rob systems for needle placement using CT or ultrasound, the INNOMOTION for MRI and CT interventions, and the MRBot for MRI procedures. Following these descriptions, the technology issues of image compatibility, registration, patient movement and respiration, force feedback, and control mode are briefly discussed. It is our belief that robotic systems will be an important part of future interventions, but more research and clinical trials are needed. The possibility of performing new clinical procedures that the human cannot achieve remains an ultimate goal for medical robotics. Engineers and physicians should work together to create and validate these systems for the benefits of patients everywhere. PMID:16754193

  16. Safety issues in robotic handling of nuclear weapon parts

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

    1993-12-31

    Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive weapon parts. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations that are currently performed manually. The robotic systems at Sandia incorporate several levels of mechanical, electrical, and software safety for handling hazardous materials. For example, tooling used by the robot to handle radioactive parts has been designed with mechanical features that allow the robot to release its payload only at designated locations in the robotic workspace. In addition, software processes check for expected and unexpected situations throughout the operations. Incorporation of features such as these provides multiple levels of safety for handling hazardous or valuable payloads with automated intelligent systems.

  17. [Principles of MR-guided interventions, surgery, navigation, and robotics].

    PubMed

    Melzer, A

    2010-08-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an imaging technique in interventional and surgical techniques provides a new dimension of soft tissue-oriented precise procedures without exposure to ionizing radiation and nephrotoxic allergenic, iodine-containing contrast agents. The technical capabilities of MRI in combination with interventional devices and systems, navigation, and robotics are discussed.

  18. Automating activity-based interventions: the role of robotics.

    PubMed

    Hidler, Joseph; Hamm, Larry F; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne L

    2008-01-01

    We have seen a continued growth of robotic devices being tested in neurorehabilitation settings over the last decade, with the primary goal to improve upper- and lower-motor function in individuals following stroke, spinal cord injury, and other neurological conditions. Interestingly, few studies have investigated the use of these devices in improving the overall health and well-being of these individuals despite the capability of robotic devices to deliver intensive time-unlimited therapy. In this article, we discuss the use of robotic devices in delivering intense, activity-based therapies that may have significant exercise benefits. We also present preliminary data from studies that investigated the metabolic and cardiac responses during and after 6 months of lower-limb robotic training. Finally, we speculate on the future of robotics and how these devices will affect rehabilitation interventions.

  19. [History of robotics: from archytas of tarentum until Da Vinci robot. (Part II)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, F M; Jiménez Schlegl, P; Millán Rodríguez, F; Salvador-Bayarri, J; Monllau Font, V; Palou Redorta, J; Villavicencio Mavrich, H

    2007-03-01

    Robotic surgery is a reality. In order to to understand how new robots work is interesting to know the history of ancient (see part i) and modern robotics. The desire to design automatic machines imitating humans continued for more than 4000 years. Archytas of Tarentum (at around 400 a.C.), Heron of Alexandria, Hsieh-Fec, Al-Jazari, Bacon, Turriano, Leonardo da Vinci, Vaucanson o von Kempelen were robot inventors. At 1942 Asimov published the three robotics laws. Mechanics, electronics and informatics advances at XXth century developed robots to be able to do very complex self governing works. At 1985 the robot PUMA 560 was employed to introduce a needle inside the brain. Later on, they were designed surgical robots like World First, Robodoc, Gaspar o Acrobot, Zeus, AESOP, Probot o PAKI-RCP. At 2000 the FDA approved the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), a very sophisticated robot to assist surgeons. Currently urological procedures like prostatectomy, cystectomy and nephrectomy are performed with the da Vinci, so urology has become a very suitable speciality to robotic surgery.

  20. “MRI Stealth” robot for prostate interventions

    PubMed Central

    STOIANOVICI, DAN; SONG, DANNY; PETRISOR, DORU; URSU, DANIEL; MAZILU, DUMITRU; MUTENER, MICHAEL; SCHAR, MICHAEL; PATRICIU, ALEXANDRU

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports an important achievement in MRI instrumentation, a pneumatic, fully actuated robot located within the scanner alongside the patient and operating under remote control based on the images. Previous MRI robots commonly used piezoelectric actuation limiting their compatibility. Pneumatics is an ideal choice for MRI compatibility because it is decoupled from electromagnetism, but pneumatic actuators were hardly controllable. This achievement was possible due to a recent technology breakthrough, the invention of a new type of pneumatic motor, PneuStep (1), designed for the robot reported here with uncompromised MRI compatibility, high-precision, and medical safety. MrBot is one of the “MRI stealth” robots today (the second is described in this issue by Zangos et al.). Both of these systems are also multi-imager compatible, being able to operate with the imager of choice or cross-imaging modalities. For MRI compatibility the robot is exclusively constructed of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, crystals, rubbers and is electricity free. Light-based encoding is used for feedback, so that all electric components are distally located outside the imager’s room. MRI robots are modern, digital medical instruments in line with advanced imaging equipment and methods. These allow for accessing patients within closed bore scanners and performing interventions under direct (in scanner) imaging feedback. MRI robots could allow e.g. to biopsy small lesions imaged with cutting edge cancer imaging methods, or precisely deploy localized therapy at cancer foci. Our robot is the first to show the feasibility of fully automated in-scanner interventions. It is customized for the prostate and operates transperineally for needle interventions. It can accommodate various needle drivers for different percutaneous procedures such as biopsy, thermal ablations, or brachytherapy. The first needle driver is customized for fully automated low

  1. Robotic image-guided needle interventions of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors' group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image.

  2. Robotic Image-Guided Needle Interventions of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors’ group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image. PMID:19390670

  3. On the static structural design of climbing robots: part 2.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ausama Hadi; Menon, Carlo

    This manuscript is the second of two parts of a work investigating optimal configurations of legged climbing robots while loitering on vertical surfaces. In this Part 2, a structural analysis based on the finite element method, specifically the stiffness method, is performed to address the problem. Parameters that are investigated in this Part 2 include the inclination of both the body and the legs of the robot. Outcomes of the performed study are validated by analyzing the posture of 150 ants when loitering on vertical surfaces. The obtained validation ensures the predictions of the developed structural model are correct and can be used to identify optimal configurations of legged robots when loitering on vertical surfaces.

  4. Robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Scheide, A.W.

    1983-11-01

    This article reviews some of the technical areas and history associated with robotics, provides information relative to the formation of a Robotics Industry Committee within the Industry Applications Society (IAS), and describes how all activities relating to robotics will be coordinated within the IEEE. Industrial robots are being used for material handling, processes such as coating and arc welding, and some mechanical and electronics assembly. An industrial robot is defined as a programmable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move material, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for a variety of tasks. The initial focus of the Robotics Industry Committee will be on the application of robotics systems to the various industries that are represented within the IAS.

  5. A Parallel Wire Robot for Epicardial Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Costanza, Adam D.; Wood, Nathan A.; Passineau, Michael J.; Moraca, Robert J.; Bailey, Stephen H.; Yoshizumi, Tomo; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of a planar parallel wire robot that adheres to the surface of the beating heart and provides a stable platform for minimally invasive epicardial therapies. The device is deployed through a small subxiphoid skin incision and attaches to the heart using suction. This methodology obviates mechanical stabilization and lung deflation, which are typically required during minimally invasive beating-heart surgery. The prototype design involves three vacuum chambers connected by two flexible arms. The chambers adhere to the epicardium, forming the vertices of a triangular base structure. Three cables connect a movable end-effector head to the three bases; the cables then pass out of the body to external actuators. The surgical tool moves within the triangular workspace to perform injections, ablation, or other tasks on the beating heart. Tests in vitro and in vivo were conducted to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. Tests in vivo successfully demonstrated the ability to deploy through a subxiphoid incision, adhere to the surface of the beating heart, move the surgical tool head within the robot’s workspace, and perform injections into the myocardium. PMID:25571402

  6. How to Implement Robots in Interventions for Children with Autism? A Co-creation Study Involving People with Autism, Parents and Professionals.

    PubMed

    Huijnen, Claire A G J; Lexis, Monique A S; Jansens, Rianne; de Witte, Luc P

    2017-07-06

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into how robots can be practically implemented into current education and therapy interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This qualitative study included focus groups and co-creation sessions. 73 Participants (professionals and adults with ASD) took part in 13 focus groups to elicit requirements for robot assisted interventions. Additionally, 22 participants (professionals, parents of children with ASD and adults with ASD) generated ideas for interventions using robot KASPAR in three co-creation sessions. This study resulted in: an overview of requirements concerning the robot, end-user, environment and practical implementation; a template to systematically describe robot interventions in general and for KASPAR in particular; and finally new interventions.

  7. Impact of Robotics and Geospatial Technology Interventions on Youth STEM Learning and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Gwen; Barker, Bradley; Grandgenett, Neal; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of robotics and geospatial technologies interventions on middle school youth's learning of and attitudes toward science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Two interventions were tested. The first was a 40-hour intensive robotics/GPS/GIS summer camp; the second was a 3-hour event modeled on the camp…

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of a MRI-compatible Modular Robotic System for MRI-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2010-09-26

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided robotic interventions have been introduced in order to advance prostate cancer detection and treatment. To overcome problems of such robotic interventions, we have been developing a pneumatically actuated MRI-compatible modular robotic system for MRI-guided transperineal prostate intervention and its interventional procedure. For system evaluation, a series of experiments have been conducted and this paper reports a needle insertion experiment using prostate phantom and patient mockup trials. The needle insertion experiment resulted in noticeable consistent error in one direction, which we will investigate further. Nonetheless, patient mockup experiences suggest that the modular robotic system and its interventional procedure are well integrated and implemented in clinical environment.

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of a MRI-compatible Modular Robotic System for MRI-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided robotic interventions have been introduced in order to advance prostate cancer detection and treatment. To overcome problems of such robotic interventions, we have been developing a pneumatically actuated MRI-compatible modular robotic system for MRI-guided transperineal prostate intervention and its interventional procedure. For system evaluation, a series of experiments have been conducted and this paper reports a needle insertion experiment using prostate phantom and patient mockup trials. The needle insertion experiment resulted in noticeable consistent error in one direction, which we will investigate further. Nonetheless, patient mockup experiences suggest that the modular robotic system and its interventional procedure are well integrated and implemented in clinical environment. PMID:21132087

  10. Real-Time Control of Humanoid Robots Considering External Forces on Upper Part of the Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Kentaro; Shigemori, Yo; Uchimura, Yutaka

    Recently, the demand for the practical use of service robots has risen significantly because of acceleration of demographic aging, and a humanoid robot is one of the promising form factors of service robots. When a humanoid robot is used by a human in a real environment, the robot needs to be designed by taking into account the various external forces that act on the robot. Thus far, most of the walking humanoid robots have been mainly controlled by the conventional ZMP method to maintain a stable walking posture. However, the conventional ZMP method can not be used to handle the various external forces that act on the upper part of the humanoid robot body. To overcome these problems, in this paper, we propose a novel control method, which we called 3DZMP and pZMP, for a humanoid robot to react to the external force on the upper part of the body. The 3DZMP is defined as the point in three-dimensional space at which the moment about all axes is zero. 3DZMP can prevent the rotation of a humanoid robot. The pZMP is defined as the point corresponding to the orthographic projection of the 3DZMP on a plane. pZMP is used to evaluate the stability of 3DZMP. We implemented the proposed method on a prototype robot and verified that the robot gained the capability to react to external forces that could not be handled by the conventional ZMP method.

  11. [Locomotion and control study on autonomous interventional diagnostic micro-robots].

    PubMed

    Gu, Da-qiang; Zhou, Yong

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces the locomotion control and the research status of the autonomous interventional diagnostic micro-robots in detail, outlines technical problems and difficulties now existing, and discusses the developing trend of locomotion control.

  12. Energy Efficient Legged Robotics at Sandia Labs, Part 2

    ScienceCinema

    Buerger, Steve; Mazumdar, Ani; Spencer, Steve

    2016-07-12

    Sandia is developing energy efficient actuation and drive train technologies to dramatically improve the charge life of legged robots. The work is supported by DARPA, and Sandia will demonstrate an energy efficient bipedal robot at the technology exposition section of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals in June, 2015. This video, the second in a series, describes the continued development and integration of the Sandia Transmission Efficient Prototype Promoting Research (STEPPR) robot.

  13. Energy Efficient Legged Robotics at Sandia Labs, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, Steve; Mazumdar, Ani; Spencer, Steve

    2015-06-02

    Sandia is developing energy efficient actuation and drive train technologies to dramatically improve the charge life of legged robots. The work is supported by DARPA, and Sandia will demonstrate an energy efficient bipedal robot at the technology exposition section of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals in June, 2015. This video, the second in a series, describes the continued development and integration of the Sandia Transmission Efficient Prototype Promoting Research (STEPPR) robot.

  14. A Fully Sensorized Cooperative Robotic System for Surgical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Arriaga, Saúl; Vargas, José Emilio; Ramos, Juan M.; Aceves, Marco A.; Gorrostieta, Efren; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-01-01

    In this research a fully sensorized cooperative robot system for manipulation of needles is presented. The setup consists of a DLR/KUKA Light Weight Robot III especially designed for safe human/robot interaction, a FD-CT robot-driven angiographic C-arm system, and a navigation camera. Also, new control strategies for robot manipulation in the clinical environment are introduced. A method for fast calibration of the involved components and the preliminary accuracy tests of the whole possible errors chain are presented. Calibration of the robot with the navigation system has a residual error of 0.81 mm (rms) with a standard deviation of ±0.41 mm. The accuracy of the robotic system while targeting fixed points at different positions within the workspace is of 1.2 mm (rms) with a standard deviation of ±0.4 mm. After calibration, and due to close loop control, the absolute positioning accuracy was reduced to the navigation camera accuracy which is of 0.35 mm (rms). The implemented control allows the robot to compensate for small patient movements. PMID:23012551

  15. Medical robotics and computer-integrated interventional medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Russell H.

    2012-02-01

    Computer-Integrated Interventional Medicine (CIIM) promises to have a profound impact on health care in the next 20 years, much as and for many of the same reasons that the marriage of computers and information processing methods with other technology have had on manufacturing, transportation, and other sectors of our society. Our basic premise is that the steps of creating patient-specific computational models, using these models for planning, registering the models and plans with the actual patient in the operating room, and using this information with appropriate technology to assist in carrying out and monitoring the intervention are best viewed as part of a complete patient-specific intervention process that occurs over many time scales. Further, the information generated in computer-integrated interventions can be captured and analyzed statistically to improve treatment processes. This paper will explore these themes briefly, using examples drawn from our work at the Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology (CISST ERC).

  16. Closed loop control of a robot assisted smart flexible needle for percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Maria Joseph, F O; Hutapea, P; Dicker, A; Yu, Y; Podder, T

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental evaluation of a coordinated control system for a robot and robot-driven shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated smart flexible needle capable of following a curved path for percutaneous intervention. The robot driving the needle is considered the outer loop and the non-linear SMA actuated flexible needle system comprises the inner loop. The two feedback control loops are coordinated in such a way that the robot drives the needle while monitoring the needle's actual deflection against a preplanned ideal trajectory, so that the needle tip reaches the target location within an acceptable accuracy. In air and in water experimental results are presented to validate the ability of the proposed coordinated controller to track the overall desired trajectory which includes the combined trajectory of the robot driver and the needle.

  17. Fast and Efficient Radiological Interventions via a Graphical User Interface Commanded Magnetic Resonance Compatible Robotic Device

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay; Christoforou, Eftychios; Brown, Daniel; Tsekos, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The graphical user interface for an MR compatible robotic device has the capability of displaying oblique MR slices in 2D and a 3D virtual environment along with the representation of the robotic arm in order to swiftly complete the intervention. Using the advantages of the MR modality the device saves time and effort, is safer for the medical staff and is more comfortable for the patient. PMID:17946067

  18. Microsurgery robots: addressing the needs of high-precision surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G; Peretti, Giorgio; Mora, Francesco; Guastini, Luca; Cingolani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Robotics has a significant potential to enhance the overall capacity and efficiency of healthcare systems. Robots can help surgeons perform better quality operations, leading to reductions in the hospitalisation time of patients and in the impact of surgery on their postoperative quality of life. In particular, robotics can have a significant impact on microsurgery, which presents stringent requirements for superhuman precision and control of the surgical tools. Microsurgery is, in fact, expected to gain importance in a growing range of surgical specialties as novel technologies progressively enable the detection, diagnosis and treatment of diseases at earlier stages. Within such scenarios, robotic microsurgery emerges as one of the key components of future surgical interventions, and will be a vital technology for addressing major surgical challenges. Nonetheless, several issues have yet to be overcome in terms of mechatronics, perception and surgeon-robot interfaces before microsurgical robots can achieve their full potential in operating rooms. Research in this direction is progressing quickly and microsurgery robot prototypes are gradually demonstrating significant clinical benefits in challenging applications such as reconstructive plastic surgery, ophthalmology, otology and laryngology. These are reassuring results offering confidence in a brighter future for high-precision surgical interventions.

  19. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory S; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-06-13

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot performs needle insertion under real-time 3T MR image guidance; workspace requirements, MR compatibility, and workflow have been evaluated on phantoms. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system.

  20. Child disaster mental health interventions, part II

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sweeton, Jennifer L.; Newman, Elana; Varma, Vandana; Noffsinger, Mary A.; Shaw, Jon A.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on the timing of child disaster mental health intervention delivery, the settings for intervention delivery, the expertise of providers, and therapeutic approaches. Studies have been conducted on interventions delivered during all phases of disaster management from pre event through many months post event. Many interventions were administered in schools which offer access to large numbers of children. Providers included mental health professionals and school personnel. Studies described individual and group interventions, some with parent involvement. The next generation of interventions and studies should be based on an empirical analysis of a number of key areas. PMID:26295009

  1. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  2. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  3. A robotic assistant system for cardiac interventions under MRI guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Wood, Bradford J.; Horvath, Keith A.; Kapoor, Ankur

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we present a surgical assistant system for implanting prosthetic aortic valve transapically under MRI guidance, in a beating heart. The system integrates an MR imaging system, a robotic system, as well as user interfaces for a surgeon to plan the procedure and manipulate the robot. A compact robotic delivery module mounted on a robotic arm is used for delivering both balloon-expandable and self-expanding prosthesis. The system provides different user interfaces at different stages of the procedure. A compact fiducial pattern close to the volume of interest is proposed for robot registration. The image processing and the transformation recovery methods using this fiducial in MRI are presented. The registration accuracy obtained by using this compact fiducial is comparable to the larger multi-spherical marker registration method. The registration accuracy using these two methods is less than 0.62+/-0.50 deg (mean +/- std. dev.) and 0.63+/-0.72 deg (mean +/- std. dev.), respectively. We evaluated each of the components and show that they can work together to form a complete system for transapical aortic valve replacement.

  4. Visual servoing of robot manipulators -- Part 1: Projective kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruf, A.; Horaud, R.

    1999-11-01

    Visual servoing of robot manipulators is a key technique where the appearance of an object in the image plane is used to control the velocity of the end-effector such that the desired position is reached in the scene. The vast majority of visual servoing methods proposed so far uses calibrated robots in conjunction with calibrated cameras. It has been shown that the behavior of visual control loops does not degrade too much in the presence of calibration errors. Nevertheless, camera and robot calibration are complex and time-consuming processes requiring special-purpose mechanical devices, such as theodolites and calibration jigs. In this paper, the authors, suggest formulating a visual servoing control loop in nonmetric space, which in this case amounts to the projective space in which a triangulation of the scene using an uncalibrated stereo rig is expressed. The major consequence of controlling the robot in nonmetric space rather than in Euclidean space is that both the robot's direct kinematic map and the robot's Jacobian matrix must be defined in this space as well. Finally, they provide a practical method to estimate the projective kinematic model and they describe some preliminary simulated experiments that use this nonmetric model to perform stereo-based servoing. Nevertheless, in-depth analysis of projective control will be the topic of a forthcoming paper.

  5. [History of robotics: from Archytas of Tarentum until da Vinci robot. (Part I)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Martín, F M; Millán Rodríguez, F; Salvador Bayarri, J; Palou Redorta, J; Rodríguez Escovar, F; Esquena Fernández, S; Villavicencio Mavrich, H

    2007-02-01

    Robotic surgery is the newst technologic option in urology. To understand how new robots work is interesting to know their history. The desire to design machines imitating humans continued for more than 4000 years. There are references to King-su Tse (clasic China) making up automaton at 500 a. C. Archytas of Tarentum (at around 400 a.C.) is considered the father of mechanical engineering, and one of the occidental robotics classic referents. Heron of Alexandria, Hsieh-Fec, Al-Jazari, Roger Bacon, Juanelo Turriano, Leonardo da Vinci, Vaucanson o von Kempelen were robot inventors in the middle age, renaissance and classicism. At the XIXth century, automaton production underwent a peak and all engineering branches suffered a great development. At 1942 Asimov published the three robotics laws, based on mechanics, electronics and informatics advances. At XXth century robots able to do very complex self governing works were developed, like da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), a very sophisticated robot to assist surgeons.

  6. Designing HRD Interventions for Employee-Robot Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify critical causes of work stress and job satisfaction of nurses, which can contribute to find appropriate organizational supports to help nurses effectively work with a surgical robot. Delphi method was employed to identify the critical stressors and the key causes of job satisfaction of nurses working with…

  7. Designing HRD Interventions for Employee-Robot Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify critical causes of work stress and job satisfaction of nurses, which can contribute to find appropriate organizational supports to help nurses effectively work with a surgical robot. Delphi method was employed to identify the critical stressors and the key causes of job satisfaction of nurses working with…

  8. Low-cost explosive ordnance disposal robot using off-the-shelf parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czop, Andrew; Hacker, Kurt; Murphy, James; Zimmerman, Todd

    2005-05-01

    The continuing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted in a rapidly growing demand for mobile robots to be used during Explosive Ordnance Disposal operations. These robots are predominately used by EOD technicians for surveillance and neutralization of explosive threats from a safe standoff distance. The hazardous nature of the mission these vehicles help perform requires them to be expendable. Current commercially available systems, however, although capable of performing the mission, are costly and are not currently available in the large quantities needed by EOD technicians. The Naval EOD Technology Division (NAVEODTECHDIV) proposes an alternative; a low cost, mobile robot using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) parts that is specifically tailored to perform hazardous EOD missions. The main functions of this robot are efficient surveillance and explosive threat neutralization. The use of COTS parts allows for streamlined field supportability and repair. A proposed speed of five miles per hour is a drastic improvement over many existing EOD robots and will allow EOD teams to quickly survey and assess potentially dangerous situations. The manipulator will be capable of precision placement of neutralization charges. The cost of this proposed robot is 10,000. Current commercial robots capable of performing these EOD tasks range in price from 40,000 to over $150,000. This conference paper will describe the robot design and prototyping process, from gathering requirements to fabrication and testing.

  9. Advancements in Magnetic Resonance–Guided Robotic Interventions in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Katarzyna J.; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides more detailed anatomical images of the prostate compared with the transrectal ultrasound imaging. Therefore, for the purpose of intervention in the prostate gland, diagnostic or therapeutic, MRI guidance offers a possibility of more precise targeting that may be crucial to the success of prostate interventions. However, access within the scanner is limited for manual instrument handling and the MR environment is most demanding among all imaging equipment with respect to the instrumentation used. A solution to this problem is the use of MR-compatible robots purposely designed to operate in the space and environmental restrictions inside the MR scanner allowing real-time interventions. Building an MRI-compatible robot is a very challenging engineering task because, in addition to the material restrictions that MRI instruments have, the robot requires actuators and sensors that limit the type of energies that can be used. Several important design problems have to be overcome before a successful MR-compatible robot application can be built. A number of MR-compatible robots, ranging from a simple manipulator to a fully automated system, have been developed, proposing ingenious solutions to the design challenge. Several systems have been already tested clinically for prostate biopsy and brachytherapy. As technology matures, precise image guidance for prostate interventions performed or assisted by specialized MR-compatible robotic devices may provide a uniquely accurate solution for guiding the intervention directly based on MR findings and feedback. Such an instrument would become a valuable clinical tool for biopsies directly targeting imaged tumor foci and delivering tumor-centered focal therapy. PMID:19512852

  10. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  11. The intervention of robot caregivers and the cultivation of children's capability to play.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Yvette; Borenstein, Jason

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the authors examine whether and how robot caregivers can contribute to the welfare of children with various cognitive and physical impairments by expanding recreational opportunities for these children. The capabilities approach is used as a basis for informing the relevant discussion. Though important in its own right, having the opportunity to play is essential to the development of other capabilities central to human flourishing. Drawing from empirical studies, the authors show that the use of various types of robots has already helped some children with impairments. Recognizing the potential ethical pitfalls of robot caregiver intervention, however, the authors examine these concerns and conclude that an appropriately designed robot caregiver has the potential to contribute positively to the development of the capability to play while also enhancing the ability of human caregivers to understand and interact with care recipients.

  12. Child disaster mental health interventions, part I

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sweeton, Jennifer L.; Newman, Elana; Varma, Vandana; Nitiéma, Pascal; Shaw, Jon A.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Noffsinger, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    This review of child disaster mental health intervention studies describes the techniques used in the interventions and the outcomes addressed, and it provides a preliminary evaluation of the field. The interventions reviewed here used a variety of strategies such as cognitive behavioral approaches, exposure and narrative techniques, relaxation, coping skill development, social support, psychoeducation, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and debriefing. A diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or posttraumatic stress reactions were the most commonly addressed outcomes although other reactions such as depression, anxiety, behavior problems, fear, and/or traumatic grief also were examined. Recommendations for future research are outlined. PMID:25914863

  13. Remote ultrasound palpation for robotic interventions using absolute elastography.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Caitlin; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-01-01

    Although robotic surgery has addressed many of the challenges presented by minimally invasive surgery, haptic feedback and the lack of knowledge of tissue stiffness is an unsolved problem. This paper presents a system for finding the absolute elastic properties of tissue using a freehand ultrasound scanning technique, which utilizes the da Vinci Surgical robot and a custom 2D ultrasound transducer for intraoperative use. An external exciter creates shear waves in the tissue, and a local frequency estimation method computes the shear modulus. Results are reported for both phantom and in vivo models. This system can be extended to any 6 degree-of-freedom tracking method and any 2D transducer to provide real-time absolute elastic properties of tissue.

  14. Robots and manipulator systems. Part 2. [Conference papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, E.

    1977-01-01

    This book represents a conference on robots and manipulator systems. Topics discussed include: mathematical modeling systems integrators, the use of TV monitors for remote operation of machinery on earth and in space, an evaluation of various control modes, remotely piloted aircraft, undersea operations, and prosthetic devices for the physically handicapped.

  15. Precision instrument placement using a 4-DOF robot with integrated fiducials for minimally invasive interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Roland; Lin, Ralph; Cheng, Peng; Kronreif, Gernot; Kornfeld, Martin; Lindisch, David; Wood, Bradford J.; Viswanathan, Anand; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasingly attractive to patients and medical personnel because they can reduce operative trauma, recovery times, and overall costs. However, during these procedures, the physician has a very limited view of the interventional field and the exact position of surgical instruments. We present an image-guided platform for precision placement of surgical instruments based upon a small four degree-of-freedom robot (B-RobII; ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, Vienna, Austria). This platform includes a custom instrument guide with an integrated spiral fiducial pattern as the robot's end-effector, and it uses intra-operative computed tomography (CT) to register the robot to the patient directly before the intervention. The physician can then use a graphical user interface (GUI) to select a path for percutaneous access, and the robot will automatically align the instrument guide along this path. Potential anatomical targets include the liver, kidney, prostate, and spine. This paper describes the robotic platform, workflow, software, and algorithms used by the system. To demonstrate the algorithmic accuracy and suitability of the custom instrument guide, we also present results from experiments as well as estimates of the maximum error between target and instrument tip.

  16. Control of a hybrid robotic system for computer-assisted interventions in dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Smoljkic, Gabrijel; Borghesan, Gianni; Devreker, Alain; Poorten, Emmanuel Vander; Rosa, Benoit; De Praetere, Herbert; De Schutter, Joris; Reynaerts, Dominiek; Sloten, Jos Vander

    2016-07-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is becoming the standard treatment of care for a variety of procedures. Surgeons need to display a high level of proficiency to overcome the challenges imposed by the minimal access. Especially when operating on a dynamic organ, it becomes very difficult to align instruments reliably and precisely. In this paper, a hybrid rigid/continuum robotic system and a dedicated robotic control approach are proposed to assist the surgeon performing complex surgical gestures in a dynamic environment. The proposed robotic system consists of a rigid robot arm on top of which a continuum robot is mounted in series. The continuum robot is locally actuated with McKibben muscles. A control scheme based on quadratic programming framework is adopted. It is shown that the framework allows enforcing a set of constraints on the pose of the tip, as well as of the instrument shaft, which is commanded to slide in and out through the entry point. Through simulation and experiments, it is shown how the robot tool tip is able to follow sinusoidal trajectories of 0.37 and 2 Hz, while maintaining the instrument shaft pivoting along the entry point. The positioning and tracking accuracy of such system are shown to lie below 4.7 mm in position and [Formula: see text] in angle. The results suggest a good potential for applying the proposed technology to assist the surgeon during complex robot-assisted interventions. It is also illustrated that even when using flexible hence relatively safe end-effectors, it is possible to reach acceptable tracking behaviour at relatively high frequencies.

  17. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot performs needle insertion under real-time 3T MR image guidance; workspace requirements, MR compatibility, and workflow have been evaluated on phantoms. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21686038

  18. Impact of robotics and a suspended lead suit on physician radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Madder, Ryan D; VanOosterhout, Stacie; Mulder, Abbey; Elmore, Matthew; Campbell, Jessica; Borgman, Andrew; Parker, Jessica; Wohns, David

    Reports of left-sided brain malignancies among interventional cardiologists have heightened concerns regarding physician radiation exposure. This study evaluated the impact of a suspended lead suit and robotic system on physician radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Real-time radiation exposure data were prospectively collected from dosimeters worn by operating physicians at the head- and chest-level during consecutive PCI cases. Exposures were compared in three study groups: 1) manual PCI performed with traditional lead apparel; 2) manual PCI performed using suspended lead; and 3) robotic PCI performed in combination with suspended lead. Among 336 cases (86.6% manual, 13.4% robotic) performed over 30weeks, use of suspended lead during manual PCI was associated with significantly less radiation exposure to the chest and head of operating physicians than traditional lead apparel (chest: 0.0 [0.1] μSv vs 0.4 [4.0] μSv, p<0.001; head: 0.5 [1.9] μSv vs 14.9 [51.5] μSv, p<0.001). Chest-level radiation exposure during robotic PCI performed in combination with suspended lead was 0.0 [0.0] μSv, which was significantly less chest exposure than manual PCI performed with traditional lead (p<0.001) or suspended lead (p=0.046). In robotic PCI the median head-level exposure was 0.1 [0.2] μSv, which was 99.3% less than manual PCI performed with traditional lead (p<0.001) and 80.0% less than manual PCI performed with suspended lead (p<0.001). Utilization of suspended lead and robotics were observed to result in significantly less radiation exposure to the chest and head of operating physicians during PCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Step Towards Developing Adaptive Robot-Mediated Intervention Architecture (ARIA) for Children With Autism

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Esubalew T; Lahiri, Uttama; Swanson, Amy R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Warren, Zachary E.; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technology, especially robotic technology, has been shown to be appealing to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Such interest may be leveraged to provide repeatable, accurate and individualized intervention services to young children with ASD based on quantitative metrics. However, existing robot-mediated systems tend to have limited adaptive capability that may impact individualization. Our current work seeks to bridge this gap by developing an adaptive and individualized robot-mediated technology for children with ASD. The system is composed of a humanoid robot with its vision augmented by a network of cameras for real-time head tracking using a distributed architecture. Based on the cues from the child’s head movement, the robot intelligently adapts itself in an individualized manner to generate prompts and reinforcements with potential to promote skills in the ASD core deficit area of early social orienting. The system was validated for feasibility, accuracy, and performance. Results from a pilot usability study involving six children with ASD and a control group of six typically developing (TD) children are presented. PMID:23221831

  20. A step towards developing adaptive robot-mediated intervention architecture (ARIA) for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Esubalew T; Lahiri, Uttama; Swanson, Amy R; Crittendon, Julie A; Warren, Zachary E; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-03-01

    Emerging technology, especially robotic technology, has been shown to be appealing to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Such interest may be leveraged to provide repeatable, accurate and individualized intervention services to young children with ASD based on quantitative metrics. However, existing robot-mediated systems tend to have limited adaptive capability that may impact individualization. Our current work seeks to bridge this gap by developing an adaptive and individualized robot-mediated technology for children with ASD. The system is composed of a humanoid robot with its vision augmented by a network of cameras for real-time head tracking using a distributed architecture. Based on the cues from the child's head movement, the robot intelligently adapts itself in an individualized manner to generate prompts and reinforcements with potential to promote skills in the ASD core deficit area of early social orienting. The system was validated for feasibility, accuracy, and performance. Results from a pilot usability study involving six children with ASD and a control group of six typically developing (TD) children are presented.

  1. Low-cost EOD robot using off-the-shelf parts: revisions and performance testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czop, Andrew; Hacker, Kurt; Murphy, James; Zimmerman, Todd

    2006-05-01

    With the large number of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) being encountered during recent military operations, there exists a need for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) mobile robots. These robots are predominately used for surveillance and neutralization of these explosive threats from a safe distance. The nature of the mission means that these vehicles are prone to being damaged or destroyed. Current commercially available systems, although capable of performing the mission, are costly and in too short of supply to be lost or damaged in large numbers. At last year's SPIE conference the NAVEODTECHDIV proposed an alternative: a low cost, mobile robot which used commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and was tailored to the types of missions that EOD soldiers commonly perform. The prototype of this low-cost robot, the RAMBOT (Readily Available Maintainable Robot), has been continuously improved over the past year. There have been significant improvements to the original design in the areas of communication, manipulation, and electronics. The result of this work is a final prototype design, which is currently undergoing extensive testing to characterize its capabilities. Some of these tests include vehicle characteristics such as vehicle speed and mobility, vehicle weight and size, as well as maximum effective communication range, susceptibility to temperature, manipulator load limitations, and battery longevity. This conference paper will present the design changes to the robot and fully report on the results from the test series conducted thus far.

  2. A new AS-display as part of the MIRO lightweight robot for surgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Christoph M.

    2010-02-01

    The DLR MIRO is the second generation of versatile robot arms for surgical applications, developed at the Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics at Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. With its low weight of 10 kg and dimensions similar to those of the human arm, the MIRO robot can assist the surgeon directly at the operating table where space is scarce. The planned scope of applications of this robot arm ranges from guiding a laser unit for the precise separation of bone tissue in orthopedics to positioning holes for bone screws, robot assisted endoscope guidance and on to the multi-robot concept for endoscopic minimally invasive surgery. A stereo-endoscope delivers two full HD video streams that can even be augmented with information, e.g vectors indicating the forces that act on the surgical tool at any given moment. SeeFront's new autostereoscopic 3D display SF 2223, being a part of the MIRO assembly, will let the surgeon view the stereo video stream in excellent quality, in real time and without the need for any viewing aids. The presentation is meant to provide an insight into the principles at the basis of the SeeFront 3D technology and how they allow the creation of autostereoscopic display solutions ranging from smallest "stamp-sized" displays to 30" desktop versions, which all provide comfortable freedom of movement for the viewer along with excellent 3D image quality.

  3. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  4. Social skills training for children with autism spectrum disorder using a robotic behavioral intervention system.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang-Seok; Choi, JongSuk; Park, Sung-Kee; Bong, Gui-Young; Yoo, HeeJeong

    2017-07-01

    We designed a robot system that assisted in behavioral intervention programs of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The eight-session intervention program was based on the discrete trial teaching protocol and focused on two basic social skills: eye contact and facial emotion recognition. The robotic interactions occurred in four modules: training element query, recognition of human activity, coping-mode selection, and follow-up action. Children with ASD who were between 4 and 7 years old and who had verbal IQ ≥ 60 were recruited and randomly assigned to the treatment group (TG, n = 8, 5.75 ± 0.89 years) or control group (CG, n = 7; 6.32 ± 1.23 years). The therapeutic robot facilitated the treatment intervention in the TG, and the human assistant facilitated the treatment intervention in the CG. The intervention procedures were identical in both groups. The primary outcome measures included parent-completed questionnaires, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), and frequency of eye contact, which was measured with the partial interval recording method. After completing treatment, the eye contact percentages were significantly increased in both groups. For facial emotion recognition, the percentages of correct answers were increased in similar patterns in both groups compared to baseline (P > 0.05), with no difference between the TG and CG (P > 0.05). The subjects' ability to play, general behavioral and emotional symptoms were significantly diminished after treatment (p < 0.05). These results showed that the robot-facilitated and human-facilitated behavioral interventions had similar positive effects on eye contact and facial emotion recognition, which suggested that robots are useful mediators of social skills training for children with ASD. Autism Res 2017,. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1306-1323. © 2017 International Society for Autism

  5. Influence of part orientation on the geometric accuracy in robot-based incremental sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Störkle, Denis Daniel; Seim, Patrick; Thyssen, Lars; Kuhlenkötter, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    This article describes new developments in an incremental, robot-based sheet metal forming process (`Roboforming') for the production of sheet metal components for small lot sizes and prototypes. The dieless kinematic-based generation of the shape is implemented by means of two industrial robots, which are interconnected to a cooperating robot system. Compared to other incremental sheet metal forming (ISF) machines, this system offers high geometrical form flexibility without the need of any part-dependent tools. The industrial application of ISF is still limited by certain constraints, e.g. the low geometrical accuracy. Responding to these constraints, the authors present the influence of the part orientation and the forming sequence on the geometric accuracy. Their influence is illustrated with the help of various experimental results shown and interpreted within this article.

  6. Feasibility and Safety of Robotic Peripheral Vascular Interventions: Results of the RAPID Trial.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Ehtisham; Schmid, Florian; Kalmar, Peter; Deutschmann, Hannes; Hafner, Franz; Rief, Peter; Brodmann, Marianne

    2016-10-10

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a robotic-assisted platform (CorPath 200, Corindus Vascular Robotics, Waltham, Massachusetts) for treating peripheral artery disease. A robotic-assisted platform for percutaneous coronary intervention is available for treating coronary artery disease. In this prospective single-arm trial, patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (Rutherford class 2 to 5) affecting the femoropoplital artery were enrolled. Endpoints evaluated were: 1) device technical success, defined as successful cannulation of the target vessel with the robotic system; 2) device safety, defined as absence of device related serious adverse event (hospitalization, prolonged hospitalization, life threatening, or resulted in death); and 3) clinical procedural success, defined as <50% residual stenosis without an unplanned switch to manual assistance or device-related serious adverse event in the periprocedural period. The study enrolled 20 subjects (65.5 ± 9.3 years of age; 70% male) with primarily Rutherford class 2 to 3 (90%) symptoms. A total of 29 lesions (lesion length: 33.1 ± 15.5 mm) were treated with the majority (89.7%) being located in the superficial femoral artery. Device technical success, safety and clinical procedural success were all 100% with provisional stenting required in 34.5% of lesions. Fluoroscopy time (7.1 ± 3.2 min) and contrast use (73.3 ± 9.2 ml) compared favorably with studies in similar patient cohorts. There were no adverse events associated with the use of the robotic system. These data demonstrate the feasibility and safety of using a robotic-assisted platform for performing peripheral arterial revascularization. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ergonomic deficits in robotic gynecologic oncology surgery: a need for intervention.

    PubMed

    Craven, Renatta; Franasiak, Jason; Mosaly, Prithima; Gehrig, Paola A

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate surgeon strain using validated ergonomic assessment tools. Observational study (Canadian Task Force classification III). Academic medical center. Robotic surgeons performing gynecologic oncology surgical procedures. Videotape footage of surgeons performing robotic gynecologic oncology procedures was obtained. A human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics analyzed the video recordings and performed ergonomic evaluations of the surgeons. An initial evaluation was conducted using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) survey, an ergonomic assessment and prioritization method for determining posture, force, and frequency concerns with focus on the upper limbs. A more detailed analysis followed using the Strain Index (SI) method, which uses multiplicative interactions to identify jobs that are potentially hazardous. Seventeen hours of video recordings were analyzed, and descriptive data based on RULA/SI analysis were collected. Ergonomic evaluation of surgeon activity resulted in a mean RULA score of 6.46 (maximum possible RULA score, 7), indicating a need for further investigation. The mean SI grand score was 24.34. SI scores >10 suggest a potential for hazard to the operator. Thus, the current use of the surgical robot is potentially dangerous with regards to ergonomic positioning and should be modified. At a high-volume robotics center, there are ergonomics deficits that are hazardous to gynecologic surgeons and suggest the need for modification and intervention. A training strategy must be developed to address these ergonomic issues and knowledge deficiencies. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous robotic-assisted mitral valve repair and percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Adams, Corey; McClure, R Scott; Goela, Aashish; Bainbridge, Daniel; Kostuk, William J; Kiaii, Bob

    2010-09-01

    We present a case report of a robotic-assisted mitral valve repair with simultaneous percutaneous coronary intervention. A 58-year-old man presented with New York Heart Association class III symptoms from severe mitral regurgitation and significant stenosis of the right coronary artery. In a hybrid operating theater, the patient underwent placement of a bare metal stent in the right coronary artery followed immediately by robotic-assisted mitral valve repair. Both procedures were successful and occurred in a timely fashion. The patient experienced no immediate postoperative complications and was discharged home on postoperative day 5. At 2-week follow-up, he had returned to his normal activities of daily living and at 1 year remained asymptomatic. This case report demonstrates the benefits of minimally invasive robotic mitral valve repair in allowing for successful repair, early postoperative return to activity, minimal incision pain, and high patient satisfaction. It further highlights the potential benefit of a hybrid operating theater in allowing surgical and percutaneous coronary intervention procedures to be delivered in a safe and efficient manner.

  9. 3D image-guided robotic needle positioning system for small animal interventions.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeffrey S; Waring, Christopher S R; Sherebrin, Shi; Stapleton, Shawn; Hudson, Thomas J; Jaffray, David A; Lacefield, James C; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a micro-CT guided small animal robotic needle positioning system. In order to simplify the robotic design and maintain a small targeting error, a novel implementation of the remote center of motion is used in the system. The system has been developed with the objective of achieving a mean targeting error of <200 μm while maintaining a high degree of user friendliness. The robot is compact enough to operate within a 25 cm diameter micro-CT bore. Small animals can be imaged and an intervention performed without the need to transport the animal from one workspace to another. Not requiring transport of the animal reduces opportunities for targets to shift from their localized position in the image and simplifies the workflow of interventions. An improved method of needle calibration is presented that better characterizes the calibration using the position of the needle tip in photographs rather than the needle axis. A calibration fixture was also introduced, which dramatically reduces the time requirements of calibration while maintaining calibration accuracy. Two registration modes have been developed to correspond the robot coordinate system with the coordinate system of the micro-CT scanner. The two registration modes offer a balance between the time required to complete a registration and the overall registration accuracy. The development of slow high accuracy and fast low accuracy registration modes provides users with a degree of flexibility in selecting a registration mode best suited for their application. The target registration error (TRE) of the higher accuracy primary registration was TRE(primary) = 31 ± 12 μm. The error in the lower accuracy combined registration was TRE(combined) = 139 ± 63 μm. Both registration modes are therefore suitable for small-animal needle interventions. The targeting accuracy of the robotic system was characterized using targeting experiments in tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms. The results

  10. NOTE: MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Moman, Maaike R.; van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J.; Duiveman, Ed; van Schelven, Leonard J.; de Leeuw, Hendrik; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Moerland, Marinus A.

