Science.gov

Sample records for interventions improve poor

  1. Do interventions to increase income improve the health of the poor in developed economies and are such policies cost effective?

    PubMed

    Ludbrook, Anne; Porter, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Health policy has shifted towards placing a greater emphasis on the role of lifestyle and life circumstances in improving health. The factors that are associated with poor health status are known, but the comparative effectiveness of specific policy interventions in improving health and reducing inequalities in health is unclear. For example, there is little evidence that specific policies aimed at providing income support or poverty eradication have any measurable impact on health. Two previous reviews have addressed the evidence in this area but in a fairly restrictive way. One considered only randomised trials and the other excluded non-cash benefits. This article builds on the previous reviews in three ways: a broader scope of study designs and types of intervention is considered; more recent literature is reviewed; and it considers the extent to which an economic evaluation framework has been applied. A systematic search of electronic databases was carried out for literature published since 1980 and in the English language. Each study was appraised in terms of its relevance to the question of interest, and the quality of the study design was appraised in terms of its capacity to provide robust answers. Few studies were found with health outcomes as their main focus. Most of the studies that used secondary data sources or survey data were of poor quality. Where economic evaluations were reported, these tended to be restricted to financial assessments. Different types of interventions were evaluated. In studies of cash benefits, there was limited evidence that they had a positive effect on some health domains, mainly psychosocial. Studies in welfare-to-work interventions produced mixed results in terms of impact on either income or health; there was no consistent relationship between income gains and health improvements. Five welfare-to-work studies included 'benefit-cost analysis', but these were essentially financial assessments. Studies of benefits in kind

  2. A Multicomponent Motivational Intervention to Improve Adherence Among Adolescents With Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Stacy R.; Delhey, Leanna M.; Thrailkill, Kathryn; Li, Zhongze; Li, Zhigang; Budney, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To adapt and pilot test a multicomponent motivational intervention that includes family-based contingency management (CM) for adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. Methods A total of 17 adolescents, age 12–17 years (M = 14.8, SD = 1.5), with type 1 diabetes (duration M = 6.2 years, SD = 4.5) and mean HbA1c of 11.6% (SD = 2.5%) were enrolled. Adolescents and their parents received 14 weeks of motivational interviewing, clinic-based CM, and parent-directed CM that targeted increased blood glucose monitoring (BGM). Results Adolescents significantly increased their BGM (p < .001) and showed significantly improved HbA1c levels (glycemic control) from pre-to posttreatment (p < .0001). Conclusions The magnitude of improvements in the frequency of BGM and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes is encouraging and will be tested in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:23699750

  3. Suboptimal identification of patient-specific risk factors for poor wound healing can be improved by simple interventions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lauren S; Luck, Joshua E; Atherton, Rachel R

    2017-02-01

    Poor wound healing is an important surgical complication. At-risk wounds must be identified early and monitored appropriately. Wound surveillance is frequently inadequate, leading to increased rates of surgical site infections (SSIs). Although the literature demonstrates that risk factor identification reduces SSI rates, no studies have focused on wound management at a junior level. Our study assesses documentation rates of patient-specific risk factors for poor wound healing at a large district general hospital in the UK. It critically evaluates the efficacy of interventions designed to promote surveillance of high-risk wounds. We conducted a full-cycle clinical audit examining medical records of patients undergoing elective surgery over 5 days. Interventions included education of the multidisciplinary team and addition of a Wound Healing Risk Assessment (WHRA) checklist to surgical admissions booklets. This checklist provided a simple stratification tool for at-risk wounds and recommendations for escalation. Prior to interventions, the documentation of patient-specific risk factors ranged from 0·0% to 91·7% (mean 42·6%). Following interventions, this increased to 86·4-95·5% (mean 92·5%), a statistically significant increase of 117·1% (P < 0·01). This study demonstrates that documentation of patient-specific risk factors for poor wound healing is inadequate. We have shown the benefit of introducing interventions to increase risk factor awareness. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Evaluating a Large-Scale Community-Based Intervention to Improve Pregnancy and Newborn Health Among the Rural Poor in India

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Tanya; Dutta, Rahul; Rajaratnam, Julie Knoll; Ruducha, Jenny; Varkey, Leila Caleb; Wunnava, Sita; Menezes, Lysander; Taylor, Catharine; Bernson, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Sure Start project, which was implemented in 7 districts of Uttar Pradesh, India, to improve maternal and newborn health. Methods. Interventions were implemented at 2 randomly assigned levels of intensity. Forty percent of the areas received a more intense intervention, including community-level meetings with expectant mothers. A baseline survey consisted of 12 000 women who completed pregnancy in 2007; a follow-up survey was conducted for women in 2010 in the same villages. Our quantitative analyses provide an account of the project’s impact. Results. We observed significant health improvements in both intervention areas over time; in the more intensive intervention areas, we found greater improvements in care-seeking and healthy behaviors. The more intensive intervention areas did not experience a significantly greater decline in neonatal mortality. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that community-based efforts, especially mothers’ group meetings designed to increase care-seeking and healthy behaviors, are effective and can be implemented at large scale. PMID:25393175

  5. MultiComponent Exercise and theRApeutic lifeStyle (CERgAS) intervention to improve physical performance and maintain independent living among urban poor older people--a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Loh, Debbie Ann; Hairi, Noran Naqiah; Choo, Wan Yuen; Mohd Hairi, Farizah; Peramalah, Devi; Kandiben, Shathanapriya; Lee, Pek Ling; Gani, Norlissa; Madzlan, Mohamed Faris; Abd Hamid, Mohd Alif Idham; Akram, Zohaib; Chu, Ai Sean; Bulgiba, Awang; Cumming, Robert G

    2015-02-11

    The ability of older people to function independently is crucial as physical disability and functional limitation have profound impacts on health. Interventions that either delay the onset of frailty or attenuate its severity potentially have cascading benefits for older people, their families and society. This study aims to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a multiComponent Exercise and theRApeutic lifeStyle (CERgAS) intervention program targeted at improving physical performance and maintaining independent living as compared to general health education among older people in an urban poor setting in Malaysia. This cluster randomised controlled trial will be a 6-week community-based intervention programme for older people aged 60 years and above from urban poor settings. A minimum of 164 eligible participants will be recruited from 8 clusters (low-cost public subsidised flats) and randomised to the intervention and control arm. This study will be underpinned by the Health Belief Model with an emphasis towards self-efficacy. The intervention will comprise multicomponent group exercise sessions, nutrition education, oral care education and on-going support and counselling. These will be complemented with a kit containing practical tips on exercise, nutrition and oral care after each session. Data will be collected over four time points; at baseline, immediately post-intervention, 3-months and 6-months follow-up. Findings from this trial will potentially provide valuable evidence to improve physical function and maintain independence among older people from low-resource settings. This will inform health policies and identify locally acceptable strategies to promote healthy aging, prevent and delay functional decline among older Malaysian adults. ISRCTN22749696.

  6. US Intervention in Failed States: Bad Assumptions=Poor Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIVERSITY NATIONAL WAR COLLEGE STRATEGIC LOGIC ESSAY US INTERVENTION IN FAILED STATES: BAD ASSUMPTIONS = POOR ...2002 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2002 to 00-00-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US Intervention in Failed States: Bad Assumptions= Poor ...country remains in the grip of poverty , natural disasters, and stagnation. Rwanda Rwanda, another small African country, is populated principally

  7. Patient perceptions of a comprehensive telemedicine intervention to address persistent poorly controlled diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Sara M; Sperber, Nina R; Gierisch, Jennifer M; Danus, Susanne; Macy, Stephanie L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Edelman, David; Crowley, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Objective We studied a telemedicine intervention for persistent poorly controlled diabetes mellitus (PPDM) that combined telemonitoring, self-management support, and medication management. The intervention was designed for practical delivery using existing Veterans Affairs (VA) telemedicine infrastructure. To refine the intervention and inform the delivery of the intervention in other settings, we examined participants’ experiences. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 18 Veterans who completed the intervention. We analyzed interview text using directed content analysis and categorized themes by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improvement (<1% or ≥1%). Results Participants generally reported greater awareness of their blood glucose levels; however, they described dissatisfaction with the telemonitoring interface and competing demands during the intervention. Participants with <1% HbA1c improvement reported that these challenges interfered with their engagement. Participants with ≥1% HbA1c improvement reported new self-management routines despite challenges. Conclusion Despite competing demands and frustration with the telemonitoring interface, many participants demonstrated intervention engagement and substantial improvement in HbA1c ($1%). Differences in engagement may reflect differing capacity to manage treatment burden. Because it relies on existing infrastructure, this intervention is a promising model for addressing PPDM within VA. Future work should focus on optimizing systems’ telemedicine infrastructure; while reliance on existing infrastructure may facilitate practical delivery, and it may also limit intervention engagement by excessively contributing to treatment burden. PMID:28424543

  8. Surviving Performance Improvement "Solutions": Aligning Performance Improvement Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardez, Mariano L.

    2009-01-01

    How can organizations avoid the negative, sometimes chaotic, effects of multiple, poorly coordinated performance improvement interventions? How can we avoid punishing our external clients or staff with the side effects of solutions that might benefit our bottom line or internal efficiency at the expense of the value received or perceived by…

  9. Surviving Performance Improvement "Solutions": Aligning Performance Improvement Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardez, Mariano L.

    2009-01-01

    How can organizations avoid the negative, sometimes chaotic, effects of multiple, poorly coordinated performance improvement interventions? How can we avoid punishing our external clients or staff with the side effects of solutions that might benefit our bottom line or internal efficiency at the expense of the value received or perceived by…

  10. Managing Neonatal and Early Childhood Syndromic Sepsis in Sub-District Hospitals in Resource Poor Settings: Improvement in Quality of Care through Introduction of a Package of Interventions in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Afrin; Hoque, D. M. Emdadul; Moinuddin, Md.; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Rahman, Qazi Sadeq-ur; Begum, Tahmina; Chowdhury, Atique Iqbal; Haider, Rafiqul; Arifeen, Shams El; Kissoon, Niranjan; Larson, Charles P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is dysregulated systemic inflammatory response which can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. With an estimated 30 million cases per year, it is a global public health concern. Severe infections leading to sepsis account for more than half of all under five deaths and around one quarter of all neonatal deaths annually. Most of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries and could be averted by rapid assessment and appropriate treatment. Evidence suggests that service provision and quality of care pertaining to sepsis management in resource poor settings can be improved significantly with minimum resource allocation and investments. Cognizant of the stark realities, a project titled ‘Interrupting Pathways to Sepsis Initiative’ (IPSI) introduced a package of interventions for improving quality of care pertaining to sepsis management at 2 sub-district level public hospitals in rural Bangladesh. We present here the quality improvement process and achievements regarding some fundamental steps of sepsis management which include rapid identification and admission, followed by assessment for hypoxemia, hypoglycaemia and hypothermia, immediate resuscitation when required and early administration of parenteral broad spectrum antibiotics. Materials and Method Key components of the intervention package include identification of structural and functional gaps through a baseline environmental scan, capacity development on protocolized management through training and supportive supervision by onsite ‘Program Coaches’, facilitating triage and rapid transfer of patients through ‘Welcoming Persons’ and enabling rapid treatment through ‘Task Shifting’ from on-call physicians to on-duty paramedics in the emergency department and on-call physicians to on-duty nurses in the inpatient department. Results From August, 2013 to March, 2015, 1,262 under-5 children were identified as syndromic sepsis in the emergency departments; of

  11. Managing Neonatal and Early Childhood Syndromic Sepsis in Sub-District Hospitals in Resource Poor Settings: Improvement in Quality of Care through Introduction of a Package of Interventions in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ahmed Ehsanur; Iqbal, Afrin; Hoque, D M Emdadul; Moinuddin, Md; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Rahman, Qazi Sadeq-Ur; Begum, Tahmina; Chowdhury, Atique Iqbal; Haider, Rafiqul; Arifeen, Shams El; Kissoon, Niranjan; Larson, Charles P

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is dysregulated systemic inflammatory response which can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. With an estimated 30 million cases per year, it is a global public health concern. Severe infections leading to sepsis account for more than half of all under five deaths and around one quarter of all neonatal deaths annually. Most of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries and could be averted by rapid assessment and appropriate treatment. Evidence suggests that service provision and quality of care pertaining to sepsis management in resource poor settings can be improved significantly with minimum resource allocation and investments. Cognizant of the stark realities, a project titled 'Interrupting Pathways to Sepsis Initiative' (IPSI) introduced a package of interventions for improving quality of care pertaining to sepsis management at 2 sub-district level public hospitals in rural Bangladesh. We present here the quality improvement process and achievements regarding some fundamental steps of sepsis management which include rapid identification and admission, followed by assessment for hypoxemia, hypoglycaemia and hypothermia, immediate resuscitation when required and early administration of parenteral broad spectrum antibiotics. Key components of the intervention package include identification of structural and functional gaps through a baseline environmental scan, capacity development on protocolized management through training and supportive supervision by onsite 'Program Coaches', facilitating triage and rapid transfer of patients through 'Welcoming Persons' and enabling rapid treatment through 'Task Shifting' from on-call physicians to on-duty paramedics in the emergency department and on-call physicians to on-duty nurses in the inpatient department. From August, 2013 to March, 2015, 1,262 under-5 children were identified as syndromic sepsis in the emergency departments; of which 82% were admitted. More neonates (30%) were referred

  12. Differences in brain function and changes with intervention in children with poor spelling and reading abilities.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Daniela; Fink, Andreas; Kargl, Reinhard; Reishofer, Gernot; Koschutnig, Karl; Purgstaller, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Enzinger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Previous fMRI studies in English-speaking samples suggested that specific interventions may alter brain function in language-relevant networks in children with reading and spelling difficulties, but this research strongly focused on reading impaired individuals. Only few studies so far investigated characteristics of brain activation associated with poor spelling ability and whether a specific spelling intervention may also be associated with distinct changes in brain activity patterns. We here investigated such effects of a morpheme-based spelling intervention on brain function in 20 children with comparatively poor spelling and reading abilities using repeated fMRI. Relative to 10 matched controls, children with comparatively poor spelling and reading abilities showed increased activation in frontal medial and right hemispheric regions and decreased activation in left occipito-temporal regions prior to the intervention, during processing of a lexical decision task. After five weeks of intervention, spelling and reading comprehension significantly improved in the training group, along with increased activation in the left temporal, parahippocampal and hippocampal regions. Conversely, the waiting group showed increases in right posterior regions. Our findings could indicate an increased left temporal activation associated with the recollection of the new learnt morpheme-based strategy related to successful training.

  13. Differences in Brain Function and Changes with Intervention in Children with Poor Spelling and Reading Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Daniela; Fink, Andreas; Kargl, Reinhard; Reishofer, Gernot; Koschutnig, Karl; Purgstaller, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Enzinger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Previous fMRI studies in English-speaking samples suggested that specific interventions may alter brain function in language-relevant networks in children with reading and spelling difficulties, but this research strongly focused on reading impaired individuals. Only few studies so far investigated characteristics of brain activation associated with poor spelling ability and whether a specific spelling intervention may also be associated with distinct changes in brain activity patterns. We here investigated such effects of a morpheme-based spelling intervention on brain function in 20 children with comparatively poor spelling and reading abilities using repeated fMRI. Relative to 10 matched controls, children with comparatively poor spelling and reading abilities showed increased activation in frontal medial and right hemispheric regions and decreased activation in left occipito-temporal regions prior to the intervention, during processing of a lexical decision task. After five weeks of intervention, spelling and reading comprehension significantly improved in the training group, along with increased activation in the left temporal, parahippocampal and hippocampal regions. Conversely, the waiting group showed increases in right posterior regions. Our findings could indicate an increased left temporal activation associated with the recollection of the new learnt morpheme-based strategy related to successful training. PMID:22693600

  14. Effect of Wii-intervention on balance of children with poor motor performance.

    PubMed

    Mombarg, Remo; Jelsma, Dorothee; Hartman, Esther

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training with the Wii-balance board on balance and balance-related skills of children with poor motor performance. Twenty-nine children (23 boys, 6 girls; aged 7-12 years) participated in this study and were randomly assigned to an experimental and control group. All children scored below the 16th percentile on a standardized test of motor ability and balance skills (Movement Assessment Battery for children (M-ABC-2)). Before and after a six-week Wii-intervention (M=8h, 22 min, SD=53 min), the balance skills of the experimental group and control group were measured with the M-ABC-2 and the Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOT-2). Both groups improved on all tests. The M-ABC-2 and the BOT-2 total balance-scores of the experimental group improved significantly from pre to post intervention, whereas those of the control group showed no significant progress. This resulted in significant interaction-effects, favoring the experimental children. No transfer-effects of the intervention on balance-related skills were demonstrated. Our findings showed that the Wii-balance board is an effective intervention for children with poor balance control. Further development and investigation of the intervention could be directed toward the implementation of the newly acquired balance-skills in daily life.

  15. Estimating the impact on health of poor reliability of drinking water interventions in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Hartemann, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many improved drinking water supplies suffer from poor reliability. This study investigates what impact poor reliability may have on achieving health improvement targets. A Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment was conducted of the impact of interruptions in water supplies that forced people to revert to drinking raw water. Data from the literature were used to construct models on three waterborne pathogens common in Africa: Rotavirus, Cryptosporidium and Enterotoxigenic E. coli. Risk of infection by the target pathogens is substantially greater on days that people revert to raw water consumption. Over the course of a few days raw water consumption, the annual health benefits attributed to consumption of water from an improved supply will be almost all lost. Furthermore, risk of illness on days drinking raw water will fall substantially on very young children who have the highest risk of death following infection. Agencies responsible for implementing improved drinking water provision will not make meaningful contributions to public health targets if those systems are subject to poor reliability. Funders of water quality interventions in developing countries should put more effort into auditing whether interventions are sustainable and whether the health benefits are being achieved.

  16. Improving Latin America's School Quality: Which Special Interventions Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Joan B.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents new findings, first, regarding the effectiveness of compensatory interventions in improving language and math achievement, and in increasing the probability of promotion. A second question addressed in this research is whether a particular intervention is equally effective in poor and nonpoor environments. A third important…

  17. Improving Latin America's School Quality: Which Special Interventions Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Joan B.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents new findings, first, regarding the effectiveness of compensatory interventions in improving language and math achievement, and in increasing the probability of promotion. A second question addressed in this research is whether a particular intervention is equally effective in poor and nonpoor environments. A third important…

  18. Adapting and implementing an evidence-based asthma counseling intervention for resource-poor populations.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Eleanor; Kennedy, Suzanne; Hayes-Watson, Claire; Krouse, Rebecca Z; Mitchell, Herman; Cohn, Richard D; Wildfire, Jeremy; Mvula, Mosanda M; Lichtveld, Maureen; Grimsley, Faye; Martin, William J; Stephens, Kevin U

    2016-10-01

    To report implementation strategies and outcomes of an evidence-based asthma counseling intervention. The Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) intervention integrated asthma counseling (AC) capacity and addressed challenges facing children with asthma in post-disaster New Orleans. The HEAL intervention enrolled 182 children (4-12 years) with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma. Recruitment occurred from schools in the Greater New Orleans area for one year. Participants received home environmental assessments and tailored asthma counseling sessions during the study period based on the National Cooperative Inner City Asthma Study and the Inner City Asthma Study. Primary (i.e., asthma symptoms) and secondary outcomes (i.e., healthcare utilization) were captured. During the study, changes were made to meet the demands of a post-hurricane and resource-poor environment which included changes to staffing, training, AC tools, and AC sessions. After study changes were made, the AC visit rate increased by 92.3%. Significant improvements were observed across several adherence measures (e.g., running out of medications (p = 0.009), financial/insurance problems for appointments (p = 0.006), worried about medication side-effects (p = 0.01), felt medications did not work (p < 0.001)). Additionally, an increasing number of AC visits was modestly associated with a greater reduction in symptoms (test-for-trend p = 0.059). By adapting to the needs of the study population and setting, investigators successfully implemented a counseling intervention that improved participant behaviors and clinical outcomes. The strategies for implementing the AC intervention may serve as a guide for managing asthma and other chronic conditions in resource-poor settings.

  19. Community interventions for dietary improvement in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Grace S; Colecraft, Esi K

    2014-12-01

    Background. Low caregiver income and poor nutrition knowledge and skills are important barriers to achieving optimal child feeding in rural Ghana. An integrated microcredit and nutrition education intervention was implemented to address these barriers. Using a quasi-experimental design, 134 caregivers of children 2 to 5 years of age in six intervention communities were enrolled into self-selected savings and loan groups. They received small individual loans over four 16-week cycles to support their income-generating activities. Nutrition and entrepreneurial education was provided during weekly loan repayment meetings. Another 261 caregivers in six comparison communities did not receive the intervention. Data on household sociodemographic and economic characteristics, perception of income-generating activity profits, and children's consumption of animal-source foods in the previous week were collected at baseline and at four additional time points. Differences according to group (intervention vs. control) and time (baseline vs. endline) were analyzed with chi-square and Student's t-tests. The intervention and comparison groups did not differ by caregivers' age and formal education; few (35) had previous experience with microcredit loans. At endline, more intervention than comparison caregivers perceived that their business profits had increased (59% vs. 23%, p < .001). In contrast to comparison children, after 16 months of intervention children consumed more livestock meat (p =.001), organ meat (p = .04), eggs (p = .001), and milk and milk products (p < .0001) in the previous week in comparison with baseline. Integrated food-centered strategies can improve children's diets, which will enhance their nutritional status, health, and cognitive outcomes.

  20. Unmet expectations of medications and care providers among patients with heart failure assessed to be poorly adherent: results from the Chronic Heart Failure Intervention to Improve MEdication Adherence (CHIME) study.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Inger; Wolf, Axel; Vaughan Dickson, Victoria; Bosworth, Hayden B; Granger, Bradi B

    2017-10-01

    Ineffective medication management contributes to repeated hospitalisation and death among patients with heart failure. The meaning ascribed to medications and the influence of meaning on how patients manage medications is unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning and expectations associated with medication use in high-risk, non-adherent patients with heart failure. Patients ( n=265) with heart failure were screened for adherence to prescribed medication using the Morisky medication adherence scale (MMAS). Patients (MMAS score <6; n=44) participated in semistructured interviews, analysed using qualitative content analysis. Of 17 initial themes (223 representative segments), the overarching theme 'unmet expectations' consisted of two subthemes 'working to be heard' by professionals and 'resignation' to both the illness and medications. Patients' expectations were challenged by unexpected work to communicate with providers in general (72 representative segments), and specifically regarding medications (118 representative segments) and feelings of resignation regarding the medication regimen (33 representative segments). These findings suggest that unmet expectations contribute to poor medication management. Improved listening and communication by providers, to establish a common understanding and plan for managing medications may strengthen patient beliefs, resolve feelings of resignation and improve patients' ability to manage medications effectively.

  1. Reading Comprehension: A Computerized Intervention with Primary-age Poor Readers.

    PubMed

    Horne, Joanna Kathryn

    2017-01-09

    The current study investigates the effectiveness of a computerized reading comprehension programme on the reading accuracy, reading comprehension and reading rate of primary-age poor readers. There is little published literature relating to computerized reading interventions in UK primary schools, and no previous studies have investigated the Comprehension Booster programme. Thirty-eight children (26 boys and 12 girls; aged 6:7 to 11:0) from two schools in East Yorkshire, UK, took part. Half of the participants (the intervention group) undertook the Comprehension Booster programme for a 6-week period, whilst the other half (the control group) continued with their usual teaching. Significant effects of the intervention were found, with increases in reading accuracy and reading comprehension for the intervention group. It is concluded that computerized reading programmes can be effective in improving reading skills, and these are particularly useful for pupils with reading difficulties in disadvantaged areas, where resources are limited and family support in reading is lower. However, such programmes are not a replacement for good teaching, and regular monitoring of children with reading difficulties is required. Further research is necessary to compare the programme used here to other conventional and computerized intervention programmes, using a larger sample. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Preventing Poor Vocational Functioning in Psychosis Through Early Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S; Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Evensen, Julie Horgen; Haahr, Ulrik; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Langeveld, Johannes; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Melle, Ingrid; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Simonsen, Erik; Vaglum, Per Wiggen; McGlashan, Thomas H; Friis, Svein

    2017-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that early detection of psychosis improves long-term vocational functioning through the prevention of negative symptom development. Generalized estimating equations and mediation analysis were conducted to examine the association between employment and negative symptoms over ten years among patients in geographic areas characterized by usual detection (N=140) or early detection (N=141) of psychosis. Improved vocational outcome after ten years among patients in the early-detection area was mediated by lower levels of negative symptoms during the first five years. Regardless of symptoms, rates of full-time employment or study were lower among patients in the usual-detection versus the early-detection area. Patients from an early-detection area attained lower negative symptom levels earlier compared with patients from a usual-detection area, which seemed to have facilitated vocational careers.

  3. Systematic Review of Educational Interventions to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Weizer, Jennifer S.; Heisler, Michele; Lee, Paul P.; Stein, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed glaucoma medications is often poor, and proper adherence can be challenging for patients. We systematically reviewed the literature and identified eight studies using educational interventions to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Overall, five of the eight studies found that educational interventions lead to a significant improvement in medication adherence, and the remaining studies found a trend towards improvement. Using information from this systematic review and Health Behavior Theory, we constructed a conceptual framework to illustrate how counseling and education can improve glaucoma medication adherence. More rigorous studies grounded in Health Behavior Theory with adequately powered samples and longer follow-up are needed. PMID:23697623

  4. CMS proposal for interventional pain management by nurse anesthetists: evidence by proclamation with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Caraway, David L; Falco, Frank J E; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hansen, Hans; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    and training qualifications for CRNAs to offer interventional techniques, the FTC issued their opinion and CMS proposed to expand these practice patterns with a policy of improved access and reduced cost. However, in reality, the opposite will happen and will increase fraud, reduce access due to inappropriate procedures, and increase complications, all as a result of privileges by legislation without education. The CMS proposal for interventional pain management by nurse anesthetists is a proclamation with a poor prognosis.

  5. Improving quality in resource poor settings: observational study from rural Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Meera; Lee, Patrick; Habiyakare, Caste; Dusabe, Raymond; Kanama, Philibert; Epino, Henry M; Rich, Michael L; Farmer, Paul E

    2009-10-30

    Hospitals in rural Africa, such as in Rwanda, often lack electricity, supplies, and staff. In our setting, basic care processes, such monitoring vital signs, giving drugs, and laboratory testing, were performed unreliably, resulting in delays in treatment owing to lack of information needed for clinical decision making. Simple quality improvement tools, including plan-do-study-act cycles and process maps, were used to improve system level processes in a stepwise fashion; resources were augmented where necessary. 50 bed district hospital in rural Rwanda. MEASUREMENT OF IMPROVEMENT: Three key indicators (percentage of vital signs taken by 9 am, drugs given as prescribed, and laboratory tests performed and documented) were tracked daily. Data were collected from a random sample of 25 charts from six inpatient wards. Our intervention had two components: staff education on quality improvement and routine care processes, and stepwise implementation of system level interventions. Real time performance data were reported to staff daily, with a goal of 95% performance for each indicator within two weeks. A Rwandan quality improvement team was trained to run the hospital's quality improvement initiatives. EFFECTS OF CHANGES: Within two weeks, all indicators achieved the 95% goal. The data for the three objectives were analysed by using time series analysis. Progress was compared against time by using run chart rules for statistical significance of improvement, showing significant improvement for all indicators. Doctors and nurses subjectively reported improved patient care and higher staff morale. Four lessons are highlighted: making data visible and using them to inform subsequent interventions can promote change in resource poor settings; improvements can be made in advance of resource inputs, but sustained change in resource poor settings requires additional resources; local leadership is essential for success; and early successes were crucial for encouraging staff and

  6. Improved simulation of poorly drained forests using Biome-BGC.

    PubMed

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Gower, Stith T; Ahl, Douglas E

    2007-05-01

    Forested wetlands and peatlands are important in boreal and terrestrial biogeochemical cycling, but most general-purpose forest process models are designed and parameterized for upland systems. We describe changes made to Biome-BGC, an ecophysiological process model, that improve its ability to simulate poorly drained forests. Model changes allowed for: (1) lateral water inflow from a surrounding watershed, and variable surface and subsurface drainage; (2) adverse effects of anoxic soil on decomposition and nutrient mineralization; (3) closure of leaf stomata in flooded soils; and (4) growth of nonvascular plants (i.e., bryophytes). Bryophytes were treated as ectohydric broadleaf evergreen plants with zero stomatal conductance, whose cuticular conductance to CO(2) was dependent on plant water content. Individual model changes were parameterized with published data, and ecosystem-level model performance was assessed by comparing simulated output to field data from the northern BOREAS site in Manitoba, Canada. The simulation of the poorly drained forest model exhibited reduced decomposition and vascular plant growth (-90%) compared with that of the well-drained forest model; the integrated bryophyte photosynthetic response accorded well with published data. Simulated net primary production, biomass and soil carbon accumulation broadly agreed with field measurements, although simulated net primary production was higher than observed data in well-drained stands. Simulated net primary production in the poorly drained forest was most sensitive to oxygen restriction on soil processes, and secondarily to stomatal closure in flooded conditions. The modified Biome-BGC remains unable to simulate true wetlands that are subject to prolonged flooding, because it does not track organic soil formation, water table changes, soil redox potential or anaerobic processes.

  7. Poor Sleep Quality in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: An Intervention Study Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbaran, Soheila; Dehdari, Tahereh; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Majdabadi, Mahmood Mahmoodi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Poor sleep quality (SQ) is common among patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). This study attempted to determine the status of SQ following an intervention based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED model in patients with poor SQ after CABG. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study sample, including 100 patients referred to the Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinic of Tehran Heart Center, was assigned either to the intervention (recipient of exercise and lifestyle training plus designed intervention based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED model) or to the control group (recipient of exercise and lifestyle training). Eight training sessions over 8 weeks were conducted for the intervention group. Predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors as well as social support and SQ were measured in the intervention group before and one month after the intervention and compared to those in the control group at the same time points. Results: The mean age of the patients in the intervention (24% women) and control (24% women) groups was 59.3 ± 7.3 and 59.5 ± 9.3 years, respectively. The results showed that the mean scores of SQ (p value < 0.001), knowledge (p value < 0.001), beliefs (p value < 0.001), sleep self-efficacy (p value < 0.001), enabling factors (p value < 0.001), reinforcing factors (p value < 0.001), and social support (p value < 0.001) were significantly different between the intervention and control groups after the intervention. Conclusion: Adding an intervention based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to the cardiac rehabilitation program may further improve the SQ of patients. PMID:26157457

  8. Patients With Failed Prior Two-Stage Exchange Have Poor Outcomes After Further Surgical Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Michael M; Tan, Timothy L; Gomez, Miguel M; Chen, Antonia F; Parvizi, Javad

    2017-04-01

    Failure of 2-stage exchange arthroplasty for the management of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) poses a major clinical challenge. There is a paucity of information regarding the outcomes of further surgical intervention in these patients. Thus, we aim to report the clinical outcomes of subsequent surgery for a failed prior 2-stage exchange arthroplasty. Our institutional database was used to identify 60 patients (42 knees and 18 hips), with a failed prior 2-stage exchange, who underwent further surgical intervention between 1998 and 2012, and had a minimum 2-year follow-up. A retrospective review was performed to extract relevant clinical information, including mortality, microbiology, and subsequent surgeries. Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria were used to define PJI, and treatment success was defined using Delphi criteria. Irrigation and debridement (I&D) was performed after a failed 2-stage exchange in 61.7% of patients; 56.8% subsequently failed. Forty patients underwent an intended second 2-stage exchange; 6 cases required a spacer exchange. Reimplantation occurred only in 65% of cases, and 61.6% had infection controlled. The 14 cases that were not reimplanted resulted in 6 retained spacers, 5 amputations, 2 PJI-related mortalities, and 1 arthrodesis. Further surgical intervention after a failed prior 2-stage exchange arthroplasty has poor outcomes. Although I&D has a high failure rate, many patients who are deemed candidates for a second 2-stage exchange either do not undergo reimplantation or fail after reimplantation. The management of PJI clearly remains imperfect, and there is a dire need for further innovations that may improve the care of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Poor sitting posture and a heavy schoolbag as contributors to musculoskeletal pain in children: an ergonomic school education intervention program

    PubMed Central

    Syazwan, AI; Azhar, MN Mohamad; Anita, AR; Azizan, HS; Shaharuddin, MS; Hanafiah, J Muhamad; Muhaimin, AA; Nizar, AM; Rafee, B Mohd; Ibthisham, A Mohd; Kasani, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a multidisciplinary, interventional, ergonomic education program designed to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal problems by reducing schoolbag weight and correcting poor sitting posture. Methods Data were collected twice before and twice following intervention using the Standardized Nordic Body Map Questionnaire, a rapid upper limb assessment for posture evaluation, and schoolbag weight measurement in children aged 8 and 11 years attending two schools within the central region of Malaysia. Results Students who received the ergonomic intervention reported significant improvements in their sitting posture in a classroom environment and reduction of schoolbag weight as compared with the controls. Conclusion A single-session, early intervention, group ergonomics education program for children aged 8 and 11 years is appropriate and effective, and should be considered as a strategy to reduce musculoskeletal pain among schoolchildren in this age group. PMID:22003301

  10. Telemedicine Intervention Improves ICU Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Farid; Palagiri, Ashok; Trottier, Steven; Deibert, Wendy; Gudmestad, Donna; Sommer, Steven E.; Veremakis, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Telemedicine for the intensive care unit (Tele-ICU) was founded as a means of delivering the clinical expertise of intensivists located remotely to hospitals with inadequate access to intensive care specialists. This was a retrospective pre- and postintervention study of adult patients admitted to a community hospital ICU. The patients in the preintervention period (n = 630) and during the Tele-ICU period (n = 2193) were controlled for baseline characteristics, acute physiologic scores (APS), and acute physiologic and health evaluation (APACHE IV) scores. Mean APS scores were 37.1 (SD, 22.8) and 37.7 (SD, 19.4) (P = 0.56), and mean APACHE IV scores were 49.7 (SD, 24.8) and 50.4 (SD, 21.0) (P = 0.53), respectively. ICU mortality was 7.9% during the preintervention period compared with 3.8% during the Tele-ICU period (odds ratio (OR) = 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32–0.66, P < 0.0001). ICU LOS in days was 2.7 (SD, 4.1) compared with 2.2 (SD, 3.4), respectively (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI, 1.00–1.40, P = 0.01). Implementation of Tele-ICU intervention was associated with reduced ICU mortality and ICU LOS. This suggests that there are benefits of a closed Tele-ICU intervention beyond what is provided by daytime bedside physicians. PMID:23365729

  11. Experimental Intervention Research on Students with Specific Poor Comprehension: A Systematic Review of Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sung Hee; Tsai, Shu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Students with specific poor comprehension (SPC) can sound out words accurately, but have difficulty understanding what they read. However, most existing reading intervention studies on students with reading disabilities did not differentiate students with SPC from other types of students with reading disabilities who accompany with decoding…

  12. Pilot Study of a Web-Delivered Multicomponent Intervention for Rural Teens with Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, Ann S.; Casella, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-delivered multicomponent behavioral and family-based intervention targeting self-regulation and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels (SMBG) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in teens with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) living in rural US. Methods. 15 teens with poorly controlled T1DM participated in a 25-week web-delivered intervention with two phases, active treatment (weekly treatment sessions and working memory training program) and maintenance treatment (fading of treatment sessions). Results. Almost all (13 of 15) participants completed at least 14 of 15 treatment sessions and at least 20 of 25 working memory training sessions. SMBG was increased significantly at end of active and maintenance treatment, and HbA1c was decreased at end of active treatment (p's ≤ 0.05). Executive functioning improved at end of maintenance treatment: performance on working memory and inhibitory control tasks significantly improved (p's ≤ 0.02) and parents reported fewer problems with executive functioning (p = 0.05). Improvement in inhibitory control was correlated with increases in SMBG and decreases in HbA1c. Conclusions. An innovative web-delivered and multicomponent intervention was feasible for teens with poorly controlled T1DM and their families living in rural US and associated with significant improvements in SMBG and HbA1c. PMID:27610391

  13. Comprehensive care improves physical recovery of hip-fractured elderly Taiwanese patients with poor nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Yun; Tseng, Ming-Yueh; Li, Hsiao-Juan; Wu, Chi-Chuan; Cheng, Huey-Shinn; Yang, Ching-Tzu; Chou, Shih-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yen; Shyu, Yea-Ing L

    2014-06-01

    The effects of nutritional management among other intervention components have not been examined for hip-fractured elderly persons with poor nutritional status. Accordingly, this study explored the intervention effects of an in-home program using a comprehensive care model that included a nutrition-management component on recovery of hip-fractured older persons with poor nutritional status at hospital discharge. A secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial with 24-month follow-up. A 3000-bed medical center in northern Taiwan. Subjects were included only if they had "poor nutritional status" at hospital discharge, including those at risk for malnutrition or malnourished. The subsample included 80 subjects with poor nutritional status in the comprehensive care group, 87 in the interdisciplinary care group, and 85 in the usual care group. The 3 care models were usual care, interdisciplinary care, and comprehensive care. Usual care provided no in-home care, interdisciplinary care provided 4 months of in-home rehabilitation, and comprehensive care included management of depressive symptoms, falls, and nutrition as well as 1 year of in-home rehabilitation. Data were collected on nutritional status and physical functions, including range of motion, muscle power, proprioception, balance and functional independence, and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. We also compared patients' baseline characteristics: demographic characteristics, type of surgery, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, cognitive function, and depression. Patients with poor nutritional status who received comprehensive care were 1.67 times (95% confidence interval 1.06-2.61) more likely to recover their nutritional status than those who received interdisciplinary and usual care. Furthermore, the comprehensive care model improved the functional independence and balance of patients who recovered their nutritional status over the first year following discharge

  14. Interventions to improve medication adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Annette; Olfson, Mark; Boyer, Carol A; Mechanic, David

    2002-10-01

    Although nonadherence with the antipsychotic medication regimen is a common barrier to the effective treatment for schizophrenia, knowledge is limited about how to improve medication adherence. This systematic literature review examined psychosocial interventions for improving medication adherence, focusing on promising initiatives, reasonable standards for conducting research in this area, and implications for clinical practice. Studies were identified by computerized searches of MEDLINE and PsychLIT for the years between 1980 and 2000 and by manual searches of relevant bibliographies and conference proceedings. Key articles were summarized. Thirteen (33%) of 39 identified studies reported significant intervention effects. Although interventions and family therapy programs relying on psychoeducation were common in clinical practice, they were typically ineffective. Concrete problem solving or motivational techniques were common features of successful programs. Interventions targeted specifically to problems of nonadherence were more likely to be effective (55%) than were more broadly based treatment interventions (26%). One-half (four of eight) of the successful interventions not specifically focused on nonadherence involved an array of supportive and rehabilitative community-based services. Psychoeducational interventions without accompanying behavioral components and supportive services are not likely to be effective in improving medication adherence in schizophrenia. Models of community care such as assertive community treatment and interventions based on principles of motivational interviewing are promising. Providing patients with concrete instructions and problem-solving strategies, such as reminders, self-monitoring tools, cues, and reinforcements, is useful. Problems in adherence are recurring, and booster sessions are needed to reinforce and consolidate gains.

  15. A Rhythmic Musical Intervention for Poor Readers: A Comparison of Efficacy with a Letter-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhide, Adeetee; Power, Alan; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children with reading difficulties show impaired auditory rhythm perception and impairments in musical beat perception tasks. Rhythmic musical interventions with poorer readers may thus improve rhythmic entrainment and consequently improve reading and phonological skills. Here we compare the effects of a musical…

  16. A Rhythmic Musical Intervention for Poor Readers: A Comparison of Efficacy with a Letter-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhide, Adeetee; Power, Alan; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children with reading difficulties show impaired auditory rhythm perception and impairments in musical beat perception tasks. Rhythmic musical interventions with poorer readers may thus improve rhythmic entrainment and consequently improve reading and phonological skills. Here we compare the effects of a musical…

  17. Text message program improves outcomes, decreases ED utilization among ED patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic patients who lack access to primary care tend to frequent the ED, often with complications from their disease that could have been prevented with proper management and education. To get around the problem of access, researchers tested an automated program that continuously delivered educational messaging via text to a group of patients who presented to the ED with poorly controlled diabetes. After six months, researchers noted improvements in Hb A1c levels, self-reported medication adherence, and ED utilization when compared with a control group. And the impact was particularly noteworthy among Latinos, according to the researchers. The text messaging program, dubbed TExT-Med, was developed by four physicians and two diabetes educators. The messages were delivered daily, and contained educational as well motivational content derived from the National Diabetes Education Program.There were also medication reminders, healthy living challenges, and trivia questions about diabetes. At six months, Hb A1c levels decreased by 1.05% in the intervention group, compared to 0.60% in the control group, and self-reported medication adherence improved from 4.5 to 5.4 (as measured on an 8 point scale) in the intervention group versus a decrease of 0.1 in the control group. During the six-month study period, 35.9% of patients in the intervention group presented to the ED for care, as compared to 51.6% of patients in the control group.

  18. Veterans’ Perspectives on Interventions to Improve Retention in HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Kertz, Barbara L.; Cully, Jeffery A.; Stanley, Melinda A.; Davila, Jessica A.; Dang, Bich N.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Poor retention in HIV medical care is associated with increased mortality among patients with HIV/AIDS. Developing new interventions to improve retention in HIV primary care is needed. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) is the largest single provider of HIV care in the US. We sought to understand what veterans would want in an intervention to improve retention in VA HIV care. We conducted 18 one-on-one interviews and 15 outpatient focus groups with 46 patients living with HIV infection from the Michael E. DeBakey VAMC (MEDVAMC). Analysis identified three focus areas for improving retention in care: developing an HIV friendly clinic environment, providing mental health and substance use treatment concurrent with HIV care and encouraging peer support from other Veterans with HIV. PMID:26829641

  19. Development of a complex intervention to promote appropriate prescribing and medication intensification in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus in Irish general practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark E; Byrne, Molly; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Corrigan, Derek; Fahey, Tom; Smith, Susan M

    2017-09-16

    Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can be seen as failure to meet recommended targets for management of key risk factors including glycaemic control, blood pressure and lipids. Poor control of risk factors is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Failure to intensify medications for patients with poor control of T2DM when indicated is called clinical inertia and is one contributory factor to poor control of T2DM. We aimed to develop a theory and evidence-based complex intervention to improve appropriate prescribing and medication intensification in poorly controlled T2DM in Irish general practice. The first stage of the Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions was utilised. To identify current evidence, we performed a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of interventions targeting patients with poorly controlled T2DM in community settings. The Behaviour Change Wheel theoretical approach was used to identify suitable intervention functions. Workshops, simulation, collaborations with academic partners and observation of physicians were utilised to operationalise the intervention functions and design the elements of the complex intervention. Our systematic review highlighted that professional-based interventions, potentially through clinical decision support systems, could address poorly controlled T2DM. Appropriate intensification of anti-glycaemic and cardiovascular medications, by general practitioners (GPs), for adults with poorly controlled T2DM was identified as the key behaviour to address clinical inertia. Psychological capability was the key driver of the behaviour, which needed to change, suggesting five key intervention functions (education, training, enablement, environmental restructuring and incentivisation) and nine key behaviour change techniques, which were operationalised into a complex intervention. The intervention has three components: (a) a

  20. Missouri School Improvement Program: Support and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Missouri State Board of Education and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education are dedicated to ensuring that all children have access to good schools that prepare them for college and career success. The Missouri School Improvement Program: Support and Intervention Plan takes a differentiated approach to state support based on…

  1. Even small interventions can improve oral health.

    PubMed

    Vega, Lina; Carberry, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    When resources are scarce, authors of articles appearing in health publications have questioned the effectiveness of traditional interventions as a means of improving oral health. The experience in Delicias, Honduras, indicates that the principles of BPOC (Basic Package of Oral Care) may provide quicker and better results.

  2. Why Continuous Improvement Is a Poor Substitute for School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, David C.; Rochester, J. Martin

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to introduce school choice have produced pressures on public schools to improve their performance. As a result, many public schools have embraced the total quality management principle of continuous improvement. In this article we explain that while this may be well intentioned, it may have perverse unintended consequences. A likely…

  3. Why Continuous Improvement Is a Poor Substitute for School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, David C.; Rochester, J. Martin

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to introduce school choice have produced pressures on public schools to improve their performance. As a result, many public schools have embraced the total quality management principle of continuous improvement. In this article we explain that while this may be well intentioned, it may have perverse unintended consequences. A likely…

  4. Will interventions targeting conscientiousness improve aging outcomes?

    PubMed

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-05-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it may be possible to design therapeutic interventions that increase conscientiousness, there may be more effective and efficient ways to improve population health. We ask for evidence that a focus on conscientiousness improves behavior change efforts that target specific health-related behaviors or large-scale environmental modification.

  5. Cell Phone Intervention to Improve Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Marciel, Kristen K.; Saiman, Lisa; Quittell, Lynne M.; Dawkins, Kevin; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment regimens for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are time-consuming and complex, resulting in consistently low adherence rates. To date, few studies have evaluated innovative technologies to improve adherence in this population. Current infection control guidelines for patients with CF seek to minimize patient-to-patient transmission of potential pathogens. Thus, interventions must avoid face-to-face contact and be delivered individually, limiting opportunities for peer support. This study aimed to develop and assess a web-enabled cell phone, CFFONE™, designed to provide CF information and social support to improve adherence in adolescents with CF. Methods The acceptability, feasibility, and utility of CFFONE™ were evaluated with health care professionals (n = 17) adolescents with CF aged 11–18 years old (n = 12), adults with CF aged 21–36 years old (n = 6), parents of adolescents with CF (n = 12), and technology experts (n = 8). Adolescents also tested a prototype of CFFONE™ (n = 9). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected. Results Focus group data with health care = professionals indicated a need for this intervention, and indicated that CFFONE™ would be likely to improve knowledge and social support, and somewhat likely to improve adherence. Adolescent, adults, and parents all rated CFFONE™ as likely to improve adherence. Technology experts rated the prototype design and format as appropriate. Conclusions The current study provided some support from key stakeholders for this intervention to improve adherence in adolescents with CF. Next steps include a multi-center trial of the efficacy and safety of CFFONE™. PMID:20054860

  6. Educational interventions to improve recognition of delirium: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yanamadala, Mamata; Wieland, Darryl; Heflin, Mitchell T

    2013-11-01

    Delirium is a common and serious condition that is underrecognized in older adults in a variety of healthcare settings. It is poorly recognized because of deficiencies in provider knowledge and its atypical presentation. Early recognition of delirium is warranted to better manage the disease and prevent the adverse outcomes associated with it. The purpose of this article is to review the literature concerning educational interventions focusing on recognition of delirium. The Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINHAL) databases were searched for studies with specific educational focus in the recognition of delirium, and 26 studies with various designs were identified. The types of interventions used were classified according to the Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Constructs in Educational Diagnosis and Evaluation (PRECEDE) model, and outcomes were sorted according to Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Educational strategies combining predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors achieved better results than strategies that included one or two of these components. Studies using predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing strategies together were more often effective in producing changes in staff behavior and participant outcomes. Based on this review, improvements in knowledge and skill alone seem insufficient to favorably influence recognition of delirium. Educational interventions to recognize delirium are most effective when formal teaching is interactive and is combined with strategies including engaging leadership and using clinical pathways and assessment tools. The goal of the current study was to systematically review the published literature to determine the effect of educational interventions on recognition of delirium.

  7. Separate & Unequal: Use Test Scores To Improve Education--Not To Segregate Poor Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Hansel

    2001-01-01

    Disappointing high-stakes test results matter far less than the type of future citizens that schools produce. Citizenship values (teamwork, leadership, and neighborliness) are not assessed well by multiple-choice exams. Poor performers should not be segregated, data should be reinterpreted, and remediation should stress tutoring interventions, not…

  8. Perceptions of health, health care and community-oriented health interventions in poor urban communities of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Maketa, Vivi; Vuna, Mimy; Baloji, Sylvain; Lubanza, Symphorien; Hendrickx, David; Inocêncio da Luz, Raquel Andrea; Boelaert, Marleen; Lutumba, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In Democratic Republic of Congo access to health care is limited because of many geographical and financial barriers, while quality of care is often low. Global health donors assist the country with a number of community-oriented interventions such as free distribution of bednets, antihelminthic drugs, vitamin A supplementation and vaccination campaigns, but uptake of these interventions is not always optimal. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of poor urban communities of the capital Kinshasa with regard to health issues in general as well as their experiences and expectations concerning facility-based health services and community-oriented health interventions. Applying an approach rooted in the grounded theory framework, focus group discussions were conducted in eight neighborhoods of poor urban areas in the city of Kinshasa in July 2011. Study participants were easily able to evoke the city's major health problems, with the notable exceptions of malnutrition and HIV/AIDS. They perceive the high out-of-pocket cost of health services as the major obstacle when seeking access to quality care. Knowledge of ongoing community-oriented health interventions seems good. Still, while the study participants agree that those interventions are beneficial; their acceptability seems to be problematic. This is chiefly put down to a lack of information and government communication about the programs and their interventions. Furthermore, the study participants referred to rumors and the deterring effect of stories about alleged harmful consequences of those interventions. Along with improving the provision and quality of general health care, the government and international actors must improve their efforts in informing the communities about disease control programs, their rationale and benefit/risk ratio. Directly engaging community members in a dialogue might be beneficial in terms of improving acceptability and overall access to health services and

  9. Perceptions of Health, Health Care and Community-Oriented Health Interventions in Poor Urban Communities of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Maketa, Vivi; Vuna, Mimy; Baloji, Sylvain; Lubanza, Symphorien; Hendrickx, David; Inocêncio da Luz, Raquel Andrea; Boelaert, Marleen; Lutumba, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In Democratic Republic of Congo access to health care is limited because of many geographical and financial barriers, while quality of care is often low. Global health donors assist the country with a number of community-oriented interventions such as free distribution of bednets, antihelminthic drugs, vitamin A supplementation and vaccination campaigns, but uptake of these interventions is not always optimal. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of poor urban communities of the capital Kinshasa with regard to health issues in general as well as their experiences and expectations concerning facility-based health services and community-oriented health interventions. Applying an approach rooted in the grounded theory framework, focus group discussions were conducted in eight neighborhoods of poor urban areas in the city of Kinshasa in July 2011. Study participants were easily able to evoke the city’s major health problems, with the notable exceptions of malnutrition and HIV/AIDS. They perceive the high out-of-pocket cost of health services as the major obstacle when seeking access to quality care. Knowledge of ongoing community-oriented health interventions seems good. Still, while the study participants agree that those interventions are beneficial; their acceptability seems to be problematic. This is chiefly put down to a lack of information and government communication about the programs and their interventions. Furthermore, the study participants referred to rumors and the deterring effect of stories about alleged harmful consequences of those interventions. Along with improving the provision and quality of general health care, the government and international actors must improve their efforts in informing the communities about disease control programs, their rationale and benefit/risk ratio. Directly engaging community members in a dialogue might be beneficial in terms of improving acceptability and overall access to health services and

  10. Percutaneous coronary intervention for poor coronary microcirculation reperfusion of patients with stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Li, J S; Zhao, X J; Ma, B X; Wang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been extensively applied to repair the forward flow of diseased coronary artery and can achieve significant curative results. However, some patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) develop non-perfusion or poor perfusion of cardiac muscle tissue after PCI, which increases the incidence of cardiovascular events and the death rate. PCI can dredge narrowed or infarct-related artery (IRA) and thus induce full reperfusion of ischemic myocardium. It is found in practice that some cases of AMI still have no perfusion or poor perfusion in myocardial tissue even though coronary angiography suggests opened coronary artery after PCI, which increases the incidence of vascular events and mortality. Therefore, to explore the detailed mechanism of PCI in treating coronary microcirculation of patients with stable angina pectoris, we selected 140 patients with stable angina pectoris for PCI, observing the index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) of descending branch and changes of myocardial injury markers and left ventricular systolic function, and made a subgroup analysis based on the correlation between clinical indexes, IMR and other variables of diabetic and non-diabetic patients, PCI-related and non-PCI-related myocardial infarction patients. The results suggest that IMR of anterior descending branch after PCI was higher compared to that before PCI, and the difference was significant (P less than 0.05); creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), myohemoglobin and high sensitive troponin T were all increased after PCI, and the difference was also significant (P less than 0.05); brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level became higher after PCI, with significant difference (P less than 0.05); left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) declined after PCI, and the difference before and after PCI was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). Moreover, subgroup analysis results of the three groups all demonstrated statistically significant

  11. Interventions to improve antipsychotic medication adherence: review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    Dolder, Christian R; Lacro, Jonathan P; Leckband, Susan; Jeste, Dilip V

    2003-08-01

    Antipsychotic nonadherence is an important barrier to the successful treatment of schizophrenia and can lead to clinical and economic burdens. Interventions capable of significantly improving medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia would be beneficial in maximizing treatment outcomes with antipsychotics. This article reviews recent literature reporting interventions designed to improve antipsychotic adherence in patients with schizophrenia. We searched the Medline, Healthstar, and PsycInfo electronic databases for articles published since 1980 on interventions to improve medication adherence in schizophrenia. Twenty-one studies met our selection criteria. In this review, educational, behavioral, affective, or a combination of these approaches to improve adherence were examined. A total of 23 interventions were tested, as 2 studies investigated more than 1 intervention. While study design and adherence measures varied across the trials reviewed, medication adherence was noted to moderately improve with 15 of the 23 interventions tested. Interventions of a purely educational nature were the least successful at improving antipsychotic adherence. The greatest improvement in adherence was seen with interventions employing combinations of educational, behavioral, and affective strategies with which improvements in adherence were noted in 8 out of 12 studies, with additional secondary gains such as: reduced relapse, decreased hospitalization, decreased psychopathology, improved social function, gains in medication knowledge, and improved insight into the need for treatment. Longer interventions and an alliance with therapists also appeared important for successful outcomes. The continuing development and study of successful interventions to improve medication adherence are necessary to maximize the usefulness of pharmacologic treatment of schizophrenia.

  12. Interventions for improving mobility after hip fracture surgery in adults.

    PubMed

    Handoll, Helen Hg; Sherrington, Catherine; Mak, Jenson Cs

    2011-03-16

    Hip fracture mainly occurs in older people. Strategies to improve mobility include gait retraining, various forms of exercise and muscle stimulation. To evaluate the effects of different interventions for improving mobility after hip fracture surgery in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and other databases, and reference lists of articles, up to April 2010. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials comparing different mobilisation strategies after hip fracture surgery. The authors independently selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. There was no data pooling. The 19 included trials (involving 1589 older adults) were small, often with methodological flaws. Just two pairs of trials tested similar interventions.Twelve trials evaluated mobilisation strategies started soon after hip fracture surgery. Single trials found improved mobility from, respectively, a two-week weight-bearing programme, a quadriceps muscle strengthening exercise programme and electrical stimulation aimed at alleviating pain. Single trials found no significant improvement in mobility from, respectively, a treadmill gait retraining programme, 12 weeks of resistance training, and 16 weeks of weight-bearing exercise. One trial testing ambulation started within 48 hours of surgery found contradictory results. One historic trial found no significant difference in unfavourable outcomes for weight bearing started at two versus 12 weeks. Of two trials evaluating more intensive physiotherapy regimens, one found no difference in recovery, the other reported a higher level of drop-out in the more intensive group. Two trials tested electrical stimulation of the quadriceps: one found no benefit and poor tolerance of the intervention; the other found improved mobility and good tolerance.Seven trials evaluated strategies started after hospital discharge. Started soon after

  13. Interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Clasen, Thomas F; Alexander, Kelly T; Sinclair, David; Boisson, Sophie; Peletz, Rachel; Chang, Howard H; Majorin, Fiona; Cairncross, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    quality interventions might prevent diarrhoea? Diarrhoea is a major cause of death and disease, especially among young children in low-income countries where the most common causes are faecally contaminated water and food, or poor hygiene practices. In remote and low-income settings, source-based water quality improvement may include providing protected groundwater (springs, wells, and bore holes) or harvested rainwater as an alternative to surface sources (rivers and lakes). Alternatively water may be treated at the point-of-use in people's homes by boiling, chlorination, flocculation, filtration, or solar disinfection. These point-of-use interventions have the potential to overcome both contaminated sources and recontamination of safe water in the home. What the research says There is currently insufficient evidence to know if source-based improvements in water supplies, such as protected wells and communal tap stands or treatment of communal supplies, consistently reduce diarrhoea in low-income settings (very low quality evidence). We found no trials evaluating reliable piped-in water supplies to people's homes. On average, distributing disinfection products for use in the home may reduce diarrhoea by around one quarter in the case of chlorine products (low quality evidence), and around a third in the case of flocculation and disinfection sachets (moderate quality evidence). Water filtration at home probably reduces diarrhoea by around a half (moderate quality evidence), and effects were consistently seen with ceramic filters (moderate quality evidence), biosand systems (moderate quality evidence) and LifeStraw® filters (low quality evidence). Plumbed-in filtration has only been evaluated in high-income settings (low quality evidence). In low-income settings, distributing plastic bottles with instructions to leave filled bottles in direct sunlight for at least six hours before drinking probably reduces diarrhoea by around a third (moderate quality evidence). Research

  14. Psychological interventions for post-traumatic stress disorder in people living with HIV in Resource poor settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Ruth; Chibanda, Dixon; Brakarsh, Jonathan; Seedat, Soraya

    2016-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is pervasive in low- and middle-income countries. There is evidence to suggest that post-traumatic stress disorder is more common among people living with HIV than non-infected matched controls. We carried out a systematic review of interventions for adult post-traumatic stress disorder from resource poor settings with a focus on people living with HIV. We included all studies that investigated interventions for adult post-traumatic stress disorder from resource poor settings with a focus on interventions that were either randomised controlled trials or observational cohort studies carried out from 1980 to May 2015. Of the 25 articles that were identified for full review, two independent reviewers identified seven studies that met our study inclusion criteria. All randomised controlled trials (RCT) (n = 6) used cognitive behavioural therapy-based interventions and focused on people living with HIV in resource poor settings. There was only one study focusing on the use of lay counsellors to address post-traumatic stress disorder but core competencies were not described. There were no intervention studies from Africa, only an observational cohort study from Rwanda. Rigorously evaluated interventions for adult post-traumatic stress disorder in people living with HIV are rare. Most were undertaken in resource poor settings located in high-income countries. There is a need for research on the development and implementation of appropriate interventions for post-traumatic stress disorder in people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reading Intervention for Poor Readers at the Transition to Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Paula J.; Paul, Shirley-Anne S.; Smith, Glynnis; Snowling, Margaret J.; Hulme, Charles

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated two 20-week reading interventions for pupils entering secondary school with reading difficulties. The interventions were delivered by trained teaching assistants (three 35-min sessions per week). 287 pupils (ages 11-13) from 27 schools were randomly allocated to three groups: reading intervention (targeting word recognition…

  16. Modeling Determinants of Medication Attitudes and Poor Adherence in Early Nonaffective Psychosis: Implications for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Richard J.; Nordentoft, Merete; Haddock, Gillian; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang; Glenthøj, Birte; Leboyer, Marion; Leucht, Stefan; Leweke, Markus; McGuire, Phillip; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rujescu, Dan; Sommer, Iris E.; Kahn, René S.; Lewis, Shon W.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to design a multimodal intervention to improve adherence following first episode psychosis, consistent with current evidence. Existing literature identified medication attitudes, insight, and characteristics of support as important determinants of adherence to medication: we examined medication attitudes, self-esteem, and insight in an early psychosis cohort better to understand their relationships. Existing longitudinal data from 309 patients with early Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nonaffective psychosis (83% first episode) were analyzed to test the hypothesis that medication attitudes, while meaningfully different from “insight,” correlated with insight and self-esteem, and change in each influenced the others. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Birchwood Insight Scale, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale insight were assessed at presentation, after 6 weeks and 3 and 18 months. Drug Attitudes Inventory (DAI) and treatment satisfaction were rated from 6 weeks onward. Structural equation models of their relationships were compared. Insight measures’ and DAI’s predictive validity were compared against relapse, readmission, and remission. Analysis found five latent constructs best fitted the data: medication attitudes, self-esteem, accepting need for treatment, self-rated insight, and objective insight. All were related and each affected the others as it changed, except self-esteem and medication attitudes. Low self-reported insight at presentation predicted readmission. Good 6-week insight (unlike drug attitudes) predicted remission. Literature review and data modeling indicated that a multimodal intervention using motivational interviewing, online psychoeducation, and SMS text medication reminders to enhance adherence without damaging self-concept was feasible and appropriate. PMID:25750247

  17. Modeling determinants of medication attitudes and poor adherence in early nonaffective psychosis: implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Drake, Richard J; Nordentoft, Merete; Haddock, Gillian; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Glenthøj, Birte; Leboyer, Marion; Leucht, Stefan; Leweke, Markus; McGuire, Phillip; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rujescu, Dan; Sommer, Iris E; Kahn, René S; Lewis, Shon W

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to design a multimodal intervention to improve adherence following first episode psychosis, consistent with current evidence. Existing literature identified medication attitudes, insight, and characteristics of support as important determinants of adherence to medication: we examined medication attitudes, self-esteem, and insight in an early psychosis cohort better to understand their relationships. Existing longitudinal data from 309 patients with early Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nonaffective psychosis (83% first episode) were analyzed to test the hypothesis that medication attitudes, while meaningfully different from "insight," correlated with insight and self-esteem, and change in each influenced the others. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Birchwood Insight Scale, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale insight were assessed at presentation, after 6 weeks and 3 and 18 months. Drug Attitudes Inventory (DAI) and treatment satisfaction were rated from 6 weeks onward. Structural equation models of their relationships were compared. Insight measures' and DAI's predictive validity were compared against relapse, readmission, and remission. Analysis found five latent constructs best fitted the data: medication attitudes, self-esteem, accepting need for treatment, self-rated insight, and objective insight. All were related and each affected the others as it changed, except self-esteem and medication attitudes. Low self-reported insight at presentation predicted readmission. Good 6-week insight (unlike drug attitudes) predicted remission. Literature review and data modeling indicated that a multimodal intervention using motivational interviewing, online psychoeducation, and SMS text medication reminders to enhance adherence without damaging self-concept was feasible and appropriate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For

  18. Effects of Simulated Interventions to Improve School Entry Academic Skills on Socioeconomic Inequalities in Educational Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Chittleborough, Catherine R; Mittinty, Murthy N; Lawlor, Debbie A; Lynch, John W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial evidence shows that interventions before age 5 can improve skills necessary for educational success; the effect of these interventions on socioeconomic inequalities is unknown. Using trial effect estimates, and marginal structural models with data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (n = 11,764, imputed), simulated effects of plausible interventions to improve school entry academic skills on socioeconomic inequality in educational achievement at age 16 were examined. Progressive universal interventions (i.e., more intense intervention for those with greater need) to improve school entry academic skills could raise population levels of educational achievement by 5% and reduce absolute socioeconomic inequality in poor educational achievement by 15%. PMID:25327718

  19. Effects of simulated interventions to improve school entry academic skills on socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievement.

