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Sample records for interventions phantom ex-vivo

  1. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  2. Measurements of optical parameters of phantom solution and bulk animal tissues ex vivo at 650 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jian

    2008-12-01

    Optical parameters of biological tissues, including absorption coefficient (μa), reduced scattering coefficient (μs') or scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g) and refractive index (n) are investigated extensively and systemically at wavelength of 650 nm. Intralipid solution was selected to be the tissue phantom in order to test the validity of measurements. Considering the factors of fiber orientation and haemoglobin content, we chose some fresh bulk animal tissues in vitro which were bovine adipose, bovine muscle, porcine adipose, porcine muscle, porcine kidney, porcine liver, mutton and chicken breast. The basic assumption is that in vitro samples are a reasonable representation of the in vivo situation. We have gained numbers of experimental data of Intralipid and some tissues. Particularly, we have set up the close relationships among six optical parameters involving μa, μs', μs, g, n and μt. The experimental results show that for animal tissues, μa, μs' or μs and n rely deeply on muscle fiber orientations. Both of μs and μt range from 10mm-1 to 20mm-1. μa ranges from 10-2 mm-1 to 10-3 mm-1 and g from 0.95 to 0.99. The results of this study will be helpful in further understanding of optical properties of tissues.

  3. Adaptive Thermal Therapy using Planar Ultrasound Transducers with Real-time MR Temperature Feedback: Demonstration in Gel Phantoms and Ex-vivo Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kee; Choy, Vanessa; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2007-05-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The main goal of this study was to evaluate active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5T MR imager to control conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both thermal gel phantoms and ex-vivo tissue with a single-element transurethral heating applicator. The applicator rotation rate and power were controlled based on MRI-temperature measurements. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) was also investigated in gel phantoms. The 55°C isotherm generated during heating closely matched the targeted prostate shape, with an average distance error of 0.9 mm ± 0.4 mm in turkey breasts, 1.3 mm ± 0.5 mm in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. Accurate, MRI-guided, active feedback has been successfully demonstrated experimentally and has the capability to adjust for unpredictable and varying tissue properties during the treatment.

  4. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical ultrasound probe for discriminating nerves and tendons: an ex vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mari, Jean Martial; Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2015-11-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is an essential component of peripheral nerve blocks. While ultrasound (US) imaging is increasingly used as a guidance modality, it often provides insufficient contrast for identifying nerves from surrounding tissues such as tendons. Electrical nerve stimulators can be used in conjunction with US imaging for discriminating nerves from surrounding tissues, but they are insufficient to reliably prevent neural punctures, so that alternative methods are highly desirable. In this study, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was used to directly compare the signal amplitudes and spectra acquired from nerves and tendons ex vivo, for the first time. The results indicate that the system can provide significantly higher image contrast for discriminating nerves and tendons than that provided by US imaging. As such, photoacoustic imaging could be valuable as an adjunct to US for guiding peripheral nerve blocks. PMID:26580699

  5. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical ultrasound probe for discriminating nerves and tendons: an ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-11-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is an essential component of peripheral nerve blocks. While ultrasound (US) imaging is increasingly used as a guidance modality, it often provides insufficient contrast for identifying nerves from surrounding tissues such as tendons. Electrical nerve stimulators can be used in conjunction with US imaging for discriminating nerves from surrounding tissues, but they are insufficient to reliably prevent neural punctures, so that alternative methods are highly desirable. In this study, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was used to directly compare the signal amplitudes and spectra acquired from nerves and tendons ex vivo, for the first time. The results indicate that the system can provide significantly higher image contrast for discriminating nerves and tendons than that provided by US imaging. As such, photoacoustic imaging could be valuable as an adjunct to US for guiding peripheral nerve blocks.

  6. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical ultrasound probe for discriminating nerves and tendons: an ex vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mari, Jean Martial; Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2015-11-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is an essential component of peripheral nerve blocks. While ultrasound (US) imaging is increasingly used as a guidance modality, it often provides insufficient contrast for identifying nerves from surrounding tissues such as tendons. Electrical nerve stimulators can be used in conjunction with US imaging for discriminating nerves from surrounding tissues, but they are insufficient to reliably prevent neural punctures, so that alternative methods are highly desirable. In this study, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was used to directly compare the signal amplitudes and spectra acquired from nerves and tendons ex vivo, for the first time. The results indicate that the system can provide significantly higher image contrast for discriminating nerves and tendons than that provided by US imaging. As such, photoacoustic imaging could be valuable as an adjunct to US for guiding peripheral nerve blocks.

  7. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  8. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20-60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than -60dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20-60MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12dB lower range side lobe level and a 7dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50μm finer and -3dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200μm in diameter with 6dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI.

  9. Robotic system for MRI-guided prostate biopsy: feasibility of teleoperated needle insertion and ex vivo phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Seifabadi, Reza; Song, Sang-Eun; Krieger, Axel; Cho, Nathan Bongjoon; Tokuda, Junichi; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) combined with robotic assistance has the potential to improve on clinical outcomes of biopsy and local treatment of prostate cancer. Methods We report the workspace optimization and phantom evaluation of a five Degree of Freedom (DOF) parallel pneumatically actuated modular robot for MRI-guided prostate biopsy. To shorten procedure time and consequently increase patient comfort and system accuracy, a prototype of a MRI-compatible master–slave needle driver module using piezo motors was also added to the base robot. Results Variable size workspace was achieved using appropriate link length, compared with the previous design. The 5-DOF targeting accuracy demonstrated an average error of 2.5mm (STD=1.37mm) in a realistic phantom inside a 3T magnet with a bevel-tip 18G needle. The average position tracking error of the master–slave needle driver was always below 0.1mm. Conclusion Phantom experiments showed sufficient accuracy for manual prostate biopsy. Also, the implementation of teleoperated needle insertion was feasible and accurate. These two together suggest the feasibility of accurate fully actuated needle placement into prostate while keeping the clinician supervision over the task. PMID:21698389

  10. 20 MHz Forward-imaging Single-element Beam Steering with an Internal Rotating Variable-Angle Reflecting Surface: Wire phantom and Ex vivo pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, David T.; Li, Xiang; Park, Jinhyoung; Chen, Ruimin; Chabok, Hamid; Barukh, Arthur; Zhou, Qifa; Elgazery, Mahmoud; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Feasibility is demonstrated for a forward-imaging beam steering system involving a single-element 20 MHz angled-face acoustic transducer combined with an internal rotating variable-angle reflecting surface (VARS). Rotation of the VARS structure, for a fixed position of the transducer, generates a 2-D angular sector scan. If these VARS revolutions were to be accompanied by successive rotations of the single-element transducer, 3-D imaging would be achieved. In the design of this device, a single-element 20 MHz PMN-PT press-focused angled-face transducer is focused on the circle of midpoints of a micro-machined VARS within the distal end of an endoscope. The 2-D imaging system was tested in water bath experiments with phantom wire structures at a depth of 10 mm, and exhibited an axial resolution of 66 μm and a lateral resolution of 520 μm. Chirp coded excitation was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and to increase the depth of penetration. Images of an ex vivo cow eye were obtained. This VARS-based approach offers a novel forward-looking beam-steering method, which could be useful in intra-cavity imaging. PMID:23122968

  11. 20 MHz forward-imaging single-element beam steering with an internal rotating variable-angle reflecting surface: Wire phantom and ex vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    Raphael, David T; Li, Xiang; Park, Jinhyoung; Chen, Ruimin; Chabok, Hamid; Barukh, Arthur; Zhou, Qifa; Elgazery, Mahmoud; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    Feasibility is demonstrated for a forward-imaging beam steering system involving a single-element 20MHz angled-face acoustic transducer combined with an internal rotating variable-angle reflecting surface (VARS). Rotation of the VARS structure, for a fixed position of the transducer, generates a 2-D angular sector scan. If these VARS revolutions were to be accompanied by successive rotations of the single-element transducer, 3-D imaging would be achieved. In the design of this device, a single-element 20MHz PMN-PT press-focused angled-face transducer is focused on the circle of midpoints of a micro-machined VARS within the distal end of an endoscope. The 2-D imaging system was tested in water bath experiments with phantom wire structures at a depth of 10mm, and exhibited an axial resolution of 66μm and a lateral resolution of 520μm. Chirp coded excitation was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and to increase the depth of penetration. Images of an ex vivo cow eye were obtained. This VARS-based approach offers a novel forward-looking beam-steering method, which could be useful in intra-cavity imaging. PMID:23122968

  12. Automated continuous quantitative measurement of proximal airways on dynamic ventilation CT: initial experience using an ex vivo porcine lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Moriya, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kotaro; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Teramoto, Ryuichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airways, using dynamic ventilation computed tomography (CT) and our research software. Methods A porcine lung that was removed during meat processing was ventilated inside a chest phantom by a negative pressure cylinder (eight times per minute). This chest phantom with imitated respiratory movement was scanned by a 320-row area-detector CT scanner for approximately 9 seconds as dynamic ventilatory scanning. Obtained volume data were reconstructed every 0.35 seconds (total 8.4 seconds with 24 frames) as three-dimensional images and stored in our research software. The software automatically traced a designated airway point in all frames and measured the cross-sectional luminal area and wall area percent (WA%). The cross-sectional luminal area and WA% of the trachea and right main bronchus (RMB) were measured for this study. Two radiologists evaluated the traceability of all measurable airway points of the trachea and RMB using a three-point scale. Results It was judged that the software satisfactorily traced airway points throughout the dynamic ventilation CT (mean score, 2.64 at the trachea and 2.84 at the RMB). From the maximum inspiratory frame to the maximum expiratory frame, the cross-sectional luminal area of the trachea decreased 17.7% and that of the RMB 29.0%, whereas the WA% of the trachea increased 6.6% and that of the RMB 11.1%. Conclusion It is feasible to measure airway dimensions automatically at designated points on dynamic ventilation CT using research software. This technique can be applied to various airway and obstructive diseases. PMID:26445535

  13. NOTE: Spectra from 2.5-15 µm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viator, John A.; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M.; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 µm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, TopicareTM), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 µm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 µm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 µm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 µm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant μir is used. In such cases, overestimating μir will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth.

  14. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  15. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  16. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  17. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed.

  18. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  19. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24629039

  20. Real-Time Integrated Photoacoustic and Ultrasound (PAUS) Imaging System to Guide Interventional Procedures: Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Xia, Jinjun; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Because of depth-dependent light attenuation, bulky, low-repetition-rate lasers are usually used in most photoacoustic (PA) systems to provide sufficient pulse energies to image at depth within the body. However, integrating these lasers with real-time clinical ultrasound (US) scanners has been problematic because of their size and cost. In this paper, an integrated PA/US (PAUS) imaging system is presented operating at frame rates >30 Hz. By employing a portable, low-cost, low-pulse-energy (~2 mJ/pulse), high-repetition-rate (~1 kHz), 1053-nm laser, and a rotating galvo-mirror system enabling rapid laser beam scanning over the imaging area, the approach is demonstrated for potential applications requiring a few centimeters of penetration. In particular, we demonstrate here real-time (30 Hz frame rate) imaging (by combining multiple single-shot sub-images covering the scan region) of an 18-gauge needle inserted into a piece of chicken breast with subsequent delivery of an absorptive agent at more than 1-cm depth to mimic PAUS guidance of an interventional procedure. A signal-to-noise ratio of more than 35 dB is obtained for the needle in an imaging area 2.8 × 2.8 cm (depth × lateral). Higher frame rate operation is envisioned with an optimized scanning scheme. PMID:25643081

  1. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues.

    PubMed

    Tang, K; Choy, V; Chopra, R; Bronskill, M J

    2007-05-21

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 degrees C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm +/- 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm +/- 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm +/- 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 x 3 x 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 degrees C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method

  2. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, K.; Choy, V.; Chopra, R.; Bronskill, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 °C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm ± 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 × 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 °C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method of treatment

  3. Gnotobiotic Human Colon Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Frank D.; Folan, David M. A.; Winter, Des C.; Folan, Michael A.; Baird, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel emulsion with efficacy as an agent for eliminating biofilms was selected. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and effect of a formulation of ML:8 against commensal bacteria harvested from ex vivo human colonic tissues. Methods Mucosal sheets, obtained at the time of surgery, were exposed for 2 minutes to one of four solutions: Krebs-Hensleit (KH) solution, saline (NaCl; 0.9%), povidone iodine (1%), or ML:8 (2%); n = 4. Lumenal surfaces were swabbed for culture under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Following treatment, each sheet was mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped. Tissues were challenged with carbachol. Permeability coefficient (Papp) was determined using mannitol fluxes. At the end of each experiment, tissues were examined histologically. Results Similar colony forming units grew in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in both control and NaCl treated tissues. Iodine reduced and ML:8 virtually abolished viable bacteria. Basal electrophysiological parameters were not different between treatments. Transepithelial electrical resistance values did not differ between groups. All tissues responded to carbachol, although this was attenuated in iodine treated tissue. Papp values were slightly elevated in all treated tissues but this did not reach significance. Histopathological assessment revealed no overt damage to tissues. Conclusion Brief exposure to ML:8 reduced culturable bacterial burden from human intestinal tissues harvested at the time of surgical resection. Such gnotobiotic tissues retain structural and functional integrity. This is a novel approach to reduce bacterial burden. PMID:27785304

  4. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions. PMID:26811984

  5. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  6. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Robert J.; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent

    2016-01-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions. PMID:26811984

  7. Ex vivo lung perfusion and reconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Massad, Ehab; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion can act as a platform for the evaluation and repair of donor lungs. An acellular hyperosmolar solution is perfused anterograde through the donor lungs at 40% of the estimated cardiac output. Following oxygenation of the perfusate by the lung, it passes through a hollow fiber oxygenator supplied with a hypoxic gas mixture to remove oxygen and to maintain physiological carbon dioxide levels. Flow through a heat exchanger to maintain normothermia and a leukocyte filter to remove demarginated leukocytes completes the circuit. Lung function can be measured by the difference in PO2 between the perfusate postlung and postmembrane and by physiological parameters. Utilization of this method of ex vivo donor lung evaluation should reduce concerns of primary graft dysfunction and increase utilization rates of donor lungs. PMID:24412979

  8. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, JingJing; Zhang, ChengCheng

    2015-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would benefit clinical applications in several aspects, to improve patient survival, utilize cord blood stem cells for adult applications, and selectively propagate stem cell populations after genetic manipulation. In this review we summarize and discuss recent advances in the culture systems of mouse and human HSCs, which include stroma/HSC co-culture, continuous perfusion and fed-batch cultures, and those supplemented with extrinsic ligands, membrane transportable transcription factors, complement components, protein modification enzymes, metabolites, or small molecule chemicals. Some of the expansion systems have been tested in clinical trials. The optimal condition for ex vivo expansion of the primitive and functional human HSCs is still under development. An improved understanding of the mechanisms for HSC cell fate determination and the HSC culture characteristics will guide development of new strategies to overcome difficulties. In the future, development of a combination treatment regimen with agents that enhance self-renewal, block differentiation, and improve homing will be critical. Methods to enhance yields and lower cost during collection and processing should be employed. The employment of an efficient system for ex vivo expansion of HSCs will facilitate the further development of novel strategies for cell and gene therapies including genome editing.

  9. Ex vivo gene therapy and vision.

    PubMed

    Gregory-Evans, Kevin; Bashar, A M A Emran; Tan, Malcolm

    2012-04-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy, a technique where genetic manipulation of cells is undertaken remotely and more safely since it is outside the body, is an emerging therapeutic strategy particularly well suited to targeting a specific organ rather than for treating a whole organism. The eye and visual pathways therefore make an attractive target for this approach. With blindness still so prevalent worldwide, new approaches to treatment would also be widely applicable and a significant advance in improving quality of life. Despite being a relatively new approach, ex vivo gene therapy has already achieved significant advances in the treatment of blindness in pre-clinical trials. In particular, advances are being achieved in corneal disease, glaucoma, retinal degeneration, stroke and multiple sclerosis through genetic re-programming of cells to replace degenerate cells and through more refined neuroprotection, modulation of inflammation and replacement of deficient protein. In this review we discuss the latest developments in ex vivo gene therapy relevant to the visual pathways and highlight the challenges that need to be overcome for progress into clinical trials.

  10. Analysis of elastography methods using mathematical and ex vivo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byram, Brett C.; Wahl, Michael R.; Holmes, David R., III; Lerman, Amir; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) currently has a limited ability to characterize endovascular anatomic properties. IVUS elastography enhances the ability to characterize the biomechanical properties of arterial walls. A mathematical phantom generator was developed based on the characteristics of 30MHz, 64 element IVUS catheter images from excised canine femoral arteries. The difference between high and low-pressure intra-arterial images was modeled using phase shifts. The increase in phase shift occurred randomly, generally at every three pixels in our images. Using mathematical phantoms, different methods for calculating elastograms were quantitatively analyzed. Specifically, the effect of standard cross correlation versus cross correlation of the integral of the inflection characteristics for a given set of data, and the effect of an algorithm utilizing a non-constant kernel, were assessed. The specific methods found to be most accurate on the mathematical phantom data were then applied to ex vivo canine data of a scarred and a healthy artery. The algorithm detected significant differences between these two sets of arterial data. It will be necessary to obtain and analyze several more sets of canine arterial data in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of the algorithm.

  11. Ex vivo rheology of spider silk.

    PubMed

    Kojić, N; Bico, J; Clasen, C; McKinley, G H

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the rheological properties of microliter quantities of the spinning material extracted ex vivo from the major ampullate gland of a Nephila clavipes spider using two new micro-rheometric devices. A sliding plate micro-rheometer is employed to measure the steady-state shear viscosity of approximately 1 microl samples of silk dope from individual biological specimens. The steady shear viscosity of the spinning solution is found to be highly shear-thinning, with a power-law index consistent with values expected for liquid crystalline solutions. Calculations show that the viscosity of the fluid decreases 10-fold as it flows through the narrow spinning canals of the spider. By contrast, measurements in a microcapillary extensional rheometer show that the transient extensional viscosity (i.e. the viscoelastic resistance to stretching) of the spinning fluid increases more than 100-fold during the spinning process. Quantifying the properties of native spinning solutions provides new guidance for adjusting the spinning processes of synthetic or genetically engineered silks to match those of the spider. PMID:17050850

  12. Ex vivo lung perfusion in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Braga, Karina Andrighetti de Oliveira; Nepomuceno, Natalia Aparecida; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) clinically to prepare donor lungs for transplantation. Methods: A prospective study involving EVLP for the reconditioning of extended-criteria donor lungs, the criteria for which include aspects such as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 mmHg. Between February of 2013 and February of 2014, the lungs of five donors were submitted to EVLP for up to 4 h each. During EVLP, respiratory mechanics were continuously evaluated. Once every hour during the procedure, samples of the perfusate were collected and the function of the lungs was evaluated. Results: The mean PaO2 of the recovered lungs was 262.9 ± 119.7 mmHg at baseline, compared with 357.0 ± 108.5 mmHg after 3 h of EVLP. The mean oxygenation capacity of the lungs improved slightly over the first 3 h of EVLP-246.1 ± 35.1, 257.9 ± 48.9, and 288.8 ± 120.5 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively-without significant differences among the time points (p = 0.508). The mean static compliance was 63.0 ± 18.7 mmHg, 75.6 ± 25.4 mmHg, and 70.4 ± 28.0 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively, with a significant improvement from hour 1 to hour 2 (p = 0.029) but not from hour 2 to hour 3 (p = 0.059). Pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable during EVLP, with no differences among time points (p = 0.284). Conclusions: Although the lungs evaluated remained under physiological conditions, the EVLP protocol did not effectively improve lung function, thus precluding transplantation. PMID:27167429

  13. Fibre optic sensors for temperature and pressure monitoring in laser ablation: experiments on ex-vivo animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh B.; Poeggel, Sven; Adilzhan, Abzal; Aliakhmet, Kamilla; Silvestri, Sergio; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-05-01

    Optical fibre sensors have been applied to perform biophysical measurement in ex-vivo laser ablation (LA), on pancreas animal phantom. Experiments have been performed using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) arrays for spatially resolved temperature detection, and an all-glass Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (EFPI) for pressure measurement. Results using a Nd:YAG laser source as ablation device, are presented and discussed.

  14. In vitro and ex vivo strategies for intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Martin P.; Sharei, Armon; Ding, Xiaoyun; Sahay, Gaurav; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular delivery of materials has become a critical component of genome-editing approaches, ex vivo cell-based therapies, and a diversity of fundamental research applications. Limitations of current technologies motivate development of next-generation systems that can deliver a broad variety of cargo to diverse cell types. Here we review in vitro and ex vivo intracellular delivery approaches with a focus on mechanisms, challenges and opportunities. In particular, we emphasize membrane-disruption-based delivery methods and the transformative role of nanotechnology, microfluidics and laboratory-on-chip technology in advancing the field.

  15. Bringing natural killer cells to the clinic: ex vivo manipulation.

    PubMed

    Childs, Richard W; Berg, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been a substantial gain in our understanding of the role that natural killer (NK) cells play in mediating innate host immune responses against viruses and cancer. Although NK cells have long been known to be capable of killing cancer cells independently of antigen recognition, the full therapeutic potential of NK cell-based immunotherapy has yet to be realized. Here we review novel methods to activate and expand human NK cells ex vivo for adoptive transfer in humans, focusing on the important phenotypic and functional differences observed among freshly isolated, cytokine activated, and ex vivo-expanded NK populations. PMID:24319186

  16. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  17. Ex vivo engineered immune organoids for controlled germinal center reactions

    PubMed Central

    Purwada, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Ahn, Haelee; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Cerchietti, Leandro; Singh, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo engineered three-dimensional organotypic cultures have enabled the real-time study and control of biological functioning of mammalian tissues. Organs of broad interest where its architectural, cellular, and molecular complexity has prevented progress in ex vivo engineering are the secondary immune organs. Ex vivo immune organs can enable mechanistic understanding of the immune system and more importantly, accelerate the translation of immunotherapies as well as a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that lead to their malignant transformation into a variety of B and T cell malignancies. However, till date, no modular ex vivo immune organ has been developed with an ability to control the rate of immune reaction through tunable design parameter. Here we describe a B cell follicle organoid made of nanocomposite biomaterials, which recapitulates the anatomical microenvironment of a lymphoid tissue that provides the basis to induce an accelerated germinal center (GC) reaction by continuously providing extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell–cell signals to naïve B cells. Compared to existing co-cultures, immune organoids provide a control over primary B cell proliferation with ~100-fold higher and rapid differentiation to the GC phenotype with robust antibody class switching. PMID:26072995

  18. Influence of ultrasonic scattering in the calculation of thermal dose in ex-vivo bovine muscular tissues.

    PubMed

    Cortela, Guillermo A; von Krüger, Marco A; Negreira, Carlos A; Pereira, Wagner C A

    2016-02-01

    This study explores the effect of ultrasound scattering on the temperature increase in phantoms and in samples of ex-vivo biological tissue through the calculation of the thermal dose (TD). Phantoms with different weight percentages of graphite powder (0-1%w/w, different scattering mean free paths, ℓS) and ex-vivo bovine muscle tissue were isonified by therapeutic ultrasound (1 MHz). The TD values were calculated from the first 4 min of experimental temperature curves obtained at several depths and were compared with those acquired from the numerical solution of the bio-heat transfer equation (simulated with 1 MHz and 0.5-2.0 W cm(-2)). The temperature curves suggested that scattering had an important role because the temperature increments were found to be higher for higher percentages of graphite powder (lower ℓS). For example, at a 30-mm depth and a 4-min therapeutic ultrasound application (0.5 W cm(-2)), the TDs (in equivalent minutes at 43 °C) were 7.2, 17.8, and 58.3 for the phantom with ℓS of 4.35, 3.85, and 3.03 mm, respectively. In tissue, the inclusion of only absorption or full attenuation in the bio-heat transfer equation (BHTE) heat source term of the simulation leads to under- or overestimation of the TD, respectively, as compared to the TD calculated from experimental data. The experiments with phantoms (with different scatterer concentrations) and ex-vivo samples show that the high values of TD were caused by the increase of energy absorption due to the lengthening of the propagation path caused by the changing in the propagation regime. PMID:26522957

  19. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes.

  20. Models of ex vivo explant cultures: applications in bone research.

    PubMed

    Marino, Silvia; Staines, Katherine Ann; Brown, Genevieve; Howard-Jones, Rachel Anne; Adamczyk, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Ex vivo explant culture models are powerful tools in bone research. They allow investigation of bone and cartilage responses to specific stimuli in a controlled manner that closely mimics the in vivo processes. Because of limitations in obtaining healthy human bone samples the explant growth of animal tissue serves as a platform to study the complex physico-chemical properties of the bone. Moreover, these models enable preserving important cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in order to better understand the behaviour of cells in their natural three-dimensional environment. Thus, the use of bone ex vivo explant cultures can frequently be of more physiological relevance than the use of two-dimensional primary cells grown in vitro. Here, we describe isolation and ex vivo growth of different animal bone explant models including metatarsals, femoral heads, calvaria, mandibular slices and trabecular cores. We also describe how these explants are utilised to study bone development, cartilage and bone metabolism, cancer-induced bone diseases, stem cell-driven bone repair and mechanoadaptation. These techniques can be directly used to understand mechanisms linked with bone physiology or bone-associated diseases.

  1. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. PMID:23702414

  2. PASSIVE CAVITATION DETECTION DURING PULSED HIFU EXPOSURES OF EX VIVO TISSUES AND IN VIVO MOUSE PANCREATIC TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been demonstrated to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rarefactional focal pressures (1–12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms, pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KPC mice and closely recapitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50 % cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5–10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but ex vivo it decreased rapidly and stopped over the first few pulses

  3. Passive cavitation detection during pulsed HIFU exposures of ex vivo tissues and in vivo mouse pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been shown to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rare factional focal pressures (1-12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms and pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KrasLSL.G12 D/+; p53 R172 H/+; PdxCretg/+ (KPC) mice and closely re-capitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50% cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5-10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but it decreased rapidly and stopped

  4. Preliminary Study of Open Quotient in an Ex-Vivo Perfused Human Larynx Model

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Abie H.; Zhang, Zhaoyan; Luegmair, Georg; Orestes, Michael; Berke, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Scientific understanding human voice production to date is a product of indirect investigations including animal models, cadaveric tissue study, or computational modeling. Due to its invasive nature, direct experimentation of human voice production has previously not been possible. The feasibility of an ex-vivo perfused human phonatory model has recently allowed systematic investigation in virtually living human larynges with parametric laryngeal muscle stimulation. Objective In this study, the relationship between adductor muscle group stimulation and the open quotient (OQ) of vocal fold vibration was investigated using an ex-vivo perfused human larynx. Design Human perfused tissue study. Setting Physiology Laboratory. Participants Human larynx is recovered from research-consented organ donors within two hours of cardiac death. Interventions, Main Outcomes and Measures Perfusion with donated human blood is re-established shortly after cardiac death. Human perfused phonation is achieved by providing subglottal airflow under graded neuromuscular electrical stimulation bilaterally to the intrinsic adductor groups and cricothyroid muscles. The phonation resulting from the graded states of neuromuscular stimulations are evaluated through high-speed vibratory imaging. OQ is derived through digital kymography and glottal area waveform analysis. Results Under constant glottal flow, step-wise increase in adductor muscle group stimulation decreased OQ. Quantitatively, OQ values reached a lower limit of 0.42. Increased stimulation above maximal muscle deformation was unable to affect OQ beyond this lower limit. Conclusions and Relevance For the first time in a neuromuscularly activated human larynx, a negative relationship between adductor muscle group stimulation and phonatory OQ was demonstrated. Further experience with the ex-vivo perfused human phonatory model will work to systematically define this causal relationship. PMID:26181642

  5. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  6. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo imaging of the microvasculature with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, Joe; Koletar, Margaret; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G.

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates 2-Photon fluorescence microscopy of in vivo and ex vivo cleared samples for visualizing cortical vasculature. Four mice brains were imaged with in vivo 2PFM. Mice were then perfused with a FITC gel and cleared in fructose. The same regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented automatically in both images using an in-house developed algorithm that accounts for the anisotropic and spatially varying PSF ex vivo. Through non-linear warping, the ex vivo image and tracing were aligned to the in vivo image. The corresponding vessels were identified through a local search algorithm. This enabled comparison of identical vessels in vivo/ex vivo. A similar process was conducted on the in vivo tracing to determine the percentage of vessels perfused. Of all the vessels identified over the four brains in vivo, 98% were present ex vivo. There was a trend towards reduced vessel diameter ex vivo by 12.7%, and the shrinkage varied between specimens (0% to 26%). Large diameter surface vessels, through a process termed 'shadowing', attenuated in vivo signal from deeper cortical vessels by 40% at 300 μm below the cortical surface, which does not occur ex vivo. In summary, though there is a mean diameter shrinkage ex vivo, ex vivo imaging has a reduced shadowing artifact. Additionally, since imaging depths are only limited by the working distance of the microscope objective, ex vivo imaging is more suitable for imaging large portions of the brain.

  7. Development and clinical translation of OTIS: a wide-field OCT imaging device for ex-vivo tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Elizabeth A.; Rempel, David; Danner, Christine; Atchia, Yaaseen; Valic, Michael S.; Berkeley, Andrew; Davoudi, Bahar; Magnin, Paul A.; Akens, Margarete; Done, Susan J.; Kulkarni, Supriya; Leong, Wey-Liang; Wilson, Brian C.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an automated, wide-field optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based imaging device (OTISTM Perimeter Medical Imaging) for peri-operative, ex-vivo tissue imaging. This device features automated image acquisition, enabling rapid capture of high-resolution (15 μm) OCT images from samples up to 10 cm in diameter. We report on the iterative progression of device development from phantom and pre-clinical (tumor xenograft) models through to initial clinical results. We discuss the challenges associated with proving a novel imaging technology against the clinical "gold standard" of conventional post-operative pathology.