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible.

  11. Case studies of ergonomic interventions in automotive parts distribution operations.

    PubMed

    Ulin, Sheryl S; Keyserling, W Monroe

    2004-12-01

    Ergonomic job analysis, intervention design, and intervention implementation are essential components of an ergonomics program designed to reduce worker exposure to risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders. As part of a 4-year study to reduce overexertion injuries in the service parts division of a major automaker, intervention case studies were identified that could be used at multiple facilities across the division. Interventions were developed and implemented. The three case studies include 1) self-elevating powered vehicle for transporting parts throughout the facility and for reaching to high bin locations; 2) lift and tilt pallet jacks for packing small parts into large bin-like containers; and 3) single-level telescoping conveyor used for delivering hand-held totes for subsequent sorting operations. Several analysis methods were used to assess worker exposure before and after intervention implementation (biomechanical analysis, posture analysis, worker interviews, and activity analysis). Following implementation, a decrease in exposure to risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders was documented. Worker interviews revealed acceptance and agreement that risk factors associated with the targeted tasks were reduced. Each case study includes a description of the implementation hurdles and can serve as both primary and secondary prevention of musculoskeletal disorders. Future work should document worker health and/or symptom changes as well as changes in risk factor exposure.

  12. Experiments in Aligning Threaded Parts Using a Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Walker, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    Techniques for determining and correcting threaded part alignment using force and angular position data are developed to augment currently limited techniques for align- ing threaded parts. These new techniques are based on backspinning a nut with respect to a bolt and measuring the force change that occurs when the bolt "falls" into the nut. Kinematic models that describe the relationship between threaded parts during backspinning are introduced and are used to show how angular alignment may be determined. The models indicate how to distinguish between the aligned and misaligned cases of a bolt and a nut connection by using axial force data only. In addition, by tracking the in-plane relative attitude of the bolt during spinning, data can be obtained on the direction of the angular misalignment which, in turn, is used to correct the misalignment. Results from experiments using a bolt held in a specialized fixture and a three fingers Stanford/JPL hand are presented.

  13. Robotic Acquisition Of Jumbled Parts From Bins By Visual And Tactile Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Rajarshi; Wilder, Joseph

    1984-02-01

    The i-bot system is a flexible, adaptive and programmable sensory device for industrial robots. The system consists of independent modules for vision and gripper control, that guide the robot to perform acquisition of jumbled or isolated parts from a bin. The acquired parts are transported to a fixture and properly aligned by the robot-arm. The parts in the bin are identical except for minor dimensional and textural variations. These parts may be colored, contain graphics, possess multiple diameters or other cross sections, mixed material content and reflectivities. The system operates by taking a high resolution grey scale image of the bin of parts using an overhead camera under ambient illumination. The image is preprocessed by video range expansion, windowing, histogram based enhancement techniques and is segmented into multiple clusters by analyzing spatial characteristics. Algorithms are developed for fast and iterative data compression and for estimation of location and orientation of a cluster irrespective of its shape. The photobeam, collision, and pressure sensors on the parallel jaw gripper aremonitored during the acquisition process. Experiments have been performed with fuel filters, curved plier blanks, multicolored markers, "L" shaped fuel links, ball bearings and a mixture of semi-rusted threaded and unthreaded bolts of various lengths. In one image processing cycle of 2 seconds, i-bot can compute locations and orientations of a maximum of 3 work-pieces at a successful acquisition rate of approximately 95%.

  14. An Online Change of Activity in Energy Spectrum for Detection on an Early Intervention Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Boudergui, K.; Laine, F.; Montagu, T.; Blanc, P.; Deltour, A.; Mozziconacci, S.

    2015-07-01

    With the growth of industrial risks and the multiplication of CBRNe (Chemical Biological Radiological and explosive) attacks through toxic chemicals, biological or radiological threats, public services and military authorities face with increasingly critical situations, whose management is strongly conditioned by fast and reliable establishment of an informative diagnostic. Right after an attack, the five first minutes are crucial to define the various scenarios and the most dangerous for a human intervention. Therefore the use of robots is considered essential by all stakeholders of security. In this context, the SISPEO project (Systeme d'Intervention Sapeurs Pompiers Robotise) aims to create/build/design a robust response through a robotic platform for early intervention services such as civil and military security in hostile environments. CEA LIST has proposed an adapted solution to detect and characterize nuclear and radiological risks online and in motion, using a miniature embedded CdZnTe (CZT) crystal Gamma-ray spectrometer. This paper presents experimental results for this miniature embedded CZT spectrometer and its associated mathematical method to detect and characterize radiological threats online and in motion. (authors)

  15. Intelligent robots. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Robot Vision and Sensory Controls RoViSeC3, Cambridge, MA, November 7-10, 1983. Parts 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.; Hall, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pattern recognition for intelligent robots are discussed, taking into account linear algebra based object recognition algorithms for computer vision, planar object recognition by the computer vision method, real time textured-image segmentation based on noncausal Markovian random field models, model driven vision to control a surface finishing robot, robotic acquisition of jumbled parts from bins by visual and tactile guidance, and imaging using eddy current sensors. Other subjects explored are related to curved object recognition for robot vision, robot image understanding, robot applications, three-dimensional measurements for robot vision, robot vision, tactile and multirobot sensors, and precision robot vision measurements. Attention is given to mode locked lasers in modulation rangefinders, advanced architectures for factory vision, hierarchical contour coding and generalization of shape, problems in three-dimensional imaging, a vision system to identify car body types for a spray painting robot, and an adaptive gas metal arc welder.

  16. Intelligent robots; Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Robot Vision and Sensory Controls RoViSeC3, Cambridge, MA, November 7-10, 1983. Parts 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, D. P.; Hall, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pattern recognition for intelligent robots are discussed, taking into account linear algebra based object recognition algorithms for computer vision, planar object recognition by the computer vision method, real time textured-image segmentation based on noncausal Markovian random field models, model driven vision to control a surface finishing robot, robotic acquisition of jumbled parts from bins by visual and tactile guidance, and imaging using eddy current sensors. Other subjects explored are related to curved object recognition for robot vision, robot image understanding, robot applications, three-dimensional measurements for robot vision, robot vision, tactile and multirobot sensors, and precision robot vision measurements. Attention is given to mode locked lasers in modulation rangefinders, advanced architectures for factory vision, hierarchical contour coding and generalization of shape, problems in three-dimensional imaging, a vision system to identify car body types for a spray painting robot, and an adaptive gas metal arc welder.

  17. Nanotechnology and its relationship to interventional radiology. Part I: imaging.

    PubMed

    Power, Sarah; Slattery, Michael M; Lee, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. Interventional radiology stands to benefit greatly from advances in nanotechnology because much of the ongoing research is focused toward novel methods of imaging and delivery of therapy through minimally invasive means. Through the development of new techniques and therapies, nanotechnology has the potential to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and ensure its continued success. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part I of the article deals with an introduction to some of the basic concepts of nanotechnology and outlines some of the potential imaging applications, concentrating mainly on advances in oncological and vascular imaging.

  18. Participation Patterns among Families Receiving Part C Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khetani, Mary Alunkal

    2010-01-01

    Participation in the natural settings of home and community is one of four major goals for families receiving Part C early intervention services. While participation has been formally recognized as an important service-related outcome, there is a need to build knowledge about its key features to adequately apply the concept in practice. The need…

  19. Participation Patterns among Families Receiving Part C Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khetani, Mary Alunkal

    2010-01-01

    Participation in the natural settings of home and community is one of four major goals for families receiving Part C early intervention services. While participation has been formally recognized as an important service-related outcome, there is a need to build knowledge about its key features to adequately apply the concept in practice. The need…

  20. Intraocular robotic interventional surgical system (IRISS): Mechanical design, evaluation, and master-slave manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jason T; Gerber, Matthew J; Prince, Stephen W; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Schwartz, Steven D; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Tsao, Tsu-Chin

    2017-07-31

    Since the advent of robotic-assisted surgery, the value of using robotic systems to assist in surgical procedures has been repeatedly demonstrated. However, existing technologies are unable to perform complete, multi-step procedures from start to finish. Many intraocular surgical steps continue to be manually performed. An intraocular robotic interventional surgical system (IRISS) capable of performing various intraocular surgical procedures was designed, fabricated, and evaluated. Methods were developed to evaluate the performance of the remote centers of motion (RCMs) using a stereo-camera setup and to assess the accuracy and precision of positioning the tool tip using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The IRISS can simultaneously manipulate multiple surgical instruments, change between mounted tools using an onboard tool-change mechanism, and visualize the otherwise invisible RCMs to facilitate alignment of the RCM to the surgical incision. The accuracy of positioning the tool tip was measured to be 0.205±0.003 mm. The IRISS was evaluated by trained surgeons in a remote surgical theatre using post-mortem pig eyes and shown to be effective in completing many key steps in a variety of intraocular surgical procedures as well as being capable of performing an entire cataract extraction from start to finish. The IRISS represents a necessary step towards fully automated intraocular surgery and demonstrated accurate and precise master-slave manipulation for cataract removal and-through visual feedback-retinal vein cannulation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Part 2: Clinical assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nicholas C; Röijezon, Ulrik; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Proprioception can be impaired in gradual-onset musculoskeletal pain disorders and following trauma. Understanding of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor dysfunction and methods for assessment and interventions is of vital importance in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. In Part 1 of this two-part Masterclass we presented a theory-based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal conditions, and general principles of assessment and interventions. The aim of this second part is to present specific methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and extremities. Clinical assessment of proprioception can be performed using goniometers, inclinometers, laser-pointers, and pressure sensors. Manual therapy, taping, and bracing can immediately enhance proprioception and should be used to prepare for exercise interventions. Various types of exercise (active joint repositioning, force sense, co-ordination, muscle performance, balance/unstable surface, plyometric, and vibration training) should be employed for long-term enhancement of proprioception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo bioprinting for computer- and robotic-assisted medical intervention: preliminary study in mice.

    PubMed

    Keriquel, Virginie; Guillemot, Fabien; Arnault, Isabelle; Guillotin, Bertrand; Miraux, Sylvain; Amédée, Joëlle; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Catros, Sylvain

    2010-03-01

    We present the first attempt to apply bioprinting technologies in the perspective of computer-assisted medical interventions. A workstation dedicated to high-throughput biological laser printing has been designed. Nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was printed in the mouse calvaria defect model in vivo. Critical size bone defects were performed in OF-1 male mice calvaria with a 4 mm diameter trephine. Prior to laser printing experiments, the absence of inflammation due to laser irradiation onto mice dura mater was shown by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Procedures for in vivo bioprinting and results obtained using decalcified sections and x-ray microtomography are discussed. Although heterogeneous, these preliminary results demonstrate that in vivo bioprinting is possible. Bioprinting may prove to be helpful in the future for medical robotics and computer-assisted medical interventions.

  3. Robotic resection of an ectopic goiter in the mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Johannes; Fish, John; Lottersberger, Andreas C; Wetscher, Gerold; Schmid, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    We report the first robotic resection of an ectopic mediastinal thyroid adenoma in a 72-year-old woman. This intervention was part of staged management for excessive bilateral cervical goiter with intrathoracic dispersion. The robotic resection was found to be feasible and safe. The robotic operating system offers better visual control and operative accuracy than does conventional thoracoscopy.

  4. Extending the Capability of Using a Waterjet in Surgical Interventions by the Use of Robotics.

    PubMed

    Bahls, Thomas; Frohlich, Florian A; Hellings, Anja; Deutschmann, Bastian; Albu-Schaffer, Alin O

    2017-02-01

    In waterjet surgery, a thin high-pressure jet is used for dissections and surface abrasion of soft tissue. This selective preparation method preserves nerves and vessels, whereas the surrounding soft tissue is washed away. The aim of this study is to enhance the application field of this technique by resolving technological limitations. A technical task definition of handling a hand-guided waterjet applicator is derived from the literature. All reported procedures require to follow a trajectory superimposed with an oscillating movement. By introducing a robotic system and a specialized kinematic approach, the limited dexterity of the waterjet applicator is increased. Additionally, the system provides assistance by automatically performing parts of the task. The method is applied to two different procedures: a minimally invasive dissection and a surface abrasion for open medical treatments. On the basis of experiments with gelatine phantoms, the performance of the method is shown for both procedures. In the minimally invasive use case, the reachability limited by the conventional manual tools is extended by the capabilities of the robotic system. Simultaneously, the handling is simplified by automation of the superimposed oscillation. In the surface abrasion case, a dense coverage of the treated area is achievable. The risk of cross infections could be reduced by spatial separation of patient and staff. Thus, the waterjet technology can be fully integrated into robotic surgery systems and benefit from their inherent abilities.

  5. Magnetic resonance-compatible robotic and mechatronics systems for image-guided interventions and rehabilitation: a review study.

    PubMed

    Tsekos, Nikolaos V; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Christoforou, Eftychios; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    The continuous technological progress of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as its widespread clinical use as a highly sensitive tool in diagnostics and advanced brain research, has brought a high demand for the development of magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible robotic/mechatronic systems. Revolutionary robots guided by real-time three-dimensional (3-D)-MRI allow reliable and precise minimally invasive interventions with relatively short recovery times. Dedicated robotic interfaces used in conjunction with fMRI allow neuroscientists to investigate the brain mechanisms of manipulation and motor learning, as well as to improve rehabilitation therapies. This paper gives an overview of the motivation, advantages, technical challenges, and existing prototypes for MR-compatible robotic/mechatronic devices.

  6. Quality of life after percutaneous coronary intervention: part 1.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Stephen; R Baldacchino, Donia

    Quality of life (QOL) is a complex concept comprised of biopsychosocial, spiritual and environmental dimensions. However, the majority of research addresses only its physical function perspectives. This two-part series examines the holistic perspective of QOL of patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Part 1 explains the research process of a cross-sectional descriptive study and its limitations. Data were collected by a mailed WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire in Maltese from a systematic sample of patients who had undergone PCI; the response rate was 64% (n=228; males n=169, females n=59, age 40-89 years). Part 1 also considers limitations, such as its cross-sectional design and retrospective data collection. The hierarchy of human needs theory (Maslow, 1999) guided the study. Part 2 gives the findings on the holistic view of QOL. Having social and family support, as a characteristic of Maltese culture appeared to contribute towards a better QOL.

  7. A novel miniature robotic guidance device for stereotactic neurosurgical interventions: preliminary experience with the iSYS1 robot.

    PubMed

    Minchev, Georgi; Kronreif, Gernot; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Dorfer, Christian; Micko, Alexander; Mert, Aygül; Kiesel, Barbara; Widhalm, Georg; Knosp, Engelbert; Wolfsberger, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Robotic devices have recently been introduced in stereotactic neurosurgery in order to overcome the limitations of frame-based and frameless techniques in terms of accuracy and safety. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of the novel, miniature, iSYS1 robotic guidance device in stereotactic neurosurgery. METHODS A preclinical phantom trial was conducted to compare the accuracy and duration of needle positioning between the robotic and manual technique in 162 cadaver biopsies. Second, 25 consecutive cases of tumor biopsies and intracranial catheter placements were performed with robotic guidance to evaluate the feasibility, accuracy, and duration of system setup and application in a clinical setting. RESULTS The preclinical phantom trial revealed a mean target error of 0.6 mm (range 0.1-0.9 mm) for robotic guidance versus 1.2 mm (range 0.1-2.6 mm) for manual positioning of the biopsy needle (p < 0.001). The mean duration was 2.6 minutes (range 1.3-5.5 minutes) with robotic guidance versus 3.7 minutes (range 2.0-10.5 minutes) with manual positioning (p < 0.001). Clinical application of the iSYS1 robotic guidance device was feasible in all but 1 case. The median real target error was 1.3 mm (range 0.2-2.6 mm) at entry and 0.9 mm (range 0.0-3.1 mm) at the target point. The median setup and instrument positioning times were 11.8 minutes (range 4.2-26.7 minutes) and 4.9 minutes (range 3.1-14.0 minutes), respectively. CONCLUSIONS According to the preclinical data, application of the iSYS1 robot can significantly improve accuracy and reduce instrument positioning time. During clinical application, the robot proved its high accuracy, short setup time, and short instrument positioning time, as well as demonstrating a short learning curve.

  8. Modelling of a biologically inspired robotic fish driven by compliant parts.

    PubMed

    El Daou, Hadi; Salumäe, Taavi; Chambers, Lily D; Megill, William M; Kruusmaa, Maarja

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by biological swimmers such as fish, a robot composed of a rigid head, a compliant body and a rigid caudal fin was built. It has the geometrical properties of a subcarangiform swimmer of the same size. The head houses a servo-motor which actuates the compliant body and the caudal fin. It achieves this by applying a concentrated moment on a point near the compliant body base. In this paper, the dynamics of the compliant body driving the robotic fish is modelled and experimentally validated. Lighthill's elongated body theory is used to define the hydrodynamic forces on the compliant part and Rayleigh proportional damping is used to model damping. Based on the assumed modes method, an energetic approach is used to write the equations of motion of the compliant body and to compute the relationship between the applied moment and the resulting lateral deflections. Experiments on the compliant body were carried out to validate the model predictions. The results showed that a good match was achieved between the measured and predicted deformations. A discussion of the swimming motions between the real fish and the robot is presented.

  9. Visual And Tactile Sensing System For Robotic Acquisition Of Jumbled Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Rajarshi; Wilder, Joseph

    1984-10-01

    A flexible, adaptive, and programmable sensory control system for robotic acquisition of jumbled parts is described. The system consists of inde-pendent modules for vision and gripper control that guide a robot to acquire unoriented parts from a bin. The acquired parts are transported to a fixture and placed according to a desired alignment. The parts in the bin have either elongated or spherical symmetry, and all these parts are identical except for minor dimensional and textural variations. These objects may be colored or contain graphics, possess variable cross sections across their length, and have mixed material content and reflectivities. The system operates by taking a high resolution gray-scale image of the bin of parts using an overhead camera under ambient illumination. The overlapping parts in the image are separated by selectively removing the high spatial frequencies at the touching or occluding edges. These portions of the image are removed by dynamic range expansion, histogram-based adaptive image enhancement, and nonlinear homomorphic filtering. Algorithms are developed for fast and iterative data compression and segmentation and for estimation of the location and orientation of a cluster, irrespective of its shape. The photobeam, collision, and pressure sensors on the parallel jaw gripper are monitored during the process of parts acquisition and transport of experimental workpieces such as fuel filters, curved plier blanks, multicolored felt pens, L-shaped fuel links, ball bearings, and a mixture of shiny, semirusted, threaded, and unthreaded bolts of various lengths. In one image-processing cycle of 2 s or less, this system can compute locations and orientations of three objects at a successful acquisition rate of approximately 95%.

  10. MRI-guided robotics at the U of Houston: evolving methodologies for interventions and surgeries.

    PubMed

    Tsekos, Nikolaos V

    2009-01-01

    Currently, we witness the rapid evolution of minimally invasive surgeries (MIS) and image guided interventions (IGI) for offering improved patient management and cost effectiveness. It is well recognized that sustaining and expand this paradigm shift would require new computational methodology that integrates sensing with multimodal imaging, actively controlled robotic manipulators, the patient and the operator. Such approach would include (1) assessing in real-time tissue deformation secondary to the procedure and physiologic motion, (2) monitoring the tool(s) in 3D, and (3) on-the-fly update information about the pathophysiology of the targeted tissue. With those capabilities, real time image guidance may facilitate a paradigm shift and methodological leap from "keyhole" visualization (i.e. endoscopy or laparoscopy) to one that uses a volumetric and informational rich perception of the Area of Operation (AoO). This capability may eventually enable a wider range and level of complexity IGI and MIS.

  11. The effects of embodied rhythm and robotic interventions on the spontaneous and responsive social attention patterns of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sudha M.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Neelly, Linda; Bhat, Anjana N.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effects of 8-weeks of rhythm and robotic interventions with those of a comparison, standard-of-care intervention, on the spontaneous and responsive social attention patterns of school-age children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Attention patterns were examined within a standardized pretest/posttest measure of joint attention (JA) and a training-specific social attention measure during early, mid, and late training sessions. The rhythm and comparison groups demonstrated improvements in JA. Social attention was greater in the rhythm followed by the robot and lastly the comparison group. The robot and comparison groups spent maximum time fixating on the robot and objects, respectively. Across sessions, the robot group decreased attention to the robot and increased attention to elsewhere. Overall, rhythmic movement contexts afford sustained social monitoring in children with autism. PMID:27453721

  12. The effects of embodied rhythm and robotic interventions on the spontaneous and responsive social attention patterns of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sudha M; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Neelly, Linda; Bhat, Anjana N

    2016-07-01

    We compared the effects of 8-weeks of rhythm and robotic interventions with those of a comparison, standard-of-care intervention, on the spontaneous and responsive social attention patterns of school-age children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Attention patterns were examined within a standardized pretest/posttest measure of joint attention (JA) and a training-specific social attention measure during early, mid, and late training sessions. The rhythm and comparison groups demonstrated improvements in JA. Social attention was greater in the rhythm followed by the robot and lastly the comparison group. The robot and comparison groups spent maximum time fixating on the robot and objects, respectively. Across sessions, the robot group decreased attention to the robot and increased attention to elsewhere. Overall, rhythmic movement contexts afford sustained social monitoring in children with autism.

  13. Interactive autonomy and robotic skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellner, A.; Maediger, B.

    1994-01-01

    Current concepts of robot-supported operations for space laboratories (payload servicing, inspection, repair, and ORU exchange) are mainly based on the concept of 'interactive autonomy' which implies autonomous behavior of the robot according to predefined timelines, predefined sequences of elementary robot operations and within predefined world models supplying geometrical and other information for parameter instantiation on the one hand, and the ability to override and change the predefined course of activities by human intervention on the other hand. Although in principle a very powerful and useful concept, in practice the confinement of the robot to the abstract world models and predefined activities appears to reduce the robot's stability within real world uncertainties and its applicability to non-predefined parts of the world, calling for frequent corrective interaction by the operator, which in itself may be tedious and time-consuming. Methods are presented to improve this situation by incorporating 'robotic skills' into the concept of interactive autonomy.

  14. Design of an MRI-compatible robotic stereotactic device for minimally invasive interventions in the breast.

    PubMed

    Larson, Blake T; Erdman, Arthur G; Tsekos, Nikolaos V; Yacoub, Essa; Tsekos, Panagiotis V; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a robotic device to perform biopsy and therapeutic interventions in the breast with real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The device was designed to allow for (i) stabilization of the breast by compression, (ii) definition of the interventional probe trajectory by setting the height and pitch of a probe insertion apparatus, and (iii) positioning of an interventional probe by setting the depth of insertion. The apparatus is fitted with five computer-controlled degrees of freedom for delivering an interventional procedure. The entire device is constructed of MR compatible materials, i.e. nonmagnetic and non-conductive, to eliminate artifacts and distortion of the MR images. The apparatus is remotely controlled by means of ultrasonic motors and a graphical user interface, providing real-time MR-guided planning and monitoring of the operation. Joint motion measurements found probe placement in less than 50 s and sub-millimeter repeatability of the probe tip for same-direction point-to-point movements. However, backlash in the rotation joint may incur probe tip positional errors of up to 5 mm at a distance of 40 mm from the rotation axis, which may occur for women with large breasts. The imprecision caused by this backlash becomes negligible as the probe tip nears the rotation axis. Real-time MR-guidance will allow the physician to correct this error Compatibility of the device within the MR environment was successfully tested on a 4 Tesla MR human scanner

  15. Biopsy Needle Artifact Localization in MRI-guided Robotic Transrectal Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Iordachita, Iulian; Guion, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Kaushal, Aradhana; Camphausen, Kevin; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2013-01-01

    Recently a number of robotic intervention systems for magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided needle placement in the prostate have been reported. In MRI-guided needle interventions, after a needle is inserted, the needle position is often confirmed with a volumetric MRI scan. Commonly used titanium needles are not directly visible in an MR image, but they generate a susceptibility artifact in the immediate neighborhood of the needle. This paper reports the results of a quantitative study of the relationship between the true position of titanium biopsy needle and the corresponding needle artifact position in MR images, thereby providing a better understanding of the influence of needle artifact on targeting errors. The titanium needle tip artifact extended 9 mm beyond the actual needle tip location with tendency to bend towards the scanner’s B0 magnetic field direction, and axially displaced 0.38 mm and 0.32 mm (mean) in scanner’s frequency and phase encoding direction, respectively. PMID:22481805

  16. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  18. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  19. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's upper atmosphere is an extreme environment: dry, cold, and irradiated. It is unknown whether our aerobiosphere is limited to the transport of life, or there exist organisms that grow and reproduce while airborne (aerophiles); the microenvironments of suspended particles may harbor life at otherwise uninhabited altitudes[2]. The existence of aerophiles would significantly expand the range of planets considered candidates for life by, for example, including the cooler clouds of a hot Venus-like planet. The X project is an effort to engineer a robotic exploration and biosampling payload for a comprehensive survey of Earth's aerobiology. While many one-shot samples have been retrieved from above 15 km, their results are primarily qualitative; variations in method confound comparisons, leaving such major gaps in our knowledge of aerobiology as quantification of populations at different strata and relative species counts[1]. These challenges and X's preliminary solutions are explicated below. X's primary balloon payload is undergoing a series of calibrations before beginning flights in Spring 2012. A suborbital launch is currently planned for Summer 2012. A series of ground samples taken in Winter 2011 is being used to establish baseline counts and identify likely background contaminants.

  20. Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: how I do it. Part I: Patient preparation and positioning.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso, Roger F; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Zorn, Kevin C

    2013-10-01

    Radical prostatectomy remains the standard treatment for long term cure of clinically localized prostate cancer, offering excellent oncologic outcomes, with cancer-specific survival approaching 95% at 15 years after surgery. The introduction of the "da Vinci Robotic Surgical System" (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been another important step toward a minimally invasive approach to radical prostatectomy. Technologic peculiarities, such as three-dimensional vision, wristed instrumentation with seven degrees of freedom of motion, lack of tremor, a 10x-magnification and a comfortable seated position for the surgeon has added value to the surgeon and patient. In this first part of a two article series, we describe preoperative patient preparation and positioning protocols for robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) that are currently used in our institution (University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHUM)-Hopital St-Luc). We use the four-arm da Vinci Si Surgical System. Our experience with RARP is now over 250 cases with the senior surgeon having performed over 1200 RARPs and we have continually refined our technique to improve patient outcomes.

  1. Lapabot: a compact telesurgical robot system for minimally invasive surgery: part II. Telesurgery evaluation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Duck Hee; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Byeong Han; Jo, Yung Ho

    2012-05-01

    As described in Part I, the Lapabot was developed considering telesurgery from the initial design stage. The robot configuration is based on the master-slave structure in which the operator can be separated spatially from the patient. The distributed control architecture communicating through high-speed network enables remote control of surgical robot manipulators. In this work, we added network communication modules using user datagram protocol/internet protocol for implementation of the telesurgical system. For a stable network environment, a dedicated research network was adopted. To characterize the network environment, a data packet sender and a repeater whose packet length and packet structure are similar to those of the real data packet were developed. The developed system was evaluated through in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. With the developed system, we have successfully performed remote control of the Lapabot. The roundtrip time delay for the control signal ranged from 1.4 to 4.1 ms. The total time delay for the operator including image signal acquisition and transmission delays was under 333 ms. It did not impede surgical procedures. Initial evaluation results demonstrate the feasibility of the developed telesurgical system.

  2. Basic Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  3. Basic Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  4. Task-level robot programming: Integral part of evolution from teleoperation to autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, James C.

    1987-01-01

    An explanation is presented of task-level robot programming and of how it differs from the usual interpretation of task planning for robotics. Most importantly, it is argued that the physical and mathematical basis of task-level robot programming provides inherently greater reliability than efforts to apply better known concepts from artificial intelligence (AI) to autonomous robotics. Finally, an architecture is presented that allows the integration of task-level robot programming within an evolutionary, redundant, and multi-modal framework that spans teleoperation to autonomy.

  5. Design and control of a Novel 3-DOF flexible robot. Part 1: Design and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Arocena, J.I.; Daniel, R.W.

    1998-11-01

    This paper aims to rectify a perceived imbalance between theory and experiment in the research literature on the control of flexible manipulators. Additionally, this paper reflects the common-sense notion that judicious arm design can simplify a control task, making it more tractable, thereby leading to greater physical insight into the theoretical control problem. The theme, based on previous experience with flexible manipulators, is a novel 3-DOF flexible manipulator, the Rotabot, designed and constructed at the Oxford University Robotics Laboratory. The arm is an experimental concept design for a full-sized industrial flexible arm, where the tractability of the final control problem has been a major design driver. As Part 1 of a two-part series, this paper describes the different design features of the Rotabot. Part 2 explains the controller design. The kinematic and dynamic properties of the arm are evaluated, and the key design properties are demonstrated by simulation. A full model that includes transmission compliance is presented, which forms the basis of the controller in Part 2. Experimental results derived from extensive identification exercises are used to confirm the arm properties predicted by simulation.

  6. Preclinical evaluation of an MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for angulated needle placement in transperineal prostate interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Song, Sang-Eun; Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Seifabadi, Reza; Cho, Bong Joon; Tuncali, Kemal; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the targeting accuracy of a small profile MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for needle placement that can angulate a needle insertion path into a large accessible target volume. Methods We extended our MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for needle placement to utilize its four degrees-of-freedom (4-DOF) mechanism with two parallel triangular structures and support transperineal prostate biopsies in a closed-bore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The robot is designed to guide a needle towards a lesion so that a radiologist can manually insert it in the bore. The robot is integrated with navigation software that allows an operator to plan angulated needle insertion by selecting a target and an entry point. The targeting error was evaluated while the angle between the needle insertion path and the static magnetic field was between −5.7° and 5.7° horizontally and between −5.7° and 4.3° vertically in the MRI scanner after sterilizing and draping the device. Results The robot positioned the needle for angulated insertion as specified on the navigation software with overall targeting error of 0.8 ± 0.5 mm along the horizontal axis and 0.8 ± 0.8 mm along the vertical axis. The two-dimensional root-mean-square targeting error on the axial slices as containing the targets was 1.4 mm. Conclusions Our preclinical evaluation demonstrated that the MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for needle placement with the capability to angulate the needle insertion path provides targeting accuracy feasible for clinical MRI-guided prostate interventions. The clinical feasibility has to be established in a clinical study. PMID:22678723

  7. A Workspace-oriented Needle Guiding Robot for 3T MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Intervention: Evaluation of In-bore Workspace and MRI Compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Hata, Nobuhiko; Iordachita, Iulian; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare; Tokuda, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided prostate interventions have been introduced to enhance the cancer detection. For accurate needle positioning, in-bore operated robotic systems have been developed and optimal use of the confined in-bore space become a critical engineering challenge. Methods As preliminary evaluation of our prostate intervention robot, we conducted a workspace design analysis using a new evaluation method that we developed for in-bore operated robots for transperineal prostate interventions, and an MRI compatibility study. Results The workspace analysis resulted in the effective workspace (VW) of 0.32, which is greater than that of our early prototype despite that the current robot is approximately 50% larger than the early prototype in sectional space. The MRI compatibility study resulted in less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction. Conclusions The new workspace evaluation method quantifies the workspace utilization of the in-bore operated robots for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions, providing a useful tool for evaluation and new robot design. The robot creates insignificant electromagnetic noise during typical prostate imaging sequences. PMID:22492680

  8. Development and Evaluation of an Actuated MRI-Compatible Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Iordachita, Iulian; Guion, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the design, development, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility evaluation of an actuated transrectal prostate robot for MRI-guided needle intervention in the prostate. The robot performs actuated needle MRI-guidance with the goals of providing (i) MRI compatibility, (ii) MRI-guided needle placement with accuracy sufficient for targeting clinically significant prostate cancer foci, (iii) reducing interventional procedure times (thus increasing patient comfort and reducing opportunity for needle targeting error due to patient motion), (iv) enabling real-time MRI monitoring of interventional procedures, and (v) reducing the opportunities for error that arise in manually actuated needle placement. The design of the robot, employing piezo-ceramic-motor actuated needle guide positioning and manual needle insertion, is reported. Results of a MRI compatibility study show no reduction of MRI signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) with the motors disabled. Enabling the motors reduces the SNR by 80% without RF shielding, but SNR is only reduced by 40% to 60% with RF shielding. The addition of radio-frequency shielding is shown to significantly reduce image SNR degradation caused by the presence of the robotic device. An accuracy study of MRI-guided biopsy needle placements in a prostate phantom is reported. The study shows an average in-plane targeting error of 2.4 mm with a maximum error of 3.7 mm. These data indicate the system’s needle targeting accuracy is similar to that obtained with a previously reported manually actuated system, and is sufficient to reliably sample clinically significant prostate cancer foci under MRI-guidance. PMID:23326181

  9. Brief Report: Development of a Robotic Intervention Platform for Young Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Zachary; Zheng, Zhi; Das, Shuvajit; Young, Eric M.; Swanson, Amy; Weitlauf, Amy; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are attempting to develop robotic technologies for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This pilot study investigated the development and application of a novel robotic system capable of dynamic, adaptive, and autonomous interaction during imitation tasks with embedded real-time performance evaluation and…

  10. Brief Report: Development of a Robotic Intervention Platform for Young Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Zachary; Zheng, Zhi; Das, Shuvajit; Young, Eric M.; Swanson, Amy; Weitlauf, Amy; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are attempting to develop robotic technologies for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This pilot study investigated the development and application of a novel robotic system capable of dynamic, adaptive, and autonomous interaction during imitation tasks with embedded real-time performance evaluation and…

  11. Brief Report: Development of a Robotic Intervention Platform for Young Children with ASD

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Zachary; Zheng, Zhi; Das, Shuvajit; Young, Eric M.; Swanson, Amy; Weitlauf, Amy; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are attempting to develop robotic technologies for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This pilot study investigated the development and application of a novel robotic system capable of dynamic, adaptive, and autonomous interaction during imitation tasks with embedded real-time performance evaluation and feedback. The system was designed to incorporate both a humanoid robot and a human examiner. We compared child performance within system across these conditions in a sample of preschool children with ASD (n=8) and a control sample of typically developing children (n=8). The system was well-tolerated in the sample, children with ASD exhibited greater attention to the robotic system than the human administrator, and for children with ASD imitation performance appeared superior during the robotic interaction. PMID:25503680

  12. Lapabot: a compact telesurgical robot system for minimally invasive surgery: part I. System description.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesoon; Park, Jun Woo; Kim, Dong Jun; Shin, Jungwook; Park, Chan Young; Lee, Jung Chan; Jo, Yung Ho

    2012-05-01

    The applications of robotic minimally invasive surgery (MIS) have widened, providing new advantages such as augmented dexterity and telesurgery. However, current commercial robotic laparoscopic surgical systems still have aspects to be improved such as heavy and bulky systems not suitable for agile operations, large rotational radii of robot manipulator arms, limited remote control capacity, and absence of force feedback. We have developed a robotic laparoscopic surgical system that features compact slave manipulators. The system can simultaneously operate one laparoscope arm and up to four instrument arms. The slave robot is controlled remotely through an Ethernet network and is ready for telesurgery. The developed surgical robot has sufficient workspace to perform general MIS and has been shown to provide acceptable motion tracking control performance.

  13. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part I: endoscopic and direct vision imaging - techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Mahdi; Khoshnam, Mahta; Najmaei, Nima; Patel, Rajni V

    2014-09-01

    Intra-operative imaging is widely used to provide visual feedback to a clinician when he/she performs a procedure. In visual servoing, surgical instruments and parts of tissue/body are tracked by processing the acquired images. This information is then used within a control loop to manoeuvre a robotic manipulator during a procedure. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013 to provide a survey of the visual servoing applications in medical robotics. The focus is on medical applications where image-based tracking is used for closed-loop control of a robotic system. Detailed classification and comparative study of various contributions in visual servoing using endoscopic or direct visual images are presented and summarized in tables and diagrams. The main challenges in using visual servoing for medical robotic applications are identified and potential future directions are suggested. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A Model Based Approach to Increase the Part Accuracy in Robot Based Incremental Sheet Metal Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Horst; Laurischkat, Roman; Zhu Junhong

    2011-01-17

    One main influence on the dimensional accuracy in robot based incremental sheet metal forming results from the compliance of the involved robot structures. Compared to conventional machine tools the low stiffness of the robot's kinematic results in a significant deviation of the planned tool path and therefore in a shape of insufficient quality. To predict and compensate these deviations offline, a model based approach, consisting of a finite element approach, to simulate the sheet forming, and a multi body system, modeling the compliant robot structure, has been developed. This paper describes the implementation and experimental verification of the multi body system model and its included compensation method.

  15. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy.

  16. Integration and evaluation of a needle-positioning robot with volumetric microcomputed tomography image guidance for small animal stereotactic interventions.

    PubMed

    Waspe, Adam C; McErlain, David D; Pitelka, Vasek; Holdsworth, David W; Lacefield, James C; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    Preclinical research protocols often require insertion of needles to specific targets within small animal brains. To target biologically relevant locations in rodent brains more effectively, a robotic device has been developed that is capable of positioning a needle along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole in the skull under volumetric microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) guidance. An x-ray compatible stereotactic frame secures the head throughout the procedure using a bite bar, nose clamp, and ear bars. CT-to-robot registration enables structures identified in the image to be mapped to physical coordinates in the brain. Registration is accomplished by injecting a barium sulfate contrast agent as the robot withdraws the needle from predefined points in a phantom. Registration accuracy is affected by the robot-positioning error and is assessed by measuring the surface registration error for the fiducial and target needle tracks (FRE and TRE). This system was demonstrated in situ by injecting 200 microm tungsten beads into rat brains along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole on the top of the skull under micro-CT image guidance. Postintervention micro-CT images of each skull were registered with preintervention high-field magnetic resonance images of the brain to infer the anatomical locations of the beads. Registration using four fiducial needle tracks and one target track produced a FRE and a TRE of 96 and 210 microm, respectively. Evaluation with tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms showed that locations could be targeted with a mean error of 154 +/- 113 microm. The integration of a robotic needle-positioning device with volumetric micro-CT image guidance should increase the accuracy and reduce the invasiveness of stereotactic needle interventions in small animals.

  17. Integration and evaluation of a needle-positioning robot with volumetric microcomputed tomography image guidance for small animal stereotactic interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Waspe, Adam C.; McErlain, David D.; Pitelka, Vasek; Holdsworth, David W.; Lacefield, James C.; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Preclinical research protocols often require insertion of needles to specific targets within small animal brains. To target biologically relevant locations in rodent brains more effectively, a robotic device has been developed that is capable of positioning a needle along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole in the skull under volumetric microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) guidance. Methods: An x-ray compatible stereotactic frame secures the head throughout the procedure using a bite bar, nose clamp, and ear bars. CT-to-robot registration enables structures identified in the image to be mapped to physical coordinates in the brain. Registration is accomplished by injecting a barium sulfate contrast agent as the robot withdraws the needle from predefined points in a phantom. Registration accuracy is affected by the robot-positioning error and is assessed by measuring the surface registration error for the fiducial and target needle tracks (FRE and TRE). This system was demonstrated in situ by injecting 200 {mu}m tungsten beads into rat brains along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole on the top of the skull under micro-CT image guidance. Postintervention micro-CT images of each skull were registered with preintervention high-field magnetic resonance images of the brain to infer the anatomical locations of the beads. Results: Registration using four fiducial needle tracks and one target track produced a FRE and a TRE of 96 and 210 {mu}m, respectively. Evaluation with tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms showed that locations could be targeted with a mean error of 154{+-}113 {mu}m. Conclusions: The integration of a robotic needle-positioning device with volumetric micro-CT image guidance should increase the accuracy and reduce the invasiveness of stereotactic needle interventions in small animals.

  18. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention or Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: Intervention in Older Persons with Acute Coronary Syndrome—Part II

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Brett C.; Stearns, Sally C.; Massing, Mark W.; Stouffer, George A.; D’Arcy, Laura P.; Carey, Timothy S.

    2009-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part article on treatment of acute coronary syndrome in the older population. Part I (published in the October issue of Clinical Geriatrics) analyzed the differential utilization of invasive therapies with respect to age and heart disease. Part II summarizes information from the literature on acute coronary syndrome outcomes from invasive treatments (percutaneous coronary interventions or coronary artery bypass grafting) among older persons. PMID:20607092

  19. Rehabilitation robotics.

    PubMed

    Munih, Marko; Bajd, Tadej

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the background, main achievements and components of rehabilitation robotics in a simple way, using non-technical terms. The introductory part looks at the development of robotic approaches in the rehabilitation of neurological patients and outlines the principles of robotic device interactions with patients. There follows a section on virtual reality in rehabilitation. Hapticity and interaction between robot and human are presented in order to understand the added value of robotics that cannot be exploited in other devices. The importance of passive exercise and active tasks is then discussed using the results of various clinical trials, followed by the place of upper and lower extremity robotic devices in rehabilitation practice. The closing section refers to the general importance of measurements in this area and stresses quantitative measurements as one of the advantages in using robotic devices.

  20. Operation and force analysis of the guide wire in a minimally invasive vascular interventional surgery robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Wang, Hongbo; Sun, Li; Yu, Hongnian

    2015-03-01

    To develop a robot system for minimally invasive surgery is significant, however the existing minimally invasive surgery robots are not applicable in practical operations, due to their limited functioning and weaker perception. A novel wire feeder is proposed for minimally invasive vascular interventional surgery. It is used for assisting surgeons in delivering a guide wire, balloon and stenting into a specific lesion location. By contrasting those existing wire feeders, the motion methods for delivering and rotating the guide wire in blood vessel are described, and their mechanical realization is presented. A new resistant force detecting method is given in details. The change of the resistance force can help the operator feel the block or embolism existing in front of the guide wire. The driving torque for rotating the guide wire is developed at different positions. Using the CT reconstruction image and extracted vessel paths, the path equation of the blood vessel is obtained. Combining the shapes of the guide wire outside the blood vessel, the whole bending equation of the guide wire is obtained. That is a risk criterion in the delivering process. This process can make operations safer and man-machine interaction more reliable. A novel surgery robot for feeding guide wire is designed, and a risk criterion for the system is given.