    PubMed

    Chittleborough, Catherine R; Mittinty, Murthy N; Lawlor, Debbie A; Lynch, John W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial evidence shows that interventions before age 5 can improve skills necessary for educational success; the effect of these interventions on socioeconomic inequalities is unknown. Using trial effect estimates, and marginal structural models with data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (n = 11,764, imputed), simulated effects of plausible interventions to improve school entry academic skills on socioeconomic inequality in educational achievement at age 16 were examined. Progressive universal interventions (i.e., more intense intervention for those with greater need) to improve school entry academic skills could raise population levels of educational achievement by 5% and reduce absolute socioeconomic inequality in poor educational achievement by 15%. © 2014 The Authors. Child Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development.

  20. SBIRT-Based Interventions to Improve Pediatric Oral Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Considerations for Future Behavioral SBIRT Interventions in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Josué; Chi, Donald L

    2016-09-01

    Dental caries is the most common chronic disease in children and is caused by poor oral health behaviors. These behaviors include high-sugar diet, inadequate exposure to topical fluorides, and irregular use of professional dental care services. A number of behavioral intervention approaches have been used to modify health behaviors. One example is the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model, which has been widely used to reduce substance abuse in both adults and children. SBIRT is a promising behavior change approach that could similarly be used to address problematic oral health behaviors. In this paper, we will review oral health studies that have adopted SBIRT components, assess if these interventions improved oral health behaviors and outcomes, and outline considerations for researchers interested in developing and testing future oral health-related SBIRT interventions in dentistry.

  1. SBIRT-Based Interventions to Improve Pediatric Oral Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Considerations for Future Behavioral SBIRT Interventions in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is the most common chronic disease in children and is caused by poor oral health behaviors. These behaviors include high-sugar diet, inadequate exposure to topical fluorides, and irregular use of professional dental care services. A number of behavioral intervention approaches have been used to modify health behaviors. One example is the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model, which has been widely used to reduce substance abuse in both adults and children. SBIRT is a promising behavior change approach that could similarly be used to address problematic oral health behaviors. In this paper, we will review oral health studies that have adopted SBIRT components, assess if these interventions improved oral health behaviors and outcomes, and outline considerations for researchers interested in developing and testing future oral health-related SBIRT interventions in dentistry. PMID:27857880

  2. A behavioral intervention to improve obstetrical care.

    PubMed

    Althabe, Fernando; Buekens, Pierre; Bergel, Eduardo; Belizán, José M; Campbell, Marci K; Moss, Nancy; Hartwell, Tyler; Wright, Linda L

    2008-05-01

    Implementation of evidence-based obstetrical practices remains a significant challenge. Effective strategies to disseminate and implement such practices are needed. We randomly assigned 19 hospitals in Argentina and Uruguay to receive a multifaceted behavioral intervention (including selection of opinion leaders, interactive workshops, training of manual skills, one-on-one academic detailing visits with hospital birth attendants, reminders, and feedback) to develop and implement guidelines for the use of episiotomy and management of the third stage of labor or to receive no intervention. The primary outcomes were the rates of prophylactic use of oxytocin during the third stage of labor and of episiotomy. The main secondary outcomes were postpartum hemorrhage and birth attendants' readiness to change their behavior with regard to episiotomies and management of the third stage of labor. The outcomes were measured at baseline, at the end of the 18-month intervention, and 12 months after the end of the intervention. The rate of use of prophylactic oxytocin increased from 2.1% at baseline to 83.6% after the end of the intervention at hospitals that received the intervention and from 2.6% to 12.3% at control hospitals (P=0.01 for the difference in changes). The rate of use of episiotomy decreased from 41.1% to 29.9% at hospitals receiving the intervention but remained stable at control hospitals, with preintervention and postintervention values of 43.5% and 44.5%, respectively (P<0.001 for the difference in changes). The intervention was also associated with reductions in the rate of postpartum hemorrhage of 500 ml or more (relative rate reduction, 45%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9 to 71) and of 1000 ml or more (relative rate reduction, 70%; 95% CI, 16 to 78). Birth attendants' readiness to change also increased in the hospitals receiving the intervention. The effects on the use of episiotomy and prophylactic oxytocin were sustained 12 months after the end of the

  3. Evaluation of an Intervention to Help Students Avoid Unintentional Plagiarism by Improving Their Authorial Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elander, James; Pittam, Gail; Lusher, Joanne; Fox, Pauline; Payne, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Students with poorly developed authorial identity may be at risk of unintentional plagiarism. An instructional intervention designed specifically to improve authorial identity was delivered to 364 psychology students at three post-1992 universities in London, UK, and evaluated with before-and-after measures of beliefs and attitudes about academic…

  4. Can a Brief Educational Intervention Improve Parents' Knowledge of Healthy Children's Sleep? A Pilot-Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Caroline H. D.; Owens, Judith A.; Pham, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Insufficient and poor quality sleep is prevalent in children, and is a significant public health concern due to the negative consequences for health. Certain sleep-related behaviours are associated with improved sleep, and sleep behaviours are amenable to efforts targeted towards behaviour change. Parental educational interventions have…

  5. Can a Brief Educational Intervention Improve Parents' Knowledge of Healthy Children's Sleep? A Pilot-Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Caroline H. D.; Owens, Judith A.; Pham, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Insufficient and poor quality sleep is prevalent in children, and is a significant public health concern due to the negative consequences for health. Certain sleep-related behaviours are associated with improved sleep, and sleep behaviours are amenable to efforts targeted towards behaviour change. Parental educational interventions have…

  6. Effectiveness of Interactive Self-Management Interventions in Individuals With Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Sit, Janet W H; Choi, Kai-Chow; Chair, Sek-Ying; Li, Xiaomei; He, Xiao-le

    2017-02-01

    To identify, assess, and summarize available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of interactive self-management interventions on glycemic control and patient-centered outcomes in individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Major English and Chinese electronic databases including Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and WanFang Data were searched to identify randomized controlled trials that reported the effectiveness of interactive self-management interventions in individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥ 7.5% or 58 mmol/mol), from inception to June 2015. Data extraction and risk-of-bias assessment were performed by two reviewers independently. Meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3. A total of 16 trials with 3,545 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Interactive self-management interventions could have a beneficial effect in individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in reducing HbA1c (mean difference: -0.43%, 95% CI: -0.67% to -0.18%), improving diabetes knowledge (standardized mean difference [SMD]: 0.30, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.58), enhancing self-efficacy (SMD: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.44), and reducing diabetes-related distress (SMD: -0.21, 95% CI: -0.39 to -0.04). Self-management interventions supported with theory and structured curriculum showed desirable results in glycemic control. The behavioral change techniques, including providing feedback on performance, problem-solving, and action planning, were associated with a significant reduction in HbA1c. Individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes could benefit from interactive self-management interventions. Interventions targeting patients with poorly controlled diabetes, those who are at the greatest risk of developing complications, should be prioritized. Our findings indicate that providing feedback on performance, problem-solving, and action

  7. Implementing electronic handover: interventions to improve efficiency, safety and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Alhamid, Sharifah Munirah; Lee, Desmond Xue-Yuan; Wong, Hei Man; Chuah, Matthew Bingfeng; Wong, Yu Jun; Narasimhalu, Kaavya; Tan, Thuan Tong; Low, Su Ying

    2016-10-01

    Effective handovers are critical for patient care and safety. Electronic handover tools are increasingly used today to provide an effective and standardized platform for information exchange. The implementation of an electronic handover system in tertiary hospitals can be a major challenge. Previous efforts in implementing an electronic handover tool failed due to poor compliance and buy-in from end-users. A new electronic handover tool was developed and incorporated into the existing electronic medical records (EMRs) for medical patients in Singapore General Hospital (SGH). There was poor compliance by on-call doctors in acknowledging electronic handovers, and lack of adherence to safety rules, raising concerns about the safety and efficiency of the electronic handover tool. Urgent measures were needed to ensure its safe and sustained use. A quality improvement group comprising stakeholders, including end-users, developed multi-faceted interventions using rapid PDSA (P-Plan, D-Do, S-Study, A-Act ) cycles to address these issues. Innovative solutions using media and online software provided cost-efficient measures to improve compliance. The percentage of unacknowledged handovers per day was used as the main outcome measure throughout all PDSA cycles. Doctors were also assessed for improvement in their knowledge of safety rules and their perception of the electronic handover tool. An electronic handover tool complementing daily clinical practice can be successfully implemented using solutions devised through close collaboration with end-users supported by the senior leadership. A combined 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' approach with regular process evaluations is crucial for its long-term sustainability. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Transvaginal ovarian trauma, poor responders and improvement of success rates in IVF: anecdotal data and a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Bettocchi, Stefano; Basios, George; Mastorakos, George; Vrachnis, Nikos

    2014-08-01

    In this report, we propose an intervention capable of improving IVF outcomes in subfertile women with poor ovarian response. This intervention derives from anecdotal data and observations in our daily practice, but most importantly from trials on experimental models and subfertile women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). Our hypothesis suggests that transvaginal induction of trauma to the ovary in the cycle preceding IVF should benefit poor ovarian responders and their lowered pregnancy rates by increasing - at least - the number of retrieved oocytes during oocyte retrieval. Up-to-the minute data show that, via this means, there is a unique response of the ovarian surface epithelium and stroma to the induced trauma. The potential pathways of this beneficial response involve an improvement of the raised gonadotrophins to act either through the mechanical reduction of the size of the ovary or through alterations of the hormonal profile by lowering LH, inhibin and local androgen concentrations through hypothalamic-pituitary axis feedbacks, the induction of increased blood flow to the ovaries, a differentiated local immune reaction and a non-elucidated as yet role of reactive oxygen species. In this report, we also describe the technique and the associated possible negative points while we try to point out the needed research steps to ensure its efficiency before it enters daily clinical practice.

  9. Recovery interventions and strategies for improved tennis performance

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Mark S; Baker, Lindsay B

    2014-01-01

    Improving the recovery capabilities of the tennis athlete is receiving more emphasis in the research communities, and also by practitioners (coaches, physical trainers, tennis performance specialists, physical therapists, etc). The purpose of this article was to review areas of recovery to limit the severity of fatigue and/or speed recovery from fatigue. This review will cover four broad recovery techniques commonly used in tennis with the belief that the interventions may improve athlete recovery and therefore improve adaptation and future performance. The four areas covered are: (1) temperature-based interventions, (2) compressive clothing, (3) electronic interventions and (4) nutritional interventions. PMID:24668374

  10. Interventions to improve communication in autism.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rhea

    2008-10-01

    Children with autism benefit from intensive, early intervention that focuses on increasing the frequency, form, and function of communicative acts. Available evidence shows that highly structured behavioral methods have important positive consequences for these children, particularly in eliciting first words. However, the limitation of these methods in maintenance and generalization of skills suggests that many children with autism will need to have these methods supplemented with less adult-directed activities to increase communicative initiation and carry over learned skills to new settings and communication partners. Providing opportunities for mediated peer interactions with trained peers in natural settings seems to be especially important in maximizing the effects of this intervention.

  11. Interventions aiming at balance confidence improvement in older adults: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Büla, Christophe J; Monod, Stéfanie; Hoskovec, Constanze; Rochat, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Loss of balance confidence is a frequent condition that affects 20-75% of community-dwelling older persons. Although a recent fall is a common trigger, loss of balance confidence also appears independent of previous experience with falls. Maintaining or improving balance confidence is important to avoid unnecessary, self-imposed restrictions of activity and subsequent disability. Holding another person's hand or using an assistive device while walking are simple interventions that are used naturally to address poor balance confidence in daily life. However, more complex interventions have also been developed and tested to achieve more sustained improvement in balance confidence. This review describes interventions that have been tested to improve balance confidence in older community-dwelling persons. Based on 2 recent systematic reviews, an additional search for literature was performed to update current information on interventions aiming at balance confidence improvement. Interventions were classified as those directly aimed at increasing balance confidence or not, and further stratified into those using monofactorial or multifactorial approaches. A total of 46 randomized controlled trials were identified. Five of the 8 interventions that directly targeted balance confidence showed benefits. Among those, multicomponent behavioral group interventions provided the most robust evidence of benefits in improving balance confidence and in decreasing activity avoidance. Among interventions not directly aiming at balance confidence improvement (11/21 studies with benefits), exercise (including tai chi) appears as the most promising monofactorial intervention. Nine of the 17 multifactorial fall prevention programs showed an effect on balance confidence, exercise being a main component in 7 of these 9 studies. Interventions that targeted elderly persons reporting poor balance confidence and/or those at risk for falls seemed more likely to be beneficial. Positive and

  12. Improving medication adherence among community-dwelling seniors with cognitive impairment: a systematic review of interventions.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Edeltraut; Tatar, Ovidiu; Vedel, Isabelle; Giguère, Anik M C; Voyer, Philippe; Guillaumie, Laurence; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Guénette, Line

    2017-08-01

    Background Medication non-adherence may lead to poor therapeutic outcomes. Cognitive functions deteriorate with age, contributing to decreased adherence. Interventions have been tested to improve adherence in seniors with cognitive impairment or Alzheimer disease (AD), but high-quality systematic reviews are lacking. It remains unclear which interventions are promising. Objectives We conducted a systematic review to identify, describe, and evaluate interventions aimed at improving medication adherence among seniors with any type of cognitive impairment. Methods Following NICE guidance, databases and websites were searched using combinations of controlled and free vocabulary. All adherence-enhancing interventions and study designs were considered. Studies had to include community dwelling seniors, aged 65 years or older, with cognitive impairment, receiving at least one medication for a chronic condition, and an adherence measure. Study characteristics and methodological quality were assessed. Results We identified 13 interventions, including six RCTs. Two studies were of poor, nine of low/medium and two of high quality. Seven studies had sample sizes below 50 and six interventions focused on adherence to AD medication. Six interventions tested a behavioral, four a medication oriented, two an educational and one a multi-faceted approach. Studies rarely assessed therapeutic outcomes. All but one intervention showed improved adherence. Conclusion Three medium quality studies showed better adherence with patches than with pills for AD treatment. Promising interventions used educational or reminding strategies, including one high quality RCT. Nine studies were of low/moderate quality. High quality RCTs using a theoretical framework for intervention selection are needed to identify strategies for improved adherence in these seniors.

  13. Music Education Intervention Improves Vocal Emotion Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mualem, Orit; Lavidor, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The current study is an interdisciplinary examination of the interplay among music, language, and emotions. It consisted of two experiments designed to investigate the relationship between musical abilities and vocal emotional recognition. In experiment 1 (N = 24), we compared the influence of two short-term intervention programs--music and…

  14. Improving Student Reading through Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saratore, Katherine K.; Walsh, Mary Ann

    A study examined an early reading intervention program designed to lead children, identified with low reading readiness at the start of first grade, to an appropriate reading level by the end of a 6-month period. Subjects were students entering first grade in a middle class community in northern Illinois. The problems of low reading readiness were…

  15. Music Education Intervention Improves Vocal Emotion Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mualem, Orit; Lavidor, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The current study is an interdisciplinary examination of the interplay among music, language, and emotions. It consisted of two experiments designed to investigate the relationship between musical abilities and vocal emotional recognition. In experiment 1 (N = 24), we compared the influence of two short-term intervention programs--music and…

  16. An Intervention to Improve Motivation for Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akioka, Elisabeth; Gilmore, Linda

    2013-01-01

    A repeated measures design, with randomly assigned intervention and control groups and multiple sources of information on each participant, was used to examine whether changing the method of delivery of a school's homework program in order to better meet the students' needs for autonomy, relatedness and competence would lead to more positive…

  17. Web-based remote psychological intervention improves cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Yu, Tao; Yang, Lin

    2017-08-01

    Web-based-remote (WBR) intervention is a new approach that incorporates smart control technology and modern medicine to monitor patient compliance. It is based on computer control and communication technology. This study is to explore the benefits of WBR psychological intervention for cancer treatment. 128 patients diagnosed with cancer by Pathology Department of our hospital between 1 February 2013 and 1 August 2013 were included. Patients were randomly assigned to intervention and control group (n = 64). The Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30) was used for the survey. Intervention group received WBR psychological intervention in addition to regular clinical follow-up care. Control group only received regular clinical follow-up care. The QLQ-C30 score was significantly better in the intervention group than the control group when the intervention and control groups were followed for three months. In conclusion, WBR psychological intervention substantially improves the quality of life in patients during cancer treatment.

  18. [Improving health care practices and organization: methodology for intervention studies].

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Vincent; Savoldelli, Virginie; Sabatier, Brigitte; Durieux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Interventions designed to improve professional practices and healthcare organization are regularly implemented in all health systems. Their effectiveness on quality of care should be properly evaluated prior to their widespread implementation. Intervention studies can be conducted for this purpose according to a rigorous methodology in order to provide results with a good level of evidence. This article describes the main phases of an intervention study, including definition of the intervention, choice of study design, outcomes assessment, and writing of the report. It also addresses methodological issues of intervention studies designed to improve quality of care, such as cluster-randomization or the use of quasi-experimental designs. One of the specific features of these studies is that professionals are the targets, while patients are the beneficiaries of the intervention. A good knowledge of the specific features of studies designed to improve quality of care is essential to conduct research, or to evaluate the quality of the evidence from published studies.

  19. Interventions to Improve Care for Patients with Limited Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L.; Schillinger, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objective To propose a framework and describe best practices for improving care for patients with limited health literacy (LHL). Methods Review of the literature. Results Approximately half of the U.S. adult population has LHL. Because LHL is associated with poor health outcomes and contributes to health disparities, the adoption of evidence-based best practices is imperative. Feasible interventions at the clinician-patient level (eg, patient-centered communication, clear communication techniques, teach-to-goal methods, and reinforcement), at the system-patient level (eg, clear health education materials, visual aids, clear medication labeling, self-management support programs, and shame-free clinical environments), and at the community-patient level (eg, adult education referrals, lay health educators, and harnessing the mass media) can improve health outcomes for patients with LHL. Conclusion Because LHL is prevalent, and because the recommended communication strategies can benefit patients of all literacy levels, clinicians, health system planners, and health policy leaders should promote the uptake of these strategies into routine care. PMID:20046798

  20. Video Educational Intervention Improves Reporting of Concussion and Symptom Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Tamerah N.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Concussion management is potentially complicated by the lack of reporting due to poor educational intervention in youth athletics. Objective: Determine if a concussion-education video developed for high school athletes will increase the reporting of concussive injuries and symptom recognition in this group. Design: Cross-sectional,…

  1. Video Educational Intervention Improves Reporting of Concussion and Symptom Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Tamerah N.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Concussion management is potentially complicated by the lack of reporting due to poor educational intervention in youth athletics. Objective: Determine if a concussion-education video developed for high school athletes will increase the reporting of concussive injuries and symptom recognition in this group. Design: Cross-sectional,…

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness of Education Interventions in Poor Countries. Policy Insight, Volume 2, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, David K.; Ghosh, Arkadipta

    2008-01-01

    Poor countries need development programs that are both effective and cost-effective. To assess effectiveness, researchers are increasingly using randomized trials (or quasi-experimental methods that imitate randomized trials), which provide a clear picture of which outcomes are attributable to the program being evaluated. This "Policy Insight"…

  3. The Cost-Effectiveness of Education Interventions in Poor Countries. Policy Insight, Volume 2, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, David K.; Ghosh, Arkadipta

    2008-01-01

    Poor countries need development programs that are both effective and cost-effective. To assess effectiveness, researchers are increasingly using randomized trials (or quasi-experimental methods that imitate randomized trials), which provide a clear picture of which outcomes are attributable to the program being evaluated. This "Policy Insight"…

  4. Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, P; Rathbone, J; Catchpole, K

    2011-04-01

    Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Poor access to timely pain reduction interventions for pediatric patients with supracondylar humerus fracture.

    PubMed

    Porter, Robert N; Chafe, Roger; Mugford, Gerry; Newhook, Leigh; Furey, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use of analgesic interventions in children with acute supracondylar fractures presenting to a pediatric emergency department (ED) and to explore the relationship between timely interventions and severity of injury. This was a retrospective cohort study. Structured chart reviews were conducted on all eligible cases of acute supracondylar humerus fracture presenting to a single pediatric ED over a 5-year period ending in December 2009. Two interventions were studied: administration of a systemic analgesic and placement of an immobilizing backslab. Criteria for timeliness were administration of an analgesic within 30 minutes from triage and placement of a backslab before radiography. Cases were dichotomized as nonsevere or severe based on whether the fracture was treated with casting alone or with another orthopedic intervention (closed reduction in the ED or any procedure in the operating room). Of 160 eligible cases, 116 were classified as nonsevere and 44 as severe. The proportions receiving a timely analgesic were 3% and 11%, respectively, in these groups (P = 0.04 for difference). For backslab application, 16% and 61% received timely treatment in the nonsevere and severe groups, respectively (P = 0.000 for difference). Children presenting to a pediatric ED with a painful injury had low access to early systemic analgesics and backslab immobilization. Many factors may have played a role, including lack of mandated documentation of a formal pain score and lack of a medical directive allowing triage nurses to administer analgesics in the institution studied.

  6. Why Economic Analysis of Health System Improvement Interventions Matters.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Edward Ivor; Marquez, Lani

    2016-01-01

    There is little evidence to direct health systems toward providing efficient interventions to address medical errors, defined as an unintended act of omission or commission or one not executed as intended that may or may not cause harm to the patient but does not achieve its intended outcome. We believe that lack of guidance on what is the most efficient way to reduce medical errors and improve the quality of health-care limits the scale-up of health system improvement interventions. Challenges to economic evaluation of these interventions include defining and implementing improvement interventions in different settings with high fidelity, capturing all of the positive and negative effects of the intervention, using process measures of effectiveness rather than health outcomes, and determining the full cost of the intervention and all economic consequences of its effects. However, health system improvement interventions should be treated similarly to individual medical interventions and undergo rigorous economic evaluation to provide actionable evidence to guide policy-makers in decisions of resource allocation for improvement activities among other competing demands for health-care resources.

  7. An experiential community orientation to improve knowledge and assess resident attitudes toward poor patients.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Erik A; Miller-Cribbs, Julie E; Duffy, F Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Future physicians may not be prepared for the challenges of caring for the growing population of poor patients in this country. Given the potential for a socioeconomic "gulf" between physicians and patients and the lack of curricula that address the specific needs of poor patients, resident knowledge about caring for this underserved population is low. We created a 2-day Resident Academy orientation, before the start of residency training, to improve community knowledge and address resident attitudes toward poor patients through team-based experiential activities. We collected demographic and satisfaction data through anonymous presurvey and postsurvey t tests, and descriptive analysis of the quantitative data were conducted. Qualitative comments from open-ended questions were reviewed, coded, and divided into themes. We also offer information on the cost and replicability of the Academy. Residents rated most components of the Academy as "very good" or "excellent." Satisfaction scores were higher among residents in primary care training programs than among residents in nonprimary care programs for most Academy elements. Qualitative data demonstrated an overall positive effect on resident knowledge and attitudes about community resource availability for underserved patients, and the challenges of poor patients to access high-quality health care. The Resident Academy orientation improved knowledge and attitudes of new residents before the start of residency, and residents were satisfied with the experience. The commitment of institutional leaders is essential for success.

  8. Increased coronary intervention rate among diabetic patients with poor glycaemic control: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Süha; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Barındık, Nadir; İmren, Ersin; Peker, Yüksel

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between glycaemic control and coronary artery disease (CAD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is controversial. In the current cross-sectional study, we addressed the relationship between Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values and the need for revascularization among diabetic patients undergoing coronary angiography. A total of 301 consecutive patients with known T2DM (age 61.8±10.1 years, 46.2% women) requiring coronary angiography due to CAD symptoms were included. T2DM patients were categorized into two groups based on their HbA1c values 93 (30.9%) diabetics with good glycaemic control (HbA1c≤7%), and 208 (69.1%) diabetics with poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7%). A total of 123 patients (40.9%) required revascularization. The revascularization rate was 28.0% among T2DM patients with good glycaemic control and 46.6% among T2DM patients with poor glycaemic control, respectively (p=0.002). In a logistic regression analysis, the need for revascularization was predicted by poor glycaemic control (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.32-3.82; p=0.003) adjusted for age, gender, Body-Mass-Index and diabetes duration. Moreover, there was a linear relationship between HbA1c values and number of affected coronary arteries (r= 0.169; p=0.003). Our data suggest that there is a close association between poor glycaemic control and increased revascularization rate in T2DM, which should be considered in primary and secondary prevention models. PMID:24579965

  9. The Cardiovascular Intervention Improvement Telemedicine Study (CITIES): rationale for a tailored behavioral and educational pharmacist-administered intervention for achieving cardiovascular disease risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Zullig, Leah L; Melnyk, S Dee; Stechuchak, Karen M; McCant, Felicia; Danus, Susanne; Oddone, Eugene; Bastian, Lori; Olsen, Maren; Edelman, David; Rakley, Susan; Morey, Miriam; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are significant, but often preventable, contributors to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Medication and behavioral nonadherence are significant barriers to successful hypertension, hyperlidemia, and diabetes management. Our objective was to describe the theoretical framework underlying a tailored behavioral and educational pharmacist-administered intervention for achieving CVD risk reduction. Adults with poorly controlled hypertension and/or hyperlipidemia were enrolled from three outpatient primary care clinics associated with the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Durham, NC). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a pharmacist-administered, tailored, 1-year telephone-based intervention or usual care. The goal of the study was to reduce the risk for CVD through a theory-driven intervention to increase medication adherence and improve health behaviors. Enrollment began in November 2011 and is ongoing. The target sample size is 500 patients. The Cardiovascular Intervention Improvement Telemedicine Study (CITIES) intervention has been designed with a strong theoretical underpinning. The theoretical foundation and intervention are designed to encourage patients with multiple comorbidities and poorly controlled CVD risk factors to engage in home-based monitoring and tailored telephone-based interventions. Evidence suggests that clinical pharmacist-administered telephone-based interventions may be efficiently integrated into primary care for patients with poorly controlled CVD risk factors.

  10. The Cardiovascular Intervention Improvement Telemedicine Study (CITIES): Rationale for a Tailored Behavioral and Educational Pharmacist-Administered Intervention for Achieving Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L.; Melnyk, S. Dee; Stechuchak, Karen M.; McCant, Felicia; Danus, Susanne; Oddone, Eugene; Bastian, Lori; Olsen, Maren; Edelman, David; Rakley, Susan; Morey, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are significant, but often preventable, contributors to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Medication and behavioral nonadherence are significant barriers to successful hypertension, hyperlidemia, and diabetes management. Our objective was to describe the theoretical framework underlying a tailored behavioral and educational pharmacist-administered intervention for achieving CVD risk reduction. Materials and Methods: Adults with poorly controlled hypertension and/or hyperlipidemia were enrolled from three outpatient primary care clinics associated with the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Durham, NC). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a pharmacist-administered, tailored, 1-year telephone-based intervention or usual care. The goal of the study was to reduce the risk for CVD through a theory-driven intervention to increase medication adherence and improve health behaviors. Results: Enrollment began in November 2011 and is ongoing. The target sample size is 500 patients. Conclusions: The Cardiovascular Intervention Improvement Telemedicine Study (CITIES) intervention has been designed with a strong theoretical underpinning. The theoretical foundation and intervention are designed to encourage patients with multiple comorbidities and poorly controlled CVD risk factors to engage in home-based monitoring and tailored telephone-based interventions. Evidence suggests that clinical pharmacist-administered telephone-based interventions may be efficiently integrated into primary care for patients with poorly controlled CVD risk factors. PMID:24303930

  11. Reducing violence in poor urban areas of Honduras by building community resilience through community-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Nord, Nete Sloth; Kjaerulf, Finn; Almendarez, Juan; Rodas, Victor Morales; Castro, Julio

    2016-11-01

    To examine the impact of a 3 year community-based violence prevention intervention on risk of violence and social capital in two poor urban communities in Honduras in 2011-2014. A quasi-experimental design pre and post implementation of the intervention was conducted based on data from two randomly selected samples using the same structured questionnaire in 2011 and in 2014. Community members had a 42 % lower risk of violence in 2014 compared to 2011. There was a positive relation between participation in the intervention and structural social capital, and participants had more than twice the likelihood of engaging in citizenship activities compared to the general population. The intervention contributed to decreasing violence and increasing community resilience in two urban areas in Honduras. Citizenship activities and active community participation in the violence prevention agenda rather than social trust and cohesion characteristics was affected by the intervention. This research introduces important lessons learned to future researchers aiming to retrieve very sensitive data in a similarly violent setting, and provides strong research opportunities within areas, which to this date remain undiscovered.

  12. Efficacy of a brief multifactorial adherence-based intervention on reducing the blood pressure of patients with poor adherence: protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lowering of blood pressure by antihypertensive drugs reduces the risks of cardiovascular events, stroke, and total mortality. However, poor adherence to antihypertensive medications reduces their effectiveness and increases the risk of adverse events. In terms of relative risk reduction, an improvement in medication adherence could be as effective as the development of a new drug. Methods/Design The proposed randomized controlled trial will include patients with a low adherence to medication and uncontrolled blood pressure. The intervention group will receive a multifactorial intervention during the first, third, and ninth months, to improve adherence. This intervention will include motivational interviews, pill reminders, family support, blood pressure self-recording, and simplification of the dosing regimen. Measurement The primary outcome is systolic blood pressure. The secondary outcomes are diastolic blood pressure, proportion of patients with adequately controlled blood pressure, and total cost. Discussion The trial will evaluate the impact of a multifactorial adherence intervention in routine clinical practice. Ethical approval was given by the Ethical Committee on Human Research of Balearic islands, Spain (approval number IB 969/08 PI). Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN21229328 PMID:20868531

  13. An Intervention to Improve School and Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Becky

    2008-01-01

    Georgia Leadership Institute for School Improvement (GLISI) used ISPI's 10 Standards of Performance Technology to share the design, development, and implementation of an intervention striving to help Georgia districts and schools share their success stories in a clear and concise format. This intervention took the form of a PowerPoint…

  14. Targeted interventions of ultra-poor women in rural Rangpur, Bangladesh: do they make a difference to appropriate cooking practices, food habits and sanitation?

    PubMed

    Yeasmin, Lubna; Akter, Shamima; Shahidul Islam, A M; Mizanur Rahman, Md; Akashi, Hidechika; Jesmin, Subrina

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to assess whether teaching good cooking practices, food habits and sanitation to ultra-poor rural women in four rural communities of Rangpur district, Bangladesh, with a high density of extremely poor households, would improve the overall health of the community. The sample size was 200 respondents combined from the target and control areas. In the target area, twelve in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions were undertaken for knowledge dissemination. Descriptive and mixed-model analyses were performed. The results show that washing hands with soap was 1.35 times more likely in the target than the control group (p<0.01). Further, after intervention, there was a significant improvement in hand-washing behaviour: before cutting vegetables, preparing food, feeding a child and eating, and after defecating and cleaning a baby (p<0.05). Also, the target group was more likely to moderately and briefly boil their vegetables and were 19% less likely to use maximum heat when cooking vegetables than the control group (p<0.01). Improved knowledge and skills training of ultra-poor women reduces the loss of nutrients during food preparation and increases their hygiene through hand-washing in every-day life.

  15. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  16. An Educational Intervention to Improve Residents' Inpatient Charting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Joyce A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This report describes an educational intervention designed to improve psychiatry residents' inpatient charting skills. Methods: The residency training committee formed a multidisciplinary team to study the problem by using quality improvement principles. The team hypothesized that residents' charting would improve with education about…

  17. Assessing resources for implementing a community directed intervention (CDI) strategy in delivering multiple health interventions in urban poor communities in Southwestern Nigeria: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many simple, affordable and effective disease control measures have had limited impact due to poor access especially by the poorer populations (urban and rural) and inadequate community participation. A proven strategy to address the problem of access to health interventions is the Community Directed Interventions (CDI) approach, which has been used successfully in rural areas. This study was carried out to assess resources for the use of a CDI strategy in delivering health interventions in poorly-served urban communities in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods A formative study was carried out in eight urban poor communities in the Ibadan metropolis in the Oyo State. Qualitative methods comprising 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) with community members and 73 key informant interviews (KIIs) with community leaders, programme managers, community-based organisations (CBOs), non-government organisations (NGOs) and other stakeholders at federal, state and local government levels were used to collect data to determine prevalent diseases and healthcare delivery services, as well as to explore the potential resources for a CDI strategy. All interviews were audio recorded. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Malaria, upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhoea and measles were found to be prevalent in children, while hypertension and diabetes topped the list of diseases among adults. Healthcare was financed mainly by out-of-pocket expenses. Cost and location were identified as hindrances to utilisation of health facilities; informal cooperatives (esusu) were available to support those who could not pay for care. Immunisation, nutrition, reproductive health, tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy, environmental health, malaria and HIV/AIDs control programmes were the ongoing interventions. Delivery strategies included house-to-house, home-based treatment, health education and campaigns. Community participation in the planning, implementation and monitoring of

  18. Using the template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR) as a tool for improving the design and reporting of manual therapy interventions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Gerard; Cerritelli, Francesco; Urrutia, Gerard

    2016-08-01

    The detailed reporting of any research intervention is crucial to evaluate its applicability into a routinely practice-based context. However, it has been estimated that, especially in non-pharmacological interventions, the published literature typically includes incomplete intervention details. In the field of manual medicine, where interventions are delivered with a high degree of individualization and variability, poorly reported studies could compromise internal and external validity of the results. Among the various initiatives that have been undertaken to improve the intervention description, the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) has to be highlighted as the most promising. TIDieR offers both to researchers and clinicians a helpful and comprehensive guidance on how manual therapy interventions have to be designed and reported, taking into account the clinical complexity of manual therapy and the need to satisfy research gold standards.

  19. Improvement of dissolution property of poorly water-soluble drug by supercritical freeze granulation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Ryoichi; Hara, Yuko; Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Watano, Satoru

    2009-10-01

    The dissolution property of the poorly water-soluble drug, flurbiprofen (FP) was improved by a novel supercritical freeze granulation using supercritical carbon dioxide. Supercritical freeze granulation was defined as a production method of the granulated substances by using the dry ice to generate intentionally for the rapid atomization of the supercritical carbon dioxide to the atmospheric pressure. This process utilized a rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) process with the mixture of the drug and lactose. In the supercritical freeze granulation, needle-like FP fine particles were obtained which adhered to the surface of lactose particles, which did not dissolve in supercritical carbon dioxide. The number of FP particles that adhered to the surface of particles decreased with an increase in the ratio of lactose added, leading to markedly improve the dissolution rate. This improvement was caused not only by the increase in the specific surface area but also the improvement of the dispersibility of FP in water. It is thus concluded that the supercritical freeze granulation is a useful technique to improve the dissolution property of the poorly water-soluble flurbiprofen.

  20. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  1. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  2. Improving Student Achievement through Behavior Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Gina; And Others

    This report describes a program that was designed to identify and modify disruptive student behavior and improve academic performance. The targeted fifth grade class had been noted for inappropriate behavior and sporadic academic success, with problems documented by teacher observation surveys and self-reporting by students. Probable causes…

  3. Nutrition interventions need improved operational capacity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Lancet's Child Survival Series was a galvanising manifesto: it focused action plans to improve the well-being of children worldwide. However, the authors did not address in detail the importance of nutrition in child survival, and thus the current Undernutrition Series was born. This welcome n...

  4. Multifaceted Prospective Memory Intervention to Improve Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Kathie C.; Einstein, Gilles O.; Morrow, Daniel G.; Koerner, Kari M.; Hepworth, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Older adults do not take medication as prescribed, diminishing the benefits of treatment and increasing costs to individuals and society. A multifaceted prospective memory intervention for improving adherence to antihypertensive medication was tested and assessed if executive function/working memory processes moderated intervention effects. Design A two group longitudinal randomized control trial was used. Setting and Participants and Measurements The sample consisted of community-based older adults (≥ 65 years of age) without signs of dementia or symptoms of severe depression who were self-managing prescribed medication. Following four weeks of initial adherence monitoring using a medication event monitoring system (MEMS®), individuals with 90% or less adherence were randomly assigned to groups. Intervention The prospective memory intervention was designed to provide strategies that switch older adults from relying on executive function/working memory processes (that show effects of cognitive aging) to mostly automatic associative processes (that are relatively spared with normal aging) for remembering to take one’s medications. Strategies included establishing a routine, establishing cues strongly associated with medication taking actions, performing the action immediately upon thinking about it, using a medication organizer, and imagining medication taking to enhance encoding and improve cuing. Results There was significant improvement in adherence for the intervention group (57% at baseline to 78% post intervention), but most of these gains were lost after 5 months. The control condition started at 68%, was stable during the intervention, but dropped to 62%. Executive function/working memory moderated the intervention effect, with the intervention producing greater benefit for those with lower executive function/working memory. Conclusion The intervention improved adherence, but the benefits were not sustained. Further research is

  5. Encapsulation of poorly water-soluble drugs into organic nanotubes for improving drug dissolution.

    PubMed

    Moribe, Kunikazu; Makishima, Takashi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Liu, Nan; Limwikrant, Waree; Ding, Wuxiao; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2014-07-20

    Hydrocortisone (HC), a poorly water-soluble drug, was encapsulated within organic nanotubes (ONTs), which were formed via the self-assembly of N-{12-[(2-α,β-d-glucopyranosyl) carbamoyl]dodecanyl}-glycylglycylglycine acid. The stability of the ONTs was evaluated in ten organic solvents, of differing polarities, by field emission transmission electron microscopy. The ONTs maintained their stable tubular structure in the highly polar solvents, such as ethanol and acetone. Furthermore, solution-state (1)H-NMR spectroscopy confirmed that they were practically insoluble in acetone at 25°C (0.015 mg/mL). HC-loaded ONTs were prepared by solvent evaporation using acetone. A sample with a 3/7 weight ratio of HC/ONT was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, which confirmed the presence of a halo pattern and the absence of any crystalline HC peak. HC peak broadening, observed by solid-state (13)C-NMR measurements of the evaporated sample, indicated the absence of HC crystals. These results indicated that HC was successfully encapsulated in ONT as an amorphous state. Improvements of the HC dissolution rate were clearly observed in aqueous media at both pH 1.2 and 6.8, probably due to HC amorphization in the ONTs. Phenytoin, another poorly water-soluble drug, also showed significant dissolution improvement upon ONT encapsulation. Therefore, ONTs can serve as an alternative pharmaceutical excipient to enhance the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  6. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-03-09

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention.

  7. Bioavailability Improvement Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs Based on the Supersaturation Mechanism: An Update.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meiyan; Gong, Wei; Wang, Yuli; Shan, Li; Li, Ying; Gao, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The formulation development for poorly soluble drugs still remains a challenge. Supersaturating drug delivery systems (SDDS) or drug delivery systems based on supersaturating provide a promising way to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. In supersaturable formulations, drug concentration exceeds the equilibrium solubility when exposed to gastrointestinal fluids, and the supersaturation state is maintained long enough to be absorbed, resulting in compromised bioavailability. In this article, the mechanism of generating and maintaining supersaturation and the evaluation methods of supersaturation assays are discussed. Recent advances in different drug delivery systems based on supersaturating are the focus and are discussed in detail.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  8. Eggs: the uncracked potential for improving maternal and young child nutrition among the world's poor.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Lutter, Chessa K; Bunn, David A; Stewart, Christine P

    2014-06-01

    Eggs have been consumed throughout human history, though the full potential of this nutritionally complete food has yet to be realized in many resource-poor settings around the world. Eggs provide essential fatty acids, proteins, choline, vitamins A and B12 , selenium, and other critical nutrients at levels above or comparable to those found in other animal-source foods, but they are relatively more affordable. Cultural beliefs about the digestibility and cleanliness of eggs, as well as environmental concerns arising from hygiene practices and toxin exposures, remain as barriers to widespread egg consumption. There is also regional variability in egg intake levels. In Latin American countries, on average, greater proportions of young children consume eggs than in Asian or African countries. In China and Indonesia, nutrition education and social marketing have been associated with greater amounts of eggs in the diets of young children, though generally, evidence from interventions is minimal. Homestead chicken-and-egg production with appropriate vaccination, extension service, and other supports can simultaneously address poverty and nutrition in very poor rural households. With undernutrition remaining a significant problem in many parts of the world, eggs may be an uncracked part of the solution.

  9. Do multiple micronutrient interventions improve child health, growth, and development?

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Goldenberg, Tamar; Allen, Lindsay H

    2011-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are common and often co-occur in many developing countries. Several studies have examined the benefits of providing multiple micronutrient (MMN) interventions during pregnancy and childhood, but the implications for programs remain unclear. The key objective of this review is to summarize what is known about the efficacy of MMN interventions during early childhood on functional outcomes, namely, child health, survival, growth, and development, to guide policy and identify gaps for future research. We identified review articles including meta-analyses and intervention studies that evaluated the benefits of MMN interventions (3 or more micronutrients) in children (<5 y of age) using Pubmed and EMBASE. Several controlled trials (n = 45) and meta-analyses (n = 6) have evaluated the effects of MMN interventions primarily for child morbidity, anemia, and growth. Two studies found no effects on child mortality. The findings for respiratory illness and diarrhea are mixed, although suggestive of benefit when provided as fortified foods. There is evidence from several controlled trials (>25) and 2 meta-analyses that MMN interventions improve hemoglobin concentrations and reduce anemia, but the effects were small compared to providing only iron or iron with folic acid. Two recent meta-analyses and several intervention trials also indicated that MMN interventions improve linear growth compared to providing a placebo or single nutrients. Much less is known about the effects on MMN interventions during early childhood on motor and mental development. In summary, MMN interventions may result in improved outcomes for children in settings where micronutrient deficiencies are widespread.

  10. Addressing poor retention of infants exposed to HIV: a quality improvement study in rural Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Ciampa, Philip J.; Tique, Jose; Jumá, Nilton; Sidat, Mohsin; Moon, Troy D.; Rothman, Russell L.; Vermund, Sten H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Early infant diagnosis (EID) is the first step in HIV care, yet 75% of HIV-exposed infants born at two hospitals in Mozambique failed to access EID. Design Before/after study. Setting Two district hospitals in rural Mozambique. Participants HIV-infected mother/HIV-exposed infant pairs (N=791). Intervention We planned two phases of improvement using quality improvement methods. In Phase 1, we enhanced referral by offering direct accompaniment of new mothers to the EID suite, increasing privacy, and opening a medical record for infants prior to post-partum discharge. In Phase 2, we added enhanced referral activity as an item on the maternity register to standardize the process of referral. Main outcome measure(s) The proportion of HIV-infected mothers who accessed EID for their infant <90 days of life. Results We tracked mother/infant pairs from June 2009 to March 2011 (Phase 0: N=144; Phase 1: N=479; Phase 2: N=168), compared study measures for mother/infant pairs across intervention phases with chi-square, estimated time-to-EID by Kaplan-Meier, and determined the likelihood of EID by Cox regression after adjusting for likely barriers to follow-up. At baseline (phase 0), 25.7% of infants accessed EID <90 days. EID improved to 32.2% after Phase 1; only 17.3% received enhanced referral. After Phase 2, 61.9% received enhanced referral and 39.9% accessed EID, a significant three-phase improvement (p=0.007). In adjusted analysis, the likelihood of EID at any time was higher in the Phase 2 group vs. Phase 0 (aHR:1.68, 95%CI:1.19-2.37, p=0.003). Conclusions Retention improved by 55% with a simple referral enhancement. Quality improvement efforts could help improve care in Mozambique and other low-resource countries. PMID:22622077

  11. Effectiveness of a structured educational intervention using psychological delivery methods in children and adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes: a cluster-randomized controlled trial of the CASCADE intervention.

    PubMed

    Christie, Deborah; Thompson, Rebecca; Sawtell, Mary; Allen, Elizabeth; Cairns, John; Smith, Felicity; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Hargreaves, Katrina; Ingold, Anne; Brooks, Lucy; Wiggins, Meg; Oliver, Sandy; Jones, Rebecca; Elbourne, Diana; Santos, Andreia; Wong, Ian C K; O'Neil, Simon; Strange, Vicki; Hindmarsh, Peter; Annan, Francesca; Viner, Russell M

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children and adolescents is increasing worldwide with a particular increase in children <5 years. Fewer than 1 in 6 children and adolescents achieve recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values. A pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy of a clinic-based structured educational group incorporating psychological approaches to improve long-term glycemic control, quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children and adolescents with T1D. 28 pediatric diabetes services were randomized to deliver the intervention or standard care. 362 children (8-16 years) with HbA1c≥8.5% were recruited. Outcomes were HbA1c at 12 and 24 months, hypoglycemia, admissions, self-management skills, intervention compliance, emotional and behavioral adjustment, and quality of life. A process evaluation collected data from key stakeholder groups in order to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the intervention. 298/362 patients (82.3%) provided HbA1c at 12 months and 284/362 (78.5%) at 24 months. The intervention did not improve HbA1c at 12 months (intervention effect 0.11, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.50, p=0.584), or 24 months (intervention effect 0.03, 95% CI -0.36 to 0.41, p=0.891). There were no significant changes in remaining outcomes. 96/180 (53%) families in the intervention arm attended at least 1 module. The number of modules attended did not affect outcome. Reasons for low uptake included difficulties organizing groups and work and school commitments. Those with highest HbA1cs were less likely to attend. Mean cost of the intervention was £683 per child. Significant challenges in the delivery of a structured education intervention using psychological techniques to enhance engagement and behavior change delivered by diabetes nurses and dietitians in routine clinical practice were found. The intervention did not improve HbA1c in children and adolescents with poor control. ISRCTN52537669, results.

  12. Effectiveness of a structured educational intervention using psychological delivery methods in children and adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes: a cluster-randomized controlled trial of the CASCADE intervention

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Deborah; Thompson, Rebecca; Sawtell, Mary; Allen, Elizabeth; Cairns, John; Smith, Felicity; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Hargreaves, Katrina; Ingold, Anne; Brooks, Lucy; Wiggins, Meg; Oliver, Sandy; Jones, Rebecca; Elbourne, Diana; Santos, Andreia; Wong, Ian C K; O'Neil, Simon; Strange, Vicki; Hindmarsh, Peter; Annan, Francesca; Viner, Russell M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children and adolescents is increasing worldwide with a particular increase in children <5 years. Fewer than 1 in 6 children and adolescents achieve recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values. Methods A pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy of a clinic-based structured educational group incorporating psychological approaches to improve long-term glycemic control, quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children and adolescents with T1D. 28 pediatric diabetes services were randomized to deliver the intervention or standard care. 362 children (8–16 years) with HbA1c≥8.5% were recruited. Outcomes were HbA1c at 12 and 24 months, hypoglycemia, admissions, self-management skills, intervention compliance, emotional and behavioral adjustment, and quality of life. A process evaluation collected data from key stakeholder groups in order to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the intervention. Results 298/362 patients (82.3%) provided HbA1c at 12 months and 284/362 (78.5%) at 24 months. The intervention did not improve HbA1c at 12 months (intervention effect 0.11, 95% CI −0.28 to 0.50, p=0.584), or 24 months (intervention effect 0.03, 95% CI −0.36 to 0.41, p=0.891). There were no significant changes in remaining outcomes. 96/180 (53%) families in the intervention arm attended at least 1 module. The number of modules attended did not affect outcome. Reasons for low uptake included difficulties organizing groups and work and school commitments. Those with highest HbA1cs were less likely to attend. Mean cost of the intervention was £683 per child. Conclusions Significant challenges in the delivery of a structured education intervention using psychological techniques to enhance engagement and behavior change delivered by diabetes nurses and dietitians in routine clinical practice were found. The intervention did not improve HbA1c in children and adolescents with poor control

  13. Single and double layer centrifugation improve the quality of cryopreserved bovine sperm from poor quality ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Alessia; Carluccio, Augusto; Wegher, Laura; Robbe, Domenico; Befacchia, Giovanni; Contri, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient centrifugation was reported as a technique of semen preparation in assisted reproductive techniques in humans and animals. This technique was found to be efficient in improving semen quality after harmful techniques such as cryopreservation. Recently a modified technique, single layer centrifugation, was proposed as a technique providing a large amount of high quality spermatozoa, and this treatment was performed before conservation. Single layer centrifugation has been studied prevalently in stallions and in boars, but limited data were available for bulls. Occasionally bulls are known to experience a transient reduction in semen quality, thus techniques that allow improvement in semen quality could be applied in this context. The aim of this study was the evaluation of single layer and double layer centrifugation by the use of iodixanol, compared with conventional centrifugation and non-centrifuged semen, on the sperm characteristics during the cryopreservation process in bulls with normal and poor semen quality. Single layer centrifugation and double layer centrifugation both significantly increased the percentage of normal spermatozoa and decreased the percentage of non-sperm cells in poor quality samples, while both were ineffective in those of normal quality. Sperm characteristics in poor quality samples increased after single layer centrifugation and double layer centrifugation, reaching values similar to those recorded in normal samples, and this trend is maintained after equilibration and after cryopreservation. On the other hand, SLC and DLC resulted in a consistent reduction in the spermatozoa recovered, and this resulted in a reduction of the absolute amount of spermatozoa cryopreserved in the normal samples, without a clear improvement in sperm characteristics in this type of sample. These data suggested that both SLC and DLC could be performed in practice, but their application should be limited to the cases in which the quality of

  14. Interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Clasen, T; Roberts, I; Rabie, T; Schmidt, W; Cairncross, S

    2006-07-19

    Diarrhoeal diseases are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, especially among young children in developing countries. While many of the infectious agents associated with diarrhoeal disease are potentially waterborne, the evidence for reducing diarrhoea in settings where it is endemic by improving the microbiological quality of drinking water has been equivocal. To assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (December 2005), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 4), MEDLINE (December 2005), EMBASE (December 2005), and LILACS (December 2005). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked references from identified studies. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing interventions aimed at improving the microbiological quality of drinking water with no intervention in children and adults living in settings where diarrhoeal disease is endemic. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used meta-analyses to estimate pooled measures of effect, where appropriate, and investigated potential sources of heterogeneity using subgroup analyses. Thirty trials (including 38 independent comparisons) covering over 53,000 participants met the inclusion criteria. Differences between the trials limited the comparability of results and pooling by meta-analysis. In general, the evidence suggests that interventions to improve the microbiological quality of drinking water are effective in preventing diarrhoea both for populations of all ages and children less than five years old. Subgroup analyses suggest that household interventions are more effective in preventing diarrhoea than interventions at the water source. Effectiveness was positively associated with compliance. Effectiveness was not conditioned on the presence of improved

  15. Improving Breastfeeding Behaviors: Evidence from Two Decades of Intervention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Cynthia P.

    This report summarizes research on interventions intended to improve four key breastfeeding behaviors: early initiation of breastfeeding, feeding of colostrum to newborns, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 0-6 months, and continued breastfeeding through the second year and beyond. It clarifies what is known about improving these practices in…

  16. Improving resistance and resiliency through crisis intervention training.

    PubMed

    Chan, Angelina O M; Chan, Yiong Huak; Kee, Jass P C

    2012-01-01

    To our knowledge no research has been done on the impact of crisis intervention training programs on resistance and resiliency. This paper describes the use of a localized crisis intervention course and its impact on resistance and resiliency in the participants after 2 days of training. Participants attending the localized version of ICISF Individual Crisis Intervention and Peer Support courses participated in a pre-course quiz and a post-course quiz. The overall resistance and resiliency scores improved at the end of the localized 2-Day Individual Crisis Intervention and Peer Support course. Organizations should view the training of employees in mental health and crisis intervention as contributing to the overall resiliency of the organization, in addition to providing services that facilitate the resilience and recovery of employees affected by personal or workplace stress or critical incidents.

  17. [Improvement of intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs by various sugar esters].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akira; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Effects of sucrose fatty acid esters (sugar esters) on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs were examined by an in situ closed loop method in rats. 5(6)-Carboxyfluorescein (CF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) with various molecular weights were used as model drugs of poorly absorbable drugs. The absorption of CF from the rat small intestine was significantly enhanced in the presence of various sugar esters and a maximal absorption enhancing effect was observed in the presence of 0.5%(w/v) S-1670. The absorption enhancing effect of S-1670 in the small intestine decreased as the molecular weights of drugs increased. Moreover, we evaluated the intestinal membrane damage with or without various sugar esters. These sugar esters (0.5%(w/v)) did not increase the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), suggesting that these sugar esters did not cause serious membrane damage to the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, these sugar esters increased membrane fluidity of lipid layers of the intestinal brush border membranes and decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells. Therefore, these findings suggested that these sugar esters might improve the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs via a transcellular and a paracellular pathways.

  18. Mobile phone-based interventions for improving contraception use.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris; Gold, Judy; Ngo, Thoai D; Sumpter, Colin; Free, Caroline

    2015-06-26

    Contraception provides significant benefits for women's and children's health, yet an estimated 225 million women had an unmet need for modern contraceptive methods in 2014. Interventions delivered by mobile phone have been demonstrated to be effective in other health areas, but their effects on use of contraception have not been established. To assess the effects of mobile phone-based interventions for improving contraception use. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of client-provider interventions delivered by mobile phone to improve contraception use compared with standard care or another intervention. We searched the electronic databases Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, PsycINFO, POPLINE, Africa-Wide Information and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) from January 1993 to October 2014, as well as clinical trials registries, online mHealth resources and abstracts from key conferences. Randomised controlled trials of mobile phone-based interventions to improve any form of contraception use amongst users or potential users of contraception. Outcome measures included uptake of contraception, measures of adherence, pregnancy and abortion. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of studies retrieved using the search strategy and extracted data from the included studies. We calculated the Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Differences in interventions and outcome measures did not permit us to undertake meta-analysis. Five RCTs met our inclusion criteria. Three trials aimed to improve adherence to a specific method of contraception amongst existing or new contraception users by comparing automated text message interventions versus standard care. Two trials aimed to improve both uptake and adherence, not limited to one method, in

  19. Mesoporous silica-based dosage forms improve release characteristics of poorly soluble drugs: case example fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Dressman, Jennifer B; Herbert, Elisabeth; Wieber, Alena; Birk, Gudrun; Saal, Christoph; Lubda, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Mesoporous silica-based dosage forms offer the potential for improving the absorption of poorly soluble drugs after oral administration. In this investigation, fenofibrate was used as a model drug to study the ability of monomodal ('PSP A') and bimodal ('PSP B') porous silica to improve release by a 'spring' effect in in vitro biorelevant dissolution tests. Also investigated was the addition of various polymers to provide a 'parachute' effect, that is, to keep the drug in solution after its release. Loading fenofibrate onto PSP A or PSP B porous silica substantially improved the dissolution profile of fenofibrate under fasted state conditions compared with both pure drug and the marketed product, TriCor® 145 mg. Adding a polymer such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate, polyvinylpyrrolidone or copovidon (HPMCAS, PVP or PVPVA) sustains the higher release of fenofibrate from the PSP A silica, resulting in a combination 'spring and parachute' effect - loading the drug onto the silica causes a 'spring' effect while the polymer enhances the spring effect (HPMCAS, PVP) and adds a sustaining 'parachute'. Interestingly, a silica to polymer ratio of 4:1 w/w appears to have an optimal effect for fenofibrate (HPMCAS, PVP). Dissolution results under conditions simulating the fasted state in the small intestine with the PSP A or the PSP B silica with HPMCAS added in a 4:1 w/w ratio show very substantial improvement over the marketed, nanosized product (TriCor® 145 mg). Further experiments to determine whether the highly positive effects on fenofibrate release observed with the silica prototypes investigated to date can be translated to further poorly soluble drugs and to what extent they translate into improved in-vivo performance are warranted. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Superoxide dismutase and taurine supplementation improves in vitro blastocyst yield from poor-quality feline oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ochota, Małgorzata; Pasieka, Anna; Niżański, Wojciech

    2016-03-15

    Blastocyst production in vitro seems to be crucial part of assisted reproduction techniques in feline species. However, the results of cats' oocyte maturation and embryo development are still lower than those in other species. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the supplementation with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and taurine during maturation or culture would improve the blastocyst yield obtained from lower grades of oocytes, that are usually discarded, as not suitable for further in vitro purposes. To investigate the effect of antioxidants' addition, the good- and poor-quality oocytes, were cultured with the addition of 10-mmol taurine and 600 UI/mL SOD. The nuclear maturity, embryo development, and blastocyst quality were subsequently assessed. In control group, without antioxidant supplementation, significantly less poor-quality oocytes matured (42% vs. 62%) and more degenerated (35% vs. 20%), comparing to the experimental group supplemented with SOD and taurine. The amount of obtained blastocyst was much higher, when poor quality oocytes were supplemented with SOD and taurine (supplementation to IVM-4%; supplementation to IVC-5.5%; supplementation to IVM and IVC-5.9% of blastocyst), comparing to not supplemented control group (1.3%). The best blastocysts were obtained when poor oocytes had antioxidants added only during embryo culture (185 ± 13.4 blastomeres vs. 100 ± 1.5 in control). In the present study, we reported that the lower grades of oocytes can better mature and form significantly more blastocysts with better quality, when cultured with addition of SOD and taurine.

  1. Dual intervention to improve pathologic staging of resectable lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Ramirez, Robert A; Wang, Christopher G; Miller, Laura E; Smeltzer, Matthew M; Sareen, Srishti; Javed, Ahmed Y; Robbins, Samuel G; Khandekar, Alim; Wolf, Bradley A; Gibson, Jeffrey; Spencer, David; Robbins, Edward T

    2013-12-01

    Detection of lymph node metastasis is of immense prognostic value in patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but routine pathologic nodal staging is suboptimal. To determine the impact on the rate of detection of nodal metastasis, we tested dual intervention with a prelabeled lymph node specimen collection kit to improve intraoperative node dissection and a fastidious gross dissection of the lung resection specimen for intrapulmonary lymph nodes. We matched dual-intervention cases with controls staged using standard surgical specimen collection and pathologic examination protocols. Controls were hierarchically matched for extent of resection, laterality, surgeon, pathologist, and T stage. All statistical comparisons were made with exact conditional logistic regression, to account for the matched case-control design. One hundred dual-intervention cases were matched with 100 controls. The dual interventions resulted in approximately a 3-fold increase in the number of lymph nodes examined and the number of lymph nodes with metastasis detected; they also increased the proportion of patients with lymph node metastasis from 21% to 35% (p = 0.02). There were strong trends toward higher aggregate stage distribution, and eligibility for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in the dual-intervention cases. The combination of interventions improved the thoroughness and accuracy of pathologic nodal staging. A prospective randomized trial to test the survival impact of the dual interventions is warranted. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Morphological awareness assessment and intervention to improve language and literacy.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Julie A; Gibson, Frances E

    2015-02-01

    Morphological awareness positively influences language and literacy development and may be an ideal intervention focus for improving vocabulary, sight word reading, reading decoding, and reading comprehension in students with and without language and literacy deficits. This article will provide supporting theory, research, and strategies for implementing morphological awareness intervention with students with language and literacy deficits. Additionally, functional connections are explored through the incorporation and application of morphological awareness intervention in academic literacy contexts linked to Common Core State Standards. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing practices for hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Davey, Peter; Brown, Erwin; Charani, Esmita; Fenelon, Lynda; Gould, Ian M; Holmes, Alison; Ramsay, Craig R; Wiffen, Philip J; Wilcox, Mark

    2013-04-30

    included any professional or structural interventions as defined by EPOC. The intervention had to include a component that aimed to improve antibiotic prescribing to hospital inpatients, either by increasing effective treatment or by reducing unnecessary treatment. The results had to include interpretable data about the effect of the intervention on antibiotic prescribing or microbial outcomes or relevant clinical outcomes. Two authors extracted data and assessed quality. We performed meta-regression of ITS studies to compare the results of persuasive and restrictive interventions. Persuasive interventions advised physicians about how to prescribe or gave them feedback about how they prescribed. Restrictive interventions put a limit on how they prescribed; for example, physicians had to have approval from an infection specialist in order to prescribe an antibiotic. We standardized the results of some ITS studies so that they are on the same scale (percent change in outcome), thereby facilitating comparisons of different interventions. To do this, we used the change in level and change in slope to estimate the effect size with increasing time after the intervention (one month, six months, one year, etc) as the percent change in level at each time point. We did not extrapolate beyond the end of data collection after the intervention. The meta-regression was performed using standard weighted linear regression with the standard errors of the coefficients adjusted where necessary. For this update we included 89 studies that reported 95 interventions. Of the 89 studies, 56 were ITSs (of which 4 were controlled ITSs), 25 were RCT (of which 5 were cluster-RCTs), 5 were CBAs and 3 were CCTs (of which 1 was a cluster-CCT).Most (80/95, 84%) of the interventions targeted the antibiotic prescribed (choice of antibiotic, timing of first dose and route of administration). The remaining 15 interventions aimed to change exposure of patients to antibiotics by targeting the decision to treat

  4. A multifaceted education intervention for improving family physicians' case management.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Flores-Hernández, Sergio; Tomé-Sandoval, Patricia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    The Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) is the largest public health care system in Mexico. IMSS family physicians' management of clinical problems is frequently not consistent with published evidence. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve management of acute respiratory infections (ARI) by IMSS family physicians. A non-randomized pre-post intervention with comparison group design was conducted in eight IMSS family medicine clinics in which 106 family physicians practiced. An evidence-based clinical guideline for ARI management was developed, and clinical tutors were trained. The three-stage intervention comprised interactive workshops, individual tutorials, and round-table peer-review sessions. The main outcome was appropriate ARI case management. The intervention effect was calculated by using the differences-in-differences model, adjusting for cluster of physicians. In the intervention group, the difference in mean proportion of improvement compared with baseline evaluation was 22.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]=10.3 to 34.9) for appropriate prescription of antibiotics, 29.8% (95% CI=17.2 to 42.4) for indication of worsening signs, and 19.6% (95% CI=11.2 to 28.0) for overall appropriate case management. The comparison group showed no significant changes. The educational intervention improved ARI management. Further studies are needed to analyze organizational implications, cost, sustainability, and effects on health outcomes.