  8. An ex vivo model for the reperfusion of explanted human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Kadipasaoglu, K A; Bennink, G W; Conger, J L; Birovljev, S; Sartori, M; Clubb, F J; Noda, H; Ferguson, J J; Frazier, O H

    1993-01-01

    A model of an ex vivo-reperfused human heart was developed by using a modified Langendorff coronary perfusion circuit. The technical and physiologic aspects of reestablishing myocardial contractility are described. Preliminary studies were conducted in animals. In the present study, we obtained 12 human hearts that had been arrested with cardioplegic solution and excised from cardiac transplant recipients. The perfusate contained type-specific human donor red blood cells in a lactated Ringer's solution containing 5% dextrose. Myocardial contractility was successfully reestablished in 11 hearts and sustained for an average of 98 minutes (range, 79 to 180 minutes) at a coronary perfusion pressure of 80 mmHg. Left ventricular contraction pressures reached 40 mmHg (against intraventricular balloons at an internal pressure of 50 to 75 mmHg). Partial oxygen pressure (PO2) dropped significantly across the empty beating myocardium (from 498 +/- 40 mmHg to 219 +/- 53 mmHg [mean +/- SD]), but no significant change in hemoglobin saturation was observed. Myocardial failure generally stemmed from edematous changes leading to progressive impairment of myocardial relaxation. The intracoronary insertion of over-the-wire catheters did not adversely affect myocardial function. In conclusion, an ex vivo-supported human heart model has been developed that may have a number of applications, including the preclinical evaluation of new interventional diagnostic and therapeutic techniques aimed at the coronary circulation, and the investigation of myocardial mechanics, preservation, and metabolism. Images PMID:8508061

  9. Functional Genetic Targeting of Embryonic Kidney Progenitor Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M. Rita; Brändli, André W.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor–treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting. PMID:25201883

  10. Ex vivo gene therapy for HIV-1 treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Lisa J.; Rossi, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, progress in ex vivo gene therapy (GT) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) treatment has been incremental. Long-term HIV-1 remission in a patient who received a heterologous stem cell transplant for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma from a CCR5−/– donor, even after discontinuation of conventional therapy, has energized the field. We review the status of current approaches as well as future directions in the areas of therapeutic targets, combinatorial strategies, vector design, introduction of therapeutics into stem cells and enrichment/expansion of gene-modified cells. Finally, we discuss recent advances towards clinical application of HIV-1 GT. PMID:21505069

  11. Ex Vivo Fluorescence Molecular Tomography of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhare, Monish; Chen, Jin; Venugopal, Vivek; Intes, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the potential of fluorescence molecular tomography to image ex vivo samples collected from a large animal model, in this case, a dog spine. Wide-field time-gated fluorescence tomography was employed to assess the impact of multiview acquisition, data type, and intrinsic optical properties on the localization and quantification accuracy in imaging a fluorescent inclusion in the intervertebral disk. As expected, the TG data sets, when combining early and late gates, provide significantly better performances than the CW data sets in terms of localization and quantification. Moreover, the use of multiview imaging protocols led to more accurate localization. Additionally, the incorporation of the heterogeneous nature of the tissue in the model to compute the Jacobians led to improved imaging performances. This preliminary imaging study provides a proof of concept of the feasibility of quantitatively imaging complex ex vivo samples nondestructively and with short acquisition times. This work is the first step towards employing optical molecular imaging of the spine to detect and characterize disc degeneration based on targeted fluorescent probes. PMID:23197973

  12. Generation and Expansion of T Helper 17 Lymphocytes Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Darya; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    CD4(+) T helper (Th) lymphocytes are essential elements of the complex cellular networks regulating the initiation, development, and termination of adaptive immune responses. Different independent and specialized subsets of Th cells can be distinguished based on their dedicated transcription factor and cytokine expression profiles. Th17 lymphocytes have been described about a decade ago as CD4(+) Th cells producing high quantity of IL-17A as a signature cytokine. Since their initial discovery, Th17 have drawn intense scrutiny for their dominant role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune, infectious diseases and allergy. The influence of Th17 lymphocytes in cancer remains however ambiguous. The plethoric functions of Th17 may rely on the remarkable plasticity of these cells, endowed with the ability to trans-differentiate into other Th subpopulations depending on the environmental cytokine context. The possibility to generate Th17 ex vivo has facilitated the elucidation of the signals and transcription factors required for their differentiation and functions and has allowed for the evaluation of their functions following adoptive transfer in vivo. Several protocols have been developed to produce Th17 in vitro. The intent of this chapter is to provide examples of procedures for generating and expanding Th17 ex vivo. PMID:26530797

  13. Fluorescent probes concentration estimation in vitro and ex vivo as a model for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-12-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's disease (AD) begins years before clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a method that may detect AD several years earlier than current exams. The method is based on previous reports that relate the concentration ratio of biomarkers (amyloid-beta and tau) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the development of AD. Our method replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing by using fluorescence measurements. The system uses an optical fiber coupled to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites two fluorescent probes which may bond to the CSF biomarkers. Their concentration ratio is extracted from the fluorescence intensities and can be used for future AD detection. First, we present a theoretical model for fluorescence concentration ratio estimation. The method's feasibility was validated using Monte Carlo simulations. Its accuracy was then tested using multilayered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, CSF, and bone. These phantoms have various optical properties, thicknesses, and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate human anatomy variations and different fiber locations. The method was further tested using ex vivo chicken tissue. The average errors of the estimated concentration ratios were low both in vitro (4.4%) and ex vivo (10.9%), demonstrating high accuracy.

  14. Validation of NIRS in measuring tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation on ex vivo and isolated limb models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaorong; Zhu, Wen; Padival, Vikram; Xia, Mengna; Cheng, Xuefeng; Bush, Robin; Christenson, Linda; Chan, Tim; Doherty, Tim; Iatridis, Angelo

    2003-07-01

    Photonify"s tissue spectrometer uses Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for real-time, noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation [SO2] of biological tissues. The technology was validated by a series of ex vivo and animal studies. In the ex vivo experiment, a close loop blood circulation system was built, precisely controlling the oxygen saturation and the hemoglobin concentration of a liquid phantom. Photonify"s tissue spectrometer was placed on the surface of the liquid phantom for real time measurement and compared with a gas analyzer, considered the gold standard to measure oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration. In the animal experiment, the right hind limb of each dog accepted onto the study was surgically removed. The limb was kept viable by connecting the femoral vein and artery to a blood-primed extracorporeal circuit. Different concentrations of hemoglobin were obtained by adding designated amount of saline solution into the perfusion circuit. Photonify"s tissue spectrometers measured oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration at various locations on the limb and compared with gas analyzer results. The test results demonstrated that Photonify"s tissue spectrometers were able to detect the relative changes in tissue oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration with a high linear correlation compared to the gas analyzer

  15. The clinical potential of ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-02-01

    The number of patients listed for lung transplantation largely exceeds the number of available transplantable organs because of both a shortage of organ donors and a low utilization rate of donor lungs. Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a method that maintains the organ in physiologically protective conditions outside the body during preservation, and shows great promise to increase utilization of donor lungs by allowing more accurate evaluation, as well as treatment and repair, of damaged donor lungs prior to transplantation. This article will cover the rationale, technical details and results of experimental and clinical studies with EVLP. The significant potential applications of EVLP in lung transplantation, lung regeneration and oncology are discussed. PMID:22283576

  16. Radioprotective effects of ATP in human blood ex vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Swennen, Els L.R. Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Van den Beucken, Twan; Bast, Aalt

    2008-03-07

    Damage to healthy tissue is a major limitation of radiotherapy treatment of cancer patients, leading to several side effects and complications. Radiation-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines is thought to be partially responsible for the radiation-associated complications. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of extracellular ATP on markers of oxidative stress, radiation-induced inflammation and DNA damage in irradiated blood ex vivo. ATP inhibited radiation-induced TNF-{alpha} release and increased IL-10 release. The inhibitory effect of ATP on TNF- {alpha} release was completely reversed by adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate, indicating a P2Y{sub 11} mediated effect. Furthermore, ATP attenuated radiation-induced DNA damage immediate, 3 and 6 h after irradiation. Our study indicates that ATP administration alleviates radiation-toxicity to blood cells, mainly by inhibiting radiation-induced inflammation and DNA damage.

  17. Polyethylene glycol diffusion in ex vivo skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genin, V. D.; Tuchina, D. K.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    Optical clearing of the rat skin under the action of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with molecular weight 300 and 400 Dalton was studied ex vivo. The collimated transmittance was measured at the wavelength range 500-900 nm. It was found that collimated transmittance of skin samples increased, whereas weight, thickness and area of the samples decreased during PEG penetration in skin tissue. A mechanism of the optical clearing under the action of PEG is discussed. Taking into account the kinetics of volume and thickness of the skin samples, diffusion coefficient of PEGs in skin tissue has been estimated as (1.83±2.22)×10-6 cm2/s and (1.70±1.47)×10-6 cm2/s for PEG-300 and PEG-400, respectively. The presented results can be useful for enhancement of many methods of laser therapy and optical diagnostics of skin diseases and localization of subcutaneous neoplasms.

  18. Assessment of donor heart viability during ex vivo heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    White, Christopher W; Ambrose, Emma; Müller, Alison; Li, Yun; Le, Hoa; Hiebert, Brett; Arora, Rakesh; Lee, Trevor W; Dixon, Ian; Tian, Ganghong; Nagendran, Jayan; Hryshko, Larry; Freed, Darren

    2015-10-01

    Ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP) may facilitate resuscitation of discarded donor hearts and expand the donor pool; however, a reliable means of demonstrating organ viability prior to transplantation is required. Therefore, we sought to identify metabolic and functional parameters that predict myocardial performance during EVHP. To evaluate the parameters over a broad spectrum of organ function, we obtained hearts from 9 normal pigs and 37 donation after circulatory death pigs and perfused them ex vivo. Functional parameters obtained from a left ventricular conductance catheter, oxygen consumption, coronary vascular resistance, and lactate concentration were measured, and linear regression analyses were performed to identify which parameters best correlated with myocardial performance (cardiac index: mL·min(-1)·g(-1)). Functional parameters exhibited excellent correlation with myocardial performance and demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for identifying hearts at risk of poor post-transplant function (ejection fraction: R(2) = 0.80, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.85; stroke work: R(2) = 0.76, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.77; minimum dP/dt: R(2) = 0.74, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.54; tau: R(2) = 0.51, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.92), whereas metabolic parameters were limited in their ability to predict myocardial performance (oxygen consumption: R(2) = 0.28; coronary vascular resistance: R(2) = 0.20; lactate concentration: R(2) = 0.02). We concluded that evaluation of functional parameters provides the best assessment of myocardial performance during EVHP, which highlights the need for an EVHP device capable of assessing the donor heart in a physiologic working mode.

  19. Ex vivo infection of live tissue with oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Jean-Simon; Roy, Dominic; Abdelbary, Hesham; De Silva, Naomi; Bell, John C

    2011-06-25

    Oncolytic Viruses (OVs) are novel therapeutics that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells(1). Several clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of a variety of oncolytic platforms including HSV, Reovirus, and Vaccinia OVs as treatment for cancer are currently underway(2-5). One key characteristic of oncolytic viruses is that they can be genetically modified to express reporter transgenes which makes it possible to visualize the infection of tissues by microscopy or bio-luminescence imaging(6,7). This offers a unique advantage since it is possible to infect tissues from patients ex vivo prior to therapy in order to ascertain the likelihood of successful oncolytic virotherapy(8). To this end, it is critical to appropriately sample tissue to compensate for tissue heterogeneity and assess tissue viability, particularly prior to infection(9). It is also important to follow viral replication using reporter transgenes if expressed by the oncolytic platform as well as by direct titration of tissues following homogenization in order to discriminate between abortive and productive infection. The object of this protocol is to address these issues and herein describes 1. The sampling and preparation of tumor tissue for cell culture 2. The assessment of tissue viability using the metabolic dye alamar blue 3. Ex vivo infection of cultured tissues with vaccinia virus expressing either GFP or firefly luciferase 4. Detection of transgene expression by fluorescence microscopy or using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS) 5. Quantification of virus by plaque assay. This comprehensive method presents several advantages including ease of tissue processing, compensation for tissue heterogeneity, control of tissue viability, and discrimination between abortive infection and bone fide viral replication.

  20. Influence of water dilution on percutaneous absorption of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in vivo and ex vivo in rats and ex vivo in humans.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Fabrice; Payan, Jean-Paul; Beydon, Dominique; Wathier, Ludivine; Ferrari, Elisabeth; Grandclaude, Marie-Christine

    2015-11-01

    N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) is mainly used as a monomer in the production of polyvinylpyrrolidone or copolymers. Percutaneous absorption is an important source of exposure in the work environment. However, few studies have investigated this route of absorption. In this study, percutaneous absorption of neat or aqueous NVP solutions was measured in vivo and ex vivo in rats, and ex vivo in humans. Penetration and absorption fluxes were very similar following in vivo exposure to neat NVP (0.54 and 0.43 mg/cm(2)/h, respectively). Exposing rats to a 50% aqueous solution of NVP increased both fluxes threefold (to 1.48 and 1.55 mg/cm(2)/h, respectively). Ex vivo, the absorption flux increased with solutions from 10 to 25% of NVP, reached a plateau (between 25 and 50% in rat, 25 and 75% in human) and then decreased with neat NVP. In vivo and ex vivo absorption fluxes measured using rat skin were similar, supporting the hypothesis that the ex vivo measurements were a good representation of what was observed in vivo. Thus, for humans, the ex vivo measurements are likely the same as would be determined in vivo.

  1. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the in-vitro and ex-vivo detection of excitatory amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, D. P.; Motamedi, Massoud; Chen, Jefferson; Cote, Gerard L.

    1999-04-01

    Traditionally methods for the detection of excitatory amino acids, which have been linked to secondary injury following head trauma, can be excessively time consuming clinically. A near real-time measurement system could provide clinical information in anticipation of pharmaceutical intervention for head injured patients. Our studies have shown that surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with silver colloids has the ability to measure physiological concentrations of in vitro excitatory amino acids using short scan times. Employing a damage model for ischemia, preliminary ex vivo rat extracellular grain fluid analysis shows an intriguing correlation between SERS spectral features and expected Glutamate concentration fluctuations following head injuries.

  3. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min p<0.001) in the tissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  4. Photoacoustic tomography of ex vivo mouse hearts with myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holotta, Markus; Grossauer, Harald; Kremser, Christian; Torbica, Pavle; Völkl, Jakob; Degenhart, Gerald; Esterhammer, Regina; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Günther; Jaschke, Werner

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the applicability of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) on small animal organs. We used photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to visualize infarcted areas within murine hearts and compared these data to other imaging techniques [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography] and histological slices. In order to induce ischemia, an in vivo ligation of the left anterior descending artery was performed on nine wild-type mice. After varying survival periods, the hearts were excised and fixed in formaldehyde. Samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser pulses delivered by a Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator. Ultrasound detection was achieved using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) working as an integrating line detector. The voxel data were computed using a Fourier-domain based reconstruction algorithm, followed by inverse Radon transforms. The results clearly showed the capability of PAI to visualize myocardial infarction and to produce three-dimensional images with a spatial resolution of approximately 120 μm. Regions of affected muscle tissue in PAI corresponded well with the results of MRI and histology. Photoacoustic tomography utilizing a MZI for ultrasound detection allows for imaging of small tissue samples. Due to its high spatial resolution, good soft tissue contrast and comparatively low cost, PAT offers great potentials for imaging.

  5. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. PMID:26730551

  6. Ex vivo model of an immobilized-enzyme reactor.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, H; Langer, R

    1988-01-01

    Immobilized-enzyme reactors are beginning to be studied for a variety of therapeutic applications. To facilitate the design of these devices for different clinical situations and a diverse patient population, mathematical models may be valuable. An immobilized-heparinase (EC 4.2.2.7) reactor was selected as a model system. The device removes heparin from blood that has been anticoagulated to prevent thrombus formation. Heparinase was immobilized to cross-linked agarose particles. A mathematical model was developed to describe the clearance of heparin by the reactor ex vivo and compared to experimental clearances measured in sheep. The model accounted for enzymatic degradation as well as the binding of heparin and its breakdown products to antithrombin. The device was modeled as a steady-state continuously stirred tank reactor. Molar conservation equations within the agarose particles accounted for simultaneous diffusion and chemical reaction. The model had no adjustable parameters and was able to predict the clearance of heparin within 5-25% for three different animals and 12 different perfusions. PMID:3186758

  7. Impact of Hydration Media on Ex Vivo Corneal Elasticity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of hydration media on ex vivo corneal elasticity. Methods Experiments were conducted on forty porcine eyes retrieved from an abattoir (10 eyes each for PBS, BSS, Optisol, 15% Dextran). The epithelium was removed and the cornea was excised with an intact scleral rim and placed in 20% Dextran overnight to restore its physiological thickness. For each hydration media, corneas were evenly divided into two groups: one with an intact scleral rim and the other without. Corneas were mounted onto a custom chamber and immersed in a hydration medium for elasticity testing. While in each medium, corneal elasticity measurements were performed for 2 hours: at 5-minute intervals for the first 30 minutes and then 15-minute intervals for the remaining 90 minutes. Elasticity testing was performed using nanoindentation with spherical indenters and Young’s modulus was calculated using the Hertz model. Thickness measurements were taken before and after elasticity testing. Results The percentage change in corneal thickness and elasticity was calculated for each hydration media group. BSS, PBS, and Optisol showed an increase in thickness and Young’s moduli for corneas with and without an intact scleral rim. 15% Dextran exhibited a dehydrating effect on corneal thickness and provided stable maintenance of corneal elasticity for both groups. Conclusions Hydration media affects the stability of corneal thickness and elasticity measurements over time. 15% Dextran was most effective in maintaining corneal hydration and elasticity, followed by Optisol. PMID:25603443

  8. Recellularized human dermis for testing gene electrotransfer ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bulysheva, Anna A; Burcus, Nina; Lundberg, Cathryn; Edelblute, Chelsea M; Francis, Michael P; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer (GET) is a proven and valuable tool for in vivo gene delivery to a variety of tissues such as skin, cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, and tumors, with controllable gene delivery and expression levels. Optimizing gene expression is a challenging hurdle in preclinical studies, particularly for skin indications, due to differences in electrical conductivity of animal compared to human dermis. Therefore, the goal of this study was to develop an ex vivo model for GET using recellularized human dermis to more closely mimic human skin. Decellularized human dermis (DermACELL(®)) was cultured with human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes for 4 weeks. After one week of fibroblast culture, fibroblasts infiltrated and dispersed throughout the dermis. Air-liquid interface culture led to epithelial cell proliferation, stratification and terminal differentiation with distinct basal, spinous, granular and cornified strata. Firefly luciferase expression kinetics were evaluated after GET of recellularized constructs for testing gene delivery parameters to skin in vitro. Elevated luciferase expression persisted up to a week following GET compared to controls without electrotransfer. In summary, recellularized dermis structurally and functionally resembled native human skin in tissue histological organization and homeostasis, proving an effective 3D human skin model for preclinical gene delivery studies. PMID:27121769

  9. In vitro and ex vivo antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Maryam; Mostafaie, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Bidmeshkipour, Ali; Motlagh, Hamid Reza Mohammadi; Parvaneh, Shahram

    2010-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer and its metastasis. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis extract and its fractions was investigated. S. officinalis aerial parts were extracted with ethanol and its successive hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions were evaluated for their antiangiogenic activities using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) capillary tube formation and rat aorta models in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. Furthermore, antimigrative effects of the fractions were assessed using a wound healing model. The ethanol extract of S. officinalis (ESO) potently inhibited capillary tube formation in HUVEC and rat aorta models of angiogenesis, and its hexane fraction (HSO) exerted the highest inhibitory effect. In addition, the ethanol extract of S. officinalis and its hexane fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibitory activity on the migration of the endothelial cells in the wound healing model. Furthermore, ESO inhibited endothelial cell proliferation at 50-200 μg/mL in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicated some new pharmacological activities of S. officinalis such as antiangiogenic in vitro and ex vivo, and antimigrative activity in vitro. Therefore, S. officinalis could be a candidate as a useful herb with therapeutic or preventive activity against angiogenesis related disorders.

  10. Photodynamic inactivation of somatic frog nerve ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Seliverstov, George A.; Akchurin, George G.; Kudryashova, Svetlana Y.

    2004-06-01

    New techniques research mechanisms of photdynamic reactions at somatic frog nerve was approved. Dosimetry PDT with minimum time resolution ~1ms determined by changing the amplitude of compound action potential of somatic frog nerve. Light-induced inactivation of dynamic response of somatic frog nerve on electrical pulsed excitation was study ex vivo. The light-sensitive dyes: methylene blue (Mb), Indocianin green and eryhtrocin-B has been used on photodynamic induced inactivation of the processes generation nerve pulses. Inactivation of consequence action potential of somatic frog nerve using excitation of electical pulsed was achieved by irradiation with He-Ne laser light in a red spectral region (λ=633 nm, power level 2-20 mW), diode laser (λ=805 nm, P<0.1-1 W/cm2) in the case of Indocianin green and YAG:Nd laser (λ=532 nm, P~1mW) for eryhtrocin-B. It was discovered that methylene blue, Indocainine green and erytrocin-B decrease of the amplitude compound action potential of the ensemble neurons. The possible cell death mechanism was connected with damage of the sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase (K-Na ATP) active transport which decrease of amplitude of compound action potential and decrease lifetime ionic channel of membrane nerve.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression ex vivo in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Mari, David C; Whitehurst, Michael; Slusher, Aaron; Wilson, Alan; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2014-01-17

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk in neurodegenerative diseases. To counteract the neuronal damage, the human body increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, leading to neuronal survival and plasticity. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have been found to release BDNF as a potential neuroprotective role of inflammation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PBMC activation would lead to differences in BDNF and inflammatory responses between obese and non-obese subjects. Thirty-one subjects (14 obese and 17 non-obese), ages 18 to 30years, were recruited. PBMCs were cultured for 24h with 10ng/mL LPS. BDNF, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured in both plasma and cell culture supernatants. Our results did not illustrate any differences in plasma BDNF levels between obese and non-obese groups. However, obese subjects elicited a greater plasma IL-6 production, which was positively associated with plasma BDNF. Furthermore, LPS-induced PBMCs expressed significantly higher BDNF and IL-6 levels in obese subjects compared to the non-obese subjects. Finally, these BDNF levels were positively correlated with IL-6 response ex vivo. These findings suggest that under a high inflammatory state, PBMCs produce greater BDNF and IL-6 expression which may play a collaborative role to protect against neuronal damage associated with obesity. PMID:24140987

  12. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min p<0.001) in the tissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  13. A superfusion apparatus for ex vivo human eye irritation investigations.

    PubMed

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Salvalaio, Gianni; Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Baruzzo, Mattia; Cagini, Carlo; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    A superfusion apparatus (SA) was developed to maintain isolated human corneas ex vivo under conditions which mimic the natural eye environment in vivo, including controlled temperature, tear flow and intraocular pressure. The SA was designed, developed and tested for use in ophthalmic pre-clinical research and to test new pharmaceutical formulations. Corneas undergo an equilibration process in the new physiological environment for one day. The test was then initiated by the application of the test substance, incubation, and temporal assessment of corneal damage using various parameters. The effects of mild and severe irritant concentrations of NaOH (2% and 8%, respectively) on corneal opacity, swelling and epithelial integrity were studied, and the inflammatory status assessed using F4/80 and MPO as macrophages and neutrophils markers, respectively. The SA was then used to test new artificial tear formulations supplemented with silver ions as an active constituent, showing different degrees of inflammatory responses as indicated by the migration of MPO and F4/80 positive cells towards the epithelium. The human cornea superfusion apparatus was proposed as a model for acute eye irritation research.

  14. Optical clearing of skin tissue ex vivo with polyethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, D. K.; Genin, V. D.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the optical and structural (weight, thickness, and square) parameters of skin caused by polyethylene glycol (PEG) with molecular weights of 300 and 400 Da were studied experimentally. The objects of the study were ex vivo skin samples of albino laboratory rats. Collimated transmittance of the skin was measured in the wavelength range 500-900 nm. As a result of exposure to the agents, an increase in the collimated transmittance and a decrease in weight, thickness, and square of skin samples were observed. Analysis of the kinetics of parameters alterations allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient of the agents in the skin as (1.83 ± 2.22) × 10-6 and (1.70 ± 1.47) × 10-6 cm2/s for PEG-300 and PEG-400, respectively, and the rate of alterations of the structural parameters. The results obtained in this study can be used for the improvement of existing and development of new methods of noninvasive diagnostics and therapy of subcutaneous diseases.

  15. Effect of ticlopidine ex vivo on platelet intracellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Derian, C.K.; Friedman, P.A.

    1988-04-01

    The antiplatelet compound ticlopidine exerts its potent inhibitory activity through an as yet undetermined mechanism(s). The goal of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of ticlopidine ex vivo on platelet calcium mobilization. Ticlopidine inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation by 50-80%. In the presence of 1 mM EGTA, ticlopidine inhibited ADP- and thrombin-stimulated increases in (Ca2+)i in fura-2 loaded platelets. We evaluated further the effect of ticlopidine on calcium mobilization by examining both agonist-stimulated formation of inositol trisphosphate in intact platelets and the ability of inositol trisphosphate to release /sup 45/Ca from intracellular sites in permeabilized cells. We show here that while ticlopidine significantly affected agonist-induced intracellular calcium mobilization in intact platelets, the drug was without effect on agonist-stimulated formation of inositol trisphosphate in intact platelets and on inositol trisphosphate-induced /sup 45/Ca release in saponin-permeabilized platelets. Our study demonstrates that ticlopidine exerts at least part of its effect via inhibition of intracellular calcium mobilization but that its site of action remains to be determined.

  16. Effects of human hair on trans-cranial focused ultrasound efficacy in an ex-vivo cadaver model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hananel, Arik; Snell, John W.; Kassell, Neal F.; Eames, Matthew D. C.

    2012-11-01

    Current practice before a trans-cranial MR guided Focused ultrasound procedure is shaving the patient head on treatment day. Here we present an initial attempt to evaluate the feasibility of trans-cranial FUS, in an unshaved, ex-vivo cadaver skull. We have sonicated using 220kHz and 710kHz head transducers, a cadaver skull filled with tissue mimicking phantom and covered with a wig made of human hair to evaluate feasibility of acoustic energy transfer in a full size model. Heating at focal point was measured using MR proton resonance shift thermometry. Results showed negligible effect of hair in 220kHz, and an 18% drop in temperature elevation when using 710kHz.

  17. Angiotensin II regulates growth of the developing papillas ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Khalili, Ali; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lack of angiotensin (ANG) II production in angiotensinogen (AGT)-deficient mice or pharmacologic antagonism of ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) impairs growth of the developing papillas ex vivo, thus contributing to the hypoplastic renal medulla phenotype observed in AGT- or AT1R-null mice. Papillas were dissected from Hoxb7GFP+ or AGT+/+, +/−, −/− mouse metanephroi on postnatal day P3 and grown in three-dimentional collagen matrix gels in the presence of media (control), ANG II (10−5 M), or the specific AT1R antagonist candesartan (10−6 M) for 24 h. Percent reduction in papillary length was attenuated in AGT+/+ and in AGT+/− compared with AGT−/− (−18.4 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, −22.8 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). ANG II blunted the decrease in papilla length observed in respective media-treated controls in Hoxb7GFP+ (−1.5 ± 0.3 vs. −10.0 ± 1.4%, P < 0.05) or AGT+/+, +/−, and −/− papillas (−12.8 ± 0.7 vs. −18.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05, −16.8 ± 1.1 vs. −23 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05; −26.2 ± 1.6 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, percent decrease in the length of Hoxb7GFP+ papillas in the presence of the AT1R antagonist candesartan was higher compared with control (−24.3 ± 2.1 vs. −10.5 ± 1.8%, P < 0.05). The number of proliferating phospho-histone H3 (pH3)-positive collecting duct cells was lower, whereas the number of caspase 3-positive cells undergoing apoptosis was higher in candesartan- vs. media-treated papillas (pH3: 12 ± 1.4 vs. 21 ± 2.1, P < 0.01; caspase 3: 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AT1R signaling regulates the expression of genes implicated in morphogenesis of the renal medulla. We conclude that AT1R prevents shrinkage of the developing papillas observed ex vivo via control of Wnt7b, FGF7, β-catenin, calcineurin B1, and α3 integrin gene expression, collecting duct cell

  18. An Ex vivo Culture System to Study Thyroid Development

    PubMed Central

    Delmarcelle, Anne-Sophie; Villacorte, Mylah

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid is a bilobated endocrine gland localized at the base of the neck, producing the thyroid hormones T3, T4, and calcitonin. T3 and T4 are produced by differentiated thyrocytes, organized in closed spheres called follicles, while calcitonin is synthesized by C-cells, interspersed in between the follicles and a dense network of blood capillaries. Although adult thyroid architecture and functions have been extensively described and studied, the formation of the “angio-follicular” units, the distribution of C-cells in the parenchyma and the paracrine communications between epithelial and endothelial cells is far from being understood. This method describes the sequential steps of mouse embryonic thyroid anlagen dissection and its culture on semiporous filters or on microscopy plastic slides. Within a period of four days, this culture system faithfully recapitulates in vivo thyroid development. Indeed, (i) bilobation of the organ occurs (for e12.5 explants), (ii) thyrocytes precursors organize into follicles and polarize, (iii) thyrocytes and C-cells differentiate, and (iv) endothelial cells present in the microdissected tissue proliferate, migrate into the thyroid lobes, and closely associate with the epithelial cells, as they do in vivo. Thyroid tissues can be obtained from wild type, knockout or fluorescent transgenic embryos. Moreover, explants culture can be manipulated by addition of inhibitors, blocking antibodies, growth factors, or even cells or conditioned medium. Ex vivo development can be analyzed in real-time, or at any time of the culture by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. In conclusion, thyroid explant culture combined with downstream whole-mount or on sections imaging and gene expression profiling provides a powerful system for manipulating and studying morphogenetic and differentiation events of thyroid organogenesis. PMID:24961920

  19. Ex Vivo Estimation of Photoacoustic Imaging for Detecting Thyroid Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeeun; Chung, Woong Youn; Kang, Sang-Wook; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Yoo, Jaeheung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Chang, Jin Ho; Song, Tai-kyong; Lee, Sohee; Kwak, Jin Young

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of PAI at detecting thyroid microcalcifications at 700 nm laser wavelengths. Methods This study included 36 resected samples in 18 patients. To evaluate the PA manifestation of microcalcifications in PAI, gray level histogram and co-occurrence matrix (COM) texture parameters were extracted from the 3 fixed ROI US and PA images, respectively, per sample. We compared the textural parameters obtained from specimen PAIs between samples with punctate microcalcifications on specimen radiography and those without microcalcifications. Results On specimen US, the mean value (2748.4±862.5) of samples with microcalcifications on specimen radiography was higher than that (1961.9±780.2) of those without microcalcifications (P = 0.007). However, there were no significant differences in textural parameters obtained from specimen PAIs between samples with punctate microcalcifications on specimen radiography and those without when applying both the mean value of the three slices of thyroid specimens and the value of the thyroid specimen slice which had the highest value of the mean values in specimen US. Conclusion PAI did not show significant PA contrast on thyroid microcalcifications indicating that the experimental setup and protocols should be enhanced, e.g., method of complete blood rejection from ex vivo specimens, the multi-wavelength spectroscopic PA imaging method which can solely extract the PA signal from microcalcifications even with high spectral interferences, or PA imaging with narrower slice thickness using 2-dimensional array transducer, etc. PMID:25415564

  20. Shape of the isolated ex-vivo human crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Raksha; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Borja, David; Amelinckx, Adriana; Smith, Jared; Jain, Rakhi; Augusteyn, Robert; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop an age-dependent mathematical model of the isolated ex-vivo human crystalline lens shape to serve as basis for use in computational modeling. Methods Profiles of whole isolated human lenses (n=27) aged 6 to 82, were measured from shadow-photogrammetric images. Two methods were used to analyze the lenses. In the Two-Curves Method (TCM) the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lens were fit to 10th-order even polynomials and in the One-Curve Method (OCM) the contour of one half-meridional section of the lens was fit to 10th-order polynomials. The age-dependence of the polynomial coefficients was assessed. The analysis was used to produce an age-dependent polynomial model of the whole lens shape. Results The root mean squared errors for the fits ranged from 11 to 70 μm for the OCM, 9 to 27 μm for the posterior surface of the TCM and 8 to 134 μm for the anterior surface of the TCM. The coefficients of the OCM did not display a significant trend with age. The 2nd, 6th and 10th-order coefficients of the anterior surface of the TCM decreased with age while the 8th-order coefficient increased. For the posterior surface of the TCM, the 8th-order coefficient significantly decreased with age and the 10th-order coefficient increased. The age-dependent equations of both the models provide a reliable model from age 20 to 60. The OCM model can be used for lenses older than 60 as well. Conclusion The shape of the whole human crystalline lens can be accurately modeled with 10th-order polynomial functions. These models can serve to improve computational modeling, such as finite element (FE) modeling of crystalline lenses. PMID:18950656

  1. In and ex-vivo Myocardial Tissue Temperature Monitoring by Combined Infrared and Ultrasonic Thermometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engrand, C.; Laux, D.; Ferrandis, J.-Y.; Sinquet, J.-C.; Demaria, R.; Le Clézio, E.