  1. NASA automation and robotics. Information exchange workshop: proceedings. Volume 2, Part A, presentations material

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Objective of the workshop were to produce an information exchange between the NASA centers on current efforts in advanced artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation and to provide the identification of current efforts throughout NASA, and gaps in the current efforts, in relation to Space Station automation and robotics. The agenda was a set of technical overview presentations from the NASA centers on current efforts in advanced artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, and a joint session with the (SSIS) workshop being held at JSC the same week.

  2. NASA automation and robotics. Information exchange workshop proceedings. Volume 2, Part B. Presentations material

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Objectives of the workshop were to produce an information exchange between the NASA centers on current efforts in advanced artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation and to provide the identification of current efforts throughout NASA, and gaps in the current efforts, in relation to Space Station automation and robotics. The agenda was a set of technical overview presentations from the NASA centers on current efforts in advanced artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, and a joint session with the (SSIS) workshop being held at JSC the same week.

  3. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part II: Pilot Clinical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) is an intervention approach for children with reading difficulties that emphasizes reading as an important occupation of children. Part I presented the theoretical basis of the OPARI. Part II describes a pilot clinical application of the OPARI. Guided by Schkade and…

  4. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part II: Pilot Clinical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) is an intervention approach for children with reading difficulties that emphasizes reading as an important occupation of children. Part I presented the theoretical basis of the OPARI. Part II describes a pilot clinical application of the OPARI. Guided by Schkade and…

  5. Robotic intelligence kernel

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-11-17

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes a robot intelligence kernel (RIK) that includes a multi-level architecture and a dynamic autonomy structure. The multi-level architecture includes a robot behavior level for defining robot behaviors, that incorporate robot attributes and a cognitive level for defining conduct modules that blend an adaptive interaction between predefined decision functions and the robot behaviors. The dynamic autonomy structure is configured for modifying a transaction capacity between an operator intervention and a robot initiative and may include multiple levels with at least a teleoperation mode configured to maximize the operator intervention and minimize the robot initiative and an autonomous mode configured to minimize the operator intervention and maximize the robot initiative. Within the RIK at least the cognitive level includes the dynamic autonomy structure.

  6. Implementing a Prereferral Intervention System: Part I. The Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graden, Janet L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The article addresses implementing a prereferral intervention model as the first step in special education services delivery system. The model includes four prereferral stages (request for consultation, consultation, observation, conference), and two referral stages (formal referral and program meeting). (Author/CL)

  7. Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities. Volume 10. Part A: Theoretical Perspectives [and] Part B: Intervention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Thomas E., Ed.; Mastropieri, Margo A., Ed.

    This two-volume set presents 11 papers on the state of the art in learning and behavioral disabilities, the first volume, Part A, includes 6 papers providing theoretical perspectives and, the second volume, Part B, includes 5 papers on intervention research. The theoretical papers are: "Defining Emotional or Behavioral Disorders: Divergence…

  8. Reducing Youth Gun Violence. Part One--An Overview [and] Part Two--Prevention and Intervention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Alan, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains two issues of a journal on reducing youth gun violence, reprinted from a report by the U.S. Department of Justice. The first issue, part one, provides an overview of programs and initiatives. The second issue, part two, describes prevention and intervention programs. To reduce violence and build healthy communities requires…

  9. So Long, Robot Reader! A Superhero Intervention Plan for Improving Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcell, Barclay; Ferraro, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an engaging means for turning disfluent readers into prosody superstars. Each week students align with Poetry Power Man and his superhero friends to battle the evil Robot Reader and his sidekicks. The Fluency Foursome helps students adhere to the multidimensional aspects of fluency where expression and comprehension are…

  10. From medical images to minimally invasive intervention: Computer assistance for robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Lin; Lerotic, Mirna; Vitiello, Valentina; Giannarou, Stamatia; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Visentini-Scarzanella, Marco; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been established as an important way forward in surgery for reducing patient trauma and hospitalization with improved prognosis. The introduction of robotic assistance enhances the manual dexterity and accuracy of instrument manipulation. Further development of the field in using pre- and intra-operative imaging guidance requires the integration of the general anatomy of the patient with clear pathologic indications and geometrical information for preoperative planning and intra-operative manipulation. It also requires effective visualization and the recreation of haptic and tactile sensing with dynamic active constraints to improve consistency and safety of the surgical procedures. This paper describes key technical considerations of tissue deformation tracking, 3D reconstruction, subject-specific modeling, image guidance and augmented reality for robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery. It highlights the importance of adapting preoperative surgical planning according to intra-operative data and illustrates how dynamic information such as tissue deformation can be incorporated into the surgical navigation framework. Some of the recent trends are discussed in terms of instrument design and the usage of dynamic active constraints and human-robot perceptual docking for robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. So Long, Robot Reader! A Superhero Intervention Plan for Improving Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcell, Barclay; Ferraro, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an engaging means for turning disfluent readers into prosody superstars. Each week students align with Poetry Power Man and his superhero friends to battle the evil Robot Reader and his sidekicks. The Fluency Foursome helps students adhere to the multidimensional aspects of fluency where expression and comprehension are…

  12. Battered women: intervention and prevention. A psychosociocultural perspective, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Hoff, L A

    1993-01-01

    Building on the foundation of understanding and comprehensive assessment of battered women, this article addresses service planning and intervention. Strategies are approached within the framework of a Crisis Paradigm developed from field research with battered women and their families. They include mechanisms such as support groups which link crisis service to the long-term needs of battered women, and systematic approaches to removing the obstacles which keep women victimized. An Assessment and Service Planning Guide (ASPG) is proposed for inclusion in routine health care of abused women. The article concludes with strategies for preventing violence at interpersonal and societal levels.

  13. Sedation, analgesia and anesthesia for interventional radiological procedures in adults. Part II. Recommendations for interventional radiologists.

    PubMed

    Venneman, I; Lamy, M

    2000-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are given orally as a premedication before an interventional radiological procedure. Local analgesia is achieved by drugs such as lidocaine, bupivacaine or ropivacaine. General analgesia is obtained by non opioid analgesics and opioid narcotics. For intravenous sedation, benzodiazepines such as ketamine or propofol should be administered under the supervision of an anesthesiologist. A preprocedure consultation with the anesthesiologist is recommended. Monitoring equipments, drugs and nursing staff assistance should be provided in the interventional suite. Vital signs should be monitored for several hours until patient's discharge. Close collaboration between anesthesiologists and interventional radiologists is a prerequisite for achieving high standard sedation and analgesia.

  14. Predicting the long-term effects of human-robot interaction: a reflection on responsibility in medical robotics.

    PubMed

    Datteri, Edoardo

    2013-03-01

    This article addresses prospective and retrospective responsibility issues connected with medical robotics. It will be suggested that extant conceptual and legal frameworks are sufficient to address and properly settle most retrospective responsibility problems arising in connection with injuries caused by robot behaviours (which will be exemplified here by reference to harms occurred in surgical interventions supported by the Da Vinci robot, reported in the scientific literature and in the press). In addition, it will be pointed out that many prospective responsibility issues connected with medical robotics are nothing but well-known robotics engineering problems in disguise, which are routinely addressed by roboticists as part of their research and development activities: for this reason they do not raise particularly novel ethical issues. In contrast with this, it will be pointed out that novel and challenging prospective responsibility issues may emerge in connection with harmful events caused by normal robot behaviours. This point will be illustrated here in connection with the rehabilitation robot Lokomat.

  15. 75 FR 68613 - Part C Early Intervention Services Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... be transferring Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C funds as a Non-Competitive Replacement Award, to... treatment services and avoid a disruption of HIV/AIDS clinical care to clients in East and Central Harlem... Health will receive $577,174 of fiscal year (FY) 2010 funds to ensure ongoing clinical HIV/ AIDS...

  16. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S.; DiMaio, Simon P.; Gobbi, David G.; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called “workphases” that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6 mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. PMID:19699057

  17. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S; DiMaio, Simon P; Gobbi, David G; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called "workphases" that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrating socially assistive robotics into mental healthcare interventions: applications and recommendations for expanded use.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Sarah M; Kazdin, Alan E; Scassellati, Brian

    2015-02-01

    As a field, mental healthcare is faced with major challenges as it attempts to close the huge gap between those who need services and those who receive services. In recent decades, technological advances have provided exciting new resources in this battle. Socially assistive robotics (SAR) is a particularly promising area that has expanded into several exciting mental healthcare applications. Indeed, a growing literature highlights the variety of clinically relevant functions that these robots can serve, from companion to therapeutic play partner. This paper reviews the ways that SAR have already been used in mental health service and research and discusses ways that these applications can be expanded. We also outline the challenges and limitations associated with further integrating SAR into mental healthcare. SAR is not proposed as a replacement for specially trained and knowledgeable professionals nor is it seen as a panacea for all mental healthcare needs. Instead, robots can serve as clinical tools and assistants in a wide range of settings. Given the dramatic growth in this area, now is a critical moment for individuals in the mental healthcare community to become engaged in this research and steer it toward our field's most pressing clinical needs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Improving Collaborative Play between Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Siblings: The Effectiveness of a Robot-Mediated Intervention Based on Lego® Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huskens, Bibi; Palmen, Annemiek; Van der Werff, Marije; Lourens, Tino; Barakova, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a brief robot-mediated intervention based on Lego® therapy on improving collaborative behaviors (i.e., interaction initiations, responses, and play together) between children with ASD and their siblings during play sessions, in a therapeutic setting. A concurrent multiple baseline design…

  20. Improving Collaborative Play between Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Siblings: The Effectiveness of a Robot-Mediated Intervention Based on Lego® Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huskens, Bibi; Palmen, Annemiek; Van der Werff, Marije; Lourens, Tino; Barakova, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a brief robot-mediated intervention based on Lego® therapy on improving collaborative behaviors (i.e., interaction initiations, responses, and play together) between children with ASD and their siblings during play sessions, in a therapeutic setting. A concurrent multiple baseline design…

  1. A MR-conditional High-torque Pneumatic Stepper Motor for MRI-guided and Robot-assisted Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging allows for visualizing detailed pathological and morphological changes of soft tissue. This increasingly attracts attention on MRI-guided intervention; hence, MR-conditional actuations have been widely investigated for development of image-guided and robot-assisted surgical devices under the MRI. This paper presents a simple design of MR-conditional stepper motor which can provide precise and high-torque actuation without adversely affecting the MR image quality. This stepper motor consists of two MR-conditional pneumatic cylinders and the corresponding supporting structures. Alternating the pressurized air can drive the motor to rotate each step in 3.6° with the motor coupled to a planetary gearbox. Experimental studies were conducted to validate its dynamics performance. Maximum 800mNm output torque can be achieved. The motor accuracy independently varied by two factors: motor operating speed and step size, was also investigated. The motor was tested within a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The image artifact and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated in order to study its MRI compliancy. The results show that the presented pneumatic stepper motor generated 2.35% SNR reduction in MR images and no observable artifact was presented besides the motor body itself. The proposed motor test also demonstrates a standard to evaluate the motor capability for later incorporation with motorized devices used in robot-assisted surgery under MRI. PMID:24957635

  2. Mentalizing Family Violence Part 2: Techniques and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Asen, Eia; Fonagy, Peter

    2017-03-01

    This is the second of two companion papers that provide an overview of mentalization-based concepts and techniques when working with the seeming "mindlessness" of intra-family violence. The focus of this paper is on general mentalization-oriented approaches and specific interventions that aim to (1) disrupt the non-mentalizing cycles that can generate intra-family violence and (2) encourage the emergence of patterns of family interactions that provide the foundation for non-violent alternatives. Various playful exercises and activities are described, including the taking of "mental state snapshots" and "selfies" in sessions and staging inverted role-plays, as well as using theatrical masks and creating body-mind maps and scans. These can make "chronic" relationship issues come alive in session and permit "here and now" experiences that generate a safe context for mentalizing to take place. At the core of the work is the continuous focus on integrating experience and reflection. Without acute awareness of the thoughts and feelings occurring in the sessions, mere reflection is not likely to enable change. By increasing mentalizing in the family system, family members' trusting attitudes grow, both within and outside the family. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  3. Population-based public health interventions: innovations in practice, teaching, and management. Part II.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda Olson; Strohschein, Susan; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Lia-Hoagberg, Betty

    2004-01-01

    The Intervention Wheel is a population-based practice model that encompasses three levels of practice (community, systems, and individual/family) and 17 public health interventions. Each intervention and practice level contributes to improving population health. The Intervention Wheel, previously known as the Public Health Intervention Model, was originally introduced in 1998 by the Minnesota Department of Health, Section of Public Health Nursing (PHN). The model has been widely disseminated and used throughout the United States since that time. The evidence supporting the Intervention Wheel was recently subjected to a rigorous critique by regional and national experts. This critical process, which involved hundreds of public health nurses, resulted in a more robust Intervention Wheel and established the validity of the model. The critique also produced basic steps and best practices for each of the 17 interventions. Part I describes the Intervention Wheel, defines population-based practice, and details the recommended modifications and validation process. Part II provides examples of the innovative ways that the Intervention Wheel is being used in public health/PHN practice, education, and administration. The two articles provide a foundation and vision for population-based PHN practice and direction for improving population health.

  4. Population-based public health interventions: practice-based and evidence-supported. Part I.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda Olson; Strohschein, Susan; Lia-Hoagberg, Betty; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2004-01-01

    The Intervention Wheel is a population-based practice model that encompasses three levels of practice (community, systems, and individual/family) and 17 public health interventions. Each intervention and practice level contributes to improving population health. The Intervention Wheel, previously known as the Public Health Intervention Model, was originally introduced in 1998 by the Minnesota Department of Health, Section of Public Health Nursing. The model has been widely disseminated and used throughout the United States since that time. The evidence supporting the Intervention Wheel was recently subjected to a rigorous critique by regional and national experts. This critical process, which involved hundreds of public health nurses, resulted in a more robust Intervention Wheel and established the validity of the model. The critique also produced basic steps and best practices for each of the 17 interventions. Part I describes the Intervention Wheel, defines population-based practice, and details the recommended modifications and validation process. Part II provides examples of the innovative ways that the Intervention Wheel is being used in public health/public health nursing practice, education, and administration. The two articles provide a foundation and vision for population-based public health nursing practice and direction for improving population health.

  5. Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: how I do it. Part II: Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso, Roger F; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Zorn, Kevin C

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of the "da Vinci Robotic Surgical System" (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been an important step towards a minimally invasive approach to radical prostatectomy. Technologic peculiarities, such as three-dimensional vision, wristed instrumentation with seven degrees of freedom of motion, lack of tremor, a 10x-magnification and a comfortable seated position for the surgeon has added value to the procedure for the surgeon and the patient. In this article, we describe the 9 step surgical technique for robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) that is currently used in our institution (University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHUM) - Hopital St-Luc). We use the four-arm da Vinci Surgical System. Our experience with RARP is now over 250 cases with the senior surgeon having performed over 1200 RARPs and we have continually refined our technique to improve patient outcomes.

  6. Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-06

    I~D~·L Paper Number Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations ABSTRACT As research advances individual robot capabilities, a logical...progression is the use of multiple robots to complete a task more effectively. Mission performance can be improved by the ability to allocate robots with...diverse capabilities to perform different parts of a complex task. To paraphrase [[10], there are many advantages to enabling robotic collaborative

  7. Simple robust control laws for robot manipulators. Part 1: Non-adaptive case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, J. T.; Bayard, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    A new class of exponentially stabilizing control laws for joint level control of robot arms is introduced. It has been recently recognized that the nonlinear dynamics associated with robotic manipulators have certain inherent passivity properties. More specifically, the derivation of the robotic dynamic equations from the Hamilton's principle gives rise to natural Lyapunov functions for control design based on total energy considerations. Through a slight modification of the energy Lyapunov function and the use of a convenient lemma to handle third order terms in the Lyapunov function derivatives, closed loop exponential stability for both the set point and tracking control problem is demonstrated. The exponential convergence property also leads to robustness with respect to frictions, bounded modeling errors and instrument noise. In one new design, the nonlinear terms are decoupled from real-time measurements which completely removes the requirement for on-line computation of nonlinear terms in the controller implementation. In general, the new class of control laws offers alternatives to the more conventional computed torque method, providing tradeoffs between robustness, computation and convergence properties. Furthermore, these control laws have the unique feature that they can be adapted in a very simple fashion to achieve asymptotically stable adaptive control.

  8. A novel, general-purpose, MR-compatible, manually actuated robotic manipulation system for minimally invasive interventions under direct MRI guidance.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Eftychios G; Seimenis, Ioannis; Andreou, Eleni; Eracleous, Eleni; Tsekos, Nikolaos V

    2014-03-01

    Performing minimally invasive interventions under direct MRI guidance offers significant advantages. Required accessibility to the patient inside the MRI scanner is fairly limited, and employment of robotic assistance has been proposed. The development of MR-compatible robotic systems entails engineering challenges related to geometric constraints and the magnetic nature of the scanning environment. A novel, general-purpose, MR-compatible robotic manipulation system has been developed for the performance of minimally invasive interventions inside a cylindrical scanner under direct MRI guidance. The system is endowed with five degrees of freedom (DOF), is characterized by a unique kinematics structure and is manually actuated. The prototype system was shown to exhibit the required MR-compatibility characteristics and a task-space positioning ability of approximately 5 mm. Needle targeting testing demonstrated a 93% success rate in acquiring a 5 mm spherical target. Phantom testing was performed inside a 3 T scanner and results are reported for an experimental study simulating MRI-guided, manipulator-assisted, MR arthrography. Robotic assistance provided by the developed manipulator may effectively facilitate the performance of various MRI-guided, minimally invasive interventions inside a cylindrical scanner. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A comparison of the effects of rhythm and robotic interventions on repetitive behaviors and affective states of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sudha M.; Park, Isabel K.; Neelly, Linda B.; Bhat, Anjana N.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive behaviors and poor affect regulation are commonly seen in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We compared the effects of two novel interventions - rhythm and robotic therapies, with those of a standard-of-care intervention, on the repetitive behaviors and affective states of 36 children with ASD between 5 and 12 years using a randomized controlled trial design. We coded for frequencies of sensory, negative, and stereotyped behaviors and the duration of positive, negative, and interested affective states in children during early, mid, and late training sessions. In terms of repetitive behaviors, in the early session, the rhythm and robot groups engaged in greater negative behaviors, whereas the comparison group engaged in greater sensory behaviors. With training, the rhythm group reduced negative behaviors whereas there were no training-related changes in the other groups. In terms of affective states, the rhythm and robot groups showed greater negative affect, whereas the comparison group demonstrated greater interested affect across all sessions. With training, the rhythm group showed a reduction in negative affect and an increase in interested affect whereas the robot group showed a reduction in positive affect. Overall, it appears that rhythm-based interventions are socially engaging treatment tools to target core impairments in autism. PMID:26251668

  10. A comparison of the effects of rhythm and robotic interventions on repetitive behaviors and affective states of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sudha M; Park, Isabel K; Neelly, Linda B; Bhat, Anjana N

    2015-10-01

    Repetitive behaviors and poor affect regulation are commonly seen in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We compared the effects of two novel interventions - rhythm and robotic therapies, with those of a standard-of-care intervention, on the repetitive behaviors and affective states of 36 children with ASD between 5 and 12 years using a randomized controlled trial design. We coded for frequencies of sensory, negative, and stereotyped behaviors and the duration of positive, negative, and interested affective states in children during early, mid, and late training sessions. In terms of repetitive behaviors, in the early session, the rhythm and robot groups engaged in greater negative behaviors, whereas the comparison group engaged in greater sensory behaviors. With training, the rhythm group reduced negative behaviors whereas there were no training-related changes in the other groups. In terms of affective states, the rhythm and robot groups showed greater negative affect, whereas the comparison group demonstrated greater interested affect across all sessions. With training, the rhythm group showed a reduction in negative affect and an increase in interested affect whereas the robot group showed a reduction in positive affect. Overall, it appears that rhythm-based interventions are socially engaging treatment tools to target core impairments in autism.

  11. Parents' Judgments of the Acceptability and Importance of Socially Interactive Robots for Intervening with Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Embler, Davon

    2013-01-01

    A number of different types of socially interactive robots are being used as part of interventions with young children with disabilities to promote their joint attention and language skills. Parents' judgments of two dimensions (acceptance and importance) of the social validity of four different social robots were the focus of the study described…

  12. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part I: Defining Reading as an Occupation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of two papers that explore a role that occupational therapy can play in supporting children with reading challenges. Part I presents the grounding framework for an occupation and participation approach to reading intervention (OPARI) and serves to introduce the clinical application of the approach presented in Part II. In this…

  13. 75 FR 3746 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Part C Early Intervention Services (EIS) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Part C Early..., Florida, that will ensure continuity of Part C, Early Intervention Services (EIS), HIV/AIDS care and...: Critical funding for HIV/AIDS care and treatment to the target populations in Orange County,...

  14. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part I: Defining Reading as an Occupation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of two papers that explore a role that occupational therapy can play in supporting children with reading challenges. Part I presents the grounding framework for an occupation and participation approach to reading intervention (OPARI) and serves to introduce the clinical application of the approach presented in Part II. In this…

  15. Concept for practical exercises for studying autonomous flying robots in a university environment: part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gageik, Nils; Dilger, Erik; Montenegro, Sergio; Schön, Stefan; Wildenhein, Rico; Creutzburg, Reiner; Fischer, Arno

    2015-03-01

    The present paper demonstrates the application of quadcopters as educational material for students in aerospace computer science, as it is already in usage today. The work with quadrotors teaches students theoretical and practical knowledge in the fields of robotics, control theory, aerospace and electrical engineering as well as embedded programming and computer science. For this the material, concept, realization and future view of such a course is discussed in this paper. Besides that, the paper gives a brief overview of student research projects following the course, which are related to the research and development of fully autonomous quadrotors.

  16. Reducing incivility in the workplace: results of a three-part educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Lasater, Kathie; Mood, Laura; Buchwach, Deborah; Dieckmann, Nathan F

    2015-01-01

    Incivility among nursing staff has a negative impact on the workplace environment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a three-part educational intervention improved the work environment in two units of a major health sciences hospital. Staff (N = 94) participated in assessments of the intervention at designated time points postintervention. Interviews of eight volunteer participants followed the intervention. Perceived acts of incivility decreased significantly for both units. Self-efficacy increased for both units, whereas collective efficacy decreased for one unit and increased for the second unit. Qualitative data supported the positive impact but identified that participants were not confident their units could effectively combat incivility without refresher sessions. A three-part educational intervention was effective in decreasing incidences of perceived incivility and increasing self-efficacy. Collective efficacy might be improved and sustained with unit refresher sessions or regular discussion. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Simple robust control laws for robot manipulators. Part 2: Adaptive case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Wen, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    A new class of asymptotically stable adaptive control laws is introduced for application to the robotic manipulator. Unlike most applications of adaptive control theory to robotic manipulators, this analysis addresses the nonlinear dynamics directly without approximation, linearization, or ad hoc assumptions, and utilizes a parameterization based on physical (time-invariant) quantities. This approach is made possible by using energy-like Lyapunov functions which retain the nonlinear character and structure of the dynamics, rather than simple quadratic forms which are ubiquitous to the adaptive control literature, and which have bound the theory tightly to linear systems with unknown parameters. It is a unique feature of these results that the adaptive forms arise by straightforward certainty equivalence adaptation of their nonadaptive counterparts found in the companion to this paper (i.e., by replacing unknown quantities by their estimates) and that this simple approach leads to asymptotically stable closed-loop adaptive systems. Furthermore, it is emphasized that this approach does not require convergence of the parameter estimates (i.e., via persistent excitation), invertibility of the mass matrix estimate, or measurement of the joint accelerations.

  18. Towards explaining the health impacts of residential energy efficiency interventions - A realist review. Part 1: Pathways.

    PubMed

    Willand, Nicola; Ridley, Ian; Maller, Cecily

    2015-05-01

    This paper is Part 1 of a realist review that tries to explain the impacts of residential energy efficiency interventions (REEIs) on householder health. According to recent systematic reviews residential energy efficiency interventions may benefit health. It is argued that home energy improvement are complex interventions and that a better understanding of the latent mechanisms and contextual issues that may shape the outcome of interventions is needed for effective intervention design. This realist review synthesises the results of 28 energy efficiency improvement programmes. This first part provides a review of the explanatory factors of the three key pathways, namely warmth in the home, affordability of fuel and psycho-social factors, and the pitfall of inadequate indoor air quality. The review revealed that REEIs improved winter warmth and lowered relative humidity with benefits for cardiovascular and respiratory health. In addition, residential energy efficiency improvements consolidated the meaning of the home as a safe haven, strengthened the householder's perceived autonomy and enhanced social status. Although satisfaction with the home proved to be an important explanation for positive mental health outcomes, financial considerations seemed to have played a secondary role. Evidence for negative impacts was rare but the risk should not be dismissed. Comprehensive refurbishments were not necessarily more effective than thermal retrofits or upgrades. A common protocol for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of interventions would facilitate the synthesis of future studies. Householder and contextual influences are addressed in Part 2.

  19. Personalized, relevance-based Multimodal Robotic Imaging and augmented reality for Computer Assisted Interventions.

    PubMed

    Navab, Nassir; Fellow, Miccai; Hennersperger, Christoph; Frisch, Benjamin; Fürst, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, many researchers in medical image computing and computer assisted interventions across the world focused on the development of the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH), aiming at changing the practice of medicine from classification and treatment of diseases to that of modeling and treating patients. These projects resulted in major advancements in segmentation, registration, morphological, physiological and biomechanical modeling based on state of art medical imaging as well as other sensory data. However, a major issue which has not yet come into the focus is personalizing intra-operative imaging, allowing for optimal treatment. In this paper, we discuss the personalization of imaging and visualization process with particular focus on satisfying the challenging requirements of computer assisted interventions. We discuss such requirements and review a series of scientific contributions made by our research team to tackle some of these major challenges. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections.

  1. Design of a decoupled MRI-compatible force sensor using fiber bragg grating sensors for robot-assisted prostate interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfaredi, Reza; Seifabadi, Reza; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2013-03-01

    During prostate needle insertion, the gland rotates and displaces resulting in needle placement inaccuracy. To compensate for this error, we proposed master-slave needle steering under real-time MRI in a previous study. For MRI-compatibility and accurate motion control, the master (and the slave) robot uses piezo actuators. These actuators however, are non-backdrivable. To cope with this issue, force sensor is required. Force sensor is also required at the slave side to reflect the insertion force to clinician's hand through the master robot. Currently, there is no MRI-compatible force sensor commercially available. In order to generate a combination of linear and rotary motions for needle steering, this study is seeking to develop a MRI-compatible 2 Degrees of Freedom (DOF) force/torque sensor. Fiber Brag Grating (FBG) strain measuring sensors which are proven to be MRI-compatible are used. The active element is made of phosphor-bronze and other parts are made of brass. The force and torque measurements are designed to be entirely decoupled. The sensor measures -20 to 20 N axial force with 0.1 N resolution, and -200 to 200 Nmm axial torque with 1 Nmm resolution. Analytical and Finite Element (FE) analyses are performed to ensure the strains are within the measurable range of the FBG sensors. The sensor is designed to be compact (diameter =15 mm, height =20 mm) and easy to handle and install. The proposed sensor is fabricated and calibrated using a commercial force/torque sensor.

  2. How Does the Narrowing of Eligibility Criteria Affect Enrollment in Part C Early Intervention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaum, Batya; Celimli-Aksoy, Seniz; Marshall, Jennifer T.; Berkovits, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, many states have narrowed their eligibility criteria for participation in the IDEA Part C early intervention (EI) program for infants and toddlers with or at risk for developmental delays. However, there is scant research on the effects of such a policy change on the population of children served or on the timing of children's…

  3. Parent Perspectives of Participation in Home and Community Activities when Receiving Part C Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khetani, Mary A.; Cohn, Ellen S.; Orsmond, Gael I.; Law, Mary C.; Coster, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the extent to which parent expectations, perceptions about resource availability and supports, and strategies used to promote participation in home and community activities varied by setting and activity type. Sixteen 90-min semistructured interviews were completed with families receiving Part C early intervention services in…

  4. How Does the Narrowing of Eligibility Criteria Affect Enrollment in Part C Early Intervention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaum, Batya; Celimli-Aksoy, Seniz; Marshall, Jennifer T.; Berkovits, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, many states have narrowed their eligibility criteria for participation in the IDEA Part C early intervention (EI) program for infants and toddlers with or at risk for developmental delays. However, there is scant research on the effects of such a policy change on the population of children served or on the timing of children's…

  5. Child Factors Associated with Enrollment in Part C Early Intervention among Children Adopted from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth; Dunst, Carl J.; Mogro-Wilson, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The provision of services under Part C of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act is built on a premise that children benefit from early intervention. This article presents findings from a study of children adopted from China. Given information obtained from a survey, the researchers grouped children as (a) those who received early…

  6. Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Part 1: Basic science and principles of assessment and clinical interventions.

    PubMed

    Röijezon, Ulrik; Clark, Nicholas C; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Impaired proprioception has been reported as a feature in a number of musculoskeletal disorders of various body parts, from the cervical spine to the ankle. Proprioception deficits can occur as a result of traumatic damage, e.g., to ligaments and muscles, but can also occur in association with painful disorders of a gradual-onset nature. Muscle fatigue can also adversely affect proprioception and this has implications for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Due to the importance of proprioception for sensorimotor control, specific methods for assessment and training of proprioception have been developed for both the spine and the extremities. The aim of this first part of a two part series on proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation is to present a theory based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, assessment, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal disorders and general principles of interventions targeting proprioception. An understanding of the basic science of proprioception, consequences of disturbances and theories behind assessment and interventions is vital for the clinical management of musculoskeletal disorders. Part one of this series supplies a theoretical base for part two which is more practically and clinically orientated, covering specific examples of methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and the extremities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Combining psychological and engineering approaches to utilizing social robots with children with autism.

    PubMed

    Dickstein-Fischer, Laurie; Fischer, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    It is estimated that Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects 1 in 68 children. Early identification of an ASD is exceedingly important to the introduction of an intervention. We are developing a robot-assisted approach that will serve as an improved diagnostic and early intervention tool for children with autism. The robot, named PABI® (Penguin for Autism Behavioral Interventions), is a compact humanoid robot taking on an expressive cartoon-like embodiment. The robot is affordable, durable, and portable so that it can be used in various settings including schools, clinics, and the home. Thus enabling significantly enhanced and more readily available diagnosis and continuation of care. Through facial expressions, body motion, verbal cues, stereo vision-based tracking, and a tablet computer, the robot is capable of interacting meaningfully with an autistic child. Initial implementations of the robot, as part of a comprehensive treatment model (CTM), include Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy where the child interacts with a tablet computer wirelessly interfaced with the robot. At the same time, the robot makes meaningful expressions and utterances and uses stereo cameras in eyes to track the child, maintain eye contact, and collect data such as affect and gaze direction for charting of progress. In this paper we present the clinical justification, anticipated usage with corresponding requirements, prototype development of the robotic system, and demonstration of a sample application for robot-assisted ABA therapy.

  8. A Continuum Robot and Control Interface for Surgical Assist in Fetoscopic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, George; Chadebecq, Francois; Tella Amo, Marcel; Bergeles, Christos; Maneas, Efthymios; Pawar, Vijay; Vander Poorten, Emanuel; Deprest, Jan; Ourselin, Sebastien; De Coppi, Paolo; Vercauteren, Tom; Stoyanov, Danail

    2017-01-01

    Twin–twin transfusion syndrome requires interventional treatment using a fetoscopically introduced laser to sever the shared blood supply between the fetuses. This is a delicate procedure relying on small instrumentation with limited articulation to guide the laser tip and a narrow field of view to visualize all relevant vascular connections. In this letter, we report on a mechatronic design for a comanipulated instrument that combines concentric tube actuation to a larger manipulator constrained by a remote centre of motion. A stereoscopic camera is mounted at the distal tip and used for imaging. Our mechanism provides enhanced dexterity and stability of the imaging device. We demonstrate that the imaging system can be used for computing geometry and enhancing the view at the operating site. Results using electromagnetic sensors for verification and comparison to visual odometry from the distal sensor show that our system is promising and can be developed further for multiple clinical needs in fetoscopic procedures. PMID:28680967

  9. A Continuum Robot and Control Interface for Surgical Assist in Fetoscopic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, George; Chadebecq, Francois; Tella Amo, Marcel; Bergeles, Christos; Maneas, Efthymios; Pawar, Vijay; Vander Poorten, Emanuel; Deprest, Jan; Ourselin, Sebastien; De Coppi, Paolo; Vercauteren, Tom; Stoyanov, Danail

    2017-03-08

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome requires interventional treatment using a fetoscopically introduced laser to sever the shared blood supply between the fetuses. This is a delicate procedure relying on small instrumentation with limited articulation to guide the laser tip and a narrow field of view to visualize all relevant vascular connections. In this letter, we report on a mechatronic design for a comanipulated instrument that combines concentric tube actuation to a larger manipulator constrained by a remote centre of motion. A stereoscopic camera is mounted at the distal tip and used for imaging. Our mechanism provides enhanced dexterity and stability of the imaging device. We demonstrate that the imaging system can be used for computing geometry and enhancing the view at the operating site. Results using electromagnetic sensors for verification and comparison to visual odometry from the distal sensor show that our system is promising and can be developed further for multiple clinical needs in fetoscopic procedures.

  10. An MRI-Compatible Robotic System With Hybrid Tracking for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Guion, Peter; Singh, Anurag K.; Kaushal, Aradhana; Ménard, Cynthia; Pinto, Peter A.; Camphausen, Kevin; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the development, evaluation, and first clinical trials of the access to the prostate tissue (APT) II system—a scanner independent system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transrectal prostate interventions. The system utilizes novel manipulator mechanics employing a steerable needle channel and a novel six degree-of-freedom hybrid tracking method, comprising passive fiducial tracking for initial registration and subsequent incremental motion measurements. Targeting accuracy of the system in prostate phantom experiments and two clinical human-subject procedures is shown to compare favorably with existing systems using passive and active tracking methods. The portable design of the APT II system, using only standard MRI image sequences and minimal custom scanner interfacing, allows the system to be easily used on different MRI scanners. PMID:22009867

  11. Cancer concepts and principles: primer for the interventional oncologist-part I.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Ryan; Vouche, Michael; Sze, Daniel Y; Hohlastos, Elias; Collins, Jeremy; Schirmang, Todd; Memon, Khairuddin; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent; Chen, Richard; Gupta, Ramona; Resnick, Scott; Carr, James; Chrisman, Howard B; Nemcek, Albert A; Vogelzang, Robert L; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2013-08-01

    A sophisticated understanding of the rapidly changing field of oncology, including a broad knowledge of oncologic disease and the therapies available to treat them, is fundamental to the interventional radiologist providing oncologic therapies, and is necessary to affirm interventional oncology as one of the four pillars of cancer care alongside medical, surgical, and radiation oncology. The first part of this review intends to provide a concise overview of the fundamentals of oncologic clinical trials, including trial design, methods to assess therapeutic response, common statistical analyses, and the levels of evidence provided by clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. From training to robot behavior: towards custom scenarios for robotics in training programs for ASD.

    PubMed

    Gillesen, J C C; Barakova, E I; Huskens, B E B M; Feijs, L M G

    2011-01-01

    Successful results have been booked with using robotics in therapy interventions for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, to make the best use of robots, the behavior of the robot needs to be tailored to the learning objectives and personal characteristics of each unique individual with ASD. Currently training practices include adaptation of the training programs to the condition of each individual client, based on the particular learning goals or the mood of the client. To include robots in such training will imply that the trainers are enabled to control a robot through an intuitive interface. For this purpose we use a visual programming environment called TiViPE as an interface between robot and trainer, where scenarios for specific learning objectives can easily be put together as if they were graphical LEGO-like building blocks. This programming platform is linked to the NAO robot from Aldebaran Robotics. A process flow for converting trainers' scenarios was developed to make sure the gist of the original scenarios was kept intact. We give an example of how a scenario is processed, and implemented into the clinical setting, and how detailed parts of a scenario can be developed.

  13. Exploratorium: Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  14. Exploratorium: Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  15. An overview of artificial intelligence and robotics. Volume 1: Artificial intelligence. Part B: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an emerging technology that has recently attracted considerable attention. Many applications are now under development. This report, Part B of a three part report on AI, presents overviews of the key application areas: Expert Systems, Computer Vision, Natural Language Processing, Speech Interfaces, and Problem Solving and Planning. The basic approaches to such systems, the state-of-the-art, existing systems and future trends and expectations are covered.

  16. Evaluation of short term effects of the IROMEC robotic toy for children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tanja; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; de Witte, Luc; Vanstipelen, Silvie

    2011-01-01

    Research shows a reduced playfulness in children with developmental disabilities. This is a barrier for participation and children's health and wellbeing. IROMEC is a purposely designed robot to support play in impaired children. The reported study evaluates short-term effects of the IROMEC robot toy supporting play in an occupational therapy intervention for children with developmental disabilities. Two types of play intervention (standard occupational therapy versus robot-facilitated play intervention) were compared regarding their effect on the level of playfulness, on children's general functional development, goal achievement as well as the therapist's evaluation of the added value of a robot-facilitated play intervention. Three young children took part in this single-subject design study. Evaluation was performed through Test of Playfulness (ToP), the IROMEC evaluation questionnaire and qualitative evaluation by the therapists. Results confirmed the IROMEC robot did partly meet the needs of the children and therapists, and positive impact on TOP results was found with two children. This suggests robotic toys can support children with developmental disabilities in enriching play. Long term effect evaluation should verify these positive indications resulting from use of this innovative social robot for children with developmental disabilities. But it also became clear further development of the robot is required. © 2011 IEEE

  17. Robotics and human factors: current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Mcilvaine Parsons, H.; Kearsley, G.P.

    1982-10-01

    From the perspective of human factors engineering, the most important question is the division of labor between robots and humans, who participate in robot systems in nine activities: surveillance, intervention, maintenance, backup, input, output, supervision, inspection, and synergy. Additional concerns include hardware and software design of interfaces with operators, procedure development, accident prevention, and training. There have been a few human factors studies but more are needed, drawing in part on research in artificial intelligence, to support robotics for industrial productivity and military requirements. 49 references.

  18. 78 FR 25458 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services...

  19. 78 FR 31568 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.... ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services One-Time Noncompetitive... care services for persons living with HIV/AIDS, HRSA will provide a one-time noncompetitive Ryan...

  20. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part II. Effects of Information and Skills Training on Health-Related Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Ivan L.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a model that was used as a framework for reviewing studies of psychoeducational interventions intended to influence illness- and treatment-related behaviors and attitudes in pediatric cancer patients. In Part II, we distinguish between interventions that attempt to influence patients' behaviors just by…

  1. Potential impact of pharmacist interventions to reduce cost for Medicare Part D beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Erin E; Vanwert, Elizabeth M; Erickson, Steven R

    2013-06-01

    The objective was to determine the impact of simulated pharmacist interventions on out-of-pocket cost, time to coverage gap, and cost per patient to the Medicare Part D program using actual patient cases from an adult general medicine clinic. Medication profiles of 100 randomly selected Medicare-eligible patients from a university-affiliated general internal medicine clinic were reviewed by a pharmacist to identify opportunities to cost-maximize the patients' therapies based on the plan. An online Part-D calculator, Aetna Medicare Rx Essentials, was used as the standard plan to determine medication cost and time to gap. The primary analysis was comparison of the patients' pre-review and post-review out-of-pocket cost, time to coverage gap, and cost to Medicare. A total of 65 patients had at least 1 simulated pharmacist cost intervention. The most common intervention was substituting for a less costly generic, followed by substituting a generic for a brand name. Projected patient cost savings was $476 per year. The average time to coverage gap was increased by 0.7 ±1.2 months. This study illustrates that the pharmacists may be able to reduce cost to some patients as well as to the Medicare Part D program.

  2. Human Factors in Automated and Robotic Space Systems: Proceedings of a symposium. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Human factors research likely to produce results applicable to the development of a NASA space station is discussed. The particular sessions covered in Part 2 include: (1) computer aided monitoring and decision making; (2) telepresence and supervisory control; (3) social factors in productivity and performance; and (4) the human role in space systems. Papers from each subject area are reproduced and the discussions from each area are summarized.

  3. Human Factors in Automated and Robotic Space Systems: Proceedings of a symposium. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Thomas B. (Editor); Kruser, Dana S. (Editor); Deutsch, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Human factors research likely to produce results applicable to the development of a NASA space station is discussed. The particular sessions covered in Part 1 include: (1) system productivity -- people and machines; (2) expert systems and their use; (3) language and displays for human-computer communication; and (4) computer aided monitoring and decision making. Papers from each subject area are reproduced and the discussions from each area are summarized.

  4. Effects of a Socially Interactive Robot on the Conversational Turns between Parents and Their Young Children with Autism. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.; Prior, Jeremy; Derryberry, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a socially interactive robot on the conversational turns between four young children with autism and their mothers were investigated as part of the intervention study described in this research report. The interventions with each child were conducted over 4 or 5 days in the children's homes where a practitioner facilitated…

  5. Robot Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Mecanotron, now division of Robotics and Automation Corporation, developed a quick-change welding method called the Automatic Robotics Tool-change System (ARTS) under Marshall Space Flight Center and Rockwell International contracts. The ARTS system has six tool positions ranging from coarse sanding disks and abrasive wheels to cloth polishing wheels with motors of various horsepower. The system is used by fabricators of plastic body parts for the auto industry, by Texas Instruments for making radar domes, and for advanced composites at Aerospatiale in France.

  6. A Review of CAM for Procedural Pain in Infancy: Part II. Other Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Subhadra; Meldrum, Marcia; Altman, Tamara; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series reviewing the empirical evidence for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches for the management of pain related to medical procedures in infants up to 6 weeks of age. Part I of this series investigated the effects of sucrose with or without non-nutritive sucking (NNS). The present article examines other CAM interventions for procedural pain including music-based interventions, olfactory stimulation, kangaroo care and swaddling. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials. Preliminary support was revealed for the analgesic effects of the CAM modalities reviewed. However, the overall quality of the evidence for these approaches remains relatively weak. Additional well-designed trials incorporating rigorous methodology are required. Such investigations will assist in the development of evidence-based guidelines on the use of CAM interventions either alone or in concert with conventional approaches to provide safe, reliable analgesia for infant procedural pain. PMID:18955254

  7. Center of Cardiac Surgery Robotic Computerized Telemanipulation as Part of a Comprehensive Approach to Advanced Heart Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    RACAB for a single year. For ninety percent of the 159 sites RACAB use as a percent of their total CABG volume the year prior to discontinuing RACAB was...SUPPORTING DATA Appendix A: Target Robot-Assisted Site Survey Appendix B: Collection of Conventional and Robotic Lima Metrics Appendix...submitted the TARGET protocol and site survey to the TJU IRB as an exempt review. IRB approval was received on 21DEC2010; the IRB document package sent

  8. Going Green Robots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jacqueline M.

    2011-01-01

    In looking at the interesting shapes and sizes of old computer parts, creating robots quickly came to the author's mind. In this article, she describes how computer parts can be used creatively. Students will surely enjoy creating their very own robots while learning about the importance of recycling in the society. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  9. Going Green Robots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jacqueline M.