  5. Development of the Community Health Improvement Navigator Database of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Brita; Stanojevich, Joel; Stange, Paul; Jiwani, Nafisa; King, Raymond; Koo, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Summary With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the requirements for hospitals to achieve tax-exempt status include performing a triennial community health needs assessment and developing a plan to address identified needs. To address community health needs, multisector collaborative efforts to improve both health care and non–health care determinants of health outcomes have been the most effective and sustainable. In 2015, CDC released the Community Health Improvement Navigator to facilitate the development of these efforts. This report describes the development of the database of interventions included in the Community Health Improvement Navigator. The database of interventions allows the user to easily search for multisector, collaborative, evidence-based interventions to address the underlying causes of the greatest morbidity and mortality in the United States: tobacco use and exposure, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. PMID:26917110

  6. Comparing the effectiveness of interventions to improve ventilation behavior in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Geelen, L M J; Huijbregts, M A J; Ragas, A M J; Bretveld, R W; Jans, H W A; van Doorn, W J; Evertz, S J C J; van der Zijden, A

    2008-10-01

    Poor air quality in schools has been associated with adverse health effects. Indoor air quality can be improved by increasing ventilation. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different interventions to improve ventilation behavior in primary schools. We used indoor CO(2) concentrations as an indicator. In 81 classes of 20 Dutch primary schools, we applied three different interventions: (i) a class-specific ventilation advice; (ii) the advice combined with a CO(2) warning device and (iii) the advice combined with a teaching package. The effectiveness of the interventions was tested directly after intervention and 6 weeks after intervention by measuring the CO(2) concentrations and comparison with a control group (iv). Before intervention, the CO(2) concentration exceeded 1000 ppm for 64% of the school day. The class-specific ventilation advice without further support appeared an ineffective tool to improve ventilation behavior. The advice in combination with a CO(2) warning device or the teaching package proved effective tools and resulted in lower indoor CO(2) concentrations when compared with the control group. Ventilation was significantly improved, but CO(2) concentrations still exceeded 1000 ppm for more than 40% of the school day. Hence, until ventilation facilities are upgraded, the CO(2) warning device and the teaching package are useful low-cost tools. To improve ventilation behavior and indoor air quality in schools, CO(2) warning device and teaching package combined with a class-specific ventilation advice, are effective tools, while giving the ventilation advice solely, is not effective. Although ventilation is significantly improved through behavioral change, the ventilation rate is still insufficient to maintain good air quality during the full school day. Therefore, the improvement of the ventilation facilities is recommended. Hence, until ventilation facilities in schools are upgraded, the CO(2) warning device and the

  7. Interventions to improve immigrant health. A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Barreda, Gaby; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Holdsworth, Michelle; Salami, Bukola; Rammohan, Anu; Chung, Roger Yat-Nork; Padmadas, Sabu S.; Krafft, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Disparities in health between immigrants and their host populations have been described across countries and continents. Hence, interventions for improving health targeting general populations are not necessarily effective for immigrants. Aims: To conduct a systematic search of the literature evaluating health interventions for immigrants; to map the characteristics of identified studies including range of interventions, immigrant populations and their host countries, clinical areas targeted and reported evaluations, challenges and limitations of the interventions identified. Following the results, to develop recommendations for research in the field. Methods: A scoping review approach was chosen to provide an overview of the type, extent and quantity of research available. Studies were included if they empirically evaluated health interventions targeting immigrants and/or their descendants, included a control group, and were published in English (PubMed and Embase from 1990 to 2015). Results: Most of the 83 studies included were conducted in the USA, encompassed few immigrant groups and used a randomized controlled trial (RCT) or cluster RCT design. Most interventions addressed chronic and non-communicable diseases and attendance at cancer screening services, used individual targeted approaches, targeted adult women and recruited participants from health centres. Outcome measures were often subjective, with the exception of interventions for cardiovascular risk and diabetes. Generally, authors claimed that interventions were beneficial, despite a number of reported limitations. Conclusions: Recommendations for enhancing interventions to improve immigrant health are provided to help researchers, funders and health care commissioners when deciding upon the scope, nature and design of future research in this area. PMID:28339883

  8. Interventions to Improve Adherence in Patients with Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Depont, Fanny; Berenbaum, Francis; Filippi, Jérome; Le Maitre, Michel; Nataf, Henri; Paul, Carle; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Thibout, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, poor adherence to medication is associated with increased healthcare costs, decreased patient satisfaction, reduced quality of life and unfavorable treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the impact of different interventions on medication adherence in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. Design Systematic review. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library. Study eligibility criteria for selecting studies Included studies were clinical trials and observational studies in adult outpatients treated for psoriasis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis or multiple sclerosis. Study appraisal and synthesis methods Intervention approaches were classified into four categories: educational, behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and multicomponent interventions. The risk of bias/study limitations of each study was assessed using the GRADE system. Results Fifteen studies (14 clinical trials and one observational study) met eligibility criteria and enrolled a total of 1958 patients. Forty percent of the studies (6/15) was conducted in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, half (7/15) in rheumatoid arthritis patients, one in psoriasis patients and one in multiple sclerosis patients. Seven out of 15 interventions were classified as multicomponent, four as educational, two as behavioral and two as cognitive behavioral. Nine studies, of which five were multicomponent interventions, had no serious limitations according to GRADE criteria. Nine out of 15 interventions showed an improvement of adherence: three multicomponent interventions in inflammatory bowel disease; one intervention of each category in rheumatoid arthritis; one multicomponent in psoriasis and one multicomponent in multiple sclerosis. Conclusion The assessment of interventions designed for increasing medication adherence in IMID is rare in the literature and

  9. Poor uptake of an online intervention in a cluster randomised controlled trial of online diabetes education for rural general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Paul, Christine L; Piterman, Leon; Shaw, Jonathan E; Kirby, Catherine; Forshaw, Kristy L; Robinson, Jennifer; Thepwongsa, Isaraporn; Sanson-Fisher, Robert W

    2017-03-23

    In Australia, rural and remote communities have high rates of diabetes-related death and hospitalisation. General practitioners (GPs) play a major role in diabetes detection and management. Education of GPs could optimise diabetes management and improve patient outcomes at a population level. The study aimed to describe the uptake of a continuing medical education intervention for rural GPs and its impact on the viability of a cluster randomised controlled trial of the effects of continuing medical education on whole-town diabetes monitoring and control. Trial design: the cluster randomised controlled trial involved towns as the unit of allocation and analysis with outcomes assessed by de-identified pathology data (not reported here). The intervention programme consisted of an online active learning module, direct electronic access to specialist advice and performance feedback. Multiple rounds of invitation were used to engage GPs with the online intervention content. Evidence-based strategies (e.g. pre-notification, rewards, incentives) were incorporated into the invitations to enrol in the programme. Recruitment to the programme was electronically monitored through the hosting software package during the study intervention period. Eleven matched pairs of towns were included in the study. There were 146 GPs in the 11 intervention towns, of whom 34 (23.3%) enrolled in the programme, and 8 (5.5%) completed the online learning module. No town had more than 10% of the resident GPs complete the learning module. There were no contacts made by GPs regarding requests for specialist advice. Consequently, the trial was discontinued. There is an ongoing need to engage primary care physicians in improving diabetes monitoring and management in rural areas. Online training options, while notionally attractive and accessible, are not likely to have high levels of uptake, even when evidence-based recruitment strategies are implemented. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials

  10. Poor Health Literacy in Nigeria: Causes, Consequences and Measures to improve it.

    PubMed

    Adekoya-Cole, T O; Akinmokun, O I; Enweluzo, G O; Badmus, O O; Alabi, E O

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy is the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make an appropriate decisions concerning their health. It is one of the link by which the health status of individual and the health indices and statistics of our country can be improved upon. Factors influencing health literacy in Nigeria include the culture and belief system, poor and ineffective communication, lack of education and low educational level, and low socioeconomic status Low health literacy predisposes to poorer health status, poorer disease outcome, lack of understanding in the use of preventive services, frequent hospital visitations amongst others. Factors influencing health literacy must be identified and modified to help improve the health literacy level of the populace. This will invariably improve the health status of the populace with a resultant improvement in the health indices of our country. This is a call for the Government and Health Care Professionals to acknowledge low health literacy as a problem and, therefore, be willing to play their roles in tackling this problem to achieve a healthy Nation

  11. Addressing poor retention of infants exposed to HIV: a quality improvement study in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Ciampa, Philip J; Tique, José A; Jumá, Nilton; Sidat, Mohsin; Moon, Troy D; Rothman, Russell L; Vermund, Sten H

    2012-06-01

    Early infant diagnosis (EID) is the first step in HIV care, yet 75% of HIV-exposed infants born at 2 hospitals in Mozambique failed to access EID. Before/after study. Two district hospitals in rural Mozambique. HIV-infected mother/HIV-exposed infant pairs (n = 791). We planned 2 phases of improvement using quality improvement methods. In phase 1, we enhanced referral by offering direct accompaniment of new mothers to the EID suite, increasing privacy, and opening a medical record for infants before postpartum discharge. In phase 2, we added enhanced referral activity as an item on the maternity register to standardize the process of referral. The proportion of HIV-infected mothers who accessed EID for their infant <90 days of life. We tracked mother/infant pairs from June 2009 to March 2011 (phase 0: n = 144; phase 1: n = 479; phase 2: n = 168), compared study measures for mother/infant pairs across intervention phases with χ², estimated time-to-EID by Kaplan-Meier, and determined the likelihood of EID by Cox regression after adjusting for likely barriers to follow-up. At baseline (phase 0), 25.7% of infants accessed EID <90 days. EID improved to 32.2% after phase 1, but only 17.3% had received enhanced referral. After phase 2, 61.9% received enhanced referral and 39.9% accessed EID, a significant 3-phase improvement (P = 0.007). In adjusted analysis, the likelihood of EID at any time was higher in the phase 2 group versus phase 0 (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.68, 95% confidence interval: 1.19 to 2.37, P = 0.003). Retention improved by 55% with a simple referral enhancement. Quality improvement efforts could help improve care in Mozambique and other low-resource countries [added].

  12. Family interventions to improve diabetes outcomes for adults

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Benitez, Amanda; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a critical aspect of disease management for adults with diabetes. Since family members can play a vital role in a patient’s disease management, involving them in self-care interventions may positively influence patients’ diabetes outcomes. We systematically reviewed family-based interventions for adults with diabetes published from 1994 to 2014 and assessed their impact on patients’ diabetes outcomes and the extent of family involvement. We found 26 studies describing family-based diabetes interventions for adults. Interventions were conducted across a range of patient populations and settings. The degree of family involvement varied across studies. We found evidence for improvement in patients’ self-efficacy, perceived social support, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care across the studies. Owing to the heterogeneity of the study designs, types of interventions, reporting of outcomes, and family involvement, it is difficult to determine how family participation in diabetes interventions may affect patients’ clinical outcomes. Future studies should clearly describe the role of family in the intervention, assess quality and extent of family participation, and compare patient outcomes with and without family involvement. PMID:26250784

  13. A Model of Intervention at a Psychoanalytic Parent/Child Drop-In Group in a Poor District of Lima, Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The psychoanalytically informed work of a team of workers at a drop-in centre for families in a poor district of Lima is described. Interventions involve: accepting, connecting, playing and empowering. Clinical vignettes are used to illustrate the ways in which these interventions aim to help families. The acceptance of difficult feelings provides…

  14. A Model of Intervention at a Psychoanalytic Parent/Child Drop-In Group in a Poor District of Lima, Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The psychoanalytically informed work of a team of workers at a drop-in centre for families in a poor district of Lima is described. Interventions involve: accepting, connecting, playing and empowering. Clinical vignettes are used to illustrate the ways in which these interventions aim to help families. The acceptance of difficult feelings provides…

  15. Educational interventions to improve prescribing competency: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kamarudin, Gritta; Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on educational interventions to improve prescribing and identify educational methods that improve prescribing competency in both medical and non-medical prescribers. Design A systematic review was conducted. The databases Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for articles in English published between January 1990 and July 2013. Setting Primary and secondary care. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers. Intervention Education-based interventions to aid improvement in prescribing competency. Primary outcome Improvements in prescribing competency (knows how) or performance (shows how) as defined by Miller's competency model. This was primarily demonstrated through prescribing examinations, changes in prescribing habits or adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 47 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Studies were categorised by their method of assessment, with 20 studies assessing prescribing competence and 27 assessing prescribing performance. A wide variety of educational interventions were employed, with different outcome measures and methods of assessments. In particular, six studies demonstrated that specific prescribing training using the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing increased prescribing competency in a wide variety of settings. Continuing medical education in the form of academic detailing and personalised prescriber feedback also yielded positive results. Only four studies evaluated educational interventions targeted at non-medical prescribers, highlighting that further research is needed in this area. Conclusions A broad range of educational interventions have been conducted to improve prescribing competency. The WHO Guide to Good Prescribing has the largest body of evidence to support its use and is a promising model for the design of targeted prescribing courses. There is a need for further development and evaluation

  16. Interventions to Improve Patient Comprehension in Informed Consent for Medical and Surgical Procedures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schenker, Yael; Fernandez, Alicia; Sudore, Rebecca; Schillinger, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient understanding in clinical informed consent is often poor. Little is known about the effectiveness of interventions to improve comprehension or the extent to which such interventions address different elements of understanding in informed consent. Purpose To systematically review communication interventions to improve patient comprehension in informed consent for medical and surgical procedures. Data Sources A systematic literature search of English-language articles in MEDLINE (1949–2008) and EMBASE (1974–2008) was performed. In addition, a published bibliography of empirical research on informed consent and the reference lists of all eligible studies were reviewed. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials and controlled trials with non-random allocation were included if they compared comprehension in informed consent for a medical or surgical procedure. Only studies that used a quantitative, objective measure of understanding were included. All studies addressed informed consent for a needed or recommended procedure in actual patients. Data Extraction Reviewers independently extracted data using a standardized form. All results were compared, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Data Synthesis Forty-four studies were eligible. Intervention categories included written information, audiovisual/multimedia, extended discussions, and test/feedback techniques. The majority of studies assessed patient understanding of procedural risks; other elements included benefits, alternatives, and general knowledge about the procedure. Only 6 of 44 studies assessed all 4 elements of understanding. Interventions were generally effective in improving patient comprehension, especially regarding risks and general knowledge. Limitations Many studies failed to include adequate description of the study population, and outcome measures varied widely. Conclusions A wide range of communication interventions improve comprehension in clinical informed

  17. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a multifaceted quality improvement intervention to promote sleep in an ICU.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Biren B; Yang, Jessica; King, Lauren M; Neufeld, Karin J; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Rowden, Annette M; Brower, Roy G; Collop, Nancy A; Needham, Dale M

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients commonly experience poor sleep quality in the intensive care unit (ICU) because of various modifiable factors. To address this issue, an ICU-wide, multifaceted quality improvement (QI) project was undertaken to promote sleep in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Medical ICU (MICU). To supplement previously published results of this QI intervention, the present article describes the specific QI framework used to develop and implement this intervention, which consists of 4 steps: (a) summarizing the evidence to create a list of sleep-promoting interventions, (b) identifying and addressing local barriers to implementation, (c) selecting performance measures to assess intervention adherence and patient outcomes, and (d) ensuring that all patients receive the interventions through staff engagement and education and regular project evaluation. Measures of performance included daily completion rates of daytime and nighttime sleep improvement checklists and completion rates of individual interventions. Although long-term adherence and sustainability pose ongoing challenges, this model provides a foundation for future ICU sleep promotion initiatives.

  18. Effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions to improve cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta G; Olivo, Susan Armijo; Biondo, Patricia D; Stiles, Carla R; Yurtseven, Ozden; Fainsinger, Robin L; Hagen, Neil A

    2011-05-01

    Cancer pain is prevalent, yet patients do not receive best care despite widely available evidence. Although national cancer control policies call for education, effectiveness of such programs is unclear and best practices are not well defined. To examine existing evidence on whether knowledge translation (KT) interventions targeting health care providers, patients, and caregivers improve cancer pain outcomes. A systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to evaluate primary studies that examined effects of KT interventions on providers and patients. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported interventions targeting health care providers, four focused on patients or their families, one study examined patients and their significant others, and 16 studies examined patients only. Seven quantitative comparisons measured the statistical effects of interventions. A significant difference favoring the treatment group in least pain intensity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44, 1.42) and in usual pain/average pain (95% CI: 0.13, 0.74) was observed. No other statistical differences were observed. However, most studies were assessed as having high risk of bias and failed to report sufficient information about the intervention dose, quality of educational material, fidelity, and other key factors required to evaluate effectiveness of intervention design. Trials that used a higher dose of KT intervention (characterized by extensive follow-up, comprehensive educational program, and higher resource allocation) were significantly more likely to have positive results than trials that did not use this approach. Further attention to methodological issues to improve educational interventions and research to clarify factors that lead to better pain control are urgently needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interventions to improve cortisol regulation in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A; Shonkoff, Jack P

    2014-02-01

    Childhood adversity is associated with physiologic dysregulation across multiple biological systems; however, relatively little is known about whether these changes are reversible with intervention. The objective of this review was to examine evidence for the effectiveness of interventions to promote healthy cortisol regulation in children. We selected articles from English-language publications in PubMed and EBSCO databases through 2012. Two independent reviewers assessed articles against eligibility criteria. Eligible studies were randomized controlled or quasi-experimental studies designed to improve relationships, environments, or psychosocial functioning in children and examined cortisol as an outcome. We identified 19 articles. There was substantial heterogeneity across studies with regard to age, selection criteria, intervention design, cortisol assessment, and follow-up duration. Eighteen of the 19 articles reported at least 1 difference in baseline cortisol, diurnal cortisol, or cortisol responsivity between intervention and control participants. Importantly, however, there was remarkable inconsistency with regard to how the interventions influenced cortisol. Therefore, studies that included a low-risk comparison group (n = 8) provided critical insight, and each found some evidence that postintervention cortisol levels in the intervention group approximated the low-risk comparison group and differed from children receiving usual care. In conclusion, existing studies show that cortisol activity can be altered by psychosocial interventions. These findings are promising, not only because they indicate physiologic plasticity that can be leveraged by interventions but also because they suggest it may be possible to repair regulatory systems after childhood adversity, which could inform strategies for reducing health disparities and promoting lasting improvements in health.

  20. Interventions to Improve Cortisol Regulation in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Shonkoff, Jack P.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood adversity is associated with physiologic dysregulation across multiple biological systems; however, relatively little is known about whether these changes are reversible with intervention. The objective of this review was to examine evidence for the effectiveness of interventions to promote healthy cortisol regulation in children. We selected articles from English-language publications in PubMed and EBSCO databases through 2012. Two independent reviewers assessed articles against eligibility criteria. Eligible studies were randomized controlled or quasi-experimental studies designed to improve relationships, environments, or psychosocial functioning in children and examined cortisol as an outcome. We identified 19 articles. There was substantial heterogeneity across studies with regard to age, selection criteria, intervention design, cortisol assessment, and follow-up duration. Eighteen of the 19 articles reported at least 1 difference in baseline cortisol, diurnal cortisol, or cortisol responsivity between intervention and control participants. Importantly, however, there was remarkable inconsistency with regard to how the interventions influenced cortisol. Therefore, studies that included a low-risk comparison group (n = 8) provided critical insight, and each found some evidence that postintervention cortisol levels in the intervention group approximated the low-risk comparison group and differed from children receiving usual care. In conclusion, existing studies show that cortisol activity can be altered by psychosocial interventions. These findings are promising, not only because they indicate physiologic plasticity that can be leveraged by interventions but also because they suggest it may be possible to repair regulatory systems after childhood adversity, which could inform strategies for reducing health disparities and promoting lasting improvements in health. PMID:24420810

  1. Lipid nanoparticles with no surfactant improve oral absorption rate of poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Yuka; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-07-15

    A pharmacokinetic study was performed in rats to evaluate the oral absorption ratios of nanoparticle suspensions containing the poorly water-soluble compound nifedipine (NI) and two different types of lipids, including hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. NI-lipid nanoparticle (LN) suspensions with a mean particle size of 48.0 nm and a zeta potential of -57.2 mV were prepared by co-grinding combined with a high-pressure homogenization process. The oral administration of NI-LN suspensions to rats led to a significant increase in the NI plasma concentration, and the area under the curve (AUC) value was found to be 108 min μg mL⁻¹, indicating a 4-fold increase relative to the NI suspensions. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the NI-LN suspensions with those of the NI solution prepared using only the surfactant polysorbate 80 revealed that although the AUC and bioavailability (59%) values were almost identical, a rapid absorption rate was still observed in the NI-LN suspensions. These results therefore indicated that lipid nanoparticles prepared using only two types of phospholipid with a mean particle size of less than 50 nm could improve the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-sensory intervention for preterm infants improves sucking organization

    PubMed Central

    Medoff-Cooper, Barbara; Rankin, Kristin; Li, Zhuoying; Liu, Li; White-Traut, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this RCT was to evaluate sucking organization in premature infants following a preterm infant multi-sensory intervention, the Auditory, Tactile, Visual, and Vestibular (ATVV). Study Design A convenience sample of 183 healthy premature infants born 29 - 34 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) enrolled. Sucking organization was measured at baseline, then weekly assessments, during the infant's hospital stay. Results A quadratic trend was observed for number of sucks, sucks per burst, and maturity index, with the intervention group increasing significantly faster by day 7 (Model estimates for group*day: β = 13.69, p < 0.01; β = 1.16, p < 0.01; and β = 0.12, p < 0.05, respectively). Sucking pressure increased linearly over time, with significant between-group differences at day 14 (β = 45.66, p < 0.01). Conclusion ATVV infants exhibited improved sucking organization during hospitalization, suggestive that ATVV intervention improves oral feeding. PMID:25822519

  3. Transient improvement of urticaria induces poor adherence as assessed by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Furue, Masutaka; Onozuka, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Sugaya, Makoto; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shintani, Yoichi; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Kitami, Yuki; Tanioka, Miki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Hagihara, Akihito; Morisky, Donald E; Katoh, Norito

    2015-11-01

    Poor adherence to medication is a major public health challenge. Here, we aimed to determine the adherence to oral and topical medications and to analyze underlying associated factors using the translated Japanese version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 regarding urticaria treatment. Web-based questionnaires were performed for 3096 registered dermatological patients, along with a subanalysis of 751 registered urticaria patients in this study. The adherence to oral medication was significantly associated with the frequency of hospital visits. Variables that affected the adherence to topical medication included age and experience of drug effectiveness. The rate of responses that "It felt like the symptoms had improved" varied significantly among the dermatological diseases treated with oral medications. Dermatologists should be aware that adherence to the treatment of urticaria is quite low. Regular visits and active education for patients with urticaria are mandatory in order to achieve a good therapeutic outcome by increasing the adherence.

  4. A Systematic Review of Digital Interventions for Improving the Diet and Physical Activity Behaviors of Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rose, Taylor; Barker, Mary; Maria Jacob, Chandni; Morrison, Leanne; Lawrence, Wendy; Strömmer, Sofia; Vogel, Christina; Woods-Townsend, Kathryn; Farrell, David; Inskip, Hazel; Baird, Janis

    2017-08-16

    Many adolescents have poor diet and physical activity behaviors, which can lead to the development of noncommunicable diseases in later life. Digital platforms offer inexpensive means of delivering health interventions, but little is known about their effectiveness. This systematic review was conducted to synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of digital interventions to improve diet quality and increase physical activity in adolescents, to effective intervention components and to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Following a systematic search, abstracts were assessed against inclusion criteria, and data extraction and quality assessment were performed for included studies. Data were analyzed to identify key features that are associated with significant improvement in behavior. A total of 27 studies met inclusion criteria. Most (n = 15) were Web site interventions. Other delivery methods were text messages, games, multicomponent interventions, emails, and social media. Significant behavior change was often seen when interventions included education, goal setting, self-monitoring, and parental involvement. None of the publications reported cost-effectiveness. Due to heterogeneity of studies, meta-analysis was not feasible.It is possible to effect significant health behavior change in adolescents through digital interventions that incorporate education, goal setting, self-monitoring, and parental involvement. Most of the evidence relates to Web sites and further research into alternate media is needed, and longer term outcomes should be evaluated. There is a paucity of data on the cost-effectiveness of digital health interventions, and future trials should report these data. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance improvement of GPS single frequency, single epoch attitude determination with poor satellite visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wantong; Sun, Xingli

    2016-07-01

    Similar to global positioning system (GPS) positioning in urban canyons, a fast and successful attitude determination with limited satellite visibility is very significant. For land vehicles, the possible attitude candidates can be treated as a spherical zone with the center at the reference antenna and the baseline as the radius. This provides an important constraint, which can be exploited to improve the reliability of GPS single frequency and single epoch attitude determination in the case of poor satellite reception. First, we fully integrate the spherical zone constraint into the estimation procedure of ambiguity resolution, but not in the validation procedure. Combining both the coordinate domain search and the ambiguity domain search, allows development of a global minimizer of the fixed ambiguity objective function. This scheme also improves the precision of the float ambiguity solution, thus avoiding the problem of search halting. The performance of the new ambiguity resolution method was analyzed by means of several experimental tests, using simulated as well as actual GPS data in urban environments. The experimental results showed that this new, proposed method can utilize a priori spherical zone knowledge to improve the reliability of ambiguity resolution in difficult environments.

  6. Improving chocolate flavor in poor-quality cocoa almonds by enzymatic treatment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Hilana Salete Silva; Mamede, Maria Eugênia Oliveira; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; Koblitz, Maria Gabriela Bello

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to enzymatically treat poor-quality cocoa almonds (known as "slate") to ensure the formation of chocolate flavor precursors. The production of flavor precursors improves the quality of these almonds, which are usually responsible for the low quality of the liquor produced. Proteases and carboxypeptidases from different sources were tested under various conditions. The different treatments were evaluated by chemical analysis (hydrolysis efficiency) and sensory analysis of the treated material compared to good-quality cocoa almonds. The results show that it is possible, through the use of microbial enzymes, to generate the mixture of compounds that will release, after roasting, the characteristic chocolate flavor in poor-quality almonds. However, it is necessary to optimize the conditions of enzymatic treatment to obtain better results and thus establish a process that can be used for industrial purposes for manufacturing cocoa and chocolate. The basidiomycete Moniliophtora perniciosa is the causative agent of witches' broom disease (WBD) of the cocoa tree, whose seeds are the source of chocolate. It is the most important phytopathological problem of cocoa-producing areas of the American continent, and has decimated the Brazilian cocoa industry. In Bahia (Brazil), M. perniciosa was identified in 1989 and, as a consequence of its spreading, the annual production of cocoa almonds dropped from 450,000 to 90,000 tons within 12 y, reducing export values from an all-time high of about US$ 1 billion to 110 million. The high incidence of WBD incapacitates Brazil to produce enough cocoa almonds even for the internal market, leading the country to import low-quality cocoa almonds mainly from African countries. Our work proposes an enzymatic treatment to increase the quality of that cocoa almonds and, consequently, to improve the quality of the chocolate produced and consumed in the country. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. An Evaluation of the Cost-effectiveness of Policy Navigators to Improve Access to Care for the Poor in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Solon, Orville; Peabody, John W.; Woo, Kimberly; Quimbo, Stella A.; Florentino, Jhiedon; Shimkhada, Riti

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Even when health insurance coverage is available, health policies may not be effective at increasing coverage among vulnerable populations. New approaches are needed to improve access to care. We experimentally introduced a novel intervention that uses Policy Navigators to increase health insurance enrollment in a poor population. Methods We used data from the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), a randomized experiment taking place at the district level in the Visayas region of the Philippines. In two arms of the study, we compared the effects of introducing Policy Navigators to controls. The Policy Navigators advocated for improved access to care by providing regular system-level expertise directly to the policy-makers, municipal mayors and governors responsible for paying for and enrolling poor households into the health insurance program. Using regression models, we compared levels of enrollment in our intervention versus control sites. We also assessed the cost effectiveness of marginal increases in enrollment. Results We found that Policy Navigators improved enrollment in health insurance between 39 and 102% compared to the controls. Policy navigators were cost-effective at $0.86 USD per enrollee. However, supplementary national government campaigns, which were implemented to further increase coverage, attenuated normal enrollment efforts. Conclusion Policy Navigators appear to be effective in improving access to care and their success underscores the importance of local-level strategies for improving enrollment. PMID:19349090

  8. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of policy navigators to improve access to care for the poor in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Solon, Orville; Peabody, John W; Woo, Kimberly; Quimbo, Stella A; Florentino, Jhiedon; Shimkhada, Riti

    2009-09-01

    Even when health insurance coverage is available, health policies may not be effective at increasing coverage among vulnerable populations. New approaches are needed to improve access to care. We experimentally introduced a novel intervention that uses Policy Navigators to increase health insurance enrollment in a poor population. We used data from the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), a randomized experiment taking place at the district level in the Visayas region of the Philippines. In two arms of the study, we compared the effects of introducing Policy Navigators to controls. The Policy Navigators advocated for improved access to care by providing regular system-level expertise directly to the policy-makers, municipal mayors and governors responsible for paying for and enrolling poor households into the health insurance program. Using regression models, we compared levels of enrollment in our intervention versus control sites. We also assessed the cost-effectiveness of marginal increases in enrollment. We found that Policy Navigators improved enrollment in health insurance between 39% and 102% compared to the controls. Policy navigators were cost-effective at 0.86 USD per enrollee. However, supplementary national government campaigns, which were implemented to further increase coverage, attenuated normal enrollment efforts. Policy Navigators appear to be effective in improving access to care and their success underscores the importance of local-level strategies for improving enrollment.

  9. Effective interventions on service quality improvement in a physiotherapy clinic.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, Farid; Tabrizi, JafarSadegh; Eteraf Oskouei, MirAli; AsghariJafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Service quality is considered as a main domain of quality associ-ated with non-clinical aspect of healthcare. This study aimed to survey and im-proves service quality of delivered care in the Physiotherapy Clinic affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. A quasi experimental interventional study was conducted in the Physiotherapy Clinic, 2010-2011. Data were collected using a validated and reli-able researcher made questionnaire with participation of 324 patients and their coadjutors. The study questionnaire consisted of 7 questions about demographic factors and 38 questions for eleven aspects of service quality. Data were then analyzed using paired samples t-test by SPSS16. In the pre intervention phase, six aspects of service quality including choice of provider, safety, prevention and early detection, dignity, autonomy and availability achieved non-acceptable scores. Following interventions, all aspects of the service quality improved and also total service quality score improved from 8.58 to 9.83 (P<0.001). Service quality can be improved by problem implementation of appropriate interventions. The acquired results can be used in health system fields to create respectful environments for healthcare customers.

  10. Integrated Morphological Awareness Intervention as a Tool for Improving Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Cecilia; Gillon, Gail T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of an intervention program aimed to improve reading and spelling ability through instruction in morphological awareness together with other forms of linguistic awareness, including knowledge of phonology, orthography, syntax, and semantics. Method: Sixteen children aged between 8;07 (years;months) and…

  11. Improving Student Writing Ability through the Use of Teacher Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouty, Jackie; Lid, Sandy

    This report described a program to improve student writing ability. The targeted population consisted of first and third grade students in a middle class community, located in the Midwest. The problem of inadequate writing and the results of the interventions were documented. Analysis of probable cause data revealed that students lacked positive…

  12. Baduanjin Mind-Body Intervention Improves the Executive Control Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tingting; Yue, Guang H.; Tian, Yingxue; Jiang, Changhao

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at comparing the effects of the Baduanjin mind-body (BMB) intervention with a conventional relaxation training program on enhancing the executive function. The study also attempts to explore the neural substrates underlying the cognitive effect of BMB intervention using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique. Forty-two healthy college students were randomly allocated into either the Baduanjin intervention group or relaxation training (control) group. Training lasted for 8 weeks (90 min/day, 5 days/week). Each participant was administered the shortened Profile of Mood States to evaluate their mood status and the flanker task to evaluate executive function before and after training. While performing the flanker task, the NIRS data were collected from each participant. After training, individuals who have participated in BMB exercise showed a significant reduction in depressive mood compared with the same measure before the intervention. However, participants in the control group showed no such reduction. The before vs. after measurement difference in the flanker task incongruent trails was significant only for the Baduanjin intervention group. Interestingly, an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin in the left prefrontal cortex was observed during the Incongruent Trails test only after the BMB exercise intervention. These findings implicate that Baduanjin is an effective and easy-to-administering mind-body exercise for improving executive function and perhaps brain self-regulation in a young and healthy population. PMID:28133453

  13. Effect of a Community Health Worker Intervention Among Latinos With Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: The Miami Healthy Heart Initiative Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Olveen; Lebron, Cynthia; Alonzo, Yisel; Li, Hua; Chang, Aileen; Kenya, Sonjia

    2017-07-01

    Community health worker (CHW) intervention is a promising approach to address type 2 diabetes among Latinos. However, evidence from randomized clinical studies is limited. To compare a CHW intervention with enhanced usual care. This 52-week, single-blind, randomized clinical trial included 300 Latino adults aged 18 to 65 years who were treated in 2 public hospital outpatient clinics in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from July 1, 2010, through October 31, 2013. Eligible participants had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of 8.0 or greater. Follow-up was completed January 31, 2015, and data were analyzed from March 10, 2015, to June 6, 2016. A 1-year CHW intervention consisted of home visits, telephone calls, and group-level activities. Primary outcomes included systolic blood pressure (SBP), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) levels, and HbA1c levels. Secondary outcomes included body mass index, medication regimen intensification, and self-reported measures of diet, physical activity, and medication regimen adherence. Of the 300 participants randomized (135 men [45%] and 165 women [55%]; mean [SD] age, 55.2 [7.0] years), we obtained follow-up data on 215 (71.7%). Participants in the CHW group received a median of 4 home visits and 20 telephone calls. After adjusting for baseline values and covariates, participants in the CHW group had an HbA1c level that was 0.51% lower (95% CI, -0.94% to -0.08%) than that of participants in the enhanced usual care group. The reduction in SBP of 4.62 mm Hg (95% CI, -9.01 to -0.24 mm Hg) did not meet the preplanned target of 8 mm Hg and was not statistically significant in unadjusted models. No significant differences in LDLC levels (mean difference, -8.2 mg/dL; 95% CI, -18.8 to 2.3 mg/dL) or any of the preplanned secondary outcomes were observed. Post hoc analyses suggest that the intervention may be more beneficial among those with worse control of their type 2 diabetes at baseline. Among Latinos with poorly controlled type 2

  14. An educational intervention to improve pain assessment in preverbal children.

    PubMed

    Vael, Aimee; Whitted, Kelli

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric nurses often use an inappropriate tool to assess pain in children younger than 36 months of age. This intervention intended to improve the nursing practice of assessing pain in preverbal (less than 36 months of age) children. Pain assessment frequency and use of a pain assessment pediatric tool use was evaluated pre- and post-intervention via a retrospective chart review and a survey of pediatric nurses. Parametric and non-parametric statistical tests were used to determine significant differences between pre- and post-intervention data for both approaches. The chart review data showed a significant increase in the number of times pain was assessed and documented post-educational intervention. Similarly, the survey data analysis showed a significant post-intervention increase in the use of a pain assessment tool and that most nurses used the FLACC pain assessment tool when assessing pain in preverbal children. Educating staff nurses about the use of an appropriate pain assessment scale altered practice and improved the frequency of pain assessment of preverbal children.

  15. Educational interventions to improve prescribing competency: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kamarudin, Gritta; Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2013-08-30

    To review the literature on educational interventions to improve prescribing and identify educational methods that improve prescribing competency in both medical and non-medical prescribers. A systematic review was conducted. The databases Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for articles in English published between January 1990 and July 2013. Primary and secondary care. Medical and non-medical prescribers. Education-based interventions to aid improvement in prescribing competency. Improvements in prescribing competency (knows how) or performance (shows how) as defined by Miller's competency model. This was primarily demonstrated through prescribing examinations, changes in prescribing habits or adherence to guidelines. A total of 47 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Studies were categorised by their method of assessment, with 20 studies assessing prescribing competence and 27 assessing prescribing performance. A wide variety of educational interventions were employed, with different outcome measures and methods of assessments. In particular, six studies demonstrated that specific prescribing training using the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing increased prescribing competency in a wide variety of settings. Continuing medical education in the form of academic detailing and personalised prescriber feedback also yielded positive results. Only four studies evaluated educational interventions targeted at non-medical prescribers, highlighting that further research is needed in this area. A broad range of educational interventions have been conducted to improve prescribing competency. The WHO Guide to Good Prescribing has the largest body of evidence to support its use and is a promising model for the design of targeted prescribing courses. There is a need for further development and evaluation of educational methods for non-medical prescribers.

  16. Randomized Multilevel Intervention to Improve Outcomes of Residents in Nursing Homes in Need of Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Nahm, Helen E.; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary; Hicks, Lanis; Mehr, David; Flesner, Marcia; Petroski, Gregory F.; Madsen, Richard W.; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A comprehensive multilevel intervention was tested to build organizational capacity to create and sustain improvement in quality of care and subsequently improve resident outcomes in nursing homes in need of improvement. Intervention facilities (n=29) received a two-year multilevel intervention with monthly on-site consultation from expert nurses with graduate education in gerontological nursing. Attention control facilities (n=29) that also needed to improve resident outcomes received monthly information about aging and physical assessment of elders. Design and Methods Randomized clinical trial of nursing homes in need of improving resident outcomes of bladder and bowel incontinence, weight loss, pressure ulcers, and decline in activities of daily living (ADL). It was hypothesized that following the intervention, experimental facilities would have better resident outcomes, higher quality of care, higher staff retention, more organizational attributes of improved working conditions than control facilities, similar staffing and staff mix, and lower total and direct care costs. Results The intervention did improve quality of care (p=0.02); there were improvements in pressure ulcers (p=0.05), weight loss (p=0.05). Staff retention, organizational working conditions, staffing, and staff mix and most costs were not affected by the intervention. Leadership turnover was surprisingly excessive in both intervention and control groups. Implications Some facilities that are in need of improving quality of care and resident outcomes are able to build the organizational capacity to improve while not increasing staffing or costs of care. Improvement requires continuous supportive consultation and leadership willing to involve staff and work together to build the systematic improvements in care delivery needed. PMID:21816681

  17. Lifestyle intervention according to general recommendations improves glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Marco; Blaak, Ellen E; Corpeleijn, Eefje; Saris, Wim H; de Bruin, Tjerk W; Feskens, Edith J

    2003-12-01

    Changing dietary and physical activity habits has the potential to postpone or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. However, it needs to be assessed whether moderate interventions, in agreement with current guidelines for the general population, are effective. We evaluated the impact of a 2-year combined diet and physical activity intervention program on glucose tolerance in Dutch subjects at increased risk for developing diabetes. Subjects with glucose intolerance were randomly assigned to either the lifestyle intervention group (INT) or control group (CON). The INT received regular dietary advice and was stimulated to increase their physical activity. The CON received a brief leaflet about healthy diet and increased physical activity. Primary outcome measure was the change in glucose tolerance. In total, 88 subjects completed 2 years of intervention (40 subjects in the INT, 48 subjects in the CON, mean BMI 29.4 kg/m2). Subjects in the INT reduced their body weight, waist circumference, and (saturated) fat intake and improved their aerobic capacity. Two-hour plasma glucose concentration declined from 8.7 to 8.0 mM in the INT and rose from 8.6 to 9.4 mM in the CON (p < 0.01). Subjects adherent to both the diet and exercise intervention showed the largest reduction in 2-hour glucose levels. Our results showed that a lifestyle intervention program according to general recommendations improves glucose tolerance, even in a less obese and more physical active population. Furthermore, our results underscore the importance of combining diet and physical activity to improve glucose tolerance and insulin resistance.

  18. Interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing practices for hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Davey, Peter; Marwick, Charis A; Scott, Claire L; Charani, Esmita; McNeil, Kirsty; Brown, Erwin; Gould, Ian M; Ramsay, Craig R; Michie, Susan

    2017-02-09

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health problem. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are associated with prolonged hospital stay and death compared with infections caused by susceptible bacteria. Appropriate antibiotic use in hospitals should ensure effective treatment of patients with infection and reduce unnecessary prescriptions. We updated this systematic review to evaluate the impact of interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing to hospital inpatients. To estimate the effectiveness and safety of interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing to hospital inpatients and to investigate the effect of two intervention functions: restriction and enablement. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, and Embase. We searched for additional studies using the bibliographies of included articles and personal files. The last search from which records were evaluated and any studies identified incorporated into the review was January 2015. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies (NRS). We included three non-randomised study designs to measure behavioural and clinical outcomes and analyse variation in the effects: non- randomised trials (NRT), controlled before-after (CBA) studies and interrupted time series (ITS) studies. For this update we also included three additional NRS designs (case control, cohort, and qualitative studies) to identify unintended consequences. Interventions included any professional or structural interventions as defined by the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group. We defined restriction as 'using rules to reduce the opportunity to engage in the target behaviour (or increase the target behaviour by reducing the opportunity to engage in competing behaviours)'. We defined enablement as 'increasing means/reducing barriers to increase capability or opportunity'. The main comparison was between intervention and

  19. Effective Interventions on Service Quality Improvement in a Physiotherapy Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gharibi, Farid; Tabrizi, JafarSadegh; Eteraf Oskouei, MirAli; AsghariJafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Service quality is considered as a main domain of quality associ­ated with non-clinical aspect of healthcare. This study aimed to survey and im­proves service quality of delivered care in the Physiotherapy Clinic affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A quasi experimental interventional study was conducted in the Physiotherapy Clinic, 2010-2011. Data were collected using a validated and reli­able researcher made questionnaire with participation of 324 patients and their coadjutors. The study questionnaire consisted of 7 questions about demographic factors and 38 questions for eleven aspects of service quality. Data were then analyzed using paired samples t-test by SPSS16. Results: In the pre intervention phase, six aspects of service quality including choice of provider, safety, prevention and early detection, dignity, autonomy and availability achieved non-acceptable scores. Following interventions, all aspects of the service quality improved and also total service quality score improved from 8.58 to 9.83 (P<0.001). Conclusion: Service quality can be improved by problem implementation of appropriate interventions. The acquired results can be used in health system fields to create respectful environments for healthcare customers. PMID:25097838

  20. Methods to improve routine bioassay monitoring for freshly separated, poorly transported plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Bihl, D.E.; Lynch, T.P.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several human cases involving inhalation of plutonium oxide at Hanford have shown clearance half-times from the lung that are much longer than the 500-day half-time recommended for class Y plutonium in Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP). The more tenaciously retained material is referred to as super class Y plutonium. The ability to detect super class Y plutonium by current routine bioassay measurements is shown to be poor. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff involved in the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program investigated four methods to se if improvements in routine monitoring of workers for fresh super class Y plutonium are feasible. The methods were lung counting, urine sampling, fecal sampling, and use of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) to enhance urinary excretion. Use of DTPA was determined to be not feasible. Routine fecal sampling was found to be feasible but not recommended. Recommendations were made to improve the detection level for routine annual urinalysis and routine annual lung counting. 12 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Asthma disease management-Australian pharmacists' interventions improve patients' asthma knowledge and this is sustained.

    PubMed

    Saini, Bandana; LeMay, Kate; Emmerton, Lynne; Krass, Ines; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Stewart, Kay; Burton, Deborah; Armour, Carol

    2011-06-01

    To assess any improvements in knowledge of asthma patients after a tailored education program delivered by pharmacists and measure the sustainability of any improvements. To ascertain patients' perceptions about any changes in their knowledge. Ninety-six specially trained pharmacists recruited patients based on their risk of poor asthma control. A tailored intervention was delivered to patients based on individual needs and goals, and was conducted at three or four time points over six months. Asthma knowledge was assessed at the beginning and end of the service, and six and 12 months after it had ended. Patients' perceptions of the impact of the service on their knowledge were explored qualitatively in interviews. The 96 pharmacists recruited 570 patients, 398 (70%) finished. Asthma knowledge significantly improved as a result of the service (7.65 ± 2.36, n=561, to 8.78 ± 2.14, n=393). This improvement was retained for at least 12 months after the service. Patients reported how the knowledge and skills gained had led to a change in the way they managed their asthma. Improvements in knowledge are achievable and sustainable if pharmacists used targeted educational interventions. Pharmacist educational interventions are an efficient way to improve asthma knowledge in the community. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A ventilation intervention study in classrooms to improve indoor air quality: the FRESH study.

    PubMed

    Rosbach, Jeannette T M; Vonk, Machiel; Duijm, Frans; van Ginkel, Jan T; Gehring, Ulrike; Brunekreef, Bert

    2013-12-17

    Classroom ventilation rates often do not meet building standards, although it is considered to be important to improve indoor air quality. Poor indoor air quality is thought to influence both children's health and performance. Poor ventilation in The Netherlands most often occurs in the heating season. To improve classroom ventilation a tailor made mechanical ventilation device was developed to improve outdoor air supply. This paper studies the effect of this intervention. The FRESH study (Forced-ventilation Related Environmental School Health) was designed to investigate the effect of a CO2 controlled mechanical ventilation intervention on classroom CO2 levels using a longitudinal cross-over design. Target CO2 concentrations were 800 and 1200 parts per million (ppm), respectively. The study included 18 classrooms from 17 schools from the north-eastern part of The Netherlands, 12 experimental classrooms and 6 control classrooms. Data on indoor levels of CO2, temperature and relative humidity were collected during three consecutive weeks per school during the heating seasons of 2010-2012. Associations between the intervention and weekly average indoor CO2 levels, classroom temperature and relative humidity were assessed by means of mixed models with random school-effects. At baseline, mean CO2 concentration for all schools was 1335 ppm (range: 763-2000 ppm). The intervention was able to significantly decrease CO2 levels in the intervention classrooms (F (2,10) = 17.59, p < 0.001), with a mean decrease of 491 ppm. With the target set at 800 ppm, mean CO2 was 841 ppm (range: 743-925 ppm); with the target set at 1200 ppm, mean CO2 was 975 ppm (range: 887-1077 ppm). Although the device was not capable of precisely achieving the two predefined levels of CO2, our study showed that classroom CO2 levels can be reduced by intervening on classroom ventilation using a CO2 controlled mechanical ventilation system.

  3. Adaptation of a Motivational Interviewing Intervention to Improve Antidepressant Adherence among Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Interian, Alejandro; Martinez, Igda; Rios, Lisbeth Iglesias; Krejci, Jonathan; Guarnaccia, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Poor antidepressant adherence is a significant issue in depression treatment that adversely affects treatment outcomes. While being a common problem, it tends to be more common among Latinos. To address this problem, the current study adapted a Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention to improve adherence among Latinos with depression. The adaptation process included six focus groups that elicited participants’ perspectives (N = 30), applying the intervention with test cases (N = 7) to fine tune the intervention, and eliciting feedback on the intervention (N = 5). The findings generated from these adaptation phases are described, along with a case example. Examples of adaptations to the MI included reframing antidepressant adherence as a way to luchar (struggle) against problems, focusing on motivation for improving depression and not just medication, refining methods for imparting antidepressant information, and inclusion of personalized visual feedback on dose-taking. The findings provide a description of the antidepressant issues experienced by a group of Latinos, as well as considerations for applying MI with this population. The intervention remained grounded in MI principles, but was contextualized for this Latino group. PMID:20438160

  4. Intervening in the local health system to improve diabetes care: lessons from a health service experiment in a poor urban neighborhood in India

    PubMed Central

    Bhojani, Upendra; Kolsteren, Patrick; Criel, Bart; De Henauw, Stefaan; Beerenahally, Thriveni S.; Verstraeten, Roos; Devadasan, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Background Many efficacious health service interventions to improve diabetes care are known. However, there is little evidence on whether such interventions are effective while delivered in real-world resource-constrained settings. Objective To evaluate an intervention aimed at improving diabetes care using the RE-AIM (reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) framework. Design A quasi-experimental study was conducted in a poor urban neighborhood in South India. Four health facilities delivered the intervention (n=163 diabetes patients) and the four matched facilities served as control (n=154). The intervention included provision of culturally appropriate education to diabetes patients, use of generic medications, and standard treatment guidelines for diabetes management. Patients were surveyed before and after the 6-month intervention period. We did field observations and interviews with the doctors at the intervention facilities. Quantitative data were used to assess the reach of the intervention and its effectiveness on patients’ knowledge, practice, healthcare expenditure, and glycemic control through a difference-in-differences analysis. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically to understand adoption, implementation, and maintenance of the intervention. Results Reach: Of those who visited intervention facilities, 52.3% were exposed to the education component and only 7.2% were prescribed generic medications. The doctors rarely used the standard treatment guidelines for diabetes management. Effectiveness: The intervention did not have a statistically and clinically significant impact on the knowledge, healthcare expenditure, or glycemic control of the patients, with marginal reduction in their practice score. Adoption: All the facilities adopted the education component, while all but one facility adopted the prescription of generic medications. Implementation: There was poor implementation of the intervention, particularly

  5. Improving pharmacist documentation of clinical interventions through focused education.

    PubMed

    Rector, Katherine B; Veverka, Angie; Evans, Stacie Krick

    2014-08-01

    The impact of a focused education initiative to increase pharmacists' documentation of clinical interventions is described. A focused education initiative was developed to increase the consistency of pharmacists' documentation of clinical interventions in order to achieve pharmacy goals and to demonstrate the value of pharmacy services at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. Education was provided through weekly pharmacy newsletter publications, weekly huddles, and monthly staff meetings. Pharmacy clinical specialists were tasked with providing examples of activities that should be documented as interventions, reviewing the selection of intervention categories to best capture the specific activity, and emphasizing the need for appropriate documentation. Monthly progress was monitored, and results were posted publicly to incentivize staff and assist with accountability. Increases in the number of clinical interventions was reported at monthly pharmacy staff meetings to reinforce the value of this process. The total number of pharmacy clinical interventions increased from an average of 12,493 per month in the first quarter of 2012 to an average of 27,978 per month in the second quarter of 2013, representing a 120% improvement. Associated cost-avoidance dollars also increased proportionally, such that the average cost-avoidance dollars in the second quarter of 2013 was $1.5 million per month. In addition, the pharmacy department far exceeded the health system's division of pharmacy targets for established quality indicators. Effects were sustained during the 12 months after completion of the education initiative. Implementation of a focused pharmacist education initiative led to increased numbers of clinical interventions reported and increased documentation of costs avoided. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investments on Pro-poor Development Projects on Goats: Ensuring Success for Improved Livelihoods*

    PubMed Central

    Devendra, C.

    2013-01-01

    The elements that determine the success of development projects on goats and the prerequisites for ensuring this are discussed in the context of the bewildering diversity of goat genetic resources, production systems, multifunctionality, and opportunities for responding to constraints for productivity enhancement. Key determinants for the success of pro-poor projects are the imperatives of realistic project design, resolution of priorities and positive impacts to increase investments and spur agricultural growth, and appropriate policy. Throughout the developing world, there exist 97% of the total world population of 921 million goats across all agro-ecological zones (AEZs), including 570 breeds and 64% share of the breeds. They occupy a very important biological and socio-economic niche in farming systems making significant multifunctional contributions especially to food, nutrition and financial security, stability of farm households, and survival of the poor in the rural areas. Definitions are given of successful and failed projects. The analyses highlighted in successful projects the value of strong participatory efforts with farmers and climate change. Climate change effects on goats are inevitable and are mediated through heat stress, type of AEZ, water availability, quantity and quality of the available feed resources and type of production system. Within the prevailing production systems, improved integrated tree crops - ruminant systems are underestimated and are an important pathway to enhance C sequestration. Key development strategies and opportunities for research and development (R and D) are enormous, and include inter alia defining a policy framework, resolution of priority constraints using systems perspectives and community-based participatory activities, application of yield-enhancing technologies, intensification, scaling up, and impacts. The priority for development concerns the rainfed areas with large concentrations of ruminants in which

  7. Investments on Pro-poor Development Projects on Goats: Ensuring Success for Improved Livelihoods.

    PubMed

    Devendra, C

    2013-01-01

    The elements that determine the success of development projects on goats and the prerequisites for ensuring this are discussed in the context of the bewildering diversity of goat genetic resources, production systems, multifunctionality, and opportunities for responding to constraints for productivity enhancement. Key determinants for the success of pro-poor projects are the imperatives of realistic project design, resolution of priorities and positive impacts to increase investments and spur agricultural growth, and appropriate policy. Throughout the developing world, there exist 97% of the total world population of 921 million goats across all agro-ecological zones (AEZs), including 570 breeds and 64% share of the breeds. They occupy a very important biological and socio-economic niche in farming systems making significant multifunctional contributions especially to food, nutrition and financial security, stability of farm households, and survival of the poor in the rural areas. Definitions are given of successful and failed projects. The analyses highlighted in successful projects the value of strong participatory efforts with farmers and climate change. Climate change effects on goats are inevitable and are mediated through heat stress, type of AEZ, water availability, quantity and quality of the available feed resources and type of production system. Within the prevailing production systems, improved integrated tree crops - ruminant systems are underestimated and are an important pathway to enhance C sequestration. Key development strategies and opportunities for research and development (R and D) are enormous, and include inter alia defining a policy framework, resolution of priority constraints using systems perspectives and community-based participatory activities, application of yield-enhancing technologies, intensification, scaling up, and impacts. The priority for development concerns the rainfed areas with large concentrations of ruminants in which

  8. Brief educational intervention improves content of intern handovers.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Erin E; Ginsbach, Kimberly; Groeschl, Nicole; Bragg, Dawn; Weisgerber, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to ensure safe patient handovers and to document resident competency in handover communication, yet there are few evidence-based curricula teaching resident handover skills. We assessed the immediate and sustained impact of a brief educational intervention on pediatrics intern handover skills. Interns at a freestanding children's hospital participated in an intervention that included a 1-hour educational workshop on components of high-quality handovers, as well as implementation of a standardized handover format. The format, SAFETIPS, includes patient information, current diagnosis and assessment, patient acuity, a focused plan, a baseline exam, a to-do list, anticipatory guidance, and potential pointers and pitfalls. Important communication behaviors, such as paraphrasing key information, were addressed. Quality of intern handovers was evaluated using a simulated encounter 2 weeks before, 2 weeks after, and 7 months after the workshop. Two trained, blinded, independent observers scored the videotaped encounters. All 27 interns rotating at the Children's Hospital consented to participate in the study, and 20 attended the workshop. We included all participant data in the analysis, regardless of workshop attendance. Following the intervention, intern reporting of patient acuity improved from 13% to 92% (P < .001), and gains were maintained 7 months later. Rates of key communication behaviors, such as paraphrasing critical information, did not improve. A brief educational workshop promoting standardized handovers improved the inclusion of essential information during intern handovers, and these improvements were sustained over time. The intervention did not improve key communication behaviors.

  9. The Work Compatibility Improvement Framework: theory and application of improvement action and intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Genaidy, Ash M; Rinder, Magda M; Sequeira, Reynold; A-Rehim, Amal D

    2009-05-01

    Challenges facing management of manufacturing firms can be transformed into asset gains by giving careful consideration to the worker-work environment interface. The benefits of a 'healthy' interface may lead to sizable reductions in rising health care costs and retention of highly qualified workers. This paper presents a novel approach for the 'improve' phase of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. The work tasks of this research consisted of: (a) fundamentals of cognitive-based improvement action and intervention; (b) design concepts and process of improvement action/intervention generation; (c) assessment model of estimated gains in company's assets; (d) application demonstration in the manufacturing sector. The process of improvement action/intervention generation is described, preceded by a description of the fundamentals of cognitive-based improvement action and intervention and system architecture. This is followed by a documentation of estimated asset gains as a result of the improvement plan. The results showed that expert workers were, on average, 78% in agreement with the algorithm-identified improvement actions. Their knowledge was used to update the recommended actions as well as to detail the multiple strategies required to address the improvement actions. As a result, an integrated improvement plan was developed resulting in estimated asset gains of $1.6 million, which was validated by the general manager. The research reported herein documented the theory and application of the 'improve' phase of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. The economic assessment of the suggested improvement is also reported and this has proved to be an important driver to secure the firm collaboration of manufacturing enterprise management. An integrated improvement solution plan backed by a detailed economic assessment of suggested improvements is essential to demonstrate the full potential of workplace micro- and macro-ergonomic interventions.

  10. Interventions to improve delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uptake of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to prevent tuberculosis has been poor, particularly in the highest risk populations. Interventions to improve IPT delivery could promote implementation. The large number of existing systematic reviews on treatment adherence has made drawing conclusions a challenge. To provide decision makers with the evidence they need, we performed an overview of systematic reviews to compare different organizational interventions to improve IPT delivery as measured by treatment completion among those at highest risk for the development of TB disease, namely child contacts or HIV-infected individuals. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), and MEDLINE up to August 15, 2012. Two authors used a standardized data extraction form and the AMSTAR instrument to independently assess each review. Results Six reviews met inclusion criteria. Interventions included changes in the setting/site of IPT delivery, use of quality monitoring mechanisms (e.g., directly observed therapy), IPT delivery integration into other healthcare services, and use of lay health workers. Most reviews reported a combination of outcomes related to IPT adherence and treatment completion rate but without a baseline or comparison rate. Generally, we found limited evidence to demonstrate that the studied interventions improved treatment completion. Conclusions While most of the interventions were not shown to improve IPT completion, integration of tuberculosis and HIV services yielded high treatment completion rates in some settings. The lack of data from high burden TB settings limits applicability. Further research to assess different IPT delivery interventions, including those that address barriers to care in at-risk populations, is urgently needed to identify the most effective practices for IPT delivery and TB control in high TB burden settings. PMID:24886159

  11. Training interventions for improving telephone consultation skills in clinicians.

    PubMed

    Vaona, Alberto; Pappas, Yannis; Grewal, Rumant S; Ajaz, Mubasshir; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip

    2017-01-05

    Since 1879, the year of the first documented medical telephone consultation, the ability to consult by telephone has become an integral part of modern patient-centred healthcare systems. Nowadays, upwards of a quarter of all care consultations are conducted by telephone. Studies have quantified the impact of medical telephone consultation on clinicians' workload and detected the need for quality improvement. While doctors routinely receive training in communication and consultation skills, this does not necessarily include the specificities of telephone communication and consultation. Several studies assessed the short-term effect of interventions aimed at improving clinicians' telephone consultation skills, but there is no systematic review reporting patient-oriented outcomes or outcomes of interest to clinicians. To assess the effects of training interventions for clinicians' telephone consultation skills and patient outcomes. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other electronic databases and two trial registers up to 19 May 2016, and we handsearched references, checked citations and contacted study authors to identify additional studies and data. We considered randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies evaluating training interventions compared with any control intervention, including no intervention, for improving clinicians' telephone consultation skills with patients and their impact on patient outcomes. Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of eligible studies using standard Cochrane and EPOC guidance and the certainty of evidence using GRADE. We contacted study authors where additional information was needed. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane for data analysis. We identified one very small controlled before-after study performed in 1989: this study used a

  12. Interventions to Improve Parental Communication About Sex: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Cynthia L.; Bost, James

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: The relative effectiveness of interventions to improve parental communication with adolescents about sex is not known. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness and methodologic quality of interventions for improving parental communication with adolescents about sex. METHODS: We searched 6 databases: OVID/Medline, PsychInfo, ERIC, Cochrane Review, Communication and Mass Media, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. We included studies published between 1980 and July 2010 in peer-reviewed English-language journals that targeted US parents of adolescents aged 11 to 18 years, used an experimental or quasi-experimental design, included a control group, and had a pretest/posttest design. We abstracted data on multiple communication outcomes defined by the integrative conceptual model (communication frequency, content, skills, intentions, self-efficacy, perceived environmental barriers/facilitators, perceived social norms, attitudes, outcome expectations, knowledge, and beliefs). Methodologic quality was assessed using the 11-item methodologic quality score. RESULTS: Twelve studies met inclusion criteria. Compared with controls, parents who participated in these interventions experienced improvements in multiple communication domains including the frequency, quality, intentions, comfort, and self-efficacy for communicating. We noted no effects on parental attitudes toward communicating or the outcomes they expected to occur as a result of communicating. Four studies were of high quality, 7 were of medium quality, and 1 was of lower quality. CONCLUSIONS: Our review was limited by the lack of standardized measures for assessing parental communication. Still, interventions for improving parent-adolescent sex communication are well designed and have some targeted effects. Wider dissemination could augment efforts by schools, clinicians, and health educators. PMID:21321027

  13. A remedial intervention linked to a formative assessment is effective in terms of improving student performance in subsequent degree examinations.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Jennifer; Mackenzie, R K; Ross, S; Sinclair, H K; Lee, A J

    2010-01-01

    Intervention may help weaker medical students improve their performance. However, the effectiveness of remedial intervention is inconclusive due to small sample sizes in previous studies. We asked: is remedial intervention linked to a formative assessment effective in terms of improving student performance in subsequent degree examinations? This was a retrospective, observational study of anonymous databases of student assessment outcomes. Data were analysed for students due to graduate in the years 2005-2009 (n = 909). Exam performance was compared for students who received remediation versus those who did not. The main outcome measure was summative degree examination marks. After adjusting for cohort, gender, overseas versus home funding, previous degree and previous performance in the corresponding baseline third year summative exam, students receiving a remedial intervention (after poor performance on a formative objective structured clinical examination and written exams mid-fourth year) were significantly more likely to obtain an improved mark on end-of-fourth year summative written (p = 0.005) and OSCE (p = 0.001) exams compared to those students who did not receive remediation. A remedial intervention linked to poor assessment performance predicted improved performance in later examination. There is a need for prospective studies in order to identify the effective components of remedial interventions.