    The success of cardiac surgery essentially depends on tissue preservation during intervention. Consequently a hypothermic cardio-plegia is applied in order to avoid ischemia. However, myocardial temperature is not monitored during operation. The aim of this study is then to find a relevant and simple method for myocardial global temperature estimation in real time using both ultrasounds and infra-red thermography. In order to quantify the sensitivity of ultrasonic velocity to temperature, a 2.25 MHz ultrasonic probe was used for ex-vivo tests. Pig myocards (n=25) were placed in a thermostatically-controlled water bath and measurements of the ultrasound velocity were realized from 10 to 30 ˚C. The results of this study indicate that the specificity and sensitivity of the ultrasonic echo delay induced by the modification of temperature can be exploited for in-depth thermometry. In parallel, for TIR experiments, a bolometer was used to detect the myocardium surface thermal evolution during in-vivo pig heart experiments. Hypothermic cardioplegic solutions were injected and infra-red surface imaging was performed during one hour. In the near futur, the correlation of the ultrasound and the infrared measurements should allow the real time estimation of the global temperature of the heart. The final objective being to realize in vivo measurements on human hearts, this information may have a very high importance in terms of per-operation inspection as well as decision making process during medical interventions.

  2. Human placenta as an ex vivo vascular model for neurointerventional research

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, John Ching Kwong; Huang, Wei; Leung, Wing-Cheong; Chan, Siu-Ki; Chan, Kwong-Yau; Leung, Kar-Ming; Chu, Alberto Chi Ho; Lam, Alexander Kar Ngai

    2014-01-01

    Background Human placenta is a convenient resource for biomedical research, and has not yet been used for neurointerventional surgery research. Objective Our objective was to explore the feasibility of using human placenta to test various endovascular interventions and for training. Design 18 placentas soon after delivery were prepared for six pilot studies. (1) Study on anatomical similarity to human cerebral vessel. (2) Simulation of stent assisted coiling and flow diversion on an aneurysm model. (3) Simulation of intra-arterial thrombolysis. (4) Simulation of embolization of arteriovenous malformation with glues. (5) Simulation of mechanical thrombolysis and comparison of different devices. (6) Vascular model for training of neurointerventionalists. Results When the chorionic plate vessels were compared with the cerebral cortical vessels, similarities were found in vascular branch patterns, histological cross sections, and angiographic appearances. Due to the semitransparency of its vessel wall, performance of flow diverter and stent assisted coiling of an aneurysm could be visualized under direct microscopic observation. Similarly, timing of clot lysis and glue polymerization could be estimated. Endothelial change after thrombectomy could be assessed by histological methods. From these pilot studies, the placenta model could be adopted to simulate various clinical situations. It is also ideal for interventional radiology training. Conclusions It is feasible to adopt the human placenta as an ex vivo vascular model in neurointerventional surgery research due to the fact that its vessels resemble the brain vasculature. PMID:23904450

  3. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  4. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  5. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Yanille M.; Park, Seo Young

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection. PMID:26596954

  6. Ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion and viability testing of discarded human donor livers.

    PubMed

    op den Dries, S; Karimian, N; Sutton, M E; Westerkamp, A C; Nijsten, M W N; Gouw, A S H; Wiersema-Buist, J; Lisman, T; Leuvenink, H G D; Porte, R J

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to traditional static cold preservation of donor livers, normothermic machine perfusion may reduce preservation injury, improve graft viability and potentially allows ex vivo assessment of graft viability before transplantation. We have studied the feasibility of normothermic machine perfusion in four discarded human donor livers. Normothermic machine perfusion consisted of pressure and temperature controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion for 6 h. Two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators provided oxygenation of the perfusion fluid. Biochemical markers in the perfusion fluid reflected minimal hepatic injury and improving function. Lactate levels decreased to normal values, reflecting active metabolism by the liver (mean lactate 10.0 ± 2.3 mmol/L at 30 min to 2.3 ± 1.2 mmol/L at 6 h). Bile production was observed throughout the 6 h perfusion period (mean rate 8.16 ± 0.65 g/h after the first hour). Histological examination before and after 6 h of perfusion showed well-preserved liver morphology without signs of additional hepatocellular ischemia, biliary injury or sinusoidal damage. In conclusion, this study shows that normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers is technically feasible. It allows assessment of graft viability before transplantation, which opens new avenues for organ selection, therapeutic interventions and preconditioning.

  7. Effects of Ex-Vivo and In-Vivo Treatment with Probiotics on the Inflammasome in Dogs with Chronic Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Silke; Werling, Dirk; Allenspach, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes coordinate the maturation of IL-1β and IL-18 in response to danger signals. They are vital for maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and have been linked to chronic intestinal inflammation in humans. Probiotics have been advocated as treatment in intestinal inflammation. So far, no study has investigated the role of the inflammasome in canine chronic enteropathy (CE). In this study the intestinal expression of inflammasome components was assessed in CE dogs compared to controls, when treated with probiotic Enterococcus faecium (EF) ex-vivo and in-vivo. RNA extraction from endoscopic biopsies and reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR was performed for NLRP3, casp-1, IL-1β and IL-18. Immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate protein expression in tissues. Gene expression of casp-1 and NLRP3 was lower in CE samples than controls. Ex-vivo treatment with EF reduced NLRP3 expression in control samples. Treatment of CE dogs with EF alongside dietary intervention had no effect on gene expression. In contrast, IL-1β protein expression in CE decreased with dietary treatment (but not with probiotics). The results of this study suggest that the inflammasome or its components may be partially involved in the inflammatory process seen in CE, but distinct from intestinal inflammation in humans. PMID:25799280

  8. Assessing patient dose in interventional fluoroscopy using patient-dependent hybrid phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry Barnett

    Interventional fluoroscopy uses ionizing radiation to guide small instruments through blood vessels or other body pathways to sites of clinical interest. The technique represents a tremendous advantage over invasive surgical procedures, as it requires only a small incision, thus reducing the risk of infection and providing for shorter recovery times. The growing use and increasing complexity of interventional procedures, however, has resulted in public health concerns regarding radiation exposures, particularly with respect to localized skin dose. Tracking and documenting patient-specific skin and internal organ dose has been specifically identified for interventional fluoroscopy where extended irradiation times, multiple projections, and repeat procedures can lead to some of the largest doses encountered in radiology. Furthermore, inprocedure knowledge of localized skin doses can be of significant clinical importance to managing patient risk and in training radiology residents. In this dissertation, a framework is presented for monitoring the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The framework is built around two key points, developing better anthropomorphic models, and designing clinically relevant software systems for dose estimation. To begin, a library of 50 hybrid patient-dependent computational phantoms was developed based on the UF hybrid male and female reference phantoms. These phantoms represent a different type of anthropomorphic model whereby anthropometric parameters from an individual patient are used during phantom selection. The patient-dependent library was first validated and then used in two patient-phantom matching studies focused on cumulative organ and local skin dose. In terms of organ dose, patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to large patients where error associated with soft tissue attenuation differences could be minimized. For small patients, inherent difference

  9. Intervention Planning Using a Laser Navigation System for CT-Guided Interventions: A Phantom and Patient Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clara; Bolck, Jan; Naguib, Nagy N.N.; Schulz, Boris; Eichler, Katrin; Aschenbach, Rene; Wichmann, Julian L.; Vogl, Thomas. J.; Zangos, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the accuracy, efficiency and radiation dose of a novel laser navigation system (LNS) compared to those of free-handed punctures on computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods Sixty punctures were performed using a phantom body to compare accuracy, timely effort, and radiation dose of the conventional free-handed procedure to those of the LNS-guided method. An additional 20 LNS-guided interventions were performed on another phantom to confirm accuracy. Ten patients subsequently underwent LNS-guided punctures. Results The phantom 1-LNS group showed a target point accuracy of 4.0 ± 2.7 mm (freehand, 6.3 ± 3.6 mm; p = 0.008), entrance point accuracy of 0.8 ± 0.6 mm (freehand, 6.1 ± 4.7 mm), needle angulation accuracy of 1.3 ± 0.9° (freehand, 3.4 ± 3.1°; p < 0.001), intervention time of 7.03 ± 5.18 minutes (freehand, 8.38 ± 4.09 minutes; p = 0.006), and 4.2 ± 3.6 CT images (freehand, 7.9 ± 5.1; p < 0.001). These results show significant improvement in 60 punctures compared to freehand. The phantom 2-LNS group showed a target point accuracy of 3.6 ± 2.5 mm, entrance point accuracy of 1.4 ± 2.0 mm, needle angulation accuracy of 1.0 ± 1.2°, intervention time of 1.44 ± 0.22 minutes, and 3.4 ± 1.7 CT images. The LNS group achieved target point accuracy of 5.0 ± 1.2 mm, entrance point accuracy of 2.0 ± 1.5 mm, needle angulation accuracy of 1.5 ± 0.3°, intervention time of 12.08 ± 3.07 minutes, and used 5.7 ± 1.6 CT-images for the first experience with patients. Conclusion Laser navigation system improved accuracy, duration of intervention, and radiation dose of CT-guided interventions. PMID:26175571

  10. Visualizing Oxazine 4 nerve-specific fluorescence ex vivo in frozen tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Connor W.; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-03-01

    Nerve damage plagues surgical outcomes and remains a major burden for patients, surgeons, and the healthcare system. Fluorescence image-guided surgery using nerve specific small molecule fluorophores offers a solution to diminish surgical nerve damage through improved intraoperative nerve identification and visualization. Oxazine 4 has shown superior nerve specificity in initial testing in vivo, while exhibiting a red shifted excitation and emission spectra compared to other nerve-specific fluorophores. However, Oxazine 4 does not exhibit near-infrared (NIR) excitation and emission, which would be ideal to improve penetration depth and nerve signal to background ratios for in vivo imaging. Successful development of a NIR nerve-specific fluorophore will require understanding of the molecular target of fluorophore nerve specificity. While previous small molecule nerve-specific fluorophores have demonstrated excellent ex vivo nerve specificity, Oxazine 4 ex vivo nerve specific fluorescence has been difficult to visualize. In the present study, we examined each step of the ex vivo fluorescence microscopy sample preparation procedure to discover how in vivo nerve-specific fluorescence is changed during ex vivo tissue sample preparation. Through step-by-step examination we found that Oxazine 4 fluorescence was significantly diminished by washing and mounting tissue sections for microscopy. A method to preserve Oxazine 4 nerve specific fluorescence ex vivo was determined, which can be utilized for visualization by fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion and Transplant: State of the Art and View to the Future.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed S A

    2015-12-01

    After the first clinical application of ex vivo lung perfusion in 2001, the technique has been used in many lung transplant centers worldwide. In addition, many modifications have been tested, leading to the development of various ex vivo lung perfusion systems and application protocols. Currently, the Lund protocol, the Toronto protocol, and Organ Care System Lung protocol are the clinically applied ex vivo lung perfusion protocols, based on the favorable results of the safety studies. Accordingly, the comparison among these EVLP systems and protocols should be an important research target, in order to provide the evidence based medical data that would recommend one protocol over the others. In this manuscript, the current experience with EVLP is reviewed and some molecular and clinical targets, that could be used to compare the various protocols of the technique, are introduced.

  12. Biomonitoring and Hormone-Disrupting Effect Biomarkers of Persistent Organic Pollutants In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C; Ghisari, Mandana; Wielsøe, Maria; Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Kjeldsen, Lisbeth S; Long, Manhai

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) include lipophilic legacy POPs and the amphiphilic perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). They have long half-lives and bioaccumulate in the environment, animals and human beings. POPs possess toxic, carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting potentials. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are compounds that either mimic or block endogenous hormones and thus disrupt the normal hormone homeostasis. Biomonitoring assesses the internal doses of a person to provide information about chemical exposures. Effect biomarkers assess chemicals potential to affect cellular functions in vivo/ex vivo. Human beings are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, having individually very different biological potentials and effects. Therefore, the assessment of the combined, integrated biological effect of the actual chemical mixture in human blood is important. In vitro and ex vivo cell systems have been introduced for the assessment of the integrated level of xenobiotic cellular effects in human beings. Ex vivo studies have shown geographical differences in bioaccumulated POP serum levels, being reflected by the combined biomarker effects of the complex mixture extracted from human serum. Xenohormone receptor transactivities can be used as an ex vivo integrated biomarker of POP exposure and effects. Epidemiological and in vitro/ex vivo studies have supported the potential impact of the combined effect of serum POPs on the activity of hormone and/or dioxin receptors as a risk factor for human health. With focus on hormone disruption, this MiniReview will give an update on recent POP-related endocrine-disrupting effects in vitro/ex vivo/in vivo and some related genetic data. PMID:24797035

  13. Novel approaches to expanding the lung donor pool: donation after cardiac death and ex vivo conditioning.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Yeung, Jonathan C; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-06-01

    Two novel approaches have been developed to potentially increase the availability of donor lungs for lung transplantation. In the first approach, lungs from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are used to increase the quantity of organ donors. In the second approach, a newly developed normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) technique is used as a means of reassessing the adequacy of lung function from DCD and from high-risk brain death donors prior to transplantation. This EVLP technique can also act as a platform for the delivery of novel therapies to repair injured organs ex vivo. PMID:21511086

  14. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Models for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Training

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Arnau, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a technically challenging but highly effective technique for the treatment of well selected early neoplasms in the digestive tract. Although it is frequently performed in East Asian countries, the Western world has not adopted this technique yet, probably due in part to the difficulty to learn it. Ex vivo and in vivo animal models are invaluable tools to overcome at least the beginning of the learning curve, although the initial step is the acquisition of basic knowledge about early diagnosis of neoplasias, and observing real procedures in expert centers. The practical issues, advantages, and disadvantages of the ex vivo and in vivo models are discussed. PMID:23251881

  15. Organotypic slice co-culture systems to study axon regeneration in the dopaminergic system ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Heine, Claudia; Franke, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Organotypic slice co-cultures are suitable tools to study axonal regeneration and development (growth or regrowth) of different projection systems of the CNS under ex vivo conditions.In this chapter, we describe in detail the reconstruction of the mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection system culturing tissue slices from the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra (VTA/SN) with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) or the striatum (STR). The protocol includes the detailed slice preparation and incubation. Moreover, different application possibilities of the ex vivo model are mentioned; as an example, the substance treatment procedure and biocytin tracing are described to reveal the effect of applied substances on fiber outgrowth. PMID:24838961

  16. Optical clearing of skin under action of glycerol: Ex vivo and in vivo investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Sinichkin, Yu. P.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2010-08-01

    The behavior of optical parameters of the skin of a laboratory rat under the action of an aqueous solution of glycerol is studied ex vivo and in vivo. It is found that the collimated transmission coefficient of ex vivo skin samples increases by a factor of 20-40-fold depending on the wavelength in the studied spectral range, and the diffuse reflection coefficient of skin in vivo decreases on the average by 16%. The results presented can be useful for many methods of laser therapy and optical diagnostics of skin diseases and localization of subcutaneous neoplasms.

  17. Augmented reality system for MR-guided interventions: phantom studies and first animal test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Sebastian; Wacker, Frank; Khamene, Ali; Elgort, Daniel R.; Sielhorst, Tobias; Niemann, Heinrich; Duerk, Jeff; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Sauer, Frank

    2004-05-01

    We developed an augmented reality navigation system for MR-guided interventions. A head-mounted display provides in real-time a stereoscopic video-view of the patient, which is augmented with three-dimensional medical information to perform MR-guided needle placement procedures. Besides with the MR image information, we augment the scene with 3D graphics representing a forward extension of the needle and the needle itself. During insertion, the needle can be observed virtually at its actual location in real-time, supporting the interventional procedure in an efficient and intuitive way. In this paper we report on quantitative results of AR guided needle placement procedures on gel phantoms with embedded targets of 12mm and 6mm diameter; we furthermore evaluate our first animal experiment involving needle insertion into deep lying anatomical structures of a pig.

  18. Economically affordable anatomical kidney phantom with calyxes for puncture and drainage training in interventional urology and radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Peeter; Gavšin, Juri; Semjonov, Eero; Kruusmaa, Maarja

    2014-01-01

    Background Trends in interventional radiology and urology training are orientated towards reducing costs and increasing efficiency. In order to comply with the trends, we propose training on inexpensive patient-specific kidney phantoms. Purpose To develop a new kidney phantom for puncture and drainage training in interventional urology and radiology, and to evaluate their anatomical correctness and suitability for training compared to the traditional way of training on home-made phantoms. Material and Methods A case study for validation of kidney phantoms was conducted with nine radiology students divided into two groups: one trained on standard home-made training phantom (n = 4) and the other on our kidney phantoms (n = 5). Another test phantom was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the training of the two groups. The tests were video recorded and analyzed. Duration of the procedure was used as the primary indicator of procedure’s quality. Comparison tests were also conducted with professional radiologists. Anatomical correctness of the kidney phantom was evaluated by comparing the post mortem kidney scans with reconstructed models from CT scans. Subjective feedback was also collected from the participants. Wider use of kidney phantoms was analyzed. Results The average volumetric difference between post mortem kidney scans and reconstructed CT kidney models was 4.70 ± 3.25%. All five students practicing on the kidney phantom improved their performance and the results were almost equal to the results of the professional radiologist while in the other group two students out of four trained on standard home-made training phantoms failed to improve their performance. However, the small number of test subjects prevents us from drawing general conclusions about the efficiency of the new practice. The kidney phantoms were found usable also for nephrostomy catheter placement training under fluoroscopy. Conclusion The feedback from radiologists showed

  19. Thalidomide inhibits granulocyte responses in healthy humans after ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, N P; Verbon, A; Schultz, M J; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; Speelman, P; van der Poll, T

    2001-05-01

    Ingestion of thalidomide was associated with a reduction in the upregulation of the granulocyte activation marker CD11b and a reduced capacity to release elastase and lactoferrin after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. A single oral dose of thalidomide attenuates neutrophil activation upon ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

  20. Dermoscopy: Ex vivo visualization of fleas head and bag of eggs confirms the diagnosis of Tungiasis.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Rebecca; Asher, Ruth; Bowling, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    Tungiasis, caused by the impregnated female sand flea Tunga penetrans, is increasingly common in returned travellers from endemic areas. Clinical suspicion is raised by the clinicodermoscopic correlation, leading to rapid treatment which involves extraction of the intact flea. Ex vivo dermoscopy demonstrates the parasite's head and distended abdomen full of eggs, confirming the diagnosis. PMID:22571560

  1. Simultaneous ex vivo Functional Testing of Two Retinas by in vivo Electroretinogram System

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types. PMID:25992809

  2. Polydimethylsiloxane embedded mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model: proof-of-concept study focusing on atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc P; Keel, Rahel Bänziger; Lehner, Roman; Hunziker, Patrick R

    2012-07-01

    Existing mouse artery ex vivo perfusion models have utilized arteries such as carotid, uterine, and mesenteric arteries, but not the aorta. However, the aorta is the principal vessel analyzed for atherosclerosis studies in vivo. We have devised a mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model that can bridge this gap. Aortas from apoE((-/-)) mice are embedded in a transparent, gas-permeable, and elastic polymer matrix [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)] and artificially perfused with cell culture medium under cell culture conditions. After 24 h of artificial ex vivo perfusion, no evidence of cellular apoptosis is detected. Utilizing a standard confocal microscope, it is possible to image specific receptor targeting of cells in atherosclerotic plaques during 24 h. Imaging motion artifacts are minimal due to the polymer matrix embedding. Re-embedding of the aorta enables tissue sectioning and immuno-histochemical analysis. The ex vivo data are validated by comparison with in vivo experiments. This model can save animal lives via production of multiple endpoints in a single experiment, is easy to apply, and enables straightforward comparability with pre-existing atherosclerosis in vivo data. It is suited to investigate atherosclerotic disease in particular and vascular biology in general.

  3. EFFECTS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM) ON EX VIVO LUTEAL FUNCTION IN THE F344 RAT DURING PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) on Ex Vivo Luteal Function In the Pregnant F344 Rat

    Susan R. Bielmeier1, Ashley S. Murr2, Deborah S. Best2, Jerome M. Goldman2, and Michael G. Narotsky2

    1Curriculum in Toxicology, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599,...

  4. Improvement of adoptive cellular immunotherapy of human cancer using ex-vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephane; Calmels, Bastien; Acres, R Bruce

    2002-02-01

    A variety of adoptive cellular strategies, aimed at boosting the immune system, have been tested in the management of metastatic diseases. Despite the drawbacks associated with ex vivo cell manipulation and upscaling, several such approaches have been assessed in the clinic. The use of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, auto-lymphocyte therapy (ALT) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have been the best studied and further trials are ongoing. Thus far, these approaches have not consistently shown benefit when compared to standard immune-based treatment with biologic response modifiers, notably, high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). More recently, it has been shown, in various animal models, that the ex vivo transfer of genes to cells of the immune system can have a dramatic impact on cancer immunotherapy. The application of gene transfer techniques to immunotherapy has animated the field of cell-based cancer therapy research. A wide variety of viral and non-viral gene transfer methods have been investigated in this context. Ex vivo strategies include gene delivery into tumor cells and into cellular components of the immune system, including cytotoxic T cells, NK, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). Several of these approaches have already been translated into cancer therapy clinical trials. In this review, we focus on the rationale and types of ex vivo gene-based immunotherapy of cancer. Finally, the use of genetically modified DC for tumor vaccination and its prospects are discussed. PMID:12108977

  5. Polydimethylsiloxane embedded mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model: proof-of-concept study focusing on atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc P.; Keel, Rahel Bänziger; Lehner, Roman; Hunziker, Patrick R.

    2012-07-01

    Existing mouse artery ex vivo perfusion models have utilized arteries such as carotid, uterine, and mesenteric arteries, but not the aorta. However, the aorta is the principal vessel analyzed for atherosclerosis studies in vivo. We have devised a mouse aorta ex vivo perfusion model that can bridge this gap. Aortas from apoE(-/-) mice are embedded in a transparent, gas-permeable, and elastic polymer matrix [polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)] and artificially perfused with cell culture medium under cell culture conditions. After 24 h of artificial ex vivo perfusion, no evidence of cellular apoptosis is detected. Utilizing a standard confocal microscope, it is possible to image specific receptor targeting of cells in atherosclerotic plaques during 24 h. Imaging motion artifacts are minimal due to the polymer matrix embedding. Re-embedding of the aorta enables tissue sectioning and immuno-histochemical analysis. The ex vivo data are validated by comparison with in vivo experiments. This model can save animal lives via production of multiple endpoints in a single experiment, is easy to apply, and enables straightforward comparability with pre-existing atherosclerosis in vivo data. It is suited to investigate atherosclerotic disease in particular and vascular biology in general.

  6. Development and characterization of an ex-vivo brain slice culture model of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases have long incubation times in vivo, therefore, modeling the diseases ex-vivo will advance the development of rationale-based therapeutic strategies. An organotypic slice culture assay (POSCA) was recently developed for scrapie prions by inoculating mouse cerebellar brain slices with R...

  7. Ex vivo model for pre-clinical evaluation of dialyzers containing new membranes.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Meinhold, H; Jörres, A; Krieg, R; Kessel, M; Tretzel, J; Baurmeister, U

    1985-01-01

    The ex vivo model which reflects hemodialysis modulating factors during the first twenty minutes of blood membrane interaction, is applicable as a pre-clinical test for new membranes. The biocompatibility of a new cellulosic membrane (MC) proved to be superior to regenerated cellulose and comparable to synthetic membranes such as PAN regarding complement activation.

  8. Ex vivo Co-culture of Lymphoid Tissue Stromal Cells and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Haase, Ashley T.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells within lymphoid tissues produce IL-7, which is critical for the survival and function of T cells. This protocol is to be used to isolate primary human lymphoid tissue stromal cells to study their impact on the survival of T cells in an ex vivo co-culture system.

  9. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  14. Results of the TOP Study: Prospectively Randomized Multicenter Trial of an Ex Vivo Tacrolimus Rinse Before Transplantation in EDC Livers

    PubMed Central

    Pratschke, Sebastian; Arnold, Hannah; Zollner, Alfred; Heise, Michael; Pascher, Andreas; Schemmer, Peter; Scherer, Marcus N.; Bauer, Andreas; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Werner, Jens; Guba, Markus; Angele, Martin K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Organ shortage results in the transplantation of extended donor criteria (EDC) livers which is associated with increased ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Experimental studies indicate that an organ rinse with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus before implantation protects against IRI. The tacrolimus organ perfusion study was initiated to examine the effects of ex vivo tacrolimus perfusion on IRI in transplantation of EDC livers. Methods A prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing ex vivo perfusion of marginal liver grafts (≥2 EDC according to Eurotransplant manual) with tacrolimus (20 ng/mL) or histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate solution (control) was carried out at 5 German liver transplant centers (Munich Ludwig-Maximilians University, Berlin, Heidelberg, Mainz, Regensburg) between October 2011 and July 2013. Primary endpoint was the maximum alanine transaminase (ALT) level within 48 hours after transplantation. Secondary endpoints were aspartate transaminase (AST), prothrombine ratio, and graft-patient survival within an observation period of 1 week. After an interim analysis, the study was terminated by the scientific committee after the treatment of 24 patients (tacrolimus n = 11, Control n = 13). Results Tacrolimus rinse did not reduce postoperative ALT peaks compared with control (P = 0.207; tacrolimus: median, 812; range, 362-3403 vs control: median, 652; range, 147-2034). Moreover, ALT (P = 0.100), prothrombine ratio (P = 0.553), and bilirubin (P = 0.815) did not differ between the groups. AST was higher in patients treated with tacrolimus (P = 0.011). Survival was comparable in both groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions Contrary to experimental findings, tacrolimus rinse failed to improve the primary endpoint of the study (ALT). Because 1 secondary endpoint (AST) was even higher in the intervention group, the study was terminated prematurely. Thus, tacrolimus rinse cannot be recommended in transplantation of EDC livers. PMID:27500266

  15. Does the presence of an implant including expander with internal port alter radiation dose? An ex vivo model

    PubMed Central

    Strang, Barbara; Murphy, Kyla; Seal, Shane; Cin, Arianna Dal

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of literature examining the dosimetric implications of irradiating breast implants and expanders with internal ports inserted at the time of mastectomy. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the presence of breast expanders with port in saline or silicone implants affect the dose uniformity across the breast when irradiated with various photon and electron energies. METHODS: One tissue-equivalent torso phantom with overlying tissue expanders in saline or silicone implants were irradiated using tangential fields with 6 MV and 18 MV photons and 9 MeV and 12 MeV electrons. All dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The TLDs were arranged around the port and the perimeters of either the expander, or saline or silicone implant. Comparisons of measured radiation doses, and between the expected and measured doses of radiation from the TLDs on each prosthesis, were performed. Data were analyzed using two-tailed t tests. RESULTS: There were no differences in TLD measurements between the expander and the saline implant for all energy modalities, and for the expected versus actual measurements for the saline implant. Higher than anticipated measurements were recorded for a significant number of TLD positions around the silicone implants. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation doses around saline implants or expanders with internal port were unaltered, whereas dose recordings for silicone implants were higher than predicted in the present laboratory/ex vivo study. PMID:24431935

  16. Treatment planning for image-guided neuro-vascular interventions using patient-specific 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; O'Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patientspecific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays.

  17. Myelin contrast across lamina at 7T, ex-vivo and in-vivo dataset.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Alessio; van Veluw, Susanne J; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R; Spliet, Wim; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Dumoulin, Serge O; Petridou, Natalia

    2016-09-01

    In this article we report the complete data obtained in-vivo for the paper: "Lines of Baillarger in vivo and ex-vivo: myelin contrast across lamina at 7T MRI and histology" (Fracasso et al., 2015) [1]. Single participant data (4 participants) from the occipital lobe acquisition are reported for axial, coronal and sagittal slices; early visual area functional localization and laminar profiles are reported. Data from whole brain images are reported and described (5 participants), for axial, coronal and sagittal slices. Laminar profiles from occipital, parietal and frontal lobes are reported. The data reported in this manuscript complements the paper (Fracasso et al., 2015) [1] by providing the full set of results from the complete pool of participants, on a single-participant basis. Moreover, we provide histological images from the ex-vivo sample reported in Fracasso et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:27508254

  18. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  19. Monitoring changes in tissue optical properties following interstitial photothermal therapy of ex vivo human prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weersink, Robert A.; He, Jie; Veilleux, Israel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    We are developing a method of monitoring treatment progression of interstitial photothermal therapy of focal prostate cancer using transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT) combined with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS). Measurements of prostate tissue optical properties were made on ex vivo human prostate samples prior to and post coagulation. Interstitial photothermal treatments were delivered to the ex vivo samples and monitored using an interstitial probe near the treatment fiber. After treatment, bulk optical properties were measured on native and coagulated zones of tissue. Changes in optical properties across the boundary between native and coagulated tissues were spatially mapped using a small diffuse reflectance probe. The optical property estimates and spatial information obtained using each method was compared.