    2011-01-01

    In looking at the interesting shapes and sizes of old computer parts, creating robots quickly came to the author's mind. In this article, she describes how computer parts can be used creatively. Students will surely enjoy creating their very own robots while learning about the importance of recycling in the society. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  10. Multi-Robot Systems in Military Domains (Les Systemes Multi-Robots Dans les Domaines Militaires)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Interaction with Multi-Robot Systems David Kortenkamp, Debra Schreckenghost, and Cheryl Martin Human-Robot Interactions in Robot-Assisted Urban Search...RTO-TR-IST-032 On Dynamic Reconfiguration of Multi-Robot Formations Rafael Fierro , Aveek K. Das Distributed Multi-Robot Mapping Dieter Fox...Robot Testbed for Biologically-Inspired Cooperative Control Rafael Fierro , Justin Clark, Dean Hougen, and Sesh Commuri Part VI – Human-Robot Interaction

  11. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as an integral part of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Deborah S; Nowzari, Shahrzad; Reimann, Brie; Fischer, Leigh; Pace, Elizabeth; Goplerud, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Substance use screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) should be an integral part of the scope of nursing practice. This commentary is an appeal for nurses to advance their knowledge and competencies related to SBIRT. The question of how to move SBIRT into the mainstream of nursing practice was posed to several leaders of federal agencies, health care and nursing organizations, nurse educators, and nurse leaders. The authors provide recommendations for moving this set of clinical strategies (i.e., SBIRT) into day-to-day nursing practice.

  12. Impairment-Based 3-D Robotic Intervention Improves Upper Extremity Work Area in Chronic Stroke: Targeting Abnormal Joint Torque Coupling With Progressive Shoulder Abduction Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael D.; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa M.; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of a robotic system (ACT3D) that allowed for a quantitative measurement of abnormal joint torque coupling in chronic stroke survivors and, most importantly, a quantitative means of initiating and progressing an impairment-based intervention, is described. Individuals with chronic moderate to severe stroke (n = 8) participated in this single-group pretest-posttest design study. Subjects were trained over eight weeks by progressively increasing the level of shoulder abduction loading experienced by the participant during reaching repetitions as performance improved. Reaching work area was evaluated pre- and postintervention for ten different shoulder abduction loading levels along with isometric single-joint strength and a qualitative clinical assessment of impairment. There was a significant effect of session (pre versus post) with an increase in reaching work area, despite no change in single-joint strength. This data suggests that specifically targeting the abnormal joint torque coupling impairment through progressive shoulder abduction loading is an effective strategy for improving reaching work area following hemiparetic stroke. Application of robotics, namely, the ACT3D, allowed for quantitative control of the exercise parameters needed to directly target the synergistic coupling impairment. The targeted reduction of abnormal joint torque coupling is likely the key factor explaining the improvements in reaching range of motion achieved with this intervention. PMID:20657711

  13. Overview of States' Use of Telehealth for the Delivery of Early Intervention (IDEA Part C) Services.

    PubMed

    Cason, Jana; Behl, Diane; Ringwalt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) services are designed to promote the development of skills and enhance the quality of life of infants and toddlers who have been identified as having a disability or developmental delay, enhance capacity of families to care for their child with special needs, reduce future educational costs, and promote independent living (NECTAC, 2011). EI services are regulated by Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA); however, personnel shortages, particularly in rural areas, limit access for children who qualify. Telehealth is an emerging delivery model demonstrating potential to deliver EI services effectively and efficiently, thereby improving access and ameliorating the impact of provider shortages in underserved areas. The use of a telehealth delivery model facilitates inter-disciplinary collaboration, coordinated care, and consultation with specialists not available within a local community. A survey sent by the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC) to IDEA Part C coordinators assessed their utilization of telehealth within states' IDEA Part C programs. Reimbursement for provider type and services and barriers to implement a telehealth service delivery model were identified. Representatives from 26 states and one jurisdiction responded to the NECTAC telehealth survey. Of these, 30% (n=9) indicated that they are either currently using telehealth as an adjunct service delivery model (n=6) or plan to incorporate telehealth within the next 1-2 years (n=3). Identified telehealth providers included developmental specialists, teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH), speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, behavior specialists, audiologists, and interpreters. Reimbursement was variable and included use of IDEA Part C funding, Medicaid, and private insurance. Expressed barriers and concerns for the implementation of telehealth as a delivery model within Part

  14. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  15. Robotic technology in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Johannes; Vetrovec, George; Riga, Celia; Wazni, Oussama; Stadler, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Robotic technology has been used in cardiovascular medicine since the late 1990s. Interventional cardiology, electrophysiology, endovascular surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and laparoscopic vascular surgery are all fields of application. Robotic devices enable endoscopic reconstructive surgery in narrow spaces and fast, very precise placement of catheters and devices in catheter-based interventions. In all robotic systems, the operator manipulates the robotic arms from a control station or console. In the field of cardiac surgery, mitral valve repair, CABG surgery, atrial septal defect repair, and myxoma resection can be achieved using robotic technology. Furthermore, vascular surgeons can perform a variety of robotically assisted operations to treat aortic, visceral, and peripheral artery disease. In electrophysiology, ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation can be carried out with robotic support. In the past few years, robotically assisted percutaneous coronary intervention and abdominal aortic endovascular surgery techniques have been developed. The basic feasibility and safety of robotic approaches in cardiovascular medicine has been demonstrated, but learning curves and the high costs associated with this technology have limited its widespread use. Nonetheless, increased procedural speed, accuracy, and reduced exposure to radiation and contrast agent in robotically assisted catheter-based interventions, as well as reduced surgical trauma and shortened patient recovery times after robotic cardiovascular surgery are promising achievements in the field.

  16. VI.3. Rehabilitation robotics.

    PubMed

    Munih, Marko; Bajd, Tadej

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the background, main achievements and components of rehabilitation robotics in a simple way, using non-technical terms. The introductory part looks at the development of robotic approaches in the rehabilitation of neurological patients and outlines the principles of robotic device interactions with patients. There follows a section on virtual reality in rehabilitation. Hapticity and interaction between robot and human are presented in order to understand the added value of robotics that cannot be exploited in other devices. The importance of passive exercise and active tasks is then discussed using the results of various clinical trials, followed by the place of upper and lower extremity robotic devices in rehabilitation practice. The closing section refers to the general importance of measurements in this area and stresses quantitative measurements as one of the advantages in using robotic devices.

  17. Space robotics in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, William; Lowrie, James W.; Mccain, Harry; Bejczy, Antal; Sheridan, Tom; Kanade, Takeo; Allen, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Japan has been one of the most successful countries in the world in the realm of terrestrial robot applications. The panel found that Japan has in place a broad base of robotics research and development, ranging from components to working systems for manufacturing, construction, and human service industries. From this base, Japan looks to the use of robotics in space applications and has funded work in space robotics since the mid-1980's. The Japanese are focusing on a clear image of what they hope to achieve through three objectives for the 1990's: developing long-reach manipulation for tending experiments on Space Station Freedom, capturing satellites using a free-flying manipulator, and surveying part of the moon with a mobile robot. This focus and a sound robotics infrastructure is enabling the young Japanese space program to develop relevant systems for extraterrestrial robotics applications.

  18. Space robotics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, William; Lowrie, James W.; McCain, Harry; Bejczy, Antal; Sheridan, Tom; Kanade, Takeo; Allen, Peter

    1994-03-01

    Japan has been one of the most successful countries in the world in the realm of terrestrial robot applications. The panel found that Japan has in place a broad base of robotics research and development, ranging from components to working systems for manufacturing, construction, and human service industries. From this base, Japan looks to the use of robotics in space applications and has funded work in space robotics since the mid-1980's. The Japanese are focusing on a clear image of what they hope to achieve through three objectives for the 1990's: developing long-reach manipulation for tending experiments on Space Station Freedom, capturing satellites using a free-flying manipulator, and surveying part of the moon with a mobile robot. This focus and a sound robotics infrastructure is enabling the young Japanese space program to develop relevant systems for extraterrestrial robotics applications.

  19. Clinical Management of Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome: Part I—Psychiatric and Behavioral Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tanya; Leckman, James; Shaw, Richard; Williams, Kyle; Kapphahn, Cynthia; Frankovich, Jennifer; Geller, Daniel; Bernstein, Gail; Chang, Kiki; Elia, Josephine; Swedo, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article outlines the consensus guidelines for symptomatic treatment for children with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Syndrome Associated with Streptococcal Infection (PANDAS). Methods: Extant literature on behavioral, psychotherapeutic, and psychopharmacologic treatments for PANS and PANDAS was reviewed. Members of the PANS Research Consortium pooled their clinical experiences to find agreement on treatment of PANS and PANDAS symptoms. Results: Current guidelines result from consensus among the Consortium members. Conclusion: While underlying infectious and inflammatory processes in PANS and PANDAS patients are treated, psychiatric and behavioral symptoms need simultaneous treatment to decrease suffering and improve adherence to therapeutic intervention. Psychological, behavioral, and psychopharmacologic interventions tailored to each child's presentation can provide symptom improvement and improve functioning during both the acute and chronic stages of illness. In general, typical evidence-based interventions are appropriate for the varied symptoms of PANS and PANDAS. Individual differences in expected response to psychotropic medication may require marked reduction of initial treatment dose. Antimicrobials and immunomodulatory therapies may be indicated, as discussed in Parts 2 and 3 of this guideline series. PMID:28722481

  20. Is there life after Buckley's Formocresol? Part I -- a narrative review of alternative interventions and materials.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, V; Patchett, C L; Waterhouse, P J

    2006-03-01

    (1) To present a narrative review of the currently available alternative interventions and materials to formocresol pulpotomy for the management of extensive caries in the primary molar, and (2) to produce a clinical protocol for pulp therapy techniques in the extensively carious primary molar. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has recently classified formaldehyde as carcinogenic to human beings. Since Buckley's Formocresol contains 19% formaldehyde in its full strength and, therefore, 1% in a 20% dilution, a safer alternative should be identified. A narrative review of the published literature for primary molar pulp therapy techniques was undertaken following an extensive and appropriate literature search. A specialist group of paediatric dentists was formed to arrive at a consensus and establish an evidence-based protocol for the management of extensively carious primary molar teeth. Part I of this paper explores the currently available alternative interventions and materials to formocresol in the form of a narrative review. The second part of the paper will present the formation of a specialist group to arrive at a consensus and establish an evidence-based protocol for the management of the extensively carious primary molar. After consideration of a review of extensively searched literature, a protocol and key points document have been developed to assist clinicians in their treatment planning. Further long-term studies with the highest level of evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials) are required to enable us to identify acceptable alternatives which can replace formocresol.

  1. Community Participation Patterns Among Preschool-Aged Children who Have Received Part C Early Intervention Services

    PubMed Central

    Khetani, Mary; Graham, James E.; Alvord, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Background We examined activity-specific patterns and child, family, and environmental correlates of participation restriction in nine community-based activities among preschoolers with disabilities who have received Part C early intervention services. Methods Data were gathered from a subsample of 1509 caregivers whose children (mean age = 67.7 months) had enrolled in the National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study (NEILS) and completed a 40-minute computerized telephone interview or 12-page mailed survey. Data were analyzed on cases with complete data on the variables of interest. Bivariate relationships were examined between variables, including patterns of co-reporting participation difficulties for pairs of community activities. Results Caregivers were more than twice as likely to report difficulty in 1 activity (20%) than difficulties in 2–3, 4–5, or 6–9 activities. Co-reporting paired difficulties was strong for activities pertaining to neighborhood outings but less conclusive for community-sponsored activities and recreation and leisure activities. Our data show strong and positive associations between child functional limitations in mobility, toileting, feeding, speech, safety awareness, and friendships and participation difficulty in 7 to 9 activities. Lower household income was associated with participation difficulty in 7 out of 9 activities and difficulty managing problematic behavior was strongly associated with participation difficulty in all 9 activities. Each of the 3 environmental variables (limited access to social support, transportation, and respite) was associated with participation restrictions in all 9 activities. Conclusion Results provide practitioners with detailed descriptive knowledge about modifiable factors related to the child, family, and environment for promoting young children’s community participation, as well information to support development of a comprehensive assessment tool for research and intervention planning

  2. Congruence between patient characteristics and interventions may partly explain medication adherence intervention effectiveness: An analysis of 190 randomized controlled trials from a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Allemann, Samuel S; Nieuwlaat, Robby; Navarro, Tamara; Haynes, Brian; Hersberger, Kurt E; Arnet, Isabelle

    2017-08-09

    Due to the negative outcomes of medication non-adherence, interventions to improve adherence have been the focus of countless studies. The congruence between adherence-related patient characteristics and interventions may partly explain the variability of effectiveness in medication adherence studies. In their latest update of a Cochrane review reporting inconsistent effects of adherence interventions, the authors offered access to their database for sub-analysis. We aimed to use this database to assess congruence between adherence-related patient characteristics and interventions and its association with intervention effects. We developed a congruence score consisting of six features related to inclusion criteria, patient characteristics at baseline, and intervention design. Two independent raters extracted and scored items from the 190 studies available in the Cochrane database. We correlated overall congruence score and individual features with intervention effects regarding adherence and clinical outcomes using Kruskal Wallis rank sum test and Fisher's exact test. Interrater-reliability for newly extracted data was almost perfect with a Cohen's Kappa of 0.92 (95% CI 0.89 - 0.94, p < 0.001). Although present in only six studies, the inclusion of non-adherent patients was the single feature significantly associated with effective adherence interventions (p = 0.003). Moreover, effective adherence interventions were significantly associated with improved clinical outcomes (OR = 6.0, CI95% = 3.1 - 12.0, p < 0.0001). However, neither the overall congruence score, nor any other individual feature (i.e. "determinants of non-adherence as inclusion criteria", "tailoring of interventions to the inclusion criteria", "reasons for non-adherence assessed at baseline", "adjustment of intervention to individual patient needs", and "theory based interventions") were significantly associated with intervention effects. The presence of only six studies that included non

  3. Robot and robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E. (Inventor); Marzwell, Neville I. (Inventor); Wall, Jonathan N. (Inventor); Poole, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A robot and robot system that are capable of functioning in a zero-gravity environment are provided. The robot can include a body having a longitudinal axis and having a control unit and a power source. The robot can include a first leg pair including a first leg and a second leg. Each leg of the first leg pair can be pivotally attached to the body and constrained to pivot in a first leg pair plane that is substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body.

  4. State of the Science of Spirituality and Palliative Care Research Part II: Screening, Assessment, and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Tracy A; Fitchett, George; Handzo, George F; Johnson, Kimberly S; Koenig, Harold G; Pargament, Kenneth I; Puchalski, Christina M; Sinclair, Shane; Taylor, Elizabeth J; Steinhauser, Karen E

    2017-09-01

    The State of the Science in Spirituality and Palliative Care was convened to address the current landscape of research at the intersection of spirituality and palliative care and to identify critical next steps to advance this field of inquiry. Part II of the SOS-SPC report addresses the state of extant research and identifies critical research priorities pertaining to the following questions: 1) How do we assess spirituality? 2) How do we intervene on spirituality in palliative care? And 3) How do we train health professionals to address spirituality in palliative care? Findings from this report point to the need for screening and assessment tools that are rigorously developed, clinically relevant, and adapted to a diversity of clinical and cultural settings. Chaplaincy research is needed to form professional spiritual care provision in a variety of settings, and outcomes assessed to ascertain impact on key patient, family, and clinical staff outcomes. Intervention research requires rigorous conceptualization and assessments. Intervention development must be attentive to clinical feasibility, incorporate perspectives and needs of patients, families, and clinicians, and be targeted to diverse populations with spiritual needs. Finally, spiritual care competencies for various clinical care team members should be refined. Reflecting those competencies, training curricula and evaluation tools should be developed, and the impact of education on patient, family, and clinician outcomes should be systematically assessed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (P.L. 101-476, Part H).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnier, Catherine

    This guide to early intervention services under Part H of Public Law 101-476 (the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) is intended to aid state legislators who have the primary responsibility to create and shape programs under this Act. Three aspects of Part H legislation are stressed: (1) requirement of unprecedented coordination among…

  6. Fathers' and Mothers' Experiences with Participation in Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Early Intervention Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baden, Kristin Marie

    2012-01-01

    Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) includes a provision for states to provide early intervention (EI) for infants and toddlers demonstrating developmental challenges. Limited data identify how parents, and especially fathers, feel about their experiences participating in Part C EI. This study investigated how fathers…

  7. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services E Appendix E to Part 57 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early...

  8. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods.

  9. The effects of embodied rhythm and robotic interventions on the spontaneous and responsive verbal communication skills of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A further outcome of a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sudha M; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Gifford, Timothy; Bhat, Anjana N

    2016-07-01

    The current manuscript is the second in a mini-series of manuscripts reporting the effects of alternative, movement-based, rhythm and robotic interventions on the social communication skills of 36 school-age children with ASD. This pilot randomized controlled trial compared the effects of 8-weeks of rhythm and robotic interventions to those of a standard-of-care, comparison intervention. The first manuscript reported intervention effects on the spontaneous and responsive social attention skills of children. In this manuscript, we report intervention effects on the spontaneous and responsive verbal communication skills of children. Communication skills were assessed within a standardized test of responsive communication during the pretest and posttest as well as using training-specific measures of social verbalization during early, mid, and late training sessions. The rhythm and comparison groups improved on the standardized test in the posttest compared to the pretest. The rhythm and robot groups increased levels of social verbalization across training sessions. Movement-based and stationary contexts afforded different types and amounts of communication in children with ASD. Overall, movement-based interventions are a promising tool to enhance verbal and non-verbal communication skills in children with ASD.

  10. The effects of embodied rhythm and robotic interventions on the spontaneous and responsive verbal communication skills of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A further outcome of a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sudha M.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Gifford, Timothy; Bhat, Anjana N.

    2016-01-01

    The current manuscript is the second in a mini-series of manuscripts reporting the effects of alternative, movement-based, rhythm and robotic interventions on the social communication skills of 36 school-age children with ASD. This pilot randomized controlled trial compared the effects of 8-weeks of rhythm and robotic interventions to those of a standard-of-care, comparison intervention. The first manuscript reported intervention effects on the spontaneous and responsive social attention skills of children. In this manuscript, we report intervention effects on the spontaneous and responsive verbal communication skills of children. Communication skills were assessed within a standardized test of responsive communication during the pretest and posttest as well as using training-specific measures of social verbalization during early, mid, and late training sessions. The rhythm and comparison groups improved on the standardized test in the posttest compared to the pretest. The rhythm and robot groups increased levels of social verbalization across training sessions. Movement-based and stationary contexts afforded different types and amounts of communication in children with ASD. Overall, movement-based interventions are a promising tool to enhance verbal and non-verbal communication skills in children with ASD. PMID:27668011

  11. Neurotechnology for Biomimetic Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This award funded in part, the travel of three investigators to the international conference on Neurotechnology for Biomimetic Robots. The three...investigators participated in a conference held at Northeastern University May 14-16 on the subject of ’ Neurotechnology for Biomimetic Robots’. Each

  12. Ground operation of robotics on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Z. Alex; Hunter, David G.; Cantin, Marc R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reflects work carried out on Ground Operated Telerobotics (GOT) in 1992 to refine further the ideas, procedures, and technologies needed to test the procedures in a high latency environment, and to integrate GOT into Space Station Freedom operations. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be in operation for 30 years, and will depend on robots to carry out a significant part of the assembly, maintenance, and utilization workload. Current plans call for on-orbit robotics to be operated by on-board crew members. This approach implies that on-orbit robotics operations use up considerable crew time, and that these operations cannot be carried out when SSF is unmanned. GOT will allow robotic operations to be operated from the ground, with on-orbit crew interventions only when absolutely required. The paper reviews how GOT would be implemented, how GOT operations would be planned and supported, and reviews GOT issues, critical success factors, and benefits.

  13. Sedation, analgesia and anesthesia for interventional radiological procedures in adults. Part I. Survey of interventional radiological practice in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Trotteur, G; Stockx, L; Dondelinger, R F

    2000-06-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to 217 interventional radiologists to evaluate current practice in analgesia and sedation in adults. Response rate was 15% (33/217). Diagnostic angiography was performed with local anesthesia in 94% to 99%; for PTA, local thrombolysis or stent placement, light sedation was added in 0.1%. Premedication was given in 43% of diagnostic angiographies and in 68% of therapeutic procedures. Radiologists consulted an anesthesiologist before administration of intravenous sedation, always in 54% of cases, occasionally in 19% and never in 27%. General anesthesia with artificial ventilation was applied in 56% of TIPS, in 70% of aortic stent grafting and in 82% of neuroradiological interventions. Intravenous sedation was applied given in 53% of percutaneous biliary drainage, in 42% of bile duct dilatation or stenting, in 40% of percutaneous nephrostomy and in 72% of ureteral balloon dilatation. Patient monitoring during an interventional procedure was always carried out by an anesthesiologist in 52% of cases. 21% of radiologists never visited the patient before a therapeutic procedure, and 36% never did so after completion of a procedure. This survey showed that high standard practice of sedation and analgesia, with the assistance of anesthesiologists, is underused by interventional radiologists in Belgium.

  14. MRH-5 Robot/Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

    This student manual for the Miller MRH-5 welding robot contains nine modules on how to: safely operate the MRH-5 robot; recognize different types of data; weld a part programming the MRH-5; re-teach an already taught program; weld various joints with the MRH-5 robot; weld a desk plaque with the MRH-5 robot; perform editing functions; check/edit…

  15. Direct Adaptive Control Of An Industrial Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Lee, Thomas; Delpech, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Decentralized direct adaptive control scheme for six-jointed industrial robot eliminates part of overall computational burden imposed by centralized controller and degrades performance of robot by reducing sampling rate. Control and controller-adaptation laws based on observed performance of manipulator: no need to model dynamics of robot. Adaptive controllers cope with uncertainties and variations in robot and payload.

  16. Robotic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A complicated design project, successfully carried out by New York manufacturing consultant with help from NERAC, Inc., resulted in new type robotic system being marketed for industrial use. Consultant Robert Price, operating at E.S.I, Inc. in Albany, NY, sought help from NERAC to develop an automated tool for deburring the inside of 8 inch breech ring assemblies for howitzers produced by Watervliet Arsenal. NERAC conducted a search of the NASA data base and six others. From information supplied, Price designed a system consisting of a standard industrial robot arm, with a specially engineered six-axis deburring tool fitted to it. A microcomputer and computer program direct the tool on its path through the breech ring. E.S.I. markets the system to aerospace and metal cutting industries for deburring, drilling, routing and refining machined parts.

  17. Robotic servicing of EOS instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaghi, Andrea I.; Juberts, Maris

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses robotic servicing of the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) instruments. The goals of implementing a robotic servicing system on EOS would be to maintain the instruments throughout the required mission life and minimize life-cycle costs. To address robot servicing, an initial design concept has been developed which will be applied to a representative EOS instrument. This instrument will be used as a model for determining the most practical level of servicing of its parts, and how to design these parts for robot servicing. Using this representative EOS instrument as a model, a generic design scheme will be developed that can be applied to all EOS instruments. The first task is to determine how to identify which parts must be designed for robot servicing. Next, the requirements imposed on the instruments and the servicing robot when designing for robot serviceability must be examined.

  18. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators) and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies). In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h) and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%). Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules), as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns. PMID:23043818

  19. Robotic devices in surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies

    2003-03-01

    Robotic devices are defined wich can be used as an aid to surgery. A classification system is proposed that reflects the manner of use and the safety of the systems. Typical benefits and problems of using robots are discussed, and a number of applications are reviewed. These cover "autonomous" systems, that involve no intervention from the surgeon; "hands-on" systems, that require the direct involvement of the surgeon; and "Master/Slave" (or Telemanipulator) systems, that are somewhere between these two and involve some degree of indirect surgeon activity. A number of predictions for the future of medical robotics are provided.

  20. [Robotics in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Possibilities, chances, risks].

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, S; Raczkowsky, J; Bohner, P; Hofele, C; Holler, C; Mühling, J; Rembold, U

    1997-11-01

    Robot systems are being tested in stereotactic neurosurgical interventions, orthopedic surgery of the hip or knee and advancal endoscopic systems for minimally invasive surgery. In contrast to most industrially manufactured products, objects for medical treatment are characterized by plasticity as well as by complex and individual forms. Thus, features of robots in this field have to be further developed in terms of advanced sensory and specific micromotoric systems. Safety and cooperation between surgeon and robot on the patient in the operating room have to be guaranteed. Extensive three-dimensional diagnosis, computer-aided planning and simulation of the intervention as well as sensory systems that monitor the actual performance of the operation are mandatory parts of this concept. In our interdisciplinary study, we aim to examine whether a robot-given a complete preoperative planning and simulation procedure-is able to perform certain surgical operations more precisely than the surgeon. Examples are drilling with depth control, shaping of bone surface by milling, sawing with defined depth in cranial osteotomies, defined preparation of implant sites and the positioning and insertion of dental and other surgical implants, whereby autonomous employment of the robot is not that which is aspired to in these interventions but rather the interactive support of the surgeon.

  1. [Robots and intellectual property].

    PubMed

    Larrieu, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    This topic is part of the global issue concerning the necessity to adapt intellectual property law to constant changes in technology. The relationship between robots and IP is dual. On one hand, the robots may be regarded as objects of intellectual property. A robot, like any new machine, could qualify for a protection by a patent. A copyright may protect its appearance if it is original. Its memory, like a database, could be covered by a sui generis right. On the other hand, the question of the protection of the outputs of the robot must be raised. The robots, as the physical embodiment of artificial intelligence, are becoming more and more autonomous. Robot-generated works include less and less human inputs. Are these objects created or invented by a robot copyrightable or patentable? To whom the ownership of these IP rights will be allocated? To the person who manufactured the machine ? To the user of the robot? To the robot itself? All these questions are worth discussing.

  2. Restricting state part C eligibility policy is associated with lower early intervention utilization.

    PubMed

    McManus, Beth M; Magnusson, Dawn; Rosenberg, Steven

    2014-05-01

    To examine if state differences in early intervention (EI) utilization can be explained by recent restrictions on EI state eligibility policy. The sample (n = 923), derived from the 2009/10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, included CSHCN who were ages 0-3 with a developmental delay or disability that affected their function. Multi-level logistic modeling was used to describe state differences in EI utilization and to determine if narrower state eligibility policy explained these differences. EI utilization ranged from 6 to 87 % across states. Having a severe condition (β = 0.99, SE = 0.28) and a usual source of care (β = 0.01, SE = 0.001) was associated with higher odds of utilizing EI. Compared to a diagnosed disability, having a developmental delay (β = -0.61, SE = 0.20) was associated with lower odds of utilizing EI. Living in a state with narrow and narrower state eligibility policy (β = -0.18, SE = 0.06) was significantly associated with lower odds of EI utilization, and this effect was strongest for children with the most severe functional impairments. Significant state variation in EI rates exists that can be explained, in part, by the restrictiveness of state eligibility criteria. Children with the most severe functional impairments appear to be least likely to utilize EI in states with the most restrictive eligibility policies.

  3. Patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: current concepts and concerns: part II.

    PubMed

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S; Brown, Richard A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease (CAD) often present concomitantly. Given the increased risk of thrombotic complications with either of them but different pathogenesis of clot formation, combined antithrombotic therapy is necessary in patients developing acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Different antithrombotic regimens in this group of patients have been summarized and discussed earlier. Triple therapy remains the treatment of choice in these patients despite the increased risk of hemorrhagic complications. Given the absence of evidence from randomized controlled trials, balancing the risk of stroke and stent thrombosis against the risk of major bleeding is a challenge. Precise stroke and bleeding risk assessment is an essential part of the decision making process regarding antithrombotic management. Continuing the discussion of current concepts and concerns of antithrombotic management in AF patients undergoing PCI, we emphasize the importance of various strategies to reduce bleeding in the modern era, namely, radial access combined with careful selection of a P2Y₁₂ receptor inhibitor, use of newer drug-eluting stents, and uninterrupted anticoagulation for patients undergoing procedures. We also focus on the role of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (novel oral anticoagulants, eg, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) which are increasingly used for stroke prevention in AF. Finally, recent recommendations on the management of antithrombotic therapy in AF patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing PCI as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions are highlighted.

  4. A critical review of the American Pain Society clinical practice guidelines for interventional techniques: part 2. Therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Datta, Sukdeb; Gupta, Sanjeeva; Munglani, Rajesh; Bryce, David A; Ward, Stephen P; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Sharma, Manohar Lal; Helm, Standiford; Fellows, Bert; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are a constructive response to the reality that practicing physicians require assistance in assimilating and applying the exponentially expanding, often contradictory, body of medical knowledge. They attempt to define practices that meet the needs of most patients under most circumstances. Ideally, specific clinical recommendations contained within practice guidelines are systematically developed by expert panels who have access to all the available evidence, have an understanding of the clinical problem, and have clinical experience with the procedure being assessed, as well as knowledge of relevant research methods. The recent development of American Pain Society (APS) guidelines has created substantial controversy because of their perceived lack of objective analysis and recommendations perceived to be biased due to conflicts of interest. To formally and carefully assess the APS guidelines' evidence synthesis for low back pain for therapeutic interventions using the same methodology utilized by the APS authors. The interventions examined were therapeutic interventions for managing low back pain, including epidural injections, adhesiolysis, facet joint interventions, and spinal cord stimulation. A literature search by 2 authors was carried out utilizing appropriate databases from 1966 through July 2008. Articles in which conflicts arose were reviewed and mediated by a third author to arrive at a consensus. Selections of manuscripts and methodologic quality assessment was also performed by at least 2 authors utilizing the same criteria applied in the APS guidelines. The guideline reassessment process included the evaluation of individual studies and systematic reviews and their translation into practice recommendations. The conclusions of APS and our critical assessment based on grading of good, fair, and poor, agreed that there is fair evidence for spinal cord stimulation in post lumbar surgery syndrome, and poor evidence for lumbar

  5. Facts, fallacies, and politics of comparative effectiveness research: Part 2 - implications for interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Boswell, Mark V; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-01-01

    times it becomes an orphan. Part 2 of this comprehensive review will provide facts, fallacies, and politics of CER along with discussion of potential outcomes, impact of CER on health care delivery, and implications for interventional pain management in the United States.

  6. Preliminary results in force-guided assembly for teams of heterogeneous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Juan; Peters, R. A., II

    2009-05-01

    The missions to the Moon and to Mars currently being planned by NASA require the advanced deployment of robots to prepare sites for human life support prior to the arrival of astronauts. Part of the robot's work will be the assembly of modular structures such as solar arrays, radiators, antennas, propellant tanks, and habitation modules. The construction will require teams of robots to work cooperatively and with a certain degree of independence. Such systems are complex and require of human intervention in the form of teleoperation attending unexpected contingencies. Latency in communications, however, will require that robots perform autonomous tasks during this time window. This paper proposes an approach to maximize the likelihood of success for teams of heterogeneous robots as they autonomously perform assembly tasks using force feedback to guide the process. An evaluation of the challenges related to the cooperation of two heterogeneous robots to join two parts into a stable, rigid configuration in a loosely structured environment is conducted. A control basis is such approach: it recasts a control problem by concurrently running a series of controllers to encode complex robot behavior. Each controller represents a control law that parses the underlying continuous control space and provides asymptotic stability, even under local perturbations. The control basis approach allows several controllers to be active concurrently through the null space control technique. Preliminary experimental results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the control basis to address the challenges of assembly tasks by teams of heterogeneous robots.

  7. An Eligibility Determination Algorithm for Part C Early Intervention Enrollment. TRACE Practice Guide, Volume 1, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.

    2006-01-01

    Procedures for using a decision algorithm for determining whether an infant or toddler is eligible for Part C early intervention is the focus of this eligibility determination practice guideline. An algorithm is a step-by-step problem-solving procedure or decision-making process that results in a solution or accurate decision in a finite number of…

  8. 75 FR 5603 - Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA),...

  9. 78 FR 10183 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  10. 78 FR 10183 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... a lapse in comprehensive primary care services for persons living with HIV/AIDS, HRSA will...

  11. 78 FR 10183 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... prevent a lapse in comprehensive primary care services for persons living with HIV/AIDS, HRSA will...

  12. 78 FR 78976 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  13. 78 FR 10182 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  14. 78 FR 18989 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  15. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 80 - Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Families A Appendix A to Part 80 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES WITHIN...

  16. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 80 - Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Families A Appendix A to Part 80 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES WITHIN...

  17. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 80 - Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Families A Appendix A to Part 80 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES WITHIN...

  18. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 80 - Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Families A Appendix A to Part 80 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES WITHIN...

  19. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 80 - Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Families A Appendix A to Part 80 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE... WITH DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES WITHIN THE... Families A. Requirements For A System of Early Intervention Services 1. A system of...

  20. Validation of individual and multiple-sequential interventions for reduction of microbial populations during processing of poultry carcasses and parts.

    PubMed

    Stopforth, J D; O'Connor, R; Lopes, M; Kottapalli, B; Hill, W E; Samadpour, M

    2007-06-01

    Changes in aerobic plate counts (APC), total coliform counts (TCC), Escherichia coli counts (ECC), and Salmonella incidence on poultry carcasses and parts and in poultry processing water were evaluated. Bacterial counts were estimated before and after individual interventions and after poultry carcasses were exposed to multiple-sequential interventions at various stages during the slaughter process. Individual and multiple-sequential interventions were evaluated at three processing plants: (i) plant A (New York wash, postevisceration wash, inside-outside bird washes 1 and 2, chlorine dioxide wash, chlorine dioxide wash plus chlorine chiller, chiller exit spray, and postchiller wash), (ii) plant B (New York wash, inside-outside bird washes 1 and 2, trisodium phosphate wash, and chlorine chiller), and (iii) plant C (trisodium phosphate wash and chlorine chiller). The majority of individual interventions effectively or significantly (P < 0.05) reduced microbial populations on or in carcasses, carcass parts, and processing water. Reductions in APC, TCC, and ECC due to individual interventions ranged from 0 to 1.2, 0 to 1.2, and 0 to 0.8 log CFU/ml, respectively. Individual interventions reduced Salmonella incidence by 0 to 100% depending on the type of process and product. Multiple-sequential interventions resulted in significant reductions (P < 0.05) in APC, TCC, ECC, and Salmonella incidence of 2.4, 2.8, and 2.9 log CFU/ml and 79%, respectively, at plant A; 1.8, 1.7, and 1.6 log CFU/ml and 91%, respectively, at plant B; and 0.8, 1.1, and 0.9 log CFU/ml and 40%, respectively, at plant C. These results enabled validation of in-plant poultry processing interventions and provide a source of information to help the industry in its selection of antimicrobial strategies.

  1. Socially intelligent robots: dimensions of human-robot interaction.

    PubMed

    Dautenhahn, Kerstin

    2007-04-29

    Social intelligence in robots has a quite recent history in artificial intelligence and robotics. However, it has become increasingly apparent that social and interactive skills are necessary requirements in many application areas and contexts where robots need to interact and collaborate with other robots or humans. Research on human-robot interaction (HRI) poses many challenges regarding the nature of interactivity and 'social behaviour' in robot and humans. The first part of this paper addresses dimensions of HRI, discussing requirements on social skills for robots and introducing the conceptual space of HRI studies. In order to illustrate these concepts, two examples of HRI research are presented. First, research is surveyed which investigates the development of a cognitive robot companion. The aim of this work is to develop social rules for robot behaviour (a 'robotiquette') that is comfortable and acceptable to humans. Second, robots are discussed as possible educational or therapeutic toys for children with autism. The concept of interactive emergence in human-child interactions is highlighted. Different types of play among children are discussed in the light of their potential investigation in human-robot experiments. The paper concludes by examining different paradigms regarding 'social relationships' of robots and people interacting with them.

  2. Effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the nonmedical use of psychoactive substances: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of brief interventions (BIs) as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the nonmedical use of psychoactive substances. Methods Bibliographic databases (including MEDLINE, Embase, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PsycINFO to April 2012) and gray literature sources were searched. We included randomized controlled trials that opportunistically screened adolescents or adults and then provided a one-to-one, verbal BI to those at risk of substance-use harm. Of interest was the nonmedical use of psychoactive substances (for example, drugs prohibited by international law), excluding alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine. Interventions comprised four or fewer sessions and were compared with no/delayed intervention or provision of information only. Studies were assessed for bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results were synthesized narratively. Evidence was interpreted according to the GRADE framework. Results We identified 8,836 records. Of these, five studies met our inclusion criteria. Two studies compared BI with no BI, and three studies compared BI with information only. Studies varied in characteristics such as substances targeted, screening procedures, and BI administered. Outcomes were mostly reported by a single study, leading to limited or uncertain confidence in effect estimates. Conclusions Insufficient evidence exists as to whether BIs, as part of SBIRT, are effective or ineffective for reducing the use of, or harms associated with nonmedical use of, psychoactive substances when these interventions are administered to nontreatment-seeking, screen-detected populations. Updating this review with emerging evidence will be important. Trial registration CRD42012002414 PMID:24887418

  3. Effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the nonmedical use of psychoactive substances: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Young, Matthew M; Stevens, Adrienne; Galipeau, James; Pirie, Tyler; Garritty, Chantelle; Singh, Kavita; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Golfam, Mohammed; Pratt, Misty; Turner, Lucy; Porath-Waller, Amy; Arratoon, Cheryl; Haley, Nancy; Leslie, Karen; Reardon, Rhoda; Sproule, Beth; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Moher, David

    2014-05-24

    The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of brief interventions (BIs) as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the nonmedical use of psychoactive substances. Bibliographic databases (including MEDLINE, Embase, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PsycINFO to April 2012) and gray literature sources were searched. We included randomized controlled trials that opportunistically screened adolescents or adults and then provided a one-to-one, verbal BI to those at risk of substance-use harm. Of interest was the nonmedical use of psychoactive substances (for example, drugs prohibited by international law), excluding alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine. Interventions comprised four or fewer sessions and were compared with no/delayed intervention or provision of information only. Studies were assessed for bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results were synthesized narratively. Evidence was interpreted according to the GRADE framework. We identified 8,836 records. Of these, five studies met our inclusion criteria. Two studies compared BI with no BI, and three studies compared BI with information only. Studies varied in characteristics such as substances targeted, screening procedures, and BI administered. Outcomes were mostly reported by a single study, leading to limited or uncertain confidence in effect estimates. Insufficient evidence exists as to whether BIs, as part of SBIRT, are effective or ineffective for reducing the use of, or harms associated with nonmedical use of, psychoactive substances when these interventions are administered to nontreatment-seeking, screen-detected populations. Updating this review with emerging evidence will be important. CRD42012002414.

  4. Interventional physiology. Part XVI: normal coronary flow velocity patterns: considerations of artifacts, arrhythmias, and anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tron, C; Donohue, T J; Kern, M J

    1995-04-01

    During normal flow velocity recording, various physiologic or technical problems may appear which can produce confusing flow signals. This section of Interventional Physiology reviews the patterns of normal coronary flow velocity and examines several artifacts and other features encountered in clinical practice. Recognition of these variations will help the interventional cardiologist to differentiate between physiologic and pathologic events.

  5. A review of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness. Part I.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung

    2014-12-01

    This review is focused on the effect of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occurs after exercise. In general, high force eccentric contractions and/or unaccustomed exercise result in DOMS attributed to reduction in performance such as muscle strength and range of motion (ROM) for both athletes and non-athletes. Nutritional intervention is one of the preventive or therapeutic ways to reduce DOMS. Previous research studies have suggested the following nutrition intervention: caffeine, omega-3 fatty acids, taurine, polyphenols, and so on. Nutritional intervention with these nutrients before and after exercise was reported to be effective in reducing DOMS. These nutritional interventions have also been reported to affect inflammatory responses and oxidative stress leading to DOMS reduction. However, other studies have reported that these nutritional interventions have no effect on DOMS. It is suggested that intake of proper nutrition intervention can effectively reduce DOMS after exercise and quickly help an athlete return to exercise or training program. In addition, nutritional intervention may help both athletes and non-athletes who engage in physical therapy or rehabilitative programs after surgery or any injurious events.

  6. A review of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness. Part I

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused on the effect of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occurs after exercise. In general, high force eccentric contractions and/or unaccustomed exercise result in DOMS attributed to reduction in performance such as muscle strength and range of motion (ROM) for both athletes and non-athletes. Nutritional intervention is one of the preventive or therapeutic ways to reduce DOMS. Previous research studies have suggested the following nutrition intervention: caffeine, omega-3 fatty acids, taurine, polyphenols, and so on. Nutritional intervention with these nutrients before and after exercise was reported to be effective in reducing DOMS. These nutritional interventions have also been reported to affect inflammatory responses and oxidative stress leading to DOMS reduction. However, other studies have reported that these nutritional interventions have no effect on DOMS. It is suggested that intake of proper nutrition intervention can effectively reduce DOMS after exercise and quickly help an athlete return to exercise or training program. In addition, nutritional intervention may help both athletes and non-athletes who engage in physical therapy or rehabilitative programs after surgery or any injurious events. PMID:25610818

  7. Drink Refusal Training as Part of a Combined Behavioral Intervention: Effectiveness and Mechanisms of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Donovan, Dennis M.; Hartzler, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Many trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral interventions for alcohol dependence, yet few studies have examined why particular treatments are effective. This study was designed to evaluate whether drink refusal training was an effective component of a combined behavioral intervention (CBI) and whether change…

  8. An MR-conditional high-torque pneumatic stepper motor for MRI-guided and robot-assisted intervention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging allows for visualizing detailed pathological and morphological changes of soft tissue. MR-conditional actuations have been widely investigated for development of image-guided and robot-assisted surgical devices under the Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This paper presents a simple design of MR-conditional stepper motor which can provide precise and high-torque actuation without adversely affecting the MR image quality. This stepper motor consists of two MR-conditional pneumatic cylinders and the corresponding supporting structures. Alternating the pressurized air can drive the motor to rotate each step in 3.6° with the motor coupled to a planetary gearbox. Experimental studies were conducted to validate its dynamics performance. Maximum 800 mN m output torque is achieved. The motor accuracy independently varied by two factors: motor operating speed and step size, was also investigated. The motor was tested within a 3T Siemens MRI scanner (MAGNETOM Skyra, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and a 3T GE MRI scanner (GE SignaHDx, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA). The image artifact and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated for study of its MRI compliancy. The results show that the presented pneumatic stepper motor generated 2.35% SNR reduction in MR images. No observable artifact was presented besides the motor body itself. The proposed motor test also demonstrates a standard to evaluate the pneumatic motor capability for later incorporation with motorized devices used under MRI.