  14. Improving Flood Prediction By the Assimilation of Satellite Soil Moisture in Poorly Monitored Catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C. D.; Ryu, D.; Western, A. W.; Crow, W. T.; Su, C. H.; Robertson, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Flood prediction in poorly monitored catchments is among the greatest challenges faced by hydrologists. To address this challenge, an increasing number of studies in the last decade have explored methods to integrate various existing observations from ground and satellites. One approach in particular, is the assimilation of satellite soil moisture (SM-DA) into rainfall-runoff models. The rationale is that satellite soil moisture (SSM) can be used to correct model soil water states, enabling more accurate prediction of catchment response to precipitation and thus better streamflow. However, there is still no consensus on the most effective SM-DA scheme and how this might depend on catchment scale, climate characteristics, runoff mechanisms, model and SSM products used, etc. In this work, an operational SM-DA scheme was set up in the poorly monitored, large (>40,000 km2), semi-arid Warrego catchment situated in eastern Australia. We assimilated passive and active SSM products into the probability distributed model (PDM) using an ensemble Kalman filter. We explored factors influencing the SM-DA framework, including relatively new techniques to remove model-observation bias, estimate observation errors and represent model errors. Furthermore, we explored the advantages of accounting for the spatial distribution of forcing and channel routing processes within the catchment by implementing and comparing lumped and semi-distributed model setups. Flood prediction is improved by SM-DA (Figure), with a 30% reduction of the average root-mean-squared difference of the ensemble prediction, a 20% reduction of the false alarm ratio and a 40% increase of the ensemble mean Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. SM-DA skill does not significantly change with different observation error assumptions, but the skill strongly depends on the observational bias correction technique used, and more importantly, on the performance of the open-loop model before assimilation. Our findings imply that proper

  15. Community-based approaches to combating malnutrition and poor education among girls in resource-poor settings: report of a large scale intervention in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Pappas, G; Agha, A; Rafique, G; Khan, K S; Badruddin, S H; Peermohamed, H

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition and low levels of education continue to be major problems in many developing countries, especially for female children. In Pakistan, a large-scale school lunch program was implemented in 29 of the poorest rural districts through a public-private partnership. The project provided freshly prepared meals in 4035 government primary girls' schools over a 2 year period. The primary strategy was empowerment of women in the community who volunteered to plan the meals, purchase the food, and cook and serve the meals. The project collected data from growth monitoring, attendance records, pre- and post-intervention community based surveys, focus group discussions, and the use of other ethnographic methods. A study on changes in the levels of malnutrition was based on an analytical sample of 203,116 girls who received at least two sets of body measurements at least 6 months apart. Over the intervention period, wasting declined by almost half and school enrolment increased by 40%. Girls who entered the program early were found to have similar levels of malnutrition to girls who entered late, suggesting that factors external to the program were not associated with the decrease in malnutrition. This study demonstrates the potential success and scalability of school feeding programs in Pakistan. Lessons learned include that synergies are found when working across sectors (health, education, and empowerment) and that there are challenges to intersectoral projects. Globalization may undermine this successful model as Pakistan considers expanded school feeding programs.

  16. Interventions to improve inhaler technique for people with asthma.

    PubMed

    Normansell, Rebecca; Kew, Kayleigh M; Mathioudakis, Alexander G

    2017-03-13

    Asthma is a common chronic disease worldwide. Inhalers are often prescribed to help control asthma symptoms, improve quality of life and reduce the risk of exacerbations or flare-ups. However, evidence suggests that many people with asthma do not use their inhaler correctly. It is therefore important to evaluate whether interventions aimed specifically at improving technique are effective and safe, and whether use of these interventions translates into improved clinical outcomes. To assess the impact of interventions to improve inhaler technique on clinical outcomes and safety in adults and children with asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Trials Register, which contains records compiled from multiple electronic and handsearched resources. We also searched trial registries and reference lists of primary studies. We conducted the most recent search on 23 November 2016. We included studies comparing a group of adults or children with asthma receiving an inhaler technique intervention versus a group receiving a control or alternative intervention. We included parallel and cluster-randomised trials of any duration conducted in any setting, and planned to include only the first phase of any cross-over trials identified. We included studies reported as full-text articles, those published as abstracts only and unpublished data. Two review authors screened the search results for eligible studies. We extracted outcome data, assessed risk of bias in duplicate and resolved discrepancies by involving another review author. We grouped studies making similar comparisons by consensus (e.g. all those comparing enhanced inhaler technique education vs usual care) and conducted meta-analyses only if treatments, participants and the underlying clinical question were similar enough for pooling to make sense. We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios, and continuous data as mean differences or standardised mean differences, all with random-effects models. We described skewed data

  17. Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Medley, Nancy; Darzi, Andrea J; Richardson, Marty; Habiba Garga, Kesso; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least four antenatal care (ANC) visits for all pregnant women. Almost half of pregnant women worldwide, and especially in developing countries do not receive this amount of care. Poor attendance of ANC is associated with delivery of low birthweight babies and more neonatal deaths. ANC may include education on nutrition, potential problems with pregnancy or childbirth, child care and prevention or detection of disease during pregnancy. This review focused on community-based interventions and health systems-related interventions. Objectives To assess the effects of health system and community interventions for improving coverage of antenatal care and other perinatal health outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials and cluster-randomised trials. Trials of any interventions to improve ANC coverage were eligible for inclusion. Trials were also eligible if they targeted specific and related outcomes, such as maternal or perinatal death, but also reported ANC coverage. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Main results We included 34 trials involving approximately 400,000 women. Some trials tested community-based interventions to improve uptake of antenatal care (media campaigns, education or financial incentives for pregnant women), while other trials looked at health systems interventions (home visits for pregnant women or equipment for clinics). Most trials took place in low- and middle-income countries, and 29 of the 34 trials used a cluster-randomised design. We assessed 30 of the 34 trials as of low or unclear overall risk of bias. Comparison 1: One intervention versus no intervention We

  18. Compliance therapy: an intervention to improve inpatients' attitudes toward treatment.

    PubMed

    Tay, Sim-Eng Clara

    2007-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescription medication is the leading cause of relapse or recurrence of psychotic illness. Literature has shown that compliance therapy, a brief intervention based on motivational interviewing and cognitive approaches, can lead to improved attitudes, adherence to treatment, and insight. This descriptive study aimed to examine the effectiveness of compliance therapy on treatment adherence. The 69 participants were patients of the same ward, either referred for patient education by the psychiatrist or selected from a convenience sample of patients on the clinical pathway of relapsed schizophrenia or major depression. Compliance therapy was conducted individually or in small groups of 2 to 3 patients. The shortened version of the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-10), along with a rating scale adapted from another study, was used to measure attitude and the rate of adherence before and after therapy. Patients in both individual and group sessions showed significant improvements in attitude. Those with six or more admissions had slightly less significant improvement, and those with personality disorder or substance abuse showed no significant improvement. Compliance therapy benefits patients and improves their attitude toward treatment. Psychiatric nurses could be trained in this clinical intervention to enable them to conduct compliance therapy in the hospital or in the community.

  19. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children.

  20. Towards improving dose administration aid supply: a quality improvement intervention aimed at reducing dispensing errors.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Julia Fiona-Maree; Marriott, Jennifer Lillian; Hussainy, Safeera Yasmeen

    2013-12-01

    There is a risk that medicines can be dispensed into dose administration aids (DAAs), inaccurately or unsuitably. Quality improvement interventions (QIIs) may target this pharmacy medicine supply service and reduce the occurrence of these dispensing errors. In turn, medicine administration can improve in nursing homes (NHs) that use these devices. To develop, introduce and evaluate the potential of a QII to improve DAA medicine supply. Fourteen Victorian community pharmacies and 45 NHs. A QII was developed using findings from three focus groups with 13 participants involved with DAAs at community pharmacies and NHs. The intervention was introduced to community pharmacies and NHs via a pharmacist-facilitated education session; attendees completed an evaluation questionnaire. Potential usefulness and effectiveness of the QII at improving DAA supply and reducing dispensing errors. The QII was titled: 'Be alert and work together for medicine safety, DAA incident awareness toolkit'. Four-hundred and thirty-five questionnaires were returned (85.0 % response rate). Respondents believed the intervention had the potential to improve pharmacy medicine supply or NH medicine administration involving DAAs 'very' (47.3 % of responses) or 'extremely well' (23.4 %). The intervention had the potential to reduce the occurrence of DAA dispensing errors 'very' (49.6 %) or 'extremely well' (20.5 %). A stakeholder informed QII was perceived to have the potential to improve DAA medicine supply from community pharmacies to NHs and reduce the occurrence of dispensing errors found within them. Future quantitative evaluation of the intervention is required.

  1. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    5-year BC rate was 52% for RP+RT vs. 30% for RP (p < 0.01). The 5-year BC rate for patients with seminal vesicle invasion was 60% for RP+RT vs. 18% for RP (p < 0.01). For those with positive margins, the 5-year BC rate was 64% for RP+RT vs. 27% for RP (p < 0.01). The use of adjuvant RT remained statistically significant on multivariate analysis when applying either biochemical failure definition. Adjuvant RT also remained statistically significant when including the postoperative PSA level (>30 days after surgery) in the multivariate analyses. In addition, 99 (17%) of the 583 RP patients required salvage prostatic fossa RT (median dose, 59.4 Gy) at a median interval of 1.3 years after surgery (range, 0.1-8.4) for a palpable recurrence (n = 10) or a detectable/rising postoperative PSA level (n = 89). The median PSA level before salvage RT was 0.8 ng/mL (mean, 3.2 ng/mL). The 5-year and 8-year BC rate, using the PSA < 0.1 ng/mL definition, from the date of salvage RT was 41% and 35%, respectively. The 5-year and 8-year BC rate, using the PSA < 0.3 ng/mL definition, was 46% and 36%, respectively. The 8-year local recurrence rate after salvage RT was 4%. Conclusion: Adjuvant RT demonstrated improved efficacy against prostate cancer. For patients with poor pathologic features (extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive margins), adjuvant RT improved the biochemical outcome independent of other prognostic factors.

  2. Improving psychotherapy research: The example of mindfulness based interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number and sophistication of available psychotherapies suggests that a critical appraisal of the methodological issues of psychotherapy studies is highly needed. Several key questions regarding the efficacy of a given intervention, the understanding of whether positive effects observed following the delivery of a psychotherapeutic intervention are specifically attributable to the intervention itself or to other “non specific” factors, such as benefit expectations, therapist attention and support, and the possibility of improving psychotherapy research need an answer. This, in turn, could provide clinicians with more rigorous information about psychotherapy outcomes and could properly address several shortcomings that are frequently observed in current psychotherapy studies. Accordingly, in this editorial I will highlight some of the most important critical issues that a well designed psychotherapy study should take into account, including the need for appropriate control groups, appropriate randomization and blinding procedures, and the importance of performing appropriately powered studies that include a sufficiently long follow-up period. Finally, I will build on my expertise in the field of mindfulness based interventions, in particular mindfulness based stress reduction and mindfulness based cognitive therapy, to show how such issues have been and can be successfully implemented in the design of future psychotherapy studies. PMID:25237607

  3. Telehealth interventions to improve clinical nursing of elders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Josette F; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews reports of research conducted worldwide from 1966 to January 2001 on telehealth interventions in clinical nursing for elders. Reports were identified through a systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, ERIC, and ACM using the search terms Telemedicine or Health Information Networks, Nursing, and Research, and were restricted to those published in English. Reports of research using interactive computer technology to assess or intervene with nursing problems commonly observed in persons age 65 and older were sought. Only published reports presenting the findings of an exploratory or experimental study and exploring the association between one intervention variable and technology were included. The search resulted in 18 research reports describing eight research projects. Due to the preponderance of demonstrations and feasibility reports, the dearth of experimental investigations, and the heterogeneous nature of the few studies identified, statistical summarization was not attempted. Telehealth interventions have the potential to improve the clinical nursing care of elders because they provide alternative, equivalent approaches to assess key indicators of the physical and psychological state of elders; are acceptable to nurses, elders, and family caregivers; and may prove less costly than face-to-face interventions. Telehealth approaches provide not only acceptable substitutes for discrete nursing actions but also can serve as a context within which a large range of professional gerontological nursing services can be delivered in a manner that is timely and convenient for elders.

  4. Improving health and energy efficiency through community-based housing interventions.

    PubMed

    Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Crane, Julian; Chapman, Ralph; Fougere, Geoff

    2011-12-01

    Houses designed for one climate and cultural group may not be appropriate for other places and people. Our aim is to find cost-effective ways to improve the characteristics of older homes, ill-fitted for New Zealand's climate, in order to improve the occupants' health. We have carried out two community randomised trials, in partnership with local communities, which have focused on retrofitted insulation and more effective heating and have two other studies under way, one which focuses on electricity vouchers and the other on housing hazard remediation. The Housing, Insulation and Health Study showed that insulating 1,350 houses, built before insulation was required, improved the occupants' health and well being as well as household energy efficiency. In the Housing, Heating and Health Study we investigated the impact of installing more effective heating in insulated houses for 409 households, where there was a child with doctor-diagnosed asthma. Again, the study showed significant results in the intervention group; indoor temperatures increased and levels of NO(2) were halved. Children reported less poor health, lower levels of asthma symptoms and sleep disturbances by wheeze and dry cough. Children also had fewer days off school. Improving the energy efficiency of older housing leads to health improvements and energy efficiency improvements. Multidisciplinary studies of housing interventions can create compelling evidence to support policies for sustainable housing developments which improve health.

  5. Interventions for improving upper limb function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Alex; Farmer, Sybil E; Brady, Marian C; Langhorne, Peter; Mead, Gillian E; Mehrholz, Jan; van Wijck, Frederike

    2014-11-12

    Improving upper limb function is a core element of stroke rehabilitation needed to maximise patient outcomes and reduce disability. Evidence about effects of individual treatment techniques and modalities is synthesised within many reviews. For selection of effective rehabilitation treatment, the relative effectiveness of interventions must be known. However, a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in this area is currently lacking. To carry out a Cochrane overview by synthesising systematic reviews of interventions provided to improve upper limb function after stroke. We comprehensively searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; the Database of Reviews of Effects; and PROSPERO (an international prospective register of systematic reviews) (June 2013). We also contacted review authors in an effort to identify further relevant reviews. We included Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with stroke comparing upper limb interventions with no treatment, usual care or alternative treatments. Our primary outcome of interest was upper limb function; secondary outcomes included motor impairment and performance of activities of daily living. When we identified overlapping reviews, we systematically identified the most up-to-date and comprehensive review and excluded reviews that overlapped with this. Two overview authors independently applied the selection criteria, excluding reviews that were superseded by more up-to-date reviews including the same (or similar) studies. Two overview authors independently assessed the methodological quality of reviews (using a modified version of the AMSTAR tool) and extracted data. Quality of evidence within each comparison in each review was determined using objective criteria (based on numbers of participants, risk of bias, heterogeneity and review quality) to apply GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) levels of evidence. We resolved

  6. The Feasibility of Health Trainer Improved Patient Self-Management in Patients with Low Health Literacy and Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Protheroe, Joanne; Rathod, Trishna; Bartlam, Bernadette; Rowlands, Gillian; Richardson, Gerry; Reeves, David

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is most prevalent in deprived communities and patients with low health literacy have worse glycaemic control and higher rates of diabetic complications. However, recruitment from this patient population into intervention trials is highly challenging. We conducted a study to explore the feasibility of recruitment and to assess the effect of a lay health trainer intervention, in patients with low health literacy and poorly controlled diabetes from a socioeconomically disadvantaged population, compared with usual care. Methods. A pilot RCT comparing the LHT intervention with usual care. Patients with HbA1c > 7.5 (58 mmol/mol) were recruited. Baseline and 7-month outcome data were entered directly onto a laptop to reduce patient burden. Results. 76 patients were recruited; 60.5% had low health literacy and 75% were from the most deprived areas of England. Participants in the LHT arm had significantly improved mental health (p = 0.049) and illness perception (p = 0.040). The intervention was associated with lower resource use, better patient self-care management, and better QALY profile at 7-month follow-up. Conclusion. This study describes successful recruitment strategies for hard-to-reach populations. Further research is warranted for this cost-effective, relatively low-cost intervention for a population currently suffering a disproportionate burden of diabetes, to demonstrate its sustained impact on treatment effects, health, and health inequalities.

  7. The Feasibility of Health Trainer Improved Patient Self-Management in Patients with Low Health Literacy and Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Trishna; Rowlands, Gillian; Richardson, Gerry; Reeves, David

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is most prevalent in deprived communities and patients with low health literacy have worse glycaemic control and higher rates of diabetic complications. However, recruitment from this patient population into intervention trials is highly challenging. We conducted a study to explore the feasibility of recruitment and to assess the effect of a lay health trainer intervention, in patients with low health literacy and poorly controlled diabetes from a socioeconomically disadvantaged population, compared with usual care. Methods. A pilot RCT comparing the LHT intervention with usual care. Patients with HbA1c > 7.5 (58 mmol/mol) were recruited. Baseline and 7-month outcome data were entered directly onto a laptop to reduce patient burden. Results. 76 patients were recruited; 60.5% had low health literacy and 75% were from the most deprived areas of England. Participants in the LHT arm had significantly improved mental health (p = 0.049) and illness perception (p = 0.040). The intervention was associated with lower resource use, better patient self-care management, and better QALY profile at 7-month follow-up. Conclusion. This study describes successful recruitment strategies for hard-to-reach populations. Further research is warranted for this cost-effective, relatively low-cost intervention for a population currently suffering a disproportionate burden of diabetes, to demonstrate its sustained impact on treatment effects, health, and health inequalities. PMID:27833922

  8. Improving oxygen prescribing rates by tailoring interventions for specific healthcare professional groups

    PubMed Central

    Helliar, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen prescription remains a nationwide problem. The dangers associated with unregulated oxygen administration are well described in the literature with the potential for serious harm in patients with chronic hypercapnia, as well as potentially delaying discharge in patients who are administered it without a prescription. This project identifies poor compliance with regional and national standards and sets out to improve the frequency of oxygen prescribing on a cardiology ward. By studying the problem at a Somerset district general hospital we identified two main groups of professionals responsible for the poor compliance, nursing staff (who administer the oxygen) and junior doctors (who should prescribe it). A series of interventions was designed to firstly raise awareness of the problem within these two groups before going on to target each group with a further intervention over 24 weeks. At baseline we found only 11.3% of patients receiving oxygen had it prescribed. At the end of the project this had improved to 69.6%. We also found that following raised awareness in the nursing staff and introduction of a bedside warning the number of patients receiving oxygen on the ward fell by 35%. In conclusion, this project outlines a strategy for improving oxygen prescribing rates on a medical ward. By targeting different populations we had hoped to see a cumulative improvement after each improvement cycle, however, some resistance from junior doctors in engaging with our third intervention was reflected with a slight decrease in prescribing rates. Further work should address this issue and look to apply this strategy across a wider clinical area with a greater sample size to see if the results are replicable on a larger scale. PMID:28074129

  9. Exercise and nutritional interventions for improving aging muscle health.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; Little, Jonathan P; Candow, Darren G

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass declines with age (i.e., sarcopenia) resulting in muscle weakness and functional limitations. Sarcopenia has been associated with physiological changes in muscle morphology, protein and hormonal kinetics, insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. The purpose of this review is to highlight how exercise and nutritional intervention strategies may benefit aging muscle. It is well known that resistance exercise training increases muscle strength and size and evidence also suggests that resistance training can increase mitochondrial content and decrease oxidative stress in older adults. Recent findings suggest that fast-velocity resistance exercise may be an effective intervention for older adults to enhance muscle power and functional capacity. Aerobic exercise training may also benefit aging skeletal muscle by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, improving insulin sensitivity, and/or decreasing oxidative stress. In addition to exercise, creatine monohydrate, milk-based proteins, and essential fatty acids all have biological effects which could enhance some of the physiological adaptations from exercise training in older adults. Additional research is needed to determine whether skeletal muscle adaptations to increased activity in older adults are further enhanced with effective nutritional interventions and whether this is due to enhanced muscle protein synthesis, improved mitochondrial function, and/or a reduced inflammatory response.

  10. Systematic review of interventions to improve patient uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Arwel W.; Taylor, Abigail; Gowler, Holly; O'Kelly, Noel; Ghosh, Sudip; Bridle, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is considered a key management strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but its effectiveness is undermined by poor patient uptake and completion. The aim of this review was to identify, select and synthesise the available evidence on interventions for improving uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD. Electronic databases and trial registers were searched for randomised trials evaluating the effect of an intervention compared with a concurrent control group on patient uptake and completion. The primary outcomes were the number of participants who attended a baseline assessment and at least one session of pulmonary rehabilitation (uptake), and the number of participants who received a discharge assessment (completion). Only one quasi-randomised study (n=115) (of 2468 records identified) met the review inclusion criteria and was assessed as having a high risk of bias. The point estimate of effect did, however, indicate greater programme completion and attendance rates in participants allocated to pulmonary rehabilitation plus a tablet computer (enabled with support for exercise training) compared with controls (pulmonary rehabilitation only). There is insufficient evidence to guide clinical practice on interventions for improving patient uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD. Despite increasing awareness of patient barriers to pulmonary rehabilitation, our review highlights the existing under-appreciation of interventional trials in this area. This knowledge gap should be viewed as an area of research priority due to its likely impact in undermining wider implementation of pulmonary rehabilitation and restricting patient access to a treatment considered the cornerstone of COPD. PMID:28154821

  11. Systematic review of interventions to improve patient uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Jones, Arwel W; Taylor, Abigail; Gowler, Holly; O'Kelly, Noel; Ghosh, Sudip; Bridle, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is considered a key management strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but its effectiveness is undermined by poor patient uptake and completion. The aim of this review was to identify, select and synthesise the available evidence on interventions for improving uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD. Electronic databases and trial registers were searched for randomised trials evaluating the effect of an intervention compared with a concurrent control group on patient uptake and completion. The primary outcomes were the number of participants who attended a baseline assessment and at least one session of pulmonary rehabilitation (uptake), and the number of participants who received a discharge assessment (completion). Only one quasi-randomised study (n=115) (of 2468 records identified) met the review inclusion criteria and was assessed as having a high risk of bias. The point estimate of effect did, however, indicate greater programme completion and attendance rates in participants allocated to pulmonary rehabilitation plus a tablet computer (enabled with support for exercise training) compared with controls (pulmonary rehabilitation only). There is insufficient evidence to guide clinical practice on interventions for improving patient uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD. Despite increasing awareness of patient barriers to pulmonary rehabilitation, our review highlights the existing under-appreciation of interventional trials in this area. This knowledge gap should be viewed as an area of research priority due to its likely impact in undermining wider implementation of pulmonary rehabilitation and restricting patient access to a treatment considered the cornerstone of COPD.

  12. [Improvement of physical fitness as anti-aging intervention].

    PubMed

    Castillo Garzón, Manuel J; Ortega Porcel, Francisco B; Ruiz Ruiz, Jonatan

    2005-02-05

    Several recent important studies have clearly shown that a low physical fitness represents a potent risk factor and even a predictor of both cardiovascular and all-causes morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, physical fitness assessment should be performed at the clinical level since, when properly assessed, it is a highly valuable health and life expectancy indicator. Based on the results of fitness assessment in a particular person and knowing his/her life style and daily physical activity, an individually adapted training program can be prescribed. This training program will allow that person to develop his/her maximal physical potential while improving his/her physical and mental health and attenuating the deleterious consequences of aging. In fact, physical exercise is today proposed as a highly effective means to treat and prevent major morbidity and mortality causes in industrialized countries. Most of these causes are associated with the aging process. In order to be effective, this type of intervention should be directed to improve the aerobic capacity and strength. In addition, it should be complemented with work directed to improve the general coordination and flexibility. Finally, diet optimization and use of nutritional supplements and legal ergogenic aids are key elements to improve the functional capacity and health, all of which is synonymous of anti-aging interventions.

  13. Process evaluation of a workplace health promotion intervention aimed at improving work engagement and energy balance.

    PubMed

    van Berkel, Jantien; Boot, Cécile R L; Proper, Karin I; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the process of the implementation of an intervention aimed at improving work engagement and energy balance, and to explore associations between process measures and compliance. Process measures were assessed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. The mindfulness training was attended at least once by 81.3% of subjects, and 54.5% were highly compliant. With regard to e-coaching and homework exercises, 6.3% and 8.0%, respectively, were highly compliant. The training was appreciated with a 7.5 score and e-coaching with a 6.8 score. Appreciation of training and e-coaching, satisfaction with trainer and coach, and practical facilitation were significantly associated with compliance. The intervention was implemented well on the level of the mindfulness training, but poorly on the level of e-coaching and homework time investment. To increase compliance, attention should be paid to satisfaction and trainer-participant relationship.

  14. Interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Thomas F; Alexander, Kelly T; Sinclair, David; Boisson, Sophie; Peletz, Rachel; Chang, Howard H; Majorin, Fiona; Cairncross, Sandy

    2015-10-20

    Diarrhoea is a major cause of death and disease, especially among young children in low-income countries. In these settings, many infectious agents associated with diarrhoea are spread through water contaminated with faeces.In remote and low-income settings, source-based water quality improvement includes providing protected groundwater (springs, wells, and bore holes), or harvested rainwater as an alternative to surface sources (rivers and lakes). Point-of-use water quality improvement interventions include boiling, chlorination, flocculation, filtration, or solar disinfection, mainly conducted at home. To assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (11 November 2014), CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library, 7 November 2014), MEDLINE (1966 to 10 November 2014), EMBASE (1974 to 10 November 2014), and LILACS (1982 to 7 November 2014). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked references from identified studies through 11 November 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, and controlled before-and-after studies (CBA) comparing interventions aimed at improving the microbiological quality of drinking water with no intervention in children and adults. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used meta-analyses to estimate pooled measures of effect, where appropriate, and investigated potential sources of heterogeneity using subgroup analyses. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Forty-five cluster-RCTs, two quasi-RCTs, and eight CBA studies, including over 84,000 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Most included studies were conducted in low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) (50 studies) with unimproved water sources (30 studies) and unimproved or unclear sanitation (34 studies). The primary

  15. Interventions for improving sit-to-stand ability following stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Alex; Gray, Charla; Culham, Elsie; Durward, Brian R; Langhorne, Peter

    2014-05-26

    Standing up from a seated position is one of the most frequently performed functional tasks, is an essential pre-requisite to walking and is important for independent living and preventing falls. Following stroke, patients can experience a number of problems relating to the ability to sit-to-stand independently. To review the evidence of effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving sit-to-stand ability after stroke. The primary objectives were to determine (1) the effect of interventions that alter the starting posture (including chair height, foot position, hand rests) on ability to sit-to-stand independently; and (2) the effect of rehabilitation interventions (such as repetitive practice and exercise programmes) on ability to sit-to-stand independently. The secondary objectives were to determine the effects of interventions aimed at improving ability to sit-to-stand on: (1) time taken to sit-to-stand; (2) symmetry of weight distribution during sit-to-stand; (3) peak vertical ground reaction forces during sit-to-stand; (4) lateral movement of centre of pressure during sit-to-stand; and (5) incidence of falls. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (June 2013), CENTRAL (2013, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2013), EMBASE (1980 to June 2013), CINAHL (1982 to June 2013), AMED (1985 to June 2013) and six additional databases. We also searched reference lists and trials registers and contacted experts. Randomised trials in adults after stroke where: the intervention aimed to affect the ability to sit-to-stand by altering the posture of the patient, or the design of the chair; stated that the aim of the intervention was to improve the ability to sit-to-stand; or the intervention involved exercises that included repeated practice of the movement of sit-to-stand (task-specific practice of rising to stand).The primary outcome of interest was the ability to sit-to-stand independently. Secondary outcomes included time taken to sit-to-stand, measures of

  16. Effects of Individualised and Small-Group Guided Oral Reading Interventions on Reading Skills and Reading Attitude of Poor Readers in Grades 2-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostdam, Ron; Blok, Henk; Boendermaker, Conny

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of guided oral reading as a remedy for low-achieving readers, two experiments were conducted in the early grades of primary school. In the first, poor-reading students were randomly divided between two treatment groups and a control group. In treatment groups, the intervention was delivered one-to-one, either in a repeated…

  17. Nutrition education linked to agricultural interventions improved child dietary diversity in rural Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Reinbott, Anika; Schelling, Anna; Kuchenbecker, Judith; Jeremias, Theresa; Russell, Iean; Kevanna, Ou; Krawinkel, Michael B; Jordan, Irmgard

    2016-10-01

    Poor infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices are major determinants of chronic malnutrition. The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of a nutrition education (NE) programme aimed at promoting improved IYCF behaviours in combination with an agriculture intervention on children's dietary diversity and nutritional status. From 2012 to 2014, a cluster randomised trial was rolled out in Cambodia in the context of an agriculture and nutrition project of the FAO of the UN. The cross-sectional baseline study was carried out in sixteen pre-selected communes in 2012. Restricted randomisation allotted the communes to either intervention (NE and agriculture intervention) or comparison arms (agriculture intervention only). The impact survey was conducted as a census in all FAO project villages in 2014. Caregivers of children aged 0-23 months were interviewed using standardised questions on socio-economic status and dietary diversity (24-h recall). Anthropometric measurements were taken. A difference-in-differences model was applied. The sample comprised 743 households with children ≥6 months of age at baseline and 921 at impact. After 1 year of NE, 69 % of the intervention households reported to have participated in the NE. Estimated mean child dietary diversity was significantly different at impact between comparison and intervention (3·6 and 3·9, respectively). In particular, the consumption of pro-vitamin A-rich foods and other fruits and vegetables increased. No treatment effects on height-for-age Z-scores could be shown. NE led to improvements in children's diets. For effects on growth, it is assumed that longer NE activities are required to achieve sustainable behaviour change of age-appropriate infant feeding.

  18. [Interventions to improve the management of diabetes mellitus in primary health care and outpatient community settings].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars Jørgen; Drivsholm, Thomas B

    2002-01-28

    This review should be cited as: Renders CM, Valk GD, Griffin S. Wagner EH, Eijk JThM van, Assendelft WJJ. Interventions to improve the management of diabetes mellitus in primary care, outpatient and community settings (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2001. Oxford: Update Software. A substantive amendment to this systematic review was last made on 29 June 2000. Cochrane reviews are regularly checked and updated if necessary. Diabetes is a common chronic disease that is increasingly managed in primary care. Different systems have been proposed to manage diabetes care. To assess the effects of different interventions, targeted at health professionals or the structure in which they deliver care, on the management of patients with diabetes in primary care, outpatient and community settings. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group specialised register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966-1999), EMBASE (1980-1999), Cinahl (1982-1999), and reference lists of articles. Randomised trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITS) analyses of professional, financial and organisational strategies aimed at improving care for people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. The participants were health care professionals, including physicians, nurses and pharmacists. The outcomes included objectively measured health professional performance or patient outcomes, and self-report measures with known validity and reliability. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Forty-one studies were included involving more than 200 practices and 48,000 patients. Twenty-seven studies were RCTs, 12 were CBAs, and two were ITS. The studies were heterogeneous in terms of interventions, participants, settings and outcomes. The methodological quality of the studies was often poor. In all studies the intervention

  19. Interventions to improve return to work in depressed people.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Faber, Babs; Verbeek, Jos H; Neumeyer-Gromen, Angela; Hees, Hiske L; Verhoeven, Arco C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Bültmann, Ute

    2014-12-03

    inhibitor (SNRI) medication on reducing sickness absence and yielded highly inconsistent results. Clinical interventions, psychological We found moderate quality evidence based on three studies that telephone or online cognitive behavioural therapy was more effective in reducing sick leave than usual primary or occupational care (SMD -0.23; 95% CI -0.45 to -0.01). Clinical interventions, psychological combined with antidepressant medication We found low quality evidence based on two studies that enhanced primary care did not substantially decrease sickness absence in the medium term (4 to 12 months) (SMD -0.02; 95% CI -0.15 to 0.12). A third study found no substantial effect on sickness absence in favour of this intervention in the long term (24 months).We found high quality evidence, based on one study, that a structured telephone outreach and care management program was more effective in reducing sickness absence than usual care (SMD - 0.21; 95% CI -0.37 to -0.05). Clinical interventions, exercise We found low quality evidence based on one study that supervised strength exercise reduced sickness absence compared to relaxation (SMD -1.11; 95% CI -1.68 to -0.54). We found moderate quality evidence based on two studies that aerobic exercise was no more effective in reducing sickness absence than relaxation or stretching (SMD -0.06; 95% CI -0.36 to 0.24). We found moderate quality evidence that adding a work-directed intervention to a clinical intervention reduced the number of days on sick leave compared to a clinical intervention alone. We also found moderate quality evidence that enhancing primary or occupational care with cognitive behavioural therapy reduced sick leave compared to the usual care. A structured telephone outreach and care management program that included medication reduced sickness absence compared to usual care. However, enhancing primary care with a quality improvement program did not have a considerable effect on sickness absence. There was no evidence

  20. Cinnamon Converts Poor Learning Mice to Good Learners: Implications for Memory Improvement.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Dasarathi, Sridevi; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-12-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB) in converting poor learning mice to good learning ones. NaB, but not sodium formate, was found to upregulate plasticity-related molecules, stimulate NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx and increase of spine density in cultured hippocampal neurons. NaB induced the activation of CREB in hippocampal neurons via protein kinase A (PKA), which was responsible for the upregulation of plasticity-related molecules. Finally, spatial memory consolidation-induced activation of CREB and expression of different plasticity-related molecules were less in the hippocampus of poor learning mice as compared to good learning ones. However, oral treatment of cinnamon and NaB increased spatial memory consolidation-induced activation of CREB and expression of plasticity-related molecules in the hippocampus of poor-learning mice and converted poor learners into good learners. These results describe a novel property of cinnamon in switching poor learners to good learners via stimulating hippocampal plasticity.

  1. Quality Improvement Intervention for Reduction of Redundant Testing

    PubMed Central

    Tacker, Danyel H.; Ducatman, Barbara S.; Long, Dustin; Perrotta, Peter L.; Lawther, Hannah; Pennington, Kelly; Lander, Owen; Warden, Mary; Failinger, Conard; Halbritter, Kevin; Pellegrino, Ronald; Treese, Marney; Stead, Jeffrey A.; Glass, Eric; Cianciaruso, Lauren; Nau, Konrad C.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory data are critical to analyzing and improving clinical quality. In the setting of residual use of creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme testing for myocardial infarction, we assessed disease outcomes of discordant creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme +/troponin I (−) test pairs in order to address anticipated clinician concerns about potential loss of case-finding sensitivity following proposed discontinuation of routine creatine kinase and creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme testing. Time-sequenced interventions were introduced. The main outcome was the percentage of cardiac marker studies performed within guidelines. Nonguideline orders dominated at baseline. Creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme testing in 7496 order sets failed to detect additional myocardial infarctions but was associated with 42 potentially preventable admissions/quarter. Interruptive computerized soft stops improved guideline compliance from 32.3% to 58% (P < .001) in services not receiving peer leader intervention and to >80% (P < .001) with peer leadership that featured dashboard feedback about test order performance. This successful experience was recapitulated in interrupted time series within 2 additional services within facility 1 and then in 2 external hospitals (including a critical access facility). Improvements have been sustained postintervention. Laboratory cost savings at the academic facility were estimated to be ≥US$635 000 per year. National collaborative data indicated that facility 1 improved its order patterns from fourth to first quartile compared to peer norms and imply that nonguideline orders persist elsewhere. This example illustrates how pathologists can provide leadership in assisting clinicians in changing laboratory ordering practices. We found that clinicians respond to local laboratory data about their own test performance and that evidence suggesting harm is more compelling to clinicians than evidence of cost savings. Our experience indicates that

  2. Quality Improvement Intervention for Reduction of Redundant Testing.

    PubMed

    Ducatman, Alan M; Tacker, Danyel H; Ducatman, Barbara S; Long, Dustin; Perrotta, Peter L; Lawther, Hannah; Pennington, Kelly; Lander, Owen; Warden, Mary; Failinger, Conard; Halbritter, Kevin; Pellegrino, Ronald; Treese, Marney; Stead, Jeffrey A; Glass, Eric; Cianciaruso, Lauren; Nau, Konrad C

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory data are critical to analyzing and improving clinical quality. In the setting of residual use of creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme testing for myocardial infarction, we assessed disease outcomes of discordant creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme +/troponin I (-) test pairs in order to address anticipated clinician concerns about potential loss of case-finding sensitivity following proposed discontinuation of routine creatine kinase and creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme testing. Time-sequenced interventions were introduced. The main outcome was the percentage of cardiac marker studies performed within guidelines. Nonguideline orders dominated at baseline. Creatine kinase M and B isoenzyme testing in 7496 order sets failed to detect additional myocardial infarctions but was associated with 42 potentially preventable admissions/quarter. Interruptive computerized soft stops improved guideline compliance from 32.3% to 58% (P < .001) in services not receiving peer leader intervention and to >80% (P < .001) with peer leadership that featured dashboard feedback about test order performance. This successful experience was recapitulated in interrupted time series within 2 additional services within facility 1 and then in 2 external hospitals (including a critical access facility). Improvements have been sustained postintervention. Laboratory cost savings at the academic facility were estimated to be ≥US$635 000 per year. National collaborative data indicated that facility 1 improved its order patterns from fourth to first quartile compared to peer norms and imply that nonguideline orders persist elsewhere. This example illustrates how pathologists can provide leadership in assisting clinicians in changing laboratory ordering practices. We found that clinicians respond to local laboratory data about their own test performance and that evidence suggesting harm is more compelling to clinicians than evidence of cost savings. Our experience indicates that interventions

  3. A Multimodal Intervention Improves Postanesthesia Care Unit Handovers.

    PubMed

    Weinger, Matthew B; Slagle, Jason M; Kuntz, Audrey H; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Banerjee, Arna; Mercaldo, Nathaniel D; Bills, James L; Wallston, Kenneth A; Speroff, Theodore; Patterson, Emily S; France, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Failures of communication are a major contributor to perioperative adverse events. Transitions of care may be particularly vulnerable. We sought to improve postoperative handovers. We introduced a multimodal intervention in an adult and a pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) to improve postoperative handovers between anesthesia providers (APs) and PACU registered nurses (RNs). The intervention included a standardized electronic handover report form, a didactic webinar, mandatory simulation training focused on improving interprofessional communication, and post-training performance feedback. Trained, blinded nurse observers scored PACU handovers during 17 months using a structured tool consisting of 8 subscales and a global score (1-5 scale). Multivariate logistic regression assessed the effect of the intervention on the proportion of observed handovers receiving a global effectiveness rating of ≥3. Four hundred fifty-two clinicians received the simulation-based training, and 981 handovers were observed and rated. In the adult PACU, the estimated percentages of acceptable handovers (global ratings ≥3) among AP-RN pairs, where neither received simulation-based training (untrained dyads), was 3% (95% confidence interval, 1%-11%) at day 0, 10% (5%-19%) at training initiation (day 40), and 57% (33%-78%) at 1-year post-training initiation (day 405). For AP-RN pairs where at least one received the simulation-based training (trained dyads), these percentages were estimated to be 18% (11%-28%) and 68% (57%-76%) on days 40 and 405, respectively. The percentage of acceptable handovers was significantly greater on day 405 than it was on day 40 for both untrained (P < 0.001) and trained dyads (P < 0.001). Similar patterns were observed in the pediatric PACU. Three years later, the unadjusted estimate of the probability of an acceptable handover was 87% (72%-95%) in the adult PACU and 56% (40%-72%) in the pediatric PACU. A multimodal intervention substantially improved

  4. Technology-driven intervention to improve hypertension outcomes in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Donna; Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Matthews, Abigail G; Wu, Daren; Ferrari, Pamela; Cohen, Asaf; Millery, Mari; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga; Farrell, Lindsay; Kopal, Helene

    2011-12-01

    To assess the impact of an electronic medical record (EMR) with clinical decision support (CDS) and performance feedback on provider adherence to guideline-recommended care and blood pressure (BP) control compared with a standard EMR alone. Quasi-experimental with repeated measures. The study was conducted in a 4-site, federally qualified health center, Open Door Family Medical Centers, located in New York. The research team, Open Door leadership, providers, and staff developed and implemented a tailored multicomponent CDS system, which included a BP alert, a hypertension (HTN) order set, an HTN template, and clinical reminders. We extracted patient-level data for each encounter 17 months prior to implementation of the intervention (June 2007-October 2008) and 15 months post-intervention (April 2009-June 2010), from the EMR's data tables for all adult nonobstetric patients with a diagnosis of HTN (N = 3636). Rates of HTN control were significantly greater in the post-intervention period compared with the baseline period (50.9% vs 60.8%; P <.001). Process measures, derived from the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure Guidelines, also improved significantly. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations showed that patients were 1.5 times more likely to have controlled BP post-intervention than pre-intervention. Correlates of poor BP control were black race, higher body mass index, diabetes, female gender, income, and a greater number of prescribed antihypertensive medications. Our findings suggest that health information technology that is implemented as part of a multicomponent quality improvement initiative can lead to improvements in HTN care and outcomes.

  5. Improving Self-Regulated Learning With a Retrieval Practice Intervention.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Robert; Karpicke, Jeffrey D

    2017-06-12

    Repeated retrieval practice is a powerful learning tool for promoting long-term retention, but students use this tool ineffectively when regulating their learning. The current experiments evaluated the efficacy of a minimal intervention aimed at improving students' self-regulated use of repeated retrieval practice. Across 2 experiments, students made decisions about when to study, engage in retrieval practice, or stop learning a set of foreign language word pairs. Some students received direct instruction about how to use repeated retrieval practice. These instructions emphasized the mnemonic benefits of retrieval practice over a less effective strategy (restudying) and told students how to use repeated retrieval practice to maximize their performance-specifically, that they should recall a translation correctly 3 times during learning. This minimal intervention promoted more effective self-regulated use of retrieval practice and better retention of the translations compared to a control group that received no instruction. Students who experienced this intervention also showed potential for long-term changes in self-regulated learning: They spontaneously used repeated retrieval practice 1 week later to learn new materials. These results provide a promising first step for developing guidelines for teaching students how to regulate their learning more effectively using repeated retrieval practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Multisystemic Therapy Improves the Patient-Provider Relationship in Families of Adolescents with Poorly Controlled Insulin Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Carcone, April Idalski; Ellis, Deborah A.; Chen, Xinguang; Naar-King, Sylvie; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Moltz, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an intensive, home and community-based family treatment, significantly improved patient-provider relationships in families where youth had chronic poor glycemic control. Methods One hundred forty-six adolescents with type 1 or 2 diabetes in chronic poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥ 8%) and their primary caregivers were randomly assigned to MST or a telephone support condition. Caregiver perceptions of their relationship with the diabetes multidisciplinary medical team were assessed at baseline and treatment termination with the Measure of Process of Care-20. Results At treatment termination, MST families reported significant improvement on the Coordinated and Comprehensive Care scale and marginally significant improvement on the Respectful and Supportive Care scale. Improvements on the Enabling and Partnership and Providing Specific Information scales were not significant. Conclusions Results suggest MST improves the ability of the families and the diabetes treatment providers to work together. PMID:25940767

  7. Pharmaceutical solid dispersion technology: a strategy to improve dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish K

    2013-08-01

    Oral bioavailability is the major problem when a poorly water-soluble active agent is delivered via oral route. To overcome such problems, solid dispersion systems have been demonstrated in literature to enhance the dissolution property of poorly water-soluble drugs. In the present review, the important aspects to be considered during preparation of solid dispersion systems viz., properties of polymer and preparation techniques of solid dispersion which affect the dissolution rate are discussed. Formulation and evaluation techniques for solid dispersions have been described. The final section of article highlights the recent patents and studies related to solid dispersion systems.

  8. Public health interventions, barriers, and opportunities for improving maternal nutrition in India.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Lowe, Alyssa; Vir, Sheila; Kumar, Shuba; Mohanraj, Rani; Chaturvedi, Anuraag; Noznesky, Elizabeth A; Martorell, Reynaldo; Mason, John B

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate nutrient intake, early and multiple pregnancies, poverty, caste discrimination, and gender inequality contribute to poor maternal nutrition in India. While malnutrition is seen throughout the life cycle, it is most acute during childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, and lactation. Although nutrition policies are on the books and interventions are in place, child malnutrition and maternal undernutrition persist as severe public health problems. To evaluate the implementation of maternal nutrition programs in India. The research was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 consisted of a desk review of national and state policies pertinent to maternal nutrition and national-level key informant interviews with respondents who have a working knowledge of relevant organizations and interventions. Phase 2 utilized in-depth interviews and focus group discussions at the state, district, and community levels in eight districts of two states: Tamil Nadu and Uttar Pradesh. All data were analyzed thematically. India has a rich portfolio of programs and policies that address maternal health and nutrition; however, systematic weaknesses, logistical gaps, resource scarcity, and poor utilization continue to hamper progress. Elevating the priority given to maternal nutrition in government health programs and implementing strategies to improve women's status will help to address many of the challenges facing India's nutrition programs. Programs can be strengthened by promoting integration of services, ensuring effective procurement mechanisms for micronutrient and food supplements, establishing regional training facilities for improved program implementation, and strengthening program monitoring and evaluation.

  9. Improving flood prediction by the assimilation of satellite soil moisture in poorly monitored catchments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flood prediction in poorly monitored catchments is among the greatest challenges faced by hydrologists. To address this challenge, an increasing number of studies in the last decade have explored methods to integrate various existing observations from ground and satellites. One approach in particula...

  10. Interlibrary Lending As an Alternative Means To Improve Resources-Poor Ghanaian Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osei-Bonsu, M.

    1998-01-01

    Highlights problems facing academic and research libraries in Ghana in providing scientific and technical information. Challenges include poor collections and inadequate funding. Topics include library cooperation, training in interlibrary lending and document delivery in the United Kingdom and in Denmark, and the need for CD-ROM databases and…

  11. Improving Educational Outcomes for Poor Children. Discussion Paper No. 1352-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Brian A.; Ludwig, Jens

    2008-01-01

    One of the best ways to avoid being poor as an adult is to obtain a good education. Individuals with higher academic achievement and more years of schooling earn more than those with lower levels of human capital. This is not surprising given that we believe that schooling makes people more productive, allowing them to command higher wages in the…

  12. Improving Educational Outcomes for Poor Children. Discussion Paper No. 1352-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Brian A.; Ludwig, Jens

    2008-01-01

    One of the best ways to avoid being poor as an adult is to obtain a good education. Individuals with higher academic achievement and more years of schooling earn more than those with lower levels of human capital. This is not surprising given that we believe that schooling makes people more productive, allowing them to command higher wages in the…

  13. Repackaging exemptions under National Health Insurance in Ghana: how can access to care for the poor be improved?

    PubMed

    Kanchebe Derbile, Emmanuel; van der Geest, Sjaak

    2013-09-01

    For the past 10 years the Ghana Government has been trying to replace the old user fee system with an overall health insurance scheme, but one problem of the old system continues to bedevil the new policy: exemption of the poor. This paper presents data from empirical fieldwork and also puts forward an opinion. It discusses how past experiences of user fee exemptions for the poor can inform exemptions under the new 'National Health Insurance Scheme' (NHIS) as a means to ensuring equity in health care. Drawing on a study of exemptions in the three regions of northern Ghana, and utilizing both qualitative and quantitative methods and data, the findings show that exemptions were applied in favour of under-fives, antenatal care, the aged and public servants to the disadvantage of the poor. As a result, the poor had very little access to exemptions. Exemptions therefore failed to address equity concerns in health care, the very reason for which they were introduced. Thus, although the paper acknowledges that provision for the enrolment of the poor into the NHIS is a step in the right direction, it underscores that effective enrolment will be essential for attaining the equity goal of the policy. Informed by past experiences that undermined the equity goal of exemptions, three policy recommendations are put forward for improving exemptions for the poor under the NHIS. These are: (1) effective community education for enhancing premium paying enrolments into the NHIS alongside education on exemptions for the poor; (2) reviewing and clarifying policy guidelines for guiding local-level identification of the poor based on communities' own understanding of poverty; and (3) providing the requisite resources to enable the Department of Social Welfare to discharge its core mandate of identifying the poor for exemptions.

  14. Point-of-Prescription Interventions to Improve Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Keith W.; Gerber, Jeffrey S.; Moehring, Rebekah; Anderson, Deverick J.; Calderwood, Michael S.; Han, Jennifer H.; Mehta, Jimish M.; Pollack, Lori A.; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Srinivasan, Arjun; Camins, Bernard C.; Schwartz, David N.; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship is pivotal to improving patient outcomes, reducing adverse events, decreasing healthcare costs, and preventing further emergence of antimicrobial resistance. In an era in which antimicrobial resistance is increasing, judicious antimicrobial use is the responsibility of every healthcare provider. Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) have made headway in improving antimicrobial prescribing using such “top-down” methods as formulary restriction and prospective audit with feedback; however, engagement of prescribers has not been fully explored. Strategies that include frontline prescribers and other unit-based healthcare providers have the potential to expand stewardship, both to augment existing centralized ASPs and to provide alternative approaches to perform stewardship at healthcare facilities with limited resources. This review discusses interventions focusing on antimicrobial prescribing at the point of prescription as well as a pilot project to engage unit-based healthcare providers in antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:25595748

  15. Identification of Risk Factors for Poor Feeding in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease and a Novel Approach to Improve Oral Feeding.

    PubMed

    Indramohan, Gitanjali; Pedigo, Tiffany P; Rostoker, Nicole; Cambare, Mae; Grogan, Tristan; Federman, Myke D

    2017-02-03

    Many infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) do not develop the skills to feed orally and are discharged home on gastrostomy tube or nasogastric feeds. We aimed to identify risk factors for failure to achieve full oral feeding and evaluate the efficacy of oral motor intervention for increasing the rate of discharge on full oral feeds by performing a prospective study in the neonatal and cardiac intensive care units of a tertiary children's hospital. 23 neonates born at ≥37weeks gestation and diagnosed with single-ventricle physiology requiring a surgical shunt were prospectively enrolled and received oral motor intervention therapy. 40 historical controls were identified. Mean length of stay was 53.7days for the control group and 40.9days for the study group (p=0.668). 13/23 patients who received oral motor intervention therapy (56.5%) and 18/40 (45.0%) controls were on full oral feeds at discharge, a difference of 11.5% (95% CI -13.9% to 37.0%, p=0.378). Diagnosis of hypoplastic left heart syndrome, longer intubation and duration of withholding enteral feeds, and presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease were predictors of poor oral feeding on univariate analysis. Although we did not detect a statistically significant impact of oral motor intervention, we found clinically meaningful differences in hospital length of stay and feeding tube requirement. Further research should be undertaken to evaluate methods for improving oral feeding in these at-risk infants.

  16. Interventions to improve hearing aid use in adult auditory rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Barker, Fiona; Mackenzie, Emma; Elliott, Lynette; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-08-18

    Acquired adult-onset hearing loss is a common long-term condition for which the most common intervention is hearing aid fitting. However, up to 40% of people fitted with a hearing aid either fail to use it or may not gain optimal benefit from it. This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in 2014. To assess the long-term effectiveness of interventions to promote the use of hearing aids in adults with acquired hearing loss fitted with at least one hearing aid. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 5); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 13 June 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions designed to improve or promote hearing aid use in adults with acquired hearing loss compared with usual care or another intervention. We excluded interventions that compared hearing aid technology. We classified interventions according to the 'chronic care model' (CCM). The primary outcomes were hearing aid use (measured as adherence or daily hours of use) and adverse effects (inappropriate advice or clinical practice, or patient complaints). Secondary patient-reported outcomes included quality of life, hearing handicap, hearing aid benefit and communication. Outcomes were measured over the short ( 12 to < 52 weeks) and long term (one year plus). We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 37 studies involving a total of 4129 participants. Risk of bias across the included studies was variable. We judged the GRADE quality of evidence to be very low or low for the primary outcomes where data were available.The majority of participants were over 65 years of age with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss. There was a mix of new and experienced hearing

  17. Risk factors for poor attendance in a family-based pediatric obesity intervention program for young children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Natalie A; Coday, Mace; Somes, Grant; Tylavsky, Frances A; Richey, Phyllis A; Hare, Marion

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of demographic characteristics, psychological factors, and family functioning on attendance in a randomized controlled trial of a family-based pediatric obesity program. Participants included 155 children between the ages of 4 and 7 years (M age = 5.77, 57.4% female, 73.6% black, M body mass index = 25.5) and their primary caregivers who were randomized to the treatment group. Three groups of participants were created based on their patterns of attendance during the program: (1) noncompleters, (2) partial completers, and (3) completers. Results indicated no differences among the attendance groups in child gender, child body mass index, or child psychological functioning. Significant group differences were found with respect to race/ethnicity, parent marital status, and family income, such that noncompleters were more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities, to living in single parent households, and to have lower incomes than partial completers and completers. After controlling for the effects of these sociodemographic risk factors, noncompleters, and partial completers reported more family dysfunction characterized by high levels of disengagement than completers. Adapting existing weight management programs to include a focus on family engagement in the early stages of treatment may help to improve participation in family-based obesity interventions targeting high risk, socioeconomically disadvantaged youth.

  18. Risk Factors for Poor Attendance in a Family-based Pediatric Obesity Intervention Program for Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Natalie A.; Coday, Mace; Somes, Grant; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Richey, Phyllis A.; Hare, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined the role of demographic characteristics, psychological factors, and family functioning on attendance in a randomized controlled trial of a family-based pediatric obesity program. Method Participants included 155 children between the ages of 4 and 7 years (M age = 5.77, 57.4% female, 73.6% African-American, M BMI = 25.5) and their primary caregivers who were randomized to the treatment group. Three groups of participants were created based on their patterns of attendance during the program: 1) noncompleters, 2) partial completers, and 3) completers. Results Results indicated no differences among the attendance groups in child gender, child BMI, or child psychological functioning. Significant group differences were found with respect to race/ethnicity, parent marital status, and family income, such that noncompleters were more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities, to living in single parent households, and to have lower incomes than partial completers and completers. After controlling for the effects these socio-demographic risk factors, noncompleters and partial completers reported more family dysfunction characterized by high levels of disengagement than completers. Conclusion Adapting existing weight management programs to include a focus on family engagement in the early stages of treatment may help to improve participation in family-based obesity interventions targeting high risk, socio-economically disadvantaged youth. PMID:21057255

  19. Enabling hygienic behavior among preschoolers: improving environmental conditions through a multifaceted intervention.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Laura; Zucker, David; Brody, David; Engelhard, Dan; Meir, Marina; Manor, Orly

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions often serve as critical enabling factors for health promotion. This article describes the effect of a preschool hygiene intervention program on classroom environmental conditions. Cluster randomized trial, with randomization at the level of the preschool. State-run preschools in Jerusalem. Forty secular and religious Jerusalem preschools (including 1029 children). A multidisciplinary hygiene intervention that included changes to the preschool environment. Presence of soap, soap dispenser, paper towel, paper towel dispenser, cloth towels, communal cup, or personal cups. Generalized estimating equations and Fisher's exact test were used to estimate the effect of the intervention program on environmental conditions. Information was obtained from most (97.9%) visits. Baseline environmental hygienic conditions were poor. Relative to the control group, the following environmental conditions were better in the intervention group after program implementation: soap (odds ratio [OR] = 14.7; p < .01), paper towels (OR = 13.5; p < .01), communal cups (OR = .05; p < .01), soap dispensers (secular preschools only, p < .01), individual cups (secular, p < .01; religious, OR = 18.7; p < .02). Environmental hygiene in the Israeli preschools studied was deficient at baseline but amenable to change. Improvement in environmental conditions was a necessary enabling factor for the changes in hand-washing behavior that were observed among the children. Sustained environmental change is possible in the preschool environment.

  20. A Metacognitive Program for Improving the Word Identification and Reading Comprehension Skills of Upper Primary Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Merle E.; Robinson, Gregory L.

    This paper reports on a series of three studies designed to assess the effectiveness of a metacognitive approach to teaching word identification and reading comprehension skills to upper primary poor readers, and to investigate effective methods for implementing the metacognitive program in the regular classroom. To improve word identification…

  1. Improving clinical interventions through successful outreach using Six Sigma quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Beard, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Interventions involving outreach to members via telephone are dependent on the success of reaching the member and engaging him or her in a discussion about treatment. This article describes a successful process improvement at a managed behavioral health organization aimed at increasing the percentage of times staff was able to reach a member by telephone. Using Six Sigma methodology, the project team was able to achieve statistically significant improvement in the rate of successful outreach for the organization.