  20. Ex-vivo expansion of red blood cells: How real for transfusion in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Masselli, Elena; Varricchio, Lilian; Whitsett, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusion is indispensable for modern medicine. In developed countries, the blood supply is adequate and safe but blood for alloimmunized patients is often unavailable. Concerns are increasing that donations may become inadequate in the future as the population ages prompting a search for alternative transfusion products. Improvements in culture conditions and proof-of-principle studies in animal models have suggested that ex-vivo expanded red cells may represent such a product. Compared to other cell therapies transfusion poses the unique challenge of requiring great cell doses (2.5 × 1012 cells vs 107 cells). Although production of such cell numbers is theoretically possible, current technologies generate red cells in numbers sufficient only for safety studies. It is conceived that by the time these studies will be completed, technical barriers to mass cell production will have been eliminated making transfusion with ex-vivo generated red cells a reality. PMID:22177597

  1. Myelin contrast across lamina at 7T, ex-vivo and in-vivo dataset.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Alessio; van Veluw, Susanne J; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R; Spliet, Wim; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Dumoulin, Serge O; Petridou, Natalia

    2016-09-01

    In this article we report the complete data obtained in-vivo for the paper: "Lines of Baillarger in vivo and ex-vivo: myelin contrast across lamina at 7T MRI and histology" (Fracasso et al., 2015) [1]. Single participant data (4 participants) from the occipital lobe acquisition are reported for axial, coronal and sagittal slices; early visual area functional localization and laminar profiles are reported. Data from whole brain images are reported and described (5 participants), for axial, coronal and sagittal slices. Laminar profiles from occipital, parietal and frontal lobes are reported. The data reported in this manuscript complements the paper (Fracasso et al., 2015) [1] by providing the full set of results from the complete pool of participants, on a single-participant basis. Moreover, we provide histological images from the ex-vivo sample reported in Fracasso et al. (2015) [1].

  2. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A.M.

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  3. Utilization of the organ care system as ex-vivo lung perfusion after cold storage transportation.

    PubMed

    Mohite, P N; Maunz, O; Popov, A-F; Zych, B; Patil, N P; Simon, A R

    2015-11-01

    The Organ Care System (OCS) allows perfusion and ventilation of the donor lungs under physiological conditions. Ongoing trials to compare preservation with OCS Lung with standard cold storage do not include donor lungs with suboptimal gas exchange and donor lungs treated with OCS following cold storage transportation. We present a case of a 48-yr-old man who received such lungs after cold storage transportation treated with ex-vivo lung perfusion utilizing OCS.

  4. Comparative ex vivo activity of novel endoperoxides in multidrug-resistant plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax.

    PubMed

    Marfurt, Jutta; Chalfein, Ferryanto; Prayoga, Pak; Wabiser, Frans; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni; Piera, Kim A; Wittlin, Sergio; Haynes, Richard K; Möhrle, Jörg J; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kenangalem, Enny; Price, Ric N

    2012-10-01

    The declining efficacy of artemisinin derivatives against Plasmodium falciparum highlights the urgent need to identify alternative highly potent compounds for the treatment of malaria. In Papua Indonesia, where multidrug resistance has been documented against both P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria, comparative ex vivo antimalarial activity against Plasmodium isolates was assessed for the artemisinin derivatives artesunate (AS) and dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439, the semisynthetic 10-alkylaminoartemisinin derivatives artemisone and artemiside, and the conventional antimalarial drugs chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), and piperaquine (PIP). Ex vivo drug susceptibility was assessed in 46 field isolates (25 P. falciparum and 21 P. vivax). The novel endoperoxide compounds exhibited potent ex vivo activity against both species, but significant differences in intrinsic activity were observed. Compared to AS and its active metabolite DHA, all the novel compounds showed lower or equal 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) in both species (median IC(50)s between 1.9 and 3.6 nM in P. falciparum and 0.7 and 4.6 nM in P. vivax). The antiplasmodial activity of novel endoperoxides showed different cross-susceptibility patterns in the two Plasmodium species: whereas their ex vivo activity correlated positively with CQ, PIP, AS, and DHA in P. falciparum, the same was not apparent in P. vivax. The current study demonstrates for the first time potent activity of novel endoperoxides against drug-resistant P. vivax. The high activity against drug-resistant strains of both Plasmodium species confirms these compounds to be promising candidates for future artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) regimens in regions of coendemicity.

  5. Ex vivo evaluation of acellular and cellular collagen-glycosaminoglycan flowable matrices.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Tom; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-08-01

    Collagen-glycosaminoglycan flowable matrices (CGFM) are increasingly finding utility in a diversifying number of cutaneous surgical procedures. Cellular in-growth and vascularisation of CGFM remain rate-limiting steps, increasing cost and decreasing efficacy. Through in vitro and ex vivo culture methods, this study investigated the improvement of injectable CGFM by the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) and viable human cells (primary human dermal fibroblasts (PHDFs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs)). Ex vivo investigations included the development and evaluation of a human cutaneous wound healing model for the comparison of dermal substitutes. Cells mixed into the Integra Flowable Wound Matrix (IFWM), a commercially available CGFM, were confirmed to be viable and proliferative through MTT assays (p  <  0.05). PHDFs proliferated with greater rapidity than BM-MSCs up to 1 week in culture (p  <  0.05), with PHDF proliferation further enhanced by HA supplementation (p  <  0.05). After scaffold mixing, gene expression was not significantly altered (qRT-PCR). PHDF and BM-MSC incorporation into ex vivo wound models significantly increased re-epithelialisation rate, with maximal effects observed for BM-MSC supplemented IFWM. HA supplementation to PHDF populated IFWM increased re-epithelialisation but had no significant effect on BM-MSC populated IFWM. In conclusion, when combined with PHDF, HA increased re-epithelialisation in IFWM. BM-MSC incorporation significantly improved re-epithelialisation in ex vivo models over acellular and PHDF populated scaffolds. Viable cell incorporation into IFWM has potential to significantly benefit wound healing in chronic and acute cutaneous injuries by allowing a point-of-care matrix to be formed from autologous or allogenic cells and bioactive molecules. PMID:26181360

  6. Improved Recellularization of Ex Vivo Vascular Scaffolds using Directed Transport Gradients to Modulate ECM Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Zehra; McFetridge, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of functional, clinically viable, tissues from acellular ex vivo tissues has been problematic largely due to poor nutrient transport conditions that limit cell migration and integration. Compounding these issues are subcellular pore sizes that necessarily requires extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in order for cells to migrate and regenerate the tissue. The aim of the present work was to create a directed growth environment that allows cells to fully populate an ex vivo-derived vascular scaffold and maintain viability over extended periods. Three different culture conditions using single (one nutrient source) or dual perfusion bioreactor systems (two nutrients sources) were designed to assess the effect of pressure and nutrient gradients under either low (50/30 mmHg) or high (120/80) relative pressure conditions. Human myofibroblasts were seeded to the ablumenal periphery of an ex vivo-derived vascular scaffold using a collagen/hydrogel cell delivery system. After 30 days culture, total cell density was consistent between groups; however, significant variation was noted in cell distribution and construct mechanics as a result of differing perfusion conditions. The most aggressive transport gradient was developed by the single perfusion low-pressure circuits and resulted in a higher proportion of cells migrating across the scaffold toward the vessel lumen (nutrient source). These investigations illustrate the influence of directed nutrient gradients where precisely controlled perfusion conditions significantly affects cell migration, distribution and function, resulting in pronounced effects on construct mechanics during early remodeling events. PMID:23613430

  7. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings.

  8. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents. PMID:8642690

  9. Ex vivo generation of a functional and regenerative wound epithelium from axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) skin.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Donald R; Satoh, Akira; Mandefro, Berhan; Cummings, Gillian M; Gardiner, David M; Rugg, Elizabeth L

    2010-10-01

    Urodele amphibians (salamanders) are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate structurally complete and fully functional limbs. Regeneration is a stepwise process that requires interactions between keratinocytes, nerves and fibroblasts. The formation of a wound epithelium covering the amputation site is an early and necessary event in the process but the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of the wound epithelium in regeneration remain unclear. We have developed an ex vivo model that recapitulates many features of in vivo wound healing. The model comprises a circular explant of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) limb skin with a central circular, full thickness wound. Re-epithelialization of the wound area is rapid (typically <11 h) and is dependent on metalloproteinase activity. The ex vivo wound epithelium is viable, responds to neuronal signals and is able to participate in ectopic blastema formation and limb regeneration. This ex vivo model provides a reproducible and tractable system in which to study the cellular and molecular events that underlie wound healing and regeneration.

  10. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Reus, Astrid A; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A M

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air-liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. PMID:22507867

  11. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    PubMed

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (p<0.001) platelet aggregation ex vivo and prolonged bleeding time (p<0.001) without changes in the platelet amount. The prolongation of bleeding time by CAE may be attributed to the observed inhibition of platelet aggregation. These effects could be related in part to the polyphenolic compounds present in the extract. These results support the hypothesis that the dietary intake of parsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  12. Plasticity of Cells and Ex Vivo Production of Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hiroyama, Takashi; Miharada, Kenichi; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The supply of transfusable red blood cells (RBCs) is not sufficient in many countries. If transfusable RBCs could be produced abundantly from certain resources, it would be very useful. Our group has developed a method to produce enucleated RBCs efficiently from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells present in umbilical cord blood. More recently, it was reported that enucleated RBCs could be abundantly produced from human embryonic stem (ES) cells. The common obstacle for application of these methods is that they require very high cost to produce sufficient number of RBCs that are applicable in the clinic. If erythroid cell lines (immortalized cell lines) able to produce transfusable RBCs ex vivo were established, they would be valuable resources. Our group developed a robust method to obtain immortalized erythroid cell lines able to produce mature RBCs. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first paper to show the feasibility of establishing immortalized erythroid progenitor cell lines able to produce enucleated RBCs ex vivo. This result strongly suggests that immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines able to produce mature RBCs ex vivo can also be established. PMID:21785608

  13. Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) replicates in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) erythrocytes ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Øystein; Olsen, Christel Moræus; Rimstad, Espen; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa

    2015-03-06

    Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) is a reovirus that has predominantly been detected in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). PRV is associated with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) in farmed Atlantic salmon, and recently erythrocytes were identified as major target cells. The study of PRV replication and pathogenesis of the infection has been impeded by the inability to propagate PRV in vitro. In this study we developed an ex vivo cultivation system for PRV in Atlantic salmon erythrocytes. PRV was successfully passaged to naïve erythrocytes using lysates of blood cells from infected salmon. During cultivation a significant increase in viral load was observed by RT-qPCR and flow cytometry, which coincided with the formation of cytoplasmic inclusions. The inclusions resembled viral factories and contained both PRV protein and dsRNA. In addition, the erythrocytes generated an antiviral immune gene activation after PRV infection, with significant up-regulation of IFN-α, RIG-I, Mx and PKR transcripts. Supernatants from the first passage successfully transmitted virus to naïve erythrocytes. This study demonstrates that PRV replicates in Atlantic salmon erythrocytes ex vivo. The ex vivo infection model closely reflects the situation in vivo and can be used to study the infection and replication mechanisms of PRV, as well as the antiviral immune responses of salmonid erythrocytes.

  14. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Maria D.; Jeremias, Fabiano; Cordeiro, Rita C. L.; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption) that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm). The apparent tooth length (APTL) was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0), whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL) was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson's correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P ≤ 0.48) between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length. PMID:25802894

  15. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  16. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Reus, Astrid A; Usta, Mustafa; Krul, Cyrille A M

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air-liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin.

  17. Modification of the NEMA XR21-2000 cardiac phantom for testing of imaging systems used in endovascular image guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, C. N.; Dohatcu, A.; Jain, A.; Keleshis, C.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2009-02-01

    X-ray equipment testing using phantoms that mimic the specific human anatomy, morphology, and structure is a very important step in the research, development, and routine quality assurance for such equipment. Although the NEMA XR21 phantom exists for cardiac applications, there is no such standard phantom for neuro-, peripheral and cardiovascular angiographic applications. We have extended the application of the NEMA XR21-2000 phantom to evaluate neurovascular x-ray imaging systems by structuring it to be head-equivalent; two aluminum plates shaped to fit into the NEMA phantom geometry were added to a 15 cm thick section. Also, to enable digital subtraction angiography (DSA) testing, two replaceable central plates with a hollow slot were made so that various angiographic sections could be inserted into the phantom. We tested the new modified phantom using a flat panel C-arm unit dedicated for endovascular image-guided interventions. All NEMA XR21-2000 standard test sections were used in evaluations with the new "headequivalent" phantom. DSA and DA are able to be tested using two standard removable blocks having simulated arteries of various thickness and iodine concentrations (AAPM Report 15). The new phantom modifications have the benefits of enabling use of the standard NEMA phantom for angiography in both neuro- and cardio-vascular applications, with the convenience of needing only one versatile phantom for multiple applications. Additional benefits compared to using multiple phantoms are increased portability and lower cost.

  18. Novel Sensor-Enabled Ex Vivo Bioreactor: A New Approach towards Physiological Parameters and Porcine Artery Viability

    PubMed Central

    Mundargi, Raghavendra; Venkataraman, Divya; Kumar, Saranya; Mogal, Vishal; Ortiz, Raphael; Loo, Joachim; Venkatraman, Subbu; Steele, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to design and construct an ex vivo bioreactor system to assess the real time viability of vascular tissue. Porcine carotid artery as a model tissue was used in the ex vivo bioreactor setup to monitor its viability under physiological conditions such as oxygen, pressure, temperature, and flow. The real time tissue viability was evaluated by monitoring tissue metabolism through a fluorescent indicator “resorufin.” Our ex vivo bioreactor allows real time monitoring of tissue responses along with physiological conditions. These ex vivo parameters were vital in determining the tissue viability in sensor-enabled bioreactor and our initial investigations suggest that, porcine tissue viability is considerably affected by high shear forces and low oxygen levels. Histological evaluations with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining show intact endothelium with fresh porcine tissue whereas tissues after incubation in ex vivo bioreactor studies indicate denuded endothelium supporting the viability results from real time measurements. Hence, this novel viability sensor-enabled ex vivo bioreactor acts as model to mimic in vivo system and record vascular responses to biopharmaceutical molecules and biomedical devices. PMID:26609536

  19. Exposures in interventional radiology using Monte Carlo simulation coupled with virtual anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Santos, William S; Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; Belinato, Walmir; Caldas, Linda V E; Carvalho, Albérico B; Maia, Ana F

    2015-12-01

    In this work we investigated the way in which conversion coefficients from air kerma-area product for effective doses (CCE) and entrance skin doses (CCESD) in interventional radiology (IR) are affected by variations in the filtration, projection angle of the X-ray beam, lead curtain attached to the surgical table, and suspended shield lead glass in regular conditions of medical practice. Computer simulations were used to model an exposure scenario similar to a real IR room. The patient and the physician were represented by MASH virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, inserted in the MCNPX 2.7.0 radiation transport code. In all cases, the addition of copper filtration also increased the CCE and CCESD values. The highest CCE values were obtained for lateral, cranial and caudal projections. In these projections, the X-ray tube was located above the table, and more scattered radiation reached the middle and upper portions of the physician trunk, where most of the radiosensitive organs are located. Another important result of this study was to show that the physician's protection is 358% higher when the lead curtain and suspended shield lead glasses are used. The values of CCE and CCESD, presented in this study, are an important resource for calculation of effective doses and entrance skin doses in clinical practice. PMID:26160701

  20. Predicting ex vivo failure loads in human metatarsals using bone strength indices derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, David J; Patel, Tarpit K; Smith, Kirk E; Commean, Paul K; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R

    2013-02-22

    We investigated the capacity of bone quantity and bone geometric strength indices to predict ultimate force in the human second metatarsal (Met2) and third metatarsal (Met3). Intact lower extremity cadaver samples were measured using clinical, volumetric quantitative computed tomography (vQCT) with positioning and parameters applicable to in vivo scanning. During processing, raw voxel data (0.4mm isotropic voxels) were converted from Hounsfield units to apparent bone mineral density (BMD) using hydroxyapatite calibration phantoms to allow direct volumetric assessment of whole-bone and subregional metatarsal BMD. Voxel data were realigned to produce cross-sectional slices perpendicular to the longitudinal axes of the metatarsals. Average mid-diaphyseal BMD, bone thickness, and buckling ratio were measured using an optimized threshold to distinguish bone from non-bone material. Minimum and maximum moments of inertia and section moduli were measured in the mid-diaphysis region using both a binary threshold for areal, unit-density measures and a novel technique for density-weighted measures. BMD and geometric strength indices were strongly correlated to ultimate force measured by ex vivo 3-point bending. Geometric indices were more highly correlated to ultimate force than was BMD; bone thickness and density-weighted minimum section modulus had the highest individual correlations to ultimate force. Density-weighted geometric indices explained more variance than their binary analogs. Multiple regression analyses defined models that predicted 85-89% of variance in ultimate force in Met2 and Met3 using bone thickness and minimum section modulus in the mid-diaphysis. These results have implications for future in vivo imaging to non-invasively assess bone strength and metatarsal fracture risk.

  1. Cluster analysis of host cytokine responses to biodefense pathogens in a whole blood ex vivo exposure model (WEEM)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid detection and therapeutic intervention for infectious and emerging diseases is a major scientific goal in biodefense and public health. Toward this end, cytokine profiles in human blood were investigated using a human whole blood ex vivo exposure model, called WEEM. Results Samples of whole blood from healthy volunteers were incubated with seven pathogens including Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus anthracis, and multiple strains of Yersinia pestis, and multiplexed protein expression profiling was conducted on supernatants of these cultures with an antibody array to detect 30 cytokines simultaneously. Levels of 8 cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNFα, were significantly up-regulated in plasma after bacterial exposures of 4 hours. Statistical clustering was applied to group the pathogens based on the host response protein expression profiles. The nearest phylogenetic neighbors clustered more closely than the more distant pathogens, and all seven pathogens were clearly differentiated from the unexposed control. In addition, the Y. pestis and Yersinia near neighbors were differentiated from the B. anthracis strains. Conclusions Cluster analysis, based on host response cytokine profiles, indicates that distinct patterns of immunomodulatory proteins are induced by the different pathogen exposures and these patterns may enable further development into biomarkers for diagnosing pathogen exposure. PMID:22607329

  2. Treatment Planning for Image-Guided Neuro-Vascular Interventions Using Patient-Specific 3D Printed Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Russ, M.; O’Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S.V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patient-specific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays. PMID:26778878

  3. Ex-Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging in South African Manganese Mine Workers

    PubMed Central

    Criswell, Susan R; Nelson, Gill; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Huang, John; Shimony, Joshua S; Checkoway, Harvey; Simpson, Christopher D; Dills, Russell; Seixas, Noah S.; Racette, Brad A

    2015-01-01

    Background Manganese (Mn) exposure is associated with increased T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal in the basal ganglia. T1 signal intensity has been correlated with occupational Mn exposure but not with clinical symptomatology or neuropathology. Objectives This study investigated predictors of ex-vivo T1 MRI basal ganglia signal intensity in neuropathologic tissue obtained from deceased South African mine workers. Methods A 3.0T MRI was performed on ex-vivo brain tissue obtained from 19 Mn mine workers and 10 race- and sex-matched mine workers of other commodities. Basal ganglia regions of interest were identified for each subject with T1-weighted intensity indices generated for each region. In a pathology subset, regional T1 indices were compared to neuronal and glial cell density and tissue metal concentrations. Results Intensity indices were higher in Mn mine workers than non-Mn mine workers for the globus pallidus, caudate, anterior putamen, and posterior putamen with the highest values in subjects with the longest cumulative Mn exposure. Intensity indices were inversely correlated with the neuronal cell density in the caudate (p = 0.040) and putamen (p = 0.050). Tissue Mn concentrations were similar in Mn and non-Mn mine workers. Tissue iron (Fe) concentration trended lower across all regions in Mn mine workers. Conclusions Mn mine workers demonstrated elevated basal ganglia T1 indices when compared to non-Mn mine workers. Predictors of ex-vivo T1 MRI signal intensity in Mn mine workers include duration of Mn exposure and neuronal density. PMID:25912463

  4. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  5. Ex Vivo Propagation of Human Corneal Stromal "Activated Keratocytes" for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M; Kadaba, Aishwarya; Tian, Dechao; Myint, Htoon Hla; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal disorder characterized by a thinning of stromal tissue, and the affected patients have induced astigmatism and visual impairment. It is associated with a loss of corneal stromal keratocytes (CSKs). Hence, reconstructing stromal tissue with autologous CSK replacement can be a viable alternative to corneal transplantation, which is restricted by the global donor material shortage and graft rejection. Human CSKs are normally quiescent and express unique markers, like aldehyde dehydrogenases and keratocan. In serum culture, they proliferate, but lose their characteristic phenotype and become stromal fibroblasts. Here we report a novel culture cocktail to ex vivo propagate and maintain CSKs. Primary human CSKs were obtained from adult donors and cultured with soluble human amnion stromal extract (ASE), rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (collectively named as ERI). Protein profiling using mass spectrometry followed by MetaCore™ pathway analysis predicted that ASE proteins might participate in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and fibroblast development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune response. In culture with 0.5% fetal bovine serum and ERI, the population of "activated keratocytes" was expanded. They had much lowered expression of both keratocyte and fibroblast markers, suppressed TGF-β-mediated Smad2/3 activation, and lacked fibroblast-mediated collagen contractibility. These "activated keratoctyes" could be propagated for six to eight passages ex vivo, and they regained CSK-specific dendritic morphology and gene marker expression, including aldehyde dehydrogenases, lumican, and keratocan biosynthesis, expression, and secretion when returned to serum-depleted ERI condition. This novel cocktail maintained human CSKs in both adherent and suspension cultures with proper keratocyte features and without the

  6. Using computed tomography scans to develop an ex-vivo gastric model

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jerome A; O’Sullivan, Gerard; Pandit, Abhay S

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was to use abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans to non-invasively quantify anthropometrical data of the human stomach and to concomitantly create an anatomically correct and distensible ex-vivo gastric model. Thirty-three abdominal CT scans of human subjects were obtained and were imported into reconstruction software to generate 3D models of the stomachs. Anthropometrical data such as gastric wall thickness, gastric surface area and gastric volume were subsequently quantified. A representative 3D computer model was exported into a selective laser sintering (SLS) rapid prototyping machine to create an anatomically correct solid gastric model. Subsequently, a replica wax template of the SLS model was created. A negative mould was offset around the wax template such that the offset distance was equivalent to that of the gastric wall thickness. A silicone with similar mechanical properties to the human stomach was poured into the offset. The lost wax manufacturing technique was employed to create a hollow distensible stomach model. 3D computer gastric models were generated from the CT scans. A hollow distensible silicone ex-vivo gastric model with similar compliance to that of the human stomach was created. The anthropometrical data indicated that there is no significant relationship between BMI and gastric surface area or gastric volume. There were inter- and intra-group differences between groups with respect to gastric wall thickness. This study demonstrates that abdominal CT scans can be used to both non-invasively determine gastric anthropometrical data as well as create realistic ex-vivo stomach models. PMID:17457968

  7. Application of Gold Nanorods for Photothermal Therapy in Ex Vivo Human Oesophagogastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Harris-Birtill, David C C; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria E; Cass, Anthony E G; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are chemically fabricated and tuned to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light, enabling deep optical penetration and therapy within human tissues, where sufficient heating induces tumour necrosis. In our studies we aim to establish the optimal gold nanorod (GNR) concentration and laser power for inducing hyperthermic effects in tissues and test this photothermal effect on ex vivo human oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma. The ideal GNR concentration and NIR laser power that would elicit sufficient hyperthermia for tumour necrosis was pre-determined on porcine oesophageal tissues. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma tissues were incubated with GNR solutions and a GNR-free control solution with corresponding healthy tissues for comparison, then irradiated with NIR light for 10 minutes. Temperature rise was found to vary linearly with both the concentration of GNRs and the laser power. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric tissues consistently demonstrated a significant temperature rise when incubated in an optimally concentrated GNR solution (3 x 10(10) GNRs/ml) prior to NIR irradiation delivered at an optimal power (2 W/cm2). A mean temperature rise of 27 degrees C was observed in tissues incubated with GNRs, whereas only a modest 2 degrees C rise in tissues not exposed to any GNRs. This study evaluates the photothermal effects of GNRs on oesophagogastric tissue examines their application in the minimally invasive therapeutics of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. This could potentially be an effective method of clinically inducing irreversible oesophagogastric tumour photodestruction, with minimal collateral damage expected in (healthy) tissues free from GNRs. PMID:27280246

  8. Ex Vivo Propagation of Human Corneal Stromal "Activated Keratocytes" for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M; Kadaba, Aishwarya; Tian, Dechao; Myint, Htoon Hla; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal disorder characterized by a thinning of stromal tissue, and the affected patients have induced astigmatism and visual impairment. It is associated with a loss of corneal stromal keratocytes (CSKs). Hence, reconstructing stromal tissue with autologous CSK replacement can be a viable alternative to corneal transplantation, which is restricted by the global donor material shortage and graft rejection. Human CSKs are normally quiescent and express unique markers, like aldehyde dehydrogenases and keratocan. In serum culture, they proliferate, but lose their characteristic phenotype and become stromal fibroblasts. Here we report a novel culture cocktail to ex vivo propagate and maintain CSKs. Primary human CSKs were obtained from adult donors and cultured with soluble human amnion stromal extract (ASE), rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (collectively named as ERI). Protein profiling using mass spectrometry followed by MetaCore™ pathway analysis predicted that ASE proteins might participate in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and fibroblast development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune response. In culture with 0.5% fetal bovine serum and ERI, the population of "activated keratocytes" was expanded. They had much lowered expression of both keratocyte and fibroblast markers, suppressed TGF-β-mediated Smad2/3 activation, and lacked fibroblast-mediated collagen contractibility. These "activated keratoctyes" could be propagated for six to eight passages ex vivo, and they regained CSK-specific dendritic morphology and gene marker expression, including aldehyde dehydrogenases, lumican, and keratocan biosynthesis, expression, and secretion when returned to serum-depleted ERI condition. This novel cocktail maintained human CSKs in both adherent and suspension cultures with proper keratocyte features and without the

  9. Application of Gold Nanorods for Photothermal Therapy in Ex Vivo Human Oesophagogastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Harris-Birtill, David C C; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria E; Cass, Anthony E G; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are chemically fabricated and tuned to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light, enabling deep optical penetration and therapy within human tissues, where sufficient heating induces tumour necrosis. In our studies we aim to establish the optimal gold nanorod (GNR) concentration and laser power for inducing hyperthermic effects in tissues and test this photothermal effect on ex vivo human oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma. The ideal GNR concentration and NIR laser power that would elicit sufficient hyperthermia for tumour necrosis was pre-determined on porcine oesophageal tissues. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma tissues were incubated with GNR solutions and a GNR-free control solution with corresponding healthy tissues for comparison, then irradiated with NIR light for 10 minutes. Temperature rise was found to vary linearly with both the concentration of GNRs and the laser power. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric tissues consistently demonstrated a significant temperature rise when incubated in an optimally concentrated GNR solution (3 x 10(10) GNRs/ml) prior to NIR irradiation delivered at an optimal power (2 W/cm2). A mean temperature rise of 27 degrees C was observed in tissues incubated with GNRs, whereas only a modest 2 degrees C rise in tissues not exposed to any GNRs. This study evaluates the photothermal effects of GNRs on oesophagogastric tissue examines their application in the minimally invasive therapeutics of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. This could potentially be an effective method of clinically inducing irreversible oesophagogastric tumour photodestruction, with minimal collateral damage expected in (healthy) tissues free from GNRs.

  10. Expanding living kidney donor criteria with ex-vivo surgery for renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Thomas B.; Rampersad, Christie; Patel, Premal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renal transplantation remains the gold standard treatment for end-stage renal disease, with living donor kidneys providing the best outcomes in terms of allograft survival. As the number of patients on the waitlist continues to grow, solutions to expand the donor pool are ongoing. A paradigm shift in the eligibility of donors with renal anomalies has been looked at as a potential source to expand the living donor pool. We sought to determine how many patients presented with anatomic renal anomalies at our transplant centre and describe the ex-vivo surgical techniques used to render these kidneys suitable for transplantation. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients referred for surgical suitability to undergo laparoscopic donor nephrectomy between January 2011 and January 2015. Patient charts were analyzed for demographic information, perioperative variables, urological histories, and postoperative outcomes. Results: 96 referrals were identified, of which 81 patients underwent laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. Of these patients, 11 (13.6%) were identified as having a renal anomaly that could potentially exclude them from the donation process. These anomalies included five patients with unilateral nephrolithiasis, four patients with large renal cysts (>4 cm diameter), one patient with an angiomyolipoma (AML) and one patient with a calyceal diverticulum filled with stones. A description of the ex-vivo surgical techniques used to correct these renal anomalies is provided. Conclusions: We have shown here that ex-vivo surgical techniques can safely and effectively help correct some of these renal anomalies to render these kidneys transplantable, helping to expand the living donor pool. PMID:27800047

  11. Ex vivo determination of bone tissue strains for an in vivo mouse tibial loading model

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, Alessandra; Abela, Lisa; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies introduced the digital image correlation (DIC) as a viable technique for measuring bone strain during loading. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of a DIC system in determining surface strains in a mouse tibia while loaded in compression through the knee joint. Specifically, we examined the effect of speckle distribution, facet size and overlap, initial vertical alignment of the bone into the loading cups, rotation with respect to cameras, and ex vivo loading configurations on the strain contour maps measured with a DIC system. We loaded tibiae of C57BL/6 mice (12 and 18 weeks old male) up to 12 N at 8 N/min. Images of speckles on the bone surface were recorded at 1 N intervals and DIC was used to compute strains. Results showed that speckles must have the correct size and density with respect to the facet size of choice for the strain distribution to be computed and reproducible. Initial alignment of the bone within the loading cups does not influence the strain distribution measured during peak loading, but bones must be placed in front of the camera with the same orientation in order for strains to be comparable. Finally, the ex vivo loading configurations with the tibia attached to the entire mouse, or to the femur and foot, or only to the foot, showed different strain contour maps. This work provides a better understanding of parameters affecting full field strain measurements from DIC in ex vivo murine tibial loading tests. PMID:24835472

  12. Recombinant Human Elastase Alters the Compliance of Atherosclerotic Tibial Arteries After Ex Vivo Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Karen; Moss, Emma; Gottlieb, Daniel P.; Wong, Marco D.; Bland, Kimberly S.; Franano, F. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether vonapanitase (formerly PRT-201), a recombinant human elastase, treatment can fragment the protein elastin in elastic fibers and cause dilation of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries subjected to ex vivo balloon angioplasty. Materials and Methods: Seven patients undergoing lower limb amputation for peripheral artery disease or who died and donated their bodies to science donated 11 tibial arteries (5 anterior, 6 posterior) for this study. All arteries were atherosclerotic by visual inspection. The arteries underwent ex vivo balloon angioplasty and thereafter were cut into rings and studied on wire myographs where the rings were stretched and tension was recorded. After treatment with vonapanitase 2 mg/mL or vehicle control, myography was repeated and the rings were then subject to elastin content measurement using a desmosine radioimmunoassay and elastic fiber visualization by histology. The wire myography data were used to derive compliance, stress-strain, and incremental elastic modulus curves. Results: Vonapanitase treatment reduced elastin (desmosine) content by 60% and decreased elastic fiber histologic staining. Vonapanitase-treated rings experienced less tension at any level of stretch and as a result had shifts in the compliance and stress-strain curves relative to vehicle-treated rings. Vonapanitase treatment did not alter the incremental elastic modulus curve. Conclusions: Vonapanitase treatment of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries after ex vivo balloon angioplasty fragmented elastin in elastic fibers, decreased tension in the rings at any level of stretch, and altered the compliance and stress-strain curves in a manner predicting arterial dilation in vivo. Based on this result, local treatment of balloon angioplasty sites may increase blood vessel diameter and thereby improve the success of balloon angioplasty in peripheral artery disease. PMID:26745001

  13. Ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery in a perfused ex vivo artery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.