  9. Robotics: A Bridge for Education and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnat, Winifred I.

    Robotics (robot usage) is discussed from a historical perspective with regard to its role in employment and education. Part 1 examines the transition from an industrial to an information society and speculates what the future might hold, particularly in terms of employment. Part 2 gives a historical overview of the robotics industry and discusses…

  10. Robotics: A Bridge for Education and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnat, Winifred I.

    Robotics (robot usage) is discussed from a historical perspective with regard to its role in employment and education. Part 1 examines the transition from an industrial to an information society and speculates what the future might hold, particularly in terms of employment. Part 2 gives a historical overview of the robotics industry and discusses…

  11. Evaluation of automated decisionmaking methodologies and development of an integrated robotic system simulation, volume 2, part 1. Appendix A: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrie, J. W.; Fermelia, A. J.; Haley, D. C.; Gremban, K. D.; Vanbaalen, J.; Walsh, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Documentation of the preliminary software developed as a framework for a generalized integrated robotic system simulation is presented. The program structure is composed of three major functions controlled by a program executive. The three major functions are: system definition, analysis tools, and post processing. The system definition function handles user input of system parameters and definition of the manipulator configuration. The analysis tools function handles the computational requirements of the program. The post processing function allows for more detailed study of the results of analysis tool function executions. Also documented is the manipulator joint model software to be used as the basis of the manipulator simulation which will be part of the analysis tools capability.

  12. Teleprogramming a cooperative space robotic workcell for space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haule, Damian D.; Noorhosseini, S. M.; Malowany, Alfred S.

    1992-11-01

    The growing insight into the complexity and cost of in-orbit operations of future space missions strengthens the belief that a significant amount of automation will be needed to operate the orbital laboratories in a safe, efficient, and economic way. Thus, Automation & Robotics (A&R) technology is vital for unmanned exploration missions to comets and planets. While part of the space worksite may be structured, the space environment is generally unstructured. By `structured,' we mean environments that are designed and engineered to somehow `cooperate' with the machine. In addition, the structured part of the space worksite may be damaged or in an unknown condition. This lack of structure, as well as the non- repetitive nature of the tasks, require constant adaptation to the space environment by the robot. This is the motivation for increased space robot autonomy. However, complete autonomy is still beyond the scope of today's state-of-the-art in the case of a system executing a complete mission in a hazardous environment such as space. A systematic approach for the development of A&R technologies will reduce the lead-times and costs of facilities for recurrent basic tasks. A space robotic workcell (SRW) is a collection of robots, sensors, and other industrial equipment grouped in a cooperative environment to perform various complex tasks in space. Due to their distributed nature, the control and programming of SRWs is often a difficult task. The issues involved in order to design a real-time teleprogrammable SRW system that performs intervention tasks at remote unstructured sites are summarized. The concept of `remotely operated autonomous robots' (i.e., robots teleprogrammed and telesupervised at the task level while at a space worksite) is also developed via telepresence for human-machine interface and voice/speech programming. This paper makes an assessment of the role that teleprogramming may have in furthering the automation capabilities of space teleoperated

  13. ARIES NDA Robot operators` manual

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, N.L.; Nelson, D.C.

    1998-05-01

    The ARIES NDA Robot is an automation device for servicing the material movements for a suite of Non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments. This suite of instruments includes a calorimeter, a gamma isotopic system, a segmented gamma scanner (SGS), and a neutron coincidence counter (NCC). Objects moved by the robot include sample cans, standard cans, and instrument plugs. The robot computer has an RS-232 connection with the NDA Host computer, which coordinates robot movements and instrument measurements. The instruments are expected to perform measurements under the direction of the Host without operator intervention. This user`s manual describes system startup, using the main menu, manual operation, and error recovery.

  14. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  15. Ericksonian Approach to Experiential Education, Part 1: Developing the Stance of the Practitioner; Part 2: Tailoring Interventions; Part 3: Applying Specific Ericksonian Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itin, Christian

    This three-part workshop presentation explores the ideas of Milton Erickson on the therapeutic relationship and the therapeutic use of metaphor, and applies these ideas to experiential education and adventure therapy. Part 1 introduces the practitioner to the core philosophy within an Ericksonian approach: "utilization" of a client's…

  16. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  17. Registration of a needle-positioning robot to high-resolution 3D ultrasound and computed tomography for image-guided interventions in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Lacefield, James C.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Preclinical research often requires the delivery of biological substances to specific locations in small animals. Guiding a needle to targets in small animals with an error < 200 μm requires accurate registration. We are developing techniques to register a needle-positioning robot to high-resolution three-dimensional ultrasound and computed tomography small animal imaging systems. Both techniques involve moving the needle to predetermined robot coordinates and determining corresponding needle locations in image coordinates. Registration accuracy will therefore be affected by the robot positioning error and is assessed by measuring the target registration error (TRE). A point-based registration between robot and micro-ultrasound coordinates was accomplished by attaching a fiducial phantom onto the needle. A TRE of 145 μm was achieved when moving the needle to a set of robot coordinates and registering the coordinates to needle tip locations determined from ultrasound fiducial measurements. Registration between robot and micro-CT coordinates was accomplished by injecting barium sulfate into tracks created when the robot withdraws the needle from a phantom. Points along cross-sectional slices of the segmented needle tracks were determined using an intensity-weighted centroiding algorithm. A minimum distance TRE of 194 +/- 18 μm was achieved by registering centroid points to robot trajectories using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. Simulations, incorporating both robot and ultrasound fiducial localization errors, verify that robot error is a significant component of the experimental registration. Simulations of micro-CT to robot ICP registration similarly agree with the experimental results. Both registration techniques produce a TRE < 200 μm, meeting design specification.

  18. Feasibility of using a humanoid robot to elicit communicational response in children with mild autism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Norjasween Abdul; Shamsuddin, Syamimi; Yussof, Hanafiah; Azfar Miskam, Mohd; Che Hamid, Aminullah

    2013-12-01

    Research evidences are accumulating with regards to the potential use of robots for the rehabilitation of children with autism. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the results of communicational response in two children with autism during interaction with the humanoid robot NAO. Both autistic subjects in this study have been diagnosed with mild autism. Following the outcome from our first pilot study; the aim of this current experiment is to explore the application of NAO robot to engage with a child and further teach about emotions through a game-centered and song-based approach. The experiment procedure involved interaction between humanoid robot NAO with each child through a series of four different modules. The observation items are based on ten items selected and referenced to GARS-2 (Gilliam Autism Rating Scale-second edition) and also input from clinicians and therapists. The results clearly indicated that both of the children showed optimistic response through the interaction. Negative responses such as feeling scared or shying away from the robot were not detected. Two-way communication between the child and robot in real time significantly gives positive impact in the responses towards the robot. To conclude, it is feasible to include robot-based interaction specifically to elicit communicational response as a part of the rehabilitation intervention of children with autism.

  19. An assembly-type master-slave catheter and guidewire driving system for vascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyo-Jeong; Yi, Byung-Ju; Won, Jong Yun

    2017-01-01

    Current vascular intervention inevitably exposes a large amount of X-ray to both an operator and a patient during the procedure. The purpose of this study is to propose a new catheter driving system which assists the operator in aspects of less X-ray exposure and convenient user interface. For this, an assembly-type 4-degree-of-freedom master-slave system was designed and tested to verify the efficiency. First, current vascular intervention procedures are analyzed to develop a new robotic procedure that enables us to use conventional vascular intervention devices such as catheter and guidewire which are commercially available in the market. Some parts of the slave robot which contact the devices were designed to be easily assembled and dissembled from the main body of the slave robot for sterilization. A master robot is compactly designed to conduct insertion and rotational motion and is able to switch from the guidewire driving mode to the catheter driving mode or vice versa. A phantom resembling the human arteries was developed, and the master-slave robotic system is tested using the phantom. The contact force of the guidewire tip according to the shape of the arteries is measured and reflected to the user through the master robot during the phantom experiment. This system can drastically reduce radiation exposure by replacing human effort by a robotic system for high radiation exposure procedures. Also, benefits of the proposed robot system are low cost by employing currently available devices and easy human interface.

  20. CASSY Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Anna; Wright, Ann; Rice, Aaron; Shyaka, Claude

    2014-03-01

    The CASSY Robot project involved two square robots coded in RobotC. The goal was to code a robot to do a certain set of tasks autonomously. To begin with, our task was to code the robot so that it would roam a certain area, marked off by black tape. When the robot hit the black tape, it knew to back up and turn around. It was able to do this thanks to the light sensor that was attached to the bottom of the robot. Also, whenever the robot hit an obstacle, it knew to stop, back up, and turn around. This was primarily to prevent the robot from hurting itself if it hit an obstacle. This was accomplished by using touch sensors set up as bumpers. Once that was accomplished, we attached sonar sensors and created code so that one robot was able to find and track the other robot in a sort of intruder/police scenario. The overall goal of this project was to code the robot so that we can test it against a robot coded exactly the same, but using Layered Mode Selection Logic. Professor.

  1. Mergeable nervous systems for robots.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Nithin; Christensen, Anders Lyhne; O'Grady, Rehan; Mondada, Francesco; Dorigo, Marco

    2017-09-12

    Robots have the potential to display a higher degree of lifetime morphological adaptation than natural organisms. By adopting a modular approach, robots with different capabilities, shapes, and sizes could, in theory, construct and reconfigure themselves as required. However, current modular robots have only been able to display a limited range of hardwired behaviors because they rely solely on distributed control. Here, we present robots whose bodies and control systems can merge to form entirely new robots that retain full sensorimotor control. Our control paradigm enables robots to exhibit properties that go beyond those of any existing machine or of any biological organism: the robots we present can merge to form larger bodies with a single centralized controller, split into separate bodies with independent controllers, and self-heal by removing or replacing malfunctioning body parts. This work takes us closer to robots that can autonomously change their size, form and function.Robots that can self-assemble into different morphologies are desired to perform tasks that require different physical capabilities. Mathews et al. design robots whose bodies and control systems can merge and split to form new robots that retain full sensorimotor control and act as a single entity.

  2. Comparative costs and cost-effectiveness of behavioural interventions as part of HIV prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Justine; Zinsou, Cyprien; Parkhurst, Justin; N'Dour, Marguerite; Foyet, Léger; Mueller, Dirk H

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural interventions have been widely integrated in HIV/AIDS social marketing prevention strategies and are considered valuable in settings with high levels of risk behaviours and low levels of HIV/AIDS awareness. Despite their widespread application, there is a lack of economic evaluations comparing different behaviour change communication methods. This paper analyses the costs to increase awareness and the cost-effectiveness to influence behaviour change for five interventions in Benin. Cost and cost-effectiveness analyses used economic costs and primary effectiveness data drawn from surveys. Costs were collected for provider inputs required to implement the interventions in 2009 and analysed by 'person reached'. Cost-effectiveness was analysed by 'person reporting systematic condom use'. Sensitivity analyses were performed on all uncertain variables and major assumptions. Cost-per-person reached varies by method, with public outreach events the least costly (US$2.29) and billboards the most costly (US$25.07). Influence on reported behaviour was limited: only three of the five interventions were found to have a significant statistical correlation with reported condom use (i.e. magazines, radio broadcasts, public outreach events). Cost-effectiveness ratios per person reporting systematic condom use resulted in the following ranking: magazines, radio and public outreach events. Sensitivity analyses indicate rankings are insensitive to variation of key parameters although ratios must be interpreted with caution. This analysis suggests that while individual interventions are an attractive use of resources to raise awareness, this may not translate into a cost-effective impact on behaviour change. The study found that the extensive reach of public outreach events did not seem to influence behaviour change as cost-effectively when compared with magazines or radio broadcasts. Behavioural interventions are context-specific and their effectiveness influenced by a

  3. Clean-room robot implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Comeau, J.L.

    1982-07-14

    A robot has been incorporated in a clean room operation in which vacuum tube parts are cleaned just prior to final assembly with a 60 lb/in/sup 2/ blast of argon gas. The robot is programmed to pick up the parts, manipulate/rotate them as necessary in the jet pattern and deposit them in a tray precleaned by the robot. A carefully studied implementation plan was followed in the procurement, installation, modification and programming of the robot facility. An unusual configuration of one tube part required a unique gripper design. A study indicated that the tube parts processed by the robot are 12% cleaner than those manually cleaned by an experienced operator.

  4. Robot-laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Akeel, H.A.

    1987-03-17

    A robot-laser system is described for providing a laser beam at a desired location, the system comprising: a laser beam source for generating a laser beam; a robot having at least three degrees of freedom and including a base and a robot arm supported on the base, the robot arm having first and second elongated arm parts, the second arm part projecting from the first arm part. The robot arm has a wrist mechanism located at the distal end of the second arm part, the arm parts and the wrist mechanism being hollow and fluidly interconnected to define a laser beam path therewithin extending through the first arm part, along the entire projecting length of the second arm part and through the wrist mechanism. The arm parts and wrist mechanism are adapted to direct the laser beam therewithin; and at least one mirror for reflecting the laser beam, a single mirror being mounted to and supported by the arm therewithin at a position of fluid interconnection between the arm parts to move therewith and reflect the laser beam. A first one of the degrees of freedom comprises a linear movement of the first arm part along an axis coincident with the laser beam path. A second one of the degrees of freedom comprises a linear movement of the second arm part along a second axis coincident with the laser beam path through the second arm part and a third one of the degrees of freedom comprises a rotary movement of one of the arm parts about the laser beam path.

  5. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  6. Beyond Part C: Reducing Middle School Special Education for Early Intervention Children with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullery, Mary Anne; Katz, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the rates of special education placement during middle school grades (sixth through eighth) among children who participated in the Linda Ray Intervention Program (LRIP) center-based and home-based learning modalities. The study sample included 113 children in Miami Dade County Public Schools who had gestational cocaine exposure…

  7. Trauma-Informed Part C Early Intervention: A Vision, A Challenge, A New Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Linda; Graham, Mimi; Harris, Deborah; Oser, Cindy; Clarke, Jane; Hairston-Fuller, Tody C.; Lertora, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Federal directives require that any child less than 3 years old with a substantiated case of abuse be referred to the early intervention (EI) system. This article details the need and presents a vision for a trauma-informed EI system. The authors describe two exemplary program models which implement this vision and recommend steps which the field…

  8. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part I. Patient Information and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Beale, Ivan L.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic review of published research on psychoeducational interventions for children with cancer. The current lack of an organizational model for this literature makes it difficult to form a coherent picture of the scattered literature and draw nomothetic conclusions. A model is described that is based on functional concepts from…

  9. Trauma-Informed Part C Early Intervention: A Vision, A Challenge, A New Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Linda; Graham, Mimi; Harris, Deborah; Oser, Cindy; Clarke, Jane; Hairston-Fuller, Tody C.; Lertora, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Federal directives require that any child less than 3 years old with a substantiated case of abuse be referred to the early intervention (EI) system. This article details the need and presents a vision for a trauma-informed EI system. The authors describe two exemplary program models which implement this vision and recommend steps which the field…

  10. The burden of disaster: part II. applying interventions across the child's social ecology.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jacobs, Anne K; Noffsinger, Mary A; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H

    2012-01-01

    This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the childs social ecology consisting of the Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning andpractice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem - including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems - affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child's Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child's environment.

  11. Health Care Policy and Part H Services: Early Intervention as a Concept (Not a Separate Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonkoff, Jack P.

    This paper argues that there is a critical need to reframe the fundamental policy questions which fragment early childhood intervention services and health care, in order to construct an integrated system of comprehensive services that includes basic health care and developmental support for all children and their families and that provides…

  12. Beyond Part C: Reducing Middle School Special Education for Early Intervention Children with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullery, Mary Anne; Katz, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the rates of special education placement during middle school grades (sixth through eighth) among children who participated in the Linda Ray Intervention Program (LRIP) center-based and home-based learning modalities. The study sample included 113 children in Miami Dade County Public Schools who had gestational cocaine exposure…

  13. The Burden of Disaster: Part II. Applying Interventions Across the Child’s Social Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jacobs, Anne K.; Noffsinger, Mary A.; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H.

    2014-01-01

    This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the child’s social ecology consisting of (he Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning and practice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem – including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems – affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child’s Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster. The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger, Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child’s environment. PMID:23894798

  14. Robotic mitral valve repair for all prolapse subsets using techniques identical to open valvuloplasty: establishing the benchmark against which percutaneous interventions should be judged.

    PubMed

    Suri, Rakesh M; Burkhart, Harold M; Daly, Richard C; Dearani, Joseph A; Park, Soon J; Sundt, Thoralf M; Li, Zhuo; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2011-11-01

    Recent reports have shown that robotic mitral valve repair is effective in treating posterior leaflet disease; however, comparison with trans-sternal (open) valvuloplasty for all prolapse categories has not been performed. Moreover, data from the recently published EVEREST II trial infer that adverse event rates after mitral valve repair for degenerative disease are high. We therefore compared early outcomes of robotic versus open mitral valve repair for patients with mitral valve prolapse. Among 745 consecutive patients undergoing open or robotic mitral repair for degenerative disease, 95 propensity-matched pairs were identified. Leaflet prolapse categories were similar between groups. Complete mitral valve repair was performed using identical techniques. Median crossclamp and bypass times were longer in the robotic group but decreased significantly over time (P < .001). There were no conversions to open sternotomy, repair rate and early survival were 100%, dismissal mitral regurgitation grade was similar (P = 1.00), and all patients in the robotic group had mild or less mitral regurgitation at 1 month after repair. There were no differences in adverse events (5% open vs 4% robotic, P = 1.00). Patients in the robotic group had shorter postoperative ventilation time, intensive care unit stay, and hospital stay. Robotic mitral valve repair allows complete anatomic correction of all categories of leaflet prolapse using techniques identical to open approaches. Robotic repair effectively corrects mitral regurgitation, offers excellent freedom from adverse events, and facilitates rapid weaning from ventilation, translating into earlier hospital dismissal. Safety and efficacy after both open and robotic mitral valve repair are higher than recently reported in the EVEREST II trial and establish a benchmark against which nonsurgical therapies should be evaluated. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Army Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  16. Space Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENTS CATALOG NUIA3.R CMU-RI-TR-82-10 I4 1 (. 4. ;,;-LL (and Sublitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD CovEREO SPACE ROBOTICS Interim... Robotics Institute Pittsburgh, PA. 15213 It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Office of Naval Research -August 1982 Arlington, VA 22217...SXnet.eE . Space Robotics Richard E. Korf Department of Computer Science and The Robotics Institute Carnegie-Mellon University Pittsburgh, Oetusylvania

  17. TARDEC Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-12

    unclassified TARDEC Robotics Dr. James L. Overholt Director, Joint Center for Robotics US Army TARDEC Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TARDEC Robotics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) James L. Overholt... Robotics , Network and Control Components with a Focus on Customer Driven Requirements to Provide Full System Solutions to the War Fighter Technology

  18. Robotic comfort zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhachev, Maxim; Arkin, Ronald C.

    2000-10-01

    The paper investigates how the psychological notion of comfort can be useful in the design of robotic systems. A review of the existing study of human comfort, especially regarding its presence in infants, is conducted with the goal being to determine the relevant characteristics for mapping it onto the robotics domain. Focus is place on the identification of the salient features in the environment that affect the comfort level. Factors involved include current state familiarity, working conditions, the amount and location of available resources, etc. As part of our newly developed comfort function theory, the notion of an object as a psychological attachment for a robot is also introduced, as espoused in Bowlby's theory of attachment. The output space of the comfort function and its dependency on the comfort level are analyzed. The results of the derivation of this comfort function are then presented in terms of the impact they have on robotic behavior. Justification for the use of the comfort function are then presented in terms of the impact they have on robotic behavior. Justification for the use of the comfort function in the domain of robotics is presented with relevance for real-world operations. Also, a transformation of the theoretical discussion into a mathematical framework suitable for implementation within a behavior-based control system is presented. The paper concludes with results of simulation studies and real robot experiments using the derived comfort function.

  19. Feasibility and acceptance of a robotic surgery ergonomic training program.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason; Craven, Renatta; Mosaly, Prithima; Gehrig, Paola A

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of ergonomic strain during robotic surgery indicates there is a need for intervention. However, limited data exist detailing the feasibility and acceptance of ergonomic training (ET) for robotic surgeons. This prospective, observational pilot study evaluates the implementation of an evidence-based ET module. A two-part survey was conducted. The first survey assessed robotic strain using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Participants were given the option to participate in either an online or an in-person ET session. The ET was derived from Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and developed by a human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics. After ET, a follow-up survey including the NMQ and an assessment of the ET were completed. The survey was sent to 67 robotic surgeons. Forty-two (62.7%) responded, including 18 residents, 8 fellows, and 16 attending physicians. Forty-five percent experienced strain resulting from performing robotic surgery and 26.3% reported persistent strain. Only 16.6% of surgeons reported prior ET in robotic surgery. Thirty-five (78%) surgeons elected to have in-person ET, which was successfully arranged for 32 surgeons (91.4%). Thirty-seven surgeons (88.1%) completed the follow-up survey. All surgeons participating in the in-person ET found it helpful and felt formal ET should be standard, 88% changed their practice as a result of the training, and 74% of those reporting strain noticed a decrease after their ET. Thus, at a high-volume robotics center, evidence-based ET was easily implemented, well-received, changed some surgeons' practice, and decreased self-reported strain related to robotic surgery.

  20. Feasibility and Acceptance of a Robotic Surgery Ergonomic Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Renatta; Mosaly, Prithima; Gehrig, Paola A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Assessment of ergonomic strain during robotic surgery indicates there is a need for intervention. However, limited data exist detailing the feasibility and acceptance of ergonomic training (ET) for robotic surgeons. This prospective, observational pilot study evaluates the implementation of an evidence-based ET module. Methods: A two-part survey was conducted. The first survey assessed robotic strain using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Participants were given the option to participate in either an online or an in-person ET session. The ET was derived from Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and developed by a human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics. After ET, a follow-up survey including the NMQ and an assessment of the ET were completed. Results: The survey was sent to 67 robotic surgeons. Forty-two (62.7%) responded, including 18 residents, 8 fellows, and 16 attending physicians. Forty-five percent experienced strain resulting from performing robotic surgery and 26.3% reported persistent strain. Only 16.6% of surgeons reported prior ET in robotic surgery. Thirty-five (78%) surgeons elected to have in-person ET, which was successfully arranged for 32 surgeons (91.4%). Thirty-seven surgeons (88.1%) completed the follow-up survey. All surgeons participating in the in-person ET found it helpful and felt formal ET should be standard, 88% changed their practice as a result of the training, and 74% of those reporting strain noticed a decrease after their ET. Conclusion: Thus, at a high-volume robotics center, evidence-based ET was easily implemented, well-received, changed some surgeons' practice, and decreased self-reported strain related to robotic surgery. PMID:25489213

  1. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  2. (Robotic hands)

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1988-09-23

    The traveler attended the International Workshop on Robot Hands at the Palace Hotel in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia. The traveler presented a lecture on An integrated sensor system for the ORNL mobile robot.'' The traveler obtained important information on current R D efforts in multi-fingered robot hands and object recognition using touch sensing.

  3. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  4. White Paper: Interventional MRI: Current Status and Potential for Development Considering Economic Perspectives, Part 1: General Application.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Kahn, Thomas; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane K; Lotz, Joachim; Maintz, David; Ricke, Jens; Schönberg, Stefan O; Vogl, Thomas J; Wacker, Frank K

    2017-07-01

    children with congenital heart defects and for atrial ablation at individual centers. Greater application can be expected in the future.. Citation format · Barkhausen J, Kahn T, Krombach GA et al. White Paper: Interventional MRI: Current Status and Potential for Development Considering Economic Perspectives, Part 1: General Application. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 611 - 623. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Human-robot coordination using scripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Laura E.; Murphy, Robin R.; Craighead, Jeffrey D.

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes an extension of scripts, which have been used to control sequences of robot behavior, to facilitate human-robot coordination. The script mechanism permits the human to both conduct expected, complementary activities with the robot and to intervene opportunistically taking direct control. Scripts address the six major issues associated with human-robot coordination. They allow the human to visualize the robot's mental model of the situation and build a better overall understanding of the situation and what level of autonomy or intervention is needed. It also maintains synchronization of the world and robot models so that control can be seamlessly transferred between human and robot while eliminating "coordination surprise". The extended script mechanism and its implementation in Java on an Inuktun micro-VGTV robot for the technical search task in urban search and rescue is described.

  6. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 2: Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nitri, Marco; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an extra-articular lateral knee structure, most recently referred to as the anterolateral ligament (ALL), contributes to overall rotational stability of the knee. However, the effect of anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) has not been biomechanically investigated or validated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical function of anatomic ALLR in the setting of a combined ACL and ALL injury. More specifically, this investigation focused on the effect of ALLR on resultant rotatory stability when performed in combination with concomitant ACLR. It was hypothesized that ALLR would significantly reduce internal rotation and axial plane translation laxity during a simulated pivot-shift test compared with isolated ACLR. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were evaluated with a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Knee kinematics were evaluated with simulated clinical examinations including a simulated pivot-shift test consisting of coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques, a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, and an 88-N anterior tibial load. Kinematic differences between ACLR with an intact ALL, ACLR with ALLR, and ACLR with a deficient ALL were compared with the intact state. Single-bundle ACLR tunnels and ALLR tunnels were placed anatomically according to previous quantitative anatomic attachment descriptions. Combined anatomic ALLR and ACLR significantly improved the rotatory stability of the knee compared with isolated ACLR in the face of a concurrent ALL deficiency. During a simulated pivot-shift test, ALLR significantly reduced internal rotation and axial plane tibial translation when compared with ACLR with an ALL deficiency. Isolated ACLR for the treatment of a combined ACL and ALL injury was not able to restore stability of the knee, resulting in a significant increase in

  7. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  8. Medication adherence and patient outcomes: part 2: interventions and resources to overcome low health literacy.

    PubMed

    Petty, Janet L

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the influence of health literacy on medication adherence. With health literacy skills nearly flat for over a decade and an aging population receiving multiple and complex medication regimens, literacy is becoming a more important factor in nursing assessment and intervention. Concrete tools are provided to help the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) assess literacy and evaluate written resources for patient education and to improve medication adherence.

  9. An Effective Psychoeducational Intervention for Early Childhood Caries Prevention: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Warren, John J.; Reeve, Johnmarshall; Drake, David R.; Kramer, Katherine W.O.; Marshall, Teresa A.; Dawson, Deborah V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to compare whether mothers exposed to an autonomy-supportive psychoeducational videotaped message, informed by self-determination theory (SDT), demonstrated greater changes in behavior concerning their children's oral health than mothers exposed to a neutral message delivered by brochure. Methods Data were collected at baseline, one- and six-month follow-ups from 415 12- to 49- month-old WIC-enrolled children and their mothers: 283 in the video intervention group and 132 in the brochure control group. Mothers completed questionnaires regarding their child's dietary/oral hygiene habits. Chi-square, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests were used to analyze data (P<0.05). Results Significantly more positive changes were observed for dietary/oral hygiene behaviors among the intervention group mothers at one- and six-month follow-ups than for the controls. Significantly fewer mothers in the intervention group shared dining ware with their child at both one- (P=0.0046) and six-month follow-ups (P<0.0001); this practice was decreased only at six-months for the control group mothers (P=0.05). Restricting consideration only to mothers who were not checking for white spot lesions at baseline, a significantly greater proportion of mothers in the intervention group performed this behavior at six-months (P=0.0044). Conclusions Data provided evidence of the effectiveness of the SDT videotaped oral health message relative to a neutral brochure. PMID:23756309

  10. Patient fears of tumor cell dissemination secondary to surgical interventions-part II.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Stacy; Weiss, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    Patient fears are an ever-present factor of patient care, and addressing those fears is a responsibility of the healthcare provider. One such fear may be of tumor cell dissemination secondary to surgical interventions. Preparing for such discussions will allow the healthcare provider to speak with authority on the topic of tumor dissemination secondary to breast biopsy or surgery, even in a situation where a patient has underlying fears.

  11. FIRST Robotics Kickoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA engineers Scott Olive (left) and Bo Clarke answer questions during the 2007 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition regional kickoff event held Saturday, Jan. 6, 2007, at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The SSC employees and FIRST Robotics volunteer mentors are standing near a mock-up of the playing field for the FIRST Robotics' 2007 `Rack n' Roll' challenge. Roughly 300 students and adult volunteers - representing 29 high schools from four states - attended the kickoff to hear the rules of `Rack n' Roll.' The teams will spend the next six weeks building and programming robots from parts kits they received Saturday, then battle their creations at regional spring competitions in New Orleans, Houston, Atlanta and other cities around the nation. FIRST aims to inspire students in the pursuit of engineering and technology studies and careers.

  12. FIRST Robotics Kickoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA engineers Scott Olive (left) and Bo Clarke answer questions during the 2007 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition regional kickoff event held Saturday, Jan. 6, 2007, at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The SSC employees and FIRST Robotics volunteer mentors are standing near a mock-up of the playing field for the FIRST Robotics' 2007 `Rack n' Roll' challenge. Roughly 300 students and adult volunteers - representing 29 high schools from four states - attended the kickoff to hear the rules of `Rack n' Roll.' The teams will spend the next six weeks building and programming robots from parts kits they received Saturday, then battle their creations at regional spring competitions in New Orleans, Houston, Atlanta and other cities around the nation. FIRST aims to inspire students in the pursuit of engineering and technology studies and careers.

  13. FIRST Robotics Kickoff

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-06

    NASA engineers Scott Olive (left) and Bo Clarke answer questions during the 2007 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition regional kickoff event held Saturday, Jan. 6, 2007, at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The SSC employees and FIRST Robotics volunteer mentors are standing near a mock-up of the playing field for the FIRST Robotics' 2007 `Rack n' Roll' challenge. Roughly 300 students and adult volunteers - representing 29 high schools from four states - attended the kickoff to hear the rules of `Rack n' Roll.' The teams will spend the next six weeks building and programming robots from parts kits they received Saturday, then battle their creations at regional spring competitions in New Orleans, Houston, Atlanta and other cities around the nation. FIRST aims to inspire students in the pursuit of engineering and technology studies and careers.

  14. Early intervention, IDEA Part C services, and the medical home: collaboration for best practice and best outcomes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard C; Tapia, Carl

    2013-10-01

    The medical home and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Part C Early Intervention Program share many common purposes for infants and children ages 0 to 3 years, not the least of which is a family-centered focus. Professionals in pediatric medical home practices see substantial numbers of infants and toddlers with developmental delays and/or complex chronic conditions. Economic, health, and family-focused data each underscore the critical role of timely referral for relationship-based, individualized, accessible early intervention services and the need for collaborative partnerships in care. The medical home process and Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Part C policy both support nurturing relationships and family-centered care; both offer clear value in terms of economic and health outcomes. Best practice models for early intervention services incorporate learning in the natural environment and coaching models. Proactive medical homes provide strategies for effective developmental surveillance, family-centered resources, and tools to support high-risk groups, and comanagement of infants with special health care needs, including the monitoring of services provided and outcomes achieved.

  15. Consensus on timing of intervention for common congenital heart diseases: part I - acyanotic heart defects.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Syamasundar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review/editorial is to discuss how and when to treat the most common acyanotic congenital heart defects (CHD); the discussion of cyanotic heart defects will be presented in a subsequent editorial. By and large, the indications and timing of intervention are decided by the severity of the lesion. Balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty is the treatment of choice for valvar pulmonary stenosis and the indication for intervention is peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient >50 mmHg across the pulmonary valve. For aortic valve stenosis, balloon aortic valvuloplasty appears to be the first therapeutic procedure of choice; the indications for balloon dilatation of aortic valve are peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient across the aortic valve in excess of 70 mmHg irrespective of the symptoms or a gradient ≥ 50 mmHg with either symptoms or electrocardiographic ST-T wave changes indicative of myocardial perfusion abnormality. The indications for intervention in coarctation of the aorta are significant hypertension and/or congestive heart failure along with a pressure gradient in excess of 20 mmHg across the coarctation; the type of intervention varies with age at presentation and the anatomy of coarctation: surgical intervention for neonates and young infants, balloon angioplasty for discrete native coarctation in children, and stents in adolescents and adults. Long segment coarctations or those associated with hypoplasia of the isthmus or transverse aortic arch require surgical treatment in younger children and stents in adolescents and adults. For post-surgical aortic recoarctation, balloon angioplasty in young children and stents in adolescents and adults are treatment options. Transcatheter closure methods are currently preferred for ostium secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs); the indications for occlusion are right ventricular volume overload by echocardiogram. Ostium primum, sinus venosus and coronary sinus ASDs require surgical closure. For all ASDs

  16. Robot Technicians: Is There a Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minty, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The study attempted to determine needs for training robotic technicians in Michigan. The survey had three parts: (1) needed technical specialities, (2) current problems with robot maintenance and repair, and (3) number of robots needed to keep a full-time technician occupied. (CH)

  17. Sample Return Robot Centennial Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-16

    NASA Program Manager for Centennial Challenges Sam Ortega help show a young visitor how to drive a rover as part of the interactive NASA Mars rover exhibit during the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) "TouchTomorrow" education and outreach event that was held in tandem with the NASA-WPI Sample Return Robot Centennial Challenge on Saturday, June 16, 2012 in Worcester, Mass. The NASA-WPI challenge tasked robotic teams to build autonomous robots that can identify, collect and return samples. NASA needs autonomous robotic capability for future planetary exploration. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Robotics as an Educational Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miglino, Orazio; Lund, Henrik Hautop; Cardaci, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    Explores a new educational application of Piaget's theories of cognitive development: the use, as a teaching tool, of physical robots conceived as artificial organisms. Reviews educational projects using real robots. Shows that the use of intelligent systems to enlarge the view of biological reality could become an integral part of curricula in…

  19. Robotics as an Educational Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miglino, Orazio; Lund, Henrik Hautop; Cardaci, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    Explores a new educational application of Piaget's theories of cognitive development: the use, as a teaching tool, of physical robots conceived as artificial organisms. Reviews educational projects using real robots. Shows that the use of intelligent systems to enlarge the view of biological reality could become an integral part of curricula in…

  20. Rotorcraft and Enabling Robotic Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines some of the issues underlying potential robotic rescue devices (RRD) in the context where autonomous or manned rotorcraft deployment of such robotic systems is a crucial attribute for their success in supporting future disaster relief and emergency response (DRER) missions. As a part of this discussion, work related to proof-of-concept prototyping of two notional RRD systems is summarized.

  1. Consensus on timing of intervention for common congenital heart diseases: part II - cyanotic heart defects.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Syamasundar

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this review/editorial is to discuss how and when to treat the most common cyanotic congenital heart defects (CHDs); the discussion of acyanotic heart defects was presented in a previous editorial. By and large, the indications and timing of intervention are decided by the severity of the lesion. While some patients with acyanotic CHD may not require surgical or transcatheter intervention because of spontaneous resolution of the defect or mildness of the defect, the majority of cyanotic CHD will require intervention, mostly surgical. Total surgical correction is the treatment of choice for tetralogy of Fallot patients although some patients may need to be palliated initially by performing a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. For transposition of the great arteries, arterial switch (Jatene) procedure is the treatment of choice, although Rastelli procedure is required for patients who have associated ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary stenosis (PS). Some of these babies may require Prostaglandin E1 infusion and/or balloon atrial septostomy prior to corrective surgery. In tricuspid atresia patients, most babies require palliation at presentation either with a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt or pulmonary artery banding followed later by staged Fontan (bidirectional Glenn followed later by extracardiac conduit Fontan conversion usually with fenestration). Truncus arteriosus babies are treated by closure of VSD along with right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit; palliative banding of the pulmonary artery is no longer recommended. Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection babies require anastomosis of the common pulmonary vein with the left atrium at presentation. Other defects should also be addressed by staged correction or complete repair depending upon the anatomy/physiology. Feasibility, safety and effectiveness of treatment of cyanotic CHD with currently available medical, transcatheter and surgical methods are well established and should

  2. What makes a robot 'social'?

    PubMed

    Jones, Raya A

    2017-08-01

    Rhetorical moves that construct humanoid robots as social agents disclose tensions at the intersection of science and technology studies (STS) and social robotics. The discourse of robotics often constructs robots that are like us (and therefore unlike dumb artefacts). In the discourse of STS, descriptions of how people assimilate robots into their activities are presented directly or indirectly against the backdrop of actor-network theory, which prompts attributing agency to mundane artefacts. In contradistinction to both social robotics and STS, it is suggested here that to view a capacity to partake in dialogical action (to have a 'voice') is necessary for regarding an artefact as authentically social. The theme is explored partly through a critical reinterpretation of an episode that Morana Alač reported and analysed towards demonstrating her bodies-in-interaction concept. This paper turns to 'body' with particular reference to Gibsonian affordances theory so as to identify the level of analysis at which dialogicality enters social interactions.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  4. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  5. Nonstandard drugs and feasible new interventions for autoimmune hepatitis: part II.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2012-10-01

    Molecular, cellular, and genetic interventions are now feasible for autoimmune hepatitis because of improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, advances in recombinant technology, and previous successes in animal models and humans with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Non-mitogenic monoclonal antibodies to CD3 promote apoptosis of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, inhibit production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, improve the function of regulatory T cells, and induce a durable remission in mouse models and humans with autoimmune diabetes. Monoclonal antibodies to CD20 deplete B lymphocytes, modify antibody-dependent and cell-mediated cytotoxic pathways, enhance regulatory T cell function, and improve isolated cases of autoimmune hepatitis with B-cell disorders. Recombinant cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 fused with immunoglobulin can block the second co-stimulatory signal required for lymphocyte activation, and it has been licensed for use in rheumatoid arthritis but not tried in autoimmune hepatitis. Other considerations on the distant horizon are monoclonal antibodies against inhibitory receptors on regulatory T cells, adoptive transfer of fresh regulatory T cells, tailored glycolipids that strengthen the immunosuppressive activity of natural killer T cells, small inhibitory ribonucleic acid molecules that silence promoter genes supporting disease activity, and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation to re-constitute immune homeostasis and support the damaged liver. Development of these feasible new interventions for autoimmune hepatitis requires therapeutic animal models, societal support, and a collaborative network of investigators to conduct rigorous clinical trials.

  6. [Quality profile of a CAM rehabilitation clinic--Part 1: Structure, quality assurance and interventions].

    PubMed

    Melchart, Dieter; Wessel, Anne; Wunderlich, Stefanie

    2007-10-01

    To present a patient care evaluation program exemplified by a rehabilitation clinic for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with focus on aspects of structure quality, steps of quality assurance and interventions administered. Assessment of previously defined criteria of structure (general characteristics of the facility, staff, medical equipment and constructional features, medical concept, continuing care, internal communication) and measures of quality assurance with the aid of a questionnaire filled in by the management of the hospital. Development of internal guidelines for diagnostics and therapy with respect to relevant diseases. The clinic's structure profile describes the indications and contraindications in effect, the quantity and qualification structure of staff, and the constructional and medical equipment details. Based on a multidimensional bio-psycho-social concept the general objectives of rehabilitation are derived. According to the medical concept the corresponding diagnostic and therapeutic methods are presented. Guidelines for treatment were exemplified by patients with migraine. The structural features do not fully meet the preconditions valid for the various indications in rehabilitation. As CAM hospitals define themselves by the methods of intervention they apply rather than by the indications to be treated they demand for an exceptional position.

  7. Hexapod Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begody, Ericka

    2016-01-01

    right or up and down. The hexapod will eventually be able to track the object moving its head and body in sync with on another and being able to rotate its body at 360 degrees. This is the plans and possible end results for the hexapod robot I will be working on during my summer internship at NASA Johnson Space Center. Since working on the hexapod project I have gained an increase interest in robotics. I enjoy the process of critical thinking. Also will working on this project I was challenged in a way that made more passionate to strive even more to become an engineer. I've learned that asking questions is an important part of the learning process. Also I learn that much more is accomplished when teamwork is applied.

  8. PIR-1 and PIRPL. A Project in Robotics Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Charles P.

    This paper presents the results of a project in robotics education that included: (1) designing a mobile robot--the Personal Instructional Robot-1 (PIR-1); (2) providing a guide to the purchase and assembly of necessary parts; (3) providing a way to interface the robot with common classroom microcomputers; and (4) providing a language by which the…

  9. Recent Advances in Robotics and Career Opportunities for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchier, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Some of the most significant advances in robotic systems over the last year are shown in this talk, which covers both autonomous and partly autonomous robots. A few robotic employers, both in Texas and elsewhere are profiled, with an emphasis on opportunities of interest to physicists. The presenter is president of the Dallas Personal Robotics Group.

  10. Technology Teaching or Mediated Learning, Part II, 1990s: Literacy Linkages and Intervention Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coufal, Kathy L.

    2002-01-01

    Themes during the 1990s included the bootstrapping effects between oral and literate language, importance of supporting emergent literacy, parallels between oral language impairment and academic failure, and challenges in facilitating language learning. This article addresses questions posed in Part I related to use of computer technology for…

  11. Robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Diana, M; Marescaux, J

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in minimally invasive surgery requires intensive and continuous training, as it is technically challenging for unnatural visual and haptic perceptions. Robotic and computer sciences are producing innovations to augment the surgeon's skills to achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery. This article reviews the current use of robotically assisted surgery, focusing on technology as well as main applications in digestive surgery, and future perspectives. The PubMed database was interrogated to retrieve evidence-based data on surgical applications. Internal and external consulting with key opinion leaders, renowned robotics laboratories and robotic platform manufacturers was used to produce state-of-the art business intelligence around robotically assisted surgery. Selected digestive procedures (oesophagectomy, gastric bypass, pancreatic and liver resections, rectal resection for cancer) might benefit from robotic assistance, although the current level of evidence is insufficient to support widespread adoption. The surgical robotic market is growing, and a variety of projects have recently been launched at both academic and corporate levels to develop lightweight, miniaturized surgical robotic prototypes. The magnified view, and improved ergonomics and dexterity offered by robotic platforms, might facilitate the uptake of minimally invasive procedures. Image guidance to complement robotically assisted procedures, through the concepts of augmented reality, could well represent a major revolution to increase safety and deal with difficulties associated with the new minimally invasive approaches. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Canine prostate models in preclinical studies of minimally invasive interventions: part II, benign prostatic hyperplasia models

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Canine prostate is widely used as animal model in the preclinical evaluation of emerging therapeutic interventions. Spontaneous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is common in adult intact male dogs with two distinct pathological types: glandular and complex form of prostatic hyperplasia. The complex form of prostatic hyperplasia, usually occurring in older dogs, represents an ideal model because of its unique pathologic feature, including not only glandular hyperplasia but also an increase in prostate stromal components. The limited commercial availability of adult dogs with spontaneous BPH motivates experimentally induced BPH in young dogs. Hormone-induced canine BPH model has been well established with various hormonal treatment regimens and administration approaches. The goal of this review is to provide the veterinary background in spontaneous BPH in dogs, summarize the techniques in hormonal induction of canine BPH, and highlight the pathological and clinical limitations of the canine models that may lead to distinct therapeutic responses compared to clinical trials in humans. PMID:28725598

  13. Minimal intervention dentistry: part 4. Detection and diagnosis of initial caries lesions.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, A; Gaucher, C; Bonte, E; Lasfargues, J J

    2012-12-01

    The detection of carious lesions is focused on the identification of early mineral changes to allow the demineralisation process to be managed by non-invasive interventions. The methods recommended for clinical diagnosis of initial carious lesions are discussed and illustrated. These include the early detection of lesions, evaluation of the extent of the lesion and its state of activity and the establishment of appropriate monitoring. The place of modern tools, including those based on fluorescence, is discussed. These can help inform patients. They are also potentially useful in regular control visits to monitor the progression or regression of early lesions. A rigorous and systematic approach to caries diagnosis is essential to establish a care plan for the disease and to identify preventive measures based on more precise diagnosis and to reduce reliance on restorative measures.