  2. Interventions for improving community ambulation in individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Ruth E; Stevenson, Ted J; Poluha, William; Ripat, Jacquie; Nett, Cristabel; Srikesavan, Cynthia S

    2015-03-13

    Community ambulation refers to the ability of a person to walk in their own community, outside of their home and also indoors in private or public locations. Some people choose to walk for exercise or leisure and may walk with others as an important aspect of social functioning. Community ambulation is therefore an important skill for stroke survivors living in the community whose walking ability has been affected. To determine: (1) whether interventions improve community ambulation for stroke survivors, and (2) if any specific intervention method improves community ambulation more than other interventions. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (September 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (November 2013), PubMed (1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (1980 to November 2013), CINAHL (1982 to November 2013), PsycINFO (1887 to November 2013), Scopus (1960 to November 2013), Web of Science (1900 to November 2013), SPORTDiscus (1975 to November 2013), and PEDro, CIRRIE and REHABDATA (November 2013). We also searched ongoing trials registers (November 2013) and reference lists, and performed a cited reference search. Selection criteria included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cross-over RCTs, studies in which participants are adult (aged 18 years or more) stroke survivors, and interventions that were aimed at improving community ambulation. We defined the primary outcome as participation; secondary outcomes included activity level outcomes related to gait and self-efficacy. One review author independently screened titles. Two review authors screened abstracts and full text articles, with a third review author was available to resolve any disagreements. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias. All outcomes were continuous. The analysis for the primary outcome used the generic inverse variance methods for meta-analysis, using the standardised mean difference (SMD) and standard error (SE

  3. Improvement of primary health care of patients with poorly regulated diabetes mellitus type 2 using shared decision-making – the DEBATE trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2004, a national Disease Management Program (DMP) has been implemented in Germany, which includes educational measures aimed at patients with type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, about 15-20% of T2D patients remain in poor metabolic control. Qualitative research shows that one reason for this might be an increasing frustration of general practitioners (GPs) with the management of their poorly regulated T2D patients over time. We aim at approaching this problem by improving the GP-patient-communication and fostering shared decision-making. Methods/Design An educative intervention will be tested within a multi-centred cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) in Germany. We include 20 GPs in three regions. Each of the 60 GPs will recruit about 13 patients meeting the inclusion criteria (total of 780 patients). GPs allocated to the intervention group will receive a peer-visit from a specifically trained GP-colleague who will motivate them to apply patient-centred communication techniques including patient-centred decision aids. GPs allocated to the control group will not take part in any intervention program, but will provide care as usual to their patients. The primary inclusion criterion for patients at the time of the recruitment is an HbA1c-level of over 8.0. Primary outcome is the change of HbA1c at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months compared to HbA1c at baseline. Secondary outcomes include patient’s participation in the process of shared decision-making and quality of life. Discussion If this intervention proves to be effective it may be integrated into the existing Disease Management Program for T2D in Germany. PMID:22913642

  4. Improving access to psychosocial interventions for common mental health problems in the United Kingdom: narrative review and development of a conceptual model for complex interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United Kingdom and worldwide, there is significant policy interest in improving the quality of care for patients with mental health disorders and distress. Improving quality of care means addressing not only the effectiveness of interventions but also the issue of limited access to care. Research to date into improving access to mental health care has not been strongly rooted within a conceptual model, nor has it systematically identified the different elements of the patient journey from identification of illness to receipt of care. This paper set out to review core concepts underlying patient access to mental health care, synthesise these to develop a conceptual model of access, and consider the implications of the model for the development and evaluation of interventions for groups with poor access to mental health care such as older people and ethnic minorities. Methods Narrative review of the literature to identify concepts underlying patient access to mental health care, and synthesis into a conceptual model to support the delivery and evaluation of complex interventions to improve access to mental health care. Results The narrative review adopted a process model of access to care, incorporating interventions at three levels. The levels comprise (a) community engagement (b) addressing the quality of interactions in primary care and (c) the development and delivery of tailored psychosocial interventions. Conclusions The model we propose can form the basis for the development and evaluation of complex interventions in access to mental health care. We highlight the key methodological challenges in evaluating the overall impact of access interventions, and assessing the relative contribution of the different elements of the model. PMID:22889290

  5. Interventions to improve adherence to inhaled steroids for asthma.

    PubMed

    Normansell, Rebecca; Kew, Kayleigh M; Stovold, Elizabeth

    2017-04-18

    Despite its proven efficacy in improving symptoms and reducing exacerbations, many patients with asthma are not fully adherent to their steroid inhaler. Suboptimal adherence leads to poorer clinical outcomes and increased health service utilisation, and has been identified as a contributing factor to a third of asthma deaths in the UK. Reasons for non-adherence vary, and a variety of interventions have been proposed to help people improve treatment adherence. To assess the efficacy and safety of interventions intended to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids among people with asthma. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Trials Register, which contains studies identified through multiple electronic searches and handsearches of other sources. We also searched trial registries and reference lists of primary studies. We conducted the most recent searches on 18 November 2016. We included parallel and cluster randomised controlled trials of any duration conducted in any setting. We included studies reported as full-text articles, those published as abstracts only and unpublished data. We included trials of adults and children with asthma and a current prescription for an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) (as monotherapy or in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA)). Eligible trials compared an intervention primarily aimed at improving adherence to ICS versus usual care or an alternative intervention. Two review authors screened the searches, extracted study characteristics and outcome data from included studies and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes were adherence to ICS, exacerbations requiring at least oral corticosteroids and asthma control. We graded results and presented evidence in 'Summary of findings' tables for each comparison.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios, and continuous data as mean differences or standardised mean differences, all using a random-effects model. We described skewed data narratively. We made no a

  6. A ventilation intervention study in classrooms to improve indoor air quality: the FRESH study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classroom ventilation rates often do not meet building standards, although it is considered to be important to improve indoor air quality. Poor indoor air quality is thought to influence both children’s health and performance. Poor ventilation in The Netherlands most often occurs in the heating season. To improve classroom ventilation a tailor made mechanical ventilation device was developed to improve outdoor air supply. This paper studies the effect of this intervention. Methods The FRESH study (Forced-ventilation Related Environmental School Health) was designed to investigate the effect of a CO2 controlled mechanical ventilation intervention on classroom CO2 levels using a longitudinal cross-over design. Target CO2 concentrations were 800 and 1200 parts per million (ppm), respectively. The study included 18 classrooms from 17 schools from the north-eastern part of The Netherlands, 12 experimental classrooms and 6 control classrooms. Data on indoor levels of CO2, temperature and relative humidity were collected during three consecutive weeks per school during the heating seasons of 2010–2012. Associations between the intervention and weekly average indoor CO2 levels, classroom temperature and relative humidity were assessed by means of mixed models with random school-effects. Results At baseline, mean CO2 concentration for all schools was 1335 ppm (range: 763–2000 ppm). The intervention was able to significantly decrease CO2 levels in the intervention classrooms (F (2,10) = 17.59, p < 0.001), with a mean decrease of 491 ppm. With the target set at 800 ppm, mean CO2 was 841 ppm (range: 743–925 ppm); with the target set at 1200 ppm, mean CO2 was 975 ppm (range: 887–1077 ppm). Conclusions Although the device was not capable of precisely achieving the two predefined levels of CO2, our study showed that classroom CO2 levels can be reduced by intervening on classroom ventilation using a CO2 controlled mechanical ventilation system

  7. Postoperative management of hip fractures: interventions associated with improved outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2012-01-01

    The annual number of hip fractures worldwide is expected to exceed 6 million by 2050. Currently, nearly 50% of hip fracture patients will develop at least one short-term complication including infection, delirium, venous thromboembolism (VTE), pressure ulcers or cardiovascular events. More than half will experience an adverse long-term outcomes including worsened ambulation or functional status, additional fractures and excess mortality. This paper summarizes current evidence for postoperative interventions attempting to improve these outcomes, including pain management, anemia management, delirium prevention strategies, VTE prophylaxis, rehabilitation type, nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids and secondary fracture prevention. Models of care that have been tested in this population including interdisciplinary orthogeriatric services, clinical pathways and hospitalist care are summarized. In general, good quality evidence supports routine use of VTE prophylaxis, and moderate quality evidence supports multifactorial delirium prevention protocols, and a conservative transfusion strategy. Aggressive pain control with higher doses of opiates and/or regional blocks are associated with lower delirium rates. Low-moderate quality evidence supports the use of clinical pathways, and dedicated orthogeriatric consultative services or wards. After hospital discharge, good quality evidence supports the use of bisphosphonates for secondary fracture prevention and mortality reduction. Rehabilitation services are important, but evidence to guide quantity, type or venue is lacking. Additional research is needed to clarify the role of nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids, home care and psychosocial interventions. PMID:24340216

  8. Development of a complex intervention to improve health literacy skills

    PubMed Central

    Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Danielsen, Stein; Opheim, Elin; Bjørndal, Arild; Reinar, Liv Merete; Flottorp, Signe; Oxman, Andrew David; Helseth, Sølvi

    2013-01-01

    Background Providing insight into the developmental processes involved in building interventions is an important way to ensure methodological transparency and inform future research efforts. The objective of this study was to describe the development of a web portal designed to improve health literacy skills among the public. Methods The web portal was tailored to address three key barriers to obtaining information, using the conceptual frameworks of shared decision-making and evidence-based practice and based on explicit criteria for selecting the content and form of the intervention. Results The web portal targeted the general public and took the form of structured sets of tools. Content included: an introduction to research methods, help on how to find evidence-based health information efficiently based on the steps of evidence-based practice, an introduction to critical appraisal, information about patient participation rights in decision-making, and a decision aid for consultations. Conclusions The web portal was designed in a systematic and transparent way and address key barriers to obtaining and acting upon reliable health information. The web portal provides open access to the tools and can be used independently by health care users, or during consultations with health professionals. PMID:24251890

  9. [Evidence-based and promising interventions to prevent infectious diseases among youth as a result of poor hand hygiene in schools: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Hélène; Nugier, Angélique; Clément, Juliette; Lamboy, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major cause of death among young people throughout the world. This paper reviews the current knowledge of empirically validated and promising interventions aimed at preventing infectious diseases among children caused by poor hand hygiene in schools. The study used a standard protocol to identify and review the literature and to classify the selected interventions. Approximately ten interventions were found to have a beneficial effect by promoting hand washing and hand hygiene in schools. The study also found that most of the interventions were implemented at elementary school. However, some interventions were also implemented at kindergarten or in child care centers, while others were aimed at university students. Most of the interventions were implemented by teachers, peers and/or external professionals. The study found that hand hygiene is effective regardless of the type of cleaning product used (i.e. antibacterial or plain soap, alcohol-based or alcohol-free hand sanitizer). This study aims to contribute to the understanding of empirically validated and promising interventions and to promote reflection on professional practice in France.

  10. Ergonomic intervention for improving work postures during notebook computer operation.

    PubMed

    Jamjumrus, Nuchrawee; Nanthavanij, Suebsak

    2008-06-01

    This paper discusses the application of analytical algorithms to determine necessary adjustments for operating notebook computers (NBCs) and workstations so that NBC users can assume correct work postures during NBC operation. Twenty-two NBC users (eleven males and eleven females) were asked to operate their NBCs according to their normal work practice. Photographs of their work postures were taken and analyzed using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) technique. The algorithms were then employed to determine recommended adjustments for their NBCs and workstations. After implementing the necessary adjustments, the NBC users were then re-seated at their workstations, and photographs of their work postures were re-taken, to perform the posture analysis. The results show that the NBC users' work postures are improved when their NBCs and workstations are adjusted according to the recommendations. The effectiveness of ergonomic intervention is verified both visually and objectively.

  11. Key principles to improve programmes and interventions in complementary feeding.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Chessa K; Iannotti, Lora; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Guyon, Agnes; Daelmans, Bernadette; Robert, Rebecca; Haider, Rukhsana

    2013-09-01

    Although there are some examples of successful complementary feeding programmes to promote healthy growth and prevent stunting at the community level, to date there are few, if any, examples of successful programmes at scale. A lack of systematic process and impact evaluations on pilot projects to generate lessons learned has precluded scaling up of effective programmes. Programmes to effect positive change in nutrition rarely follow systematic planning, implementation, and evaluation (PIE) processes to enhance effectiveness over the long term. As a result a set of programme-oriented key principles to promote healthy growth remains elusive. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap by proposing a set of principles to improve programmes and interventions to promote healthy growth and development. Identifying such principles for programme success has three requirements: rethinking traditional paradigms used to promote improved infant and young child feeding; ensuring better linkages to delivery platforms; and, improving programming. Following the PIE model for programmes and learning from experiences from four relatively large-scale programmes described in this paper, 10 key principles are identified in the areas of programme planning, programme implementation, programme evaluation, and dissemination, replication, and scaling up. Nonetheless, numerous operational research questions remain, some of which are highlighted in this paper.

  12. Achieving the same for less: improving mood depletes blood glucose for people with poor (but not good) emotion control.

    PubMed

    Niven, Karen; Totterdell, Peter; Miles, Eleanor; Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have found that acts of self-control like emotion regulation deplete blood glucose levels. The present experiment investigated the hypothesis that the extent to which people's blood glucose levels decline during emotion regulation attempts is influenced by whether they believe themselves to be good or poor at emotion control. We found that although good and poor emotion regulators were equally able to achieve positive and negative moods, the blood glucose of poor emotion regulators was reduced after performing an affect-improving task, whereas the blood glucose of good emotion regulators remained unchanged. As evidence suggests that glucose is a limited energy resource upon which self-control relies, the implication is that good emotion regulators are able to achieve the same positive mood with less cost to their self-regulatory resource. Thus, depletion may not be an inevitable consequence of engaging in emotion regulation.

  13. Improved delivery of poorly soluble compounds using nanoparticle technology: a review.

    PubMed

    Kalepu, Sandeep; Nekkanti, Vijaykumar

    2016-06-01

    Although a large number of new drug molecules with varied therapeutic potentials have been discovered in the recent decade, yet most of them are still in developmental process. This can be attributed to the limited aqueous solubility which governs the bioavailability of such drug molecules. Hence, there is a requisite for a technology-based product (formulation) in order to overcome such issues without compromising on the therapeutic response. The purpose of this review is to provide an insight to the formulation of drug nanoparticles for enhancing solubility and dissolution velocity with concomitant enhancement in bioavailability. In the recent decade, nanonization has evolved from a concept to reality owing to its versatile applications, especially in the development of drugs having poor solubility. In this review, a relatively simple and scalable approach for the manufacture of drug nanoparticles and latest characterization techniques utilized to evaluate the drug nanoparticles are discussed. The drug nanoparticulate approach described herein provides a general applicability of the platform technology in designing a formulation for drugs associated with poor aqueous solubility.

  14. Improvement of drug delivery with a breath actuated pressurised aerosol for patients with poor inhaler technique.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S P; Weisz, A W; Talaee, N; Clarke, S W

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND The metered dose inhaler is difficult to use correctly, synchronising actuation with inhalation being the most important problem. A breath actuated pressurised inhaler, designed to help patients with poor inhaler technique, was compared with a conventional metered dose inhaler in terms of aerosol deposition and bronchodilator response. METHODS Radioaerosol deposition and bronchodilator response to 100 micrograms salbutamol were measured in 18 asthmatic patients, who inhaled from a conventional metered dose inhaler by their own chosen metered dose inhaler technique, from a conventional metered dose inhaler by a taught metered dose inhaler technique, and from a breath actuated pressured inhaler (Autohaler). RESULTS In the 10 patients who could coordinate actuation and inhalation of the inhaler on their own deposition of aerosol in the lungs and bronchodilator response were equivalent on the three study days. By contrast, in the eight patients who could not coordinate the mean (SEM) percentage of the dose deposited in the lungs with their own inhaler technique (7.2% (3.4%] was substantial lower than those attained by the taught metered dose inhaler technique (22.8% (2.5%] and by Autohaler (20.8% (1.7%]. CONCLUSION Although of little additional benefit to asthmatic patients with good coordination, the Autohaler is potentially a valuable aid to those with poor coordination, and should be considered in preference to a conventional metered dose inhaler in any patient whose inhaler technique is not known to be satisfactory. Images PMID:1750017

  15. Behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E; Hassmén, P; Welvaert, M; Pumpa, K L

    2017-04-01

    Poor adherence to lifestyle intervention remains a key factor hindering treatment effectiveness and health outcomes for adults with obesity. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine if behavioural treatment strategies (e.g. goal setting, motivational interviewing, relapse prevention, cognitive restructuring etc.) improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. Randomized controlled trials that investigated the use of behavioural treatment strategies in obesity management were identified by systematically reviewing the literature within Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science from their inception to August 2016. This meta-analysis shows that behavioural treatment interventions have a significant positive effect on session attendance (percentage) and physical activity (total min/week) in adults with obesity (M = 17.63 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.77, 24.50), z =5.0337, P < 0.0001 and M = 105.98 (95% CI = 58.64, 153.32), z =4.3878, P < 0.0001, respectively). This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials provides evidence that behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. These strategies should be routinely incorporated into lifestyle intervention, obesity management and weight loss programmes with the aim of improving engagement and adherence. If adherence were improved, treatment effectiveness, health outcomes and the ultimate burden of chronic disease could also be improved. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  16. Physicochemical Properties of Solid Phospholipid Particles as a Drug Delivery Platform for Improving Oral Absorption of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Miyazaki, Aoi; Fukushima, Mayuko; Sato, Keiko; Yamamura, Yuko; Mohri, Kohta; Sakuma, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    A novel drug delivery platform, mesoporous phospholipid particle (MPP), is introduced. Its physicochemical properties and ability as a carrier for enhancing oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs are discussed. MPP was prepared through freeze-drying a cyclohexane/t-butyl alcohol solution of phosphatidylcholine. Its basic properties were revealed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, hygroscopicity measurement, and so on. Fenofibrate was loaded to MPP as a poorly soluble model drug, and effect of MPP on the oral absorption behavior was observed. MPP is spherical in shape with a diameter typically in the range of 10-15 μm and a wide surface area that exceeds 10 m(2)/g. It has a bilayer structure that may accommodate hydrophobic drugs in the acyl chain region. When fenofibrate was loaded in MPP as a model drug, it existed partially in a crystalline state and improvement in the dissolution behavior was achieved in the presence of a surfactant, because of the formation of mixed micelles composed of phospholipids and surfactants in the dissolution media. MPP greatly improved the oral absorption of fenofibrate compared to that of the crystalline drug and its efficacy was almost equivalent to that of an amorphous drug dispersion. MPP is a promising option for improving the oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs based on the novel mechanism of dissolution improvement.

  17. C3435T polymorphism of the ABCB1 gene is associated with poor clopidogrel responsiveness in a Mexican population undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Cruz, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Galván, Karen; Manzo-Francisco, Luis Antonio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Fragoso, José Manuel; Peña-Duque, Marco Antonio; Reyes-Gómez, Carlos Alberto; Martínez-Ríos, Marco Antonio; De la Peña-Díaz, Aurora

    2015-11-01

    Clopidogrel is a pro-drug and its intestinal absorption is limited by the P-glycoprotein encoded by the ABCB1 gene. It is metabolized hepatically by cytochrome P450 enzymes encoded by CYP genes to produce an active metabolite that antagonizes the P2Y12 platelet receptor. Some patients exhibit poor clopidogrel responsiveness due to polymorphisms, resulting in thrombotic events. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between poor clopidogrel responsiveness and the ABCB1, CYP and P2RY12 gene polymorphisms among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Two hundred seventy-six patients who underwent PCI were included in this study. Clopidogrel responsiveness was determined via optical aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma using 10 μM ADP. Patients exhibiting a platelet aggregation response higher than 70% were classified as poor responders. The genetic polymorphisms were analyzed via real-time PCR. Poor responsiveness to clopidogrel was noted in 22.1% of the patients. The TT genotype of the C3435T polymorphism of the ABCB1 gene and omeprazole usage were each associated with poor clopidogrel responsiveness (Exp (β) 2.73, p=0.009 and Exp (β) 3.86, p=0.04, respectively). Poor clopidogrel responsiveness is associated with the TT genotype of the C3435T polymorphism of the ABCB1 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and evaluation of an interprofessional communication intervention to improve family outcomes in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J Randall; Ciechanowski, Paul S; Downey, Lois; Gold, Julia; Nielsen, Elizabeth L; Shannon, Sarah E; Treece, Patsy D; Young, Jessica P; Engelberg, Ruth A

    2012-11-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU), where death is common and even survivors of an ICU stay face the risk of long-term morbidity and re-admissions to the ICU, represents an important setting for improving communication about palliative and end-of-life care. Communication about the goals of care in this setting should be a high priority since studies suggest that the current quality of ICU communication is often poor and is associated with psychological distress among family members of critically ill patients. This paper describes the development and evaluation of an intervention designed to improve the quality of care in the ICU by improving communication among the ICU team and with family members of critically ill patients. We developed a multi-faceted, interprofessional intervention based on self-efficacy theory. The intervention involves a "communication facilitator" - a nurse or social worker - trained to facilitate communication among the interprofessional ICU team and with the critically ill patient's family. The facilitators are trained using three specific content areas: a) evidence-based approaches to improving clinician-family communication in the ICU, b) attachment theory allowing clinicians to adapt communication to meet individual family member's communication needs, and c) mediation to facilitate identification and resolution of conflict including clinician-family, clinician-clinician, and intra-family conflict. The outcomes assessed in this randomized trial focus on psychological distress among family members including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder at 3 and 6 months after the ICU stay. This manuscript also reports some of the lessons that we have learned early in this study.

  19. Media Reporting of Health Interventions: Signs of Improvement, but Major Problems Persist

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Amanda; Bonevski, Billie; Jones, Alison; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies have persistently shown deficiencies in medical reporting by the mainstream media. We have been monitoring the accuracy and comprehensiveness of medical news reporting in Australia since mid 2004. This analysis of more than 1200 stories in the Australian media compares different types of media outlets and examines reporting trends over time. Methods and Findings Between March 2004 and June 2008 1230 news stories were rated on a national medical news monitoring web site, Media Doctor Australia. These covered a variety of health interventions ranging from drugs, diagnostic tests and surgery to dietary and complementary therapies. Each story was independently assessed by two reviewers using ten criteria. Scores were expressed as percentages of total assessable items deemed satisfactory according to a coding guide. Analysis of variance was used to compare mean scores and Fishers exact test to compare proportions. Trends over time were analysed using un-weighted linear regression analysis. Broadsheet newspapers had the highest average satisfactory scores: 58% (95% CI 56–60%), compared with tabloid newspapers and online news outlets, 48% (95% CI 44–52) and 48% (95% CI 46–50) respectively. The lowest scores were assigned to stories broadcast by human interest/current affairs television programmes (average score 33% (95% CI 28–38)). While there was a non- significant increase in average scores for all outlets, a significant improvement was seen in the online news media: a rise of 5.1% (95%CI 1.32, 8.97; P 0.009). Statistically significant improvements were seen in coverage of the potential harms of interventions, the availability of treatment or diagnostic options, and accurate quantification of benefits. Conclusion Although the overall quality of medical reporting in the general media remains poor, this study showed modest improvements in some areas. However, the most striking finding was the continuing very poor coverage of health news by

  20. Eliminating Poor Performers: The Catalyst to Improve Quality in the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    eventually improve job satisfaction by increasing the quality of leaders. Changing the parameters of success to be more qualitative by allowing unit...will initially increase quality of units and will eventually improve job satisfaction by increasing the quality of leaders. Changing the parameters ...satisfaction by increasing the quality of leaders. Changing the parameters of success to be more qualitative by allowing unit commanders to decrease to an

  1. Mindfulness-based Intervention for Perinatal Grief Education and Reduction among Poor Women in Chhattisgarh, India: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa; Montgomery, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stillbirth is a significant public health problem in low-to-middle-income countries and results in perinatal grief, often with negative psychosocial impact. In low-resource settings, such as Chhattisgarh, India, where needs are high, it is imperative to utilize low-cost, effective interventions. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an empirically sound intervention that has been utilized for a broad range of physical and mental health problems, and is adaptable to specific populations. The main objective of this pilot study was to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a shortened, culturally adapted mindfulness-based intervention to address complex grief after stillbirth. Methods We used an observational, pre-post-6-week post study design. The study instrument was made up of descriptive demographic questions and validated scales and was administered as a structured interview due to low literacy rates. We used a community participatory approach to culturally adapt the five-week mindfulness-based intervention and delivered it through two trained local nurses. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses explored study outcomes as well as acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Results 29 women with a history of stillbirth enrolled, completed the pretest and began the intervention; 26 completed the five-week intervention and post-test (89.7%), and 23 completed the six-week follow-up assessment (88.5%). Pretest results included elevated psychological symptoms and high levels of perinatal grief, including the active grief, difficulty coping, and despair subscales. General linear modeling repeated measures was used to explore posttest and six-week follow up changes from baseline, controlling for significantly correlated demographic variables. These longitudinal results included significant reduction in psychological symptoms; four of the five facets of mindfulness changed in the desired direction, two significantly; as well as

  2. Point-of-prescription interventions to improve antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Keith W; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Moehring, Rebekah; Anderson, Deverick J; Calderwood, Michael S; Han, Jennifer H; Mehta, Jimish M; Pollack, Lori A; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Srinivasan, Arjun; Camins, Bernard C; Schwartz, David N; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2015-04-15

    Antimicrobial stewardship is pivotal to improving patient outcomes, reducing adverse events, decreasing healthcare costs, and preventing further emergence of antimicrobial resistance. In an era in which antimicrobial resistance is increasing, judicious antimicrobial use is the responsibility of every healthcare provider. Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) have made headway in improving antimicrobial prescribing using such "top-down" methods as formulary restriction and prospective audit with feedback; however, engagement of prescribers has not been fully explored. Strategies that include frontline prescribers and other unit-based healthcare providers have the potential to expand stewardship, both to augment existing centralized ASPs and to provide alternative approaches to perform stewardship at healthcare facilities with limited resources. This review discusses interventions focusing on antimicrobial prescribing at the point of prescription as well as a pilot project to engage unit-based healthcare providers in antimicrobial stewardship. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Improving hand hygiene behaviour among adolescents by a planning intervention.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Jiang, Tingting; Knoll, Nina; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    To improve regular hand hygiene in adolescents, educational messages based on medical information have not been very successful. Therefore, a theory-guided self-regulatory intervention has been designed with a particular focus on planning strategies. A randomised controlled trial with 307 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, was conducted in high schools. The control group received educational hand hygiene leaflets, whereas the experimental group received a self-regulatory treatment which required them to generate specific action plans and coping plans. Three times during one month, both groups received verbal reminder messages about planning to wash their hands properly. At one-month follow-up, hand hygiene behaviour as well as planning to practise hand hygiene were higher in the self-regulation than in the education group (p < .01). Moreover, changes in planning levels operated as a mediator between experimental conditions and changes in behavioural outcomes. Teaching self-regulatory planning strategies may constitute a superior approach than educational messages to improve regular hand hygiene practice in adolescents.

  4. Motor Skill Interventions to Improve Fundamental Movement Skills of Preschoolers with Developmental Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Megan A.; Rhodes, Ryan E.

    2011-01-01

    Preschoolers with developmental delay (DD) are at risk for poor fundamental movement skills (FMS), but a paucity of early FMS interventions exist. The purpose of this review was to critically appraise the existing interventions to establish direction for future trials targeting preschoolers with DD. A total of 11 studies met the inclusion…

  5. Cognitive Interventions to Improve Face-Name Recall: The Role of Personality Trait Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratzinger, Peter; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explored the relationship between three personality traits in older adults and improvement in face-name recall after three types of intervention. Results showed improvement in recall after intervention; a correlation between the openness trait and recall with all interventions; and a correlation between the fantasy subfactor trait and recall with…

  6. [Intervention to improve hand hygiene compliance in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Sobrequés, Jordi; Espuñes, Jordi; Bañeres, Joaquim

    2014-07-01

    Hand hygiene (HM) is the single most important measure and effective in reducing the risk of Healthcare acquired infections (IRAS). Although HM is an effective, simple and cheap measure, it is usual to find results of low compliance among health professionals. The main objective of this strategy has been to give new force to the promotion of HM in hospitals and educate professionals about the importance of this single action. The strategy was planned as a multicenter intervention study to promote HM in health centers of Catalonia in 2009-2010. The intervention is based on 4 main areas: a survey of barriers and facilitators, distribution of graphic material, training at different levels and measure of quality indicators. With this strategy a total of 57% of the number of acute beds in the concerted public and private network of hospitals were reached. The survey revealed that training was perceived as the main facilitator of the HM action. 15,376 professionals registered to the on-line training. The overall compliance with HM indications (based on "five moments for HM") was 56.45% in the acute areas. The campaigns and programs to promote HM carried out in the last four years in Catalonia has helped to achieve an increasing number of hospitals associated to the strategy of the Alliance for Patient Safety in Catalonia. The on-line curse acceptance was very high and seems a powerful tool to improve hand hygiene knowledge and compliance among health professionals. The compliance of HM seems to increase in the hospitals of Catalonia evaluated.

  7. Intervention Learning Plan to Address the Issue of Poor Writing Skills among Students of Al Ittihad Model School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarsar, Nasreddine Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Students in UAE Model Schools exhibit poor writing skills. Samples of some of the essays they came up with bear clear evidence of the problems they have with writing in particular and place them at an increased risk for literacy failure. The data I gathered by means of questionnaires and interviews with teachers and students alike suggest that the…

  8. Accelerating Decoding-Related Skills in Poor Readers Learning a Foreign Language: A Computer-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björn, Piia Maria; Leppänen, Paavo H. T.

    2013-01-01

    The results of Fast ForWord® training on English decoding-related skills were examined. Finnish fifth-grade students were identified as having reading fluency problems and poor skills in English as a foreign language learned at school and were randomly assigned to either a training group (TRG) or a control group. The TRG ("n"?=?13)…

  9. Outpatient rehabilitation as an intervention to improve employees' physical capacity.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Birgitta; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Nikkari, Seppo T

    2016-01-01

    The aging of the workforce poses new challenges for maintaining work ability. Because of limited information on the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation performed in traditional inpatient programs, extended interest in outpatient rehabilitation has risen in the past few years. We examined the effects of a new outpatient rehabilitation program where every participant defined their own goals to improve work ability by the aid of a goal-oriented multi-professional team. This report will focus on the employees' physical capacity during a nine-month program. A total of 605 municipal employees from different production areas of the City of Tampere took part in the outpatient rehabilitation program, implemented by the occupational health unit. Groups of 12 employees participated in eight one-day sessions at intervals of two to three weeks; the final follow-up was 9 months from the beginning. Submaximal aerobic capacity was tested by a calibrated cycle ergometer with a commercial program (Aino Fitware pro, Helsinki, Finland). Musculoskeletal tests assessed muscle strength, balance and mobility. During the 9-month follow-up of the rehabilitation program, the employees' physical capacity was improved. The follow-up test scores from a total of 329 employees were significantly higher in the submaximal aerobic capacity test (p < 0.001). Other tests were also improved, such as standing on one foot (p = 0.001), back side bending flexibility test (p < 0.001), dynamic sit up (p = 0.001), upper extremity right (p < 0.001), and knee bending (p = 0.029). About 40% of the participants did not have an adequate health situation to take part in physical capacity tests; however they took part in the intervention. The new outpatient rehabilitation program organized by the occupational health unit had a positive influence on employees' physical capacity during a nine-month follow up.

  10. Characterization of supersaturatable formulations for improved absorption of poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Shi, Yi

    2012-12-01

    With the increasing number of poorly water-soluble compounds in contemporary drug discovery pipelines, the concept of supersaturation as an effective formulation approach for enhancing bioavailability is gaining momentum. This is intended to design the formulation to yield significantly high intraluminal concentrations of the drug than the thermodynamic equilibrium solubility through achieving supersaturation and thus to enhance the intestinal absorption. The major challenges faced by scientists developing supersaturatable formulations include controlling the rate and degree of supersaturation with the application of polymeric precipitation inhibitor and maintenance of post-administration supersaturation. This review is intended to cover publications on this topic since April 2009. Scientific publications associated with characterization of supersaturatable systems and related preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) studies are reviewed. Specifically, this review will address issues related to assessing the performance of supersaturatable systems including: (1) Diversified approaches for developing supersaturatable formulations, (2) meaningful in vitro test methods to evaluate supersaturatable formulations, and (3) in vivo PK study cases which have demonstrated direct relevance between the supersaturation state and the exposure observed in animal models and human subjects.

  11. 76 FR 12969 - Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... goal of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research is to raise consumers' awareness of the ] importance of good medication adherence, a vital first step toward improved adherence behavior and better... National Consumers League (NCL) to develop and lead a groundbreaking national campaign to raise...

  12. Interventions for improving adherence to iron chelation therapy in people with sickle cell disease or thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Patricia M; Madgwick, Karen V; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn; Estcourt, Lise J

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To identify and assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve adherence to iron chelation therapy compared to standard care in people with SCD or thalassaemia including: identifying and assessing the effectiveness of different types of interventions (psychological and psychosocial, educational, medication interventions, or multi-component interventions);identifying and assessing the effectiveness of interventions specific to different age groups (children, adolescents, adults). PMID:27713668

  13. Taking action on the social determinants of health: improving health access for the urban poor in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, the country of Mongolia (population 2.8 million) has experienced rapid social changes associated with economic growth, persisting socio-economic inequities and internal migration. In order to improve health access for the urban poor, the Ministry of Health developed a "Reaching Every District" strategy (RED strategy) to deliver an integrated package of key health and social services. The aim of this article is to present findings of an assessment of the implementation of the RED strategy, and, on the basis of this assessment, articulate lessons learned for equitable urban health planning. Methods Principal methods for data collection and analysis included literature review, barrier analysis of health access and in-depth interviews and group discussions with health managers and providers. Findings The main barriers to health access for the urban poor relate to interacting effects of poverty, unhealthy daily living environments, social vulnerability and isolation. Implementation of the RED strategy has resulted in increased health access for the urban poor, as demonstrated by health staff having reached new clients with immunization, family planning and ante-natal care services, and increased civil registrations which enable social service provision. Organizational effects have included improved partnerships for health and increased motivation of the health workforce. Important lessons learned from the early implementation of the RED strategy include the need to form strong partnerships among stakeholders at each level of the health system and in the community, as well as the need to develop a specific financing strategy to address the needs of the very poor. The diverse social context for health in an urban poor setting calls for a decentralized planning and partnership strategy, but with central level commitment towards policy guidance and financing of pro-poor urban health strategies. Conclusions Lessons from Mongolia mirror other

  14. School-based interventions for improving contraceptive use in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laureen M; Bernholc, Alissa; Chen, Mario; Tolley, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-29

    Young women, especially adolescents, often lack access to modern contraception. Reasons vary by geography and regional politics and culture. The projected 2015 birth rate in 'developing' regions was 56 per 1000 compared with 17 per 1000 for 'developed' regions. To identify school-based interventions that improved contraceptive use among adolescents Until 6 June 2016, we searched for eligible trials in PubMed, CENTRAL, ERIC, Web of Science, POPLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP. We considered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assigned individuals or clusters. The majority of participants must have been 19 years old or younger.The educational strategy must have occurred primarily in a middle school or high school. The intervention had to emphasize one or more effective methods of contraception. Our primary outcomes were pregnancy and contraceptive use. We assessed titles and abstracts identified during the searches. One author extracted and entered the data into RevMan; a second author verified accuracy. We examined studies for methodological quality.For unadjusted dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). For cluster randomized trials, we used adjusted measures, e.g. OR, risk ratio, or difference in proportions. For continuous outcomes, we used the adjusted mean difference (MD) or other measures from the models. We did not conduct meta-analysis due to varied interventions and outcome measures. The 11 trials included 10 cluster RCTs and an individually randomized trial. The cluster RCTs had sample sizes from 816 to 10,954; the median number of clusters was 24. Most trials were conducted in the USA and UK; one was from Mexico and one from South Africa.We focus here on the trials with moderate quality evidence and an intervention effect. Three addressed preventing pregnancy and HIV/STI through interactive sessions. One trial provided a multifaceted two-year program. Immediately after year one and

  15. Interventions to Improve Asthma Management of the School-Age Child.

    PubMed

    Friend, Mary; Morrison, Amber

    2015-06-01

    Improvement of medication adherence in the school-age child can lead to improvement in quality of life, decreased morbidity, and a potential decreased risk of deferred academic, social, and emotional development. The objective of this article is to review barriers to asthma medication adherence and identify evidence-based techniques that improve medication management of the asthmatic child 5 to 12 years of age. A literature review was performed and articles were obtained through database searches within Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and PubMed. Research indicates that barriers to the adherence of medication regimens required for asthmatic children include poor understanding of the medication regimen, substandard education on symptom recognition and environmental triggers, rejection of the diagnosis, and a lack of support or understanding within the community. Researched techniques aimed to improve medication management in 5- to 12-year-olds include: computer-based education; workshops for parents, teachers, and children; incorporation of asthma education into classroom lessons; use of case managers; the introduction of a nurse practitioner in the school to provide care, including medication prescriptions for the asthmatic child; and assessment and evaluation of environmental and emotional triggers in the home and school. Collaboration of current data may help lead to a successful interventional model that can improve asthma management in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Evaluating the ready biodegradability of two poorly water-soluble substances: comparative approach of bioavailability improvement methods (BIMs).

    PubMed

    Sweetlove, Cyril; Chenèble, Jean-Charles; Barthel, Yves; Boualam, Marc; L'Haridon, Jacques; Thouand, Gérald

    2016-09-01

    Difficulties encountered in estimating the biodegradation of poorly water-soluble substances are often linked to their limited bioavailability to microorganisms. Many original bioavailability improvement methods (BIMs) have been described, but no global approach was proposed for a standardized comparison of these. The latter would be a valuable tool as part of a wider strategy for evaluating poorly water-soluble substances. The purpose of this study was to define an evaluation strategy following the assessment of different BIMs adapted to poorly water-soluble substances with ready biodegradability tests. The study was performed with two poorly water-soluble chemicals-a solid, anthraquinone, and a liquid, isodecyl neopentanoate-and five BIMs were compared to the direct addition method (reference method), i.e., (i) ultrasonic dispersion, (ii) adsorption onto silica gel, (iii) dispersion using an emulsifier, (iv) dispersion with silicone oil, and (v) dispersion with emulsifier and silicone oil. A two-phase evaluation strategy of solid and liquid chemicals was developed involving the selection of the most relevant BIMs for enhancing the biodegradability of tested substances. A description is given of a BIM classification ratio (R BIM), which enables a comparison to be made between the different test chemical sample preparation methods used in the various tests. Thereby, using this comparison, the BIMs giving rise to the greatest biodegradability were ultrasonic dispersion and dispersion with silicone oil or with silicone oil and emulsifier for the tested solid chemical, adsorption onto silica gel, and ultrasonic dispersion for the liquid one.

  17. Improving antibiotic prescribing for children in the resource-poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, Kirsty; Barker, Charlotte I S; Irwin, Adam; Sharland, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are a critically important part of paediatric medical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where infectious diseases are the leading cause of child mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that >50% of all medicines are prescribed, dispensed or sold inappropriately and that half of all patients do not take their medicines correctly. Given the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance globally, inappropriate antibiotic use is of international concern, and countries struggle to implement basic policies promoting rational antibiotic use. Many barriers to rational paediatric prescribing in LMICs persist. The World Health Organization initiatives, such as ‘Make medicines child size’, the Model List of Essential Medicines for Children and the Model Formulary for Children, have been significant steps forward. Continued strategies to improve access to appropriate drugs and formulations, in conjunction with improved evidence-based clinical guidelines and dosing recommendations, are essential to the success of such initiatives on both a national and an international level. This paper provides an overview of these issues and considers future developments that may improve LMIC antibiotic prescribing. PMID:24433393

  18. Improving antibiotic prescribing for children in the resource-poor setting.

    PubMed

    Le Doare, Kirsty; Barker, Charlotte I S; Irwin, Adam; Sharland, Mike

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotics are a critically important part of paediatric medical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where infectious diseases are the leading cause of child mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that >50% of all medicines are prescribed, dispensed or sold inappropriately and that half of all patients do not take their medicines correctly. Given the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance globally, inappropriate antibiotic use is of international concern, and countries struggle to implement basic policies promoting rational antibiotic use. Many barriers to rational paediatric prescribing in LMICs persist. The World Health Organization initiatives, such as 'Make medicines child size', the Model List of Essential Medicines for Children and the Model Formulary for Children, have been significant steps forward. Continued strategies to improve access to appropriate drugs and formulations, in conjunction with improved evidence-based clinical guidelines and dosing recommendations, are essential to the success of such initiatives on both a national and an international level. This paper provides an overview of these issues and considers future developments that may improve LMIC antibiotic prescribing.

  19. Designing a theory-informed, contextually appropriate intervention strategy to improve delivery of paediatric services in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background District hospital services in Kenya and many low-income countries should deliver proven, effective interventions that could substantially reduce child and newborn mortality. However such services are often of poor quality. Researchers have therefore been challenged to identify intervention strategies that go beyond addressing knowledge, skill, or resource inadequacies to support health systems to deliver better services at scale. An effort to develop a system-oriented intervention tailored to local needs and context and drawing on theory is described. Methods An intervention was designed to improve district hospital services for children based on four main strategies: a reflective process to distill root causes for the observed problems with service delivery; developing a set of possible intervention approaches to address these problems; a search of literature for theory that provided the most appropriate basis for intervention design; and repeatedly moving backwards and forwards between identified causes, proposed interventions, identified theory, and knowledge of the existing context to develop an overarching intervention that seemed feasible and likely to be acceptable and potentially sustainable. Results and discussion In addition to human and resource constraints key problems included failures of relevant professionals to take responsibility for or ownership of the challenge of pediatric service delivery; inadequately prepared, poorly supported leaders of service units (mid-level managers) who are often professionally and geographically isolated and an almost complete lack of useful information for routinely monitoring or understanding service delivery practice or outcomes. A system-oriented intervention recognizing the pivotal role of leaders of service units but addressing the outer and inner setting of hospitals was designed to help shape and support an appropriate role for these professionals. It aims to foster a sense of ownership while

  20. The midwifery initiated oral health-dental service protocol: an intervention to improve oral health outcomes for pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; George, Ajesh; Dahlen, Hannah; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Blinkhorn, Anthony; Ellis, Sharon; Yeo, Anthony

    2015-01-15

    Evidence is emerging that women's poor oral health and health practices during pregnancy are associated with poor oral health in their children and potentially an increased risk of pre-term or low-birth weight infants. The Midwifery Initiated Oral Health-Dental Service (MIOH-DS) trial is a three arm multicentre randomised controlled trial which will recruit women from three metropolitan hospitals aimed at improving women's oral health and service access and indirectly reducing perinatal morbidity. All three arms of the trial will deliver oral health promotion material, although a midwife oral assessment and referral to private/public/health fund dental services pathway (Intervention Group 1) and the midwife oral assessment and referral to local free public dental services pathway (Intervention Group 2) will be compared to the control group of oral health promotional material only. Midwives will undergo specific oral health education and competency testing to undertake this novel intervention. This efficacy trial will promote a new partnership between midwives and dentists focused on enhancing the oral health of women and their infants. Should the intervention be found effective, this intervention, with existing on-line educational program for midwives, can be easily transferred into practice for large metropolitan health services within and beyond Australia. Further cost-benefit analysis is proposed to inform national health policy. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001271897.

  1. Reaching the poor with health interventions: programme-incidence analysis of seven randomised trials of women's groups to reduce newborn mortality in Asia and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Houweling, Tanja A J; Morrison, Joanna; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Das, Sushmita; Hossen, Munir; Kuddus, Abdul; Lewycka, Sonia; Looman, Caspar W; Magar, Bharat Budhathoki; Manandhar, Dharma S; Akter, Mahfuza; Dube, Albert Lazarous Nkhata; Rath, Shibanand; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Tripathy, Prasanta; Costello, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Efforts to end preventable newborn deaths will fail if the poor are not reached with effective interventions. To understand what works to reach vulnerable groups, we describe and explain the uptake of a highly effective community-based newborn health intervention across social strata in Asia and Africa. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of seven randomised trials of participatory women's groups to reduce newborn mortality in India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Malawi. We analysed data on 70 574 pregnancies. Socioeconomic and sociodemographic differences in group attendance were tested using logistic regression. Qualitative data were collected at each trial site (225 focus groups, 20 interviews) to understand our results. Results Socioeconomic differences in women's group attendance were small, except for occasional lower attendance by elites. Sociodemographic differences were large, with lower attendance by young primigravid women in African as well as in South Asian sites. The intervention was considered relevant and interesting to all socioeconomic groups. Local facilitators ensured inclusion of poorer women. Embarrassment and family constraints on movement outside the home restricted attendance among primigravid women. Reproductive health discussions were perceived as inappropriate for them. Conclusions Community-based women's groups can help to reach every newborn with effective interventions. Equitable intervention uptake is enhanced when facilitators actively encourage all women to attend, organise meetings at the participants’ convenience and use approaches that are easily understandable for the less educated. Focused efforts to include primigravid women are necessary, working with families and communities to decrease social taboos. PMID:26246540

  2. Exercise interventions in polypathological aging patients that coexist with diabetes mellitus: improving functional status and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-06-01

    In elderly populations, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength, poor muscle quality, and accelerated loss of muscle mass. In addition, diabetes mellitus increases risk for accelerated aging and for the development of frailty syndrome. This disease is also associated with a polypathological condition, and its complications progressively affect quality of life and survival. Exercise interventions, including resistance training, represent the cornerstones of diabetes management, especially in patients at severe functional decline. This review manuscript aimed to describe the beneficial effects of different exercise interventions on the functional capacity of elderly diabetics, including those at polypathological condition. The SciELO, Science Citation Index, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and ScienceDirect databases were searched from 1980 to 2015 for articles published from original scientific investigations. In addition to the beneficial effects of exercise interventions on glycemic control, and on the cardiovascular risk factors associated with diabetes, physical exercise is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength, power output, and aerobic power and functional capacity in elderly diabetic patients. Thus, a combination of resistance and endurance training is the most effective exercise intervention to promote overall physical fitness in these patients. In addition, in diabetic patients with frailty and severe functional decline, a multicomponent exercise program including strength and power training, balance exercises, and gait retraining may be an effective intervention to reduce falls and improve functional capacity and quality of life in these patients.

  3. Improving indoor air quality for poor families: a controlled experiment in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, S; Wheeler, D; Huq, M; Khaliquzzaman, M

    2009-02-01

    The World Health Organization's 2004 Global and Regional Burden of Disease Report estimates that acute respiratory infections from indoor air pollution (pollution from burning wood, animal dung, and other bio-fuels) kill a million children annually in developing countries, inflicting a particularly heavy toll on poor families in South Asia and Africa. This paper reports on an experiment that studied the use of different fuels in conjunction with different combinations of construction materials, space configurations, cooking locations, and household ventilation practices (use of doors and windows) as potentially-important determinants of indoor air pollution. Results from controlled experiments in Bangladesh were analyzed to test whether changes in these determinants can have significant effects on indoor air pollution. Analysis of the data shows, for example, that pollution from the cooking area is transported into living spaces rapidly and completely. Furthermore, it is important to factor in the interaction between outdoor and indoor air pollution. Hence, the optimal cooking location should take 'seasonality' in account. Among fuels, seasonal conditions seem to affect the relative severity of pollution from wood, dung, and other biomass fuels. However, there is no ambiguity about their collective impact. All are far dirtier than clean (LPG and Kerosene) fuels. The analysis concludes that if cooking with clean fuels is not possible, then building the kitchen with permeable construction material and providing proper ventilation in cooking areas will yield a better indoor health environment. Several village-level measures could significantly reduce IAP exposure in Bangladesh. All would require arrangements and the assert of male heads-of-household: negotiated bulk purchases of higher cost, cleaner fuels; purchase of more fuel-efficient stoves; peripheral location of cooking facilities; building the kitchen with permeable construction material; rotation of women in

  4. An injectable hybrid nanoparticle-in-oil-in-water submicron emulsion for improved delivery of poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wenquan; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2012-04-13

    Poor drugability problems are commonly seen in a class of chemical entities with poor solubility in water and oil, and moreover, physicochemical instability of these compounds poses extra challenges in design of dosage forms. Such problems contribute a significant high failure rate in new drug development. A hybrid nanoparicle-in-oil-in-water (N/O/W) submicron emulsion was proposed for improved delivery of poorly soluble and unstable drugs (e.g., dihydroartemisinin (DHA)). DHA is known for its potent antimalarial effect and antitumor activity. However, its insolubility and instability impose big challenges for formulations, and so far, no injectable dosage forms are clinically available yet. Therefore, an injectable DHA N/O/W system was developed. Unlike other widely-explored systems (e.g., liposomes, micelles, and emulsions), in which low drug load and only short-term storage are often found, the hybrid submicron emulsion possesses three-fold higher drug-loading capacity than the conventional O/W emulsion. Of note, it can be manufactured into a freeze-drying form and can render its storage up to 6 months even in room temperature. The in vivo studies demonstrated that the PK profiles were significantly improved, and this injectable system was effective in suppressing tumor growth. The strategy provides a useful solution to effective delivery of such a class of drugs.

  5. An injectable hybrid nanoparticle-in-oil-in-water submicron emulsion for improved delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wenquan; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2012-04-01

    Poor drugability problems are commonly seen in a class of chemical entities with poor solubility in water and oil, and moreover, physicochemical instability of these compounds poses extra challenges in design of dosage forms. Such problems contribute a significant high failure rate in new drug development. A hybrid nanoparicle-in-oil-in-water (N/O/W) submicron emulsion was proposed for improved delivery of poorly soluble and unstable drugs (e.g., dihydroartemisinin (DHA)). DHA is known for its potent antimalarial effect and antitumor activity. However, its insolubility and instability impose big challenges for formulations, and so far, no injectable dosage forms are clinically available yet. Therefore, an injectable DHA N/O/W system was developed. Unlike other widely-explored systems (e.g., liposomes, micelles, and emulsions), in which low drug load and only short-term storage are often found, the hybrid submicron emulsion possesses three-fold higher drug-loading capacity than the conventional O/W emulsion. Of note, it can be manufactured into a freeze-drying form and can render its storage up to 6 months even in room temperature. The in vivo studies demonstrated that the PK profiles were significantly improved, and this injectable system was effective in suppressing tumor growth. The strategy provides a useful solution to effective delivery of such a class of drugs.

  6. Impact on diarrhoeal illness of a community educational intervention to improve drinking water quality in rural communities in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R; Ramírez Toro, Graciela I; Minnigh, Harvey A

    2010-04-28

    Waterborne disease is a major risk for small water supplies in rural settings. This study was done to assess the impact of an educational intervention designed to improve water quality and estimate the contribution of water to the incidence of diarrhoeal disease in poor rural communities in Puerto Rico a two-part study was undertaken. An educational intervention was delivered to communities relying on community water supplies. This intervention consisted of student operators and administrators supervising and assisting community members who voluntarily "operate" these systems. These voluntary operators had no previous training and were principally concerned with seeing that some water was delivered. The quality of that water was not something they either understood or addressed. The impact of this intervention was measured through water sampling for standard bacteriological indicators and a frank pathogen. In addition, face-to-face epidemiological studies designed to determine the base-line occurrence of diarrhoeal disease in the communities were conducted. Some 15 months after the intervention a further epidemiological study was conducted in both the intervention communities and in control communities that had not received any intervention. Diarrhoeal illness rates over a four week period prior to the intervention were 3.5%. Salmonella was isolated from all of 5 distributed samples prior to intervention and from only 2 of 12 samples after the intervention. In the 15 months follow-up study, illness rates were lower in the intervention compared to control communities (2.5% vs 3.6%%) (RR = 0.70, 95%CI 0.43, 1.15), though this was not statistically significant. However, in the final Poisson regression model living in an intervention system (RR = 0.318; 95%CI 0.137 - 0.739) and owning a dog (RR = 0.597, 95%CI 0.145 - 0.962) was negatively associated with illness. Whilst size of system (RR = 1.006, 95%CI 1.001 - 1.010) and reporting problems with sewage system (RR = 2

  7. Impact on diarrhoeal illness of a community educational intervention to improve drinking water quality in rural communities in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Waterborne disease is a major risk for small water supplies in rural settings. This study was done to assess the impact of an educational intervention designed to improve water quality and estimate the contribution of water to the incidence of diarrhoeal disease in poor rural communities in Puerto Rico a two-part study was undertaken. Methods An educational intervention was delivered to communities relying on community water supplies. This intervention consisted of student operators and administrators supervising and assisting community members who voluntarily "operate" these systems. These voluntary operators had no previous training and were principally concerned with seeing that some water was delivered. The quality of that water was not something they either understood or addressed. The impact of this intervention was measured through water sampling for standard bacteriological indicators and a frank pathogen. In addition, face-to-face epidemiological studies designed to determine the base-line occurrence of diarrhoeal disease in the communities were conducted. Some 15 months after the intervention a further epidemiological study was conducted in both the intervention communities and in control communities that had not received any intervention. Results Diarrhoeal illness rates over a four week period prior to the intervention were 3.5%. Salmonella was isolated from all of 5 distributed samples prior to intervention and from only 2 of 12 samples after the intervention. In the 15 months follow-up study, illness rates were lower in the intervention compared to control communities (2.5% vs 3.6%%) (RR = 0.70, 95%CI 0.43, 1.15), though this was not statistically significant. However, in the final Poisson regression model living in an intervention system (RR = 0.318; 95%CI 0.137 - 0.739) and owning a dog (RR = 0.597, 95%CI 0.145 - 0.962) was negatively associated with illness. Whilst size of system (RR = 1.006, 95%CI 1.001 - 1.010) and reporting problems

  8. Particle size reduction to the nanometer range: a promising approach to improve buccal absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shasha; Song, Yunmei; Peddie, Frank; Evans, Allan M

    2011-01-01

    Poorly water-soluble drugs, such as phenylephrine, offer challenging problems for buccal drug delivery. In order to overcome these problems, particle size reduction (to the nanometer range) and cyclodextrin complexation were investigated for permeability enhancement. The apparent solubility in water and the buccal permeation of the original phenylephrine coarse powder, a phenylephrine–cyclodextrin complex and phenylephrine nanosuspensions were characterized. The particle size and particle surface properties of phenylephrine nanosuspensions were used to optimize the size reduction process. The optimized phenylephrine nanosuspension was then freeze dried and incorporated into a multi-layered buccal patch, consisting of a small tablet adhered to a mucoadhesive film, yielding a phenylephrine buccal product with good dosage accuracy and improved mucosal permeability. The design of the buccal patch allows for drug incorporation without the need to change the mucoadhesive component, and is potentially suited to a range of poorly water-soluble compounds. PMID:21753876

  9. Improved oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble glimepiride by utilizing microemulsion technique

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiying; Pan, Tingting; Cui, Ying; Li, Xiaxia; Gao, Jiefang; Yang, Wenzhi; Shen, Shigang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare an oil/water glimepiride (GM) microemulsion (ME) for oral administration to improve its solubility and enhance its bioavailability. Based on a solubility study, pseudoternary phase diagrams, and Box–Behnken design, the oil/water GMME formulation was optimized and prepared. GMME was characterized by dynamic laser light scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, and viscosity. The in vitro drug release, storage stability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of GMME were investigated. The optimized GMME was composed of Capryol 90 (oil), Cremophor RH40 (surfactant), and Transcutol (cosurfactant), and increased GM solubility up to 544.6±4.91 µg/mL. The GMME was spherical in shape. The particle size and its polydispersity index were 38.9±17.46 nm and 0.266±0.057, respectively. Meanwhile, the GMME was physicochemically stable at 4°C for at least 3 months. The short-term efficacy in diabetic mice provided the proof that blood glucose had a consistent and significant reduction at a dose of 375 µg/kg whether via IP injection or IG administration of GMME. Compared with the glimepiride suspensions or glimepiride-meglumine complex solution, the pharmacokinetics of GMME in Wistar rats via IG administration exhibited higher plasma drug concentration, larger area under the curve, and more enhanced oral bioavailability. There was a good correlation of GMME between the in vitro release values and the in vivo oral absorption. ME could be an effective oral drug delivery system to improve bioavailability of GM. PMID:27540291

  10. Oral Motor Intervention Improved the Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xu; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Song, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oral feeding for preterm infants has been a thorny problem worldwide. To improve the efficacy of oral feeding in preterm infants, oral motor intervention (OMI), which consists of nonnutritive sucking, oral stimulation, and oral support, was developed. Published studies demonstrated that OMI may be as an alternative treatment to solve this problem; however, these results remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis (TSA) to objectively evaluate the potential of OMI for improving the current status of oral feeding in preterm infants. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed to capture relevant citations until at the end of October, 2014. Lists of references of eligible studies and reviews were also hand-checked to include any latent studies. Two independent investigators screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the methodology, and then a meta-analysis and TSA was performed by using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3 and TSA 0.9 beta, respectively. A total of 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 855 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The meta-analyses suggested that OMI is associated with the reduced transition time (ie, the time needed from tube feeding to totally oral feeding) (mean difference [MD], −4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], −5.22 to −2.84), shorten hospital stays (MD, −3.64; 95% CI, −5.57 to −1.71), increased feeding efficiency (MD, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.36–1.27), and intake of milk (MD, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06–0.21) rather than weight gain. Results of TSA for each outcomes of interest confirmed these pooled results. With present evidences, OMI can be as an alternative to improve the condition of transition time, length of hospital stays, feeding efficiency, and intake of milk in preterm infants. However, the pooled results may be impaired due to low quality included, and thus

  11. Improving Treatment Integrity through a Functional Approach to Intervention Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaupsin, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    A functional approach to intervention planning has been shown to be effective in reducing problem behaviors and promoting appropriate behaviors in children and youth with behavior disorders. When function-based intervention plans are not successful, it is often due to issues of treatment integrity in which teachers omit or do not sufficiently…

  12. Food Environment Interventions to Improve the Dietary Behavior of Young Adults in Tertiary Education Settings: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajshri; Kelly, Bridget; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    The current obesity-promoting food environment, typified by highly accessible unhealthy foods and drinks, may lead to an increased risk of chronic disease, particularly within young adults. A number of university-based intervention trials have been conducted in the United States and Europe to improve the food environment in this setting. However, there are no systematic reviews focusing on these interventions conducted exclusively in tertiary education settings. Our objective was to conduct a systematic literature review evaluating food environment interventions targeting dietary behavior in young adults in college and university settings. Eight databases were searched for randomized controlled trials, pre- and postintervention studies, quasiexperimental studies, cross-sectional studies, and other nonexperimental studies from 1998 to December 2014 that were conducted in tertiary education settings (ie, colleges and universities). Studies that evaluated a food environment intervention and reported healthier food choices, reductions in unhealthy food choices, nutrition knowledge, and/or food and drink sales as primary outcomes were included. Fifteen studies of high (n=5), medium (n=7), and poor quality (n=3) met the inclusion criteria, 13 of which showed positive improvements in outcome measures. Information relating to healthy foods through signage and nutrition labels (n=10) showed improvements in outcomes of interest. Increasing the availability of healthy foods (n=1) and decreasing the portion size of unhealthy foods (n=2) improved dietary intake. Price incentives and increased availability of healthy foods combined with nutrition information to increase purchases of healthy foods (n=2) were identified as having a positive effect on nutrition-related outcomes. Potentially useful interventions in tertiary education settings were nutrition messages/nutrient labeling, providing healthy options, and portion size control of unhealthy foods. Price decreases for and

  13. Interventions to improve hand hygiene compliance in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah J; Moralejo, Donna; Drey, Nicholas; Chudleigh, Jane H

    2010-09-08

    Health care-associated infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hand hygiene is regarded as an effective preventive measure. To update the review done in 2007, to assess the short and longer-term success of strategies to improve hand hygiene compliance and to determine whether a sustained increase in hand hygiene compliance can reduce rates of health care-associated infection. We conducted electronic searches of: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group specialised register of trials; MEDLINE; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; and the BNI. Originally searched to July 2006, for the update databases were searched from August 2006 until November 2009. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series analyses meeting explicit entry and quality criteria used by the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group were eligible for inclusion. Studies reporting indicators of hand hygiene compliance and proxy indicators such as product use were considered. Self-reported data were not considered a valid measure of compliance. Studies to promote hand hygiene compliance as part of a care bundle approach were included, providing data relating specifically to hand hygiene were presented separately. Studies were excluded if hand hygiene was assessed in simulations, non-clinical settings or the operating theatre setting. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed data quality. Four studies met the criteria for the review: two from the original review and two from the update. Two studies evaluated simple education initiatives, one using a randomized clinical trial design and the other a controlled before and after design. Both measured hand hygiene compliance by direct observation. The other two studies were both interrupted times series studies. One study presented three separate interventions within the

  14. Cryptococcal meningitis: improving access to essential antifungal medicines in resource-poor countries.

    PubMed

    Loyse, Angela; Thangaraj, Harry; Easterbrook, Philippa; Ford, Nathan; Roy, Monika; Chiller, Tom; Govender, Nelesh; Harrison, Thomas S; Bicanic, Tihana

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the leading cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa, and contributes up to 20% of AIDS-related mortality in low-income and middle-income countries every year. Antifungal treatment for cryptococcal meningitis relies on three old, off-patent antifungal drugs: amphotericin B deoxycholate, flucytosine, and fluconazole. Widely accepted treatment guidelines recommend amphotericin B and flucytosine as first-line induction treatment for cryptococcal meningitis. However, flucytosine is unavailable in Africa and most of Asia, and safe amphotericin B administration requires patient hospitalisation and careful laboratory monitoring to identify and treat common side-effects. Therefore, fluconazole monotherapy is widely used in low-income and middle-income countries for induction therapy, but treatment is associated with significantly increased rates of mortality. We review the antifungal drugs used to treat cryptococcal meningitis with respect to clinical effectiveness and access issues specific to low-income and middle-income countries. Each drug poses unique access challenges: amphotericin B through cost, toxic effects, and insufficiently coordinated distribution; flucytosine through cost and scarcity of registration; and fluconazole through challenges in maintenance of local stocks--eg, sustainability of donations or insufficient generic supplies. We advocate ten steps that need to be taken to improve access to safe and effective antifungal therapy for cryptococcal meningitis.