    Acoustically driven stable cavitation may improve treatments of diseases in which passive penetration of drug into the target tissue is poor. Examples include atherosclerosis, in which the endothelium can prevent penetration of therapeutics into the plaque, and ischemic stroke, in which pathologically low flow of blood impedes the delivery of intravenous drugs to the clot. Understanding the way in which ultrasound cavitation agents nucleate cavitation in flowing blood-mimicking solutions is an important step in optimizing ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery. The use of a perfused, living ex vivo artery model permitted study of this phenomenon while still providing information on arterial bioeffects. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of anti-ICAM-1-targeted echogenic liposomes into and beyond the ex vivo murine aortic endothelium was demonstrated using 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound. Acoustic cavitation had no apparent effect on the health of the murine arterial tissue. A method of maximizing the energy of stable cavitation through the use of intermittent 120-kHz ultrasound with quiescent periods to allow contrast agent inflow was developed. Using this insonificaiton method, sonothrombolysis was studied in ex vivo porcine carotid arteries using a 120-kHz center frequency and 0.44 MPa peak-to-peak pressure amplitude. Clot mass loss was used as a metric of thrombolytic efficacy. Clots exposed to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and the ultrasound contrast agent, DefinityRTM in flowing porcine plasma without ultrasound experienced 34% mass loss. When robust stable cavitation was induced via 120-kHz insonation, the mean clot mass loss rose to 83%, which constituted a significant improvement (n = 6, p<0.0001). Without DefinityRTM there was no thrombolytic enhancement by ultrasound exposure alone at the same insonation pressure (n = 6, p<0.0001). Significant loss of endothelium occurred in 64% of the porcine carotid arteries, possibly due to poor oxygen delivery by the

  14. An ex vivo approach to botanical-drug interactions: A proof of concept study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinwen; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Munoz, Juliana; Gurley, Bill J.; Markowitz, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Botanical medicines are frequently used in combination with therapeutic drugs, imposing a risk for harmful botanical-drug interactions (BDIs). Among the existing BDI evaluation methods, clinical studies are the most desirable, but due to their expense and protracted time-line for completion, conventional in vitro methodologies remain the most frequently used BDI assessment tools. However, many predictions generated from in vitro studies are inconsistent with clinical findings. Accordingly, the present study aimed to develop a novel ex vivo approach for BDI assessment and expand the safety evaluation methodoloy in applied ethnopharmacological research. Materials and Methods This approach differs from conventional in vitro methods in that rather than botanical extracts or individual phytochemicals being prepared in artificial buffers, human plasma/serum collected from a limited number of subjects administered botanical supplements was utilized to assess BDIs. To validate the methodology, human plasma/serum samples collected from healthy subjects administered either milk thistle or goldenseal extracts were utilized in incubation studies to determine their potential inhibitory effects on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. Silybin A and B, two principal milk thistle phytochemicals, and hydrastine and berberine, the purported active constituents in goldenseal, were evaluated in both phosphate buffer and human plasma based in vitro incubation systems. Results Ex vivo study results were consistent with formal clinical study findings for the effect of milk thistle on the disposition of tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate, and for goldenseal’s influence on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a widely accepted CYP3A4/5 substrate. Compared to conventional in vitro BDI methodologies of assessment, the introduction of human plasma into the in vitro study model changed the observed inhibitory effect of silybinA, silybin B and hydrastine and berberine

  15. Live Imaging, Identifying, and Tracking Single Cells in Complex Populations In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minjung; Xenopoulos, Panagiotis; Muñoz-Descalzo, Silvia; Lou, Xinghua; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Advances in optical imaging technologies combined with the use of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have enabled the visualization of stem cells over extensive periods of time in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of genetically encoded fluorescent protein reporters that are fused with subcellularly localized proteins, such as human histone H2B, has made it possible to direct fluorescent protein reporters to specific subcellular structures and identify single cells in complex populations. This facilitates the visualization of cellular behaviors such as division, movement, and apoptosis at a single-cell resolution and, in principle, allows the prospective and retrospective tracking towards determining the lineage of each cell. PMID:23640250

  16. Ex-vivo liver perfusion for organ preservation: Recent advances in the field.

    PubMed

    Barbas, A S; Goldaracena, N; Dib, M J; Selzner, M

    2016-07-01

    Liver transplantation is the optimal treatment for end-stage liver disease but is limited by the severe shortage of donor organs. This shortage has prompted increased utilization of marginal grafts from DCD and extended criteria donors, which poorly tolerate cold storage in comparison to standard criteria grafts. Ex-vivo liver perfusion (EVLP) technology has emerged as a potential alternative to cold storage for organ preservation, but there is no consensus regarding the optimal temperature or conditions for EVLP. Herein, we review recent advances in both pre-clinical and clinical studies, organized by perfusion temperature (hypothermic, subnormothermic, normothermic). PMID:27158081

  17. Ex-vivo assessment of tissue viability using dynamic laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Miquet, E. E.; Miquet Romero, L. M.; Darias, J. G.; Martínez-Celorio, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic laser speckle is a non-destructive contactless sensing method useful for exploring activity inherent to biological samples. We present an ex-vivo analysis of dermal and epidermal tissue with different degrees of activity in healthy and burned tissue. Pseudocolor images obtained after processing biospeckle stacks with the generalized differences reveal a correlation between cellular lysis and speckle pattern activity. Epidermis shows higher activity than dermal tissue, which is attributable to the number of cells and each tissue. The analysis presented here could be employed in assessment of viability of tissues for graft and burns treatments.

  18. Ex vivo models to evaluate the role of ocular melanin in trans-scleral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pescina, Silvia; Santi, Patrizia; Ferrari, Giulio; Padula, Cristina; Cavallini, Pierugo; Govoni, Paolo; Nicoli, Sara

    2012-08-15

    Trans-scleral delivery is nowadays considered as a possible way to deliver drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. Despite the potentiality of this administration route, there is a lack of fundamental knowledge on the role of the numerous barriers involved. The aim of this work was to develop an easy and cheap ex vivo method to evaluate the barrier properties of the choroid-Bruch's layer and in particular to estimate the role of melanin in drug diffusion through ocular tissues. In vitro binding studies were performed to estimate drug affinity for melanin; model molecules used were methylene blue, propranolol, levofloxacin and methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The ex vivo model set up is based on porcine eye bulbs with light blue iris or brown iris. While the choroid of brown eyes is dark, the choroid of blue eyes is transparent, due to the absence of melanin. Permeation experiments using pigmented and not-pigmented porcine tissues gave the opportunity to discriminate between the barrier role of choroid-Bruch's membrane as such and the barrier role of melanin. Ex vivo permeation experiments can be performed using isolated choroid-Bruch's or the sclera-choroid-Bruch's layer. In this last case, it is possible to take into account also the barrier role of the sclera that tends to decrease the drug concentration at the sclera/choroid interface, thus amplifying the effect of melanin. The data obtained in this paper indicate that for some drugs melanin can really represent a barrier and the effect can imply a lower drug flux or simply a longer lag time depending on the kind of drug and the concentration applied. However, it is a saturable barrier, thus its effect can probably be overtaken by high doses or multiple administrations. The ex vivo model set up can help to refine computational models, to better evaluate the interplay among static, dynamic and metabolic barriers. Additionally, since human eyes display a full range of pigmentation, the model could also be

  19. Ex vivo Time Evolution of Thrombus Growth through Optical and Electrical Impedance data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Specogna, R.; Trevisan, F.

    2013-09-01

    We designed a novel sensor specifically aimed at ex vivo measurements of white thrombus volume growth; a white thrombus is induced within an artificial micro-channel where hemostasis takes place starting from whole blood under flow conditions. The advantage of the proposed methodology is to identify the time evolution of the thrombus volume by means of an original data fusion methodology based on 2D optical and electrical impedance data simultaneously processed. On the contrary, the present state of the art optical imaging methodologies allow the thrombus volume estimation only at the end of the hemostatic process.

  20. Mind-body interventions for treatment of phantom limb pain in persons with amputation.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vera Lucia; Faurot, Keturah R; Gaylord, Susan A; Mann, J Douglas; Sill, Morgan; Lynch, Chanee; Lee, Michael Y

    2012-08-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a significant source of chronic pain in most persons with amputation at some time in their clinical course. Pharmacologic therapies for this condition are often only moderately effective and may produce unwanted adverse effects. There is growing empirical evidence of the therapeutic effectiveness of mind-body therapies for the relief of chronic pain; therefore, an exploration of their role in relieving amputation-related chronic pain is warranted. We undertook a focused literature review on mind-body interventions for patients with amputation who experience PLP. Because of study heterogeneity, only descriptive presentations of the studies are presented. Only studies of hypnosis, imagery, and biofeedback, including visual mirror feedback, were found; studies on meditation, yoga, and tai chi/qigong were missing from the literature. Few studies of specific mind-body therapies were dedicated to management of PLP, with the exception of mirror visual therapy. Overall, studies were largely exploratory and reflect considerable variability in the application of mind-body techniques, making definitive conclusions inadvisable. Nevertheless, the weight of existing findings indicates that a mind-body approach to PLP pain management is promising and that specific methods may offer either temporary or long-term relief, either alone or in combination with conventional therapies. The authors discuss the potential for usefulness of specific mind-body therapies and the relevance of their mechanisms of action to those of PLP, including targeting cortical reorganization, autonomic nervous system deregulation, stress management, coping ability, and quality-of-life. The authors recommend more and better quality research exploring the efficacy and mechanisms of action. PMID:22286895

  1. Ex Vivo Expansion and In Vivo Self-Renewal of Human Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Charville, Gregory W; Cheung, Tom H; Yoo, Bryan; Santos, Pauline J; Lee, Gordon K; Shrager, Joseph B; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-10-13

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, or satellite cells (SCs), regenerate functional muscle following transplantation into injured or diseased tissue. To gain insight into human SC (huSC) biology, we analyzed transcriptome dynamics by RNA sequencing of prospectively isolated quiescent and activated huSCs. This analysis indicated that huSCs differentiate and lose proliferative potential when maintained in high-mitogen conditions ex vivo. Further analysis of gene expression revealed that p38 MAPK acts in a transcriptional network underlying huSC self-renewal. Activation of p38 signaling correlated with huSC differentiation, while inhibition of p38 reversibly prevented differentiation, enabling expansion of huSCs. When transplanted, expanded huSCs differentiated to generate chimeric muscle and engrafted as SCs in the sublaminar niche with a greater frequency than freshly isolated cells or cells cultured without p38 inhibition. These studies indicate characteristics of the huSC transcriptome that promote expansion ex vivo to allow enhanced functional engraftment of a defined population of self-renewing huSCs. PMID:26344908

  2. Ex vivo reconstruction of the epidermis with melanocytes and the influence of UVB.

    PubMed

    Bessou, S; Surlève-Bazeille, J E; Sorbier, E; Taïeb, A

    1995-10-01

    To study pigmentation, we have reconstructed an epidermis ex vivo with keratinocytes and melanocytes. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were grown first in primary cocultures and separately in secondary cultures, then seeded on a dead deepidermized dermis (Pruniéras type) at a 1:20 melanocyte/keratinocyte ratio. Reconstructed epidermis were grown in a special medium enriched with calcium and fetal bovine serum lifted for 15 days at the air-liquid interface. Using histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy we have shown an excellent level of differentiation of the reconstructed epidermis and a physiologic distribution of dendritic melanocytes in the basal layer capable of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes. UVB irradiation 0.15 J/cm2 x 5 consecutive days increased melanocyte numbers and stimulated pigmentation as evidenced macroscopically and microscopically and at the biochemical level. Following UVB irradiation melanosome transfer was markedly increased and isolated or clumps of melanosomes were seen in the basal layers as well as in the stratum corneum. This model allows the study of the physiology of pigmentation ex vivo. PMID:8789198

  3. Ex vivo expansion of circulating CD34(+) cells enhances the regenerative effect on rat liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Koga, Hironori; Iwamoto, Hideki; Tsutsumi, Victor; Imamura, Yasuko; Naitou, Masako; Masuda, Atsutaka; Ikezono, Yu; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Wada, Fumitaka; Sakaue, Takahiko; Ueno, Takato; Ii, Masaaki; Alev, Cantas; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Asahara, Takayuki; Torimura, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of autologous cells is indispensable for cell transplantation therapy of patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of human ex vivo-expanded CD34(+) cells for treatment of cirrhotic rat liver. Recipient rats were intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 twice weekly for 3 weeks before administration of CD34(+) cells. CCl4 was then re-administered twice weekly for 3 more weeks, and the rats were sacrificed. Saline, nonexpanded or expanded CD34(+) cells were injected via the spleen. After 7 days, CD34(+) cells were effectively expanded in a serum-free culture medium. Expanded CD34(+) cells were also increasingly positive for cell surface markers of VE-cadherin, VEGF receptor-2, and Tie-2. The expression of proangiogenic growth factors and adhesion molecules in expanded CD34(+) cells increased compared with nonexpanded CD34(+) cells. Expanded CD34(+) cell transplantation reduced liver fibrosis, with a decrease of αSMA(+) cells. Assessments of hepatocyte and sinusoidal endothelial cell proliferative activity indicated the superior potency of expanded CD34(+) cells over non-expanded CD34(+) cells. The inhibition of integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5 disturbed the engraftment of transplanted CD34(+) cells and aggravated liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that expanded CD34(+) cells enhanced the preventive efficacy of cell transplantation in a cirrhotic model. PMID:27162932

  4. Role of Transgene Regulation in Ex Vivo Lentiviral Correction of Artemis Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Megan M.; Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Karlen, Andrea D.; Olson, Erik R.; Gunther, Roland; Somia, Nikunj V.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Artemis is a single-stranded endonuclease, deficiency of which results in a radiation-sensitive form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-A) most effectively treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and potentially treatable by administration of genetically corrected autologous HSCs. We previously reported cytotoxicity associated with Artemis overexpression and subsequently characterized the human Artemis promoter with the intention to provide Artemis expression that is nontoxic yet sufficient to support immunodevelopment. Here we compare the human Artemis promoter (APro) with the moderate-strength human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter and the strong human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter to regulate expression of Artemis after ex vivo lentiviral transduction of HSCs in a murine model of SCID-A. Recipient animals treated with the PGK-Artemis vector exhibited moderate repopulation of their immune compartment, yet demonstrated a defective proliferative T lymphocyte response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Animals treated with the EF1α-Artemis vector displayed high levels of T lymphocytes but an absence of B lymphocytes and deficient lymphocyte function. In contrast, ex vivo transduction with the APro-Artemis vector supported effective immune reconstitution to wild-type levels, resulting in fully functional T and B lymphocyte responses. These results demonstrate the importance of regulated Artemis expression in immune reconstitution of Artemis-deficient SCID. PMID:25738323

  5. Normothermic ex vivo perfusion prevents lung injury compared to extended cold preservation for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cypel, M; Rubacha, M; Yeung, J; Hirayama, S; Torbicki, K; Madonik, M; Fischer, S; Hwang, D; Pierre, A; Waddell, T K; de Perrot, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2009-10-01

    Treatment of injured donor lungs ex vivo to accelerate organ recovery and ameliorate reperfusion injury could have a major impact in lung transplantation. We have recently demonstrated a feasible technique for prolonged (12 h) normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). This study was performed to examine the impact of prolonged EVLP on ischemic injury. Pig donor lungs were cold preserved in Perfadex for 12 h and subsequently divided into two groups: cold static preservation (CSP) or EVLP at 37 degrees C with Steen solution for a further 12 h (total 24 h preservation). Lungs were then transplanted and reperfused for 4 h. EVLP preservation resulted in significantly better lung oxygenation (PaO(2) 531 +/- 43 vs. 244 +/- 49 mmHg, p < 0.01) and lower edema formation rates after transplantation. Alveolar epithelial cell tight junction integrity, evaluated by zona occludens-1 protein staining, was disrupted in the cell membranes after prolonged CSP but not after EVLP. The maintenance of integrity of barrier function during EVLP translates into significant attenuation of reperfusion injury and improved graft performance after transplantation. Integrity of functional metabolic pathways during normothermic perfusion was confirmed by effective gene transfer and GFP protein synthesis by lung alveolar cells. In conclusion, EVLP prevents ongoing injury associated with prolonged ischemia and accelerates lung recovery. PMID:19663886

  6. In vivo and ex vivo evaluation of cosmetic properties of seedcakes.

    PubMed

    Ratz-Łyko, Anna; Arct, Jacek; Pytkowska, Katarzyna; Majewski, Sławomir

    2015-04-01

    The seedcakes are a potential source of natural bioactive substances: antioxidants, protein, and carbohydrates. Thus, they may scavenge free radicals and have an effect on the stratum corneum hydration and epidermal barrier function. The aim of the study was to evaluate the in vivo and ex vivo properties of emulsions with the seedcake extracts using the pH meter, corneometer, tewameter, methyl nicotinate model of micro-inflammation in human skin, and tape stripping of the stratum corneum. The in vivo and ex vivo studies showed that the emulsions with Oenothera biennis, Borago officinalis, and Nigella sativa seedcake extracts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. The 6-week topical application of the emulsions with the B. officinalis and N. sativa seedcakes significantly reduced skin irritation and influenced the improvement of the skin hydration and epidermal barrier function compared with placebo. The seedcakes due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have potential application in anti-aging, moisturizing, mitigating, and protective cosmetics. PMID:25415370

  7. Automated segmentation of in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, Alize E H; van de Ven, Rob C G; van der Weerd, Louise; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H C

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is required for many applications, such as the comparison of different structures or time points, and for annotation purposes. Currently, the gold standard for automated image segmentation is nonlinear atlas-based segmentation. However, these methods are either not sufficient or highly time consuming for mouse brains, owing to the low signal to noise ratio and low contrast between structures compared with other applications. We present a novel generic approach to reduce processing time for segmentation of various structures of mouse brains, in vivo and ex vivo. The segmentation consists of a rough affine registration to a template followed by a clustering approach to refine the rough segmentation near the edges. Compared with manual segmentations, the presented segmentation method has an average kappa index of 0.7 for 7 of 12 structures in in vivo MRI and 11 of 12 structures in ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we found that these results were equal to the performance of a nonlinear segmentation method, but with the advantage of being 8 times faster. The presented automatic segmentation method is quick and intuitive and can be used for image registration, volume quantification of structures, and annotation. PMID:19344574

  8. Pushing the envelope in tissue engineering: ex vivo production of thick vascularized cardiac extracellular matrix constructs.

    PubMed

    Sarig, Udi; Nguyen, Evelyne Bao-Vi; Wang, Yao; Ting, Sherwin; Bronshtein, Tomer; Sarig, Hadar; Dahan, Nitsan; Gvirtz, Maskit; Reuveny, Shaul; Oh, Steve K W; Scheper, Thomas; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Machluf, Marcelle

    2015-05-01

    Functional vascularization is a prerequisite for cardiac tissue engineering of constructs with physiological thicknesses. We previously reported the successful preservation of main vascular conduits in isolated thick acellular porcine cardiac ventricular ECM (pcECM). We now unveil this scaffold's potential in supporting human cardiomyocytes and promoting new blood vessel development ex vivo, providing long-term cell support in the construct bulk. A custom-designed perfusion bioreactor was developed to remodel such vascularization ex vivo, demonstrating, for the first time, functional angiogenesis in vitro with various stages of vessel maturation supporting up to 1.7 mm thick constructs. A robust methodology was developed to assess the pcECM maximal cell capacity, which resembled the human heart cell density. Taken together these results demonstrate feasibility of producing physiological-like constructs such as the thick pcECM suggested here as a prospective treatment for end-stage heart failure. Methodologies reported herein may also benefit other tissues, offering a valuable in vitro setting for "thick-tissue" engineering strategies toward large animal in vivo studies.

  9. Linarin Inhibits the Acetylcholinesterase Activity In-vitro and Ex-vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinchi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Linarin is a flavone glycoside in the plants Flos chrysanthemi indici, Buddleja officinalis, Cirsium setosum, Mentha arvensis and Buddleja davidii, and has been reported to possess analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this paper, linarin was investigated for its AChE inhibitory potential both in-vitro and ex-vivo. Ellman's colorimetric method was used for the determination of AChE inhibitory activity in mouse brain. In-vitro assays revealed that linarin inhibited AChE activity with an IC50 of 3.801 ± 1.149 μM. Ex-vivo study showed that the AChE activity was significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus of mice treated intraperitoneally with various doses of linarin (35, 70 and 140 mg/Kg). The inhibition effects produced by high dose of linarin were the same as that obtained after huperzine A treatment (0.5 mg/Kg). Molecular docking study revealed that both 4'-methoxyl group and 7-O-sugar moiety of linarin played important roles in ligand-receptor binding and thus they are mainly responsible for AChE inhibitory activity. In view of its potent AChE inhibitory activity, linarin may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of some diseases associated with AChE, such as glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, gastric motility and Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Linarin Inhibits the Acetylcholinesterase Activity In-vitro and Ex-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinchi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Linarin is a flavone glycoside in the plants Flos chrysanthemi indici, Buddleja officinalis, Cirsium setosum, Mentha arvensis and Buddleja davidii, and has been reported to possess analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this paper, linarin was investigated for its AChE inhibitory potential both in-vitro and ex-vivo. Ellman’s colorimetric method was used for the determination of AChE inhibitory activity in mouse brain. In-vitro assays revealed that linarin inhibited AChE activity with an IC50 of 3.801 ± 1.149 μM. Ex-vivo study showed that the AChE activity was significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus of mice treated intraperitoneally with various doses of linarin (35, 70 and 140 mg/Kg). The inhibition effects produced by high dose of linarin were the same as that obtained after huperzine A treatment (0.5 mg/Kg). Molecular docking study revealed that both 4’-methoxyl group and 7-O-sugar moiety of linarin played important roles in ligand-receptor binding and thus they are mainly responsible for AChE inhibitory activity. In view of its potent AChE inhibitory activity, linarin may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of some diseases associated with AChE, such as glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, gastric motility and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26330885

  11. Ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed brain sample.

    PubMed

    Forest, Fabien; Cinotti, Elisa; Yvorel, Violaine; Habougit, Cyril; Vassal, François; Nuti, Christophe; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Péoc'h, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Confocal microscopy is a technique able to realize "optic sections" of a tissue with increasing applications. We wondered if we could apply an ex vivo confocal microscope designed for dermatological purpose in a routine use for the most frequent brain tumors. The aim of this work was to identify tumor tissue and its histopathological hallmarks, and to assess grading criteria used in neuropathological practice without tissue loss on freshly removed brain tissue. Seven infiltrating gliomas, nine meningiomas and three metastases of carcinomas were included. We compared imaging results obtained with the confocal microscope to frozen sections, smears and tissue sections of formalin-fixed tissue. Our results show that ex vivo confocal microscopy imaging can be applied to brain tumors in order to quickly identify tumor tissue without tissue loss. It can differentiate tumors and can assess most of grading criteria. Confocal microscopy could represent a new tool to identify tumor tissue on freshly removed sample and could help in selecting areas for biobanking of tumor tissue.

  12. In vitro and ex vivo effect of hyaluronic acid on erythrocyte flow properties

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyaluronic acid (HA) is present in many tissues; its presence in serum may be related to certain inflammatory conditions, tissue damage, sepsis, liver malfunction and some malignancies. In the present work, our goal was to investigate the significance of hyaluronic acid effect on erythrocyte flow properties. Therefore we performed in vitro experiments incubating red blood cells (RBCs) with several HA concentrations. Afterwards, in order to corroborate the pathophysiological significance of the results obtained, we replicated the in vitro experiment with ex vivo RBCs from diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, a serum HA-increasing pathology. Methods Erythrocyte deformability (by filtration through nucleopore membranes) and erythrocyte aggregability (EA) were tested on blood from healthy donors additioned with purified HA. EA was measured by transmitted light and analyzed with a mathematical model yielding two parameters, the aggregation rate and the size of the aggregates. Conformational changes of cytoskeleton proteins were estimated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). Results In vitro, erythrocytes treated with HA showed increased rigidity index (RI) and reduced aggregability, situation strongly related to the rigidization of the membrane cytoskeleton triggered by HA, as shown by EPR results. Also, a significant correlation (r: 0.77, p < 0.00001) was found between RI and serum HA in RA patients. Conclusions Our results lead us to postulate the hypothesis that HA interacts with the erythrocyte surface leading to modifications in erythrocyte rheological and flow properties, both ex vivo and in vitro. PMID:20152040

  13. An Ex Vivo Porcine Nasal Mucosa Explants Model to Study MRSA Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Tulinski, Pawel; Fluit, Ad C.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; de Bruin, Alain; Glorieux, Sarah; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Duim, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×108 CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue. PMID:23326505

  14. Pharmacokinetics of buspirone as determined by ex vivo (/sup 3/H)-DPAT binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sethy, V.H.; Francis, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Ex vivo (/sup 3/H)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetraline ((/sup 3/H)-DPAT) binding to the hippocampus has been utilized to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of buspirone after i.v. and oral administration of this drug to rats. Intravenous buspirone rapidly penetrated the brain as demonstrated by a maximum inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-DPAT binding at 1 min. Elimination of drug from the brain was biphasic, with a first component half-life of 24.8 min and a second component half-life of 96 min. Oral buspirone at 3 times the i.v. dose produced less than one-third the maximum inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-DPAT binding compared to that observed with i.v. buspirone. The pharmacokinetic parameters of buspirone observed in the present study are in agreement with those reported previously. Thus, the ex vivo binding assay could be utilized to determine the bioavailability of the drug to the brain, and its duration of action. 20 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Ex-Vivo percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin: Comparison of LMOG organogel vs. pentravan cream.

    PubMed

    Kirilov, Plamen; Tran, Van Hung; Ducrotté-Tassel, Alban; Salvi, Jean-Paul; Perrot, Sébastien; Haftek, Marek; Boulieu, Roselyne; Pirot, Fabrice

    2016-02-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin from two base formulations, Pentravan cream and LMOG organogel. Ex-vivo experiments were carried out on pig ear skin. The percutaneous permeation through pig skin of two formulations containing 5 wt% of enrofloxacin was measured and compared using Franz diffusion cells. At appropriate intervals up to 120 h, diffusion samples were taken and analyzed using HPLC assays. Permeation profiles were established and the parameters Tlag and flux values were calculated. In this ex-vivo study, the flux values were 0.35 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for Pentravan and 1.22 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for LMOG organogel, corresponding respectively to 7.9 % and 29.3 % of enrofloxacin absorbed after 120 h by these formulations. The lag time (T lag) of Pentravan and organogel were 6.32 and 0.015 h respectively. The absorption time to reach the antibiotic concentration of enrofloxacin (2 μgmL(-1)) in the receptor was 60 h with Pentravan and 30 h with the organogel, suggesting more effective treatment by the latter. Enrofloxacin contained in organogel could be absorbed through pig ear skin 3.7 times greater than that in Pentravan (commercial formulation). This study demonstrates the perspective of organogel formulations as potential drug delivery systems.

  16. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-02-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent biliary transport of DCF-acylglucuronide (DAG), leading to decreased intestinal exposure to DAG and DCF. However, it is not known to what extent adaptive changes in the Mrp2 intestine itself influence its sensitivity to DCF toxicity without the influence of liver metabolites. To investigate this, DCF toxicity and disposition were studied ex vivo by precision-cut intestinal slices and Ussing chamber using intestines from wild type(WT) and Mrp2 rats. The results show that adaptive changes due to Mrp2 deficiency concerning Mrp2, Mrp3 and BCRP gene expression, GSH content and DAG formation were different between liver and intestine. Furthermore, Mrp2 intestine was intrinsically more resistant to DCF toxicity than its WT counterpart ex vivo. This can at least partly be explained by a reduced DCF uptake by the Mrp2 intestine, but isnot related to the other adaptive changes in the intestine. The extrapolation of this data to humans with MRP2 deficiency is uncertain due to species differences in activity and regulation of transporters.

  17. Ex vivo evaluation of a microneedle array device for transdermal application.

    PubMed

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; van Vuuren, Sandy; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2015-12-30

    A new approach of transdermal drug delivery is the use of microneedles. This promising technique offers the potential to be broadly used for drug administration as it enables the dramatic increase in permeation of medicaments across the stratum corneum. The potential of microneedles has evolved to spawn a plethora of potential transdermal applications. In order to advance the microneedle capabilities and possibly revolutionize advanced drug delivery, this study introduces a novel transdermal electro-modulated hydrogel-microneedle array (EMH-MNA) device composed of a nano-porous, embeddable ceramic microneedle array as well as an optimized EMH for the electro-responsive delivery of indomethacin through the skin. The ex vivo permeation as well as drug release experiments were performed on porcine skin tissue to ascertain the electro-responsive capabilities of the device. In addition, the microbial permeation ability of the microneedles across the viable epidermis in both microneedle-punctured skin as well as hypodermic needle-punctured skin was determined. Ex vivo evaluation of the EMH-MNA device across porcine skin demonstrated that without electro-stimulation, significantly less drug release was obtained (±0.4540mg) as compared to electro-stimulation (±2.93mg). PMID:26453791

  18. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  19. Ex vivo reconstruction of the epidermis with melanocytes and the influence of UVB.

    PubMed

    Bessou, S; Surlève-Bazeille, J E; Sorbier, E; Taïeb, A

    1995-10-01

    To study pigmentation, we have reconstructed an epidermis ex vivo with keratinocytes and melanocytes. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were grown first in primary cocultures and separately in secondary cultures, then seeded on a dead deepidermized dermis (Pruniéras type) at a 1:20 melanocyte/keratinocyte ratio. Reconstructed epidermis were grown in a special medium enriched with calcium and fetal bovine serum lifted for 15 days at the air-liquid interface. Using histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy we have shown an excellent level of differentiation of the reconstructed epidermis and a physiologic distribution of dendritic melanocytes in the basal layer capable of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes. UVB irradiation 0.15 J/cm2 x 5 consecutive days increased melanocyte numbers and stimulated pigmentation as evidenced macroscopically and microscopically and at the biochemical level. Following UVB irradiation melanosome transfer was markedly increased and isolated or clumps of melanosomes were seen in the basal layers as well as in the stratum corneum. This model allows the study of the physiology of pigmentation ex vivo.