  14. Coronary revascularization in Japan. Part 3: percutaneous coronary intervention during 1997.

    PubMed

    Shihara, Miwako; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi, Miyuki; Shigematsu, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Shimako; Koike, George; Kono, Suminori; Takeshita, Akira

    2002-01-01

    A survey by the Japanese Coronary Intervention Study (JCIS) group revealed that 109,788 percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures were performed at 1,023 laboratories during 1997. The present study aimed to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, in-hospital outcomes, and long-term outcomes of these patients. A total of 10,642 PCIs performed in 8,814 patients, which corresponded to approximately 10% of the overall PCIs, were selected at random. The mean patient age was 65 years, and 75% were males. The patients often had extensive coronary risk factors. The most prevalent clinical diagnosis was stable angina (36%), followed by myocardial infarction (MI) excluding acute myocardial infarction (AMI; 28%) and AMI (25%). Plain old balloon angioplasty was used as the sole procedure in 58% of lesions for which an attempt to heal was made, and coronary stent placement in 38%. Angiographic success was achieved in 92% of attempted lesions. Mortality, MI and emergency coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) rates during the hospitalization were 2.6%, 2.0% and 0.7%, respectively. In-hospital mortality rate for AMI was 7.6%, whereas that for elective PCI in cases without AMI was 0.6%. The overall mortality for 1.8 years was 8%. Repeat PCI was performed for 35% and CABG for 6% during the follow-up period. In Japan, PCI was performed in patients with coronary artery disease and extensive risk factors, but a high rate of angiographic success was achieved. The rates of in-hospital mortality and emergency CABG were low in non-AMI patients, but the 1-year rate of repeat PCI was as high as 32%.

  15. Robot goniophotometry at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, M.; Maass, R.; Sauter, G.

    2015-04-01

    The total luminous flux of a light source is the complete integration of its spectral radiance distribution weighted with the photopic observer and taken over all parts of its surface and over the full solid angle of emittance. The spatial distributions are measured with various types of goniophotometers and the PTB robot goniophotometer is a new type with many unique features. It is built as an arrangement of three robots with arms of more than 6 m in length and with 7 degrees of freedom each. The extreme flexibility of the robots allows computer controlled tracks with variable radii and speeds up to 3 m and 1 m s-1, respectively. One robot aligns the light source and the two other robots move photometers and array spectrometers in their hemispheres simultaneously measuring planar illuminance and the related relative spectral distribution. The robot goniophotometer is optimized for the realisation of the luminous flux unit, the lumen and it is completely characterized in this report. The relevant properties and correction factors are explained, as well as the implementation of techniques for synchronisation and stabilisation of spatially resolved or integrated photometric and colorimetric quantities. Finally, all contributions are combined in the model of evaluation for the (total) luminous flux value and the measurement uncertainty associated with that value is evaluated in the presented uncertainty budget. The goniophotometric determination of the values for colorimetric quantities is explained for the total luminous flux and the spatially distributed radiant power.

  16. The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sudha M; Kaur, Maninderjit; Park, Isabel K; Gifford, Timothy D; Marsh, Kerry L; Bhat, Anjana N

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2). We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD.

  17. The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sudha M.; Kaur, Maninderjit; Park, Isabel K.; Gifford, Timothy D.; Marsh, Kerry L.; Bhat, Anjana N.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2). We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD. PMID:26793394

  18. TARDEC Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    TARDEC Robotics Dr. Greg Hudas Greg.hudas@us.army.mil UNCLASSIFIED: Dist A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TARDEC Robotics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Greg Hudas...ANSI Std Z39-18 Excellence in Robotics Outreach & University Shaping Requirements Building Modeling & Simulation Component Development International

  19. ROBOT WRITING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Technical writers who are hypnotized by the mechanical metaphor inevitably produce robot writing - a separate language, distantly related to the...prose of Darwin, Huxley, Jeans, and Einstein. Where they were clear, fresh, and graceful, the robot writer is hard, dull, and clumsy. Where they were...merely human, the robot writer is infallible, prefabricated, impersonal, and irresponsible. These four characteristics are interlinked. An example of one usually illustrates the other three.

  20. Robot Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    34natural" behavior . They are each suitable to some applications more than others. Robot systems should support a wide repertoire of such motion regimes... behavior at a kinematic singularity. Some applications, such as arc-welding or spray-painting, can require very fine control of the robot’s speed...for specifying the behavior of systems more complex than a single robot. Another example of the need of this kind of coordination is in the

  1. Hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a hopping robot that includes a misfire tolerant linear actuator suitable for long trips, low energy steering and control, reliable low energy righting, miniature low energy fuel control. The present invention provides a robot with hopping mobility, capable of traversing obstacles significant in size relative to the robot and capable of operation on unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides a hopping robot with misfire-tolerant combustion actuation, and with combustion actuation suitable for use in oxygen-poor environments.

  2. Robotics research

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.; Paul, R.

    1984-01-01

    Organized around a view of robotics as ''the intelligent connection of perception to action,'' the fifty-three contributions collected in this book present leading current research in one of the fastest moving fields of artificial intelligence. Readings Include: Hand-Eye Coordination in Rope Handling; 3-D Balance Using 2-D algorithms. A Model Driven Visual Inspection Module: Stereo Vision: Complexity and Constraints; Interpretation of Contact Geometers from Force Measurement; The Utah MIT Dextrous Hand: Work in Progress; Hierarchical Nonlinear Control for Robots; VAL-11; A Robot Programming Language and Control System; Technological Barriers in Robotics: A Perspective from Industry.

  3. Research activities on robotics at the Electrotechnical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakikura, M.

    Various robotics research activities carried out at the Electrotechnical Laboratory in Japan are discussed. The history of robotics research, which has been going on since the late 1960s as a part of artificial-intelligence research is described. Consideration is given to the full-scale robot system called ETL-ROBOT Mk. 1, to the carpenter robot, to the intelligent locomotive-handling robot, to the flexible finger, and to the hand-eye robot. The present aspect of the research in relation to past results is examined and includes the development of new robot systems such as a vision system based on a three-dimensional model, an interactive modeling system, a direct-drive manipulator, a robot vision language, and a language-aided robotic teleoperation system. Research themes planned for the near future include manipulation techniques, sensor techniques, autonomous robot control techniques, advanced teleoperation techniques, and system totalizing techniques.

  4. Association of a Full-Day versus Part-Day Preschool Intervention with School Readiness, Attendance, and Parent Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Richardson, Brandt A.; Hayakawa, C. Momoko; Lease, Erin M.; Warner-Richter, Mallory; Englund, Michelle M.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Sullivan, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Importance Early childhood interventions have demonstrated many positive effects on well-being. Whether attending for the full day vs part day improves outcomes is unknown. Objective To evaluate the association between a school-based full- and part-day early childhood development program and multiple indicators of school readiness, attendance, and parent involvement for a large cohort of low-income children. Design, Setting, and Participants End-of-preschool follow-up of a nonrandomized, matched-group cohort of predominantly low-income, ethnic minority children who enrolled in the Child-Parent Centers for the full school day (7 hours; n = 409) or part of the day (3 hours on average; n = 573) in the fall of 2012 in 11 schools in Chicago, Ill. Interventions The Midwest Child-Parent Center Education Program provides comprehensive education, family-support, and health services from preschool to third grade in high-poverty neighborhoods. In the preschool component assessed in this study, 3- and 4-year-olds in enrolled in the program for full- or part-day. Main Outcomes and Measures School readiness skills in 6 domains and on a total score at the end of the year, attendance and chronic absences, and parental involvement. Mean raw scores and the number of items for readiness domains were as follows: literacy (57.1, 12 items), language (37.8, 6), math (36.3, 7), cognitive (57.6, 10), socioemotional (55.4, 9), physical health (33.8, 5), and the total (278.0; 49). Results Full-day preschool participants had higher scores than part-day peers in the same schools on socioemotional development (58.6 vs. 54.5; diff. = 4.1; P = .025; 95% CI = 0.5, 7.6), language (39.9 vs. 37.3; diff = 2.6; P =.010; 95% CI = 0.6, 4.6), math (40.0 vs. 36.4; diff. = 3.6; P = .022; 95% CI = 0.5, 6.7), and physical health (35.5 vs. 33.6; diff. = 1.9; P = .006; 95% CI = 0.5, 3.2) but not parent involvement in school (3.95 vs. 4.65; diff. = -0.70; P = .170; 95% CI = -1.7, 3.0). The full-day group also

  5. Interventions for Children and Youth with Autism: Prudent Choices in a World of Exaggerated Claims and Empty Promises. Part I: Intervention and Treatment Option Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heflin, L. Juane; Simpson, Richard L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses intervention and treatment options being used with the population of children and youth who have autism spectrum disorders. The discussion includes interventions based on relationship formation (including holding therapy, gentle teaching, options, and floor time), skill-based treatments, physiologically oriented intervention, and…

  6. From an Idea to a Working Robot Prototype: Distributing Knowledge of Robotics through Science Museum Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishuk, Alexander; Verner, Igor; Mir, Ronen

    This paper presents our experience of teaching robotics to primary and middle school students at the Gelfand Center for Model Building, Robotics & Communication which is part of the Israel National Museum of Science, Technology and Space (MadaTech). The educational study examines the value and characteristics of students’ teamwork in the museum robotics workshops.

  7. Preliminary clinical experience with a dedicated interventional robotic system for CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions: a comparison with the conventional manual technique.

    PubMed

    Anzidei, Michele; Argirò, Renato; Porfiri, Andrea; Boni, Fabrizio; Anile, Marco; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Vitolo, Domenico; Saba, Luca; Napoli, Alessandro; Leonardi, Andrea; Longo, Flavia; Venuta, Federico; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Evaluate the performance of a robotic system for CT-guided lung biopsy in comparison to the conventional manual technique. One hundred patients referred for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomly assigned to group A (robot-assisted procedure) or group B (conventional procedure). Size, distance from entry point and position in lung of target lesions were evaluated to assess homogeneity differences between the two groups. Procedure duration, dose length product (DLP), precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were evaluated to assess the clinical performance of the robotic system as compared to the conventional technique. All biopsies were successfully performed. The size (p = 0.41), distance from entry point (p = 0.86) and position in lung (p = 0.32) of target lesions were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Procedure duration and radiation dose were significantly reduced in group A as compared to group B (p = 0.001). Precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy can be performed safely and with high diagnostic accuracy, reducing procedure duration and radiation dose in comparison to the conventional manual technique. • CT-guided biopsy is the main procedure to obtain diagnosis in lung tumours. • The robotic device facilitates percutaneous needle placement under CT guidance. • Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy reduces procedure duration and radiation dose.

  8. Towards a sustainable modular robot system for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S. G. M.

    This thesis investigates multiple perspectives of developing an unmanned robotic system suited for planetary terrains. In this case, the unmanned system consists of unit-modular robots. This type of robot has potential to be developed and maintained as a sustainable multi-robot system while located far from direct human intervention. Some characteristics that make this possible are: the cooperation, communication and connectivity among the robot modules, flexibility of individual robot modules, capability of self-healing in the case of a failed module and the ability to generate multiple gaits by means of reconfiguration. To demonstrate the effects of high flexibility of an individual robot module, multiple modules of a four-degree-of-freedom unit-modular robot were developed. The robot was equipped with a novel connector mechanism that made self-healing possible. Also, design strategies included the use of series elastic actuators for better robot-terrain interaction. In addition, various locomotion gaits were generated and explored using the robot modules, which is essential for a modular robot system to achieve robustness and thus successfully navigate and function in a planetary environment. To investigate multi-robot task completion, a biomimetic cooperative load transportation algorithm was developed and simulated. Also, a liquid motion-inspired theory was developed consisting of a large number of robot modules. This can be used to traverse obstacles that inevitably occur in maneuvering over rough terrains such as in a planetary exploration. Keywords: Modular robot, cooperative robots, biomimetics, planetary exploration, sustainability.

  9. Calculating the peak skin dose resulting from fluoroscopically guided interventions. Part I: Methods.

    PubMed

    Jones, A Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander S

    2011-11-15

    While direct measurement of the peak skin dose resulting from a fluoroscopically-guided procedure is possible, the decision must be made a priori at additional cost and time. It is most often the case that the need for accurate knowledge of the peak skin dose is realized only after a procedure has been completed, or after a suspected reaction has been discovered. Part I of this review article discusses methods for calculating the peak skin dose across a range of clinical scenarios. In some cases, a wealth of data are available, while in other cases few data are available and additional data must be measured in order to estimate the peak skin dose. Data may be gathered from a dose report, the DICOM headers of images, or from staff and physician interviews. After data are gathered, specific steps must be followed to convert dose metrics, such as the reference point air kerma (K(a,r)) or the kerma area product (KAP), into peak skin dose. These steps require knowledge of other related factors, such as the f-factor and the backscatter factor, tables of which are provided in this manuscript. Sources of error and the impact of these errors on the accuracy of the final estimate of the peak skin dose are discussed.

  10. Using multiple information sources to identify opportunities for ergonomic interventions in automotive parts distribution: a case study.

    PubMed

    Keyserling, W M; Ulin, S S; Lincoln, A E; Baker, S P

    2003-01-01

    An essential activity in any ergonomics program is determining specific work locations and activities where physical demands place workers at increased risk of sustaining an overexertion injury. To do this, safety and health professionals rely on a variety of information sources to identify and prioritize opportunities for ergonomic interventions. As part of a 4-year project to reduce overexertion injuries in the service parts division of a major auto maker, a study was performed in 19 parts distribution centers to evaluate the contributions of the following information sources in identifying specific high-risk work locations and activities: (1) archival medical/injury records, (2) identification of "problem tasks" by plant-based ergonomic committees, (3) facility walk-throughs by experienced ergonomists, and (4) detailed ergonomic job analyses. Archival records were not particularly useful in identifying high-risk activities because essential exposure information (e.g., task, work location) was not documented. Walk-throughs and detailed ergonomic analyses were partially effective in identifying high-risk activities; however, in some cases the observation time was too short to observe peak exposures. Ergonomic committees were generally effective in identifying specific high-risk tasks and work locations. Rankings of "problem tasks" from multiple sites identified consensus division-wide ergonomic concerns. Detailed ergonomic job analyses confirmed that these tasks had high exposure to ergonomic risk factors. This study demonstrated potential pitfalls in relying on a single information source to identify work locations and activities that place workers at increased risk of overexertion injury.

  11. Robotics 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Robots are used in all kinds of industrial settings. They are used to rivet bolts to cars, to move items from one conveyor belt to another, to gather information from other planets, and even to perform some very delicate types of surgery. Anyone who has watched a robot perform its tasks cannot help but be impressed by how it works. This article…

  12. Robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A robot having a plurality of interconnected sections is disclosed. Each of the sections includes components which are moveable relative to components of an adjacent section. A plurality of electric motors are operably connected to at least two of said relatively moveable components to effect relative movement. A fitted, removable protective covering surrounds the sections to protect the robot.

  13. Robotics 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Robots are used in all kinds of industrial settings. They are used to rivet bolts to cars, to move items from one conveyor belt to another, to gather information from other planets, and even to perform some very delicate types of surgery. Anyone who has watched a robot perform its tasks cannot help but be impressed by how it works. This article…

  14. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  15. Robot Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Martin Marietta Aero and Naval Systems has advanced the CAD art to a very high level at its Robotics Laboratory. One of the company's major projects is construction of a huge Field Material Handling Robot for the Army's Human Engineering Lab. Design of FMR, intended to move heavy and dangerous material such as ammunition, was a triumph in CAD Engineering. Separate computer problems modeled the robot's kinematics and dynamics, yielding such parameters as the strength of materials required for each component, the length of the arms, their degree of freedom and power of hydraulic system needed. The Robotics Lab went a step further and added data enabling computer simulation and animation of the robot's total operational capability under various loading and unloading conditions. NASA computer program (IAC), integrated Analysis Capability Engineering Database was used. Program contains a series of modules that can stand alone or be integrated with data from sensors or software tools.

  16. Yakson touch as a part of early intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A systematic narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Preeti; Samuel, Asir John; Bansal, Arpna; Aranka, Vencita Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Yakson is a Korean therapeutic touch given to neonates and infants by caressing their abdomen with one hand while the other hand is placed on the back of the neonate\\infant either to relieve their pain or to calm them down. It was traditionally used by Koreans by caressing the aching body part of their children with a belief that it would relieve their pain. In spite of clinical evidence of its usefulness, there is limited literature available on Yakson touch. A systematic narrative review (SNR) was undertaken on studies that were carried out on the effectiveness of Yakson touch on infants and neonates. Only seven studies were detected from five major electronic databases, searched with the keywords: “Yakson,“ “Yakson touch,” and “Yakson in neonates”. One of the studies has been included in two Cochrane reviews by the same group of researchers published in 2011 and 2015, respectively, and also in a literature review. The evidence from these articles suggests that Yakson touch is able to increase the sleep scores of infants, affects their behavioral response, decreases the stress levels, increases maternal attachment, and has calming effects on them. However, the number of studies is limited, and thus the efficacy of this intervention has not been sufficiently established. Hence, there is a definite need for future studies to prove the efficacy of Yakson to include it in the early intervention programs. This SNR is aimed at compiling the studies which determined to prove the efficacy of the intervention of Yakson. PMID:27390459

  17. An example of the use of robotics in French nuclear power plants the ISIS robot; First and second generation

    SciTech Connect

    Seguy, J. ); Thirion, H. )

    1988-01-01

    The authors report how Robotics in French nuclear power plants (NPP) is used to solve maintenance problems. One of the most typical example of the use of robotics in French NPP is the ISIS robot. The first generation of this robot has performed the repair of corroded upper internal structures in Chinon A3 gaz cooled reactor. Two robots of this type have successfully welded more than 200 repair parts in the core without major failure during more than 12,000 hours.

  18. Part C Updates: Fourth in a Series of Updates on Selected Aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities, Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan, Ed.

    Part C Updates is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The intent of the compilation is to collect, in a convenient format, a variety of resources that meet the information needs of state and…

  19. [Current applications of robotic heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Setina, M; Veselka, J; Mokrácek, A; Vanek, I

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the article is to describe the history, development and current state of robotic heart surgery. Robotic heart surgery is a new technology which has recorded dramatic growth in recent years. This is because of the effort to develop, in all fields of surgery, new and minimally invasive methods and to reduce surgical stress. Overview of the relevant literature dealing with the history and development of robotic surgery, with a focus on heart surgery. The number of centres using a robot in clinical practice is growing fast. After a slow start, heart surgery is now the fastest growing field of robotic technology. It has been proven already that almost all heart surgeries can be performed with the use of a robot. Most of surgery fields have already introduced robots in current use. None of them, however, has yet advanced to a 100% robotic coverage of the whole range of interventions. Therefore it is a good strategy today to build multi-specialised operating theatres with robots that could be used for different fields of surgery. Even though robotic surgery is in its beginnings today, its great potential is quite apparent. Only the years to come will show the efficiency, safety, and the cost benefit of robotic technology as compared with traditional methods.

  20. Artificial heart for humanoid robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnuru, Akshay; Wu, Lianjun; Tadesse, Yonas

    2014-03-01

    A soft robotic device inspired by the pumping action of a biological heart is presented in this study. Developing artificial heart to a humanoid robot enables us to make a better biomedical device for ultimate use in humans. As technology continues to become more advanced, the methods in which we implement high performance and biomimetic artificial organs is getting nearer each day. In this paper, we present the design and development of a soft artificial heart that can be used in a humanoid robot and simulate the functions of a human heart using shape memory alloy technology. The robotic heart is designed to pump a blood-like fluid to parts of the robot such as the face to simulate someone blushing or when someone is angry by the use of elastomeric substrates and certain features for the transport of fluids.

  1. Quartz and respirable dust in the Dutch construction industry: a baseline exposure assessment as part of a multidimensional intervention approach.

    PubMed

    van Deurssen, Erik; Pronk, Anjoeka; Spaan, Suzanne; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik; Heederik, Dick; Meijster, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Quartz exposure can cause several respiratory health effects. Although quartz exposure has been described in several observational workplace studies, well-designed intervention studies that investigate the effect of control strategies are lacking. This article describes a baseline exposure study that is part of a multidimensional intervention program aiming to reduce quartz exposure among construction workers. In this study, personal respirable dust and quartz exposure was assessed among 116 construction workers (bricklayers, carpenters, concrete drillers, demolishers, and tuck pointers). Possible determinants of exposure, like job, tasks, and work practices, use of control measures, and organizational and psychosocial factors, were explored using exposure models for respirable dust and quartz separately. Stratified analyses by job title were performed to evaluate the effect of control measures on exposure and to explore the association between control measures and psychosocial factors. Overall, 62% of all measurements exceeded the Dutch occupational exposure limit for quartz and 11% for respirable dust. Concrete drillers and tuck pointers had the highest exposures for quartz and respirable dust (0.20 and 3.43mg m(-3), respectively). Significant predictors of elevated quartz exposure were abrasive tasks and type of material worked on. Surprisingly, in a univariate model, an increased knowledge level was associated with an increase in exposure. Although control measures were used infrequently, if used they resulted in approximately 40% reduction in quartz exposure among concrete drillers and tuck pointers. Only among concrete drillers, the use of control measures was associated with a higher score for social influence (factor 1.6); knowledge showed an inverse association with use of control measures for concrete drillers, demolishers, and tuck pointers. In conclusion, the detailed information on determinants of exposure, use of control measures, and constraints to

  2. Patient Evaluation and Preparation in Vascular and Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know (Part 1: Patient Assessment and Laboratory Tests)

    SciTech Connect

    Taslakian, Bedros; Sebaaly, Mikhael Georges Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-03-15

    Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care after the procedure is completed. After patient referral, contact with the referring physician and multidisciplinary team approach is vital. In addition, clinical history, physical examination, as well as full understanding of the pre-procedural laboratory results and imaging findings can guide the interventional radiologist to implement the most appropriate management plan, avoid unnecessary procedures, and prevent complications to achieve a successful outcome. We provide a comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and management in patients undergoing vascular and interventional radiology procedures.

  3. Development of autonomous eating mechanism for biomimetic robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kil-Woong; Cho, Ik-Jin; Lee, Yun-Jung

    2005-12-01

    Most of the recently developed robots are human friendly robots which imitate animals or humans such as entertainment robot, bio-mimetic robot and humanoid robot. Interest for these robots are being increased because the social trend is focused on health, welfare, and graying. Autonomous eating functionality is most unique and inherent behavior of pets and animals. Most of entertainment robots and pet robots make use of internal-type battery. Entertainment robots and pet robots with internal-type battery are not able to operate during charging the battery. Therefore, if a robot has an autonomous function for eating battery as its feeds, the robot is not only able to operate during recharging energy but also become more human friendly like pets. Here, a new autonomous eating mechanism was introduced for a biomimetic robot, called ELIRO-II(Eating LIzard RObot version 2). The ELIRO-II is able to find a food (a small battery), eat and evacuate by itself. This work describe sub-parts of the developed mechanism such as head-part, mouth-part, and stomach-part. In addition, control system of autonomous eating mechanism is described.

  4. Compliant Robotic Structures. Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    in diameter. Gordius (Figure 4) and Ascaris (Figure 5) represent two phyla of worms, Nematomorpha and Nematoda respectively, whose members function...Jean L. ( 1974), Ultrastructural features of a gordian worm ( Nematomorpha ), Jlournaol of Ultrastructure R’esearch, 46: 351-374. Freeman, W.H., and

  5. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  6. Intelligent robots and computer vision VIII: Algorithms and techniques; Proceedings of the Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, Nov. 6-10, 1989. Parts 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of computer-vision systems for robotics applications are discussed in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to pattern recognition for intelligent robots and computer vision; segmentation, image processing, and feature extraction; three-dimensional shape determination and representation; color and range image processing; and neural networks and associative processors for advanced vision processing. Also considered are the biological basis for machine vision, fuzzy logic in intelligent systems and computer vision, image understanding and analysis, time-sequential image processing, and polar exponential grid processing for synthetic vision systems. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and sample images are provided.

  7. Empowering families through Relationship Development Intervention: an important part of the biopsychosocial management of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutstein, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    Relationship Development Intervention (RDI) is a program designed to empower and guide parents of children, adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and similar developmental disorders to function as facilitators for their children's mental development. RDI teaches parents to play an important role in improving critical emotional, social, and metacognitive abilities through carefully graduated, guided interaction in daily activities. The paper reviews RDI's theoretical underpinnings, current methodology and preliminary research results. The clinical utilization of RDI is discussed as an important part of the biopsychosocial management of ASD. Although a controlled, blinded study of RDI has yet to be done, preliminary research suggests that parents, through the RDI curriculum and consultation process, have the potential to exert a powerful impact on their ASD children's experience-sharing communication, social interaction, and adaptive functioning. RDI should be considered as part of a comprehensive treatment regimen, in which the physician plays a clinical management role, providing medical and psychiatric consultation. The RDI clinician can function as a remediation specialist, providing accurate feedback to the physician, along with individualized training and guidance to family members.

  8. Subsumption Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Subsumption Robotics Christopher K. DeBolt Naval EOD Technology Division 2008 Stump Neck Road Indian Head, MD 20640-5070 phone: (301) 744-6850, Ext...eodmgate.navsea.navy.mil; nguyent.eodtc@eodmgate.navsea.navy.mil Helen Greiner and Polly K. Pook I.S. Robotics phone: (617) 629-0055 e-mail: helen@isr.com , pook...408) 656-3462 e-mail: healey@me.nps.navy.mil LONG-TERM GOALS Through the use of subsumption architectures, low cost, simple robots can be developed

  9. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures.

  10. Robotic thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, F Christopher; Chung, Woong Youn

    2014-06-01

    Robotic thyroidectomy is ideal for patients with indeterminate, likely benign lesions less than 3 cm, and a body mass index less than 35 kg/mg(2). Proper arm position and padding are important to facilitate exposure and development of the working space from axilla to thyroid bed. The working space is developed using headlight and retractors without robotic assistance, establishing exposure of the thyroid bed from a 5-cm incision in the axilla. Three robotic instruments and a stereoscopic endoscope provide excellent visualization of the associated thyroid neurovasculature anatomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlling robots with spoken commands

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.; Phelan, P.

    1987-10-01

    A robotic system for handling radioactive materials has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Because of safety considerations, the robot must be under the control of a human operator continuously. In this paper we describe the implementation of a voice-recognition system that makes such control possible, yet permits the robot to perform preprogrammed manipulations without the operator's intervention. We also describe the training given both the operator and the voice recognition-system, as well as practical problems encountered during routine operation. A speech synthesis unit connected to the robot's control computer provides audible feedback to the operator. Thus, when a task is completed or if an emergency develops, the computer provides an appropriate spoken message. Implementation and operation of this commercially available hardware are discussed.

  12. [Surgical robotics in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Zoltán

    2009-09-06

    Surgical robotics is one of the most dynamically advancing areas of biomedical engineering. In the past few decades, computer-integrated interventional medicine has gained significance internationally in the field of surgical procedures. More recently, mechatronic devices have been used for nephrectomy, cholecystectomy, as well as in orthopedics and radiosurgery. Estimates show that 70% of the radical prostatectomies were performed with the da Vinci robot in the United States last year. Robot-aided procedures offer remarkable advantages in neurosurgery both for the patient and the surgeon, making microsurgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery a reality, and even complete teleoperation accessible. This paper introduces surgical robotic systems developed primarily for brain and spine applications, besides, it focuses on the different research strategies applied to provide smarter, better and more advanced tools to surgeons. A new system is discussed in details that we have developed together with the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. This cooperatively-controlled system can assist with skull base drilling to improve the safety and quality of neurosurgery while reducing the operating time. The paper presents the entire system, the preliminary results of phantom and cadaver tests and our efforts to improve the accuracy of the components. An effective optical tracking based patient motion compensation method has been implemented and tested. The results verify the effectiveness of the system and allow for further research.

  13. Multiagent robotic systems' ambient light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iureva, Radda A.; Maslennikov, Oleg S.; Komarov, Igor I.

    2017-05-01

    Swarm robotics is one of the fastest growing areas of modern technology. Being subclass of multi-agent systems it inherits the main part of scientific-methodological apparatus of construction and functioning of practically useful complexes, which consist of rather autonomous independent agents. Ambient light sensors (ALS) are widely used in robotics. But speaking about swarm robotics, the technology which has great number of specific features and is developing, we can't help mentioning that its important to use sensors on each robot not only in order to help it to get directionally oriented, but also to follow light emitted by robot-chief or to help to find the goal easier. Key words: ambient light sensor, swarm system, multiagent system, robotic system, robotic complexes, simulation modelling

  14. Parallel Architecture For Robotics Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1990-01-01

    Universal Real-Time Robotic Controller and Simulator (URRCS) is highly parallel computing architecture for control and simulation of robot motion. Result of extensive algorithmic study of different kinematic and dynamic computational problems arising in control and simulation of robot motion. Study led to development of class of efficient parallel algorithms for these problems. Represents algorithmically specialized architecture, in sense capable of exploiting common properties of this class of parallel algorithms. System with both MIMD and SIMD capabilities. Regarded as processor attached to bus of external host processor, as part of bus memory.

  15. Surrogate Robot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-21

    The Surrogate robot Surge, built at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA., is being developed in order to extend humanity reach into hazardous environments to perform tasks such as using environmental test equipment.

  16. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  17. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  18. Robotic arm

    DOEpatents

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  19. Robotic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W. Donald

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  20. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  1. Predictors of receiving therapy among very low birth weight 2-year olds eligible for Part C early intervention in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    McManus, Beth Marie; Robert, Stephanie; Albanese, Aggie; Sadek-Badawi, Mona; Palta, Mari

    2013-07-11

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (Part C) authorizes states to establish systems to provide early intervention services (e.g., therapy) for children at risk, with the incentive of federal financial support. This study examines family and neighborhood characteristics associated with currently utilizing physical, occupational, or speech therapy among very low birthweight (VLBW) 2-year-old children who meet Wisconsin eligibility requirements for early intervention services (EI) due to developmental delay. This cross-sectional analysis used data from the Newborn Lung Project, a regional cohort study of VLBW infants hospitalized in Wisconsin's newborn intensive care units during 2003-2004. We included the 176 children who were age two at follow-up, and met Wisconsin state eligibility requirements for EI based on developmental delay. Exact logistic regression was used to describe child and neighborhood socio-demographic correlates of parent-reported receipt of therapy. Among VLBW children with developmental delay, currently utilizing therapy was higher among children with Medicaid (aOR = 5.3, 95% CI: 1.3, 28.3) and concomitant developmental disability (aOR = 5.2, 95% CI: 2.1, 13.3) and lower for those living in a socially more disadvantaged neighborhood (aOR=0.48, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.98, per tertile). Among a sample of VLBW 2-year olds with developmental delays who are EI-eligible in WI, 4 out of 5 were currently receiving therapy, per parent report. Participation in Medicaid positively influences therapy utilization. Children with developmental difficulties who live in socially disadvantaged neighborhoods are at highest risk for not receiving therapy.

  2. Development of an Interactive Augmented Environment and Its Application to Autonomous Learning for Quadruped Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hayato; Osaki, Tsugutoyo; Okuyama, Tetsuro; Gramm, Joshua; Ishino, Akira; Shinohara, Ayumi

    This paper describes an interactive experimental environment for autonomous soccer robots, which is a soccer field augmented by utilizing camera input and projector output. This environment, in a sense, plays an intermediate role between simulated environments and real environments. We can simulate some parts of real environments, e.g., real objects such as robots or a ball, and reflect simulated data into the real environments, e.g., to visualize the positions on the field, so as to create a situation that allows easy debugging of robot programs. The significant point compared with analogous work is that virtual objects are touchable in this system owing to projectors. We also show the portable version of our system that does not require ceiling cameras. As an application in the augmented environment, we address the learning of goalie strategies on real quadruped robots in penalty kicks. We make our robots utilize virtual balls in order to perform only quadruped locomotion in real environments, which is quite difficult to simulate accurately. Our robots autonomously learn and acquire more beneficial strategies without human intervention in our augmented environment than those in a fully simulated environment.

  3. Computerized lifelong mentoring support using robot for autistic individuals.

    PubMed

    Ijichi, Shinji; Ijichi, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    Developmental diversity in childhood is transformed into personality variation in adulthood. This view is now revalued through an ongoing paradigm shift in the field of developmental conditions, the transition from the qualitative dichotomy perspective to the quantitative concept. In the quantitative concept, autism is not a disease nor a developmental qualitative disorder, but a behavioral extreme in individual variation. Although the traditional qualitative view cannot interpret the recent worldwide prevalence of autism, the increase in the reported number of cases with autism and border cases can be easily explained by a dimensional exploration in which the primary autistic phenotype is regarded as an evolutional superiority. Therefore, the only suitable intervention is mentoring which provides a powerful lifelong support for higher social achievement in individuals with autism. Here, we hypothesize the coming mentoring circumstances for autistic individuals in the near future. Ongoing progress in robot and computer technology might allow the guardians to leave the major part of mentoring support to an individualized robot, and the 'folk physics' tendency in individuals with autism could facilitate the spread of the mentoring support system. The development of the robot mentor software may be simple because of the uniformity and stereotypy of the behavior patterns in individuals with autism. With the help of the robot mentor and under its guidance, autistic people might enjoy their social life and contribute to the prosperity of the human society to the maximum degree. Because the future population ratio of autistics/non-autistics might be reversed according to the current trend of the prevalence, mentoring robot programs for autistic individuals should be developed without delay as a novel preliminary activity in the Jiminy Cricket movement, which is a campaign to reverse the estrangement of the present majority from autism and to increase the number of mentors

  4. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.

  5. Rolling Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed rolling robot routinely traverses rough terrain, clearing rocks as high as 1 m. Climbs steps 1 m high and spans ditches 2.3 m wide. Simple but rugged semiautonomous rover has large wheels and articulated body. With combined yaw, roll, and four-wheel drive, robot crawls slowly to pass over soft or sandy terrain. Senses terrain along corridor, chooses path to avoid insurmountable obstacles, and monitors state of vehicle for unexpected hazards.

  6. Can Robotic Interaction Improve Joint Attention Skills?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Swanson, Amy R.; Bekele, Esubalew; Zhang, Lian; Crittendon, Julie A.; Weitlauf, Amy F.; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Although it has often been argued that clinical applications of advanced technology may hold promise for addressing impairments associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), relatively few investigations have indexed the impact of intervention and feedback approaches. This pilot study investigated the application of a novel robotic interaction system capable of administering and adjusting joint attention prompts to a small group (n = 6) of children with ASD. Across a series of four sessions, children improved in their ability to orient to prompts administered by the robotic system and continued to display strong attention toward the humanoid robot over time. The results highlight both potential benefits of robotic systems for directed intervention approaches as well as potent limitations of existing humanoid robotic platforms. PMID:24014194

  7. Robot Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Tests with robots and the high-fidelity Hubble Space Telescope mockup astronauts use to train for servicing missions have convinced NASA managers it may be possible to maintain and upgrade the orbiting observatory without sending a space shuttle to do the job. In a formal request last week, the agency gave bidders until July 16 to sub-mit proposals for a robotic mission to the space telescope before the end of 2007. At a minimum, the mission would attach a rocket motor to deorbit the telescope safely when its service life ends. In the best case, it would use state-of-the- art robotics to prolong its life on orbit and install new instruments. With the space shuttle off-limits for the job under strict post-Columbia safety policies set by Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA has designed a "straw- man" robotic mission that would use an Atlas V or Delta N to launch a 20,ooO-lb. "Hubble Robotic Vehicle" to service the telescope. There, a robotic arm would grapple it, much as the shuttle does.

  8. Handbook of industrial robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Nof, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of artificial intelligence to robots used in industrial plants. Topics considered include vision systems, elements of industrial robot software, robot teaching, the off-line programming of robots, a structured programming robot language, task-level manipulator programming, expert systems, and the role of the computer in robot intelligence.

  9. Tutorial on robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.G.; Gonzalez, R.C.; Fu, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Basic fundamentals in robotics are presented in this tutorial. Topics covered are as follows: robot arm kinematics; robot arm dynamics; planning or manipulator trajectories; servo control for manipulators; force sensing and control; robot vision systems; robot programming languages; and machine intelligence and robot planning.

  10. Mission Reliability Estimation for Repairable Robot Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Dolan, John; Stancliff, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A mission reliability estimation method has been designed to translate mission requirements into choices of robot modules in order to configure a multi-robot team to have high reliability at minimal cost. In order to build cost-effective robot teams for long-term missions, one must be able to compare alternative design paradigms in a principled way by comparing the reliability of different robot models and robot team configurations. Core modules have been created including: a probabilistic module with reliability-cost characteristics, a method for combining the characteristics of multiple modules to determine an overall reliability-cost characteristic, and a method for the generation of legitimate module combinations based on mission specifications and the selection of the best of the resulting combinations from a cost-reliability standpoint. The developed methodology can be used to predict the probability of a mission being completed, given information about the components used to build the robots, as well as information about the mission tasks. In the research for this innovation, sample robot missions were examined and compared to the performance of robot teams with different numbers of robots and different numbers of spare components. Data that a mission designer would need was factored in, such as whether it would be better to have a spare robot versus an equivalent number of spare parts, or if mission cost can be reduced while maintaining reliability using spares. This analytical model was applied to an example robot mission, examining the cost-reliability tradeoffs among different team configurations. Particularly scrutinized were teams using either redundancy (spare robots) or repairability (spare components). Using conservative estimates of the cost-reliability relationship, results show that it is possible to significantly reduce the cost of a robotic mission by using cheaper, lower-reliability components and providing spares. This suggests that the

  11. What is next in robotic urology?

    PubMed

    Cathelineau, Xavier; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Sivaraman, Arjun

    2014-12-01

    The application of robotic technology in surgical practice was developed during the past three decades, but its clinical application has made a significant impact during the last 10 years. Urologists have embraced surgical robots throughout their evolution, and robot-assisted urologic surgeries have matured into everyday clinical practice in many parts of the world. Long-term data from robot-assisted radical prostatectomies (RARP), an early robotic urologic surgery, has shown that the results are comparable to contemporary open radical prostatectomy (ORP) cohorts. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) is largely restricted to high-volume academic centers; comparative studies have demonstrated significant advantages in favor of RAPN over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) to achieve adequate warm ischemia time, surgical margins free of cancer cells, and no peri-operative complications. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy shows results that are comparable to contemporary open radical cystectomy. Several authors have reported the feasibility of robotic intracorporeal urinary diversion. The available long-term outcomes of robot-assisted urological surgeries are comparable to conventional open surgical methods and are associated with fewer complications. Surgical robots continue to evolve, and robotic engineers alongside surgeons strive hard to synthesize and evaluate novel robotic platforms, downsize hardware, and develop flexible instruments and newer technologies. Robotic applications available at this point represent the infancy of this technology. Future developments in robotics are profoundly limited to human imagination and can potentially scale to unimaginable heights. We would expect robots coupled with imaging and energies, aiming to provide accurate and reliable treatments which will be finely targeted by biogenetic information.

  12. Addressing Student Problem Behavior--Part III: Creating Positive Behavioral Intervention Plans and Supports. 1st Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Robert A.; Quinn, Mary Magee; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.; Howell, Kenneth W.; Hoffman, Catherine C.

    This monograph discusses development and implementation of positive behavioral intervention plans with students who have emotional and/or behavioral disorders. It focuses on four steps of a 10-step methodology using functional behavioral assessment and intervention. Emphasis is on the use of positive behavioral intervention plans and supports as…

  13. Control of autonomous robot using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Adam; Volna, Eva

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the article is to design a method of control of an autonomous robot using artificial neural networks. The introductory part describes control issues from the perspective of autonomous robot navigation and the current mobile robots controlled by neural networks. The core of the article is the design of the controlling neural network, and generation and filtration of the training set using ART1 (Adaptive Resonance Theory). The outcome of the practical part is an assembled Lego Mindstorms EV3 robot solving the problem of avoiding obstacles in space. To verify models of an autonomous robot behavior, a set of experiments was created as well as evaluation criteria. The speed of each motor was adjusted by the controlling neural network with respect to the situation in which the robot was found.

  14. Robots show us how to teach them: feedback from robots shapes tutoring behavior during action learning.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Anna-Lisa; Mühlig, Manuel; Steil, Jochen J; Pitsch, Karola; Fritsch, Jannik; Rohlfing, Katharina J; Wrede, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Robot learning by imitation requires the detection of a tutor's action demonstration and its relevant parts. Current approaches implicitly assume a unidirectional transfer of knowledge from tutor to learner. The presented work challenges this predominant assumption based on an extensive user study with an autonomously interacting robot. We show that by providing feedback, a robot learner influences the human tutor's movement demonstrations in the process of action learning. We argue that the robot's feedback strongly shapes how tutors signal what is relevant to an action and thus advocate a paradigm shift in robot action learning research toward truly interactive systems learning in and benefiting from interaction.

  15. Robots Show Us How to Teach Them: Feedback from Robots Shapes Tutoring Behavior during Action Learning

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Anna-Lisa; Mühlig, Manuel; Steil, Jochen J.; Pitsch, Karola; Fritsch, Jannik; Rohlfing, Katharina J.; Wrede, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Robot learning by imitation requires the detection of a tutor's action demonstration and its relevant parts. Current approaches implicitly assume a unidirectional transfer of knowledge from tutor to learner. The presented work challenges this predominant assumption based on an extensive user study with an autonomously interacting robot. We show that by providing feedback, a robot learner influences the human tutor's movement demonstrations in the process of action learning. We argue that the robot's feedback strongly shapes how tutors signal what is relevant to an action and thus advocate a paradigm shift in robot action learning research toward truly interactive systems learning in and benefiting from interaction. PMID:24646510

  16. System and method for controlling a vision guided robot assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Yhu-Tin; Daro, Timothy; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Turner, III, Raymond D.; Casoli, Daniel J.