  15. The effects of preconception interventions on improving reproductive health and pregnancy outcomes in primary care: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Norita; Kai, Joe; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive health and pregnancy outcomes may be improved if the reproductive risk assessment is moved from the antenatal to the preconception period. Primary care has been highlighted as an ideal setting to offer preconception assessment, yet the effectiveness in this setting is still unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of preconception interventions on improving reproductive health and pregnancy outcomes in primary care. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases were searched from July 1999 to the end of July 2015. Only interventional studies with a comparator were included, analysed and appraised systematically, taking into consideration the similarities and differences of the participants, the nature of interventions and settings. Eight randomized controlled trials were eligible. Preconception interventions involved multifactorial or single reproductive health risk assessment, education and counselling and the intensity ranged from brief, involving a single session within a day to intensive, involving more than one session over several weeks. Five studies recruited women planning a pregnancy. Four studies involved multifactorial risks interventions; two were brief and the others were intensive. Four studies involved single risk intervention, addressing folate or alcohol. There was some evidence that both multifactorial and single risk interventions improved maternal knowledge; self-efficacy and health locus of control; and risk behaviour, irrespective of whether brief or intensive. There was no evidence to support reduced adverse pregnancy outcomes. One study reported no undue anxiety. The quality of the studies was moderate to poor. The evidence from eligible studies is limited to inform future practice in primary care. Nevertheless, this review has highlighted that women who received preconception education and counselling were more likely to have improved knowledge, self-efficacy and health locus of control and risk behaviour. More studies are

  16. Lean intervention improves patient discharge times, improves emergency department throughput and reduces congestion.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael J; Okerblom, Davin; Kumar, Anika; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar; Scalzi, Lisabeth V

    2016-12-01

    To determine if a lean intervention improved emergency department (ED) throughput and reduced ED boarding by improving patient discharge efficiency from a tertiary care children's hospital. The study was conducted at a tertiary care children's hospital to study the impact lean that changes made to an inpatient pediatric service line had on ED efficiency. Discharge times from the general pediatrics' service were compared to patients discharged from all other pediatric subspecialty services. The intervention was multifaceted. First, team staffing reconfiguration permitted all discharge work to be done at the patient's bedside using a new discharge checklist. The intervention also incorporated an afternoon interdisciplinary huddle to work on the following day's discharges. Retrospectively, we determined the impact this had on median times of discharge order entry, patient discharge, and percent of patients discharged before noon. As a marker of ED throughput, we determined median hour of day that admitted patients left the ED to move to their hospital bed. As marker of ED congestion we determined median boarding times. For the general pediatrics service line, the median discharge order entry time decreased from 1:43pm to 11:28am (p < 0.0001) and the median time of discharge decreased from 3:25pm to 2:25pm (p < 0.0001). The percent of patients discharged before noon increased from 14.0% to 26.0% (p < 0.0001). The discharge metrics remained unchanged for the pediatric subspecialty services group. Median ED boarding time decreased by 49 minutes (p < 0.0001). As a result, the median time of day admitted patients were discharged from the ED was advanced from 5 PM to 4 PM. Lean principles implemented by one hospital service line improved patient discharge times enhanced patient ED throughput, and reduced ED boarding times.

  17. Development of a Non-Aqueous Dispersion to Improve Intestinal Epithelial Flux of Poorly Permeable Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sam; Medani, Mekki; Carballeira, Nestor N; Winter, Desmond C; Baird, Alan W; Brayden, David J

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) offer an attractive strategy to enable oral peptide administration. However, optimal presentation of peptide and PE from solid-dosage forms is offset by slow dissolution rates in the small intestine, which reduces the likelihood that the PE can reach the threshold concentration for sufficient permeability enhancement. The purpose of this study was to design a PE-based liquid dispersion that can improve intestinal permeation of macromolecules across Caco-2 monolayers and isolated rat/human intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. An enhancer screen in monolayers based on permeability (TEER, Papp [(14)C]-mannitol) and cytotoxicity (MTT assay) initially identified methyl 10-hydroxydecanoate (10-OHC10CH3) as a candidate. 10-OHC10CH3 (20 mM) increased the Papp of fluorescent dextran of 4 kDa (FD4) (167-fold), 10 kDa (FD10) (429-fold), and 40 kDa (FD40) (520-fold) across monolayers. Blends of 10-OHC10CH3 with low molecular weight PEGs (0.2-1 kDa) formed liquid dispersions in which enhancement capacity across monolayers of 10-OHC10CH3 was increased over 10-OHC10CH3 alone in the order PEG200 < PEG400 < PEG600 < PEG1000. Finally, a 1:5 ratio of 10-OHC10CH3 (10-20 mM)/PEG600 (50-100 mM) increased the Papp of [(14)C]-mannitol across rat and human intestinal mucosae. This study highlights the potential future role for non-aqueous, PE-based liquid dispersions in oral delivery of macromolecules.

  18. A Monte Carlo approach for improved estimation of groundwater level spatial variability in poorly gauged basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater level is an important source of information in hydrological modelling. In many aquifers the boreholes monitored are scarce and/or sparse in space. In both cases, geostatistical methods can help to visualize the free surface of an aquifer, whereas the use of auxiliary information improves the accuracy of level estimates and maximizes the information gain for the quantification of groundwater level spatial variability. In addition, they allow the exploitation of datasets that cannot otherwise be efficiently used in catchment models. In this presentation, we demonstrate an approach for incorporating auxiliary information in interpolation approaches using a specific case study. In particular, the study area is located on the island of Crete (Greece). The available data consist of 70 hydraulic head measurements for the wet period of the hydrological year 2002-2003, the average pumping rates at the 70 wells, and 10 piezometer readings measured in the preceding hydrological year. We present a groundwater level trend model based on the generalized Thiem's equation for multiple wells. We use the drift term to incorporate secondary information in Residual Kriging (RK) (Varouchakis and Hristopulos 2013). The residuals are then interpolated using Ordinary Kriging and then are added to the drift model. Thiem's equation describes the relationship between the steady-state radial inflow into a pumping well and the drawdown. The generalized form of the equation includes the influence of a number of pumping wells. It incorporates the estimated hydraulic head, the initial hydraulic head before abstraction, the number of wells, the pumping rate, the distance of the estimation point from each well, and the well's radius of influence. We assume that the initial hydraulic head follows a linear trend, which we model based on the preceding hydrological year measurements. The hydraulic conductivity in the study basin varies between 0.0014 and 0.00014 m/s according to geological

  19. A study of a multi-level intervention to improve non-adherence in difficult to control asthma.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Jacqueline; Stevenson, Michael; Heaney, Liam G

    2011-09-01

    Difficult to control asthma accounts for significant morbidity and healthcare cost, and non-adherence to medication is a common cause. It remains unclear if targeting non-adherence in this population improves healthcare outcomes. All subjects were referred to a Specialist Difficult Asthma Service (60% from Respiratory physicians); poor adherence was identified using prescription refill records for inhaled combination therapy. A sequential 2 phase study examined the effect of identifying and targeting non-adherence to inhaled long-acting β-agonist/inhaled steroid combination therapy; phase 1 - an observational study utilising objective measures of non-adherence to facilitate a medical concordance discussion followed by phase 2, a 12 month prospective single blind randomised controlled trial where subjects with persistent poor adherence were randomised to a nurse-led menu driven intervention. A total of 239 patients were assessed; 31 of 83 subjects (37%) who were initially non-adherent, significantly improved adherence after concordance interview, with reduced prescribed daily dose of ICS (data p<0.001), rescue prednisolone courses (data, p<0.001) and hospital admissions (data, p=0.006). With the menu driven intervention, adherence also improved (intervention 37.6% to 61.9%, control group 31.7% to 28.8%) with reduced maintenance oral steroid dose in subjects on maintenance steroids. Poor adherence in difficult-to control asthma is common, but when identified and targeted can be improved and this is associated with large improvements in important healthcare outcomes. Previous nihilism towards non-adherence in this population is not supported by this study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-04-15

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Practice: Interventions to Improve High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Fiona; Bowden, A. Brooks; Belfield, Clive; Levin, Henry M.; Cheng, Henan; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Hanisch-Cerda, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we perform cost-effectiveness analysis on interventions that improve the rate of high school completion. Using the What Works Clearinghouse to select effective interventions, we calculate cost-effectiveness ratios for five youth interventions. We document wide variation in cost-effectiveness ratios between programs and between…

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Practice: Interventions to Improve High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Fiona; Bowden, A. Brooks; Belfield, Clive; Levin, Henry M.; Cheng, Henan; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Hanisch-Cerda, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we perform cost-effectiveness analysis on interventions that improve the rate of high school completion. Using the What Works Clearinghouse to select effective interventions, we calculate cost-effectiveness ratios for five youth interventions. We document wide variation in cost-effectiveness ratios between programs and between…

  3. Effectiveness of interventions to improve antidepressant medication adherence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chong, W W; Aslani, P; Chen, T F

    2011-09-01

    Non-adherence to antidepressant medications is a significant barrier to the successful treatment of depression in clinical practice. This review aims to systematically assess the effectiveness of interventions for improving antidepressant medication adherence among patients with unipolar depression, and to evaluate the effect of these interventions on depression clinical outcomes. MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE databases were searched for English-language randomised controlled trials published between January 1990 and December 2010 on interventions to improve antidepressant adherence. The impact of interventions on antidepressant medication adherence (compliance and persistence) and depression clinical outcomes was evaluated. Data concerning the quality of the included studies were also extracted. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Interventions were classified as educational, behavioural and multifaceted interventions. A total of 28 interventions were tested, as two studies investigated two interventions each. Sixteen (57%) of the 28 interventions showed significant effects on antidepressant adherence outcomes, whereas 12 (43%) interventions demonstrated significant effects on both antidepressant adherence and depression outcomes. The interventions which showed significant improvement in outcomes were primarily multifaceted and complex, with proactive care management and involvement of mental health specialists. The most commonly used elements of multifaceted interventions included patient educational strategies, telephone follow-up to monitor patients' progress, as well as providing medication support and feedback to primary care providers. Overall, educational interventions alone were ineffective in improving antidepressant medication adherence. In conclusion, improving adherence to antidepressants requires a complex behavioural change and there is some evidence to support behavioural and multifaceted interventions as the most effective in improving

  4. Improving Intervention Implementation and Fidelity in Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Teacher Preference into Intervention Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehby, Joseph H.; Maggin, Daniel M.; Johnson, LeAnne; Symons, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect that teacher choice of intervention has on their level of procedural implementation and quality of implementation. The following research questions helped to guide the study: (1) Do teachers randomly assigned to the intervention "choice" group have higher ratings of procedural fidelity…

  5. Pharmacological interventions to improve sleep in hospitalised adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kanji, Salmaan; Mera, Alexandru; Hutton, Brian; Burry, Lisa; Rosenberg, Erin; MacDonald, Erika; Luks, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Patients often suffer from disturbed sleep in hospital. Poor-quality sleep in hospitalised patients has been associated with significant morbidity and pharmacological sleep aids are often prescribed. The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions used for sleep in hospitalised patients. Setting/participants We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane database and grey literature for prospective studies that evaluated sleep in hospitalised adults after a pharmacological intervention. Primary and secondary outcome measures Two reviewers assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data for efficacy outcomes, including sleep efficiency, sleep latency, sleep fragmentation and objectively measured sleep stage distribution. Risk of bias was assessed and meta-analyses were planned contingent upon homogeneity of the included studies. Results After screening 1920 citations, 15 studies involving 861 patients were included. Medications studied included benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine sedatives, melatonin, propofol and dexmedetomidine. Five studies were deemed to be of high quality. Heterogeneity and variable outcome reporting precluded meta-analysis in most cases. No consistent trends with respect to sleep efficiency, quality or interruptions were observed identifying a drug or drug class as superior to another or no treatment. Benzodiazepines appeared to be better than no treatment with respect to sleep latency, but this was not consistently demonstrated across all studies. Sleep stage distribution shows that sleep in hospital is dominated by stages N1 and N2. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to suggest that pharmacotherapy improves the quality or quantity of sleep in hospitalised patients suffering from poor sleep. No drug class or specific drug was identified as superior even when compared to placebo or no treatment. Although 15 studies were included, the quality of evidence

  6. Front-office staff can improve clinical tobacco intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Frederic; Naish, Brigham; Buwembo, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To learn whether front-line personnel in primary care practices can increase delivery of clinical tobacco interventions and also help smokers address physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression. Design Uncontrolled before-and-after design. Setting Vancouver, BC, area (4 practices); northern British Columbia (2 practices). Participants Six practices, with 1 staff person per practice serving as a “health coordinator” who tracked and, after the baseline period, delivered preventive interventions to all patients who smoked. To assess delivery of preventive interventions, each practice was to sample 300 consecutive patient records, both at baseline and at follow-up 15 months later. Interventions Front-office staff were recruited, trained, paid, and given ongoing support to provide preventive care. Clinicians supplemented this care with advice and guided the use of medication. Main outcome measures Effectiveness of the intervention was based on comparison, at baseline and at follow-up, of the proportion of patients with any of the following 6 proven intervention components documented in their medical records: chart reminder, advice received, self-management plan, target quit date, referral, and follow-up date (as they applied to tobacco, physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression). A Tobacco Intervention Flow Sheet cued preventive care, and its data were entered into a spreadsheet (which served as a smokers’ registry). Qualitative appraisal data were noted. Results For tobacco, substantial increases occurred after the intervention period in the proportion of patients with each of the intervention components noted in their charts: chart reminder (20% vs 94%); provision of advice (34% vs 79%); self-management plan (14% vs 57%); target quit date (5% vs 11%); referral (6% vs 11%); and follow-up date (7% vs 42%). Interventions for physical inactivity and depression showed some gains, but there were no gains for at

  7. Improvement of time in therapeutic range with warfarin by pharmaceutical intervention.

    PubMed

    Víquez-Jaikel, Alvaro; Victoria Hall-Ramírez; Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2017-02-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is highly effective for prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, its management is challenging especially in developing countries, where the medical access is difficult and patient education is poor. Objective To determine the effect of pharmaceutical intervention (PI) on the time in therapeutic range (TTR) of a group of anticoagulated patients from our referral center. Method A group of consecutive outpatients previously treated by usual medical care underwent PI. The intervention consisted in the identification and avoidance of food and drug interactions, the confection of medication schedule charts and education to patients regarding side effects and drug monitoring. Mean TTR before and after PI was compared through the Wilcoxon test for repeated measures. Regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between a TTR level under 65% and potential explanatory variables. Results Mean TTR before PI was 37.4 ± 23.5% and after PI it raised to 67.0 ± 24.9%. Mean change in TTR was +29.5% (95% CI 14.5-44.6; p < 0.001). Before PI only 4 patients had TTR values above 65%, in contrast to 18 patients after PI. Conclusion Our findings support the efficacy of PI to improve TTR values in patients treated with warfarin.

  8. User perceptions of gaming interventions for improving upper extremity motor function in persons with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Finley, Margaret; Combs, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    Finding ways to engage patients with stroke in repetitive intervention protocols long-term is poorly understood, particularly from the patients' perspective. Limited information exists that combines clinical expertise as well as user feedback on improving gaming interaction. The purpose of this study was to utilize input from focus groups of gaming intervention users with chronic stroke to identify characteristics of gaming that influence user/patient engagement in the activity. Two focus groups (n = 10) were conducted with each group participant playing two different gaming systems. Following exposure to the two systems, guided group interview sessions occurred that consisted of open-ended questions encompassing areas of overall gaming system preference, aspects that were liked or disliked, background appearance, music options, feedback provided, as well as recommendations for change. Findings revealed that participants enjoyed playing the gaming systems. Three primary themes emerged differentiating the systems: (1) musical encouragement; (2) focus and attention; and (3) motivation provided by performance feedback. It was concluded that when selecting a gaming system for upper extremity rehabilitation, a clinician should select a system that provides user-relevant music options with a modifiable background appearance for progression from basic to more challenging, providing appropriate feedback in an effort to encompass to a variety of user performance levels.

  9. Mathematical literacy in Plant Physiology undergraduates: results of interventions aimed at improving students' performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Francisca; Sanz, Amparo

    2013-09-01

    The importance of mathematical literacy in any scientific career is widely recognized. However, various studies report lack of numeracy and mathematical literacy in students from various countries. In the present work, we present a detailed study of the mathematical literacy of Spanish undergraduate students of Biology enrolled in a Plant Physiology course. We have performed individual analyses of results obtained during the period 2000-2011, for questions in the examinations requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. Additionally, we present the outcome of two interventions introduced with the aim of helping students improve their prospects for success in the course. Our results confirm previous research showing students' deficiencies in mathematical skills. However, the scores obtained for mathematical questions in the examinations are good predictors of the final grades attained in Plant Physiology, as there are strong correlations at the individual level between results for questions requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. The introduction of a laboratory session devoted to strengthening the application of students' previously acquired mathematical knowledge did not change significantly the results obtained for mathematical questions. Since mathematical abilities of students entering university have declined in recent years, this intervention may have helped to maintain students' performance to a level comparable to that of previous years. The outcome of self-assessment online tests indicates that although Mathematics anxiety is lower than during examinations, the poor results obtained for questions requiring mathematical skills are, at least in part, due to a lack of self-efficacy.

  10. Improving School Outcomes for Children Affected by Parental HIV/AIDS: Evaluation of the ChildCARE Intervention at 6-, 12-, and 18-Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sayward E.; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, JiaJia; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Children affected by parental HIV/AIDS are at-risk for poor school outcomes including reduced attendance, lower grades, and lower school satisfaction compared to unaffected peers. Resilience-based interventions offer promise to improve functioning across a number of domains. A four-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted with 790 children…

  11. Impact of extension interventions in improving livelihood of dairy farmers of Nadia district of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Garai, Suman; Garai, Sanchita; Maiti, Sanjit; Meena, B S; Ghosh, M K; Bhakat, Champak; Dutta, T K

    2017-03-01

    Livestock is a one of the major sources of livelihood for most of the small and marginal farmers in India, particularly for rural households who live in below poverty line. Extension interventions have long been seen as a key element for enabling farmers to obtain information and technologies that can improve their livelihoods. It is also recognized that extension is an important factor in promoting dairy development. Ex-post-facto cause to effect research design was applied in this study to trace out the impact of extension interventions in improving knowledge, attitude, adoption towards scientific dairy farming practices and improvement in milk production of dairy animal and income from dairying which will be resulted into improved livelihood of rural poor in Nadia district of West Bengal, India. Therefore, 60 dairy farmers of experimental villages who were considered as beneficiaries and 60 dairy farmers of control villages who were considered as non-beneficiaries were selected as sample for the study. It was found that beneficiaries had significantly higher score in all the five components of livelihood improvement with its all sub components, i.e., knowledge, attitude, adoption of scientific dairy farming practices, milk production per household per day and monthly income from dairying except disease control, and marketing component of adoption. Hence, it may be concluded that extension interventions had a significant impact on improving livelihood of rural dairy farmers in Nadia district of West Bengal, India.

  12. Effects of modifying the World Health Organization standard operating procedures for malaria microscopy to improve surveillance in resource poor settings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with fever are screened for malaria in specially-established malaria diagnostic laboratories set up in rural hospitals in the Northern and Eastern Provinces of Sri Lanka. Large numbers of blood smears negative for malaria parasites are being screened daily. Good quality smears are essential to maintain a high diagnostic competency among the technical staff. The modifications made to the World Health Organization (WHO) standard operating procedures to improve the quality of smears have been studied. Methods A blinded, controlled, interventional study was conducted in 22 intervention and 21 control malaria diagnostic laboratories. Changes were made to the WHO standard operating procedure protocols to prepare, stain and examine blood smears for malaria parasite detection which were implemented in intervention laboratories. These included wipe-cleaning slides, preparing both thick and thin smears on the same slide, reversing the order of collecting blood for thick and thin smears, dry fixing thick smear for 20–25 minutes under table lamp, polishing the edge of spreader slide with sand paper and fixing the thin smear with methanol if not stained within four hours. Parameters with respect to quality of the smear as per WHO criteria were studied using randomly selected slides, and time taken for the report to be issued was recorded in both groups before and after the intervention. Results There were no significant differences observed in the parameters studied at baseline between the two groups or pre and post intervention in the control group. In the intervention group streak formation in thin smears was reduced from 29.4% to 5.0%. The average fixing time of thick smears was reduced from 2.4 hours to 20 minutes. Inappropriate thickness of thick smears reduced from 18.3% to 1.5%. Overall quality of thick smears and thin smears increased from 76.1% to 98.0% and 81.7% to 87.0%, respectively. The quality of slides bearing both thick and thin

  13. Polyamidoamine dendrimers as novel potential absorption enhancers for improving the small intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yulian; Fujimori, Takeo; Kawaguchi, Naoko; Tsujimoto, Yuiko; Nishimi, Mariko; Dong, Zhengqi; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2011-01-05

    Effects of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs were examined by an in situ closed loop method in rats. 5(6)-Carboxyfluorescein (CF), fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) with various molecular weights, calcitonin and insulin were used as model drugs of poorly absorbable drugs. The absorption of CF, FD4 and calcitonin from the rat small intestine was significantly enhanced in the presence of PAMAM dendrimers. The absorption-enhancing effects of PAMAM dendrimers for improving the small intestinal absorption of CF were concentration and generation dependent and a maximal absorption-enhancing effect was observed in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) G2 PAMAM dendrimer. However, G2 PAMAM dendrimer had almost no absorption-enhancing effect on the small intestinal absorption of macromolecular drugs including FD10 and insulin. Overall, the absorption-enhancing effects of G2 PAMAM dendrimer in the small intestine decreased as the molecular weights of drug increased. However, G2 PAMAM dendrimer did not enhance the intestinal absorption of these drugs with different molecular weights in the large intestine. Furthermore, we evaluated the intestinal membrane damage with or without G2 PAMAM dendrimer. G2 PAMAM dendrimer (0.5% (w/v)) significantly increased the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the amounts of protein released from the intestinal membranes, but the activities and amounts of these toxic markers were less than those in the presence of 3% Triton X-100 used as a positive control. Moreover, G2 PAMAM dendrimer at concentrations of 0.05% (w/v) and 0.1% (w/v) did not increase the activities and amounts of these toxic markers. These findings suggested that PAMAM dendrimers at lower concentrations might be potential and safe absorption enhancers for improving absorption of poorly absorbable drugs from the small intestine.

  14. Enhancing Documentation of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions: A Quality Improvement Strategy to Reduce Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese M; Thompson, Susan L; Halvorson, Anna M; Zeitler, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers requires the implementation of evidence-based interventions. A quality improvement project was conducted to provide nurses with data on the frequency with which pressure ulcer prevention interventions were performed as measured by documentation. Documentation reports provided feedback to stakeholders, triggering reminders and reeducation. Intervention reports and modifications to the documentation system were effective both in increasing the documentation of pressure ulcer prevention interventions and in decreasing the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  15. Carboxylated mesoporous carbon microparticles as new approach to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhi, Zhizhuang; Li, Xue; Gao, Jian; Song, Yaling

    2013-09-15

    The main objective of this study was to develop carboxylated ordered mesoporous carbon microparticles (c-MCMs) loaded with a poorly water-soluble drug, intended to be orally administered, able to enhance the drug loading capacity and improve the oral bioavailability. A model drug, carvedilol (CAR), was loaded onto c-MCMs via a procedure involving a combination of adsorption equilibrium and solvent evaporation. The physicochemical properties of the drug-loaded composites were systematically studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and HPLC. It was found that c-MCM has a high drug loading level up to 41.6%, and higher than that of the mesoporous silica template. Incorporation of CAR in both drug carriers enhanced the solubility and dissolution rate of the drug, compared to the pure crystalline drug. After loading CAR into c-MCMs, its oral bioavailability was compared with the marketed product in dogs. The results showed that the bioavailability of CAR was improved 179.3% compared with that of the commercial product when c-MCM was used as the drug carrier. We believe that the present study will help in the design of oral drug delivery systems for enhanced oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  16. Melt dispersion granules: formulation and evaluation to improve oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs - a case study with valsartan.

    PubMed

    Chella, Naveen; Tadikonda, Ramarao

    2015-06-01

    Solid dispersion (SD) technique is a promising strategy to improve the solubility and dissolution of BCS class II drugs. However, only few products are marketed till today based on SD technology due to poor flow properties and stability. The present work was intended to solve these problems by using combination approach, melt dispersion and surface adsorption technologies. The main aim of the present work is to improve the absorption in the stomach (at lower pH) where the absorption window exists for the drug by improving the dissolution, resulting in the enhancement of oral bioavailability of poorly soluble, weakly acidic drug with pH dependant solubility, i.e. valsartan. Melt dispersion granules were prepared in different ratios using different carriers (Gelucire 50/13, PEG 8000 and Pluronic F-68) and lactose as an adsorbent. Similarly, physical mixtures were also prepared at corresponding ratios. The prepared dispersion granules and physical mixtures were characterized by FTIR, DSC and in vitro dissolution studies. DSC studies revealed reduction in the crystallinity with a possibility of presence of amorphous character of drug in the dispersion granules. From dissolution studies, valsartan Gelucire dispersion (GSD4; 1:4 ratio) showed complete drug release in 30 min against the plain drug which showed only 11.31% of drug release in 30 min. Pharmacokinetic studies of optimized formulation in male Wistar rats showed 2.65-fold higher bioavailability and 1.47-fold higher Cmax compared to pure drug. The melt dispersion technology has the potential to improve dissolution and the bioavailability of BCS class II drugs.

  17. Nutrition-sensitive interventions and programmes: how can they help to accelerate progress in improving maternal and child nutrition?

    PubMed

    Ruel, Marie T; Alderman, Harold

    2013-08-10

    Acceleration of progress in nutrition will require effective, large-scale nutrition-sensitive programmes that address key underlying determinants of nutrition and enhance the coverage and effectiveness of nutrition-specific interventions. We reviewed evidence of nutritional effects of programmes in four sectors--agriculture, social safety nets, early child development, and schooling. The need for investments to boost agricultural production, keep prices low, and increase incomes is undisputable; targeted agricultural programmes can complement these investments by supporting livelihoods, enhancing access to diverse diets in poor populations, and fostering women's empowerment. However, evidence of the nutritional effect of agricultural programmes is inconclusive--except for vitamin A from biofortification of orange sweet potatoes--largely because of poor quality evaluations. Social safety nets currently provide cash or food transfers to a billion poor people and victims of shocks (eg, natural disasters). Individual studies show some effects on younger children exposed for longer durations, but weaknesses in nutrition goals and actions, and poor service quality probably explain the scarcity of overall nutritional benefits. Combined early child development and nutrition interventions show promising additive or synergistic effects on child development--and in some cases nutrition--and could lead to substantial gains in cost, efficiency, and effectiveness, but these programmes have yet to be tested at scale. Parental schooling is strongly associated with child nutrition, and the effectiveness of emerging school nutrition education programmes needs to be tested. Many of the programmes reviewed were not originally designed to improve nutrition yet have great potential to do so. Ways to enhance programme nutrition-sensitivity include: improve targeting; use conditions to stimulate participation; strengthen nutrition goals and actions; and optimise women's nutrition, time

  18. A review of the effectiveness of agriculture interventions in improving nutrition outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berti, Peter R; Krasevec, Julia; FitzGerald, Sian

    2004-08-01

    To review the impact of agriculture interventions on nutritional status in participating households, and to analyse the characteristics of interventions that improved nutrition outcomes. We identified and reviewed reports describing 30 agriculture interventions that measured impact on nutritional status. The interventions reviewed included home gardening, livestock, mixed garden and livestock, cash cropping, and irrigation. We examined the reports for the scientific quality of the research design and treatment of the data. We also assessed whether the projects invested in five types of 'capital' (physical, natural, financial, human and social) as defined in the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework, a conceptual map of major factors that affect people's livelihoods. Most agriculture interventions increased food production, but did not necessarily improve nutrition or health within participating households. Nutrition was improved in 11 of 13 home gardening interventions, and in 11 of 17 other types of intervention. Of the 19 interventions that had a positive effect on nutrition, 14 of them invested in four or five types of capital in addition to the agriculture intervention. Of the nine interventions that had a negative or no effect on nutrition, only one invested in four or five types of capital. Those agriculture interventions that invested broadly in different types of capital were more likely to improve nutrition outcomes. Those projects which invested in human capital (especially nutrition education and consideration of gender issues), and other types of capital, had a greater likelihood of effecting positive nutritional change, but such investment is neither sufficient nor always necessary to effect change.

  19. Reaching the poor with health interventions: programme-incidence analysis of seven randomised trials of women's groups to reduce newborn mortality in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Houweling, Tanja A J; Morrison, Joanna; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Das, Sushmita; Hossen, Munir; Kuddus, Abdul; Lewycka, Sonia; Looman, Caspar W; Magar, Bharat Budhathoki; Manandhar, Dharma S; Akter, Mahfuza; Dube, Albert Lazarous Nkhata; Rath, Shibanand; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Tripathy, Prasanta; Costello, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to end preventable newborn deaths will fail if the poor are not reached with effective interventions. To understand what works to reach vulnerable groups, we describe and explain the uptake of a highly effective community-based newborn health intervention across social strata in Asia and Africa. We conducted a secondary analysis of seven randomised trials of participatory women's groups to reduce newborn mortality in India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Malawi. We analysed data on 70,574 pregnancies. Socioeconomic and sociodemographic differences in group attendance were tested using logistic regression. Qualitative data were collected at each trial site (225 focus groups, 20 interviews) to understand our results. Socioeconomic differences in women's group attendance were small, except for occasional lower attendance by elites. Sociodemographic differences were large, with lower attendance by young primigravid women in African as well as in South Asian sites. The intervention was considered relevant and interesting to all socioeconomic groups. Local facilitators ensured inclusion of poorer women. Embarrassment and family constraints on movement outside the home restricted attendance among primigravid women. Reproductive health discussions were perceived as inappropriate for them. Community-based women's groups can help to reach every newborn with effective interventions. Equitable intervention uptake is enhanced when facilitators actively encourage all women to attend, organise meetings at the participants' convenience and use approaches that are easily understandable for the less educated. Focused efforts to include primigravid women are necessary, working with families and communities to decrease social taboos. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Improving lifestyle interventions for people with serious mental illnesses: Qualitative results from the STRIDE study

    PubMed Central

    Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H.; Stumbo, Scott P.; Yarborough, Micah T.; Young, Thomas J.; Green, Carla A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Individuals with serious mental illnesses are disproportionately affected by overweight and obesity. Understanding the factors that facilitate or hinder lifestyle change in this population could lead to better interventions and improved health outcomes. Methods A subset of intervention and usual-care participants (n = 84) in the STRIDE randomized trial were interviewed at 3, 9, and 18 months, yielding 101 interviews (some were interviewed more than once). Participants had a mean age of 48.1 (SD = 10.1); 64% were female. Participants had diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (41%), bipolar disorder (20%), affective psychoses (37%) or PTSD (2%). Interviews were transcribed verbatim, coded using Atlas.ti, and analyzed for common themes. Results Barriers to behavior change were similar to those described for the general population, including lack of support from significant others, the lure of unhealthy foods, and poor weather impeding exercise. Additional challenges included the effects of psychiatric symptoms, or consequences of symptoms (i.e., social isolation), on ability to make and sustain lifestyle changes. We found a strong preference for ongoing, group-based support to foster a sense of accountability which motivated and helped to sustain behavior changes. Conclusions and implications for practice Individuals with serious mental illnesses encounter many of the same barriers to weight loss seen in the general population, but they may be more vulnerable to additional obstacles. Lifestyle change interventions for this population should help participants develop the ability to iteratively cope with fluctuating mood and subsequent changes in motivation to eat healthfully and exercise regularly. PMID:26214184

  1. A quality improvement study using fishbone analysis and an electronic medical records intervention to improve care for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jonathan; Reyes-Gastelum, David; Turner, Jane; Davies, H Dele

    2014-01-01

    Despite expert guidelines, gaps persist in quality of care for children with asthma. This study sought to identify barriers and potential interventions to improve compliance to national asthma prevention guidelines at a single academic pediatric primary care clinic. Using the plan-do-check-act (PDCA) quality improvement framework and fishbone analysis, several barriers to consistent asthma processes and possible interventions were identified by a group of key stakeholders. Two interventions were implemented using the electronic medical record (EMR). Physician documentation of asthma quality measures were analyzed before intervention and during 2 subsequent time points over 16 months. Documentation of asthma action plans (core group P < .001, noncore group P = .004) and medication counseling (core group P < .001, noncore group P < .001) improved substantially by the third time point. A systematic approach to quality improvement using PDCA and fishbone analysis in conjunction with embedded EMR tools can improve asthma care in a pediatric primary care setting.

  2. Practical, office-based interventions that improve care today.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2015-01-01

    This issue is devoted to practical information and interventions to enhance patient care. Fully explaining the richness of the articles to our readers in a short Editors' Note is sometimes difficult. This month we were struck by the large number of specific interventions that could be used directly in practice today, or in the near future, because they do not require much additional time or much additional cost. These interventions do require some learning-and perhaps some unlearning-but readers can use this issue to make changes tomorrow! We would love to hear from any readers who use this information and implement one or another of the actions; send your stories to jabfm@med.wayne.edu. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. Early Behavioral Intervention to Improve Social Communication Function in Infants with TSC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0183 TITLE: Early Behavioral Intervention to Improve Social Communication Function in Infants with TSC PRINCIPAL...30 Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Early Behavioral Intervention to Improve Social Communication Function in Infants with TSC 5a...14. ABSTRACT Using a collaborative and multi-site model , this project rigorously tests an evidence-based intervention that is developmentally

  4. Early Intervention to Improve Hand Function in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anna Purna; Pearse, Janice; Kelly, Susan; Wisher, Vicki; Kisler, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy often have marked hand involvement with excessive thumb adduction and flexion and limited active wrist extension from infancy. Post-lesional aberrant plasticity can lead to progressive abnormalities of the developing motor system. Disturbances of somatosensory and visual function and developmental disregard contribute to difficulties with hand use. Progressive soft tissue and bony changes may occur, leading to contractures, which further limit function in a vicious cycle. Early intervention might help to break this cycle, however, the precise nature and appropriateness of the intervention must be carefully considered. Traditional approaches to the hemiplegic upper limb include medications and botulinum toxin injections to manage abnormalities of tone, and surgical interventions. Therapist input, including provision of orthoses, remains a mainstay although many therapies have not been well evaluated. There has been a recent increase in interventions for the hemiplegic upper limb, mostly aimed outside the period of infancy. These include trials of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and bimanual therapy as well as the use of virtual reality and robot-assisted therapy. In future, non-invasive brain stimulation may be combined with therapy. Interventions under investigation in the infant age group include modified CIMT and action observation therapy. A further approach which may be suited to the infant with thumb-in-palm deformity, but which requires evaluation, is the use of elastic taping. Enhanced cutaneous feedback through mechanical stimulation to the skin provided by the tape during movement has been postulated to modulate ongoing muscle activity. If effective, this would represent a low-cost, safe, widely applicable early intervention. PMID:25610423

  5. Intervention in Overweight Children Improves BMI and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Siwik, Violet; Kutob, Randa; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Cruz, Luis; Senf, Janet; Aickin, Mikel; Going, Scott; Shatte, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a growing epidemic in family medicine with few clinical treatment options. We implemented and evaluated a group office-visit intervention by family physicians emphasizing nutrition and physical activity within a resiliency psychosocial model, for overweight children and their parents. Methods The intervention lasted for 3 months, with half of the children crossing over to intervention after 6 months on study. Participants included 35 children who met eligibility criteria of being in third through fifth grades and having a body mass index above the 85th percentile. The 3-month twelve-session intervention, “Choices”, included topics on nutrition, physical activity, and resiliency. The sessions were developed for delivery by a family physician, and a nutritionist, who all received training in positive psychology and resilience skills. Main outcome measures were body mass index (BMI) z-scores for age-and-gender, and weight-for-age-and-gender z-scores, as well as qualitative interviews to understand individual and family processes. Results The intervention resulted in a significant effect on one primary outcome, BMI z-score (-0.138 per 9 months (p =0.017) and a trend toward significance on the other, weight for age z-score (-0.87 per 9 months (p=0.09). The net shift of activity from the low METS to the high METS had an intervention effect of 2.84 METS (p = 0.037). Families reported lasting changes in behaviors and attitudes. Discussion The innovative approach used in this study demonstrated modest efficacy in reducing BMI z-score, changing physical activity levels, and possibly shifting family dynamics. PMID:23471926

  6. Simulation Improves Resident Performance in Catheter-Based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chaer, Rabih A.; DeRubertis, Brian G.; Lin, Stephanie C.; Bush, Harry L.; Karwowski, John K.; Birk, Daniel; Morrissey, Nicholas J.; Faries, Peter L.; McKinsey, James F.; Kent, K Craig

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical simulation has been shown to enhance the training of general surgery residents. Since catheter-based techniques have become an important part of the vascular surgeon's armamentarium, we explored whether simulation might impact the acquisition of catheter skills by surgical residents. Methods: Twenty general surgery residents received didactic training in the techniques of catheter intervention. Residents were then randomized with 10 receiving additional training with the Procedicus, computer-based, haptic simulator. All 20 residents then participated in 2 consecutive mentored catheter-based interventions for lower extremity occlusive disease in an OR/angiography suite. Resident performance was graded by attending surgeons blinded to the resident's training status, using 18 procedural steps as well as a global rating scale. Results: There were no differences between the 2 resident groups with regard to demographics or scores on a visuospatial test administered at study outset. Overall, residents exposed to simulation scored higher than controls during the first angio/OR intervention: procedural steps (simulation/control) (50 ± 6 vs. 33 ± 9, P = 0.0015); global rating scale (30 ± 7 vs. 19 ± 5, P = 0.0052). The advantage provided by simulator training persisted with the second intervention (53 ± 6 vs. 36 ± 7, P = 0.0006); global rating scale (33 ± 6 vs. 21 ± 6, P = 0.0015). Moreover, simulation training, particularly for the second intervention, led to enhancement in almost all of the individual measures of performance. Conclusion: Simulation is a valid tool for instructing surgical residents and fellows in basic endovascular techniques and should be incorporated into surgical training programs. Moreover, simulators may also benefit the large number of vascular surgeons who seek retraining in catheter-based intervention. PMID:16926560

  7. Text Messaging to Improve Hypertension Medication Adherence in African Americans: BPMED Intervention Development and Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Artinian, Nancy T; Schwiebert, Loren; Yarandi, Hossein; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension (HTN) is a major public health concern in the United States, with almost 78 million Americans age 20 years and over suffering from the condition. Moreover, HTN is a key risk factor for health disease and stroke. African Americans disproportionately shoulder the burdens of HTN, with greater prevalence, disease severity, earlier onset, and more HTN-related complications than age-matched whites. Medication adherence for the treatment of HTN is poor, with estimates indicating that only about half of hypertensive patients are adherent to prescribed medication regimens. Although no single intervention for improving medication adherence has emerged as superior to others, text message medication reminders have the potential to help improve medication adherence in African Americans with uncontrolled HTN as mobile phone adoption is very high in this population. Objective The purpose of this two-phased study was to develop (Phase I) and test in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Phase II) a text message system, BPMED, to improve the quality of medication management through increasing medication adherence in African Americans with uncontrolled HTN. Methods In Phase I, we recruited 16 target end-users from a primary care clinic, to assist in the development of BPMED through participating in one of three focus groups. Focus groups sought to gain patient perspectives on HTN, medication adherence, mobile phone use, and the use of text messaging to support medication adherence. Potential intervention designs were presented to participants, and feedback on the designs was solicited. In Phase II, we conducted two pilot RCTs to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of BPMED in primary care and emergency department settings. Both pilot studies recruited approximately 60 participants, who were randomized equally between usual care and the BPMED intervention. Results Although data collection is now complete, data analysis from the

  8. Effectiveness of physician-targeted interventions to improve antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Alike W; Pijpers, Eefje J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah KG; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo JM

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibiotic use and concomitant resistance are increasing. Literature reviews do not unambiguously indicate which interventions are most effective in improving antibiotic prescribing practice. Aim To assess the effectiveness of physician-targeted interventions aiming to improve antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care, and to identify intervention features mostly contributing to intervention success. Design and setting Analysis of a set of physician-targeted interventions in primary care. Method A literature search (1990–2009) for studies describing the effectiveness of interventions aiming to optimise antibiotic prescription for RTIs by primary care physicians. Intervention features were extracted and effectiveness sizes were calculated. Association between intervention features and intervention success was analysed in multivariate regression analysis. Results This study included 58 studies, describing 87 interventions of which 60% significantly improved antibiotic prescribing; interventions aiming to decrease overall antibiotic prescription were more frequently effective than interventions aiming to increase first choice prescription. On average, antibiotic prescription was reduced by 11.6%, and first choice prescription increased by 9.6%. Multiple interventions containing at least ‘educational material for the physician’ were most often effective. No significant added value was found for interventions containing patient-directed elements. Communication skills training and near-patient testing sorted the largest intervention effects. Conclusion This review emphasises the importance of physician education in optimising antibiotic use. Further research should focus on how to provide physicians with the relevant knowledge and tools, and when to supplement education with additional intervention elements. Feasibility should be included in this process. PMID:23211259

  9. Feasibility and Acceptability of the TALK Social Worker Intervention to Improve Live Kidney Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePasquale, Nicole; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Darrell, Linda; Boyer, LaPricia Lewis; Ephraim, Patti; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2012-01-01

    Live kidney transplantation (LKT) is underused by patients with end-stage renal disease. Easily implementable and effective interventions to improve patients' early consideration of LKT are needed. The Talking About Live Kidney Donation (TALK) social worker intervention (SWI) improved consideration and pursuit of LKT among patients with…

  10. Feasibility and Acceptability of the TALK Social Worker Intervention to Improve Live Kidney Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePasquale, Nicole; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Darrell, Linda; Boyer, LaPricia Lewis; Ephraim, Patti; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2012-01-01

    Live kidney transplantation (LKT) is underused by patients with end-stage renal disease. Easily implementable and effective interventions to improve patients' early consideration of LKT are needed. The Talking About Live Kidney Donation (TALK) social worker intervention (SWI) improved consideration and pursuit of LKT among patients with…

  11. Time for action-Improving the design and reporting of behaviour change interventions for antimicrobial stewardship in hospitals: Early findings from a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Davey, Peter; Peden, Claire; Charani, Esmita; Marwick, Charis; Michie, Susan

    2015-03-01

    There is strong evidence that self-monitoring and feedback are effective behaviour change techniques (BCTs) across a range of healthcare interventions and that their effectiveness is enhanced by goal setting and action planning. Here we report a summary of the update of a systematic review assessing the application of these BCTs to improving hospital antibiotic prescribing. This paper includes studies with valid prescribing outcomes published before the end of December 2012. We used a structured method for reporting these BCTs in terms of specific characteristics and contacted study authors to request additional intervention information. We identified 116 studies reporting 123 interventions. Reporting of BCTs was poor, with little detail of BCT characteristics. Feedback was only reported for 17 (13.8%) of the interventions, and self-monitoring was used in only 1 intervention. Goals were reported for all interventions but were poorly specified, with only three of the nine characteristics reported for ≥50% of interventions. A goal threshold and timescale were specified for just 1 of the 123 interventions. Only 29 authors (25.0%) responded to the request for additional information. In conclusion, both the content and reporting of interventions for antimicrobial stewardship fell short of scientific principles and practices. There is a strong evidence base regarding BCTs in other contexts that should be applied to antimicrobial stewardship now if we are to further our understanding of what works, for whom, why and in what contexts.

  12. Internet interventions for improving psychological well-being in psycho-oncology: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Leykin, Yan; Thekdi, Seema M; Shumay, Dianne M; Muñoz, Ricardo F; Riba, Michelle; Dunn, Laura B

    2012-09-01

    Too few cancer patients and survivors receive evidence-based interventions for mental health symptoms. This review examines the potential for Internet interventions to help fill treatment gaps in psychosocial oncology and presents evidence regarding the likely utility of Internet interventions for cancer patients. The authors examined available literature regarding Internet interventions tailored to cancer patients' mental health needs and reviewed elements of Internet interventions for mental health relevant to advancing psycho-oncology Internet intervention research. Few rigorous studies focusing on mental health of cancer patients have been conducted online. A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy, accessibility, and acceptability of mental health Internet interventions for a variety of general and medical patient populations. The authors present recommendations and guidelines to assist researchers in developing, testing, and disseminating Internet interventions for cancer patients and survivors, to manage and improve their mental health. Issues unique to Internet interventions-including intervention structure, customization, provider interaction, and privacy and confidentiality issues-are discussed. These guidelines are offered as a step toward establishing a set of "best practices" for Internet interventions in psycho-oncology and to generate further discussion regarding the goals of such interventions and their place in cancer care. Internet interventions have the potential to fill an important gap in quality cancer care by augmenting limited available mental health services. These interventions should be developed in a manner consistent with best practices and must be empirically tested and validated. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Interventions to improve the management of pain in emergency departments: systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sampson, F C; Goodacre, S W; O'Cathain, A

    2014-10-01

    Pain management in emergency departments (ED) is often inadequate despite the availability of effective analgesia, with many patients receiving insufficient and untimely analgesia. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify interventions that could improve pain management in the ED. We systematically searched seven databases for studies reporting pain management outcomes after intervention to change professional practice to improve pain management in the ED, compared with pain management before or without intervention. Data was synthesised using principles of narrative synthesis. We identified 43 relevant studies, including 40 uncontrolled before-and-after studies. Interventions included implementation of guidelines and protocols, educational interventions, pain scoring tools and changes in nursing roles, with many multifaceted interventions incorporating two or more of these elements. Interventions aimed to improve assessment and documentation of pain, knowledge and awareness of pain management and reduce time to analgesia. Due to the high probability of bias in study design and significant variation between studies, it was not possible to estimate the overall effectiveness of interventions, or identify which had the greatest impact. Intervention to improve pain management was reported to have some positive impact in most studies, but these findings may be explained by limitations in study design. Many interventions reported improvements in pain management, but current evidence is insufficient to recommend any for widespread adoption. In order to improve pain management we need to understand more about the theory underlying interventions, the context in which interventions work, and develop interventions based on this stronger theoretical understanding. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Improvements In US Diet Helped Reduce Disease Burden And Lower Premature Deaths, 1999-2012; Overall Diet Remains Poor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong D; Li, Yanping; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of time trends in dietary quality and their relation to disease burden provides essential feedback for policy making. We used an index titled the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 to evaluate trends in dietary quality among 33,885 US adults. From 1999 to 2012 the index increased from 39.9 to 48.2 (perfect score = 110). Gaps in performance on the index across socioeconomic groups persisted or widened. Using data relating index scores to health outcomes in two large cohorts, we estimated that the improvements in dietary quality from 1999 to 2012 prevented 1.1 million premature deaths. Also, this improvement in diet quality resulted in 8.6 percent fewer cardiovascular disease cases, 1.3 percent fewer cancer cases, and 12.6 percent fewer type 2 diabetes cases. Although the steady improvement in dietary quality likely accounted for substantial reductions in disease burden from 1999 to 2012, overall dietary quality in the United States remains poor. Policy initiatives are needed to ensure further improvements. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Conflicting priorities: evaluation of an intervention to improve nurse-parent relationships on a Tanzanian paediatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Manongi, Rachel N; Nasuwa, Fortunata R; Mwangi, Rose; Reyburn, Hugh; Poulsen, Anja; Chandler, Clare IR

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient, or parent/guardian, satisfaction with health care provision is important to health outcomes. Poor relationships with health workers, particularly with nursing staff, have been reported to reduce satisfaction with care in Africa. Participatory research approaches such as the Health Workers for Change initiative have been successful in improving provider-client relationships in various developing country settings, but have not yet been reported in the complex environment of hospital wards. We evaluated the HWC approach for improving the relationship between nurses and parents on a paediatric ward in a busy regional hospital in Tanzania. Methods The intervention consisted of six workshops, attended by 29 of 31 trained nurses and nurse attendants working on the paediatric ward. Parental satisfaction with nursing care was measured with 288 parents before and six weeks after the workshops, by means of an adapted Picker questionnaire. Two focus-group discussions were held with the workshop participants six months after the intervention. Results During the workshops, nurses demonstrated awareness of poor relationships between themselves and mothers. To tackle this, they proposed measures including weekly meetings to solve problems, maintain respect and increase cooperation, and representation to administrative forces to request better working conditions such as equipment, salaries and staff numbers. The results of the parent satisfaction questionnaire showed some improvement in responsiveness of nurses to client needs, but overall the mean percentage of parents reporting each of 20 problems was not statistically significantly different after the intervention, compared to before it (38.9% versus 41.2%). Post-workshop focus-group discussions with nursing staff suggested that nurses felt more empathic towards mothers and perceived an improvement in the relationship, but that this was hindered by persisting problems in their working environment, including

  16. Improving early language and literacy skills: differential effects of an oral language versus a phonology with reading intervention.

    PubMed

    Bowyer-Crane, Claudine; Snowling, Margaret J; Duff, Fiona J; Fieldsend, Elizabeth; Carroll, Julia M; Miles, Jeremy; Götz, Kristina; Hulme, Charles

    2008-04-01

    This study compares the efficacy of two school-based intervention programmes (Phonology with Reading (P + R) and Oral Language (OL)) for children with poor oral language at school entry. Following screening of 960 children, 152 children (mean age 4;09) were selected from 19 schools on the basis of poor vocabulary and verbal reasoning skills and randomly allocated to either the P + R programme or the OL programme. Both groups of children received 20 weeks of daily intervention alternating between small group and individual sessions, delivered by trained teaching assistants. Children in the P + R group received training in letter-sound knowledge, phonological awareness and book level reading skills. Children in the OL group received instruction in vocabulary, comprehension, inference generation and narrative skills. The children's progress was monitored at four time points: pre-, mid- and post-intervention, and after a 5-month delay, using measures of literacy, language and phonological awareness. The data are clustered (children within schools) and robust confidence intervals are reported. At the end of the 20-week intervention programme, children in the P + R group showed an advantage over the OL group on literacy and phonological measures, while children in the OL group showed an advantage over the P + R group on measures of vocabulary and grammatical skills. These gains were maintained over a 5-month period. Intervention programmes designed to develop oral language skills can be delivered successfully by trained teaching assistants to children at school entry. Training using P + R fostered decoding ability whereas the OL programme improved vocabulary and grammatical skills that are foundations for reading comprehension. However, at the end of the intervention, more than 50% of at-risk children remain in need of literacy support.

  17. An intervention to improve the timing of vancomycin levels.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Stacy E F; Mijailovic, Aleksandar S; Wright, Aileen P M; Szumita, Paul M; Bates, David W; Tanasijevic, Milenko J

    2013-12-01

    Blood samples for vancomycin levels are often drawn too early, leading to potential misinterpretation of results. However, only a few studies describe interventions to reduce mistimed vancomycin levels. We implemented an information technology (IT)-based intervention that provided educational instructions to nurses and determined the percentage of levels drawn too early for 27 months before (n = 6,291) and 14 months after (n = 3,608) the intervention. In addition, we conducted nurse interviews (n = 40) and dataset analysis to assess the root causes of mistimed levels. The percentage of vancomycin timing errors decreased from 39% (2,438/6,291) to 32% (1,137/3,608), though in a time series analysis this decrease was not statistically significant (P = .64). Four common causes of mistimed levels were found: (1) unclear provider orders, (2) scheduling levels to be drawn with morning laboratory tests, (3) lack of communication between providers, and (4) failure to adjust the blood draw in relation to the previous dose. A real-time, IT-based intervention that links the timing of levels with medication administration might have a more substantial impact.

  18. Cold Plasma: an emerging antimicrobial intervention to improve food safety

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contamination of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by foodborne pathogens has prompted research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes. This flexible sanitizing method uses ele...

  19. Improving Fine Motor Skills in Young Children: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carol G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Primary Movement programme on the fine motor skills of children in an early years setting in an area of high social disadvantage. Primary Movement is a programme which can be used as an early intervention technique to help children inhibit persistent primary reflexes that have been shown to…

  20. An Intervention and Assessment to Improve Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharf, Davida

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of the study was to test an intervention using a brief essay as an instrument for evaluating higher-order information literacy skills in college students, while accounting for prior conditions such as socioeconomic status and prior academic achievement, and identify other predictors of information literacy through an evaluation…

  1. Evaluation of Interventions to Improve Solar Protection in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girgis, Afaf; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An intensive intervention group (n=247) of 9-11 year olds were exposed to SKIN SAFE, a curriculum about sun protection. A standard group (n=180) received a lecture about skin cancer; control group numbered 185. The intensive group were significantly more likely to use high levels of protection; no differences were apparent between the standard and…

  2. An Intervention and Assessment to Improve Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharf, Davida

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of the study was to test an intervention using a brief essay as an instrument for evaluating higher-order information literacy skills in college students, while accounting for prior conditions such as socioeconomic status and prior academic achievement, and identify other predictors of information literacy through an evaluation…

  3. Commentary--Enlarging Concepts, Refining Methods, Improving Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palacios, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    As illustrated by the articles in this special issue, the research into ethnic identity in adoption is making significant progress. At the same time, it faces new challenges in the definition of concepts, the use of appropriate methods of study, and the consideration of implications for professional interventions. This commentary offers additional…

  4. Improving Preservice Chemistry Teachers' Content Knowledge through Intervention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    The effect of intervention activities on the chemistry content knowledge of 92 preservice chemistry teachers (PSCT) was examined via a pre and post true/false with confidence level test focusing on ionisation energy values and the use of a common alternative conception (AC). Data were collected from three cohorts of PSCT each engaged in a one year…

  5. Improving Fine Motor Skills in Young Children: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carol G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Primary Movement programme on the fine motor skills of children in an early years setting in an area of high social disadvantage. Primary Movement is a programme which can be used as an early intervention technique to help children inhibit persistent primary reflexes that have been shown to…

  6. Evaluation of Interventions to Improve Solar Protection in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girgis, Afaf; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An intensive intervention group (n=247) of 9-11 year olds were exposed to SKIN SAFE, a curriculum about sun protection. A standard group (n=180) received a lecture about skin cancer; control group numbered 185. The intensive group were significantly more likely to use high levels of protection; no differences were apparent between the standard and…

  7. Using a Taped Intervention to Improve Kindergarten Students' Number Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Katherine R.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Fuller, Emily J.; Greear, Corrine

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across students was used to evaluate the effects of a taped numbers (TN) intervention on the number-identification accuracy of 4 kindergarten students. During TN, students attempted to name the numbers 0 through 9 on randomized lists before each number was provided via a tape player 2 s later. All 4 students showed…

  8. Using Teacher Impression Journals to Improve Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, SeonYeong; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meyer, Lori E.; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "Teacher Impression Journals" during a larger study that examined the efficacy of an intervention program designed to promote kindergarteners' positive attitudes toward peers with disabilities (i.e., the "Special Friends" program). The journals were designed to gather information about…

  9. Active educational intervention as a tool to improve safe and appropriate use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shehadeh, Mayadah B; Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Hammad, Eman A

    2016-09-01

    Misconception about antibiotics use among the public has been widely outlined to be a main reason for inappropriate use of antibiotics including failure to complete treatment, skipping of doses, re-use of leftover medicines and overuse of antibiotics. The study was devised to evaluate whether education might be a potential strategy to promote safer use of antibiotics and reducing self-medication. Two hundred seventy one adults were asked to complete two questionnaires; a pre and posteducation. The questionnaires comprised of three parts consisting of 17 statements assessing the knowledge on: appropriate use, safe use and resistance of antibiotics. Knowledge score was estimated by calculating the percentage of correct responses. The mean (SD) knowledge score pre-education was 59.4% (20.3). However, posteducation the score was 65.9% (17.9), p < 0.001(t-test). Knowledge scores were classified as poor, adequate and good. Posteducation, participants within poor and adequate knowledge categories were significantly shifted to the good category describing better knowledge, McNemar-χ2 = 28.7, df = 3, p < 0.001. It is concluded that using tailored education material targeting antibiotic need and use with a major aim of improving the public knowledge about antibiotics can be an effective and feasible strategy. This pilot study could be considered as the starting point for a wider scale public educational intervention study and national antibiotic campaign. However, the improvement in participant's knowledge might not reflect an actual change in antibiotics-seeking behaviour or future retention of knowledge. Future research should seek to assess the impact of education on participant's behaviour.

  10. A Chinese Chan-based Mind-Body Intervention Improves Memory of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes S.; Cheung, Winnie K.; Yeung, Michael K.; Woo, Jean; Kwok, Timothy; Shum, David H. K.; Yu, Ruby; Cheung, Mei-chun

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in the adoption of lifestyle interventions to remediate age-related declines in memory functioning and physical and psychological health among older adults. This study aimed to investigate whether a Chinese Chan-based lifestyle intervention, the Dejian Mind-Body Intervention (DMBI), leads to positive benefits for memory functioning in older adults. Fifty-six adults aged 60 years or older with subjective memory complaints (SMC) were randomly assigned to receive the DMBI or a control intervention (i.e., a conventional memory intervention; MI) once a week for 10 weeks; 48 of the adults completed the intervention. Participants’ verbal and visual memory functioning before and after the intervention were compared. In addition, changes in the participants’ subjective feelings about their memory performance and physical and psychological health after the intervention were examined. The results showed that both the DMBI and MI resulted in significant improvements in both verbal and visual memory functioning and that the extent of the improvements was correlated with participants’ level of performance at baseline. In addition, compared to the MI group, the DMBI group had significantly greater improvements in subjective physical and psychological health after the intervention. In summary, the present findings support the potential of the DMBI as an alternative lifestyle intervention for improving memory functioning, subjective physical and psychological health of older adults with SMC. PMID:28659789

  11. Improving Parental Stress Levels Among Mothers Living with HIV: A Randomized Control Group Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erica R.; Davies, Susan L.; Aban, Inmaculada; Mugavero, Michael J.; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Limited knowledge exists regarding parenting efficacy interventions for mothers living with HIV (MLH). This study evaluated the impact of a supportive group intervention on lowering parenting stress among MLH. Eighty MLH were randomized to a parenting (N=34) or health focused (control) (N=46) group intervention. Pre- and post-intervention stress levels were assessed using the Parental Stress Index-Short Form (PSI/SF). Differences in PSI/SF scores were examined using ANOVA, and predictors of PSI/SF scores were evaluated using multivariable linear regression. Findings indicate that both groups experienced significant decreases in parenting stress from baseline to post-intervention (p=0.0001), with no significant differences between interventions. At baseline, 41% of participants were identified as highly stressed and 30% as clinically stressed, with PSI/SF scores above the 85th and 90th percentile, respectively. Amongst the highly stressed subpopulation, significant improvements in PSI/SF scores for Parental Distress PSI/SF (p=0.039), Difficult Child PSI/SF (p=0.048), and total PSI/SF (p=0.036) were seen, with greater improvements in the parenting intervention. Among the clinically stressed subpopulation, significant improvements in total post-intervention PSI/SF scores were seen (p=0.049), with greater improvements in the parenting intervention. Results indicate that screening for high levels of stress should be considered in clinical practice to effectively implement stress-reducing interventions among MLH. PMID:25734870

  12. Improving parental stress levels among mothers living with HIV: a randomized control group intervention study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica R; Davies, Susan L; Aban, Inmaculada; Mugavero, Michael J; Shrestha, Sadeep; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2015-04-01

    Limited knowledge exists regarding parenting efficacy interventions for mothers living with HIV (MLH). This study evaluated the impact of a supportive group intervention on lowering parenting stress among MLH. Eighty MLH were randomized to a parenting (N=34) or health focused (control) (N=46) group intervention. Pre- and post-intervention stress levels were assessed using the Parental Stress Index-Short Form (PSI/SF). Differences in PSI/SF scores were examined using ANOVA, and predictors of PSI/SF scores were evaluated using multivariable linear regression. Findings indicate that both groups experienced significant decreases in parenting stress from baseline to post-intervention (p=0.0001), with no significant differences between interventions. At baseline, 41% of participants were identified as highly stressed and 30% as clinically stressed, with PSI/SF scores above the 85(th) and 90(th) percentile, respectively. Amongst the highly stressed subpopulation, significant improvements in PSI/SF scores for Parental Distress PSI/SF (p=0.039), Difficult Child PSI/SF (p=0.048), and total PSI/SF (p=0.036) were seen, with greater improvements in the parenting intervention. Among the clinically stressed subpopulation, significant improvements in total post-intervention PSI/SF scores were seen (p=0.049), with greater improvements in the parenting intervention. Results indicate that screening for high levels of stress should be considered in clinical practice to effectively implement stress-reducing interventions among MLH.

  13. Telehealth for improved glycaemic control in patients with poorly controlled diabetes after acute hospitalization - a preliminary study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wai Leng, Chow; Jundong, Jiang; Li Wei, Cho; Joo Pin, Foo; Kwong Ming, Fock; Chen, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated a disease management and education programme delivered via telephone support (TS) to patients with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c >7%). All eligible patients were invited to participate in the programme, which involved education on lifestyle modification and disease management delivered via three scheduled monthly calls by trained nurses. Patients who declined or could not be contacted acted as the controls (usual care, UC). A per protocol analysis was conducted using a mixed effect model for two subgroups with different baseline HbA1c levels (i.e. baseline HbA1c <8.0% and HbA1c ≥8.0%). A total of 2646 patients with diabetes were eligible for enrolment. Of these, 1391 participants had HbA1c measurements available. The study comprised 633 patients (46%) who completed the programme (TS), 598 (43%) who were not contactable or refused to participate at the first telephone call (UC) and 160 patients who dropped out. In the patients with HbA1c ≥8%, TS reduced the adjusted mean HbA1c by 0.38% (P = 0.022) but the reduction in diabetes-related admissions (4.2% lower adjusted mean admission rate) was not significant. In patients with HbA1c <8%, TS had no additional effect on glycaemic control or diabetes-related admission. Telephone support appeared effective in improving glycaemic control in patients with poor diabetes control.

  14. Improvement of health care for the poor in Split (southern Croatia) during the first half of the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Brisky, Livia; Brisky, Tibor

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the health care available for the poor citizens of Split during the first half of the 19th century. Soon after being constructed in 1797, the Civic Hospital in Split founded by the Ergovac brothers for the needs of the poor was transformed into a military hospital. Consequently, caring for this social stratum was taken over by two inadequate shelters and later by a small civic hospital situated in the Split suburb of Dobri. The year of the application of Petar Ergovac to the supreme ruler for the transformation of the hospital building established by his family from a military to a civil institution was found, as well as the correct data regarding its return to initial idea in 1821. On the basis of the archival documents kept in the Archaeological Museum in Split and in the State Archives in Zadar, the work organization of the Civic Hospital in Split and the first stage of its change from a charitable to a public health hospital institution were presented. This study revealed the aspiration of the authorities in the first half of the 19th century to improve the health system of the city of Split.