  20. Ex Vivo Maintenance of Primary Human Multiple Myeloma Cells through the Optimization of the Osteoblastic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenting; Gu, Yexin; Sun, Qiaoling; Siegel, David S.; Tolias, Peter; Yang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported a new approach for culturing difficult-to-preserve primary patient-derived multiple myeloma cells (MMC) using an osteoblast (OSB)-derived 3D tissue scaffold constructed in a perfused microfluidic environment and a culture medium supplemented with patient plasma. In the current study, we used this biomimetic model to show, for the first time, that the long-term survival of OSB is the most critical factor in maintaining the ex vivo viability and proliferative capacity of MMC. We found that the adhesion and retention of MMC to the tissue scaffold was meditated by osteoblastic N-cadherin, as one of potential mechanisms that regulate MMC-OSB interactions. However, in the presence of MMC and patient plasma, the viability and osteogenic activity of OSB became gradually compromised, and consequently MMC could not remain viable over 3 weeks. We demonstrated that the long-term survival of both OSB and MMC could be enhanced by: (1) optimizing perfusion flow rate and patient-derived plasma composition in the culture medium and (2) replenishing OSB during culture as a practical means of prolonging MMC’s viability beyond several weeks. These findings were obtained using a high-throughput well plate-based perfusion device from the perspective of optimizing the ex vivo preservation of patient-derived MM biospecimens for downstream use in biological studies and chemosensitivity analyses. PMID:25973790

  1. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion.

  2. Dynamic holographic endoscopy--ex vivo investigations of malignant tumors in the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Wolfgang; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; Domagk, Dirk; Poremba, Christopher; von Bally, Gert; Domschke, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Laser holographic interferometry is based on the superimposition of the holograms of different motional states of an object on a single holographic storing medium. Using a combination of holographic interferometry and endoscopic imaging, we tried to detect areas of focally disturbed tissue elasticity in gastric cancer preparations. By connecting a mobile electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) camera system (light source: double frequency Nd:YAG laser, lambda = 532 nm) to different types of endoscopes, ex vivo experiments were performed on ten formalin fixed human stomachs, nine containing adenocarcinomas and one with a gastric lymphoma. Linking the endoscopic ESPI camera complex to a fast image processing system, the method of double pulse exposure image subtraction was applied at a video frame rate of 12.5 Hz. Speckle correlation patterns and corresponding phase difference distributions resulting from gastric wall deformation by gentle touch with a guide wire were analyzed. Tumor-free gastric areas showed high-contrast concentric fringes around the point of stimulation. In contrast, fringe patterns and filtered phase difference distributions corresponding to the areas of malignancy in all the cases were characterized by largely parallel lines, indicating that stimulation of rigid tumor tissue primarily led to tilting. Our ex vivo investigations of malignant gastric tumors show that the application of dynamic holographic endoscopy makes it possible to distinguish areas of malignancy from surrounding healthy tissue based on the differences in tissue elasticity. PMID:15726298

  3. Animal, In Vitro, and Ex Vivo Models of Flow-Dependent Atherosclerosis: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rezvan, Amir; Ni, Chih-Wen; Alberts-Grill, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease preferentially occurring in curved or branched arterial regions, whereas straight parts of the arteries are protected, suggesting a close relationship between flow and atherosclerosis. However, evidence directly linking disturbed flow to atherogenesis is just emerging, thanks to the recent development of suitable animal models. In this article, we review the status of various animal, in vitro, and ex vivo models that have been used to study flow-dependent vascular biology and atherosclerosis. For animal models, naturally flow-disturbed regions such as branched or curved arterial regions as well as surgically created models, including arterio-venous fistulas, vascular grafts, perivascular cuffs, and complete, incomplete, or partial ligation of arteries, are used. Although in vivo models provide the environment needed to mimic the complex pathophysiological processes, in vitro models provide simple conditions that allow the study of isolated factors. Typical in vitro models use cultured endothelial cells exposed to various flow conditions, using devices such as cone-and-plate and parallel-plate chambers. Ex vivo models using isolated vessels have been used to bridge the gap between complex in vivo models and simple in vitro systems. Here, we review these flow models in the context of the role of oxidative stress in flow-dependent inflammation, a critical proatherogenic step, and atherosclerosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1433–1448. PMID:20712399

  4. Preparation and evaluation of SEDDS of simvastatin by in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo technique.

    PubMed

    Karim, Fahim Tamzeedul; Kalam, Azad; Anwar, Rafi; Miah, Muhammad Masum; Rahman, Md Shamim; Islam, S M Ashraful

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System (SEDDS) of simvastatin, a poorly soluble drug and to evaluate by in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo techniques. Oils and surfactants were screened out depending upon their solubilizing capacity. Among all of the solvents, Capryol 90 showed good solubilizing capacity. It dissolved 105 mg/ml of simvastatin. Tween-80 also showed good solubilizing capacity which was 117 mg/ml. The two excipients were used to prepare simvastatin SEDDS. Formulations were initially checked for the color, clarity and sedimentation. The SEDDS formulations were transparent and clear. Formulation F2 containing 7:3 (m/m) mixture of Capryol 90/Tween-80 produced smallest micro-emulsion with particles size of 0.074 µm and drug release was higher than other formulation (102% within 20 min). Ex vivo study of the SEDDS formulation was evaluated using guinea pig intestinal sac. Drug diffused from F2 formulation was significantly higher than pure drug (p < 0.001). In vivo study of SEDDS was performed in albino mice using plasma cholesterol level as a pharmacodynamic marker parameter. The test formulation (F2) appeared remarkable reduction in plasma cholesterol level, after oral administration which showed that SEDDS may be an effective technique for the oral administration of simvastatin.

  5. Ex vivo expansion of circulating CD34+ cells enhances the regenerative effect on rat liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Toru; Koga, Hironori; Iwamoto, Hideki; Tsutsumi, Victor; Imamura, Yasuko; Naitou, Masako; Masuda, Atsutaka; Ikezono, Yu; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Wada, Fumitaka; Sakaue, Takahiko; Ueno, Takato; Ii, Masaaki; Alev, Cantas; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Asahara, Takayuki; Torimura, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of autologous cells is indispensable for cell transplantation therapy of patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of human ex vivo-expanded CD34+ cells for treatment of cirrhotic rat liver. Recipient rats were intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 twice weekly for 3 weeks before administration of CD34+ cells. CCl4 was then re-administered twice weekly for 3 more weeks, and the rats were sacrificed. Saline, nonexpanded or expanded CD34+ cells were injected via the spleen. After 7 days, CD34+ cells were effectively expanded in a serum-free culture medium. Expanded CD34+ cells were also increasingly positive for cell surface markers of VE-cadherin, VEGF receptor-2, and Tie-2. The expression of proangiogenic growth factors and adhesion molecules in expanded CD34+ cells increased compared with nonexpanded CD34+ cells. Expanded CD34+ cell transplantation reduced liver fibrosis, with a decrease of αSMA+ cells. Assessments of hepatocyte and sinusoidal endothelial cell proliferative activity indicated the superior potency of expanded CD34+ cells over non-expanded CD34+ cells. The inhibition of integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5 disturbed the engraftment of transplanted CD34+ cells and aggravated liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that expanded CD34+ cells enhanced the preventive efficacy of cell transplantation in a cirrhotic model. PMID:27162932

  6. Multicolor core/shell silica nanoparticles for in vivo and ex vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, Enrico; Boschi, Federico; Bonacchi, Sara; Juris, Riccardo; Montalti, Marco; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Prodi, Luca; Calderan, Laura; Rossi, Barbara; Becchi, Serena; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatible highly bright silica nanoparticles were designed, prepared and tested in small living organisms for both in vivo and ex vivo imaging. The results that we report here demonstrate that they are suitable for optical imaging applications as a possible alternative to commercially available fluorescent materials including quantum dots. Moreover, the tunability of their photophysical properties, which was enhanced by the use of different dyes as doping agents, constitutes a very important added value in the field of medical diagnostics.Biocompatible highly bright silica nanoparticles were designed, prepared and tested in small living organisms for both in vivo and ex vivo imaging. The results that we report here demonstrate that they are suitable for optical imaging applications as a possible alternative to commercially available fluorescent materials including quantum dots. Moreover, the tunability of their photophysical properties, which was enhanced by the use of different dyes as doping agents, constitutes a very important added value in the field of medical diagnostics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Particle size distribution by DLS and TEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11401h

  7. Procedure for human saphenous veins ex vivo perfusion and external reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Longchamp, Alban; Allagnat, Florent; Berard, Xavier; Alonso, Florian; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Deglise, Sébastien; Corpataux, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mainstay of contemporary therapies for extensive occlusive arterial disease is venous bypass graft. However, its durability is threatened by intimal hyperplasia (IH) that eventually leads to vessel occlusion and graft failure. Mechanical forces, particularly low shear stress and high wall tension, are thought to initiate and to sustain these cellular and molecular changes, but their exact contribution remains to be unraveled. To selectively evaluate the role of pressure and shear stress on the biology of IH, an ex vivo perfusion system (EVPS) was created to perfuse segments of human saphenous veins under arterial regimen (high shear stress and high pressure). Further technical innovations allowed the simultaneous perfusion of two segments from the same vein, one reinforced with an external mesh. Veins were harvested using a no-touch technique and immediately transferred to the laboratory for assembly in the EVPS. One segment of the freshly isolated vein was not perfused (control, day 0). The two others segments were perfused for up to 7 days, one being completely sheltered with a 4 mm (diameter) external mesh. The pressure, flow velocity, and pulse rate were continuously monitored and adjusted to mimic the hemodynamic conditions prevailing in the femoral artery. Upon completion of the perfusion, veins were dismounted and used for histological and molecular analysis. Under ex vivo conditions, high pressure perfusion (arterial, mean = 100 mm Hg) is sufficient to generate IH and remodeling of human veins. These alterations are reduced in the presence of an external polyester mesh. PMID:25350681

  8. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  9. High embryonic recovery rates with in vivo and ex vivo techniques in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Luz, M R; de Holanda, C C; Pereira, J J; Freitas, P M C; Salgado, A E P; Giannotti, J Di Giorgio; de Oliveira, S B; Teixeira, N S; Guaitolini, C R de Freitas

    2011-08-01

    The embryonic collection techniques in dogs present a vast methodological variation and low recovery rates. The objectives were to compare and describe two techniques as to the recovery of canine embryos, on the 12th day after the first mating or artificial insemination. Embryos were recovered through uterine horn flushing in vivo, before performing the ovariohysterectomy (OHE) (Group 1; n = 9) or ex vivo, immediately after the OHE (Group 2; n = 9). In total, 43 and 47 embryonic structures were recovered in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between groups on recovery rates (72.8% and 81.0%, respectively). We inferred that both in vivo and ex vivo techniques allow a high rate of embryonic recovery; in the collection technique prior to the OHE, it is essential to carefully handle the reproductive system during the trans-surgical period and that the 12th day (D12) after the first mating/artificial insemination is an efficient option for the high recovery rate of morulae and blastocysts.

  10. Ex Vivo Sentinel Node Mapping in Colon Cancer Combining Blue Dye Staining and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Hutteman, Merlijn; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The sentinel lymph node procedure has been proposed to improve nodal staging in colon cancer patients. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of near-infrared fluorescence imaging to conventional blue dye staining for ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping. Materials and Methods Twenty-two consecutive patients undergoing surgery for colon cancer were included. After tumor resection, a premixed cocktail of the near-infrared lymphatic tracer HSA800 and blue dye was submucosally injected around the tumor for detection of sentinel lymph nodes. The Mini-FLARE imaging system was used for fluorescence imaging. Results In 95% of the patients, at least one sentinel lymph node was identified. Overall, a total of 77 sentinel lymph nodes were identified, of which 77 were fluorescent (100%) and 70 (91%) were blue. Sentinel lymph nodes that were located deeper in the mesenteric fat could easily be located by NIR fluorescence. In 4 out of 5 patients with lymph node metastases, tumor cells were present in at least 1 of the sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusions This study shows the successful use and added value of the near-infrared fluorescence tracer HSA800 to conventional blue dye for the ex vivo sentinel lymph node procedure in colon cancer. PMID:23391167

  11. Ex vivo Culture of Mouse Embryonic Skin and Live-imaging of Melanoblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L.; Keighren, Margaret; Hay, Leonard; Jackson, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoblasts are the neural crest derived precursors of melanocytes; the cells responsible for producing the pigment in skin and hair. Melanoblasts migrate through the epidermis of the embryo where they subsequently colonize the developing hair follicles1,2. Neural crest cell migration is extensively studied in vitro but in vivo methods are still not well developed, especially in mammalian systems. One alternative is to use ex vivo organotypic culture3-6. Culture of mouse embryonic skin requires the maintenance of an air-liquid interface (ALI) across the surface of the tissue3,6. High resolution live-imaging of mouse embryonic skin has been hampered by the lack of a good method that not only maintains this ALI but also allows the culture to be inverted and therefore compatible with short working distance objective lenses and most confocal microscopes. This article describes recent improvements to a method that uses a gas permeable membrane to overcome these problems and allow high-resolution confocal imaging of embryonic skin in ex vivo culture6. By using a melanoblast specific Cre-recombinase expressing mouse line combined with the R26YFPR reporter line we are able to fluorescently label the melanoblast population within these skin cultures. The technique allows live-imaging of melanoblasts and observation of their behavior and interactions with the tissue in which they develop. Representative results are included to demonstrate the capability to live-image 6 cultures in parallel. PMID:24894489

  12. Ex vivo characterization and isolation of rare memory B cells with antigen tetramers.

    PubMed

    Franz, Bettina; May, Kenneth F; Dranoff, Glenn; Wucherpfennig, Kai

    2011-07-14

    Studying human antigen-specific memory B cells has been challenging because of low frequencies in peripheral blood, slow proliferation, and lack of antibody secretion. Therefore, most studies have relied on conversion of memory B cells into antibody-secreting cells by in vitro culture. To facilitate direct ex vivo isolation, we generated fluorescent antigen tetramers for characterization of memory B cells by using tetanus toxoid as a model antigen. Brightly labeled memory B cells were identified even 4 years after last immunization, despite low frequencies ranging from 0.01% to 0.11% of class-switched memory B cells. A direct comparison of monomeric to tetrameric antigen labeling demonstrated that a substantial fraction of the B-cell repertoire can be missed when monomeric antigens are used. The specificity of the method was confirmed by antibody reconstruction from single-cell sorted tetramer(+) B cells with single-cell RT-PCR of the B-cell receptor. All antibodies bound to tetanus antigen with high affinity, ranging from 0.23 to 2.2 nM. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified related memory B cell and plasmablast clones isolated more than a year apart. Therefore, antigen tetramers enable specific and sensitive ex vivo characterization of rare memory B cells as well as the production of fully human antibodies.

  13. Ex vivo complement protein adsorption on positively and negatively charged cellulose dialyser membranes.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Matata, B M; Vienken, J; Courtney, J M

    1997-05-01

    An ex vivo test system was used to measure complement protein C3 and factor B adsorption onto small dialyser modules made from regenerated and modified cellulosic hollow fibre membranes in which positive diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or negative carboxymethyl (CM) groups were introduced into the cellulose matrix. The extracorporeal system, which included test-dialysers and the dialysis environment, allowed the use of labelled proteins without contaminating the blood donors which were connected in an open-loop fashion to the extracorporeal test system. The modules were removed at selected time points from the extracorporeal system for radioactivity counting. The results were used to evaluate the mechanisms involved in complement reactions to foreign surfaces. The system therefore allowed the analysis of complement protein adsorption occurring in the dialyser modules and its relationship to the complement generation rate in the extracorporeal system to be evaluated. It was possible to demonstrate that significant complement C3 and factor B adsorption occurred in the test modules made of cellulosic membranes. Complement adsorption as a function of the pH and the release reaction of the adsorbed C3 and factor B after membrane blood perfusion were therefore found to be variable according to the cellulosic membrane type and the presence of positive or negative charged groups within the cellulose matrix. The data obtained from the ex vivo model therefore provided additional evidence on the discussion of the mechanisms involved in the increased complement activation by regenerated cellulose and in its attenuation by DEAE- or CM-modified cellulose.

  14. In vivo and ex vivo evaluation of cosmetic properties of seedcakes.

    PubMed

    Ratz-Łyko, Anna; Arct, Jacek; Pytkowska, Katarzyna; Majewski, Sławomir

    2015-04-01

    The seedcakes are a potential source of natural bioactive substances: antioxidants, protein, and carbohydrates. Thus, they may scavenge free radicals and have an effect on the stratum corneum hydration and epidermal barrier function. The aim of the study was to evaluate the in vivo and ex vivo properties of emulsions with the seedcake extracts using the pH meter, corneometer, tewameter, methyl nicotinate model of micro-inflammation in human skin, and tape stripping of the stratum corneum. The in vivo and ex vivo studies showed that the emulsions with Oenothera biennis, Borago officinalis, and Nigella sativa seedcake extracts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. The 6-week topical application of the emulsions with the B. officinalis and N. sativa seedcakes significantly reduced skin irritation and influenced the improvement of the skin hydration and epidermal barrier function compared with placebo. The seedcakes due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have potential application in anti-aging, moisturizing, mitigating, and protective cosmetics.

  15. Clinical study of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging in endoscopic mucosal resection tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Liang; Streutker, Catherine J.; Marcon, Norman; Cirocco, Maria; Lakovlev, Vladimir V.; DaCosta, Ralph; Foster, F. S.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate endoscopic detection and dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) remains a major unmet clinical need. Current diagnosis use multiple biopsies under endoscopic image guidance, where up to 99% of the tissue remains unsampled, leading to significant risk of missing dysplasia. We conducted an ex vivo clinical trial using photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in patients undergoing endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) with known high-grade dysplasia for the purpose of characterizing the esophageal microvascular pattern, with the long-term goal of performing in vivo endoscopic PAI for dysplasia detection and therapeutic guidance. EMR tissues were mounted immediately on an agar layer and covered with ultrasound gel. Digital photography guided the placement of the PAI transducer (40 MHz center frequency). The luminal side of the specimen was scanned over a field of view of 14 mm (width) by 15 mm (depth) at 680, 750, 824, 850 and 970 nm. Acoustic images were simultaneously acquired. Tissues were then sliced and fixed in formalin for histopathology with H and E staining. Analysis consisted of co-registration and correlation between the intrinsic PAI features and the histological images. The initial PAI + ultrasound images from 8 BE patients have demonstrated the technical feasibility of this approach and point to the potential of PAI to reveal the microvascular pattern within EMR specimens. There are several technical factors to be considered in rigorous interpretation of the PAI characteristics, including the loss of blood from the ex vivo specimens and the limited depth penetration of the photoacoustic signal.

  16. Use of Ex Vivo Normothermic Perfusion for Quality Assessment of Discarded Human Donor Pancreases.

    PubMed

    Barlow, A D; Hamed, M O; Mallon, D H; Brais, R J; Gribble, F M; Scott, M A; Howat, W J; Bradley, J A; Bolton, E M; Pettigrew, G J; Hosgood, S A; Nicholson, M L; Saeb-Parsy, K

    2015-09-01

    A significant number of pancreases procured for transplantation are deemed unsuitable due to concerns about graft quality and the associated risk of complications. However, this decision is subjective and some declined grafts may be suitable for transplantation. Ex vivo normothermic perfusion (EVNP) prior to transplantation may allow a more objective assessment of graft quality and reduce discard rates. We report ex vivo normothermic perfusion of human pancreases procured but declined for transplantation, with ABO-compatible warm oxygenated packed red blood cells for 1-2 h. Five declined human pancreases were assessed using this technique after a median cold ischemia time of 13 h 19 min. One pancreas, with cold ischemia over 30 h, did not appear viable and was excluded. In the remaining pancreases, blood flow and pH were maintained throughout perfusion. Insulin secretion was observed in all four pancreases, but was lowest in an older donation after cardiac death pancreas. Amylase levels were highest in a gland with significant fat infiltration. This is the first study to assess the perfusion, injury, as measured by amylase, and exocrine function of human pancreases using EVNP and demonstrates the feasibility of the approach, although further refinements are required.

  17. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. PMID:27512666

  18. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease. PMID:27574989

  19. Role of transgene regulation in ex vivo lentiviral correction of artemis deficiency.

    PubMed

    Multhaup, Megan M; Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M; Karlen, Andrea D; Olson, Erik R; Gunther, Roland; Somia, Nikunj V; Blazar, Bruce R; Cowan, Morton J; McIvor, R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Artemis is a single-stranded endonuclease, deficiency of which results in a radiation-sensitive form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-A) most effectively treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and potentially treatable by administration of genetically corrected autologous HSCs. We previously reported cytotoxicity associated with Artemis overexpression and subsequently characterized the human Artemis promoter with the intention to provide Artemis expression that is nontoxic yet sufficient to support immunodevelopment. Here we compare the human Artemis promoter (APro) with the moderate-strength human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter and the strong human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter to regulate expression of Artemis after ex vivo lentiviral transduction of HSCs in a murine model of SCID-A. Recipient animals treated with the PGK-Artemis vector exhibited moderate repopulation of their immune compartment, yet demonstrated a defective proliferative T lymphocyte response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Animals treated with the EF1α-Artemis vector displayed high levels of T lymphocytes but an absence of B lymphocytes and deficient lymphocyte function. In contrast, ex vivo transduction with the APro-Artemis vector supported effective immune reconstitution to wild-type levels, resulting in fully functional T and B lymphocyte responses. These results demonstrate the importance of regulated Artemis expression in immune reconstitution of Artemis-deficient SCID. PMID:25738323

  20. Transfer accuracy and precision scoring in planar bone cutting validated with ex vivo data.

    PubMed

    Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, Germán Luis; Bahamonde, Luis Alberto; Aponte-Tinao, Luis Alberto; Risk, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    The use of interactive surgical scenarios for virtual preoperative planning of osteotomies has increased in the last 5 years. As it has been reported by several authors, this technology has been used in tumor resection osteotomies, knee osteotomies, and spine surgery with good results. A digital three-dimensional preoperative plan makes possible to quantitatively evaluate the transfer process from the virtual plan to the anatomy of the patient. We introduce an exact definition of accuracy and precision of this transfer process for planar bone cutting. We present a method to compute these properties from ex vivo data. We also propose a clinical score to assess the goodness of a cut. A computer simulation is used to characterize the definitions and the data generated by the measurement method. The definitions and method are evaluated in 17 ex vivo planar cuts of tumor resection osteotomies. The results show that the proposed method and definitions are highly correlated with a previous definition of accuracy based in ISO 1101. The score is also evaluated by showing that it distinguishes among different transfer techniques based in its distribution location and shape. The introduced definitions produce acceptable results in cases where the ISO-based definition produce counter intuitive results.

  1. Hydralazine inhibits compression and acrolein-mediated injuries in ex vivo spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Kristin; Nehrt, Genevieve; Ouyang, Hui; Duerstock, Brad; Shi, Riyi

    2008-02-01

    We have previously shown that acrolein, a lipid peroxidation byproduct, is significantly increased following spinal cord injury in vivo, and that exposure to neuronal cells results in oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased membrane permeability, impaired axonal conductivity, and eventually cell death. Acrolein thus may be a key player in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury, where lipid peroxidation is known to be involved. The current study demonstrates that the acrolein scavenger hydralazine protects against not only acrolein-mediated injury, but also compression in guinea pig spinal cord ex vivo. Specifically, hydralazine (500 mumol/L to 1 mmol/L) can significantly alleviate acrolein (100-500 mumol/L)-induced superoxide production, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of membrane integrity, and reduced compound action potential conduction. Additionally, 500 mumol/L hydralazine significantly attenuated compression-mediated membrane disruptions at 2 and 3 h following injury. This was consistent with our findings that acrolein-lys adducts were increased following compression injury ex vivo, an effect that was prevented by hydralazine treatment. These findings provide further evidence for the role of acrolein in spinal cord injury, and suggest that acrolein-scavenging drugs such as hydralazine may represent a novel therapy to effectively reduce oxidative stress in disorders such as spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative diseases, where oxidative stress is known to play a role.

  2. The effects of in vivo and ex vivo various degrees of cold exposure on erythrocyte deformability and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Erken, Gülten; Erken, Haydar Ali; Bor-Kucukatay, Melek; Kucukatay, Vural; Genc, Osman

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background This study aimed to investigate alterations in hemorheology by cold exposure, in vivo and ex vivo, and to determine their relationship to oxidative stress. Material/Methods Rats were divided into 2 in vivo and ex vivo cold exposure groups. The in vivo group was further divided into control (AR), AC (4°C, 2 hours) and ALTC (4°C, 6 hours) subgroups; and the ex vivo group was divided into control (BR) and BC (4°C, 2 hours) subgroups. Blood samples were used for the determination of erythrocyte deformability, aggregation, and oxidative stress parameters. Results Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation were not affected by 2-hour ex vivo cold exposure. While 2 hour in vivo cold exposure reduced erythrocyte deformability, it returned to normal after 6 hours, possibly due the compensation by acute neuroendocrine response. Six hours of cold exposure decreased aggregation index, and might be an adaptive mechanism allowing the continuation of circulation. Aggregation of ex vivo groups was lower compared to in vivo groups. Cold exposure at various temperatures did not cause alterations in plasma total oxidant antioxidant status and oxidative stress index (TOS, TAS, OSI) when considered together. Conclusions Results of this study indicate that the alterations observed in hemorheological parameters due to cold exposure are far from being explained by the oxidative stress parameters determined herein. PMID:21804457

  3. In vivo and ex vivo measurements: noninvasive assessment of alcoholic fatty liver using 1H-MR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keese, Daniel; Korkusuz, Hüdayi; Huebner, Frank; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Raschidi, Bahram; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the ability of 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to detect and quantify hepatic fat content in vivo and ex vivo in an experimental rat model of alcoholic fatty liver using histopathology, biochemistry, and laboratory analyses as reference. METHODS Alcoholic fatty liver was induced within 48 hours in 20 Lewis rats; 10 rats served as control. Intrahepatic fat content determined by 1H-MRS was expressed as the percent ratio of the lipid and water peaks and was correlated with intrahepatic fat content determined histologically and biochemically. Liver enzymes were measured in serum. RESULTS Fatty liver could be detected in vivo as well as ex vivo using 1H-MRS, in all 20 animals. Histologic analysis showed a fatty liver in 16 of 20 animals. Histology and 1H-MRS results were highly correlated (in vivo, r=0.93, P = 0.0005; ex vivo, r=0.92, P = 0.0006). Also a strong correlation was noted between in vivo 1H-MRS measurements and the fat content determined biochemically (r=0.96, P = 0.0003). Ex vivo results showed a similarly strong correlation between 1H-MRS and biochemistry (r=0.89, P = 0.0011). CONCLUSION 1H-MRS can be carried out in ex vivo models, as well as in vivo, to detect and quantify intrahepatic fat content in the acute fatty liver. PMID:26627137

  4. An Eye-adapted Beamforming for Axial B-scans Free from Crystalline Lens Aberration: In vitro and ex vivo Results with a 20 MHz Linear Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matéo, Tony; Mofid, Yassine; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Ossant, Frédéric

    In ophtalmic ultrasonography, axial B-scans are seriously deteriorated owing to the presence of the crystalline lens. This strongly aberrating medium affects both spatial and contrast resolution and causes important distortions. To deal with this issue, an adapted beamforming (BF) has been developed and experimented with a 20 MHz linear array working with a custom US research scanner. The adapted BF computes focusing delays that compensate for crystalline phase aberration, including refraction effects. This BF was tested in vitro by imaging a wire phantom through an eye phantom consisting of a synthetic gelatin lens, shaped according to the unaccommodated state of an adult human crystalline lens, anatomically set up in an appropriate liquid (turpentine) to approach the in vivo velocity ratio. Both image quality and fidelity from the adapted BF were assessed and compared with conventional delay-and-sum BF over the aberrating medium. Results showed 2-fold improvement of the lateral resolution, greater sensitivity and 90% reduction of the spatial error (from 758 μm to 76 μm) with adapted BF compared to conventional BF. Finally, promising first ex vivo axial B-scans of a human eye are presented.

  5. SU-E-I-22: Dependence On Calibration Phantom and Field Area of the Conversion Factor Used to Calculate Skin Dose During Neuro-Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, V K; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S R; Bednarek, D R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the appropriate calibration factor to use when calculating skin dose with our real-time dose-tracking system (DTS) during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures by evaluating the difference in backscatter from different phantoms and as a function of entrance-skin field area. Methods: We developed a dose-tracking system to calculate and graphically display the cumulative skin-dose distribution in real time. To calibrate the DTS for neuro-interventional procedures, a phantom is needed that closely approximates the scattering properties of the head. We compared the x-ray backscatter from eight phantoms: 20-cm-thick solid water, 16-cm diameter water-filled container, 16-cm CTDI phantom, modified-ANSI head phantom, 20-cm-thick PMMA, Kyoto-Kagaku PBU- 50 head, Phantom-Labs SK-150 head, and RSD RS-240T head. The phantoms were placed on the patient table with the entrance surface at 15 cm tube-side from the isocenter of a Toshiba Infinix C-arm, and the entrance-skin exposure was measured with a calibrated 6-cc PTW ionization chamber. The measurement included primary radiation, backscatter from the phantom and forward scatter from the table and pad. The variation in entrance-skin exposure was also measured as a function of the skin-entrance area for a 30x30 cm by 20-cm-thick PMMA phantom and the SK-150 head phantom using four different added beam filters. Results: The entranceskin exposure values measured for eight different phantoms differed by up to 12%, while the ratio of entrance exposure of all phantoms relative to solid water showed less than 3% variation with kVp. The change in entrance-skin exposure with entrance-skin area was found to differ for the SK-150 head compared to the 20-cm PMMA phantom and the variation with field area was dependent on the added beam filtration. Conclusion: To accurately calculate skin dose for neuro-interventional procedures with the DTS, the phantom for calibration should be carefully chosen since different

  6. Late Effects of Heavy Ion Irradiation on Ex Vivo Osteoblastogenesis and Cancellous Bone Microarchitecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Luan Hoang; Alwood, Joshua; Kumar, Akhilesh; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged spaceflight causes degeneration of skeletal tissue with incomplete recovery even after return to Earth. We hypothesize that heavy ion irradiation, a component of Galactic Cosmic Radiation, damages osteoblast progenitors and may contribute to bone loss during long duration space travel beyond the protection of the Earth's magnetosphere. Male, 16 week old C57BL6/J mice were exposed to high LET (56 Fe, 600MeV) radiation using either low (5 or 10cGy) or high (50 or 200cGy) doses at the NASA Space Radiation Lab and were euthanized 3 - 4, 7, or 35 days later. Bone structure was quantified by microcomputed tomography (6.8 micron pixel size) and marrow cell redox assessed using membrane permeable, free radical sensitive fluorogenic dyes. To assess osteoblastogenesis, adherent marrow cells were cultured ex vivo, then mineralized nodule formation quantified by imaging and gene expression analyzed by RT PCR. Interestingly, 3 - 4 days post exposure, fluorogenic dyes that reflect cytoplasmic generation of reactive nitrogen/oxygen species (DAF FM Diacetate or CM H2DCFDA) revealed irradiation (50cGy) reduced free radical generation (20-45%) compared to sham irradiated controls. Alternatively, use of a dye showing relative specificity for mitochondrial superoxide generation (MitoSOX) revealed an 88% increase compared to controls. One week after exposure, reactive oxygen/nitrogen levels remained lower(24%) relative to sham irradiated controls. After one month, high dose irradiation (200 cGy) caused an 86% decrement in ex vivo nodule formation and a 16-31% decrement in bone volume to total volume and trabecular number (50, 200cGy) compared to controls. High dose irradiation (200cGy) up regulated expression of a late osteoblast marker (BGLAP) and select genes related to oxidative metabolism (Catalase) and DNA damage repair (Gadd45). In contrast, lower doses (5, 10cGy) did not affect bone structure or ex vivo nodule formation, but did down regulate iNOS by 0.54 - 0.58 fold

  7. Ho:YAG laser irradiation in blood vessel as a vasodilator: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, E.; Iwasaki, T.; Kaneko, K.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.