    2017-03-07

    A method includes the following steps: actuating a robotic arm to perform an action at a start position; moving the robotic arm from the start position toward a first position; determining from a vision process method if a first part from the first position will be ready to be subjected to a first action by the robotic arm once the robotic arm reaches the first position; commencing the execution of the visual processing method for determining the position deviation of the second part from the second position and the readiness of the second part to be subjected to a second action by the robotic arm once the robotic arm reaches the second position; and performing a first action on the first part using the robotic arm with the position deviation of the first part from the first position predetermined by the vision process method.

  17. Automatic learning by an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    de Saussure, G.; Spelt, P.F.; Killough, S.M.; Pin, F.G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes recent research in automatic learning by the autonomous mobile robot HERMIES-IIB at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR). By acting on the environment and observing the consequences during a set of training examples, the robot learns a sequence of successful manipulations on a simulated control panel. The robot learns to classify panel configurations in order to deal with new configurations that are not part of the original training set. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Robotics in near-earth space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    The areas of space exploration in which robotic devices will play a part are identified, and progress to date in the space agency plans to acquire this capability is briefly reviewed. Roles and functions on orbit for robotic devices include well known activities, such as inspection and maintenance, assembly, docking, berthing, deployment, retrieval, materials handling, orbital replacement unit exchange, and repairs. Missions that could benefit from a robotic capability are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of a Professional Development Workshop on Integration of Robotics into Early Childhood Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddighin, Safoura

    According to the previous research, the lack of knowledge about technology and developmentally appropriate pedagogical approaches to bring it to the classrooms, in addition to the low level of sense of self-efficacy, and positive attitude towards teaching with technology, are among the major impediments to the successful integration of new technologies into early childhood classrooms. The focus of this research as part of a three year long NSF funded project, "Ready for Robotics", is to seek strategies to be used towards resolving the problem stated above. The current thesis reports a study in which 32 early childhood educators participated in a professional development workshop on the integration of robotics as an educational intervention into their traditional classrooms. Results show a statistically significant increase in the level of knowledge in all the three areas of technology in general, pedagogy, and robotics content, along with non-numerical positive effects of the workshop.

  20. Effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Young, Matthew M; Stevens, Adrienne; Porath-Waller, Amy; Pirie, Tyler; Garritty, Chantelle; Skidmore, Becky; Turner, Lucy; Arratoon, Cheryl; Haley, Nancy; Leslie, Karen; Reardon, Rhoda; Sproule, Beth; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Moher, David

    2012-05-07

    There is a significant public health burden associated with substance use in Canada. The early detection and/or treatment of risky substance use has the potential to dramatically improve outcomes for those who experience harms from the non-medical use of psychoactive substances, particularly adolescents whose brains are still undergoing development. The Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment model is a comprehensive, integrated approach for the delivery of early intervention and treatment services for individuals experiencing substance use-related harms, as well as those who are at risk of experiencing such harm. This article describes the protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances. Studies will be selected in which brief interventions target non-medical psychoactive substance use (excluding alcohol, nicotine, or caffeine) among those 12 years and older who are opportunistically screened and deemed at risk of harms related to psychoactive substance use. We will include one-on-one verbal interventions and exclude non-verbal brief interventions (for example, the provision of information such as a pamphlet or online interventions) and group interventions. Primary, secondary and adverse outcomes of interest are prespecified. Randomized controlled trials will be included; non-randomized controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series designs will be considered in the absence of randomized controlled trials. We will search several bibliographic databases (for example, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CORK) and search sources for grey literature. We will meta-analyze studies where possible. We will conduct subgroup analyses, if possible, according to drug class and intervention setting. This review will provide evidence on the effectiveness of brief

  1. Effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a significant public health burden associated with substance use in Canada. The early detection and/or treatment of risky substance use has the potential to dramatically improve outcomes for those who experience harms from the non-medical use of psychoactive substances, particularly adolescents whose brains are still undergoing development. The Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment model is a comprehensive, integrated approach for the delivery of early intervention and treatment services for individuals experiencing substance use-related harms, as well as those who are at risk of experiencing such harm. Methods This article describes the protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances. Studies will be selected in which brief interventions target non-medical psychoactive substance use (excluding alcohol, nicotine, or caffeine) among those 12 years and older who are opportunistically screened and deemed at risk of harms related to psychoactive substance use. We will include one-on-one verbal interventions and exclude non-verbal brief interventions (for example, the provision of information such as a pamphlet or online interventions) and group interventions. Primary, secondary and adverse outcomes of interest are prespecified. Randomized controlled trials will be included; non-randomized controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series designs will be considered in the absence of randomized controlled trials. We will search several bibliographic databases (for example, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CORK) and search sources for grey literature. We will meta-analyze studies where possible. We will conduct subgroup analyses, if possible, according to drug class and intervention setting. Discussion This review will provide evidence

  2. Robotic colectomy: is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Bertani, E; Chiappa, A; Ubiali, P; Cossu, M L; Arnone, P; Andreoni, B

    2013-10-01

    More than 20 years ago the introduction of laparoscopic surgery represented a paradigm shift in the management of colorectal cancer. In most recent years robotic surgery is becoming a viable alternative to laparoscopic and traditional open surgery. The major clear advantages of robotic surgery in comparison with laparoscopy are the lower conversion to open surgery rates and the shorter learning curve. However, the role of robotics in colorectal surgery is still largely undefined and different with respect to its application in abdominal versus pelvic surgery. As for colon cancer there are emerging data that laparoscopic and robotic surgery have the same advantages in terms of faster recovery, although robotic-assisted colectomy is associated with costs increase of care without providing clear reduction in overall morbidity or length of stay. Long-term outcomes for laparoscopic versus robotic colonic resections remain still largely undetermined and randomized controlled clinical trials are required to establish a possible difference in outcomes. Interesting issues for the educational aspects are associated with robotic surgery, as the double console allows the resident to take part actively at the surgical procedure since the beginning of his surgical experience.

  3. Preliminary testing of a compact bone-attached robot for otologic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Neal P.; Balachandran, Ramya; Motte dit Falisse, Antoine; Wanna, George B.; Labadie, Robert F.; Withrow, Thomas J.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    Otologic surgery often involves a mastoidectomy procedure, in which part of the temporal bone is milled away in order to visualize critical structures embedded in the bone and safely access the middle and inner ear. We propose to automate this portion of the surgery using a compact, bone-attached milling robot. A high level of accuracy is required t o avoid damage to vital anatomy along the surgical path, most notably the facial nerve, making this procedure well-suited for robotic intervention. In this study, several of the design considerations are discussed and a robot design and prototype are presented. The prototype is a 4 degrees-of-freedom robot similar to a four-axis milling machine that mounts to the patient's skull. A positioning frame, containing fiducial markers and attachment points for the robot, is rigidly attached to the skull of the patient, and a CT scan is acquired. The target bone volume is manually segmented in the CT by the surgeon and automatically converted to a milling path and robot trajectory. The robot is then attached to the positioning frame and is used to drill the desired volume. The accuracy of the entire system (image processing, planning, robot) was evaluated at several critical locations within or near the target bone volume with a mean free space accuracy result of 0.50 mm or less at all points. A milling test in a phantom material was then performed to evaluate the surgical workflow. The resulting milled volume did not violate any critical structures.

  4. Control architecture for human-robot integration: application to a robotic wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Cipriano; Gonzalez, Javier; Fernández-Madrigal, Juan-Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Completely autonomous performance of a mobile robot within noncontrolled and dynamic environments is not possible yet due to different reasons including environment uncertainty, sensor/software robustness, limited robotic abilities, etc. But in assistant applications in which a human is always present, she/he can make up for the lack of robot autonomy by helping it when needed. In this paper, the authors propose human-robot integration as a mechanism to augment/improve the robot autonomy in daily scenarios. Through the human-robot-integration concept, the authors take a further step in the typical human-robot relation, since they consider her/him as a constituent part of the human-robot system, which takes full advantage of the sum of their abilities. In order to materialize this human integration into the system, they present a control architecture, called architecture for human-robot integration, which enables her/him from a high decisional level, i.e., deliberating a plan, to a physical low level, i.e., opening a door. The presented control architecture has been implemented to test the human-robot integration on a real robotic application. In particular, several real experiences have been conducted on a robotic wheelchair aimed to provide mobility to elderly people.

  5. Rehabilitation robotics.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H I; Volpe, B T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on rehabilitation robotics which can be used to augment the clinician's toolbox in order to deliver meaningful restorative therapy for an aging population, as well as on advances in orthotics to augment an individual's functional abilities beyond neurorestoration potential. The interest in rehabilitation robotics and orthotics is increasing steadily with marked growth in the last 10 years. This growth is understandable in view of the increased demand for caregivers and rehabilitation services escalating apace with the graying of the population. We provide an overview on improving function in people with a weak limb due to a neurological disorder who cannot properly control it to interact with the environment (orthotics); we then focus on tools to assist the clinician in promoting rehabilitation of an individual so that s/he can interact with the environment unassisted (rehabilitation robotics). We present a few clinical results occurring immediately poststroke as well as during the chronic phase that demonstrate superior gains for the upper extremity when employing rehabilitation robotics instead of usual care. These include the landmark VA-ROBOTICS multisite, randomized clinical study which demonstrates clinical gains for chronic stroke that go beyond usual care at no additional cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical robotics.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  7. Rehabilitation robotics

    PubMed Central

    KREBS, H.I.; VOLPE, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on rehabilitation robotics which can be used to augment the clinician’s toolbox in order to deliver meaningful restorative therapy for an aging population, as well as on advances in orthotics to augment an individual’s functional abilities beyond neurorestoration potential. The interest in rehabilitation robotics and orthotics is increasing steadily with marked growth in the last 10 years. This growth is understandable in view of the increased demand for caregivers and rehabilitation services escalating apace with the graying of the population. We will provide an overview on improving function in people with a weak limb due to a neurological disorder who cannot properly control it to interact with the environment (orthotics); we will then focus on tools to assist the clinician in promoting rehabilitation of an individual so that s/he can interact with the environment unassisted (rehabilitation robotics). We will present a few clinical results occurring immediately poststroke as well as during the chronic phase that demonstrate superior gains for the upper extremity when employing rehabilitation robotics instead of usual care. These include the landmark VA-ROBOTICS multisite, randomized clinical study which demonstrates clinical gains for chronic stroke that go beyond usual care at no additional cost. PMID:23312648

  8. Generic robot architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  9. Brain controlled robots

    PubMed Central

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey’s motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis’s lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the “Computational Brain Project.” CB-i’s locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey’s voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot. PMID:19404467

  10. Robotic and Survey Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, Przemysław

    Robotic telescopes are revolutionizing the way astronomers collect their dataand conduct sky surveys. This chapter begins with a discussion of principles thatguide the process of designing, constructing, and operating telescopes andobservatories that offer a varying degree of automation, from instruments remotelycontrolled by observers to fully autonomous systems requiring no humansupervision during their normal operations. Emphasis is placed on designtrade-offs involved in building end-to-end systems intended for a wide range ofscience applications. The second part of the chapter contains descriptions ofseveral projects and instruments, both existing and currently under development.It is an attempt to provide a representative selection of actual systems thatillustrates state of the art in technology, as well as important ideas and milestonesin the development of the field. The list of presented instruments spans the fullrange in size starting from small all-sky monitors, through midrange robotic andsurvey telescopes, and finishing with large robotic instruments and surveys.Explosive growth of telescope networking is enabling entirely new modesof interaction between the survey and follow-up observing. Increasingimportance of standardized communication protocols and software is stressed.These developments are driven by the fusion of robotic telescope hardware,massive storage and databases, real-time knowledge extraction, and datacross-correlation on a global scale. The chapter concludes with examplesof major science results enabled by these new technologies and futureprospects.

  11. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kariv, Y; Delaney, C P

    2005-10-01

    A minimally invasive approach has not yet become the gold standard in colorectal procedures, despite its proven advantages in postoperative recovery. This is in part the result of the technical limitations in today's standard laparoscopy, and the advanced surgical skills that are required. Robotic technology overcomes some of these limitations by successfully providing intuitive motion and enhanced precision and accuracy, in an environment that is much more ergonomic. While currently performed in only few designated centers, this technology has already been applied in almost every major procedure performed to treat both benign and malignant conditions of the large bowel. The feasibility of performing these procedures using robotic systems has been reported in several series. Conversion and complication rates are low, and short term results are comparable to conventional laparoscopy. However, no clear advantages to patients have been demonstrated yet. Furthermore, robotic technology is associated with a significant increase in time consumed during surgery and cost of care. Nevertheless, a great potential for patients benefit in the future may exist with this technology. Increasing clinical experience with these systems, further technological developments, and continuous research are required before robotic technology can be routinely incorporated into surgical procedures on the colon and rectum.

  12. Brain controlled robots.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-06-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey's motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis's lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the "Computational Brain Project." CB-i's locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey's voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot.

  13. Research and Evaluations of the Health Aspects of Disasters, Part VI: Interventional Research and the Disaster Logic Model.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Marvin L; Daily, Elaine K; O'Rourke, Ann P; Kushner, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Disaster-related interventions are actions or responses undertaken during any phase of a disaster to change the current status of an affected community or a Societal System. Interventional disaster research aims to evaluate the results of such interventions in order to develop standards and best practices in Disaster Health that can be applied to disaster risk reduction. Considering interventions as production functions (transformation processes) structures the analyses and cataloguing of interventions/responses that are implemented prior to, during, or following a disaster or other emergency. Since currently it is not possible to do randomized, controlled studies of disasters, in order to validate the derived standards and best practices, the results of the studies must be compared and synthesized with results from other studies (ie, systematic reviews). Such reviews will be facilitated by the selected studies being structured using accepted frameworks. A logic model is a graphic representation of the transformation processes of a program [project] that shows the intended relationships between investments and results. Logic models are used to describe a program and its theory of change, and they provide a method for the analyzing and evaluating interventions. The Disaster Logic Model (DLM) is an adaptation of a logic model used for the evaluation of educational programs and provides the structure required for the analysis of disaster-related interventions. It incorporates a(n): definition of the current functional status of a community or Societal System, identification of needs, definition of goals, selection of objectives, implementation of the intervention(s), and evaluation of the effects, outcomes, costs, and impacts of the interventions. It is useful for determining the value of an intervention and it also provides the structure for analyzing the processes used in providing the intervention according to the Relief/Recovery and Risk-Reduction Frameworks.

  14. Systematic Review of Occupational Therapy and Adult Cancer Rehabilitation: Part 2. Impact of Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation and Psychosocial, Sexuality, and Return-to-Work Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Elizabeth G; Gibson, Robert W; Arbesman, Marian; D'Amico, Mariana

    This article is the second part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the use of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and interventions that address psychosocial outcomes, sexuality, and return to work. Strong evidence indicates that multidisciplinary rehabilitation benefits cancer survivors and that psychosocial strategies can reduce anxiety and depression. Moderate evidence indicates that interventions can support survivors in returning to the level of sexuality desired and help with return to work. Part 1 of the review also appears in this issue. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  15. Proceedings of the 2nd international symposium on robotics research

    SciTech Connect

    Hanafusa, H.; Inoue, H.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of this book does not follow that of the symposium. The 53 papers presented at the 12 technical sessions are grouped into four parts: Visual Perception, Action Control, Robot Mechanisms, and Task Level Studies. There are two chapters in the first part, focusing on these topics in visual perception: representation and recognition of three-dimensional objects; and implementation of robot vision. The two chapters in the second part are concerned with the computational aspects of action control: control theory; and kinematics and design. The two chapters in the third part examine these features of robot mechanisms: manipulators and end effectors; and mobile robots. The two chapters in the fourth part explore the following task level studies: modelling, programming, and monitoring; and theory of manipulation. A final (fifth) part presents in two chapters 9 papers debated at two panel discussions: robotics for future industry; and key issues of robotics research. This final part also includes the 2 panel-discussion summaries.

  16. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  17. Robot Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers and interns at this NASA field center are building the prototype of a robotic rover that could go where no wheeled rover has gone before-into the dark cold craters at the lunar poles and across the Moon s rugged highlands-like a walking tetrahedron. With NASA pushing to meet President Bush's new exploration objectives, the robots taking shape here today could be on the Moon in a decade. In the longer term, the concept could lead to shape-shifting robot swarms designed to explore distant planetary surfaces in advance of humans. "If you look at all of NASA s projections of the future, anyone s projections of the space program, they re all rigid-body architecture," says Steven Curtis, principal investigator on the effort. "This is not rigid-body. The whole key here is flexibility and reconfigurability with a capital R."

  18. Robot Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm) is a 50 foot robot arm used to deploy, retrieve or repair satellites in orbit. Initial spinoff version is designed to remove, inspect and replace large components of Ontario Hydro's CANDU nuclear reactors, which supply 50 percent of Ontario Hydro's total power reduction. CANDU robot is the first of SPAR's Remote Manipulator Systems intended for remote materials handling operations in nuclear servicing, chemical processing, smelting and manufacturing. Inco Limited used remote manipulator for remote control mining equipment to enhance safety and productivity of Inco's hardrock mining operations. System not only improves safety in a hazardous operation that costs more than a score of lives annually, it also increases productivity fourfold. Remote Manipulator System Division is also manufacturing a line of industrial robots and developing additional system for nuclear servicing, mining, defense and space operations.

  19. Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A commercially available ANDROS Mark V-A robot was used by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as the departure point in the development of the HAZBOT III, a prototype teleoperated mobile robot designed for response to emergencies. Teleoperated robots contribute significantly to reducing human injury levels by performing tasks too hazardous for humans. ANDROS' manufacturer, REMOTEC, Inc., in turn, adopted some of the JPL concepts, particularly the control panel. HAZBOT III has exceptional mobility, employs solid state electronics and brushless DC motors for safer operation, and is designed so combustible gases cannot penetrate areas containing electronics and motors. Other features include the six-degree-of-freedom manipulator, the 30-pound squeeze force parallel jaw gripper and two video cameras, one for general viewing and navigation and the other for manipulation/grasping.

  20. Robot Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers and interns at this NASA field center are building the prototype of a robotic rover that could go where no wheeled rover has gone before-into the dark cold craters at the lunar poles and across the Moon s rugged highlands-like a walking tetrahedron. With NASA pushing to meet President Bush's new exploration objectives, the robots taking shape here today could be on the Moon in a decade. In the longer term, the concept could lead to shape-shifting robot swarms designed to explore distant planetary surfaces in advance of humans. "If you look at all of NASA s projections of the future, anyone s projections of the space program, they re all rigid-body architecture," says Steven Curtis, principal investigator on the effort. "This is not rigid-body. The whole key here is flexibility and reconfigurability with a capital R."

  1. Towards a Location-based Service for Early Mental Health Interventions in Disaster Response Using Minimalistic Tele-operated Android Robots Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidi, H.; Mobasheri, A.; Alimardani, M.; Guan, Q.; Bakillah, M.

    2014-04-01

    Providing early mental health services during disaster is a great challenge in the disaster response phase. Lack of access to adequate mental-health professionals in the early stages of large-scale disasters dramatically influences the trend of a successful mental health aid. In this paper, a conceptual framework has been suggested for adopting cellphone-type tele-operated android robots in the early stages of disasters for providing the early mental health services for disaster survivors by developing a locationbased and participatory approach. The techniques of enabling GI-services in a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) environment were studied to overcome the limitations of current centralized services. Therefore, the aim of this research study is to add more flexibility and autonomy to GI web services (WMS, WFS, WPS, etc.) and alleviate to some degree the inherent limitations of these centralized systems. A P2P system Architecture is presented for the location-based service using minimalistic tele-operated android robots, and some key techniques of implementing this service using BestPeer were studied for developing this framework.

  2. Nursing interventions to reduce the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Part 1: Catheter selection.

    PubMed

    Parker, Diana; Callan, Laurie; Harwood, Judith; Thompson, Donna L; Wilde, Mary; Gray, Mikel

    2009-01-01

    The urinary system is the most common site for all hospital-acquired infections, accounting for approximately 40% of all nosocomial infections. The US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has enacted 2 policies that have focused considerable attention on the optimal use of indwelling catheters in the acute and long-term care settings and the prevention of complications including catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). This is the first of a 2-part Evidence-Based Report Card reviewing current evidence pertaining to nursing actions for prevention of CAUTIs in patients with short- and long-term indwelling catheters. Part 1 reviews evidence for materials for catheter construction, including incorporation of antimicrobial substances into the catheter, and selection of catheter size. Nursing actions for prevention of CAUTIs were identified based on search of electronic databases and Web-based search engines for national or international clinical practice guidelines focusing on this topic. Evidence related to 2 common nursing interventions, selection of the material of construction and selection of catheter size, was identified by searching electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and the ancestry of articles identified in these searches. We found robust evidence supporting insertion of a silver alloy-coated catheter to reduce the risk of CAUTIs for up to 2 weeks in adult patients managed by short-term indwelling catheterization. We also found evidence supporting the insertion of an antibiotic-impregnated catheter for reduction of CAUTI risk for up to 7 days. There was insufficient evidence to determine whether regular use of an antimicrobial catheter reduces the risk of CAUTIs in adults managed with long-term indwelling catheterization. There was insufficient evidence to determine whether selection of a latex catheter, hydrogel-coated latex catheter, silicone-coated latex catheter, or all- silicone catheter influences CAUTI risk

  3. Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Robots are limited only by the dexterity of the hand. Dr. Salisbury, in conjunction with Stanford, Caltech and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, developed the Salisbury Hand which has three, three-jointed human-like fingers. The tips are covered with a resilient, high friction material for gripping. The robot hand can manipulate objects by finger motion, and adapts to different aims. Advanced software allows the hand to interpret information from fingertip sensors. Further development is expected. A company has been formed to reproduce the device; copies have been delivered to several laboratories.

  4. Robot gripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Winston S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electronic force-detecting robot gripper for gripping objects and attaching to an external robot arm is disclosed. The gripper comprises motor apparatus, gripper jaws, and electrical circuits for driving the gripper motor and sensing the amount of force applied by the jaws. The force applied by the jaws is proportional to a threshold value of the motor current. When the motor current exceeds the threshold value, the electrical circuits supply a feedback signal to the electrical control circuit which, in turn, stops the gripper motor.

  5. Early Intervention and Maltreated Children: A Current Look at the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and Part C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Kathleen M.; Squires, Jane; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Current literature regarding the prevalence of child abuse and neglect, resulting developmental impacts on children, and early intervention services for children and families involved in the child welfare system is summarized. While early intervention eligibility referrals are mandated for this population under the Child Abuse Prevention and…

  6. Early Intervention and Maltreated Children: A Current Look at the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and Part C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Kathleen M.; Squires, Jane; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Current literature regarding the prevalence of child abuse and neglect, resulting developmental impacts on children, and early intervention services for children and families involved in the child welfare system is summarized. While early intervention eligibility referrals are mandated for this population under the Child Abuse Prevention and…

  7. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION..., Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION..., Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  9. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION..., Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION..., Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  11. The state of the art in non-pharmacological interventions for developmental stuttering. Part 1: a systematic review of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Susan; Johnson, Maxine; Blank, Lindsay; Cantrell, Anna; Brumfitt, Shelagh; Enderby, Pam; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The growing range of available treatment options for people who stutter presents a challenge for clinicians, service managers and commissioners, who need to have access to the best available treatment evidence to guide them in providing the most appropriate interventions. While a number of reviews of interventions for specific populations or a specific type of intervention have been carried out, a broad-based systematic review across all forms of intervention for adults and children was needed to provide evidence to underpin future guidelines, inform the implementation of effective treatments and identify future research priorities. To identify and synthesize the published research evidence on the clinical effectiveness of the broad range of non-pharmacological interventions for the management of developmental stuttering. A systematic review of the literature reporting interventions for developmental stuttering was carried out between August 2013 and April 2014. Searches were not limited by language or location, but were restricted by date to studies published from 1990 onwards. Methods for the identification of relevant studies included electronic database searching, reference list checking, citation searching and hand searching of key journals. Appraisal of study quality was performed using a tool based on established criteria for considering risk of bias. Due to heterogeneity in intervention content and outcomes, a narrative synthesis was completed. The review included all available types of intervention and found that most may be of benefit to at least some people who stutter. There was evidence, however, of considerable individual variation in response to these interventions. The review indicated that effects could be maintained following all types of interventions (although this was weakest with regard to feedback and technology interventions). This review highlights a need for greater consensus with regard to the key outcomes used to evaluate stuttering

  12. The state of the art in non‐pharmacological interventions for developmental stuttering. Part 1: a systematic review of effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Maxine; Blank, Lindsay; Cantrell, Anna; Brumfitt, Shelagh; Enderby, Pam; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The growing range of available treatment options for people who stutter presents a challenge for clinicians, service managers and commissioners, who need to have access to the best available treatment evidence to guide them in providing the most appropriate interventions. While a number of reviews of interventions for specific populations or a specific type of intervention have been carried out, a broad‐based systematic review across all forms of intervention for adults and children was needed to provide evidence to underpin future guidelines, inform the implementation of effective treatments and identify future research priorities. Aims To identify and synthesize the published research evidence on the clinical effectiveness of the broad range of non‐pharmacological interventions for the management of developmental stuttering. Methods & Procedures A systematic review of the literature reporting interventions for developmental stuttering was carried out between August 2013 and April 2014. Searches were not limited by language or location, but were restricted by date to studies published from 1990 onwards. Methods for the identification of relevant studies included electronic database searching, reference list checking, citation searching and hand searching of key journals. Appraisal of study quality was performed using a tool based on established criteria for considering risk of bias. Due to heterogeneity in intervention content and outcomes, a narrative synthesis was completed. Main Contribution The review included all available types of intervention and found that most may be of benefit to at least some people who stutter. There was evidence, however, of considerable individual variation in response to these interventions. The review indicated that effects could be maintained following all types of interventions (although this was weakest with regard to feedback and technology interventions). Conclusions This review highlights a need for

  13. The value of robotic systems in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Stefano; Poli, Patrizia; Rosati, Giulio; Zanotto, Damiano; Iosa, Marco; Paolucci, Sefano; Morone, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss robot-mediated neurorehabilitation as a significant emerging field in clinical medicine. Stroke rehabilitation is advancing toward more integrated processes, using robotics to facilitate this integration. Rehabilitation approaches have tremendous value in reducing long-term impairments in stroke patients during hospitalization and after discharge, of which robotic systems are a new modality that can provide more effective rehabilitation. The function of robotics in rehabilitative interventions has been examined extensively, generating positive yet not completely satisfactory clinical results. This article presents state-of-the-art robotic systems and their prospective function in poststroke rehabilitation of the upper and lower limbs.

  14. Applying robotic technology to the solid film lubricant burnishing operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1984-02-01

    The PUMA 260, a programmable robot, has been used to burnish up to 22 different parts coated with solid film lubricant in the Painting Department. Some other parts also are potential candidates for robotic applications. Robot technology can reduce the burnishing operation standard hours and relieve workers' fatigue and strain as well as produce more uniform part-to-part quality. Using VAL, the versatile computer program language for PUMA 260, the process engineer can define the optimum robot burnishing actions and speeds for each part.

  15. Brain state-dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Brauchle, Daniel; Vukelić, Mathias; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input. We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reaching movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery (MI)-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function. Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns—but different aptitudes—of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e., when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject’s arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task. Brain-robot interfaces (BRIs) may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants’ efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration, a proposal that

  16. Brain state-dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Brauchle, Daniel; Vukelić, Mathias; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input. We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reaching movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery (MI)-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function. Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns-but different aptitudes-of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e., when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject's arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task. Brain-robot interfaces (BRIs) may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants' efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration, a proposal that warrants

  17. Robotics Team Lights Up New Year's Eve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    A robotics team from Muncie, Indiana--the PhyXTGears--is made up of high school students from throughout Delaware County. The group formed as part of the FIRST Robotics program (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an international program founded by inventor Dean Kamen in which students work with professional engineers and…

  18. A strategy planner for NASA robotics applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodd, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic strategy or task planning is an important element of robotics systems. A strategy planner under development at Goddard Space Flight Center automatically produces robot plans for assembly, disassembly, or repair of NASA spacecraft from computer aided design descriptions of the individual parts of the spacecraft.

  19. Robotics Team Lights Up New Year's Eve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    A robotics team from Muncie, Indiana--the PhyXTGears--is made up of high school students from throughout Delaware County. The group formed as part of the FIRST Robotics program (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an international program founded by inventor Dean Kamen in which students work with professional engineers and…

  20. Orbital Welding Head Held By Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.; Graham, Benny F.; Nesmith, Malcolm F.; Mcferrin, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital welding head positioned by robot controls motion and voltage of arc-welding torch mounted in head. New head encircles part at torch end, and held and manipulated by robot arm at opposite end. Entire welding operation automated. Useful for operations in hazardous environments.

  1. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-09-15

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  2. Robotic Rock Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Martial

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a three-month research program undertook jointly by the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and Ames Research Center as part of the Ames' Joint Research Initiative (JRI.) The work was conducted at the Ames Research Center by Mr. Liam Pedersen, a graduate student in the CMU Ph.D. program in Robotics under the supervision Dr. Ted Roush at the Space Science Division of the Ames Research Center from May 15 1999 to August 15, 1999. Dr. Martial Hebert is Mr. Pedersen's research adviser at CMU and is Principal Investigator of this Grant. The goal of this project is to investigate and implement methods suitable for a robotic rover to autonomously identify rocks and minerals in its vicinity, and to statistically characterize the local geological environment. Although primary sensors for these tasks are a reflection spectrometer and color camera, the goal is to create a framework under which data from multiple sensors, and multiple readings on the same object, can be combined in a principled manner. Furthermore, it is envisioned that knowledge of the local area, either a priori or gathered by the robot, will be used to improve classification accuracy. The key results obtained during this project are: The continuation of the development of a rock classifier; development of theoretical statistical methods; development of methods for evaluating and selecting sensors; and experimentation with data mining techniques on the Ames spectral library. The results of this work are being applied at CMU, in particular in the context of the Winter 99 Antarctica expedition in which the classification techniques will be used on the Nomad robot. Conversely, the software developed based on those techniques will continue to be made available to NASA Ames and the data collected from the Nomad experiments will also be made available.

  3. The debate over robotics in benign gynecology.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Charles R

    2014-05-01

    The debate over the role of the da Vinci surgical robotic platform in benign gynecology is raging with increasing fervor and, as product liability issues arise, greater financial stakes. Although the best currently available science suggests that, in the hands of experts, robotics offers little in surgical advantage over laparoscopy, at increased expense, the observed decrease in laparotomy for hysterectomy is almost certainly, at least in part, attributable to the availability of the robot. In this author's opinion, the issue is not whether the robot has any role but rather to define the role in an institutional environment that also supports the safe use of vaginal and laparoscopic approaches in an integrated minimally invasive surgery program. Programs engaging robotic surgery should have a clear and self-determined regulatory process and should resist pressures in place that may preferentially support robotics over other forms of minimally invasive surgery. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Robotics in Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A 0 ROBOTICS IN CONSTRUCTIONt 10 BY MICHAEL R. BROZZO A REPORT PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE... ROBOTS AND ROBOTICS ---------------------------- 3 2.1 HISTORY ------------------------------------------- 3 CHAPTER THREE - BASIC ROBOT MOVEMENTS...CHAPTER FOUR - BASIC ROBOT COMPONENTS ------------------------ 8 4.1 GENERAL ------------------------------------------- 8 4.1.1 Manipulator

  5. Robotic Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2007-01-01

    The medical field has many uses for automated and remote-controlled technology. For example, if a tissue sample is only handled in the laboratory by a robotic handling system, then it will never come into contact with a human. Such a system not only helps to automate the medical testing process, but it also helps to reduce the chances of…

  6. Robotic Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2007-01-01

    The medical field has many uses for automated and remote-controlled technology. For example, if a tissue sample is only handled in the laboratory by a robotic handling system, then it will never come into contact with a human. Such a system not only helps to automate the medical testing process, but it also helps to reduce the chances of…

  7. Beyond Robotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tally, Beth; Laverdure, Nate

    2006-01-01

    Chantilly High School Academy Robotics Team Number 612 from Chantilly, Virginia, is an award-winning team of high school students actively involved with FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), a multinational nonprofit organization that inspires students to transform culture--making science, math, engineering and…

  8. Beyond Robotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tally, Beth; Laverdure, Nate

    2006-01-01

    Chantilly High School Academy Robotics Team Number 612 from Chantilly, Virginia, is an award-winning team of high school students actively involved with FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), a multinational nonprofit organization that inspires students to transform culture--making science, math, engineering and…

  9. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong; Leung, Sau Fong; Yeung, Frederick KK; Wong, Wai Kit

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients’ long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major health care databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy), psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of functioning, and/or relapse rate. However, the comparative effects between these five approaches have not been well studied; thus, we are not able to clearly understand the superiority of any of these interventions. With the

  10. Can text messages reach the parts other process measures cannot reach: an evaluation of a behavior change intervention delivered by mobile phone?

    PubMed

    Irvine, Linda; Falconer, Donald W; Jones, Claire; Ricketts, Ian W; Williams, Brian; Crombie, Iain K

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluation is essential in developing, piloting and evaluating complex interventions. This often involves observation of intervention delivery and interviews with study participants. Mobile telephone interventions involve no face to face contact, making conventional process evaluation difficult. This study assesses the utility of novel techniques for process evaluation involving no face to face contact. Text messages were delivered to 34 disadvantaged men as part of a feasibility study of a brief alcohol intervention. Process evaluation focused on delivery of the text messages and responses received from study participants. The computerized delivery system captured data on receipt of the messages. The text messages, delivered over 28 days, included nine which asked questions. Responses to these questions served as one technique for process evaluation by ascertaining the nature of engagement with the study and with steps on the causal chain to behavior change. A total of 646 SMS text messages were sent to participants. Of these, 613 messages (95%) were recorded as delivered to participants' telephones. 88% of participants responded to messages that asked questions. There was little attenuation in responses to the questions across the intervention period. Content analysis of the responses revealed that participants engaged with text messages, thought deeply about their content and provided carefully considered personal responses to the questions. Socially disadvantaged men, a hard to reach population, engaged in a meaningful way over a sustained period with an interactive intervention delivered by text message. The novel process measures used in the study are unobtrusive, low cost and collect real-time data on all participants. They assessed the fidelity of delivery of the intervention and monitored retention in the study. They measured levels of engagement and identified participants' reactions to components of the intervention. These methods provide a

  11. Can Text Messages Reach the Parts Other Process Measures Cannot Reach: An Evaluation of a Behavior Change Intervention Delivered by Mobile Phone?

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Linda; Falconer, Donald W.; Jones, Claire; Ricketts, Ian W.; Williams, Brian; Crombie, Iain K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Process evaluation is essential in developing, piloting and evaluating complex interventions. This often involves observation of intervention delivery and interviews with study participants. Mobile telephone interventions involve no face to face contact, making conventional process evaluation difficult. This study assesses the utility of novel techniques for process evaluation involving no face to face contact. Methods Text messages were delivered to 34 disadvantaged men as part of a feasibility study of a brief alcohol intervention. Process evaluation focused on delivery of the text messages and responses received from study participants. The computerized delivery system captured data on receipt of the messages. The text messages, delivered over 28 days, included nine which asked questions. Responses to these questions served as one technique for process evaluation by ascertaining the nature of engagement with the study and with steps on the causal chain to behavior change. Results A total of 646 SMS text messages were sent to participants. Of these, 613 messages (95%) were recorded as delivered to participants’ telephones. 88% of participants responded to messages that asked questions. There was little attenuation in responses to the questions across the intervention period. Content analysis of the responses revealed that participants engaged with text messages, thought deeply about their content and provided carefully considered personal responses to the questions. Conclusions Socially disadvantaged men, a hard to reach population, engaged in a meaningful way over a sustained period with an interactive intervention delivered by text message. The novel process measures used in the study are unobtrusive, low cost and collect real-time data on all participants. They assessed the fidelity of delivery of the intervention and monitored retention in the study. They measured levels of engagement and identified participants’ reactions to components of the

  12. Robot arm apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1992-12-01

    A robot arm apparatus is provided for inspecting and/or maintaining an interior of a steam generator which has an outside wall and a port for accessing the interior of the steam generator. The robot arm apparatus includes a flexible movable conduit for conveying inspection and/or maintenance apparatus from outside the steam generator to the interior of the steam generator. The flexible conduit has a terminal working end which is translated into and around the interior of the steam generator. Three motors located outside the steam generator are employed for moving the terminal working end inside the steam generator in "x", "y", and "z" directions, respectively. Commonly conducted inspection and maintenance operations include visual inspection for damaged areas, water jet lancing for cleaning sludge deposits, core boring for obtaining sludge deposits, and scrubbing of internal parts.

  13. Robot arm apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    A robot arm apparatus is provided for inspecting and/or maintaining an interior of a steam generator which has an outside wall and a port for accessing the interior of the steam generator. The robot arm apparatus includes a flexible movable conduit for conveying inspection and/or maintenance apparatus from outside the steam generator to the interior of the steam generator. The flexible conduit has a terminal working end which is translated into and around the interior of the steam generator. Three motors located outside the steam generator are employed for moving the terminal working end inside the steam generator in "x", "y", and "z" directions, respectively. Commonly conducted inspection and maintenance operations include visual inspection for damaged areas, water jet lancing for cleaning sludge deposits, core boring for obtaining sludge deposits, and scrubbing of internal parts.

  14. Robot arm apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1990-12-31

    A robot arm apparatus is provided for inspecting and/or maintaining an interior of a steam generator which has an outside wall and a port for accessing the interior of the steam generator. The robot arm apparatus includes a flexible movable conduit for conveying inspection and/or maintenance apparatus from outside the steam generator to the interior of the steam generator. The flexible conduit has a terminal working end which is translated into and around the interior of the steam generator. Three motors located outside the steam generator are employed for moving the terminal working end inside the steam generator in ``x,`` ``y,`` and ``z`` directions, respectively. Commonly conducted inspection and maintenance operations include visual inspection for damaged areas, water jet lancing for cleaning sludge deposits, core boring for obtaining sludge deposits, and scrubbing of internal parts.

  15. Perception and estimation challenges for humanoid robotics: DARPA Robotics Challenge and NASA Valkyrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Maurice

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes ongoing work at the University of Edinburgh's Humanoid Robotics Project. University of Edinburgh have formed a collaboration with the United States' National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) around their R5 humanoid robot commonly known as Valkyrie. Also involved are MIT, Northeastern University and the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) as part of NASA's Space Robotics Challenge. We will outline the development of state estimation and localization algorithms being developed for Valkyrie.

  16. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  17. Robotics Education and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Charles C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes characteristics of robots, provides a glossary of related terms, and discusses available careers in the field of robotics. Includes a list of postsecondary institutions with robotics programs. (JOW)

  18. Robotic virtual reality simulation plus standard robotic orientation versus standard robotic orientation alone: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Christine M; Crisp, Catrina C; Fellner, Angela N; Jackson, Christopher; Kleeman, Steven D; Pavelka, James

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of virtual reality simulation training plus robotic orientation versus robotic orientation alone on performance of surgical tasks using an inanimate model. Surgical resident physicians were enrolled in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial. Residents were randomized to receive either (1) robotic virtual reality simulation training plus standard robotic orientation or (2) standard robotic orientation alone. Performance of surgical tasks was assessed at baseline and after the intervention. Nine of 33 modules from the da Vinci Skills Simulator were chosen. Experts in robotic surgery evaluated each resident's videotaped performance of the inanimate model using the Global Rating Scale (GRS) and Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills-modified for robotic-assisted surgery (rOSATS). Nine resident physicians were enrolled in the simulation group and 9 in the control group. As a whole, participants improved their total time, time to incision, and suture time from baseline to repeat testing on the inanimate model (P = 0.001, 0.003, <0.001, respectively). Both groups improved their GRS and rOSATS scores significantly (both P < 0.001); however, the GRS overall pass rate was higher in the simulation group compared with the control group (89% vs 44%, P = 0.066). Standard robotic orientation and/or robotic virtual reality simulation improve surgical skills on an inanimate model, although this may be a function of the initial "practice" on the inanimate model and repeat testing of a known task. However, robotic virtual reality simulation training increases GRS pass rates consistent with improved robotic technical skills learned in a virtual reality environment.

  19. Infant-Guided, Co-Regulated Feeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Part II: Interventions to Promote Neuroprotection and Safety.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Catherine S

    2017-04-01

    Feeding skills of preterm neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit are in an emergent phase of development and require careful support to minimize stress. The underpinnings that influence and enhance both neuroprotection and safety were discussed in Part I. An infant-guided, co-regulated approach to feeding can protect the vulnerable neonate's neurologic development, support the parent-infant relationship, and prevent feeding problems that may endure. Contingent interventions are used to maintain subsystem stability and enhance self-regulation, development, and coping skills. This co-regulation between caregiver and neonate forms the foundation for a positive infant-guided feeding experience. Caregivers select evidence-based interventions contingent to the newborn's communication. When these interventions are then titrated from moment to moment, neuroprotection and safety are fostered.

  20. Robotic Recon for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew; Fong, Terry; Ford, Ken; Heldmann, Jennifer; Helper, Mark; Hodges, Kip; Landis, Rob; Lee, Pascal; Schaber, Gerald; Schmitt, Harrison H.

    2009-01-01

    Robotic reconnaissance has the potential to significantly improve scientific and technical return from lunar surface exploration. In particular, robotic recon may increase crew productivity and reduce operational risk for exploration. However, additional research, development and field-testing is needed to mature robot and ground control systems, refine operational protocols, and specify detailed requirements. When the new lunar surface campaign begins around 2020, and before permanent outposts are established, humans will initially be on the Moon less than 10% of the time. During the 90% of time between crew visits, robots will be available to perform surface operations under ground control. Understanding how robotic systems can best address surface science needs, therefore, becomes a central issue Prior to surface missions, lunar orbiters (LRO, Kaguya, Chandrayyan-1, etc.) will map the Moon. These orbital missions will provide numerous types of maps: visible photography, topographic, mineralogical and geochemical distributions, etc. However, remote sensing data will not be of sufficient resolution, lighting, nor view angle, to fully optimize pre-human exploration planning, e.g., crew traverses for field geology and geophysics. Thus, it is important to acquire supplemental and complementary surface data. Robotic recon can obtain such data, using robot-mounted instruments to scout the surface and subsurface at resolutions and at viewpoints not achievable from orbit. This data can then be used to select locations for detailed field activity and prioritize targets to improve crew productivity. Surface data can also help identify and assess terrain hazards, and evaluate alternate routes to reduce operational risk. Robotic recon could be done months in advance, or be part of a continuing planning process during human missions.