  15. Interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines for prevention of device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Flodgren, Gerd; Conterno, Lucieni O; Mayhew, Alain; Omar, Omar; Pereira, Cresio Romeu; Shepperd, Sasha

    2013-03-28

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a major threat to patient safety, and are associated with mortality rates varying from 5% to 35%. Important risk factors associated with HAIs are the use of invasive medical devices (e.g. central lines, urinary catheters and mechanical ventilators), and poor staff adherence to infection prevention practices during insertion and care for the devices when in place. There are specific risk profiles for each device, but in general, the breakdown of aseptic technique during insertion and care for the device, as well as the duration of device use, are important factors for the development of these serious and costly infections. To assess the effectiveness of different interventions, alone or in combination, which target healthcare professionals or healthcare organisations to improve professional adherence to infection control guidelines on device-related infection rates and measures of adherence. We searched the following electronic databases for primary studies up to June 2012: the Cochrane Effective Paractice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. We searched reference lists and contacted authors of included studies. We also searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) for related reviews. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (NRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies and interrupted time series (ITS) studies that complied with the Cochrane EPOC Group methodological criteria, and that evaluated interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines for the prevention of device-related infections. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study using the Cochrane EPOC 'Risk of bias' tool. We contacted authors of original papers to obtain

  16. Knowledge Translation Interventions to Improve the Timing of Dialysis Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Elaine M. T.; Manns, Braden J.; Garg, Amit X.; Sood, Manish M.; Kim, S. Joseph; Naimark, David; Nesrallah, Gihad E.; Soroka, Steven D.; Beaulieu, Monica; Dixon, Stephanie; Alam, Ahsan; Tangri, Navdeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early initiation of chronic dialysis (starting dialysis with higher vs lower kidney function) has risen rapidly in the past 2 decades in Canada and internationally, despite absence of established health benefits and higher costs. In 2014, a Canadian guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation, recommending an intent-to-defer approach, was published. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a knowledge translation intervention to promote the intent-to-defer approach in clinical practice. Design: This study is a multicenter, 2-arm parallel, cluster randomized trial. Setting: The study involves 55 advanced chronic kidney disease clinics across Canada. Patients: Patients older than 18 years who are managed by nephrologists for more than 3 months, and initiate dialysis in the follow-up period are included in the study. Measurements: Outcomes will be measured at the patient-level and enumerated within a cluster. Data on characteristics of each dialysis start will be determined by linkages with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. Primary outcomes include the proportion of patients who start dialysis early with an estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 10.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 and start dialysis in hospital as inpatients or in an emergency room setting. Secondary outcomes include the rate of change in early dialysis starts; rates of hospitalizations, deaths, and cost of predialysis care (wherever available); quarterly proportion of new starts; and acceptability of the knowledge translation materials. Methods: We randomized 55 multidisciplinary chronic disease clinics (clusters) in Canada to receive either an active knowledge translation intervention or no intervention for the uptake of the guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation. The active knowledge translation intervention consists of audit and feedback as well as patient- and provider-directed educational tools delivered at a comprehensive in

  17. Nanosuspension for improving the bioavailability of a poorly soluble drug and screening of stabilizing agents to inhibit crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Bose, Sonali; Vippagunta, Radha; Harmon, Ferris

    2011-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nanosuspension of a poorly soluble drug by nanomilling process using wet media milling to achieve superior in vitro dissolution and high in vivo exposure in pharmacokinetic studies. A promising nanosuspension was developed with Vitamin E TPGS based formulation with particle size in the nano range. Although the formulation showed significant improvement during in vitro dissolution and in vivo plasma level, probably due to the strong hydrophobic interaction between Vitamin TPGS and the drug molecule, crystal growth was observed during stability studies. A systematic study was done with different combinations of solubilizer/stabilizer system in order to obtain a more stable nanosuspension. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC 3 cps) was found to stabilize the nanosuspension by better surface coverage due to stronger interaction with the drug as compared to other stabilizers used in this study.

  18. Interventions for improving the research literacy of nurses: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hines, Sonia; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Coyer, Fiona

    2016-02-01

    Despite the importance of research literacy for nurses, many nurses report feeling unable to effectively read and understand research, which in turn results in lower research utilization in practice. Nurses themselves identify poor experiences with trying to understand and use research as factors that contribute to a reluctance to utilize research. This reluctance often leads nurses to seek other sources of information, such as colleagues, instead. The objective of this review was to identify the effectiveness of research literacy interventions on the research literacy of registered nurses. Registered nurses.Interventions of interest were those that evaluated the effectiveness of workplace educational programs or interventions conducted in a healthcare organization or tertiary-level educational facility aiming to improve or increase registered nurses' understanding of research literature.Outcomes of interest were research literacy, measured explicitly or as research knowledge, research understanding, use of research evidence in practice, and/or ability to critically appraise research.We considered experimental study designs such as randomized controlled trials, nonrandomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental, and before and after studies. A wide range of databases were searched in order to provide the most complete possible review of the evidence. Initial keywords used were: "research litera*", "research education", "research knowledge", "evidence-based practice education". Papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Data were extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI-MAStARI. Quantitative data would have been, if possible, pooled in statistical meta

  19. A Quantitative Assessment of a 4-year Intervention That Improved Patient Counseling Through Improving Medical Student Health

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Erica; Elon, Lisa; Hertzberg, Vicki

    2007-01-01

    Objective Despite efforts to produce healthier physicians and patients, there are no published experiments where health promotion interventions throughout medical school have been compared with a control group regarding the school environment, students' personal health practices, and students' patient counseling practices. Design Using the Class of 2002 as controls, we performed a 4-year pilot study of a personal health promotion intervention on the Class of 2003 at Emory University School of Medicine (EUSM). We focused on improving the actual and perceived healthfulness of the educational milieu, and on improving their personal and clinical practices about diet, tobacco, exercise, and alcohol use. Data were collected at freshman and ward orientations and during a senior rotation (ncontrols = 110, 109, 100 and ntreatment = 114, 104, 106; all response rates greater than 90%). Results Students receiving the intervention perceived EUSM as a healthier environment than did control students. By senior year, control males reported twice the tobacco use reported by males in the intervention (43% vs 22%, P = .02), although they had previously reported very similar levels (31% vs 29%, P = .8). Diet, exercise, and tobacco counseling practices were positively related to the intervention; alcohol was inversely related to the intervention. Conclusions In this pilot, compared with controls, the intervention positively affected medical students' perceptions of their school health promotion environment, reduced tobacco use among male students and, to some extent, improved their patient counseling practices. Such a medical school-based health promotion intervention shows promise and should be studied in a broader setting. PMID:17955112

  20. Interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Rabie, Tamer; Roberts, Ian; Cairncross, Sandy

    2007-04-14

    To assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve the microbial quality of drinking water for preventing diarrhoea. Systematic review. Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group's trials register, CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, LILACS; hand searching; and correspondence with experts and relevant organisations. Randomised and quasirandomised controlled trials of interventions to improve the microbial quality of drinking water for preventing diarrhoea in adults and in children in settings with endemic disease. Allocation concealment, blinding, losses to follow-up, type of intervention, outcome measures, and measures of effect. Pooled effect estimates were calculated within the appropriate subgroups. 33 reports from 21 countries documenting 42 comparisons were included. Variations in design, setting, and type and point of intervention, and variations in defining, assessing, calculating, and reporting outcomes limited the comparability of study results and pooling of results by meta-analysis. In general, interventions to improve the microbial quality of drinking water are effective in preventing diarrhoea. Effectiveness was not conditioned on the presence of improved water supplies or sanitation in the study setting and was not enhanced by combining the intervention with instructions on basic hygiene, a water storage vessel, or improved sanitation or water supplies--other common environmental interventions intended to prevent diarrhoea. Interventions to improve water quality are generally effective for preventing diarrhoea in all ages and in under 5s. Significant heterogeneity among the trials suggests that the level of effectiveness may depend on a variety of conditions that research to date cannot fully explain.

  1. Subliminal strengthening: improving older individuals' physical function over time with an implicit-age-stereotype intervention.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Pilver, Corey; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Negative age stereotypes that older individuals assimilate from their culture predict detrimental outcomes, including worse physical function. We examined, for the first time, whether positive age stereotypes, presented subliminally across multiple sessions in the community, would lead to improved outcomes. Each of 100 older individuals (age=61-99 years, M=81) was randomly assigned to an implicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, an explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, a combined implicit- and explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, or a control group. Interventions occurred at four 1-week intervals. The implicit intervention strengthened positive age stereotypes, which strengthened positive self-perceptions of aging, which, in turn, improved physical function. The improvement in these outcomes continued for 3 weeks after the last intervention session. Further, negative age stereotypes and negative self-perceptions of aging were weakened. For all outcomes, the implicit intervention's impact was greater than the explicit intervention's impact. The physical-function effect of the implicit intervention surpassed a previous study's 6-month-exercise-intervention's effect with participants of similar ages. The current study's findings demonstrate the potential of directing implicit processes toward physical-function enhancement over time.

  2. Identifying continuous quality improvement publications: what makes an improvement intervention ‘CQI’?

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Susanne; Lim, Yee-Wei; Danz, Marjorie S; Foy, Robbie; Suttorp, Marika J; Shekelle, Paul G; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2011-01-01

    Background The term continuous quality improvement (CQI) is often used to refer to a method for improving care, but no consensus statement exists on the definition of CQI. Evidence reviews are critical for advancing science, and depend on reliable definitions for article selection. Methods As a preliminary step towards improving CQI evidence reviews, this study aimed to use expert panel methods to identify key CQI definitional features and develop and test a screening instrument for reliably identifying articles with the key features. We used a previously published method to identify 106 articles meeting the general definition of a quality improvement intervention (QII) from 9427 electronically identified articles from PubMed. Two raters then applied a six-item CQI screen to the 106 articles. Results Per cent agreement ranged from 55.7% to 75.5% for the six items, and reviewer-adjusted intra-class correlation ranged from 0.43 to 0.62. ‘Feedback of systematically collected data’ was the most common feature (64%), followed by being at least ‘somewhat’ adapted to local conditions (61%), feedback at meetings involving participant leaders (46%), using an iterative development process (40%), being at least ‘somewhat’ data driven (34%), and using a recognised change method (28%). All six features were present in 14.2% of QII articles. Conclusions We conclude that CQI features can be extracted from QII articles with reasonable reliability, but only a small proportion of QII articles include all features. Further consensus development is needed to support meaningful use of the term CQI for scientific communication. PMID:21727199

  3. Effectiveness of complementary food supplements and dietary counselling on anaemia and stunting in children aged 6–23 months in poor areas of Qinghai Province, China: a controlled interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Wei; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Chang, Suying; Han, Huijun; Xing, Min; Chen, Li; Scherpbier, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    combined with dietary counselling can improve feeding practices and reduce anaemia prevalence. Future studies should use longer follow-up to assess the effects on stunting. Strengths and limitations We included a large number of participants and assessed a combined complementary food supplements and dietary counselling intervention in a poor rural area in China with high anaemia prevalence. Although the study took place in only one intervention county and one control county, we conducted an analysis that controlled for differences between the two counties. Also, although we made significant efforts to train village doctors, their education was not systematically assessed after training and thus their delivery of the interventions may have been variable. Trial registration number ChiCTRPRC12002444; Pre-results. PMID:27799239

  4. An Informatics-supported Intervention Improves Diabetes Control in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ziemer, David C.; Tsui, Circe; Caudle, Jane; Barnes, Catherine S.; Dames, Faye; Phillips, Lawrence S.

    2006-01-01

    Although research has shown that proper management of diabetes can improve outcomes, glucose control is worsening. This partly reflects the failure of providers to intensify diabetes therapy when indicated, termed clinical inertia. Our intervention used (a) decision support reminders which provided patient specific recommendations for management at each visit, and (b) computer generated provider specific feedback on performance. This intervention improved the frequency with which providers intensified the therapy and improved glycemic control. PMID:17238779

  5. Practice-level quality improvement interventions in primary care: a review of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Ryan; Stokes, Tim; Marshall, Tom

    2015-11-01

    To present an overview of effective interventions for quality improvement in primary care at the practice level utilising existing systematic reviews. Quality improvement in primary care involves a range of approaches from the system-level to patient-level improvement. One key setting in which quality improvement needs to occur is at the level of the basic unit of primary care--the individual general practice. Therefore, there is a need for practitioners to have access to an overview of the effectiveness of quality improvement interventions available in this setting. A tertiary evidence synthesis was conducted (a review of systematic reviews). A systematic approach was used to identify and summarise published literature relevant to understanding primary-care quality improvement at the practice level. Quality assessment was via the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool for systematic reviews, with data extraction identifying evidence of effect for the examined interventions. Included reviews had to be relevant to quality improvement at the practice level and relevant to the UK primary-care context. Reviews were excluded if describing system-level interventions. A range of measures across care structure, process and outcomes were defined and interpreted across the quality improvement interventions. Audit and feedback, computerised advice, point-of-care reminders, practice facilitation, educational outreach and processes for patient review and follow-up all demonstrated evidence of a quality improvement effect. Evidence of an improvement effect was higher where baseline performance was low and was particularly demonstrated across process measures and measures related to prescribing. Evidence was not sufficient to suggest that multifaceted approaches were more effective than single interventions. Evidence exists for a range of quality improvement interventions at the primary-care practice level. More research is required to determine the use and impact of quality

  6. [Interventions for improving adherence to treatment in patients with multiple pathologies: overview of systematic reviews].

    PubMed

    González-Bueno, Javier; Vega-Coca, María Dolores; Rodríguez-Pérez, Aitana; Toscano-Guzmán, María Dolores; Pérez-Guerrero, Concepción; Santos-Ramos, Bernardo

    2016-02-01

    To assess the available scientific evidence regarding the efficacy of interventions aimed to enhance medication adherence in patients with multiple chronic conditions (PMCC). Overview of systematic reviews. The following databases were consulted (September 2013): Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CRD and WoS to identify interventions aimed to enhance medication adherence in PMCC, or otherwise, patients with chronic diseases common in the PMCC, or polypharmacy. Systematic reviews of clinical trials focused on PMCC or similar were included. They should compare the efficacy of any intervention aimed to improve compliance to prescribed and self-administered medications with clinical practice or other interventions. Information about the study population, nature of intervention and efficacy in terms of improved adherence was extracted. 566 articles were retrieved of which 9 systematic reviews were included. None was specifically focused on PMCC but considered patients with chronic diseases common in the PMCC, patients with more than one chronic disease and polypharmacy. The overall effectiveness of interventions was modest without relevant differences between behavioural, educational and combined interventions. Some components of these interventions including patient counselling and regimen simplification appear to be effective tools in improving adherence in this population group. There is a large heterogeneity of interventions aimed to improve adherence with modest efficacy, none in PMCC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Challenging logics of complex intervention trials: community perspectives of a health care improvement intervention in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Okwaro, Ferdinand M; Chandler, Clare I R; Hutchinson, Eleanor; Nabirye, Christine; Taaka, Lilian; Kayendeke, Miriam; Nayiga, Susan; Staedke, Sarah G

    2015-04-01

    Health systems in many African countries are failing to provide populations with access to good quality health care. Morbidity and mortality from curable diseases such as malaria remain high. The PRIME trial in Tororo, rural Uganda, designed and tested an intervention to improve care at health centres, with the aim of reducing ill-health due to malaria in surrounding communities. This paper presents the impact and context of this trial from the perspective of community members in the study area. Fieldwork was carried out for a year from the start of the intervention in June 2011, and involved informal observation and discussions as well as 13 focus group discussions with community members, 10 in-depth interviews with local stakeholders, and 162 context descriptions recorded through quarterly interviews with community members, health workers and district officials. Community members observed a small improvement in quality of care at most, but not all, intervention health centres. However, this was diluted by other shortfalls in health services beyond the scope of the intervention. Patients continued to seek care at health centres they considered inadequate as well as positioning themselves and their children to access care through other sources such as research and nongovernmental organization (NGO) projects. These findings point to challenges of designing and delivering interventions within a paradigm that requires factorial (reduced to predictable factors) problem definition with easily actionable and evaluable solutions by small-scale projects. Such requirements mean that interventions often work on the periphery of a health system rather than tackling the murky political and economic realities that shape access to care but are harder to change or evaluate with randomized controlled trials. Highly projectified settings further reduce the ability to genuinely 'control' for different health care access scenarios. We argue for a raised consciousness of how

  8. A Meta-Analytic Review of Stand-Alone Interventions to Improve Body Image

    PubMed Central

    Alleva, Jessica M.; Sheeran, Paschal; Webb, Thomas L.; Martijn, Carolien; Miles, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Objective Numerous stand-alone interventions to improve body image have been developed. The present review used meta-analysis to estimate the effectiveness of such interventions, and to identify the specific change techniques that lead to improvement in body image. Methods The inclusion criteria were that (a) the intervention was stand-alone (i.e., solely focused on improving body image), (b) a control group was used, (c) participants were randomly assigned to conditions, and (d) at least one pretest and one posttest measure of body image was taken. Effect sizes were meta-analysed and moderator analyses were conducted. A taxonomy of 48 change techniques used in interventions targeted at body image was developed; all interventions were coded using this taxonomy. Results The literature search identified 62 tests of interventions (N = 3,846). Interventions produced a small-to-medium improvement in body image (d+ = 0.38), a small-to-medium reduction in beauty ideal internalisation (d+ = -0.37), and a large reduction in social comparison tendencies (d+ = -0.72). However, the effect size for body image was inflated by bias both within and across studies, and was reliable but of small magnitude once corrections for bias were applied. Effect sizes for the other outcomes were no longer reliable once corrections for bias were applied. Several features of the sample, intervention, and methodology moderated intervention effects. Twelve change techniques were associated with improvements in body image, and three techniques were contra-indicated. Conclusions The findings show that interventions engender only small improvements in body image, and underline the need for large-scale, high-quality trials in this area. The review identifies effective techniques that could be deployed in future interventions. PMID:26418470

  9. Does a Quality Improvement Intervention for Anxiety Result in Differential Outcomes for Lower Income Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Chavira, Denise A.; Craske, Michelle G.; Gollineli, Daniela; Han, Xiaotong; Rose, Raphael D.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Stein, Murray B.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effects of a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders in primary care on lower income participants relative to those with higher incomes. The authors hypothesized that lower income patients might show less improvement or improve at a lower rate given that they experience greater economic stress over the treatment course. Alternatively, lower income patients could improve at a higher rate because the intervention facilitates access to evidence-based treatment, which typically is less available to persons with lower incomes. Method The authors compared baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with lower (n=287) and higher (n=717) income using t-tests and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables respectively. For the longitudinal analysis of intervention effects by income group, the authors jointly modeled the outcomes at the four assessment times by study site; income; time; intervention; time and intervention; income and time; income and intervention; and time, intervention and income. Results Although lower-income participants were more ill and disabled at baseline than those in the higher income group, the two income groups were very similar in their clinical response. The lower income participants experienced a comparable degree of clinical improvement, despite receiving fewer treatment sessions, less relapse prevention, and less continuous care. Conclusions These findings contribute to the ongoing discussion as to whether or not, and to what extent, quality improvement interventions work equally well across income groups or require tailoring for specific vulnerable populations. PMID:23377641

  10. Improving the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drug by solid dispersion and solid solution: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Rina J; Zia, Hossein; Sandhu, Harpreet K; Shah, Navnit H; Malick, Waseem A

    2007-01-01

    The solid dispersions with poloxamer 188 (P188) and solid solutions with polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVPK30) were evaluated and compared in an effort to improve aqueous solubility and bioavailability of a model hydrophobic drug. All preparations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, intrinsic dissolution rates, and contact angle measurements. Accelerated stability studies also were conducted to determine the effects of aging on the stability of various formulations. The selected solid dispersion and solid solution formulations were further evaluated in beagle dogs for in vivo testing. Solid dispersions were characterized to show that the drug retains its crystallinity and forms a two-phase system. Solid solutions were characterized to be an amorphous monophasic system with transition of crystalline drug to amorphous state. The evaluation of the intrinsic dissolution rates of various preparations indicated that the solid solutions have higher initial dissolution rates compared with solid dispersions. However, after storage at accelerated conditions, the dissolution rates of solid solutions were lower due to partial reversion to crystalline form. The drug in solid dispersion showed better bioavailability in comparison to solid solution. Therefore, considering physical stability and in vivo study results, the solid dispersion was the most suitable choice to improve dissolution rates and hence the bioavailability of the poorly water soluble drug.

  11. Synergistic role of solid lipid and porous silica in improving the oral delivery of weakly basic poorly water soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Rokhsana; Rao, Shasha; Bremmell, Kristen; Prestidge, Clive

    2017-01-01

    Oral absorption of weakly basic drugs (e.g. cinnarizine (CIN)) is limited by their pH dependent precipitation in intestinal conditions. To overcome this challenge, a novel drug delivery system composed of solid lipid and porous silica, namely silica encapsulated solid lipid (SESL) particles, was developed via hot homogenization of melted lipid dispersion, followed by ultra-sonication of the silica stabilized homogenized melted lipid dispersion. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the SESL formulation revealed non-spherical and aggregated hybrid particles, with rough exterior and structured nanoparticles visible on the surface. A 1.5, 2.2 and 7-fold improvement in the dissolution of CIN was observed for the SESL particles, under simulated intestinal non-digesting conditions, in comparison to the drug loaded in solid lipid (CIN-SL) matrix, drug loaded in porous silica (CIN-PS) and pure drug powder. Under simulated intestinal digestive condition, significant improvement in the drug solubilization was reported for the SESL formulation in compared to the individual drug loaded systems i.e. CIN-PS and CIN-SL. Thereby, silica encapsulated solid lipid system provides a promising oral delivery approach for poorly water soluble weakly basic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Usability of Diabetes MAP: A Web-delivered Intervention for Improving Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Bethune, Magaela C; Lagotte, Andrea E

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-delivered interventions are a feasible approach to health promotion. However, if a website is poorly designed, difficult to navigate, and has technical bugs, it will not be used as intended. Usability testing prior to evaluating a website’s benefits can identify barriers to user engagement and maximize future use. Objective We developed a Web-delivered intervention called Diabetes Medication Adherence Promotion (Diabetes MAP) and used a mixed-methods approach to test its usability prior to evaluating its efficacy on medication adherence and glycemic control in a randomized controlled trial. Methods We recruited English-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from an academic medical center who were prescribed diabetes medications. A trained research assistant administered a baseline survey, collected medical record information, and instructed participants on how to access Diabetes MAP. Participants were asked to use the site independently for 2 weeks and to provide survey and/or focus group feedback on their experience. We analyzed survey data descriptively and qualitative data thematically to identify participants’ favorable and unfavorable experiences, characterize usability concerns, and solicit recommendations for improving Diabetes MAP. Results Enrolled participants (N=32) were an average of 51.7 ± 11.8 years old, 66% (21/32) female, 60% (19/32) non-Hispanic White, 88% (28/32) had more than 12 years of education, half had household incomes over $50,000, and 78% (25/32) were privately insured. Average duration of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8 ± 6.3 years, average A1c was 7.4 ± 2.0, and 38% (12/32) were prescribed insulin. Of enrolled participants, 91% (29/32) provided survey and/or focus group feedback about Diabetes MAP. On the survey, participants agreed website information was clear and easy to understand, but in focus groups they reported navigational challenges and difficulty overcoming user errors (eg, entering data in an

  13. A nutrition intervention is effective in improving dietary components linked to cardiometabolic risk in youth with first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Scott B; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Watkins, Andrew; Curtis, Jackie; Kalucy, Megan; Samaras, Katherine

    2016-06-01

    Severe mental illness is characterised by a 20-year mortality gap due to cardiometabolic disease. Poor diet in those with severe mental illness is an important and modifiable risk factor. The present study aimed to (i) examine baseline nutritional intake in youth with first-episode psychosis (FEP), (ii) evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of nutritional intervention early in FEP and (iii) to evaluate the effectiveness of early dietary intervention on key nutritional end points. Participants were recruited over a 12-month period from a community-based programme specifically targeting young people aged 15-25 years with newly diagnosed FEP. Individual dietetic consultations and practical group sessions were offered as part of a broader lifestyle programme. Dietary assessments were conducted before and at the end of the 12-week intervention. Participants exceeded recommended energy and Na intakes at baseline. Retention within the nutrition intervention was 67 %, consistent with other interventions offered to FEP clients. There was a 47 % reduction in discretionary food intake (-94 g/d, P<0·001) and reductions in daily energy (-24 %, P<0·001) and Na (-26 %, P<0·001) intakes. Diet quality significantly improved, and the mean change was 3·6 (95 % CI 0·2, 6·9, P<0·05), although this finding was not significant after Bonferroni's correction. Increased vegetable intake was the main factor contributing to improved diet quality. Nutrition intervention delivered shortly after initiation of antipsychotic medication is feasible, acceptable and effective in youth with FEP. Strategies to prevent weight gain and metabolic decline will contribute to prevent premature cardiometabolic disease in this vulnerable population.

  14. Child maltreatment: interventions to improve recognition and reporting.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kathleen Sanders; Steelman, Sara Hatfield

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a significant public health problem and described as one of the greatest threats facing the health, welfare, and social well-being of children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012). The effect of child maltreatment on the children involved, their families, and society as a whole is substantial. Despite mandatory reporting laws, the poignant reality is that child maltreatment is significantly underrecognized and underreported. Interventions must be designed, tested, and implemented to fulfill the goal of child maltreatment prevention. Forensic nurses are uniquely qualified to assume a leadership role and work collaboratively with children, their caregivers, and all members of the interdisciplinary team to ensure the safety and protection of children. The purpose of this article is to present an evidence-based discussion of the scope of the problem of child maltreatment, contributing barriers to recognition and reporting, and suggestions for interventions designed to achieve the goals of primary and secondary prevention.

  15. Improving pig husbandry in tropical resource-poor communities and its potential to reduce risk of porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Lekule, Faustin P; Kyvsgaard, Niels C

    2003-06-01

    improvement of pig husbandry in tropical resource-poor countries.

  16. Pluronic-Functionalized Silica-Lipid Hybrid Microparticles: Improving the Oral Delivery of Poorly Water-Soluble Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shasha; Richter, Katharina; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Boyd, Ben J; Porter, Christopher J H; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-12-07

    A Pluronic-functionalized silica-lipid hybrid (Plu-SLH) microparticle system for the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble, weak base drugs is reported for the first time. A highly effective Plu-SLH microparticle system was composed of Labrasol as the lipid phase, Pluronic F127 as the polymeric precipitation inhibitor (PPI), and silica nanoparticles as the solid carrier. For the model drug cinnarizine (CIN), the Plu-SLH delivery system was shown to offer significant biopharmaceutical advantages in comparison with unformulated drug and drug in the silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) system. In vitro two-phase dissolution studies illustrated significantly reduced pH provoked CIN precipitation and an 8- to 14-fold improvement in the extent of dissolution in intestinal conditions. In addition, under simulated intestinal digesting conditions, the Plu-SLH provided approximately three times more drug solubilization than the SLH. Oral administration in rats resulted in superior bioavailability for Plu-SLH microparticles, i.e., 1.6- and 2.1-fold greater than the SLH and the unformulated CIN, respectively. A physical mixture of Pluronic and SLH (Plu&SLH), having the same composition as Plu-SLH, was also evaluated, but showed no significant increase in CIN absorption when compared to unmodified CIN or SLH. This work represents the first study where different methods of incorporating PPI to formulate solid-state lipid-based formulations were compared for the impact on the biopharmaceutical performance. The data suggest that the novel physicochemical properties and structure of the fabricated Plu-SLH microparticle delivery system play an important role in facilitating the synergistic advantage of Labrasol and Pluronic F127 in preventing drug precipitation, and the Plu-SLH provides efficient oral delivery of poorly water-soluble weak bases.

  17. An occupation-based video feedback intervention for improving self-awareness: protocol and rationale.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Julia; Fleming, Jennifer; Ownsworth, Tamara; Lannin, Natasha A

    2015-02-01

    Impaired self-awareness can limit rehabilitation outcomes for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Video feedback on occupational performance has been found to improve self-awareness after TBI when delivered according to specific principles. The purpose of this article is to describe an occupation-based video feedback intervention found to be effective in a randomized controlled trial to assist with translation into clinical practice. The intervention uses therapist-mediated video feedback on clients' occupational performance, aiming to facilitate self-reflection on performance and improve self-awareness. This paper describes the theoretical background, intervention principles, and protocol of the intervention. Therapists can use video feedback intervention, incorporating the principles in this article, to improve people's intellectual awareness and ability to recognize and correct errors during task performance after TBI without a negative impact on emotional status.

  18. A Multifaceted Intervention to Implement Guidelines and Improve Admission Paediatric Care in Kenyan District Hospitals: A Cluster Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ayieko, Philip; Ntoburi, Stephen; Wagai, John; Opondo, Charles; Opiyo, Newton; Migiro, Santau; Wamae, Annah; Mogoa, Wycliffe; Were, Fred; Wasunna, Aggrey; Fegan, Greg; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Background In developing countries referral of severely ill children from primary care to district hospitals is common, but hospital care is often of poor quality. However, strategies to change multiple paediatric care practices in rural hospitals have rarely been evaluated. Methods and Findings This cluster randomized trial was conducted in eight rural Kenyan district hospitals, four of which were randomly assigned to a full intervention aimed at improving quality of clinical care (evidence-based guidelines, training, job aides, local facilitation, supervision, and face-to-face feedback; n = 4) and the remaining four to control intervention (guidelines, didactic training, job aides, and written feedback; n = 4). Prespecified structure, process, and outcome indicators were measured at baseline and during three and five 6-monthly surveys in control and intervention hospitals, respectively. Primary outcomes were process of care measures, assessed at 18 months postbaseline. In both groups performance improved from baseline. Completion of admission assessment tasks was higher in intervention sites at 18 months (mean = 0.94 versus 0.65, adjusted difference 0.54 [95% confidence interval 0.05–0.29]). Uptake of guideline recommended therapeutic practices was also higher within intervention hospitals: adoption of once daily gentamicin (89.2% versus 74.4%; 17.1% [8.04%–26.1%]); loading dose quinine (91.9% versus 66.7%, 26.3% [−3.66% to 56.3%]); and adequate prescriptions of intravenous fluids for severe dehydration (67.2% versus 40.6%; 29.9% [10.9%–48.9%]). The proportion of children receiving inappropriate doses of drugs in intervention hospitals was lower (quinine dose >40 mg/kg/day; 1.0% versus 7.5%; −6.5% [−12.9% to 0.20%]), and inadequate gentamicin dose (2.2% versus 9.0%; −6.8% [−11.9% to −1.6%]). Conclusions Specific efforts are needed to improve hospital care in developing countries. A full, multifaceted intervention was associated with

  19. Improved oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble indirubin by a supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Wang, Lan; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Indirubin, isolated from the leaves of the Chinese herb Isatis tinctoria L, is a protein kinase inhibitor and promising antitumor agent. However, the poor water solubility of indirubin has limited its application. In this study, a supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SMEDDS) was developed to improve the oral bioavailability of indirubin. Methods A prototype S-SMEDDS was designed using solubility studies and phase diagram construction. Precipitation inhibitors were selected from hydrophilic polymers according to their crystallization-inhibiting capacity through in vitro precipitation tests. In vitro release of indirubin from S-SMEDDS was examined to investigate its likely release behavior in vivo. The in vivo bioavailability of indirubin from S-SMEDDS and from SMEDDS was compared in rats. Results The prototype formulation of S-SMEDDS comprised Maisine™ 35-1:Cremophor® EL:Transcutol® P (15:40:45, w/w/w). Polyvinylpyrrolidone K17, a hydrophilic polymer, was used as a precipitation inhibitor based on its better crystallization-inhibiting capacity compared with polyethylene glycol 4000 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. In vitro release analysis showed more rapid drug release from S-SMEDDS than from SMEDDS. In vivo bioavailability analysis in rats indicated that improved oral absorption was achieved and that the relative bioavailability of S-SMEDDS was 129.5% compared with SMEDDS. Conclusion The novel S-SMEDDS developed in this study increased the dissolution rate and improved the oral bioavailability of indirubin in rats. The results suggest that S-SMEDDS is a superior means of oral delivery of indirubin. PMID:22403491

  20. Social marketing improved the use of multivitamin and mineral supplements among resource-poor women in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Warnick, Elizabeth; Dearden, Kirk A; Slater, Sharon; Butrón, Betzabé; Lanata, Claudio F; Huffman, Sandra L

    2004-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that social marketing improves women's awareness and consumption of multivitamin and mineral supplements. Formative research and baseline and final surveys using a multistaged stratified cluster sample. Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Women 15 to 49 years old (n=1709 at baseline and n=1735 at final survey). Social marketing campaign using radio and television spots. Awareness and use of multivitamins, including VitalDía, the brand promoted as part of this social marketing campaign. Cross-tabulations to assess changes over time in awareness and use of multivitamins. Logistic regression analyses to identify determinants of multivitamin use. The campaign increased women's awareness and use of multiple supplements, including VitalDía. Awareness of multiple supplements nearly doubled among women with 6 to 8 years of schooling, tripled among women with 4 to 5 years of education, and more than quadrupled among women with less than 4 years of schooling. After 9 months of social marketing, 11% of women had taken VitalDía one or more times, 7% had taken it at least once in the last 3 months, and 4% had used it one or more times in the last month. Improvements in the use of VitalDía were evident for women of all socioeconomic and educational levels, with the greatest increases occurring in the least advantaged groups. Additionally, women who had a positive perception of the benefits of multivitamins were 1.7 times (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.3; P <.01) more likely than women who did not have a positive perception to ever use VitalDía, once the effects of social class were adjusted. Social marketing of multiple supplements reached resource-poor women and can be used to bridge gaps in access, improve awareness of supplementation as an option, and increase the likelihood that women will try supplements.

  1. Role of Pharmacogenetics in Improving the Safety of Psychiatric Care by Predicting the Potential Risks of Mania in CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers Diagnosed With Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Iglesias, Santiago; García-Solaesa, Virginia; García-Berrocal, Belén; Sanchez-Martín, Almudena; Lorenzo-Romo, Carolina; Martín-Pinto, Tomás; Gaedigk, Andrea; González-Buitrago, José Manuel; Isidoro-García, María

    2016-02-01

    One of the main concerns in psychiatric care is safety related to drug management. Pharmacogenetics provides an important tool to assess causes that may have contributed the adverse events during psychiatric therapy. This study illustrates the potential of pharmacogenetics to identify those patients for which pharmacogenetic-guided therapy could be appropriate. It aimed to investigate CYP2D6 genotype in our psychiatric population to assess the value of introducing pharmacogenetics as a primary improvement for predicting side effects.A broad series of 224 psychiatric patients comprising psychotic disorders, depressive disturbances, bipolar disorders, and anxiety disorders was included. The patients were genotyped with the AmpliChip CYP450 Test to analyzing 33 allelic variants of the CYP2D6 gene.All bipolar patients with poor metabolizer status showed maniac switching when CYP2D6 substrates such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed. No specific patterns were identified for adverse events for other disorders.We propose to utilize pharmacogenetic testing as an intervention to aid in the identification of patients who are at risk of developing affective switching in bipolar disorder treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CYP2D6 substrates, and inhibitors.

  2. Role of Pharmacogenetics in Improving the Safety of Psychiatric Care by Predicting the Potential Risks of Mania in CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers Diagnosed With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Iglesias, Santiago; García-Solaesa, Virginia; García-Berrocal, Belén; Sanchez-Martín, Almudena; Lorenzo-Romo, Carolina; Martín-Pinto, Tomás; Gaedigk, Andrea; González-Buitrago, José Manuel; Isidoro-García, María

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One of the main concerns in psychiatric care is safety related to drug management. Pharmacogenetics provides an important tool to assess causes that may have contributed the adverse events during psychiatric therapy. This study illustrates the potential of pharmacogenetics to identify those patients for which pharmacogenetic-guided therapy could be appropriate. It aimed to investigate CYP2D6 genotype in our psychiatric population to assess the value of introducing pharmacogenetics as a primary improvement for predicting side effects. A broad series of 224 psychiatric patients comprising psychotic disorders, depressive disturbances, bipolar disorders, and anxiety disorders was included. The patients were genotyped with the AmpliChip CYP450 Test to analyzing 33 allelic variants of the CYP2D6 gene. All bipolar patients with poor metabolizer status showed maniac switching when CYP2D6 substrates such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed. No specific patterns were identified for adverse events for other disorders. We propose to utilize pharmacogenetic testing as an intervention to aid in the identification of patients who are at risk of developing affective switching in bipolar disorder treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CYP2D6 substrates, and inhibitors. PMID:26871771

  3. Randomized controlled trial of a mobile phone intervention for improving adherence to naltrexone for alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Susan A; Arenella, Pamela B; Hendershot, Christian S

    2015-01-01

    Naltrexone is a front-line treatment for alcohol use disorders, but its efficacy is limited by poor medication adherence. This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether a mobile health intervention could improve naltrexone adherence. Treatment-seeking participants with an alcohol use disorder (N = 76) were randomized to intervention and control conditions. All participants received naltrexone (50 mg/day) with a medication event monitoring system (MEMS) and a prepaid smartphone, and received a daily text message querying medication side effects, alcohol use, and craving. Those in the intervention arm received additional medication reminders and adherence assessment via text message. The primary outcome, proportion of participants with adequate adherence (defined as ≥80% of prescribed doses taken through Week 8), did not differ between groups in intent-to-treat analyses (p = .34). Mean adherence at study midpoint (Week 4) was 83% in the intervention condition and 77% in the control condition (p = .35). Survival analysis found that the intervention group sustained adequate adherence significantly longer (M = 19 days [95% CI = 0.0-44.0]) than those in the control group (M = 3 days [95% CI = 0.0-8.1]) during the first month of treatment (p = .04). Medication adherence did not predict drinking outcomes. These results suggest that in the context of daily monitoring and assessment via cell phone, additional text message reminders do not further improve medication adherence. Although this initial trial does not provide support for the efficacy of text messaging to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy for alcohol use disorders, additional trials with larger samples and alternate designs are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349985.

  4. A community-based intervention in middle schools to improve HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Takenoshita, Remi; Narumoto, Keiichiro; Plegue, Melissa; Sen, Ananda; Crabtree, Benjamin Franklin; Fetters, Michael Derwin

    2014-01-01

    Japan has low rates of cervical cancer screening and Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. This research examines the effectiveness of a family medicine resident-led, intervention in increasing knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer in middle school-girls and increasing knowledge and intention to have cervical cancer screening in their mothers. We utilized a pre-test/post-test intervention design in three rural middle schools with 7(th) grade middle school-girls and their mothers. A school-based activity educated girls about HPV and cervical cancer. A home-based activity utilized a homework assignment for girls and their mothers. Pre/post intervention surveys were completed by the girls and their mothers. Major outcomes included changes in knowledge among girls and mothers and barriers to be screened for cervical cancer among mothers. Sixty-five students and sixty-three mothers completed the study. Two out five mothers were not in compliance with current screening recommendations. Identified barriers included: embarrassment (79%), poor access (56%), fear of having cancer (52%), and cervical cancer screening being an unknown procedure (46%). Forty-four percent of mothers deemed their daughters to be at risk for cervical cancer. Trusted sources of information included: doctors (97%), newspapers/television (89%), government (79%), the Internet (78%), and friends (62%). Student knowledge scores (7-point scale) improved significantly from pre- to post-intervention (4.8 vs. 5.9, p < 0.001). Knowledge scores (14-point scale) among mothers also significantly improved (11.7 vs. 12.0, p = 0.024). These data suggest a community-based intervention on a sensitive topic by family medicine residents can be implemented in middle schools, can improve school-girls' knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer, and can reach their mothers. Additional research could examine whether those intending to be screened receive screening and how to reach women who still resist

  5. Assessing the effectiveness of pharmacist-directed medication therapy management in improving diabetes outcomes in patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jeannine S; Poe, Brett; Hopper, Rebecca; Boyer, Alaina; Wilkins, Consuelo H

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare medication adherence rates and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) health outcomes in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM (A1C >7%) who had received pharmacist-directed medication therapy management (MTM) to those who had not received MTM. A retrospective review of 100 patient records was conducted. For the MTM group, a pharmacist engaged patients in patient-centered services to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Non-MTM patients received usual care. Outcomes were A1C, medication adherence, blood pressure, lipids, and creatinine. Group comparisons on clinical outcomes were analyzed before and after matching MTM and non-MTM patients on demographic characteristics. Before matching, the MTM group had a higher rate of medication adherence than the non-MTM group. The A1C levels were lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. Similarly, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. After matching, medication adherence rate remained higher in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. Similarly, A1C levels remained lower in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. There is a paucity of research focused on behavioral interventions for improving health outcomes in underserved communities. Our results advance the existing literature by demonstrating a positive association between pharmacist-directed MTM, medication adherence, and glycemic control in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM. A prospective pharmacy intervention and examination of long-term effects of MTM on medication adherence and T2DM health outcomes in this population is warranted. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. A two-year follow-up case of chronic fatigue syndrome: substantial improvement in personality following a yoga-based lifestyle intervention.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Sarvottam, Kumar; Magan, Dipti; Yadav, Rashmi

    2015-04-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized by excessive fatigue after minimal physical or mental exertion, muscle and joint pain, poor concentration, dizziness, and sleep disturbances. We report here the effect of a yoga-based lifestyle intervention in a 30-year old male patient with a documented diagnosis of CFS with compromised quality of life (QoL) and altered personality. The patient initially attended a short-term yoga-based lifestyle intervention program that consisted of yoga-postures, breathing exercises (pranayama), meditation, group discussions, and individualized advice on stress management, diet and physical activity besides group support. Thereafter, patient attended 5 more such programs. There was a notable and consistent improvement in his clinical profile, positive aspects of personality and subjective well-being, and reduction in anxiety following this yoga-based lifestyle intervention. Overall, the results suggest that lifestyle intervention may improve clinical condition and personality in patients with CFS.

  7. The Influence of National and Organizational Culture on the Use of Performance Improvement Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadivelu, Ramaswamy N.; Klein, James D.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the influence of national and organizational culture on the use of various performance improvement interventions. Data on intervention use were collected from practitioners in the United States and South Asia. Results revealed that orientation programs, organizational communication, instructor-led training, and…

  8. The Effectiveness of a Tablet Computer-Aided Intervention Program for Improving Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özbek, Ahmet Bilal; Girli, Alev

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a tablet computer-aided intervention program for improving reading fluency. It also investigates the opinions of students and parents about this intervention by using skill- and performance-based techniques, which have been investigated qualitatively. Three students with a learning…

  9. Parental involvement in interventions to improve child dietary intake: A systematic review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interventions that aim to improve child dietary quality and reduce disease risk often involve parents. The most effective methods to engage parents remain unclear. A systematic review of interventions designed to change child and adolescent dietary behavior was conducted to answer whether parent inv...

  10. Improving Below-Proficient Information Literacy Skills: Designing an Evidence-Based Educational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Melissa; Latham, Don; Armstrong, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the design and development of an educational intervention intended to improve information literacy skills based on research with first-year college students. The intervention was developed over the course of a three-year period, during which time grant funding was received from the Institute of Museum and Library Services…

  11. Improving Inappropriate Social Behavior of Autistic Students Using the LISTEN Intervention Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shammari, Zaid; Daniel, Cathy; Faulkner, Paula; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    A case study was conducted on the development of the LISTEN intervention strategy for use with autistic students to improve inappropriate social behaviors. The study was conducted in a special education classroom in an autism school in Kuwait. Examination of LISTEN Intervention Strategy applications included: duration of targeted behavior; methods…

  12. Effects of Simulated Interventions to Improve School Entry Academic Skills on Socioeconomic Inequalities in Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Mittinty, Murthy N.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lynch, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial evidence shows that interventions before age 5 can improve skills necessary for educational success; the effect of these interventions on socioeconomic inequalities is unknown. Using trial effect estimates, and marginal structural models with data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (n = 11,764,…

  13. How Can We Improve Preventive and Educational Interventions for Intimate Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, Thomas N.; Lavner, Justin A.

    2012-01-01

    Improving intimate relationships with preventive and educational interventions has proven to be more difficult than originally conceived, and earlier models and approaches may be reaching their limits. Basic concerns remain about the long-term effectiveness of these interventions, whether they are reaching and benefiting couples most likely to…

  14. The Influence of National and Organizational Culture on the Use of Performance Improvement Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadivelu, Ramaswamy N.; Klein, James D.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the influence of national and organizational culture on the use of various performance improvement interventions. Data on intervention use were collected from practitioners in the United States and South Asia. Results revealed that orientation programs, organizational communication, instructor-led training, and…

  15. How Can We Improve Preventive and Educational Interventions for Intimate Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, Thomas N.; Lavner, Justin A.

    2012-01-01

    Improving intimate relationships with preventive and educational interventions has proven to be more difficult than originally conceived, and earlier models and approaches may be reaching their limits. Basic concerns remain about the long-term effectiveness of these interventions, whether they are reaching and benefiting couples most likely to…

  16. Family Ties to Health Program: A Randomized Intervention to Improve Vegetable Intake in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Rachel G.; Tate, Deborah F.; Stevens, June; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Ward, Dianne S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a home-based intervention targeted toward parents to improve vegetable intake in preschool-aged children. Methods: Four-month feasibility study of home-based intervention consisting of 4 tailored newsletters and 2 motivational phone calls compared to control; 4 children's books for the control group; and measured pre and post…

  17. A cluster randomized trial of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention in Brazilian intensive care units: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Machado, Flavia; Bozza, Fernando; Ibrain, Jorge; Salluh, Figueira; Campagnucci, Valquiria Pelisser; Guimarães, Helio Penna; Normilio-Silva, Karina; Chiattone, Viviane Caetano; Vendramim, Patricia; Carrara, Fernanda; Lubarino, Juliana; da Silva, Aline Reis; Viana, Grazielle; Damiani, Lucas Petri; Romano, Edson; Teixeira, Cassiano; da Silva, Nilton Brandão; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Angus, Derek C; Berwanger, Otavio

    2015-01-13

    The uptake of evidence-based therapies in the intensive care environment is suboptimal, particularly in limited-resource countries. Checklists, daily goal assessments, and clinician prompts may improve compliance with best practice processes of care and, in turn, improve clinical outcomes. However, the available evidence on the effectiveness of checklists is unreliable and inconclusive, and the mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to evaluate whether the use of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention, including the use of a checklist and the definition of daily care goals during multidisciplinary daily rounds and clinician prompts, can improve the in-hospital mortality of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Our secondary objectives are to assess the effects of the study intervention on specific processes of care, clinical outcomes, and the safety culture and to determine which factors (the processes of care and/or safety culture) mediate the effect of the study intervention on mortality. This is a cluster randomized trial involving 118 ICUs in Brazil conducted in two phases. In the observational preparatory phase, we collect baseline data on processes of care and clinical outcomes from 60 consecutive patients with lengths of ICU stay longer than 48 h and apply the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to 75% or more of the health care staff in each ICU. In the randomized phase, we assign ICUs to the experimental or control arm and repeat data collection. Experimental arm ICUs receive the multifaceted quality improvement intervention, including a checklist and definition of daily care goals during daily multidisciplinary rounds, clinician prompting, and feedback on rates of adherence to selected care processes. Control arm ICUs maintain usual care. The primary outcome is in-hospital mortality, truncated at 60 days. Secondary outcomes include the rates of adherence to appropriate care processes, rates of other clinical outcomes, and scores

  18. Using instructional design process to improve design and development of Internet interventions.

    PubMed

    Hilgart, Michelle M; Ritterband, Lee M; Thorndike, Frances P; Kinzie, Mable B

    2012-06-28

    Given the wide reach and extensive capabilities of the Internet, it is increasingly being used to deliver comprehensive behavioral and mental health intervention and prevention programs. Their goals are to change user behavior, reduce unwanted complications or symptoms, and improve health status and health-related quality of life. Internet interventions have been found efficacious in addressing a wide range of behavioral and mental health problems, including insomnia, nicotine dependence, obesity, diabetes, depression, and anxiety. Despite the existence of many Internet-based interventions, there is little research to inform their design and development. A model for behavior change in Internet interventions has been published to help guide future Internet intervention development and to help predict and explain behavior changes and symptom improvement outcomes through the use of Internet interventions. An argument is made for grounding the development of Internet interventions within a scientific framework. To that end, the model highlights a multitude of design-related components, areas, and elements, including user characteristics, environment, intervention content, level of intervention support, and targeted outcomes. However, more discussion is needed regarding how the design of the program should be developed to address these issues. While there is little research on the design and development of Internet interventions, there is a rich, related literature in the field of instructional design (ID) that can be used to inform Internet intervention development. ID models are prescriptive models that describe a set of activities involved in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of instructional programs. Using ID process models has been shown to increase the effectiveness of learning programs in a broad range of contexts. ID models specify a systematic method for assessing the needs of learners (intervention users) to determine the gaps between current

  19. Using Instructional Design Process to Improve Design and Development of Internet Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hilgart, Michelle M; Thorndike, Frances P; Kinzie, Mable B

    2012-01-01

    Given the wide reach and extensive capabilities of the Internet, it is increasingly being used to deliver comprehensive behavioral and mental health intervention and prevention programs. Their goals are to change user behavior, reduce unwanted complications or symptoms, and improve health status and health-related quality of life. Internet interventions have been found efficacious in addressing a wide range of behavioral and mental health problems, including insomnia, nicotine dependence, obesity, diabetes, depression, and anxiety. Despite the existence of many Internet-based interventions, there is little research to inform their design and development. A model for behavior change in Internet interventions has been published to help guide future Internet intervention development and to help predict and explain behavior changes and symptom improvement outcomes through the use of Internet interventions. An argument is made for grounding the development of Internet interventions within a scientific framework. To that end, the model highlights a multitude of design-related components, areas, and elements, including user characteristics, environment, intervention content, level of intervention support, and targeted outcomes. However, more discussion is needed regarding how the design of the program should be developed to address these issues. While there is little research on the design and development of Internet interventions, there is a rich, related literature in the field of instructional design (ID) that can be used to inform Internet intervention development. ID models are prescriptive models that describe a set of activities involved in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of instructional programs. Using ID process models has been shown to increase the effectiveness of learning programs in a broad range of contexts. ID models specify a systematic method for assessing the needs of learners (intervention users) to determine the gaps between current

  20. Improving meat cutters' work: changes and effects following an intervention.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K; Karltun, J; Eklund, J; Engkvist, I-L

    2013-11-01

    Meat cutters face higher risks of injury and musculoskeletal problems than most other occupational groups. The aims of this paper were to describe ergonomics changes implemented in three meat cutting plants and to evaluate effects related to ergonomics on the individual meat cutters and their work. Data was collected by interviews, observations, document studies and a questionnaire (n = 247), as a post intervention study. The changes implemented consisted of reducing knife work to a maximum of 6 h per day and introducing a job rotation scheme with work periods of equal length. Tasks other than traditional meat cutting were added. A competence development plan for each meat cutter and easy adjustment of workplace height were introduced. The questionnaire showed a reduction in perceived physical work load. In general, the changes were perceived positively. Figures from the company showed a positive trend for injuries and sick leave. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. A systematic review of communication quality improvement interventions for patients with advanced and serious illness.

    PubMed

    Fawole, Oluwakemi A; Dy, Sydney M; Wilson, Renee F; Lau, Brandyn D; Martinez, Kathryn A; Apostol, Colleen C; Vollenweider, Daniela; Bass, Eric B; Aslakson, Rebecca A

    2013-04-01

    Effective communication is an interaction between two or more people that produces a desired effect and is a key element of quality of care for patients with advanced and serious illness and their family members. Suboptimal provider-patient/family communication is common, with negative effects on patient/family-centered outcomes. To systematically review the evidence for effectiveness of communication-related quality improvement interventions for patients with advanced and serious illness and to explore the effectiveness of consultative and integrative interventions. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane, and DARE from 2000 through December 2011 and reference list of eligible articles and reviews. Prospective, controlled quality improvement studies in populations with life-limiting or severe life-threatening illness with a primary intervention focus of improving communication with patients and/or families. Two investigators independently screened and abstracted data on patient/family-centered outcomes. We included 20 studies; 13 (65 %) were in intensive care. We found four intervention types: (1) family meetings with the usual team (11 studies, 77 % found improvement in healthcare utilization), (2) palliative care teams (5 studies, 50 % found improvement in healthcare utilization), (3) ethics consultation (2 studies, 100 % found improvement in healthcare utilization), and (4) physician-patient communication (2 studies, no significant improvement in healthcare utilization). Among studies addressing the outcomes of patient/family satisfaction, 22 % found improvement; among studies addressing healthcare utilization (e.g., length of stay), 73 % found improvement. Results suggest that consultative interventions, as opposed to integrative ones, may be more effective, but more research is needed. Study heterogeneity did not allow quantitative synthesis. Communication in the care of patients with advanced and serious illness can be improved using quality improvement

  2. Economic evaluation of mobile phone text message interventions to improve adherence to HIV therapy in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anik R.; Kessler, Jason; Braithwaite, R. Scott; Nucifora, Kimberly A.; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Zhou, Qinlian; Lester, Richard T.; Marra, Carlo A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: A surge in mobile phone availability has fueled low cost short messaging service (SMS) adherence interventions. Multiple systematic reviews have concluded that some SMS-based interventions are effective at improving antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, and they are hypothesized to improve retention in care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of SMS-based adherence interventions and explore the added value of retention benefits. Methods: We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of weekly SMS interventions compared to standard care among HIV+ individuals initiating ART for the first time in Kenya. We used an individual level micro-simulation model populated with data from two SMS-intervention trials, an East-African HIV+ cohort and published literature. We estimated average quality adjusted life years (QALY) and lifetime HIV-related costs from a healthcare perspective. We explored a wide range of scenarios and assumptions in one-way and multivariate sensitivity analyses. Results: We found that SMS-based adherence interventions were cost-effective by WHO standards, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $1,037/QALY. In the secondary analysis, potential retention benefits improved the cost-effectiveness of SMS intervention (ICER = $864/QALY). In multivariate sensitivity analyses, the interventions remained cost-effective in most analyses, but the ICER was highly sensitive to intervention costs, effectiveness and average cohort CD4 count at ART initiation. SMS interventions remained cost-effective in a test and treat scenario where individuals were assumed to initiate ART upon HIV detection. Conclusions: Effective SMS interventions would likely increase the efficiency of ART programs by improving HIV treatment outcomes at relatively low costs, and they could facilitate achievement of the UNAIDS goal of 90% viral suppression among those on ART by 2020. PMID:28207516

  3. NURSE-LED INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE SURROGATE DECISION MAKING FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CRITICAL ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas B.; Cua, Sarah Martin; Walk, Roberta; Pollice, Laura; Weissfeld, Lisa; Hong, Seoyeon; Landefeld, C. Seth; Arnold, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Problems persist with surrogate decision making in intensive care units, leading to distress for surrogates and treatment that may not reflect patients’ values. Objectives To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of a multifaceted, nurse-led intervention to improve surrogate decision making in intensive care units. Study Design A single-center, single-arm, interventional study in which 35 surrogates and 15 physicians received the Four Supports Intervention, which involved incorporating a family support specialist into the intensive care team. That specialist maintained a longitudinal relationship with surrogates and provided emotional support, communication support, decision support, and anticipatory grief support. A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate the intervention. Results The intervention was implemented successfully in all 15 patients, with a high level of completion of each component of the intervention. The family support specialist devoted a mean of 48 (SD 36) minutes per day to each clinician-patient-family triad. All participants reported that they would recommend the intervention to others. At least 90% of physicians and surrogates reported that the intervention (1) improved the quality and timeliness of communication, (2) facilitated discussion of the patient’s values and treatment preferences, and (3) improved the patient-centeredness of care. Conclusions The Four Supports Intervention is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived by physicians and surrogates to improve the quality of decision making and the patient-centeredness of care. A randomized trial is warranted to determine whether the intervention improves patient, family, and health system outcomes. PMID:23117903

  4. An educational intervention to increase "speaking-up" behaviors in nurses and improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Michelle M; McNeese-Smith, Donna; Leach, Linda Searle; Phillips, Linda R

    2012-01-01

    "Speaking up" is a critical component in improving patient safety. Studies indicate, though, that most registered nurses prefer using behaviors of avoidance or accommodation in conflict situations. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine whether an educational intervention using scenarios, personal reflection, and peer support in small groups could improve speaking-up behaviors in registered nurses. Results showed a significant difference in speaking-up behaviors and scores in the intervention group (P < .001).

  5. Factors contributing to the poor bulk behavior of meat and bone meal and methods for improving these behaviors.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R A; Flores, R A; Mazenko, C E

    2007-11-01

    Meat and bone meal (MBM), a product of the rendering industry, is a potential feedstock for numerous bio-based applications. Design of processing equipment for MBM is difficult due to MBM's bulk behaviors; it flows less easily than many other granular materials, and it tends to foul the surfaces of processing equipment. This study examines the major factors contributing to MBM's poor bulk behavior, including moisture content, fat content, particle size distribution and temperature, and the relative importance of these factors. Potential methods for improving MBM's bulk properties, including use of an anti-caking agent, dehydration, fat extraction, milling and refrigeration are also studied. The effects of these factors were determined by a standard laboratory measurement, the Hausner ratio, as well as by the rate of surface-fouling and dust generation using a pilot-scale aspirator. In contrast to past studies with other granular materials, moisture content was shown to have an insignificant effect on MBM's bulk behavior. The results, however, show that MBM fat content is a major determinant of the bulk behavior of the MBM. Reduction of fat content resulted in major changes in MBM's bulk behavior, by all measures used. Less dramatic changes were achieved through refrigeration to solidify the fat and/or treatment with an anti-caking agent.

  6. Novel polyvinylpyrrolidones to improve delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs: from design to synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Niemczyk, Anna I; Williams, Adrian C; Rawlinson-Malone, Clare F; Hayes, Wayne; Greenland, Barnaby W; Chappell, David; Khutoryanskaya, Olga; Timmins, Peter

    2012-08-06

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone is widely used in tablet formulations with the linear form acting as a wetting agent and disintegrant, whereas the cross-linked form is a superdisintegrant. We have previously reported that simply mixing the commercial cross-linked polymer with ibuprofen disrupted drug crystallinity with consequent improvements in drug dissolution behavior. In this study, we have designed and synthesized novel cross-linking agents containing a range of oligoether moieties that have then been polymerized with vinylpyrrolidone to generate a suite of novel excipients with enhanced hydrogen-bonding capabilities. The polymers have a porous surface and swell in the most common solvents and in water, properties that suggest their value as disintegrants. The polymers were evaluated in simple physical mixtures with ibuprofen as a model poorly water-soluble drug. The results show that the novel PVPs induce the drug to become "X-ray amorphous", which increased dissolution to a greater extent than that seen with commercial cross-linked PVP. The polymers stabilize the amorphous drug with no evidence for recrystallization seen after 20 weeks of storage.

  7. Improving fragmentation of poorly fragmenting peptides and phosphopeptides during collision-induced dissociation by malondialdehyde modification of arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Foettinger, Alexandra; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Despite significant technological and methodological advancements in peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, analyzing peptides that exhibit only poor fragmentation upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) remains a challenge. A major cause for unfavorable fragmentation is insufficient proton 'mobility' due to charge localization at strongly basic sites, in particular, the guanidine group of arginine. We have recently demonstrated that the conversion of the guanidine group of the arginine side chain by malondialdehyde (MDA) is a convenient tool to reduce the basicity of arginine residues and can have beneficial effects for peptide fragmentation. In the present work, we have focused on peptides that typically yield incomplete sequence information in CID-MS/MS experiments. Energy-resolved tandem MS experiments were carried out on angiotensins and arginine-containing phosphopeptides to study in detail the influence of the modification step on the fragmentation process. MDA modification dramatically improved the fragmentation behavior of peptides that exhibited only one or two dominant cleavages in their unmodified form. Neutral loss of phosphoric acid from phosphopeptides carrying phosphoserine and threonine residues was significantly reduced in favor of a higher abundance of fragment ions. Complementary experiments were carried out on three different instrumental platforms (triple-quadrupole, 3D ion trap, quadrupole-linear ion trap hybrid) to ascertain that the observation is a general effect.