    2007-02-01

    We studied Ho:YAG laser irradiation in blood vessel as a vasodilator ex vivo. We thought that the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble expansion might be able to dilate the vessel because we found the vessel wall expansion after the Ho:YAG laser irradiation, that is steady deformation, in the vessel ex vivo. There have been many reports regarding to the Ho:YAG laser irradiation in the vessel. Most of studies concentrated on the interaction between Ho:YAG laser irradiation and vessel wall to investigate side effect on Ho:YAG laser angioplasty. We proposed to use the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble expansion as a vasodilator. We studied vasodilation effect of the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble ex vivo. The flash lamp excited Ho:YAG laser surgical unit (IH102, NIIC, Japan) (λ=2.1μm) was used. The laser energy was delivered by a silica glass fiber (outer diameter: 1000μm, core diameter: 600μm). The laser-induced bubble was generated in the extracted fresh porcine carotid artery with the warmed saline perfusion. The laser energy at the fiber tip was ranging from 170-1300mJ per pulse. Number of the laser irradiation was ranged from 20pulses to 100pulses. The outer diameter of the vessel was observed. To examine the change in mechanical properties of the vessel wall, the stress-strain curve of the laser-irradiated vessel was measured. Birefringence observation and microscopic observation of staining specimen were performed. When the laser energy was set to 1300mJ per pulse, the outer diameter of the vessel after the laser irradiation was expanded by 1.4 times comparing with that of before the laser irradiation and the dilatation effect was kept even at 10minutes after the irradiation. The elasticity modulus of the artery by collagen was changed by the laser irradiation. In the polarized microscopic observation, the brightness of the intimal side of the vessel is increased comparing with that of the normal. We think this brightness increasing may be attributed to birefringence change

  8. Evaluation of hybrid algorithm for analysis of scattered light using ex vivo nuclear morphology measurements of cervical epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Drake, Tyler K; Bentley, Rex C; Valea, Fidel A; Wax, Adam

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate a new hybrid algorithm for determining nuclear morphology using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) measurements in ex vivo cervical tissue. The algorithm combines Mie theory based and continuous wavelet transform inverse light scattering analysis. The hybrid algorithm was validated and compared to traditional Mie theory based analysis using an ex vivo tissue data set. The hybrid algorithm achieved 100% agreement with pathology in distinguishing dysplastic and non-dysplastic biopsy sites in the pilot study. Significantly, the new algorithm performed over four times faster than traditional Mie theory based analysis. PMID:26309741

  9. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  10. Ex vivo photometric and polarimetric multilayer characterization of human healthy colon by multispectral Mueller imaging.

    PubMed

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Manhas, Sandeep; Benali, Abdelali; Fallet, Clément; Antonelli, Maria-Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Gayet, Brice; Validire, Pierre; De Martino, Antonello

    2012-06-01

    Healthy human colon samples were analyzed ex vivo with a multispectral imaging Mueller polarimeter operating from 500 to 700 nm in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination impinging on the innermost tissue layer, the mucosa. The intensity and polarimetric responses were taken on whole tissues first and after progressive exfoliation of the outer layers afterwards. Moreover, these measurements were carried out with two different substrates (one bright and the other dark) successively placed beneath each sample, allowing a reasonably accurate evaluation of the contributions to the overall backscattered light by the various layers. For the shorter investigated wavelengths (500 to 550 nm) the major contribution comes from mucosa and submucosa, while for the longer wavelengths (650 to 700 nm) muscular tissue and fat also contribute significantly. The depolarization has also been studied and is found to be stronger in the red part of the spectrum, mainly due to the highly depolarizing power of the muscular and fat layers. PMID:22734765

  11. Safety and efficient ex vivo expansion of stem cells using platelet-rich plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Prado, Roberto; Orive, Gorka

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the cell culture media supplements used in the ex vivo expansion of stem cells intended for cell therapy. Currently, the gold standard is the culture supplemented with fetal bovine serum, however, their use in cell therapy raises many concerns. The alternatives to its use are presented, ranging from the use of human serum to platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to serum-free media or extracellular matrix components. Finally, various growth factors present in PRP are described, which make it a safe and effective stem cell expansion supplement. These growth factors could be responsible for their efficiency, as they increase both stem cell proliferation and survival. The different PRP formulations are also discussed, as well as the need for protocol standardization.

  12. Release of rosmarinic acid from semisolid formulations and its penetration through human skin ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Stelmakienė, Ada; Ramanauskienė, Kristina; Briedis, Vitalis

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of rosmarinic acid (RA) from the experimental topical formulations with the Melissa officinalis L. extract and to evaluate its penetration through undamaged human skin ex vivo. The results of the in vitro release study showed that higher amounts of RA were released from the emulsion vehicle when lemon balm extract was added in its dry form. An inverse correlation was detected between the released amount of RA and the consistency index of the formulation. Different penetration of RA into the skin may be influenced by the characteristics of the vehicle as well as by the form of the extract. The results of penetration assessment showed that the intensity of RA penetration was influenced by its lipophilic properties: RA was accumulating in the epidermis, while the dermis served as a barrier, impeding its deeper penetration. PMID:26011936

  13. Molecular histology of arteries: mass spectrometry imaging as a novel ex vivo tool to investigate atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is usually the underlying cause of a fatal event such as myocardial infarction or ictus. The atherome plaque develops silently and asymptomatically within the arterial intima layer. In this context, the possibility to analyze the molecular content of arterial tissue while preserving each molecule's specific localization is of great interest as it may reveal further insights into the physiopathological changes taking place. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables the spatially resolved molecular analysis of proteins, peptides, metabolites, lipids and drugs directly in tissue, with a resolution sufficient to reveal molecular features specific to distinct arterial structures. MSI represents a novel ex vivo imaging tool still underexplored in cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on the MSI technique applied to cardiovascular disease and covers the main contributions to date, ongoing efforts, the main challenges and current limitations of MSI.

  14. Ex vivo Method for High Resolution Imaging of Cilia Motility in Rodent Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  15. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion – State of the Art in Lung Donor Pool Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Aron-Frederik; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P.; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N.; Zych, Bartlomiej; Saez, Diana Garcia; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Karck, Matthias; Simon, Andre R.; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation remains the gold standard for patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the number of suitable donor lungs for the increasing number of patients on the waiting list necessitates alternative tools to expand the lung donor pool. Modern preservation and lung assessment techniques could contribute to improved function in previously rejected lungs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) already demonstrated its value in identification of transplantable grafts from the higher risk donor pool. Moreover, lungs from EVLP did not show significantly different postoperative results compared to standard criteria lungs. This could be explained by the reduction of the ischemia-reperfusion injury through EVLP application. The aim of this article is to review technical characteristics and the growing clinical EVLP experience with special attention to EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25644463

  16. Ex vivo method for high resolution imaging of cilia motility in rodent airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  17. Inhibitors of ex vivo aggregation of human platelets induced by decompression, during reduced barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Kumaroo, K K

    1986-05-15

    It has been shown experimentally ex vivo that human platelet aggregation is induced by decompression (reduced pressure) produced by various means, i.e., reduced barometric pressure, reduced hydrostatic pressure, and reduced hydrodynamic pressure due to Bernoulli's principle. We report here that the spontaneous platelet aggregation induced by reduced barometric pressure (253 torr for three hours) is inhibited by 1:10(7) diluted Japanese herbal plant oil (JHP) and also by two of its major constituents, menthone and menthol with the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the millimolar range. These drugs gave essentially similar results when collagen and ADP were used as aggregating agents. Inhibitor concentrations were determined by microscopic examination of platelets in wet preparations when the aggregating stimulus was reduced pressure and by optical aggregometry when collagen and ADP were the aggregating agents. Potential usefulness of these compounds in the prevention of decompression syndrome (DCS) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) are discussed.

  18. Angiopoietin-like proteins stimulate ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Ge, Guangtao; Xie, Kathleen; Tong, Wei; Hug, Christopher; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-02-01

    Successful ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would greatly benefit the treatment of disease and the understanding of crucial questions of stem cell biology. Here we show, using microarray studies, that the HSC-supportive mouse fetal liver CD3(+) cells specifically express the proteins angiopoietin-like 2 (Angptl2) and angiopoietin-like 3 (Angptl3). We observed a 24- or 30-fold net expansion of long-term HSCs by reconstitution analysis when we cultured highly enriched HSCs for 10 days in the presence of Angptl2 or Angptl3 together with saturating levels of other growth factors. The coiled-coil domain of Angptl2 was capable of stimulating expansion of HSCs. Furthermore, angiopoietin-like 5, angiopoietin-like 7 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 also supported expansion of HSCs in culture.

  19. Ex Vivo 3D Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Quantification of Cardiac Laminar Structure

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Patrick A.; Tseng, Hsiang-Jer; Younes, Laurent; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) method for measuring cardiac fiber structure at high spatial resolution is presented. The method was applied to the ex vivo reconstruction of the fiber architecture of seven canine hearts. A novel hypothesis-testing method was developed and used to show that distinct populations of secondary and tertiary eigenvalues may be distinguished at reasonable confidence levels (P ≤ 0.01) within the canine ventricle. Fiber inclination and sheet angles are reported as a function of transmural depth through the anterior, lateral, and posterior left ventricle (LV) free wall. Within anisotropic regions, two consistent and dominant orientations were identified, supporting published results from histological studies and providing strong evidence that the tertiary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor (DT) defines the sheet normal. PMID:16149057

  20. Corneal injury to ex vivo eyes exposed to a 3.8-micron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyffe, James G.; Randolph, Donald Q.; Winston, Golda C. H.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2005-04-01

    As a consequence of the enormous expansion of laser use in medicine, industry and research, specific safety standards must be developed that appropriately address eye protection. The purpose of this study is to establish injury thresholds to the cornea for 3.8 micron 8 microsecond laser light pulses and to investigate a possible replacement model to live animal testing. Previous studies of pulsed energy absorption at 3.8 microns were performed using rhesus monkey cornea and were at pulse durations two orders of magnitude different than the 8 microsecond pulses used in this study. Ex-vivo pig eyes were exposed at varying energies and evaluated to establish the statistical threshold for corneal damage. Histology was used to determine the extent of damage to the cornea. It is expected that the results will be used to assist in the establishment of safety standards for laser use and offer an alternative to future animal use in establishment of safety standards.

  1. Corneal morphology after ex-vivo UV and mid-infrared laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Voloudakis, G. E.; Moutsouris, K.; Asproudis, I.; Baltatzis, S.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea tissue were conducted with two solid state lasers (an Er:YAG laser and the 4th harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser, both in the ns pulse width range) emitting in mid infrared and ultraviolet part of the spectrum respectively, at moderate laser fluences. The cornea epithelium of each porcine eye was manually removed before the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was performed, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal or mechanical damage caused by the midinfrared and the UV laser irradiation. For a detailed and complete examination of the morphology of the laser ablated corneal tissue, the surface roughness was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  2. The Ex-Vivo Detection of Human Breast Cancer through High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Scott; Doyle, Timothy; Hart, Vern; Goodrich, Jeffrey; Neumayer, Leigh; Factor, Rachel

    2010-10-01

    Ex-vivo studies of human mammary surgical tissues were performed at the Huntsman Cancer Institute in order to develop an ultrasonic method to detect microscopic cancer in surgical margins during breast conservation surgery. Both pitch-catch and pulse-echo measurements were acquired using a high-frequency ultrasound system operating at 50 MHz. The ultrasonic tissue signatures were categorized into three groups: Malignant tumors, fibroadenomas, and normal tissues. An analysis in the frequency domain was performed to detect frequency dependencies and unique signatures for each of these groups. Signatures were then used in a final analysis to determine future possibilities in systematic cancer detection using this approach. Results of this study and spectral comparisons are reported.

  3. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  4. Surveying the Delivery Methods of CRISPR/Cas9 for ex vivo Mammalian Cell Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kelton, William J; Pesch, Theresa; Matile, Stefan; Reddy, Sai T

    2016-01-01

    The simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been transformative in making targeted genome editing accessible for laboratories around the world. However, due to the sheer volume of literature generated in the past five years, determining the best format and delivery method of CRISPR/Cas9 components can be challenging. Here, we provide a brief overview of the progress that has been made in the ex vivo genome editing of mammalian cells and summarize the key advances made for improving efficiency and delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 in DNA, RNA, and protein form. In particular, we highlight the delivery of Cas9 components to human cells for advanced genome editing applications such as large gene insertion. PMID:27363374

  5. Ex vivo imaging of motor axon dynamics in murine triangularis sterni explants

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Martin; Reuter, Miriam S; Lichtman, Jeff W; Misgeld, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We provide a protocol that describes an explant system that allows the dynamics of motor axons to be imaged. This method is based on nerve–muscle explants prepared from the triangularis sterni muscle of mice, a thin muscle that covers the inside of the thorax. These explants, which can be maintained alive for several hours, contain long stretches of peripheral motor axons including their terminal arborizations and neuromuscular junctions. Explants can be prepared from transgenic mouse lines that express fluorescent proteins in neurons or glial cells, which enables direct visualization of their cellular and subcellular morphology by fluorescence microscopy. Time-lapse imaging then provides a convenient and reliable approach to follow the dynamic behavior of motor axons, their surrounding glial cells and their intracellular organelles with high temporal and spatial resolution. Triangularis sterni explants can be prepared in 15 min, imaged ex vivo for several hours and processed for immunohistochemistry in about 2 h. PMID:18833201

  6. Ex vivo evaluation of the percutaneous penetration of proanthocyanidin extracts from Guazuma ulmifolia using photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, J C B; Pedrochi, F; Hernandes, L; de Mello, J C P; Baesso, M L

    2007-03-21

    In this work photoacoustic spectroscopy has been applied to determine ex vivo the percutaneous penetration of proanthocyanidins present in extracts obtained from Guazuma ulmifolia, in rats. Lotion formulations containing 0.0663 mg of procyanidin B2 day(-1)animal(-1) were topically applied during 7, 10 and 13 days in each group of the animals. After the end of treatment the animals were killed, the skin dissected to remove the basal content, and the measurements were carried out as a function of the period of time of treatment. The results showed that despite the very low concentration of the active principle (procyanidin B2) in the lotion, the photoacoustic method was able to show the presence of optical absorption bands from this substance in the dermis region, evidencing once again that this method may be useful for studies of topically applied formulations of interest in the pharmacokinetic area.

  7. Evaluation of diffusion kurtosis imaging in ex vivo hypomyelinated mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Nathaniel D; West, Kathryn L; Carson, Robert P; Gochberg, Daniel F; Ess, Kevin C; Does, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), and DKI-derived white matter tract integrity metrics (WMTI) were experimentally evaluated ex vivo through comparisons to histological measurements and established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of myelin in two knockout mouse models with varying degrees of hypomyelination. DKI metrics of mean and radial kurtosis were found to be better indicators of myelin content than conventional DTI metrics. The biophysical WMTI model based on the DKI framework reported on axon water fraction with good accuracy in cases with near normal axon density, but did not provide additional specificity to myelination. Overall, DKI provided additional information regarding white matter microstructure compared with DTI, making it an attractive method for future assessments of white matter development and pathology.

  8. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  9. Release of rosmarinic acid from semisolid formulations and its penetration through human skin ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Stelmakienė, Ada; Ramanauskienė, Kristina; Briedis, Vitalis

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of rosmarinic acid (RA) from the experimental topical formulations with the Melissa officinalis L. extract and to evaluate its penetration through undamaged human skin ex vivo. The results of the in vitro release study showed that higher amounts of RA were released from the emulsion vehicle when lemon balm extract was added in its dry form. An inverse correlation was detected between the released amount of RA and the consistency index of the formulation. Different penetration of RA into the skin may be influenced by the characteristics of the vehicle as well as by the form of the extract. The results of penetration assessment showed that the intensity of RA penetration was influenced by its lipophilic properties: RA was accumulating in the epidermis, while the dermis served as a barrier, impeding its deeper penetration.

  10. Ex vivo 3D diffusion tensor imaging and quantification of cardiac laminar structure.

    PubMed

    Helm, Patrick A; Tseng, Hsiang-Jer; Younes, Laurent; McVeigh, Elliot R; Winslow, Raimond L

    2005-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) method for measuring cardiac fiber structure at high spatial resolution is presented. The method was applied to the ex vivo reconstruction of the fiber architecture of seven canine hearts. A novel hypothesis-testing method was developed and used to show that distinct populations of secondary and tertiary eigenvalues may be distinguished at reasonable confidence levels (P < or = 0.01) within the canine ventricle. Fiber inclination and sheet angles are reported as a function of transmural depth through the anterior, lateral, and posterior left ventricle (LV) free wall. Within anisotropic regions, two consistent and dominant orientations were identified, supporting published results from histological studies and providing strong evidence that the tertiary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor (DT) defines the sheet normal.

  11. Optical spectroscopy for differentiation of liver tissue under distinct stages of fibrosis: an ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabila, D. A.; Hernández, L. F.; de la Rosa, J.; Stolik, S.; Arroyo-Camarena, U. D.; López-Vancell, M. D.; Escobedo, G.

    2013-11-01

    Liver fibrosis is the decisive step towards the development of cirrhosis; its early detection affects crucially the diagnosis of liver disease, its prognosis and therapeutic decision making. Nowadays, several techniques are employed to this task. However, they have the limitation in estimating different stages of the pathology. In this paper we present a preliminary study to evaluate if optical spectroscopy can be employed as an auxiliary tool of diagnosis of biopsies of human liver tissue to differentiate the fibrosis stages. Ex vivo fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired from biopsies using a portable fiber-optic system. Empirical discrimination algorithms based on fluorescence intensity ratio at 500 nm and 680 nm as well as diffuse reflectance intensity at 650 nm were developed. Sensitivity and specificity of around 80% and 85% were respectively achieved. The obtained results show that combined use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could represent a novel and useful tool in the early evaluation of liver fibrosis.

  12. Cancer therapy. Ex vivo culture of circulating breast tumor cells for individualized testing of drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Bardia, Aditya; Aceto, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Madden, Marissa W; Donaldson, Maria C; Desai, Rushil; Zhu, Huili; Comaills, Valentine; Zheng, Zongli; Wittner, Ben S; Stojanov, Petar; Brachtel, Elena; Sgroi, Dennis; Kapur, Ravi; Shioda, Toshihiro; Ting, David T; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Getz, Gad; Iafrate, A John; Benes, Cyril; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-07-11

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present at low concentrations in the peripheral blood of patients with solid tumors. It has been proposed that the isolation, ex vivo culture, and characterization of CTCs may provide an opportunity to noninvasively monitor the changing patterns of drug susceptibility in individual patients as their tumors acquire new mutations. In a proof-of-concept study, we established CTC cultures from six patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Three of five CTC lines tested were tumorigenic in mice. Genome sequencing of the CTC lines revealed preexisting mutations in the PIK3CA gene and newly acquired mutations in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1), PIK3CA gene, and fibroblast growth factor receptor gene (FGFR2), among others. Drug sensitivity testing of CTC lines with multiple mutations revealed potential new therapeutic targets. With optimization of CTC culture conditions, this strategy may help identify the best therapies for individual cancer patients over the course of their disease.

  13. Ex vivo lung perfusion in clinical lung transplantation--state of the art.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Anders S I; Dark, John H; Fisher, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a new technique for assessing and potentially reconditioning human donor lungs previously unacceptable for clinical transplantation with the potential to dramatically push the limits of organ acceptability. With the recent introduction of portable EVLP, a new era in lung preservation may be upon us with the opportunity to also limit organ ischaemic times and potentially improve the outcome of donor lungs already deemed acceptable for transplantation. It took over half a century for the technique to evolve from basic theory to semi-automated circuits fit for clinical use that are now rapidly being adopted in transplant centres across the globe. With this field in constant evolution and many unanswered questions remaining, our review serves as an update on the state of the art of EVLP in clinical lung transplantation.

  14. Principal components analysis of FT-Raman spectra of ex vivo basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Airton A.; Bitar Carter, Renata A.; de Oliveira Nunes, Lilian; Loschiavo Arisawa, Emilia A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2004-07-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy is a modern analytical tool and it is believed that its use for skin cancer diagnosis will lead to several advantages for patients, e.g., faster results and a minimization of invasivity. This article reports results of an ex Vivo study of the FT-Raman spectra regarding differentiation between non-diseased and malignant human skin lesions, Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC). A Nd: YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman, RFS 100/S Spectrometer, Bruker. Thirty-nine sets of human skin samples, 18 histopathologically diagnosed as non-diseased, and 21 as BCC, were obtained during routine therapeutic procedures required by the primary disease. No sample preparation was needed to promote the FT-Raman spectra collection. The main spectral features, which may differentiate the sample, were found in the shift region of Amide I (1640 to 1680 cm-1), Amide III (1220 to 1330cm-1), proteins and lipids (1400 to 1500 cm-1), amino acids (939 to 940 cm-1) and deoxyribonucleic acid (1600 to 1620cm-1). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was applied to FT-Raman spectra of Basal Cell Carcinoma. Analysis was performed on mean-normalized and mean-centered data of the non-diseased skin and BCC spectra. The dynamic loading of PCA was expanded into 2D contour by calculating a variance-covariance matrix. PCA was used to verify the statistical differences in the sample. This technique applied over all samples identified tissue type within 83% of sensitivity and 100% specificity. The PCA technique proved efficient for analysis in skin tissue ex vivo, results were significant and coherent.

  15. Study of tolnaftate release from fatty acids containing ointment and penetration into human skin ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kezutyte, Toma; Drevinskas, Tomas; Maruska, Audrius; Rimdeika, Rytis; Briedis, Vitalis

    2011-01-01

    Five fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, myristic, lauric and capric) were incorporated in 10% (w/w) into ointment formulation and their influence on lipophilic model drug tolnaftate release in vitro and enhancing effect on tolnaftate penetration into epidermis and dermis of human skin ex vivo were investigated. The prepared ointments were tested for homogeneity, pH and theological properties. In vitro release studies and ex vivo skin penetration experiments were carried out using Hanson and Bronaugh-type flow-through diffusion cells, respectively. Tolnaftate cumulative amount liberated from semisolids was assayed using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. After in vitro skin penetration studies, appropriately extracted human skin layers were analyzed for tolnaftate content using a validated HPLC method. Statistical analysis revealed that release rate of tolnaftate from control ointment and ointments with fatty acids was not significantly different and only 7.34-8.98% of drug was liberated into an acceptor medium after 6 h. Tolnaftate amount penetrating into 1 cm2 of epidermis from ointments containing oleic, linoleic, myristic and lauric acids was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than from the control ointment. Penetration enhancing ratios for these fatty acids for tolnaftate penetration into epidermis ranged from 1.48 to 1.75. In conclusion, fatty acids did not increase the liberation of tolnaftate from ointment formulation, but demonstrated their enhancing effect on tolnaftate penetration into human epidermis in vitro. Results from in vitro release experiments do not suit for prediction of the situation in the skin in vitro, if chemical penetration enhancers are incorporated into the ointment formulation.

  16. Influences of age and sex on leukocytes of healthy horses and their ex vivo cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, C L; Steinig, P; Schuberth, H-J; Koy, M; Wagner, B; Wittig, B; Juhls, C; Willenbrock, S; Murua Escobar, H; Jaehnig, P; Feige, K; Cavalleri, J-M V

    2015-05-15

    Leukocytes and their functional capacities are used extensively as biomarkers in immunological research. Commonly employed indicators concerning leukocytes are as follows: number, composition in blood, response to discrete stimuli, cytokine release, and morphometric characteristics. In order to employ leukocytes as biomarkers for disease and therapeutic monitoring, physiological variations and influencing factors on the parameters measured have to be considered. The aim of this report was to describe the ranges of selected leukocyte parameters in a sample of healthy horses and to analyse whether age, sex, breed, and sampling time point (time of day) influence peripheral blood leukocyte composition, cell morphology and release of cytokines ex vivo. Flow cytometric comparative characterisation of cell size and complexity in 24 healthy horses revealed significant variance. Similarly, basal release of selected cytokines by blood mononuclear cells also showed high variability [TNFα (65-16,624pg/ml), IFNγ (4-80U/ml), IL-4 (0-5069pg/ml), IL-10 (49-1862pg/ml), and IL-17 (4-1244U/ml)]. Each animal's age influenced leukocyte composition, cell morphology and cytokine release (TNFα, IL-4, IL-10) ex vivo. Geldings showed smaller monocytes and higher spontaneous production of IL-10 when compared to the mares included. The stimulation to spontaneous release ratios of TNFα, IL-4 and IL-17 differed in Warmblood and Thoroughbred types. Sampling time influenced leukocyte composition and cell morphology. In summary, many animal factors - age being the dominant one - should be considered for studies involving the analysis of equine leukocytes. In addition, high inter-individual variances argue for individual baseline measurements.

  17. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo anti-hypertensive activity of Chrysophyllum cainito L. extract

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li-Mei; Qi, Xue-Wen; Hao, Ji-Heng; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Qing-Hua; Bu, Pei-Li

    2015-01-01

    Chrysophyllum cainito L., a traditional herbal medicine, could have the potential for management of hypertension due to presence of polyphenolic compounds. The extracts and fractions of the pulp of plant were evaluated for in vitro (inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme/ACE assay), ex vivo (isolated aorta relaxation assay) and in vivo (salt induced hypertensive rat assay). The alcoholic and aqueous extract (ALE and AQE respectively) of fruit of plant C. cainito was having 14.8 and 9.2% yield respectively. The fractionation with ethyl alcohol (EAF) and butanol (BTF) yielded 2.52 & 2.17% respectively from ALE and 0.46 & 0.31% respectively from AQE with respect to fruit pulp dry weight. More phenolic content was found in ALE (3.75±0.15 mg gallic acid equivalent or GAE g-1 of dry power of fruit pulp) compared to AQE and maximum in ethyl acetate fraction of ALE (ALE-EAF) (2.32±0.21 mg GAE g-1 of dry power of fruit pulp) among all fractions. ACE inhibition activity was found to be maximum in ALE-EAF 62.5±7.34%. While ex vivo study using isolated tissue of aorta showed again showed maximum activity (62.82±6.19 and 46.47±8.32% relaxation with 50 µg mL-1 and 10 µg mL-1 GAE concentration respectively). ALE-EAF reduced the elevated arterial pressure of salt induced hypertensive rat significantly to the level of normotensive animal group. Results of ALE-EAF have shown its potential as a source for novel constituent for the treatment hypertension and should further be studied for isolation of specific constituent for more effectiveness. PMID:26770385

  18. Ex-vivo characterization of human colon cancer by Mueller polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Benali, Abdelali; Antonelli, Maria-Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Validire, Pierre; Gayet, Brice; De Martino, Antonello

    2011-01-17

    Cancerous and healthy human colon samples have been analyzed ex-vivo using a multispectral imaging Mueller polarimeter operated in the visible (from 500 to 700 nm) in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination. Three samples of Liberkühn colon adenocarcinomas have been studied: common, mucinous and treated by radiochemotherapy. For each sample, several specific zones have been chosen, based on their visual staging and polarimetric responses, which have been correlated to the histology of the corresponding cuts. The most relevant polarimetric images are those quantifying the depolarization for incident linearly polarized light. The measured depolarization depends on several factors, namely the presence or absence of tumor, its exophytic (budding) or endophytic (penetrating) nature, its thickness (its degree of ulceration) and its level of penetration in deeper layers (submucosa, muscularis externa and serosa). The cellular density, the concentration of stroma, the presence or absence of mucus and the light penetration depth, which increases with wavelength, are also relevant parameters. Our data indicate that the tissues with the lowest and highest depolarizing powers are respectively mucus-free tumoral tissue with high cellular density and healthy serosa, while healthy submucosa, muscularis externa as well as mucinous tumor probably feature intermediate values. Moreover, the specimen coming from a patient treated successfully with radiochemotherapy exhibited a uniform polarimetric response typical of healthy tissue even in the initially pathological zone. These results demonstrate that multi-spectral Mueller imaging can provide useful contrasts to quickly stage human colon cancer ex-vivo and to distinguish between different histological variants of tumor. PMID:21263698

  19. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of mucosal nasal lymphocytes by direct ex vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Christin; Rasche, Claudia; Audring, Heike; Wahls, Michael; Worm, Margitta

    2009-05-01

    Cellular inflammation of the nasal mucosa demonstrates a local immune response which plays an important role in allergic rhinitis. The aim of the present study was to characterize nasal mucosal lymphocytes regarding their activation and differentiation state by direct ex vivo flowcytometric analysis. Lymphocytes from the inferior turbinates were isolated by a mechanical method of preparation and, for comparison, from peripheral blood by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. Patients suffering from rhinitis or difficulty in nasal breathing were divided into an allergic (pollen-allergy, n = 13) and non-allergic group (n = 24). Expression of different T- and B-cell markers was determined by flowcytometric analysis. CD4+ T-cells from the nasal mucosa exhibited a memory phenotype (CD45RO+, 97%), were highly activated (CD69+, 43-73%), and showed low expression of the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA+, 5%). Nasal CD20+ B-lymphocytes expressed significantly higher levels of mIgE and lower levels of CD23 and CD80 than peripheral B-cells. Subsets of CD80+ (4%) and CD86+ (6%) CD20+ B-lymphocytes were identified in the nasal mucosa. No significant differences between allergic and non-allergic individuals were determined. As expected, the data show profound phenotypical differences between circulating peripheral blood and nasal mucosal lymphocytes. Activated memory lymphocytes are present in the nasal mucosa from allergic, but also non-allergic patients and may indicate to a significant role of a local inflammatory state without systemic criteria for allergy. In our study, we show that direct ex vivo isolation of lymphocytes is practicable method and offers a new technique to examine the local nasal allergic immune response using a multiparametric phenotypical analysis. PMID:18766360