  1. Research on the inspection robot for cable tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihao

    2017-03-01

    Robot by mechanical obstacle, double end communication, remote control and monitoring software components. The mechanical obstacle part mainly uses the tracked mobile robot mechanism, in order to facilitate the design and installation of the robot, the other auxiliary swing arm; double side communication part used a combination of communication wire communication with wireless communication, great improve the communication range of the robot. When the robot is controlled by far detection range, using wired communication control, on the other hand, using wireless communication; remote control part mainly completes the inspection robot walking, navigation, positioning and identification of cloud platform control. In order to improve the reliability of its operation, the preliminary selection of IPC as the control core the movable body selection program hierarchical structure as a design basis; monitoring software part is the core part of the robot, which has a definite diagnosis Can be instead of manual simple fault judgment, instead the robot as a remote actuators, staff as long as the remote control can be, do not have to body at the scene. Four parts are independent of each other but are related to each other, the realization of the structure of independence and coherence, easy maintenance and coordination work. Robot with real-time positioning function and remote control function, greatly improves the IT operation. Robot remote monitor, to avoid the direct contact with the staff and line, thereby reducing the accident casualties, for the safety of the inspection work has far-reaching significance.

  2. Minimal intervention dentistry II: part 4. Minimal intervention techniques of preparation and adhesive restorations. The contribution of the sono-abrasive techniques.

    PubMed

    Decup, F; Lasfargues, J-J

    2014-04-01

    The concept of minimal intervention in oral medicine is based on advances in biological sciences applied to the dental organ. Many cultural barriers, economic as well as technical, have thwarted the application of micro-invasive conservative techniques by the general practitioner. Emerging technologies do not remove all obstacles but promote the integration of less invasive techniques in daily practice. Sono-abrasion is a technique for the selective preparation of enamel and dentine offering excellent efficacy, quality and safety. The authors describe the therapeutic principles, the choice of instrumentation and its mode of action and discuss its interest in adhesive restorative dentistry. The illustrated clinical situations focus on the preservation and optimisation of tissue bonding for both initial lesions and advanced lesions.

  3. Robots and ICT to support play in children with severe physical disabilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Renée J F; Lexis, Monique A S; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; Jansens, Rianne M L; de Witte, Luc P

    2015-09-02

    Play is an essential part of children's lives. Children with physical disabilities experience difficulties in play, especially those with severe physical disabilities. With the progress of innovative technology, the possibilities to support play are increasing. The purpose of this literature study is to gain insight into the aims, control options and commercial availability of information and communication technology (ICT) and robots to support play (especially play for the sake of play) in children with severe physical disabilities. A systematic literature search in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, IEEE and ERIC was carried out. Titles and abstracts were assessed independently by three reviewers. In addition, studies were selected using Google Scholar, conference proceedings and reference lists. Three main groups of technology for play could be distinguished: robots (n = 8), virtual reality systems (n = 15) and computer systems (n = 4). Besides, ICT and robots developed for specific therapy or educational goals using play-like activities, five of the in total 27 technologies in this study described the aim of "play for play's sake". Many ICT systems and robots to support play in children with physical disabilities were found. Numerous technologies use play-like activities to achieve therapeutic or educational goals. Robots especially are used for "play for play's sake". Implications for Rehabilitation This study gives insight into the aims, control options and commercial availability for application of robots and ICT to support play in children with severe physical disabilities. This overview can be used in both the fields of rehabilitation and special education to search for new innovative intervention options and it can stimulate them to use these innovative play materials. Especially robots may have great potential in supporting "play for play's sake".

  4. Automated Cutting And Drilling Of Composite Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed automated system precisely cuts and drills large, odd-shaped parts made of composite materials. System conceived for manufacturing lightweight composite parts to replace heavier parts in Space Shuttle. Also useful in making large composite parts for other applications. Includes robot locating part to be machined, positions cutter, and positions drill. Gantry-type robot best suited for task.

  5. Climbing robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerley, James J.; May, Edward L.; Ecklund, Wayne D.

    1993-11-01

    A mobile robot for traversing any surface consisting of a number of interconnected segments, each interconnected segment having an upper 'U' frame member, a lower 'U' frame member, a compliant joint between the upper 'U' frame member and the lower 'U' frame member, a number of linear actuators between the two frame members acting to provide relative displacement between the frame members, a foot attached to the lower 'U' frame member for adherence of the segment to the surface, an inter-segment attachment attached to the upper 'U' frame member for interconnecting the segments, a power source connected to the linear actuator, and a computer/controller for independently controlling each linear actuator in each interconnected segment such that the mobile robot moves in a caterpillar like fashion.

  6. Adaptive heterogeneous multi-robot teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control in robot missions involving loosely coupled, largely independent tasks. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, the author describes in detail the experimental results of an implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative box pushing demonstration. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes in the capabilities of the robot team.

  7. Space Robotics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    ISS036-E-025030 (26 July 2013) --- From the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, uses a computer as he partners with Ames Research Center to remotely control a surface rover in California. The experiment, called Surface Telerobotics, will help scientists plan future missions where a robotic rover could prepare a site on a moon or a planet for a crew.

  8. Space Robotics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    ISS036-E-025012 (26 July 2013) --- From the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, uses a computer as he partners with Ames Research Center to remotely control a surface rover in California. The experiment, called Surface Telerobotics, will help scientists plan future missions where a robotic rover could prepare a site on a moon or a planet for a crew.

  9. Space Robotics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    ISS036-E-025017 (26 July 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, speaks in a microphone as he partners with Ames Research Center to remotely control a surface rover in California. The experiment, called Surface Telerobotics, will help scientists plan future missions where a robotic rover could prepare a site on a moon or a planet for a crew.

  10. Space Robotics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    ISS036-E-025034 (26 July 2013) --- From the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, uses a computer as he partners with Ames Research Center to remotely control a surface rover in California. The experiment, called Surface Telerobotics, will help scientists plan future missions where a robotic rover could prepare a site on a moon or a planet for a crew.

  11. Modeling and simulation of tumor-influenced high resolution real-time physics-based breast models for model-guided robotic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neylon, John; Hasse, Katelyn; Sheng, Ke; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Breast radiation therapy is typically delivered to the patient in either supine or prone position. Each of these positioning systems has its limitations in terms of tumor localization, dose to the surrounding normal structures, and patient comfort. We envision developing a pneumatically controlled breast immobilization device that will enable the benefits of both supine and prone positioning. In this paper, we present a physics-based breast deformable model that aids in both the design of the breast immobilization device as well as a control module for the device during every day positioning. The model geometry is generated from a subject's CT scan acquired during the treatment planning stage. A GPU based deformable model is then generated for the breast. A mass-spring-damper approach is then employed for the deformable model, with the spring modeled to represent a hyperelastic tissue behavior. Each voxel of the CT scan is then associated with a mass element, which gives the model its high resolution nature. The subject specific elasticity is then estimated from a CT scan in prone position. Our results show that the model can deform at >60 deformations per second, which satisfies the real-time requirement for robotic positioning. The model interacts with a computer designed immobilization device to position the breast and tumor anatomy in a reproducible location. The design of the immobilization device was also systematically varied based on the breast geometry, tumor location, elasticity distribution and the reproducibility of the desired tumor location.

  12. Rossum's universal robots: not the machines.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael E

    2007-12-01

    One assumes in the era of rapidly expanding technology that robot implies mechanical beings. This is not how the word was used initially and represents one of those metamorphoses to another conceptualization. This is an investigation into Capek's original play, Rossum's Universal Robots, for an understanding of his intended meaning. Karel Capek was Czechoslovakian. His play was written in 1920, first performed in 1921, and presented in New York in 1922. It has come to symbolize Western society's feelings about robots. Capek's writing and the original play might clarify the definition of robot for the record, in light of some controversy as to whether the da Vinci Surgical System is a robot or not. THE PLAY: Rossum was a great physiologist who chemically synthesized living protoplasm and was capable of constructing artificial life forms: first, a dog; then, a man. His son was an engineer who quickly was able to manufacture large numbers of humanoids at lower costs " ... producing a robot has been brought down within 15 years from $10,000 to $150." This is the first foreshadowing of Moore's Law. But critically, these are not machines, even though his robots outperform humans. The story turns sinister as the robots eventually revolt and kill their creators. Like many things in our vocabulary, the term robot was initially used for a biologic organism that was created for servitude. Defined by the Robotic Institute of America (1979), a robot is ... "a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or specialized devices through various programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks." This is far from the in tended use envisioned by Capek, but applies to the da Vinci Surgical System. As Alquist in R.U.R. concludes: "... if there are no more human beings left, at least let there be Robots!"

  13. Robotic Tool Changer For Automated Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype robotic tool changer for automated welding system eliminates need for most manual tool setups and attendant problems: operates rapidly, always chooses designated tool, maneuvers tip of welding torch or other tool in correct position, and reliably connects water, gas, welding wire, high-voltage electrical signals, and ground. Also loads tools other than those for welding. Intended for use in robotic work cell producing all good parts, no rejects. In production, robot welds part, tests for flaws, and reworks as necessary before releasing it.

  14. Robotics and regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Mohamad; Giacalone, Marilu; Hemmerling, Thomas M

    2014-10-01

    Robots in regional anesthesia are used as a tool to automate the performance of regional techniques reducing the anesthesiologist's workload and improving patient care. The purpose of this review is to show the latest findings in robotic regional anesthesia. The literature separates robots in anesthesia into two groups: pharmacological robots and manual robots. Pharmacological robots are mainly closed-loop systems that help in the titration of anesthetic drugs to patients undergoing surgery. Manual robots are mechanical robots that are used to support or replace the manual gestures performed by anesthesiologists. Although in the last decade researchers have focused on the development of decision support systems and closed-loop systems, more recent evidence supports the concept that robots can also be useful in performing regional anesthesia techniques. Robots can improve the performance and safety in regional anesthesia. In this review, we present the developments made in robotic and automated regional anesthesia, and discuss the current state of research in this field.

  15. Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohjanen, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    Infants and toddlers who live in poverty are more likely to experience developmental delays or disabilities and less likely to access early intervention (EI) services. The federal initiative Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) was designed to increase access to high quality early learning programs for children at risk for…

  16. Toward True Integration of Academic and Behavior Response to Intervention Systems: Part Two--Tier 2 Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Goodman, Steve; Bohanon, Hank

    2010-01-01

    In the previous article in this series, the authors provided a rationale for integrating academic and behavior response to intervention (RTI) systems. Their rationale included: (1) research showing that challenges in academic and social behavior are linked; (2) a description of the common features that both RTI systems share; and (3) the…

  17. Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohjanen, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    Infants and toddlers who live in poverty are more likely to experience developmental delays or disabilities and less likely to access early intervention (EI) services. The federal initiative Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) was designed to increase access to high quality early learning programs for children at risk for…

  18. Comparing an Emotion- and a Behavior-Focused Parenting Program as Part of a Multsystemic Intervention for Child Conduct Problems.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Melissa E; Havighurst, Sophie S; Kehoe, Christiane E; Holland, Kerry A; Frankling, Emma J; Stargatt, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a multisystemic early intervention that included a comparison of an emotion- and behavior-focused parenting program for children with emerging conduct problems. The processes that moderated positive child outcomes were also explored. A repeated measures cluster randomized group design methodology was employed with three conditions (Tuning in to Kids, Positive Parenting Program, and waitlist control) and two periods (preintervention and 6-month follow-up). The sample consisted of 320 predominantly Caucasian 4- to 9-year-old children who were screened for disruptive behavior problems. Three outcome measures of child conduct problems were evaluated using a parent (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory) and teacher (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) rating scale and a structured child interview (Home Interview With Child). Six moderators were assessed using family demographic information and a parent-rated measure of psychological well-being (Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales short form). The results indicated that the multisystemic intervention was effective compared to a control group and that, despite different theoretical orientations, the emotion- and behavior-focused parenting programs were equally effective in reducing child conduct problems. Child age and parent psychological well-being moderated intervention response. This effectiveness trial supports the use of either emotion- or behavior-focused parenting programs in a multisystemic early intervention and provides greater choice for practitioners in the selection of specific programs.

  19. Robot Guidance Using A Morphological Vision Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, Robert M.; Tomko, Leonard M.

    1985-12-01

    An algorithm has been developed to guide a robot by identifying the orientation of a randomly-acquired part held in the robot's gripper. A program implementing this algorithm is being used to demonstrate the feasibility of part-independent robotic bin picking*. The project task was to extract unmodified industrial parts from a compartmentalized tray and position them on a fixture. The parts are singulated in the compartments but are positionally and rotationally unconstrained. The part is acquired based upon three-dimensional image data which is processed by a 3D morphological algorithm described in [1]. The vision algorithm discussed here inspects the parts, determines their orientation and calculates the robot trajectory to a keyed housing with which the part must be mated. When parts are extracted during a bin picking operation their position and orientation are affected by many factors, such as gripper insertion-induced motion, interference with container side walls during extraction, slippage due to gravity and vibration during robot motions. The loss of the known position and orientation of the part in the robot gripper makes accurate fixturing impossible. Our solution to this problem was to redetermine the orientation of the part after acquisition. This paper describes the application in detail and discusses the problems encountered in robot acquisition of unconstrained parts. Next, the physical setup and image acquisition system, including lighting and optical components, are discussed. The principles of morphological (shape-based) image processing are presented, followed by a description of the interactive algorithm development process which was used for this project. The algorithm is illustrated step by step with a series of diagrams showing the effects of the transformations applied to the data. The algorithms were run on ERIM' s new fourth generation hybrid image processing architecture, the Cyto-HSS, which is described in detail in [2], and the

  20. Controlling Robots with Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Andrew; Rony, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Discusses new robots that are mechanical arms small enough to sit on a desktop. They offer scaled-down price and performance, but are able to handle light production tasks such as spray painting or part orientation. (Available from W. C. Publications Inc., P.O. Box 1578, Montclair, NJ 07042.) (JOW)

  1. Robotics Challenge: Cognitive Robot for General Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    5 Figure 2: Screenshots of the IHC- Controlled ATLAS Robot Walking ...mean time, people at KU assumed that 1) the IHC¹s low-level control is perfect ‹ meaning that the robot can perform basic maneuvers like walking ...side even after the VRC event, IHC successfully controlled the robot to walk on a variety of surfaces. Figure 2 shows a simulated ATLAS robot with

  2. An ultra-high field strength MR image-guided robotic needle delivery system for in-bore small animal interventions.

    PubMed

    Gravett, Matthew; Cepek, Jeremy; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-08-28

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an image-guided robotic needle delivery system for accurate and repeatable needle targeting procedures in mouse brains inside the 12 cm inner diameter gradient coil insert of a 9.4 T MR scanner. Many preclinical research techniques require the use of accurate needle deliveries to soft tissues, including brain tissue. Soft tissues are optimally visualized in MR images, which offer high-soft tissue contrast, as well as a range of unique imaging techniques, including functional, spectroscopy and thermal imaging, however, there are currently no solutions for delivering needles to small animal brains inside the bore of an ultra-high field MR scanner. This paper describes the mechatronic design, evaluation of MR compatibility, registration technique, mechanical calibration, the quantitative validation of the in-bore image-guided needle targeting accuracy and repeatability, and demonstrated the system's ability to deliver needles in situ. Our six degree-of-freedom, MR compatible, mechatronic system was designed to fit inside the bore of a 9.4 T MR scanner and is actuated using a combination of piezoelectric and hydraulic mechanisms. The MR compatibility and targeting accuracy of the needle delivery system are evaluated to ensure that the system is precisely calibrated to perform the needle targeting procedures. A semi-automated image registration is performed to link the robot coordinates to the MR coordinate system. Soft tissue targets can be accurately localized in MR images, followed by automatic alignment of the needle trajectory to the target. Intra-procedure visualization of the needle target location and the needle were confirmed through MR images after needle insertion. The effects of geometric distortions and signal noise were found to be below threshold that would have an impact on the accuracy of the system. The system was found to have negligible effect on the MR image signal noise and geometric distortion

  3. Cooperative robotic sentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, John T.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Klarer, Paul; Eisler, G. R.; Caprihan, Rahul

    1999-08-01

    As part of a project for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing and testing the feasibility of a cooperative team of robotic sentry vehicles to guard a perimeter and to perform a surround task. This paper describes on-going activities in the development of these robotic sentry vehicles. To date, we have developed a robotic perimeter detection system which consists of eight 'Roving All Terrain Lunar Explorer Rovers' (RATLER), a laptop-based base-station, and several Miniature Intrusion Detection Sensors (MIDS). A radio frequency receiver on each of the RATLER vehicles alerts the sentry vehicles of alarms from the hidden MIDS. When an alarm is received, each vehicle decides whether it should investigate the alarm based on the proximity of itself and the other vehicles to the alarm. As one vehicle attends an alarm, the other vehicles adjust their position around the perimeter to better prepare for another alarm. For the surround task, both potential field and A* search path planners have been added to the base-station and vehicles. At the base-station, the operator specifies goal and exclusion regions on a GIS map. The path planner generates vehicles paths that are previewed by the operator. Once the operator has validated the path, the appropriate information is downloaded t the vehicles. For the potential field path planner, the polygons and line segments that represent the obstacles and goals are downloaded to the vehicles, instead of the simulated paths. On board the vehicles, the same potential field path planner generates the path except that it uses the true location of itself and the nearest neighboring vehicle. For the A* path planner, the actual path is downloaded to the vehicles because of limited on-board computational power.

  4. Integration of vision and robotic workcell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossieux, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the incorporation of vision into a robotic cell to obtain cell status information and use this information to influence the robot operation. It discusses both mechanical and informational solutions to the operational issues which are present. The cell uses a machine vision system to determine information about part presence in the shipping tray, part location in the tray, and tray orientation. The vision system's edge detector algorithm is used to identify the orientation of the packing trays. In addition, different vision tools are used to determine if parts are present in the trays based on the unique configuration of the individual parts. The mechanical solutions discuss the handling of medium weight (10 - 25 lb.) parts at an average cycle time of 3.1 seconds per part. The robot gripper must handle 33 different models, three identical parts at a time. This is accomplished by using stacks of rotary actuators and slides between the stacks.

  5. Hormonal regulatory mechanisms in obese children and adolescents after previous weight reduction with a lifestyle intervention: maintain - paediatric part - a RCT from 2009-15.

    PubMed

    Bau, Anne-Madeleine; Ernert, Andrea; Krude, Heiko; Wiegand, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    their weight loss. MAINTAIN is the first paediatric RCT addressing in parallel to a RCT in obese adults the course of weight regain after induced weight loss and is embedded in an experimental research consortium in order to also address several molecular mechanisms of weight regain. ClinicalTrials NCT00850629, first registration 17 February 2009, verified January 2012, Paediatric part of the interventional study. Ethic proposal approved at 08.04.2009.

  6. Robotic Arm-Assisted Sonography: Review of Technical Developments and Potential Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Daniel R; Cleary, Kevin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Azizi-Koutenaei, Bamshad; Monfaredi, Reza

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging requires trained personnel. Advances in robotics and data transmission create the possibility of telesonography. This review introduces clinicians to current technical work in and potential applications of this developing capability. Telesonography offers advantages in hazardous or remote environments. Robotically assisted ultrasound can reduce stress injuries in sonographers and has potential utility during robotic surgery and interventional procedures.

  7. The Saskatchewan/New Brunswick Healthy Start-Départ Santé intervention: implementation cost estimates of a physical activity and healthy eating intervention in early learning centers.

    PubMed

    Sari, Nazmi; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Froehlich Chow, Amanda

    2017-01-19

    Participation in daily physical activity and consuming a balanced diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods are behaviours associated with positive health outcomes during all stages of life. Previous literature suggests that the earlier these behaviours are established the greater the health benefits. As such, early learning settings have been shown to provide an effective avenue for exploring and influencing the physical activity and healthy eating behaviours of children before school entry. However, in addition to improving individual level health of children, such interventions may also result in a number of social benefits for the society. In fact, research among adult populations has shown that sufficient participation in physical activity can significantly lower hospital stays and physician visits, in turn leading to positive economic outcomes. To our knowledge there is very limited literature about economic evaluations of interventions implemented in early learning centers to increase physical activity and healthy eating behaviours among children. The primary purpose of this paper is to identify inputs and costs needed to implement a physical activity and healthy eating intervention (Healthy Start-Départ Santé (HS-DS)) in early learning centres throughout Saskatchewan and New Brunswick over the course of three years. In doing so, implementation cost is estimated to complete the first phase of a social return on investment analysis of this intervention. In order to carry out this evaluation the first step was to identify the inputs and costs needed to implement the intervention, along with the corresponding outputs. With stakeholder interviews and using existing database, we estimated the implementation cost by measuring, valuing and monetizing each individual input. Our results show that the total annual cost of implementing HS-DS was $378,753 in the first year, this total cost decreased slightly in the second year ($356,861) and again

  8. Path Planning for Semi-automated Simulated Robotic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the semi-automated robotic surgical procedure for removing the brain tumor margins, where the manual operation is a tedious and time-consuming task for surgeons. We present robust path planning methods for robotic ablation of tumor residues in various shapes, which are represented in point-clouds instead of analytical geometry. Along with the path plans, corresponding metrics are also delivered to the surgeon for selecting the optimal candidate in the automated robotic ablation. The selected path plan is then executed and tested on RAVEN(™) II surgical robot platform as part of the semi-automated robotic brain tumor ablation surgery in a simulated tissue phantom.

  9. Laboratory robotics systems at the Savannah River Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dyches, G M; Burkett, S D

    1983-01-01

    Many analytical chemistry methods normally used at the Savannah River site require repetitive procedures and handling of radioactive and other hazardous solutions. Robotics is being investigated as a method of reducing personnel fatigue and radiation exposure and also increasing product quality. Several applications of various commercially available robot systems are discussed involving cold (nonradioactive) and hot (radioactive) sample preparations and glovebox waste removal. Problems encountered in robot programming, parts fixturing, design of special robot hands and other support equipment, glovebox operation, and operator-system interaction are discussed. A typical robot system cost analysis for one application is given.

  10. Path Planning for Semi-automated Simulated Robotic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the semi-automated robotic surgical procedure for removing the brain tumor margins, where the manual operation is a tedious and time-consuming task for surgeons. We present robust path planning methods for robotic ablation of tumor residues in various shapes, which are represented in point-clouds instead of analytical geometry. Along with the path plans, corresponding metrics are also delivered to the surgeon for selecting the optimal candidate in the automated robotic ablation. The selected path plan is then executed and tested on RAVEN™ II surgical robot platform as part of the semi-automated robotic brain tumor ablation surgery in a simulated tissue phantom. PMID:26705501

  11. Robot environment expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Robot Environment Expert System uses a hexidecimal tree data structure to model a complex robot environment where not only the robot arm moves, but also the robot itself and other objects may move. The hextree model allows dynamic updating, collision avoidance and path planning over time, to avoid moving objects.

  12. Educational Robotics as Mindtools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikropoulos, Tassos A.; Bellou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    Although there are many studies on the constructionist use of educational robotics, they have certain limitations. Some of them refer to robotics education, rather than educational robotics. Others follow a constructionist approach, but give emphasis only to design skills, creativity and collaboration. Some studies use robotics as an educational…

  13. Percutaneous minimally invasive fetoscopic surgery for spina bifida aperta. Part III: neurosurgical intervention in the first postnatal year.

    PubMed

    Graf, K; Kohl, T; Neubauer, B A; Dey, F; Faas, D; Wanis, F A; Reinges, M H T; Uhl, E; Kolodziej, M A

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the need for postnatal neurosurgical intervention after fetoscopic patch coverage of spina bifida aperta (SBA). This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 71 fetuses which underwent minimally invasive fetoscopic patch coverage of SBA between 21 + 0 and 29 + 1 weeks of gestation. Postnatal neurosurgical procedures were classified into two types: re-coverage of the SBA within the first 3 months following birth, and shunt placement as treatment of associated hydrocephalus within the first year. Location of the SBA was lumbosacral in 59 cases, lumbar in seven, thoracic in three and sacral in two. In total, 20/71 (28%) patients underwent early postnatal neurosurgical intervention by means of re-coverage of the SBA. This was performed because of cerebrospinal fluid leakage in seven (35%), adhesions with functional deterioration in three (15%), incomplete coverage in five (25%) and skin defect in five (25%) cases. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement within 1 year was required in 32 (45%) cases and was preceded by ventriculostomy in two. Three (4%) infants needed Chiari decompression surgery in the first 12 months following birth, because of syringomyelia or gait disturbance. Fetoscopic patch coverage of SBA may require postnatal re-coverage in some cases. In most cases, conservative wound treatment shows good results, without requiring neurosurgical intervention. The low 1-year-shunt rate is comparable to data of the Management of Myelomeningocele Study and lower compared with published data of patients with postnatal only coverage of SBA. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Translating Research to Practice for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Part I: Definition, Associated Behaviors, Prevalence, Diagnostic Process, and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norah L; Burkett, Karen; Reinhold, Judy; Bultas, Margaret W

    2016-01-01

    The number of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is rising, along with the potential for challenging behaviors during health care encounters. We present an overview of the emerging science related to ASD diagnosis and interventions for children with ASD. Emerging science on ASD reveals common associated challenging behaviors, increasing prevalence, emphasis on early diagnosis at 18 to 24 months of age, changes in the diagnostic process with criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, and interventions with medication, education, and behavior management. Family and health care provider preparation strategies facilitate care of children with ASD and their families. Early diagnosis at 18 to 24 months of age and evidence-based interventions contribute to best outcomes for children and families. Health care providers must be aware of the state of the science for diagnosis and best practices to provide family-centered care for this growing population. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Robotics Algorithms Provide Nutritional Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    On July 5, 1997, a small robot emerged from its lander like an insect from an egg, crawling out onto the rocky surface of Mars. About the size of a child s wagon, NASA s Sojourner robot was the first successful rover mission to the Red Planet. For 83 sols (Martian days, typically about 40 minutes longer than Earth days), Sojourner - largely remote controlled by NASA operators on Earth - transmitted photos and data unlike any previously collected. Sojourner was perhaps the crowning achievement of the NASA Space Telerobotics Program, an Agency initiative designed to push the limits of robotics in space. Telerobotics - devices that merge the autonomy of robotics with the direct human control of teleoperators - was already a part of NASA s efforts; probes like the Viking landers that preceded Sojourner on Mars, for example, were telerobotic applications. The Space Telerobotics Program, a collaboration between Ames Research Center, Johnson Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and multiple universities, focused on developing remote-controlled robotics for three main purposes: on-orbit assembly and servicing, science payload tending, and planetary surface robotics. The overarching goal was to create robots that could be guided to build structures in space, monitor scientific experiments, and, like Sojourner, scout distant planets in advance of human explorers. While telerobotics remains a significant aspect of NASA s efforts, as evidenced by the currently operating Spirit and Opportunity Mars rovers, the Hubble Space Telescope, and many others - the Space Telerobotics Program was dissolved and redistributed within the Agency the same year as Sojourner s success. The program produced a host of remarkable technologies and surprising inspirations, including one that is changing the way people eat

  16. Cellular assay optimization: part II: the use of a simple integrated robotic work cell to allow the multiplexed batching of cellular assays.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Marie A; Orme, Jonathan P; Roberts, Karen

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the implementation of an automated work cell with commercially available hardware and software, capable of handling up to 15 separate reagents for performing 96-well or 384-well assays but with a small footprint and only a single liquid dispenser and two plate washers. Extremely flexible software was used to enable this simple work cell to perform processes that would traditionally require a much larger, more expensive automation platform. With the development of the C-Myc assays for the targets DYRK, BMX, PERK, and FAK, the authors describe a software solution to multibatch assays to run simultaneously, reducing reagent dead volume and increasing the efficiency of running multiple assays such that the time to generate data across multiple targets was significantly shortened. Although a larger automated system with multiple robotic arms and extensive equipment would also be able to process multiple assays simultaneously, the work cell we have described represents an inexpensive and flexible, easily upgradable option suitable for a wider range of labs.

  17. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.L.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  18. Review article: the new concept of interventional heart failure therapy--part 1: electrical therapy, treatment of CAD, fluid removal, and ventricular support.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keith A; Philip, Kiran J; Barbagelata, Alejandro; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2010-06-01

    Congestive heart failure is a chronic and debilitating disease responsible for high cardiac morbidity and mortality in the world and is associated with more than 290 000 deaths in the United States each year. Recent advances in heart failure therapy target many of the mechanical and structural aspects of heart failure that are not addressed by drug-based therapies; these include abnormalities in electrical conduction, coronary artery or valvular architecture, and in ventricular size and shape. To target these abnormalities, newer therapies have largely been mechanical and device-based in nature and can be collectively described as interventional therapy. Interventional therapy includes the use of interventional medical therapy, electrical-based devices to augment ventricular function, catheterization-based devices for the treatment of underlying coronary artery disease and valvular disease, machines for the removal of excess fluid, mechanical pumps to assist the ventricles, surgical techniques aimed at reshaping the ventricles, the use of tissue therapies such as stem cell transplantation or complete heart transplant, palliative care, and self-care. This article is the first in a 2-part series that will review interventional heart failure therapy and present the most recent data supporting its use.

  19. Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Omni-Hand was developed by Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The multiple digit hand has an opposable thumb and a flexible wrist. Electric muscles called Minnacs power wrist joints and the interchangeable digits. Two hands have been delivered to NASA for evaluation for potential use on space missions and the unit is commercially available for applications like hazardous materials handling and manufacturing automation. Previous SBIR contracts resulted in the Omni-Wrist and Omni-Wrist II robotic systems, which are commercially available for spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, as well as other uses.

  20. Robotic Stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    UltraStrip Systems, Inc.'s M-200 removes paint from the hulls of ships faster than traditional grit-blasting methods. And, it does so without producing toxic airborne particles common to traditional methods. The M-2000 magnetically attaches itself to the hull of the ship. Its water jets generate 40,000 pounds of pressure per square inch, blasting away paint down to the ships steel substrate. The only by product is water and dried paint chips and these are captured by a vacuum system so no toxic residue can escape. It was built out of a partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the National Robotics Engineering Consortium.

  1. ALLIANCE: An architecture for fault tolerant multi-robot cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    ALLIANCE is a software architecture that facilitates the fault tolerant cooperative control of teams of heterogeneous mobile robots performing missions composed of loosely coupled, largely independent subtasks. ALLIANCE allows teams of robots, each of which possesses a variety of high-level functions that it can perform during a mission, to individually select appropriate actions throughout the mission based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and the robot`s own internal states. ALLIANCE is a fully distributed, behavior-based architecture that incorporates the use of mathematically modeled motivations (such as impatience and acquiescence) within each robot to achieve adaptive action selection. Since cooperative robotic teams usually work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, this software architecture allows the robot team members to respond robustly, reliably, flexibly, and coherently to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. The feasibility of this architecture is demonstrated in an implementation on a team of mobile robots performing a laboratory version of hazardous waste cleanup.

  2. Demonstration of autonomous air monitoring through robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Rancatore, R.

    1989-11-01

    The project included modifying an existing teleoperated robot to include autonomous navigation, large object avoidance, and air monitoring and demonstrating that prototype robot system in indoor and outdoor environments. The robot was also modified to carry a HNU PI-101 Photoionization Detector air monitoring device. A sonar range finder, which already was an integral part of the Surveyor, was repositioned to the front of the robot chassis to detect large obstacles in the path of the robot. In addition, the software of the onboard computer was also extensively modified to provide: navigation control, dynamic steering to smoothly follow the wire-course without hesitation, obstacle avoidance, autonomous shut down and remote reporting of toxic substance detection.

  3. Robots and manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Robots are defined and described for various applications. The key feature of robots is programmability, which allows teleoperation, repair work in hazardous situations, and unsupervised operation in industrial functions. Two types of robots now exist: special purpose, with equipment for a specific task; and general purpose, which include nonservo-controlled robots, servo-controlled robots, and sensory control robots. Sensory robots are the most sophisticated, and are equipped with both internal control sensors and external sensors such as TV cameras, pressure detectors, laser range finders, etc. Sensory feedback to a central computer enables the robots to make appropriate modifications to the control program to adapt to new situations. Pattern recognition and scans for size are features of the TV sensors, and programs to develop a universal effector (hand) are outlined. Finally, robot programming in terms of manual, walkthrough, and textual methods are described, and the potential uses of robots for space and undersea construction and repair are discussed.

  4. Safety and Efficacy of At-Home Robotic Locomotion Therapy in Individuals with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective, Pre-Post Intervention, Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Rüdiger; Schließmann, Daniel; Plewa, Harry; Schuld, Christian; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Weidner, Norbert; Hofer, Eberhard P.; Knestel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background The compact Motorized orthosis for home rehabilitation of Gait (MoreGait) was developed for continuation of locomotion training at home. MoreGait generates afferent stimuli of walking with the user in a semi-supine position and provides feedback about deviations from the reference walking pattern. Objective Prospective, pre-post intervention, proof-of-concept study to test the feasibility of an unsupervised home-based application of five MoreGait prototypes in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Methods Twenty-five (5 tetraplegia, 20 paraplegia) participants with chronic (mean time since injury: 5.8 ± 5.4 (standard deviation, SD) years) sensorimotor iSCI (7 ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) C, 18 AIS D; Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI II): Interquartile range 9 to 16) completed the training (45 minutes / day, at least 4 days / week, 8 weeks). Baseline status was documented 4 and 2 weeks before and at training onset. Training effects were assessed after 4 and 8 weeks of therapy. Results After therapy, 9 of 25 study participants improved with respect to the dependency on walking aids assessed by the WISCI II. For all individuals, the short-distance walking velocity measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test showed significant improvements compared to baseline (100%) for both self-selected (Mean 139.4% ± 35.5% (SD)) and maximum (Mean 143.1% ± 40.6% (SD)) speed conditions as well as the endurance estimated with the six-minute walk test (Mean 166.6% ± 72.1% (SD)). One device-related adverse event (pressure sore on the big toe) occurred in over 800 training sessions. Conclusions Home-based robotic locomotion training with MoreGait is feasible and safe. The magnitude of functional improvements achieved by MoreGait in individuals with iSCI is well within the range of complex locomotion robots used in hospitals. Thus, unsupervised MoreGait training potentially represents an option to prolong effective training aiming at recovery of locomotor

  5. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  6. Robot Rocket Rally

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-14

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Students from Hagerty High School in Oviedo, Fla., participants in FIRST Robotics, show off their robots' capabilities at the Robot Rocket Rally. The three-day event at Florida's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is highlighted by exhibits, games and demonstrations of a variety of robots, with exhibitors ranging from school robotics clubs to veteran NASA scientists and engineers. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  7. Robot Rocket Rally

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-14

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A miniature humanoid robot known as DARwin-OP, from Virginia Tech Robotics, plays soccer with a red tennis ball for a crowd of students at the Robot Rocket Rally. The three-day event at Florida's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is highlighted by exhibits, games and demonstrations of a variety of robots, with exhibitors ranging from school robotics clubs to veteran NASA scientists and engineers. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  8. Robot Rocket Rally

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-14

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Students gather to watch as a DARwin-OP miniature humanoid robot from Virginia Tech Robotics demonstrates its soccer abilities at the Robot Rocket Rally. The three-day event at Florida's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is highlighted by exhibits, games and demonstrations of a variety of robots, with exhibitors ranging from school robotics clubs to veteran NASA scientists and engineers. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  9. Robot Rocket Rally

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-14

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A child gets an up-close look at Charli, an autonomous walking robot developed by Virginia Tech Robotics, during the Robot Rocket Rally. The three-day event at Florida's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is highlighted by exhibits, games and demonstrations of a variety of robots, with exhibitors ranging from school robotics clubs to veteran NASA scientists and engineers. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  10. Robotics in urological surgery: evolution, current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, A; Sanchez-Salas, R; Prapotnich, D; Barret, E; Mombet, A; Cathala, N; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2015-09-01

    Robotic surgery is rapidly evolving and has become an essential part of surgical practice in several parts of the world. Robotic technology will expand globally and most of the surgeons around the world will have access to surgical robots in the future. It is essential that we are updated about the outcomes of robot assisted surgeries which will allow everyone to develop an unbiased opinion on the clinical utility of this innovation. In this review we aim to present the evolution, objective evaluation of clinical outcomes and future perspectives of robot assisted urologic surgeries. A systematic literature review of clinical outcomes of robotic urological surgeries was made in the PUBMED. Randomized control trials, cohort studies and review articles were included. Moreover, a detailed search in the web based search engine was made to acquire information on evolution and evolving technologies in robotics. The present evidence suggests that the clinical outcomes of the robot assisted urologic surgeries are comparable to the conventional open surgical and laparoscopic results and are associated with fewer complications. However, long term results are not available for all the common robotic urologic surgeries. There are plenty of novel developments in robotics to be available for clinical use in the future. Robotic urologic surgery will continue to evolve in the future. We should continue to critically analyze whether the advances in technology and the higher cost eventually translates to improved overall surgical performance and outcomes. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimal intervention dentistry: part 5. Ultra-conservative approach to the treatment of erosive and abrasive lesions.

    PubMed

    Colon, P; Lussi, A

    2014-04-01

    The therapeutic management of tooth wear lesions does not require the removal of diseased tissue. Nevertheless, diverse etiological factors may be associated with the condition and they could be difficult to eliminate; this has to be considered when planning therapy. Interceptive procedures should be reserved for such situations while regular monitoring is recommended for other cases, in accordance with advice provided for using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE). Direct and indirect adhesive procedures with composite resins allow treatment of most clinical situations, including even extensive restorations. The possibility of managing subsequent interventions should be considered when planning the initial therapeutic approach.

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

  13. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1996-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  14. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1996-03-12

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

  15. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1994-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  16. Part 2: Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment Plus Recovery Management: A Proposed Model for Recovery-Oriented Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Fornili, Katherine S

    2016-01-01

    Part 1 of this two-part series (The Theoretical Basis for Recovery-Oriented Management of Substance Use Disorders in the Primary Care) explored the theoretical foundations for evidence-based substance Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) services. The aim was to produce possible explanations for why traditional SBIRT works well for individuals with unhealthy alcohol use but not as well for individuals who have more serious substance use disorders, including drug use and alcohol/drug dependence. Building on that analysis, through meaningful application of recovery management (RM) concepts within an integrated primary care/behavioral health context, a new, theory-based, recovery-oriented framework for primary care SBIRT is now introduced in Part 2. The proposed SBIRT Plus Recovery Management (SBIRT + RM) model moves traditional SBIRT from its original, limited, and narrow focus only on substance detection, brief intervention, and referral to its rightful, structured placement within a comprehensive, multidimensional, recovery-oriented system of care clinical practice environment. SBIRT+RM describes relevant strategies for improving recovery outcomes for individuals identified through primary care substance screening and defines primary care provider roles and responsibilities for sustained recovery support and long-term recovery maintenance.

  17. Intelligent robotics can boost America's economic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Jon D.

    1994-01-01

    A case is made for strategic investment in intelligent robotics as a part of the solution to the problem of improved global competitiveness for U.S. manufacturing, a critical industrial sector. Similar cases are made for strategic investments in intelligent robotics for field applications, construction, and service industries such as health care. The scope of the country's problems and needs is beyond the capability of the private sector alone, government alone, or academia alone to solve independently of the others. National cooperative programs in intelligent robotics are needed with the private sector supplying leadership direction and aerospace and non-aerospace industries conducting the development. Some necessary elements of such programs are outlined. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) can be key players in such national cooperative programs in intelligent robotics for several reasons: (1) human space exploration missions require supervised intelligent robotics as enabling tools and, hence must develop supervised intelligent robotic systems; (2) intelligent robotic technology is being developed for space applications at JSC (but has a strong crosscutting or generic flavor) that is advancing the state of the art and is producing both skilled personnel and adaptable developmental infrastructure such as integrated testbeds; and (3) a NASA JSC Technology Investment Program in Robotics has been proposed based on commercial partnerships and collaborations for precompetitive, dual-use developments.

  18. Performance Evaluation Methods for Assistive Robotic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Katherine M.; Feil-Seifer, David J.; Matarić, Maja J.; Yanco, Holly A.

    Robots have been developed for several assistive technology domains, including intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders, eldercare, and post-stroke rehabilitation. Assistive robots have also been used to promote independent living through the use of devices such as intelligent wheelchairs, assistive robotic arms, and external limb prostheses. Work in the broad field of assistive robotic technology can be divided into two major research phases: technology development, in which new devices, software, and interfaces are created; and clinical, in which assistive technology is applied to a given end-user population. Moving from technology development towards clinical applications is a significant challenge. Developing performance metrics for assistive robots poses a related set of challenges. In this paper, we survey several areas of assistive robotic technology in order to derive and demonstrate domain-specific means for evaluating the performance of such systems. We also present two case studies of applied performance measures and a discussion regarding the ubiquity of functional performance measures across the sampled domains. Finally, we present guidelines for incorporating human performance metrics into end-user evaluations of assistive robotic technologies.

  19. EVA Robotic Assistant Project: Platform Attitude Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickels, Kevin M.

    2003-01-01

    The Robotic Systems Technology Branch is currently working on the development of an EVA Robotic Assistant under the sponsorship of the Surface Systems Thrust of the NASA Cross Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP). This will be a mobile robot that can follow a field geologist during planetary surface exploration, carry his tools and the samples that he collects, and provide video coverage of his activity. Prior experiments have shown that for such a robot to be useful it must be able to follow the geologist at walking speed over any terrain of interest. Geologically interesting terrain tends to be rough rather than smooth. The commercial mobile robot that was recently purchased as an initial testbed for the EVA Robotic Assistant Project, an ATRV Jr., is capable of faster than walking speed outside but it has no suspension. Its wheels with inflated rubber tires are attached to axles that are connected directly to the robot body. Any angular motion of the robot produced by driving over rough terrain will directly affect the pointing of the on-board stereo cameras. The resulting image motion is expected to make tracking of the geologist more difficult. This will either require the tracker to search a larger part of the image to find the target from frame to frame or to search mechanically in pan and tilt whenever the image motion is large enough to put the target outside the image in the next frame. This project consists of the design and implementation of a Kalman filter that combines the output of the angular rate sensors and linear accelerometers on the robot to estimate the motion of the robot base. The motion of the stereo camera pair mounted on the robot that results from this motion as the robot drives over rough terrain is then straightforward to compute. The estimates may then be used, for example, to command the robot s on-board pan-tilt unit to compensate for the camera motion induced by the base movement. This has been accomplished in two ways

  20. Transperineal Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Schär, Michael; Ursu, Daniel; Song, Danny Y.; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The study was approved by the animal care and use committee. The purpose of the study was to prospectively establish proof of principle in vivo in canines for a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–compatible robotic system designed for image-guided prostatic needle intervention. The entire robot is built with nonmagnetic and dielectric materials and in its current configuration is designed to perform fully automated brachytherapy seed placement within a closed MR imager. With a 3.0-T imager, in four dogs the median error for MR imaging–guided needle positioning and seed positioning was 2.02 mm (range, 0.86–3.18 mm) and 2.50 mm (range, 1.45–10.54 mm), respectively. The robotic system is capable of accurate MR imaging–guided prostatic needle intervention within a standard MR imager in vivo in a canine model. PMID:18430882