  8. Factors That Influence Improvement in Numeracy, Reading, and Comprehension in the Context of a Numeracy Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dowker, Ann

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial 104 primary school children, who received an individualized numeracy intervention, Catch Up Numeracy, were compared with 100 children, who received matched-time teaching, and 107, who received business-as-usual teaching. They were assessed before and after intervention, on the Number Screening Test and on both the reading and comprehension components of the Salford Sentence Reading Test. Those who received the intervention improved significantly more than the controls in numeracy but not in reading or comprehension. Numeracy, reading, and comprehension scores were significantly correlated. Both reading and numeracy predicted improvement in comprehension, but only comprehension predicted improvement in reading, and neither literacy measure predicted improvement in numeracy. Children eligible for free school meals scored lower than others on all pre-tests and post-tests, but did not differ in their levels of improvement. Age negatively predicted improvement in reading and comprehension, but not numeracy. Gender affected comprehension but not reading or numeracy. PMID:28066278

  9. Quantifying accessibility and use of improved sanitation: towards a comprehensive indicator of the need for sanitation interventions

    PubMed Central

    Park, M. J.; Clements, A. C. A.; Gray, D. J.; Sadler, R.; Laksono, B.; Stewart, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent diseases associated with inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene, people needing latrines and behavioural interventions must be identified. We compared two indicators that could be used to identify those people. Indicator 1 of household latrine coverage was a simple Yes/No response to the question “Does your household have a latrine?” Indicator 2 was more comprehensive, combining questions about defecation behaviour with observations of latrine conditions. Using a standardized procedure and questionnaire, trained research assistants collected data from 6,599 residents of 16 rural villages in Indonesia. Indicator 1 identified 30.3% as not having a household latrine, while Indicator 2 identified 56.0% as using unimproved sanitation. Indicator 2 thus identified an additional 1,710 people who were missed by Indicator 1. Those 1,710 people were of lower socioeconomic status (p < 0.001), and a smaller percentage practiced appropriate hand-washing (p < 0.02). These results show how a good indicator of need for sanitation and hygiene interventions can combine evidences of both access and use, from self-reports and objective observation. Such an indicator can inform decisions about sanitation-related interventions and about scaling deworming programmes up or down. Further, a comprehensive and locally relevant indicator allows improved targeting to those most in need of a hygiene-behaviour intervention. PMID:27452598

  10. Improving Prospective Teachers' Knowledge about Scientific Models and Modelling: Design and evaluation of a teacher education intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danusso, Luciana; Testa, Italo; Vicentini, Matilde

    2010-05-01

    Evidence of the role of models in the teaching/learning process in science education is well documented in literature. A crucial role in this process is played by teachers. It is therefore important to design teacher education intervention focused on models and modelling. Although recognized as important by many authors, few attempts have been carried out and with a limited success. This paper reports of a three-year-long study whose aims can be summarized as follows: to investigate the knowledge of scientific models and modelling of physics, mathematics, and engineering prospective teachers; to explore the effectiveness of a research-based teacher education intervention aimed at improving knowledge about scientific models and modelling; to inspect the effects of a refinement process of the intervention based on a design-trial-redesign cycle. About 400 prospective teachers from two Italian universities were involved in the study. The results show that the knowledge about models and modelling of prospective teachers after the four- or five-year degree diploma is still rather poor and confused. On the other hand, the implementation results support the effectiveness of the designed intervention and of the refinement process. Implications which may give a contribution to more general research problems related to models and modelling in science education are also discussed.

  11. New Directions in Social Psychological Interventions to Improve Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy D.; Buttrick, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to improve student achievement typically focus on changing the educational environment (e.g., better schools, better teachers) or on personal characteristics of students (e.g., intelligence, self-control). The 6 articles in this special issue showcase an additional approach, emanating from social psychology, which focuses on students'…

  12. New Directions in Social Psychological Interventions to Improve Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy D.; Buttrick, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to improve student achievement typically focus on changing the educational environment (e.g., better schools, better teachers) or on personal characteristics of students (e.g., intelligence, self-control). The 6 articles in this special issue showcase an additional approach, emanating from social psychology, which focuses on students'…

  13. Improving General Intelligence with a Nutrient-Based Pharmacological Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stough, Con; Camfield, David; Kure, Christina; Tarasuik, Joanne; Downey, Luke; Lloyd, Jenny; Zangara, Andrea; Scholey, Andrew; Reynolds, Josh

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancing substances such as amphetamine and modafinil have become popular in recent years to improve acute cognitive performance particularly in environments in which enhanced cognition or intelligence is required. Nutraceutical nootropics, which are natural substances that have the ability to bring about acute or chronic changes in…

  14. Improving General Intelligence with a Nutrient-Based Pharmacological Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stough, Con; Camfield, David; Kure, Christina; Tarasuik, Joanne; Downey, Luke; Lloyd, Jenny; Zangara, Andrea; Scholey, Andrew; Reynolds, Josh

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancing substances such as amphetamine and modafinil have become popular in recent years to improve acute cognitive performance particularly in environments in which enhanced cognition or intelligence is required. Nutraceutical nootropics, which are natural substances that have the ability to bring about acute or chronic changes in…

  15. Insulin glargine improves hemoglobin A1c in children and adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anne; Ternand, Christine; Brunzell, Carol; Kleinschmidt, Teresa; Dew, Dawn; Milla, Carlos; Moran, Antoinette

    2003-06-01

    The pediatric diabetes team at the University of Minnesota made a clinical decision to switch patients with type 1 diabetes with a hemoglobin A1c level greater than 8.0% to insulin glargine in an effort to improve glycemic control. Retrospective chart analysis was performed on 37 patients 6 months after the switch to insulin glargine therapy. After 6 months, the average hemoglobin A1c level in the entire cohort dropped from 10.1 +/- 2.0 to 8.9 +/- 1.6% (p = 0.001). Thirty patients responded with an average hemoglobin A1c drop of 1.7 +/- 1.5%, from 10.3 +/- 2.2 to 8.6 +/- 1.5% (p < 0.001). Seven patients did not respond to insulin glargine therapy, with an average hemoglobin A1c rise of 1.0 +/- 0.8% from a baseline of 9.5 +/- 1.0% to 10.4 +/- 1.4% (p = 0.01). The greatest response was seen in children with an A1c > 12.0%, who dropped their hemoglobin A1c by 3.5 +/- 1.9%. Compared with responders, non-responders had significantly less contact with the diabetes team in the form of clinic visits and telephone conversations both before and after initiation of glargine therapy. Sixty-two per cent of patients received insulin glargine at lunchtime, when injections could be supervised at school. Three episodes of severe hypoglycemia occurred after initiation of insulin glargine therapy. Insulin glargine substantially improved glycemic control in children and adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. This response was most remarkable in those with a baseline hemoglobin A1c level > 12.0%, and may have been related to increased supervision of injections.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of health belief model interventions in improving adherence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christina Jane; Smith, Helen; Llewellyn, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Lack of adherence to health-promoting advice challenges the successful prevention and management of many conditions. The Health Belief Model (HBM) was developed in 1966 to predict health-promoting behaviour and has been used in patients with wide variety of disease. The HBM has also been used to inform the development of interventions to improve health behaviours. Several reviews have documented the HBM's performance in predicting behaviour, but no review has addressed its utility in the design of interventions or the efficacy of these interventions. A systematic review was conducted to identify interventional studies which use the HBM as the theoretical basis for intervention design. The HBM has been used continuously in the development of behaviour change interventions for 40 years. Of 18 eligible studies, 14 (78%) reported significant improvements in adherence, with 7 (39%) showing moderate to large effects. However, only six studies used the HBM in its entirety and five different studies measured health beliefs as outcomes. Intervention success appeared to be unrelated to HBM construct addressed challenging the utility of this model as the theoretical basis for adherence-enhancing interventions. Interventions need to be described in full to allow for the identification of effective components and replication of studies.

  17. Internet Interventions for Improving Psychological Well-Being in Psycho-Oncology: Review and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Leykin, Yan; Thekdi, Seema M.; Shumay, Dianne M.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.; Riba, Michelle; Dunn, Laura B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Too few cancer patients and survivors receive evidence-based interventions for mental health symptoms. This review examines the potential for Internet interventions to help fill treatment gaps in psychosocial oncology and presents evidence regarding the likely utility of Internet interventions for cancer patients. Methods The authors examined available literature regarding Internet interventions tailored to cancer patients’ mental health needs, and reviewed elements of Internet interventions for mental health relevant to advancing psycho-oncology Internet intervention research. Recommendations for research methods for Internet interventions are described. Results Relatively few rigorous studies focusing on mental health of cancer patients have been conducted online. A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy, accessibility, and acceptability of mental health Internet interventions for a variety of general and medical patient populations. The authors present recommendations and guidelines to assist researchers in developing, testing, and disseminating Internet interventions for cancer patients and survivors, to manage and improve their mental health. Issues unique to Internet interventions—including intervention structure, customization, provider interaction, and privacy and confidentiality issues—are discussed. These guidelines are offered as a step toward establishing a set of “best practices” for Internet interventions in psycho-oncology, and to generate further discussion regarding the goals of such interventions and their place in cancer care. Conclusions Internet interventions have the potential to fill an important gap in quality cancer care by augmenting limited available mental health services. These interventions should be developed in a manner consistent with best practices and must be empirically tested and validated. PMID:21608075

  18. Interventions to Improve Sexually Transmitted Disease Screening in Clinic-Based Settings.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Melanie M; Frasure-Williams, Jessica; Burnett, Phyllis; Park, Ina U

    2016-02-01

    The asymptomatic nature and suboptimal screening rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) call for implementation of successful interventions to improve screening in community-based clinic settings with attention to cost and resources. We used MEDLINE to systematically review comparative analyses of interventions to improve STD (chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis) screening or rescreening in clinic-based settings that were published between January 2000 and January 2014. Absolute differences in the percent of the target population screened between comparison groups or relative percent increase in the number of tests or patients tested were used to score the interventions as highly effective (>20% increase) or moderately effective (5%-19% increase) in improving screening. Published cost of the interventions was described where available and, when not available, was estimated. Of the 4566 citations reviewed, 38 articles describing 42 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Of the 42 interventions, 16 (38.1%) were categorized as highly effective and 14 (33.3%) as moderately effective. Effective low-cost interventions (<$1000) included the strategic placement of specimen collection materials or automatic collection of STD specimens as part of a routine visit (7 highly effective and 1 moderately effective) and the use of electronic health records (EHRs; 3 highly effective and 4 moderately effective). Patient reminders for screening or rescreening (via text, telephone, and postcards) were highly effective (3) or moderately effective (2) and low or moderate cost (<$1001-10,000). Interventions with dedicated clinic staff to improve STD screening were highly effective (2) or moderately effective in improving STD screening (1) but high-cost ($10,001-$100,000). Successful interventions include changing clinic flow to routinely collect specimens for testing, using EHR screening reminders, and reminding patients to get screened or rescreened. These strategies can be

  19. A randomized clinical trial of a coping improvement group intervention for HIV-infected older adults

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan; Kochman, Arlene; Heh, Victor; Neufeld, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    This research tested if a 12-session coping improvement group intervention (n = 104) reduced depressive symptoms in HIV-infected older adults compared to an interpersonal support group intervention (n = 105) and an individual therapy upon request (ITUR) control condition (n = 86). Participants were 295 HIV-infected men and women 50-plus years of age living in New York City, Cincinnati, OH, and Columbus, OH. Using A-CASI assessment methodology, participants provided data on their depressive symptoms using the Geriatric Depression Screening Scale (GDS) at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 4- and 8-month follow-up. Whether conducted with all participants (N = 295) or only a subset of participants diagnosed with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms (N = 171), mixed models analyses of repeated measures found that both coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants reported fewer depressive symptoms than ITUR controls at post-intervention, 4-month follow-up, and 8-month follow-up. The effect sizes of the differences between the two active interventions and the control group were greater when outcome analyses were limited to those participants with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms. At no assessment period did coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants differ in depressive symptoms. PMID:20857188

  20. A randomized clinical trial of a coping improvement group intervention for HIV-infected older adults.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Hansen, Nathan; Kochman, Arlene; Heh, Victor; Neufeld, Sharon

    2011-04-01

    This research tested if a 12-session coping improvement group intervention (n = 104) reduced depressive symptoms in HIV-infected older adults compared to an interpersonal support group intervention (n = 105) and an individual therapy upon request (ITUR) control condition (n = 86). Participants were 295 HIV-infected men and women 50-plus years of age living in New York City, Cincinnati, OH, and Columbus, OH. Using A-CASI assessment methodology, participants provided data on their depressive symptoms using the Geriatric Depression Screening Scale (GDS) at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 4- and 8-month follow-up. Whether conducted with all participants (N = 295) or only a subset of participants diagnosed with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms (N = 171), mixed models analyses of repeated measures found that both coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants reported fewer depressive symptoms than ITUR controls at post-intervention, 4-month follow-up, and 8-month follow-up. The effect sizes of the differences between the two active interventions and the control group were greater when outcome analyses were limited to those participants with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms. At no assessment period did coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants differ in depressive symptoms.

  1. Interventions to improve management of anxiety disorders in general practice: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heideman, Jantien; van Rijswijk, Eric; van Lin, Nieke; de Loos, Sandra; Laurant, Miranda; Wensing, Michel; van de Lisdonk, Eloy; Grol, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common in general practice and are associated with several problems regarding recognition and management. Aim To systematically evaluate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving recognition, diagnosis, and management of patients with anxiety disorders. Design of study Systematic review. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Clinical Trials' Register were searched up until 2003. Randomised controlled trials, controlled before/after trials, and interrupted time series for professional, organisational, financial, and regulatory interventions were eligible. Primary effect measures consisted of anxiety outcomes, diagnosis, prescription, and referral. Two reviewers independently made eligibility judgments: eight out of 563 articles were found to be eligible. Two reviewers participated independently in the quality assessment and data extraction process using a standardised form based on the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care checklist. Relative risks or standardised mean differences were calculated when possible. Results Four professional interventions and three organisational interventions were examined. In general, the professional interventions seemed to increase recognition, referral, and prescription as well as improving anxiety outcomes. Two out of three organisational interventions showed a positive effect on anxiety outcomes. The one study that took prescription into account showed no effect. Conclusions The quality of care for patients with anxiety can be improved. A combination of professional and organisational interventions in which an external expert is introduced seems to be most promising. Additional research is nevertheless necessary to determine the exact effects of such interventions using patient effect measures, economic evaluations, and feasibility studies. PMID:16282004

  2. Interventions aimed at improving the ability to use everyday technology in work after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte; Prellwitz, Maria; Malinowsky, Camilla; Larsson-Lund, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe how client-centred occupational therapy interventions may support and improve the ability to use everyday technology (ET) in work tasks in people with acquired brain injury (ABI). A qualitative, descriptive multiple-case study was designed, and occupation-based interventions were provided to three working-age participants with ABI. Multiple sources were used to collect data throughout the three intervention processes, including assessments, field notes, and interviews. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment were administered before the interventions, after the interventions and at a follow-up session 2-3 months subsequent to the interventions. The three intervention processes initially consisted of similar actions, but subsequently the actions took on a different focus and intensity for each case. All of the goals in each of the three case processes were achieved, and both perceived and observed abilities to use ET in work tasks improved. Client-centred occupational therapy interventions might have the potential to improve the ability to use ET in work tasks in people with ABI.

  3. Nurse-Led Self-Management Educational Intervention Improves Symptoms of Patients With Functional Constipation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiong; Zhu, Hongqin; Jiang, Guixiang; Liu, Xueqin

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of self-management educational intervention on the symptoms of patients with functional constipation. From January 2014 to April 2015, 66 patients with functional constipation were randomly assigned into intervention group receiving intensive educational interventions and control group receiving routine nursing care. The constipation score of all clinical symptoms (Bristol stool form scale, defecation interval, incomplete evacuation, evacuatory difficulty) at 1 month postdischarge were all significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group (all, p < .05). At 1 month postdischarge, the intervention group had a significantly higher proportion of patients with good health habits (reasonable diet, regular exercise, good defecation habits, proper use of laxatives) as compared with the control group (all, p < .05). These data suggest educational intervention can effectively improve constipation symptoms and compliance with treatment of patients, and lead to the development of good health habits.

  4. Teachers' Perspectives on a Professional Development Intervention to Improve Science Instruction Among English Language Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Okhee; Adamson, Karen; Maerten-Rivera, Jaime; Lewis, Scott; Thornton, Constance; Leroy, Kathryn

    2008-02-01

    Our 5-year professional development intervention is designed to promote elementary teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and practices in teaching science, along with English language and mathematics for English Language Learning (ELL) students in urban schools. In this study, we used an end-of-year questionnaire as a primary data source to seek teachers’ perspectives on our intervention during the first year of implementation. Teachers believed that the intervention, including curriculum materials and teacher workshops, effectively promoted students’ science learning, along with English language development and mathematics learning. Teachers highlighted strengths and areas needing improvement in the intervention. Teachers’ perspectives have been incorporated into our on-going intervention efforts and offer insights into features of effective professional development initiatives in improving science achievement for all students.

  5. Improvements in Child Behavior and Family Mealtime Environment After an Intensive Behavioral Feeding Intervention.

    PubMed

    Seiverling, Laura; Hendy, Helen M; Yusupova, Stella

    2016-08-31

    The present study examined changes in child and family mealtime patterns before and after intensive behavioral feeding intervention at a multidisciplinary hospital-based program for 50 children. At preintervention and postintervention, caregivers completed surveys to report child feeding goals and the About Your Child's Eating scale (AYCE). In addition, at postintervention, each caregiver rated intervention effectiveness for his or her child's feeding goals identified at preintervention and provided intervention satisfaction ratings. Results revealed that caregivers perceived all three AYCE family mealtime patterns to improve from preintervention to postintervention, the majority of caregivers rated intervention as being effective for improving the specific child feeding goals identified at preintervention, and caregivers gave high satisfaction ratings for the intervention.

  6. Assessing the population health impact of market interventions to improve access to antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Bärnighausen, Till; Kyle, Margaret; Salomon, Joshua A; Waning, Brenda

    2012-09-01

    Despite extraordinary global progress in increasing coverage of antiretroviral treatment (ART), the majority of people needing ART currently are not receiving treatment. Both the number of people needing ART and the average ART price per patient-year are expected to increase in coming years, which will dramatically raise funding needs for ART. Several international organizations are using interventions in ART markets to decrease ART price or to improve ART quality, delivery and innovation, with the ultimate goal of improving population health. These organizations need to select those market interventions that are most likely to substantially affect population health outcomes (ex ante assessment) and to evaluate whether implemented interventions have improved health outcomes (ex post assessment). We develop a framework to structure ex ante and ex post assessment of the population health impact of market interventions, which is transmitted through effects in markets and health systems. Ex ante assessment should include evaluation of the safety and efficacy of the ART products whose markets will be affected by the intervention; theoretical consideration of the mechanisms through which the intervention will affect population health; and predictive modelling to estimate the potential population health impact of the intervention. For ex post assessment, analysts need to consider which outcomes to estimate empirically and which to model based on empirical findings and understanding of the economic and biological mechanisms along the causal pathway from market intervention to population health. We discuss methods for ex post assessment and analyse assessment issues (unintended intervention effects, interaction effects between different interventions, and assessment impartiality and cost). We offer seven recommendations for ex ante and ex post assessment of population health impact of market interventions.

  7. Uptake and effectiveness of a community pharmacy intervention programme to improve asthma management.

    PubMed

    Bereznicki, B J; Peterson, G; Jackson, S; Walters, E H; George, J; Stewart, K; March, G J

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacists frequently see patients with asthma in the community who have suboptimal management. This study aimed to compare the uptake and effectiveness of pharmacist-initiated mailed and face-to-face interventions for patients whose asthma may not be well managed. Seventy-one community pharmacies in South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria (Australia) installed a software application that data-mined dispensing records, generating a list of patients who had received six or more asthma reliever inhalers in the preceding 12 months. The pharmacists were randomized, by pharmacy, to perform either a mailed or face-to-face intervention, whereby these patients received educational material and a referral to their general practitioner (GP) for an asthma management review. Matching patients from each pharmacy were also randomly assigned to a control group for 'usual care'. A total of 1483 patients were identified and grouped as follows: 510 (34·4%) mailed intervention, 480 (32·4%) face-to-face intervention and 493 (33·2%) controls. Significantly fewer face-to-face interventions were offered than mailed interventions (66·6% vs. 89·4%, respectively; χ(2) = 64·2, P < 0·0001). There were significant improvements in the preventer-to-reliever ratio after the intervention period (P < 0·0001) in each group. In a per-protocol analysis, the magnitude of improvement in the face-to-face intervention group was greater than in the mailed intervention group. The reverse was true in an intention-to-treat analysis. The improvement in the P : R ratios was mainly due to significant decreases in reliever usage. Community pharmacy dispensing records can effectively identify patients with suboptimal asthma management, who can then be referred to their GP for review. Time constraints in busy pharmacies may limit the uptake and effectiveness of face-to-face interventions in the 'real world' setting, making mailed interventions an attractive option. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Assessing the population health impact of market interventions to improve access to antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Kyle, Margaret; Salomon, Joshua A; Waning, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Despite extraordinary global progress in increasing coverage of antiretroviral treatment (ART), the majority of people needing ART currently are not receiving treatment. Both the number of people needing ART and the average ART price per patient-year are expected to increase in coming years, which will dramatically raise funding needs for ART. Several international organizations are using interventions in ART markets to decrease ART price or to improve ART quality, delivery and innovation, with the ultimate goal of improving population health. These organizations need to select those market interventions that are most likely to substantially affect population health outcomes (ex ante assessment) and to evaluate whether implemented interventions have improved health outcomes (ex post assessment). We develop a framework to structure ex ante and ex post assessment of the population health impact of market interventions, which is transmitted through effects in markets and health systems. Ex ante assessment should include evaluation of the safety and efficacy of the ART products whose markets will be affected by the intervention; theoretical consideration of the mechanisms through which the intervention will affect population health; and predictive modelling to estimate the potential population health impact of the intervention. For ex post assessment, analysts need to consider which outcomes to estimate empirically and which to model based on empirical findings and understanding of the economic and biological mechanisms along the causal pathway from market intervention to population health. We discuss methods for ex post assessment and analyse assessment issues (unintended intervention effects, interaction effects between different interventions, and assessment impartiality and cost). We offer seven recommendations for ex ante and ex post assessment of population health impact of market interventions. PMID:21914713

  9. Cost effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention to improve HIV medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High levels of adherence to medications for HIV infection are essential for optimal clinical outcomes and to reduce viral transmission, but many patients do not achieve required levels. Clinician-delivered interventions can improve patients’ adherence, but usually require substantial effort by trained individuals and may not be widely available. Computer-delivered interventions can address this problem by reducing required staff time for delivery and by making the interventions widely available via the Internet. We previously developed a computer-delivered intervention designed to improve patients’ level of health literacy as a strategy to improve their HIV medication adherence. The intervention was shown to increase patients’ adherence, but it was not clear that the benefits resulting from the increase in adherence could justify the costs of developing and deploying the intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation of development and deployment costs to the effectiveness of the intervention. Methods Costs of intervention development were drawn from accounting reports for the grant under which its development was supported, adjusted for costs primarily resulting from the project’s research purpose. Effectiveness of the intervention was drawn from results of the parent study. The relation of the intervention’s effects to changes in health status, expressed as utilities, was also evaluated in order to assess the net cost of the intervention in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Sensitivity analyses evaluated ranges of possible intervention effectiveness and durations of its effects, and costs were evaluated over several deployment scenarios. Results The intervention’s cost effectiveness depends largely on the number of persons using it and the duration of its effectiveness. Even with modest effects for a small number of patients the intervention was associated with net cost savings in some scenarios and for

  10. Increased Needle Nitrogen Contents Did Not Improve Shoot Photosynthetic Performance of Mature Nitrogen-Poor Scots Pine Trees

    PubMed Central

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Lutz, Martina; Räntfors, Mats; Näsholm, Torgny; Wallin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that temperate and boreal forests are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. However, few studies have provided a detailed account of how carbon (C) acquisition of such forests reacts to increasing N supply. We combined measurements of needle-scale biochemical photosynthetic capacities and continuous observations of shoot-scale photosynthetic performance from several canopy positions with simple mechanistic modeling to evaluate the photosynthetic responses of mature N-poor boreal Pinus sylvestris to N fertilization. The measurements were carried out in August 2013 on 90-year-old pine trees growing at Rosinedalsheden research site in northern Sweden. In spite of a nearly doubling of needle N content in response to the fertilization, no effect on the long-term shoot-scale C uptake was recorded. This lack of N-effect was due to strong light limitation of photosynthesis in all investigated canopy positions. The effect of greater N availability on needle photosynthetic capacities was also constrained by development of foliar phosphorus (P) deficiency following N addition. Thus, P deficiency and accumulation of N in arginine appeared to contribute toward lower shoot-scale nitrogen-use efficiency in the fertilized trees, thereby additionally constraining tree-scale responses to increasing N availability. On the whole our study suggests that the C uptake response of the studied N-poor boreal P. sylvestris stand to enhanced N availability is constrained by the efficiency with which the additional N is utilized. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the ability of the trees to use the greater N availability for additional light capture. For stands that have not reached canopy closure, increase in leaf area following N fertilization would be the most effective way for improving light capture and C uptake while for mature stands an increased leaf area may have a rather limited effect on light capture owing to increased self-shading. This raises the

  11. Can patient involvement improve patient safety? A cluster randomised control trial of the Patient Reporting and Action for a Safe Environment (PRASE) intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca; Sheard, Laura; Armitage, Gerry; Cocks, Kim; Buckley, Hannah; Corbacho, Belen; Reynolds, Caroline; Marsh, Claire; Moore, Sally; Watt, Ian; Wright, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of the Patient Reporting and Action for a Safe Environment intervention. Design A multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Clusters were 33 hospital wards within five hospitals in the UK. Participants All patients able to give informed consent were eligible to take part. Wards were allocated to the intervention or control condition. Intervention The ward-level intervention comprised two tools: (1) a questionnaire that asked patients about factors contributing to safety (patient measure of safety (PMOS)) and (2) a proforma for patients to report both safety concerns and positive experiences (patient incident reporting tool). Feedback was considered in multidisciplinary action planning meetings. Measurements Primary outcomes were routinely collected ward-level harm-free care (HFC) scores and patient-level feedback on safety (PMOS). Results Intervention uptake and retention of wards was 100% and patient participation was high (86%). We found no significant effect of the intervention on any outcomes at 6 or 12 months. However, for new harms (ie, those for which the wards were directly accountable) intervention wards did show greater, though non-significant, improvement compared with control wards. Analyses also indicated that improvements were largest for wards that showed the greatest compliance with the intervention. Limitations Adherence to the intervention, particularly the implementation of action plans, was poor. Patient safety outcomes may represent too blunt a measure. Conclusions Patients are willing to provide feedback about the safety of their care. However, we were unable to demonstrate any overall effect of this intervention on either measure of patient safety and therefore cannot recommend this intervention for wider uptake. Findings indicate promise for increasing HFC where wards implement ≥75% of the intervention components. Trial registration number ISRCTN07689702; pre-results. PMID:28159854

  12. Improving management of type 2 diabetes in South Asian patients: a systematic review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Bhurji, N; Javer, J; Gasevic, D; Khan, N A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Optimal control of type 2 diabetes is challenging in many patient populations including in South Asian patients. We systematically reviewed studies on the effect of diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asian patients with type 2 diabetes on glycaemic control. Design Systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and pre-post-test studies (January 1990 to February 2014). Studies were stratified by where interventions were conducted (South Asia vs Western countries). Participants Patients originating from Pakistan, Bangladesh or India with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcome Change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary end points included change in blood pressure, lipid levels, anthropomorphics and knowledge. Results 23 studies (15 RCTs) met criteria for analysis with 7 from Western countries (n=2532) and 16 from South Asia (n=1081). Interventions in Western countries included translated diabetes education, additional clinical care, written materials, visual aids, and bilingual community-based peers and/or health professionals. Interventions conducted in South Asia included yoga, meditation or exercise, community-based peers, health professionals and dietary education (cooking exercises). Among RCTs in India (5 trials; n=390), 4 demonstrated significant reductions in HbA1c in the intervention group compared with usual care (yoga and exercise interventions). Among the 4 RCTs conducted in Europe (n=2161), only 1 study, an education intervention of 113 patients, reported a significant reduction in HbA1c with the intervention. Lipids, blood pressure and knowledge improved in both groups with studies from India more often reporting reductions in body mass index and waist circumference. Conclusions Overall, there was little improvement in HbA1c level in diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asians living in Europe compared with usual care, although other outcomes did improve. The

  13. Improving Executive Function and its Neurobiological Mechanisms through a Mindfulness-Based Intervention: Advances within the Field of Developmental Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Yang, Lizhu; Leve, Leslie D; Harold, Gordon T

    2012-12-01

    Poor executive function (EF) has been associated with a host of short- and long-term problems across the lifespan, including elevated rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, drug abuse, and antisocial behavior. Mindfulness-based interventions that focus on increasing awareness of one's thoughts, emotions, and actions have been shown to improve specific aspects of EF, including attention, cognitive control, and emotion regulation. In this article, we apply a developmental neuroscience perspective to review research relevant to one specific mindfulness-based intervention, Integrative Body-Mind Training (IBMT). Randomized controlled trials of IBMT indicate improvements in specific EF components, and uniquely highlight the role of neural circuitry specific to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) as two brain-based mechanisms that underlie IBMT-related improvements. The relevance of improving specific dimensions of EF through short-term IBMT to prevent a cascade of risk behaviors for children and adolescents is described and future research directions are proposed.

  14. Systematic Review of Educational Interventions to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence: an update in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Dayno, Megan; Robin, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the current state of the research on educational interventions whose aim is to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Methods A systematic review of Pubmed, Embase and CINAHL was conducted to identify research studies evaluating educational interventions to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Studies were included if the intervention was described, the outcomes assessed glaucoma medication adherence, and the focus of the research was on adults with glaucoma. The search was conducted on June 2, 2015. Results Seventeen studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. These included nine randomized controlled trials and eight observational studies. Eight of the studies demonstrated an impact on glaucoma medication adherence, though their outcome measures were too heterogeneous to estimate a pooled effect size.. Conclusion The interventions that successfully improved glaucoma medication adherence used an adequate dose of face-to-face counseling to overcome barriers to health behavior change alongside education about glaucoma. PMID:27134639

  15. Are parenting interventions effective in improving the relationship between mothers and their preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Evans, Tracey; Whittingham, Koa; Sanders, Matthew; Colditz, Paul; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-05-01

    To systematically review the efficacy of parenting interventions in improving the quality of the relationship between mothers and preterm infants. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCT) of parenting interventions for mothers of preterm infants where mother-infant relationship quality outcomes were reported. Databases searched: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria, 14 with strong methodological quality. Eight parenting interventions were found to improve the quality of the mother-preterm infant relationship. Heterogeneity of the interventions calls for an integrated new parenting program focusing on cue-based, responsive care from the mother to her preterm infant to improve the quality of the relationship for these mother-preterm infant dyads. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Systematic Review of Community Interventions to Improve Aboriginal Child Passenger Safety

    PubMed Central

    Oudie, Eugenia; Desapriya, Ediriweera; Turcotte, Kate; Pike, Ian

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated evidence of community interventions to improve Aboriginal child passenger safety (CPS) in terms of its scientific merit and cultural relevance. We included studies if they reported interventions to improve CPS in Aboriginal communities, compared at least pre- and postintervention conditions, and evaluated rates and severity of child passenger injuries, child restraint use, or knowledge of CPS. We also appraised quality and cultural relevance of studies. Study quality was associated with community participation and cultural relevance. Strong evidence showed that multicomponent interventions tailored to each community improves CPS. Interventions in Aboriginal communities should incorporate Aboriginal views of health, involve the community, and be multicomponent and tailored to the community’s circumstances and culture. PMID:24754652

  17. The effectiveness of social marketing interventions for health improvement: what's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ross; McDermott, Laura; Stead, Martine; Angus, Kathryn

    2006-12-01

    To review the effectiveness of social marketing interventions designed to improve diet, increase physical activity, and tackle substance misuse. This article describes three reviews of systematic reviews and primary studies that evaluate social marketing effectiveness. All three reviews used pre-defined search and inclusion criteria and defined social marketing interventions as those which adopted six key social marketing principles. The reviews provide evidence that social marketing interventions can be effective in improving diet, increasing exercise, and tackling the misuse of substances like alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs. There is evidence that social marketing interventions can work with a range of target groups, in different settings, and can work upstream as well as with individuals. Social marketing provides a very promising framework for improving health both at the individual level and at wider environmental and policy-levels. Problems with research design, lack of conceptual understanding or implementation are valid research concerns.

  18. A randomized trial of an intervention to improve resident-fellow teaching interactions on the wards.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shruti; Alladina, Jehan; Heaton, Kevin; Miloslavsky, Eli

    2016-10-20

    Subspecialty fellows can serve as a tremendous educational resource to residents; however, there are multiple barriers to an effective resident-fellow teaching interaction in the setting of inpatient consultation. We designed and evaluated a resident-directed intervention to enhance communication and teaching during consultation on the general medicine wards. Five medical teams were randomized to receive the intervention over a 3 month period (3 control, 2 intervention teams). The intervention was evaluated with pre and post-intervention surveys. Fifty-nine of 112 interns completed the pre-intervention survey, and 58 completed the post-intervention survey (53 % response rate). At baseline, 83 % of the interns noted that they had in-person interactions with fellows less than 50 % of the time. 81 % responded that they received teaching from fellows in less than 50 % of consultations. Following the intervention, the percentage of interns who had an in-person interaction with fellows greater than 50 % of the time increased in the intervention group (9 % control versus 30 % intervention, p = 0.05). Additionally, interns in the intervention group reported receiving teaching in more than 50 % of their interactions more frequently (19 % control versus 42 % intervention, p = 0.05). There were no differences in other measures of teaching and communication. We demonstrate that a time-efficient intervention increased perceptions of in-person communication and the number of teaching interactions between interns and fellows. Further studies are warranted to determine whether such an approach can impact resident learning and improve patient care.

  19. Behavioral Interventions to Improve Performance in Collegiate Football

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shannon L; Ward, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Using a multitreatment withdrawal design, this study evaluated the differential effects of publicly posted plus verbal feedback, goal setting plus verbal feedback, and publicly posted feedback, verbal feedback, and goal setting together on the performance of 3 collegiate football players in practice scrimmages. Also assessed was whether the changes in practice behavior generalized to games. The dependent variables were performances on three wide receiver skills. The results show that public posting with verbal feedback, goal setting, and public posting with verbal feedback and goal setting were effective in improving player performance to a 90% criterion level during practice, and these changes generalized to game performance. PMID:17020220

  20. Improving general practitioner clinical records with a quality assurance minimal intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Del Mar, C B; Lowe, J B; Adkins, P; Arnold, E; Baade, P

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although good medical records have been associated with good care, there is considerable room for their improvement in general practice. AIM: To improve the quality of general practice medical records at minimal cost. METHOD: A total of 150 randomly sampled general practitioners (GPs) in suburban Brisbane, Australia, were randomized in a controlled trial to receive or not receive an intervention. The intervention consisted of 6 to 12 one-hour monthly meetings when the pairs of GPs assessed samples of each other's medical records using a 12-item instrument. This was developed previously by a process of consensus of general practice teachers. Mean scores of 10 medical records selected at random from before the intervention started and one year later were compared. RESULTS: After the intervention, the increase in the total score (for which the maximum possible was 18) for the intervention GPs (from a baseline of 11.5 to 12.3) was not significantly greater than for the controls (from 11.4 to 11.7). Legibility and being able to determine the doctor's assessment of the consultation were significantly improved. The post-intervention increase of 1.06 (9.3%) of the total scores of the 47% of intervention GPs who complied with the intervention was significantly greater than that for the controls. CONCLUSION: The quality assurance activity improved some components of the quality of GPs' clinical records. However, the improvement was small, and the search for activities for Australian GPs that demonstrate an improvement in the quality of their practice must continue. Images p1311-a PMID:9747547

  1. Teamwork, communication and safety climate: a systematic review of interventions to improve surgical culture.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Greg D; Shannon, Evan M; Dawes, Aaron J; Rollo, Johnathon C; Nguyen, David K; Russell, Marcia M; Ko, Clifford Y; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda A

    2015-07-01

    To define the target domains of culture-improvement interventions, to assess the impact of these interventions on surgical culture and to determine whether culture improvements lead to better patient outcomes and improved healthcare efficiency. Healthcare systems are investing considerable resources in improving workplace culture. It remains unclear whether these interventions, when aimed at surgical care, are successful and whether they are associated with changes in patient outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched from January 1980 to January 2015. We included studies on interventions that aimed to improve surgical culture, defined as the interpersonal, social and organisational factors that affect the healthcare environment and patient care. The quality of studies was assessed using an adapted tool to focus the review on higher-quality studies. Due to study heterogeneity, findings were narratively reviewed. The 47 studies meeting inclusion criteria (4 randomised trials and 10 moderate-quality observational studies) reported on interventions that targeted three domains of culture: teamwork (n=28), communication (n=26) and safety climate (n=19); several targeted more than one domain. All moderate-quality studies showed improvements in at least one of these domains. Two studies also demonstrated improvements in patient outcomes, such as reduced postoperative complications and even reduced postoperative mortality (absolute risk reduction 1.7%). Two studies reported improvements in healthcare efficiency, including fewer operating room delays. These findings were supported by similar results from low-quality studies. The literature provides promising evidence for various strategies to improve surgical culture, although these approaches differ in terms of the interventions employed as well as the techniques used to measure culture. Nevertheless, culture improvement appears to be associated with other positive effects, including

  2. Test of an interactive voice response intervention to improve adherence to controller medications in adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Apter, Andrea; Bogen, Dan K; Dickinson, Perry; Fisher, Larry; Wamboldt, Frederick S; Westfall, John M

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to test the effectiveness of a theory-based interactive voice response (IVR) intervention to improve adherence to controller medications among adults with asthma. Fifty participants aged 18 to 65 years who had a physician diagnosis of asthma and a prescription for a daily inhaled corticosteroid, attended a baseline visit and a final visit 10 weeks later. Participants randomized to the intervention group received 2 automated IVR telephone calls separated by one month, with one additional call if they reported recent symptoms of poorly controlled disease or failure to fill a prescription. Calls were completed in less than 5 minutes and included content designed to inquire about asthma symptoms, deliver core educational messages, encourage refilling of inhaled corticosteroid prescriptions, and increase communication with providers. Adherence was tracked during 10 weeks, with objective measures that included either electronic monitors or calculation of canister weight. Participants completed the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Asthma Control Test, and the Beliefs in Medications Questionnaire (BMQ) during both visits. Adherence was 32% higher among patients in the IVR group than those in the control group (P = .003). A more favorable shift in perception of inhaled corticosteroids was seen on BMQ scores of patients in the IVR group (P = .003), which in turn correlated with degree of adherence change (r = 0.342; P = .0152). No differences emerged for the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire or Asthma Control Test. The IVR intervention resulted in a significant increase in adherence to inhaled corticosteroid treatment and improved BMQ scores during the study interval. The association of increased adherence with increased BMQ scores suggests that the intervention succeeded in helping participants adopt a more favorable perception of their controller medication, leading in turn to improved adherence.

  3. Nanocomposite formation between alpha-glucosyl stevia and surfactant improves the dissolution profile of poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hiromasa; Tozuka, Yuichi; Nishikawa, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2012-05-30

    The formation of a hybrid-nanocomposite using α-glucosyl stevia (Stevia-G) and surfactant was explored to improve the dissolution of flurbiprofen (FP). As reported previously, the dissolution amount of FP was enhanced in the presence of Stevia-G, induced by the formation of an FP and Stevia-G-associated nanostructure. When a small amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was present with Stevia-G, the amount of dissolved FP was extremely enhanced. This dissolution-enhancement effect was also observed with the cationic surfactant of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, but not with the non-ionic surfactant of n-octyl-β-D-maltopyranoside. To investigate the dissolution-enhancement effect of Stevia-G/SDS mixture, the pyrene I(1)/I(3) ratio was plotted versus the Stevia-G concentration. The pyrene I(1)/I(3) ratio of Stevia-G/SDS mixture had a sigmoidal curve at lower Stevia-G concentrations compared to the Stevia-G solution alone. These results indicate that the Stevia-G/SDS mixture provides a hydrophobic core around pyrene molecules at lower Stevia-G concentrations, leading to nanocomposite formation between Stevia-G and SDS. The nanocomposite of Stevia-G/SDS showed no cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells at a mixture of 0.1% SDS and 1% Stevia-G solution, whereas 0.1% SDS solution showed high toxicity. These results suggest that the nanocomposite formation of Stevia-G/SDS may be useful way to enhance the dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs without special treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Complex interventions to improve the health of people with limited literacy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Clement, Sarah; Ibrahim, Saima; Crichton, Nicola; Wolf, Michael; Rowlands, Gillian

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the published literature on the effects of complex (multi-faceted) interventions intended to improve the health-related outcomes of individuals with limited literacy or numeracy. We undertook a systematic review of randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials with a narrative synthesis. The search strategy included searching eight databases from start date to 2007, reference checking and contacting expert informants. After the initial screen, two reviewers independently assessed eligibility, extracted data and evaluated study quality. The searches yielded 2734 non-duplicate items, which were reduced to 15 trials. Two interventions were directed at health professionals, one intervention was literacy education, and 12 were health education/management interventions. The quality of the trials was mixed, 13/15 trials were conducted in North America, and all focused on literacy rather than numeracy. 13/15 trials reported at least one significant difference in primary outcome, all favoring the intervention group. Only 8/15 trials measured direct clinical outcomes. Knowledge and self-efficacy were the class of outcome most likely to improve. A wide variety of complex interventions for adults with limited literacy are able to improve some health-related outcomes. This review supports the wider introduction of interventions for people with limited literacy, particularly within an evaluation context.

  5. Assessing Interventions To Improve Influenza Vaccine Uptake Among Health Care Workers.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Harunor; Yin, Jiehui Kevin; Ward, Kirsten; King, Catherine; Seale, Holly; Booy, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Despite official recommendations for health care workers to receive the influenza vaccine, uptake remains low. This systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to understand the evidence about interventions to improve influenza vaccine uptake among health care workers. We identified twelve randomized controlled trials that, collectively, assessed six major categories of interventions involving 193,924 health care workers in high-income countries. The categories were educational materials and training sessions, improved access to the vaccine, rewards following vaccination, organized efforts to raise vaccine awareness, reminders to get vaccinated, and the use of lead advocates for vaccination. Only one of the four studies that evaluated the effect of a single intervention in isolation demonstrated a significantly higher vaccine uptake rate in the intervention group, compared to controls. However, five of the eight studies that evaluated a combination of strategies showed significantly higher vaccine uptake. Despite the low quality of the studies identified, the data suggest that combined interventions can moderately increase vaccine uptake among health care workers. Further methodologically appropriate trials of combined interventions tailored to individual health care settings and incorporating less-studied strategies would enhance the evidence about interventions to improve immunization uptake among health care workers.

  6. A multifaceted intervention to improve treatment of depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Katon, W; Robinson, P; Von Korff, M; Lin, E; Bush, T; Ludman, E; Simon, G; Walker, E

    1996-10-01

    This research study evaluates the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention program to improve the management of depression in primary care. One hundred fifty-three primary care patients with current depression were entered into a randomized controlled trial. Intervention patients received a structured depression treatment program in the primary care setting that included both behavioral treatment to increase use of adaptive coping strategies and counseling to improve medication adherence. Control patients received "usual" care by their primary care physicians. Outcome measures included adherence to antidepressant medication, satisfaction with care of depression and with antidepressant treatment, and reduction of depressive symptoms over time. At 4-month follow-up, significantly more intervention patients with major and minor depression than usual care patients adhered to antidepressant medication and rated the quality of care they received for depression as good to excellent. Intervention patients with major depression demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in depression severity over time compared with usual care patients on all 4 outcome analyses. Intervention patients with minor depression were found to have a significant decrease over time in depression severity on only 1 of 4 study outcome analyses compared with usual care patients. A multifaceted primary care intervention improved adherence to antidepressant regimens and satisfaction with care in patients with major and minor depression. The intervention consistently resulted in more favorable depression outcomes among patients with major depression, while outcome effects were ambiguous among patients with minor depression.

  7. Improving uptake and engagement with child body image interventions delivered to mothers: Understanding mother and daughter preferences for intervention content.

    PubMed

    Garbett, Kirsty M; Diedrichs, Phillippa C

    2016-12-01

    Mothers are a key influence on adolescent girls' body image. This study aimed to improve understanding of mothers' and daughters' preferences for content in body image interventions designed to assist mothers to promote positive body image among their daughters. British mother-daughter dyads (N=190) viewed descriptions of five evidence-based influences on body image (family, friends, and relationships; appearance-based teasing; media and celebrities; appearance conversations; body acceptance and care). Mothers and daughters each selected the two most important influences to learn about in these interventions. Overall, both mothers and daughters most frequently opted for family, friends, and relationships and body acceptance and care, whereas media and celebrities was their least preferred topic. While the overall sample of mothers and daughters agreed on preferences, Fisher's exact tests showed that within-dyad agreement was low. Recommendations for improving parent and child engagement with, and effectiveness of, child body image interventions delivered to parents are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interventions to improve diabetes self-management: utility and relevance for practice.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review publications of research on diabetes self-management interventions and assess whether the interventions are relevant for practice. A content analysis was performed on research reports published between 1993 and 2004 of interventions designed to improve patients' diabetes self-management. Information was abstracted relevant to the intervention's generalizability to other settings and its compatibility and feasibility in practice. Publications included only limited information relevant to an intervention's generalizability across populations and settings. Many of the interventions tested were not designed to be compatible with the realities of current practice or to be delivered in the settings in which most diabetes care is provided. Many of the interventions were very complex, requiring multiple delivery modes and contacts, proactive scheduling, and coordination across disciplines. In view of the prevalence of diabetes, it is critical that effective self-management interventions be adopted and implemented. Interventions need to be designed so that their findings have greater relevance and utility for practice and can be generalized across practice settings.

  9. Does an educational intervention improve parents' knowledge about immunization? Experience from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Awadh, Ammar Ihsan; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Al-Lela, Omer Qutaiba; Bux, Siti Halimah; Elkalmi, Ramadan M; Hadi, Hazrina

    2014-10-06

    Parents' knowledge about immunization is an important predictor factor for their children's immunization status. The aims of this study were to assess parents' knowledge and to evaluate the effect of a short educational intervention on improving parents' knowledge of childhood immunization. A cross-sectional study using a pre- and post-test intervention survey of a single group was conducted among Malaysian parents. Changes in total knowledge score before and after the intervention were measured using a validated questionnaire. The intervention consisted of an animated movie and lecture using simple understandable language. Wilcoxon signed ranks test and the McNemar x2 test were applied to compare the differences in knowledge before and after the intervention. Seventy-three parents were enrolled in this study; the majority were mothers (n = 64, 87.7%). Parents' knowledge about childhood immunization increased significantly after the intervention compared to the baseline results (p < 0.001). There were significant differences between parents' knowledge and their educational level and monthly income (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005), respectively. A short educational intervention designed for parents had a positive effect on their knowledge about immunization. Educational interventions targeting parents with low levels of education and income are needed. Further studies investigating the actual effectiveness of such interventions on immunization rates and statuses are required.

  10. An Integrated Review of Interventions to Improve Psychological Outcomes In Caregivers of Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Strömberg, Anna; Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the Review To examine interventions aimed at improving psychological outcomes (e.g., caregiver burden, quality of life, anxiety, depression, perceived control, stress mastery, caregiver confidence and preparedness, and caregiver mastery) in family caregivers of patients with heart failure (HF). Recent Findings Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. The most common intervention involved psychoeducation facilitated by a nurse (6/8) and supplemented with a combination of follow-up face-to-face sessions (2/6), home visits (2/6), telephone calls (3/6), and telemonitoring (3/6). Two studies used a support group intervention of 4–6 sessions. Half of the interventions reported a significant effect on one or more primary outcomes, including caregiver burden (n=4), depressive symptoms (n=1), stress mastery (n=1), caregiver confidence and preparedness (n=1), and caregiver mastery (n=1). Summary Compared to dementia and cancer family caregiving, few interventions have been evaluated in caregivers of patients with HF. Of the existing interventions identified in this review, considerable variability was observed in aims, intervention content, delivery methods, duration, intensity, methodological rigor, outcomes, and effects. Given this current state of the science, direct comparison of HF caregiver interventions and recommendations for clinical practice are premature. Thus, research priority is strongly warranted for intervention development and testing to enhance HF caregiver support and education. PMID:26716392

  11. Ofatumumab in poor-prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a Phase IV, non-interventional, observational study from the European Research Initiative on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Carol; Montillo, Marco; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Dimou, Maria; Bloor, Adrian; Dupuis, Jehan; Schuh, Anna; Norin, Stefan; Geisler, Christian; Hillmen, Peter; Doubek, Michael; Trněný, Marek; Obrtlikova, Petra; Laurenti, Luca; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Smolej, Lukas; Ghia, Paolo; Cymbalista, Florence; Jaeger, Ulrich; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stavroyianni, Niki; Carrington, Patrick; Zouabi, Hamadi; Leblond, Veronique; Gomez-Garcia, Juan C.; Rubio, Martin; Marasca, Roberto; Musuraca, Gerardo; Rigacci, Luigi; Farina, Lucia; Paolini, Rossella; Pospisilova, Sarka; Kimby, Eva; Bradley, Colm; Montserrat, Emili

    2015-01-01

    We report the largest retrospective, phase IV non-interventional, observational study of ofatumumab therapy in heavily pre-treated patients with poor-prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Total number of patients was 103; median age was 65 years (range 39–85). Median number of prior lines of therapy was 4 (range 1–13), including, in most cases, rituximab-, fludarabine- and alemtuzumab-based regimens; 13 patients had been allografted. Of 113 adverse events, 28 (29%) were considered to be directly related to ofatumumab. Grade 3–4 toxicities included neutropenia (10%), thrombocytopenia (5%), anemia (3%), pneumonia (17%), and fever (3%). Two heavily pre-treated patients developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. On an intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 22% (3 complete response, 1 incomplete complete response). Median progression-free and overall survival times were 5 and 11 months, respectively. This study confirms in a daily-life setting the feasibility and acceptable toxicity of ofatumumab treatment in advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The complete response rate, however, was low. Therefore, treatment with ofatumumab should be moved to earlier phases of the disease. Ideally, this should be done in combination with other agents, as recently approved for ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as front-line treatment for patients unfit for fludarabine. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01453062. PMID:25596264

  12. Interventions to improve patient access to and utilisation of genetic and genomic counselling services

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Caroline M; Thomas, Lois H; Skirton, Heather; Gustafson, Shanna; Coupe, Jacqueline; Patch, Christine; Belk, Rachel; Tishkovskaya, Svetlana; Calzone, Kathleen; Payne, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: Primary objective The primary objective is to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve patient identification, access to and utilisation of genetic and genomic counselling services when compared to: No intervention; Usual or current practice; and Other active intervention. Secondary objective The secondary objective is to explore the resource use and costs associated with interventions aimed at improving patient identification, access to and utilisation of genetic and genomic counselling services from studies meeting the eligibility criteria. We will report on factors that may explain variation in the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving patient identification, access to and utilisation of genetic and genomic counselling services from studies meeting the eligibility criteria. Another secondary objective is to explore how interventions which target improved patient identification, access to and utilisation of genetic and genomic counselling services affect the subsequent appropriate use of health services for the prevention or early detection of disease. It is also possible that the genetic counselling interaction itself will contribute to the possible use of preventative services. PMID:26989348

  13. A Training Intervention to Improve Information Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Reed, Virginia A.; Homa, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Training programs designed to improve information management have been implemented but not adequately tested. Three critical components for information management were tested in a randomized control study: (1) knowledge of valid, synthesized summary information, (2) skills to use Web-based resources that provide access to these summaries, and (3) use of Web-based resources in clinical practice. Methods Twenty-four primary care practices were provided with computers and high-speed Internet access and then matched, with half randomly assigned to receive training and half to receive training at a later date. Training was designed to address knowledge, skills, and use of Web-based information. Outcomes were assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up questionnaires that focused on five conceptual domains related to Web-based resource use for patient care decisions and patient education. Results Compared to the delayed training group, the initial training group increased their knowledge and skill of Web-based resources and use for patient care decisions. Some measures of communication with patients about using Web-based resources and of incorporating use of Web-based resources into daily practice increased from baseline to follow-up for all participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that training and providing computers and Internet connections have measurable effects on information management behaviors. PMID:18773781

  14. Poor Sleep Habits = Poor Grades

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166509.html Poor Sleep Habits = Poor Grades Study of college students finds ... socialize, college life seems geared toward an erratic sleep schedule. But new research suggests that an unpredictable ...

  15. Response to Intervention: Does It Improve Literacy Skills for At-Risk Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatakis, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) has been used in the public school system to improve student achievement in areas of weakness and identify students who may need further resources. The local goal is to improve the retention rate and identify those students that may need additional support systems. The overall goal is to decrease the number of…

  16. Direct interventions for improving the performance of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahendra, N

    2001-11-01

    Direct interventions are being used increasingly to maintain and improve the communicative and cognitive functioning of patients with Alzheimer's dementia. Speech-language pathologists can play an integral role in maximizing the functioning of dementia patients by selecting appropriate direct interventions that capitalize on spared neuropsychological abilities to compensate for impaired abilities. Successful direct interventions use techniques that facilitate learning and retention of information and skills. In this article, direct intervention techniques-repeated exposure via spaced retrieval training and quizzes; errorless learning; multisensory stimulation using music, toys, pets, and memory wallets; and other approaches to cognitive-linguistic stimulation such as the use of personal computers; the Montessori method; and activity programming-are reviewed. The rationale for use of these direct interventions and available efficacy data with Alzheimer's patients also are presented.

  17. Improving Process Evaluations of Health Behavior Interventions: Learning From the Social Sciences.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Trimmer, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    This article reflects on the current state of process evaluations of health behavior interventions and argues that evaluation practice in this area could be improved by drawing on the social science literature to a greater degree. While process evaluations of health behavior interventions have increasingly engaged with the social world and sociological aspects of interventions, there has been a lag in applying relevant and potentially useful approaches from the social sciences. This has limited the scope for health behavior process evaluations to address pertinent contextual issues and methodological challenges. Three aspects of process evaluations are discussed: the incorporation of contexts of interventions; engagement with the concept of "process" in process evaluation; and working with theory to understand interventions. Following on from this, the article also comments on the need for new methodologies and on the implications for addressing health inequalities.

  18. A systematic review of interventions aiming to improve involvement in physical activity among adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Katie; van Dooren, Kate; McPherson, Lyn; Lennox, Nick; Ware, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Evidence suggests that most adults with intellectual disability do not participate in sufficient amounts of physical activity (PA). A systematic review of peer-reviewed studies that reported an intervention aiming to improve PA levels of adults with intellectual disability was conducted. Keywords related to intellectual disability and physical activity were used to search relevant databases. Studies were excluded if they did not measure PA as an outcome for adults with intellectual disability, were non-English, and were not peer-reviewed. All relevant studies were included in the review regardless of methodological quality and design. Six articles met the inclusion criteria. These included health education or health promotion programs with PA, nutrition, and weight loss components. The quality of studies included in this review was generally poor. Most studies used a prepost design, sample sizes were small, and measurement tools were used that are not valid and reliable for the population assessed. PA interventions have the potential to improve the health and wellbeing of people with intellectual disability, a vulnerable group who require attention from public health practitioners and researchers. Given the health inequities that exist, public health researchers should target efforts to improve PA levels among this group.

  19. A systematic review of eHealth interventions to improve health literacy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robin J; Lou, Jennie Q; Ownby, Raymond L; Caballero, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Implementation of eHealth is now considered an effective way to address concerns about the health status of health care consumers. The purpose of this study was to review empirically based eHealth intervention strategies designed to improve health literacy among consumers in a variety of settings. A computerized search of 16 databases of abstracts (e.g. Biomedical Reference Collection, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Computers & Applied Sciences Complete, Health Technology Assessments, MEDLINE) were explored in a systematic fashion to assess the presence of eHealth applications targeting health literacy. Compared to control interventions, the interventions using technology reported significant outcomes or showed promise for future positive outcomes regarding health literacy in a variety of settings, for different diseases, and with diverse samples. This review has indicated that it is feasible to deliver eHealth interventions specifically designed to improve health literacy skills for people with different health conditions, risk factors, and socioeconomic backgrounds.

  20. Strategies to Improve Adherence to Dietary Weight Loss Interventions in Research and Real-World Settings.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Alice A; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2017-07-11

    Dietary interventions are the cornerstone of obesity treatment. The optimal dietary approach to weight loss is a hotly debated topic among health professionals and the lay public alike. An emerging body of evidence suggests that a higher level of adherence to a diet, regardless of the type of diet, is an important factor in weight loss success over the short and long term. Key strategies to improve adherence include designing dietary weight loss interventions (such as ketogenic diets) that help to control the increased drive to eat that accompanies weight loss, tailoring dietary interventions to a person's dietary preferences (and nutritional requirements), and promoting self-monitoring of food intake. The aim of this paper is to examine these strategies, which can be used to improve adherence and thereby increase the success of dietary weight loss interventions.

  1. Trial of a Novel Intervention to Improve Multiple Food Hygiene Behaviors in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Om Prasad; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Cairncross, Sandy; Cavill, Sue; Curtis, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report on the results of a trial of an intervention to improve five food hygiene behaviors among mothers of young children in rural Nepal. This novel intervention targeted five behaviors; cleanliness of serving utensils, handwashing with soap before feeding, proper storage of cooked food, and thorough reheating and water treatment. Based on formative research and a creative process using the Behavior-Centered Design approach, an innovative intervention package was designed and delivered over a period of 3 months. The intervention activities included local rallies, games, rewards, storytelling, drama, competitions linking with emotional drivers of behavior, and “kitchen makeovers” to disrupt behavior settings. The effect of the package on behavior was evaluated via a cluster-randomized before–after study in four villages with four villages serving as controls. The primary outcome was the difference in the mean cluster level proportions of mothers directly observed practicing all five food hygiene behaviors. The five targeted food hygiene behaviors were rare at baseline (composite performance of all five behaviors in intervention 1% [standard deviation (SD) = 2%] and in control groups 2% [SD = 2%]). Six weeks after the intervention, the target behaviors were more common in the intervention than in the control group (43% [SD = 14%] versus 2% [SD = 2%], P = 0.02) during follow-up. The intervention appeared to be equally effective in improving all five behaviors in all intervention clusters. This study shows that a theory-driven, systematic approach employing emotional motivators and modifying behavior settings was capable of substantially improving multiple food hygiene behaviors in Nepal. PMID:28719285

  2. Pediatric HIV Disclosure Intervention Improves Knowledge and Clinical Outcomes in HIV-Infected Children in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Laura; Hamunime, Ndapewa; Shepard, Mark; Uusiku, James; John-Stewart, Grace C.; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Using routinely collected data, we evaluated a nationally implemented intervention to assist health care workers and caregivers with HIV disclosure to children. We assessed the impact of the intervention on child's knowledge and health outcomes. Methods: Data were abstracted from national databases and patient charts for HIV-infected children aged 7–15 years attending 4 high-volume HIV clinics in Namibia. Disclosure rates, time to disclosure, and HIV knowledge in 314 children participating in the intervention were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of partial vs. full disclosure. Paired t-tests and McNemar tests were used to compare adherence and viral load (VL) before versus after intervention enrollment. Results: Among children who participated in the disclosure intervention, 11% knew their HIV status at enrollment and an additional 38% reached full disclosure after enrollment. The average time to full disclosure was 2.5 years (interquartile range: 1.2–3 years). Children who achieved full disclosure were more likely to be older, have lower VLs, and have been enrolled in the intervention longer. Among children who reported incorrect knowledge regarding why they take their medicine, 83% showed improved knowledge after the intervention, defined as knowledge of HIV status or adopting intervention-specific language. On comparing 0–12 months before vs. 12–24 months after enrollment in the intervention, VL decreased by 0.5 log10 copies per milliliter (N = 42, P = 0.004), whereas mean adherence scores increased by 10% (N = 88, P value < 0.001). Conclusions: This HIV disclosure intervention demonstrated improved viral suppression, adherence, and HIV knowledge and should be considered for translation to other settings. PMID:28114186

  3. Pediatric HIV Disclosure Intervention Improves Knowledge and Clinical Outcomes in HIV-Infected Children in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Beima-Sofie, Kristin M; Brandt, Laura; Hamunime, Ndapewa; Shepard, Mark; Uusiku, James; John-Stewart, Grace C; OʼMalley, Gabrielle

    2017-05-01

    Using routinely collected data, we evaluated a nationally implemented intervention to assist health care workers and caregivers with HIV disclosure to children. We assessed the impact of the intervention on child's knowledge and health outcomes. Data were abstracted from national databases and patient charts for HIV-infected children aged 7-15 years attending 4 high-volume HIV clinics in Namibia. Disclosure rates, time to disclosure, and HIV knowledge in 314 children participating in the intervention were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of partial vs. full disclosure. Paired t-tests and McNemar tests were used to compare adherence and viral load (VL) before versus after intervention enrollment. Among children who participated in the disclosure intervention, 11% knew their HIV status at enrollment and an additional 38% reached full disclosure after enrollment. The average time to full disclosure was 2.5 years (interquartile range: 1.2-3 years). Children who achieved full disclosure were more likely to be older, have lower VLs, and have been enrolled in the intervention longer. Among children who reported incorrect knowledge regarding why they take their medicine, 83% showed improved knowledge after the intervention, defined as knowledge of HIV status or adopting intervention-specific language. On comparing 0-12 months before vs. 12-24 months after enrollment in the intervention, VL decreased by 0.5 log10 copies per milliliter (N = 42, P = 0.004), whereas mean adherence scores increased by 10% (N = 88, P value < 0.001). This HIV disclosure intervention demonstrated improved viral suppression, adherence, and HIV knowledge and should be considered for translation to other settings.

  4. A corner store intervention to improve access to fruits and vegetables in two Latino communities