  20. The effect of different root canal medicaments on the elimination of Enterococcus faecalis ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dammaschke, Till; Jung, Nina; Harks, Inga; Schafer, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine gel (CHX-G) 2%, chlorhexidine powder (CHX-P) 1%, povidone-iodine (PVP-I), polyhexanide and camphorated-and-mentholated chlorophenol (ChKM) ex vivo. Materials and Methods: For every medicament group 10 root segments (15 mm long) of extracted human teeth were prepared to ISO-size 45 and sterilized (n = 50). The root segments were then inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis and aerobically incubated at 37°C. After 1 week, ten root canals were filled with one of the medicaments, respectively and aerobically incubated at 37°C for another week. Ten teeth served as positive controls and were filled with sterile saline solution. After 7 days, the medicaments were inactivated and all root canals were instrumented to ISO-size 50. The obtained dentin samples were dispersed in Ringer solution followed by the preparation of serial dilutions. 10 μl per sample were applied to an agar plate and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colony forming units were counted and the reduction factors (RFs) were calculated and statistically analyzed. Results: Compared with the positive controls all medicaments exhibited an antibacterial effect against E. faecalis. The RFs for CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were significantly higher compared to PVP-I and polyhexanide (P < 0.05). In contrast to PVP-I and polyhexanide, CHX-G, CHX-P and ChKM were able to eliminate E. faecalis from all dentin samples. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this ex vivo investigation, 2% CHX-G and CHX-P were as effective as ChKM against E. faecalis. Thus, when choosing a root canal medicament the better biocompatibility of CHX compared with ChKM should be taken in consideration. PMID:24932119

  1. Rapid evaluation of fresh ex vivo kidney tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manu; Robinson, Brian D.; Salamoon, Bekheit; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Claude; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) is a real-time imaging technique that rapidly generates images reminiscent of histology without any tissue processing, warranting its exploration for evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue. Methods: Fresh tissue sections from tumor and adjacent nonneoplastic kidney (n = 25 nephrectomy specimens; clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) = 12, papillary RCC (PRCC) = 4, chromophobe RCC (ChRCC) = 4, papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC) = 1, angiomyolipoma (AML) = 2 and cystic nephroma = 2) were imaged with a commercial FFOCT device. Sections were submitted for routine histopathological diagnosis. Results: Glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, and blood vessels were identified in nonneoplastic tissue. In tumor sections, the normal architecture was completely replaced by either sheets of cells/trabeculae or papillary structures. The former pattern was seen predominantly in CCRCC/ChRCC and the latter in PRCC/PUC (as confirmed on H&E). Although the cellular details were not very prominent at this resolution, we could identify unique cytoplasmic signatures in some kidney tumors. For example, the hyper-intense punctate signal in the cytoplasm of CRCC represents glycogen/lipid, large cells with abundant hyper-intense cytoplasm representing histiocytes in PRCC, and signal-void large polygonal cell representing adipocytes in AML. According to a blinded analysis was performed by an uropathologist, all nonneoplastic tissues were differentiated from neoplastic tissues. Further, all benign tumors were called benign and malignant were called malignant. A diagnostic accuracy of 80% was obtained in subtyping the tumors. Conclusion: The ability of FFOCT to reliably differentiate nonneoplastic from neoplastic tissue and identify some tumor types makes it a valuable tool for rapid evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue e.g. for intraoperative margin assessment and kidney biopsy adequacy. Recently, higher resolution images were achieved

  2. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  3. Differential ex vivo responses of primary leukocytes from turkey pedigree lines to Salmonella Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Potter, Tiffany D; Glover, Paige K; Evans, Nicholas P; Dalloul, Rami A

    2016-02-01

    Escalating product recalls as a consequence of Salmonella-contaminated poultry products have resulted in detrimental economic impacts in the poultry industry. One potential long-term alternative method to Salmonella prevention is genetic selection to improve innate resistance. This study evaluated the ex vivo effects of Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) on phagocytic and bactericidal leukocyte function in turkeys from six pedigree lines (A-F). Day-of-hatch poults (n = 48) were placed and raised in cages (2 birds/gender/genetic line/cage) to 35 d when heterophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were extracted from males and females of each line. Cells were used in phagocytic and bactericidal assays to determine the ex vivo effects of SH on turkey leukocyte activity. Data were analyzed using the Fit Model platform in JMP Pro 10.0 (SAS Institute Inc.) with differences considered significant at P ≤ 0.05 and data reported as LS Means with SEM. Although genetic line had no significant effect on phagocytosis of SH by heterophils and PBMCs, cumulatively, female cells exhibited higher phagocytosis potential than those from males. The main effect of gender was significant on bactericidal activity of PBMCs when incubated at a 1:10 and 1:100 PBMC to SH ratio. Genetic line also had a significant effect on bactericidal activity of PBMCs with cells from line F exhibiting the best activity. These results suggest that gender had a marked cumulative effect on phagocytosis of SH by heterophils and PBMCs while both genetic line and gender had a prominent effect on bacterial killing of SH by turkey PBMCs. Once able to determine genetic markers associated with these immune responses to Salmonella, genetic selection for increased resistance may become feasible in turkeys.

  4. Differential ex vivo responses of primary leukocytes from turkey pedigree lines to Salmonella Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Potter, Tiffany D; Glover, Paige K; Evans, Nicholas P; Dalloul, Rami A

    2016-02-01

    Escalating product recalls as a consequence of Salmonella-contaminated poultry products have resulted in detrimental economic impacts in the poultry industry. One potential long-term alternative method to Salmonella prevention is genetic selection to improve innate resistance. This study evaluated the ex vivo effects of Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) on phagocytic and bactericidal leukocyte function in turkeys from six pedigree lines (A-F). Day-of-hatch poults (n = 48) were placed and raised in cages (2 birds/gender/genetic line/cage) to 35 d when heterophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were extracted from males and females of each line. Cells were used in phagocytic and bactericidal assays to determine the ex vivo effects of SH on turkey leukocyte activity. Data were analyzed using the Fit Model platform in JMP Pro 10.0 (SAS Institute Inc.) with differences considered significant at P ≤ 0.05 and data reported as LS Means with SEM. Although genetic line had no significant effect on phagocytosis of SH by heterophils and PBMCs, cumulatively, female cells exhibited higher phagocytosis potential than those from males. The main effect of gender was significant on bactericidal activity of PBMCs when incubated at a 1:10 and 1:100 PBMC to SH ratio. Genetic line also had a significant effect on bactericidal activity of PBMCs with cells from line F exhibiting the best activity. These results suggest that gender had a marked cumulative effect on phagocytosis of SH by heterophils and PBMCs while both genetic line and gender had a prominent effect on bacterial killing of SH by turkey PBMCs. Once able to determine genetic markers associated with these immune responses to Salmonella, genetic selection for increased resistance may become feasible in turkeys. PMID:26706359

  5. A tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide promotes neovasculogenesis in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Amin, Harsh D; Olsen, Irwin; Knowles, Jonathan; Dard, Michel; Donos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The formation of new blood vessels has been shown to be fundamental in the repair of many damaged tissues, and we have recently shown that the adult human periodontal ligament contains multipotent stem/progenitor cells that are capable of undergoing vasculogenic and angiogenic differentiation in vitro and ex vivo. Enamel matrix protein (EMP) is a heterogeneous mixture of mainly amelogenin-derived proteins produced during tooth development and has been reported to be sometimes effective in stimulating these processes, including in clinical regeneration of the periodontal ligament. However, the identity of the specific bioactive component of EMP remains unclear. In the present study we show that, while the high-molecular-weight Fraction A of enamel matrix derivative (a heat-treated form of EMP) is unable to stimulate the vasculogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (HPC) in vitro, the low-molecular-weight Fraction C significantly up-regulates the expression of the endothelial markers VEGFR2, Tie-1, Tie-2, VE-cadherin and vWF and markedly increases the internalization of low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, we also demonstrate, for the first time, that the synthetic homolog of the 45-amino acid tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide (TRAP) present in Fraction C is likely to be responsible for its vasculogenesis-inducing activity. Moreover, the chemically synthesized TRAP peptide is also shown here to be capable of up-regulating the angiogenic differentiation of the HPC, based on its marked stimulation of in vitro cell migration and tubule formation and of blood vessel formation assay in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model ex vivo. This novel peptide, and modified derivatives, might thereby represent a new class of regenerative drug that has the ability to elicit new blood vessel formation and promote wound healing in vivo.

  6. Chronic Ketamine Reduces the Peak Frequency of Gamma Oscillations in Mouse Prefrontal Cortex Ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    McNally, James M.; McCarley, Robert W.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in EEG gamma band oscillations (GBO, 30–80 Hz) serve as a prominent biomarker of schizophrenia (Sz), associated with positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms. Chronic, subanesthetic administration of antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR), such as ketamine, elicits behavioral effects, and alterations in cortical interneurons similar to those observed in Sz. However, the chronic effects of ketamine on neocortical GBO are unknown. Thus, here we examine the effects of chronic (five daily i.p. injections) application of ketamine (5 and 30 mg/kg) and the more specific NMDAR antagonist, MK-801 (0.02, 0.5, and 2 mg/kg), on neocortical GBO ex vivo. Oscillations were generated by focal application of the glutamate receptor agonist, kainate (KA), in coronal brain slices containing the prelimbic cortex. This region constitutes the rodent analog of the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a brain region strongly implicated in Sz-pathophysiology. Here we report the novel finding that chronic ketamine elicits a reduction in the peak oscillatory frequency of KA-elicited oscillations (from 47 to 40 Hz at 30 mg/kg). Moreover, the power of GBO in the 40–50 Hz band was reduced. These findings are reminiscent of both the reduced resonance frequency and power of cortical oscillations observed in Sz clinical studies. Surprisingly, MK-801 had no significant effect, suggesting care is needed when equating Sz-like behavioral effects elicited by different NMDAR antagonists to alterations in GBO activity. We conclude that chronic ketamine in the mouse mimics GBO abnormalities observed in Sz patients. Use of this ex vivo slice model may be useful in testing therapeutic compounds which rescue these GBO abnormalities. PMID:24062700

  7. Ex Vivo Apoptosis in CD8+ Lymphocytes Predicts Rectal Cancer Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Haderlein, Marlen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Apoptotic rates in peripheral blood lymphocytes can predict radiation induced normal tissue toxicity. We studied whether apoptosis in lymphocytes has a prognostic value for therapy outcome. Methods. Lymphocytes of 87 rectal cancer patients were ex vivo irradiated with 2 Gy, 8 Gy, or a combination of 2 Gy ionizing radiation and Oxaliplatin. Cells were stained with Annexin V and 7-Aminoactinomycin D and apoptotic and necrotic rates were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results. After treatment, apoptotic and necrotic rates in CD8+ cells are consistently higher than in CD4+ cells, with lower corresponding necrotic rates. Apoptotic and necrotic rates of CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells correlated well within the 2 Gy, 8 Gy, and 2 Gy and Oxaliplatin arrangements (p ≤ 0.009). High apoptotic CD8+ rates after 2 Gy, 8 Gy, and 2 Gy + Oxaliplatin treatment were prognostically favorable for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.009, p = 0.038, and p = 0.009) and disease-free survival (p = 0.013, p = 0.098, and p = 0.013). Conclusions. Ex vivo CD8+ apoptotic rates are able to predict the patient outcome in regard to metastasis-free or disease-free survival. Patients with higher CD8+ apoptotic rates in the peripheral blood have a more favorable prognosis. In addition to the prediction of late-toxicity by utilization of CD4+ apoptotic rates, the therapy outcome can be predicted by CD8+ apoptotic rates. PMID:27340400

  8. Micro CT imaging assessment for spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in an ex vivo thrombolysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2012-03-01

    In recent nanotechnology development, iron-based magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in several investigations on biomedical research for small animal experiments. Their important applications include targeted drug delivery for therapeutic purpose, contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermia treatment for tumors. These MNPs can be guided by an external magnetic field due to their physical characteristics of superparamagnetism. In a recent report, authors indicated that covalently bound recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) to MNP (MNPrtPA) with preserved enzyme activity may be guided by a bar magnet and induce target thrombolysis in an embolic model in rats. Delivery of rtPA by binding the thrombolytic drug to MNPs will improve the possibility of the drug to be delivered under magnetic guidance and retained in a local targeted area in the circulation system. In this work, an ex vivo intravascular thrombolysis model was developed to study the impact of external magnetic field on the penetration of MNP-rtPA in the blood clot samples. The samples were then scanned by a micro CT system for quantification. Images of MNPs show strong contrast with their surrounding blood clot materials. The optimum drug loading was found when 0.5 mg/ml rtPA is conjugated with 10 mg SiO2-MNP where 98% drug was attached to the carrier with full retention of its thrombolytic activity. Effective thrombolysis with tPA bound to SiO2-MNP under magnetic guidance was demonstrated in our ex vivo model where substantial reduction in time for blood clot lysis was observed compared with control groups without magnetic field application.

  9. Tolerance of human placental tissue to severe hypoxia and its relevance for dual ex vivo perfusion.

    PubMed

    Schneider, H

    2009-03-01

    In the dual ex vivo perfusion of an isolated human placental cotyledon it takes on average 20-30 min to set up stable perfusion circuits for the maternal and fetal vascular compartments. In vivo placental tissue of all species maintains a highly active metabolism and it continues to puzzle investigators how this tissue can survive 30 min of ischemia with more or less complete anoxia following expulsion of the organ from the uterus and do so without severe damage. There seem to be parallels between "depressed metabolism" seen in the fetus and the immature neonate in the peripartum period and survival strategies described in mammals with increased tolerance of severe hypoxia like hibernators in the state of torpor or deep sea diving turtles. Increased tolerance of hypoxia in both is explained by "partial metabolic arrest" in the sense of a temporary suspension of Kleiber's rule. Furthermore the fetus can react to major changes in surrounding oxygen tension by decreasing or increasing the rate of specific basal metabolism, providing protection against severe hypoxia as well as oxidative stress. There is some evidence that adaptive mechanisms allowing increased tolerance of severe hypoxia in the fetus or immature neonate can also be found in placental tissue, of which at least the villous portion is of fetal origin. A better understanding of the molecular details of reprogramming of fetal and placental tissues in late pregnancy may be of clinical relevance for an improved risk assessment of the individual fetus during the critical transition from intrauterine life to the outside and for the development of potential prophylactic measures against severe ante- or intrapartum hypoxia. Responses of the tissue to reperfusion deserve intensive study, since they may provide a rational basis for preventive measures against reperfusion injury and related oxidative stress. Modification of the handling of placental tissue during postpartum ischemia, and adaptation of the

  10. Equivalent metabolic acidosis with four colloids and saline on ex vivo haemodilution.

    PubMed

    Morgan, T J; Vellaichamy, M; Cowley, D M; Weier, S L; Venkatesh, B; Jones, M A

    2009-05-01

    Colloid infusions can cause metabolic acidosis. Mechanisms and relative severity with different colloids are incompletely understood. We compared haemodilution acid-base effects of 4% albumin, 3.5% polygeline, 4% succinylated gelatin (all weak acid colloids, strong ion difference 12 mEq/l, 17.6 mEq/l and 34 mEq/l respectively), 6% hetastarch (non-weak acid colloid, strong ion difference zero) and 0.9% saline (crystalloid, strong ion difference zero). Gelatin weak acid properties were tracked via the strong ion gap. Four-step ex vivo dilutions of pre-oxygenated human venous blood were performed to a final [Hb] near 50% baseline. With each fluid, base excess fell to approximately -13 mEq/l. Base excess/[Hb] relationships across dilution were linear and direct (R2 > or = 0.96), slopes and intercepts closely resembling saline. Baseline strong ion gap was -0.3 (2.1) mEq/l. Post-dilution increases occurred in three groups: small with saline, hetastarch and albumin (to 3.5 (02) mEq/l, 4.3 (0.3) mEq/l, 3.3 (1.4) mEq/l respectively), intermediate with polygeline (to 12.2 (0.9) mEq/l) and greatest with succinylated gelatin (to 20.8 (1.4) mEq/l). We conclude that, despite colloid weak acid activity ranging from zero (hydroxyethyl starch) to greater than that of albumin with both gelatin preparations, ex vivo dilution causes a metabolic acidosis of identical severity to saline in each case. This uniformity reflects modifications to the albumin and gelatin saline vehicles, in part aimed at pH correction. By proportionally increasing the strong ion difference, these modifications counter deviations from pure saline effects caused by colloid weak acid activity. Extrapolation in vivo requires further investigation.

  11. Impact of immunosuppressive drugs on the therapeutic efficacy of ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Scottà, Cristiano; Fanelli, Giorgia; Hoong, Sec Julie; Romano, Marco; Lamperti, Estefania Nova; Sukthankar, Mitalee; Guggino, Giuliana; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Becker, Pablo D; Afzali, Behdad; Lechler, Robert I; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs in clinical transplantation are necessary to inhibit the immune response to donor antigens. Although they are effective in controlling acute rejection, they do not prevent long-term transplant loss from chronic rejection. In addition, immunosuppressive drugs have adverse side effects, including increased rate of infections and malignancies. Adoptive cell therapy with human Tregs represents a promising strategy for the induction of transplantation tolerance. Phase I/II clinical trials in transplanted patients are already underway, involving the infusion of Tregs alongside concurrent immunosuppressive drugs. However, it remains to be determined whether the presence of immunosuppressive drugs negatively impacts Treg function and stability. We tested in vitro and in vivo the effects of tacrolimus, mycophenolate and methylprednisolone (major ISDs used in transplantation) on ex vivo expanded, rapamycin-treated human Tregs. The in vitro results showed that these drugs had no effect on phenotype, function and stability of Tregs, although tacrolimus affected the expression of chemokine receptors and IL-10 production. However, viability and proliferative capacity were reduced in a dose-dependent manner by all the three drugs. The in vivo experiments using a humanized mouse model confirmed the in vitro results. However, treatment of mice with only rapamycin maintained the viability, function and proliferative ability of adoptively transferred Tregs. Taken together, our results suggest that the key functions of ex vivo expanded Tregs are not affected by a concurrent immunosuppressive therapy. However, the choice of the drug combination and their timing and dosing should be considered as an essential component to induce and maintain tolerance by Treg.

  12. Manufacturing blood ex vivo: a futuristic approach to deal with the supply and safety concerns

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vimal K.; Saini, Abhishek; Tsuji, Kohichiro; Sharma, P. B.; Chandra, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusions are routinely done in every medical regimen and a worldwide established collection, processing/storage centers provide their services for the same. There have been extreme global demands for both raising the current collections and supply of safe/adequate blood due to increasingly demanding population. With, various risks remain associated with the donor derived blood, and a number of post collection blood screening and processing methods put extreme constraints on supply system especially in the underdeveloped countries. A logistic approach to manufacture erythrocytes ex-vivo by using modern tissue culture techniques have surfaced in the past few years. There are several reports showing the possibilities of RBCs (and even platelets/neutrophils) expansion under tightly regulated conditions. In fact, ex vivo synthesis of the few units of clinical grade RBCs from a single dose of starting material such as umbilical cord blood (CB) has been well established. Similarly, many different sources are also being explored for the same purpose, such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the major concerns remain elusive before the manufacture and clinical use of different blood components may be used to successfully replace the present system of donor derived blood transfusion. The most important factor shall include the large scale of RBCs production from each donated unit within a limited time period and cost of their production, both of these issues need to be handled carefully since many of the recipients among developing countries are unable to pay even for the freely available donor derived blood. Anyways, keeping these issues in mind, present article shall be focused on the possibilities of blood production and their use in the near future. PMID:25364733

  13. Ex vivo bioluminescence detection of alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 infection during malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Dewals, Benjamin; Myster, Françoise; Palmeira, Leonor; Gillet, Laurent; Ackermann, Mathias; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2011-07-01

    Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest asymptomatically, causes malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross-species transmitted to a variety of susceptible species of the Artiodactyla order. Experimentally, WD-MCF can be reproduced in rabbits. WD-MCF is described as a combination of lymphoproliferation and degenerative lesions in virtually all organs and is caused by unknown mechanisms. Recently, we demonstrated that WD-MCF is associated with the proliferation of CD8(+) cells supporting a latent type of infection in lymphoid tissues. Here, we investigated the macroscopic distribution of AlHV-1 infection using ex vivo bioluminescence imaging in rabbit to determine whether it correlates with the distribution of lesions in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. To reach that goal, a recombinant AlHV-1 strain was produced by insertion of a luciferase expression cassette (luc) in an intergenic region. In vitro, the reconstituted AlHV-1 luc(+) strain replicated comparably to the parental strain, and luciferase activity was detected by bioluminescence imaging. In vivo, rabbits infected with the AlHV-1 luc(+) strain developed WD-MCF comparably to rabbits infected with the parental wild-type strain, with hyperthermia and increases of both CD8(+) T cell frequencies and viral genomic charge over time in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in lymph nodes at time of euthanasia. Bioluminescent imaging revealed that AlHV-1 infection could be detected ex vivo in lymphoid organs but also in lung, liver, and kidney during WD-MCF, demonstrating that AlHV-1 infection is prevalent in tissue lesions. Finally, we show that the infiltrating mononuclear leukocytes in nonlymphoid organs are mainly CD8(+) T cells and that latency is predominant during WD-MCF.

  14. Ex Vivo Induced Regulatory Human/Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Immune Modulators.

    PubMed

    Hinden, Liad; Shainer, Reut; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decade there has been a growing interest in using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an immune-regulatory agent for prevention and treatment of various immune disorders including graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), transplanted organ rejection, and autoimmune diseases. However, the high diversity in the results from clinical trials using MSCs for such disorders emphasizes the need for MSCs to be "professionalized" ex vivo to a more defined regulatory phenotype before administering to patients. To this aim, we have established an ex vivo immunomodulatory triple combination treatment (TCT) for MSCs, using IFNγ, TGFβ, and kynurenine. We show that pretreated MSCs acquire an immunomodulatory phenotype, have improved regulatory functions, and upregulate the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), heme oxygenase 1, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and programmed death ligand 1. We define the pathway of kynurenine induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation in MSCs and how it contributes to the upregulation of COX2 expression and IL-6 downregulation. The combination of reduced IL-6 secretion with enhanced LIF expression leads to the inhibition of Th17 differentiation in coculture of TCT MSCs and lymphocytes. To test the immunomodulatory function of TCT MSCs in vivo, we used the cells as GVHD prophylaxis in a GVHD mouse model. TCT MSCs administration significantly decreased GVHD score and improved mouse survival. Importantly, single administration could attenuate disease symptoms for more than 3 weeks. Based on these results, we suggest considering TCT MSCs as an improved cell therapy for systemic diseases with an underlying inflammatory and immunologic etiology. Stem Cells 2015;33:2256-2267.

  15. Spatial distribution of niche and stem cells in ex vivo human limbal cultures.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Indumathi; Kacham, Santhosh; Purushotham, Jyothi; Maddileti, Savitri; Siamwala, Jamila; Sangwan, Virender Singh

    2014-11-01

    Stem cells at the limbus mediate corneal epithelial regeneration and regulate normal tissue homeostasis. Ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial transplantations are being widely practiced in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency. In this report, we examined whether the limbal niche cells that nurture and regulate epithelial stem cells coexist in ex vivo limbal cultures. We also compared the inherent differences between explant and suspension culture systems in terms of spatial distribution of niche cells and their effect on epithelial stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in vitro. We report that the stem cell content of both culture systems was similar, explaining the comparable clinical outcomes reported using these two methods. We also showed that the niche cells get expanded in culture and the nestin-positive cells migrate at the leading edges to direct epithelial cell migration in suspension cultures, whereas they are limited to the intact niche in explant cultures. We provide evidence that C/EBPδ-positive, p15-positive, and quiescent, label-retaining, early activated stem cells migrate at the leading edges to regulate epithelial cell proliferation in explant cultures, and this position effect is lost in early suspension cultures. However, in confluent suspension cultures, the stem cells and niche cells interact with each another, migrate in spiraling patterns, and self-organize to form three-dimensional niche-like compartments resembling the limbal crypts and thereby reestablish the position effect. These 3D-sphere clusters are enriched with nestin-, vimentin-, S100-, and p27-positive niche cells and p15-, p21-, p63α-, C/EBPδ-, ABCG2-, and Pax6-positive quiescent epithelial stem cells.

  16. Ex vivo T2 relaxation: associations with age-related neuropathology and cognition.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Robert J; Bennett, David A; Schneider, Julie A; Leurgans, Sue E; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-01

    The transverse relaxation time constant, T(2), is sensitive to brain tissue's free water content and the presence of paramagnetic materials such as iron. In this study, ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate alterations in T(2) related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and other types of neuropathology common in old age, as well as the relationship between T(2) alterations and cognition. Cerebral hemispheres were obtained from 371 deceased older adults. Using fast spin-echo imaging with multiple echo times, T(2) maps were produced and warped to a study-specific template. Hemispheres underwent neuropathologic examination for identification of AD pathology and other common age-related neuropathologies. Voxelwise linear regression was carried out to detect regions of pathology-related T(2) alterations and, in separate analyses, regions in which T(2) alterations were linked to antemortem cognitive performance. AD pathology was associated with T(2) prolongation in white matter of all lobes and T(2) shortening in the basal ganglia and insula. Gross infarcts were associated with T(2) prolongation in white matter of all lobes, and in the thalamus and basal ganglia. Hippocampal sclerosis was associated with T(2) prolongation in the hippocampus and white matter of the temporal lobe. After controlling for neuropathology, T(2) prolongation in the frontal lobe white matter was associated with lower performance in the episodic, semantic, and working memory domains. In addition, voxelwise analysis of in vivo and ex vivo T(2) values indicated a positive relationship between the two, though further investigation is necessary to accurately translate findings of the present study to the in vivo case.

  17. Preimplantation processing of ex vivo-derived vascular biomaterials: Effects on peripheral cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Uzarski, Joseph S.; Van De Walle, Aurore B.; McFetridge, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of ex vivo-derived scaffolds as vascular conduits has shown to be a clinically valid approach to repair or bypass occluded vessels. Implantation of allogeneic tissue grafts requires careful processing to lower immunogenicity and prevent bacterial infection. However, the mechanical/chemical treatments used to prepare biological scaffolds can result in significant alterations to the native structure and surface chemistry, which can affect in vivo performance. Of particular importance for vascular grafts are binding interactions between the implanted biomaterial and host cells from the circulation and adjacent vasculature. Here we present a comparison of four strategies used to decellularize allogeneic human umbilical vein (HUV) scaffolds: ethanol/acetone, sodium chloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), or Triton X-100. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that all four techniques achieved removal of native cells from both the lumenal and ablumenal surfaces of HUV grafts. Platelets and promyelocytic HL-60 cells showed preferential binding on the more loosely structured ablumenal surface, although low surface coverage was observed overall by peripheral blood cells. Vascular endothelial cell adhesion was highest on HUV decellularized using ethanol/acetone, and significantly higher than on SDS-processed grafts (p = 0.016). Primary cells showed high viability on the lumenal surface regardless of decellularization technique (over 95% in all cases). These results demonstrate the critical effects of various chemical processing strategies on the adhesive properties of ex vivo-derived vascular grafts. Careful application-specific consideration is warranted when selecting a processing strategy that minimizes innate responses (e.g. thrombosis, inflammation) that are often deleterious to graft survival. PMID:22825780

  18. Ex vivo testing of immune responses in precision-cut lung slices

    SciTech Connect

    Henjakovic, M.; Sewald, K.; Switalla, S.; Kaiser, D.; Mueller, M.; Veres, T.Z.; Martin, C.; Uhlig, S.; Krug, N.; Braun, A.

    2008-08-15

    The aim of this study was the establishment of precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) as a suitable ex vivo alternative approach to animal experiments for investigation of immunomodulatory effects. For this purpose we characterized the changes of cytokine production and the expression of cell surface markers after incubation of PCLS with immunoactive substances lipopolysaccharide (LPS), macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2), interferon {gamma} (IFN{gamma}), and dexamethasone. Viability of PCLS from wild-type and CD11c-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (CD11-EYFP)-transgenic mice was controlled by measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme activity and live/dead fluorescence staining using confocal microscopy. Cytokines and chemokines were detected with Luminex technology and ELISA. Antigen presenting cell (APC) markers were investigated in living mouse PCLS in situ using confocal microscopy. LPS triggered profound pro-inflammatory effects in PCLS. Dexamethasone prevented LPS-induced production of cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin (IL)-5, IL-1{alpha}, TNF{alpha}, IL-12(p40), and RANTES in PCLS. Surface expression of MHC class II, CD40, and CD11c, but not CD86 was present in APCs of naive PCLS. Incubation with LPS enhanced specifically the expression of MHC class II on diverse cells. MALP-2 only failed to alter cytokine or chemokine levels, but was highly effective in combination with IFN{gamma} resulting in increased levels of TNF{alpha}, IL-12(p40), RANTES, and IL-1{alpha}. PCLS showed characteristic responses to typical pro-inflammatory stimuli and may thus provide a suitable ex vivo technique to predict the immunomodulatory potency of inhaled substances.

  19. Spatial distribution of niche and stem cells in ex vivo human limbal cultures.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Indumathi; Kacham, Santhosh; Purushotham, Jyothi; Maddileti, Savitri; Siamwala, Jamila; Sangwan, Virender Singh

    2014-11-01

    Stem cells at the limbus mediate corneal epithelial regeneration and regulate normal tissue homeostasis. Ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial transplantations are being widely practiced in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency. In this report, we examined whether the limbal niche cells that nurture and regulate epithelial stem cells coexist in ex vivo limbal cultures. We also compared the inherent differences between explant and suspension culture systems in terms of spatial distribution of niche cells and their effect on epithelial stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in vitro. We report that the stem cell content of both culture systems was similar, explaining the comparable clinical outcomes reported using these two methods. We also showed that the niche cells get expanded in culture and the nestin-positive cells migrate at the leading edges to direct epithelial cell migration in suspension cultures, whereas they are limited to the intact niche in explant cultures. We provide evidence that C/EBPδ-positive, p15-positive, and quiescent, label-retaining, early activated stem cells migrate at the leading edges to regulate epithelial cell proliferation in explant cultures, and this position effect is lost in early suspension cultures. However, in confluent suspension cultures, the stem cells and niche cells interact with each another, migrate in spiraling patterns, and self-organize to form three-dimensional niche-like compartments resembling the limbal crypts and thereby reestablish the position effect. These 3D-sphere clusters are enriched with nestin-, vimentin-, S100-, and p27-positive niche cells and p15-, p21-, p63α-, C/EBPδ-, ABCG2-, and Pax6-positive quiescent epithelial stem cells. PMID:25232182

  20. Direct Ex-Vivo Evaluation of Pneumococcal Specific T-Cells in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Aamir; Chapel, Helen; Ogg, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an encapsulated bacterium that causes significant global morbidity and mortality. The nasopharynxes of children are believed to be the natural reservoir of pneumococcus and by adulthood nasopharyngeal carriage is infrequent; such infrequency may be due to demonstrable pneumococcal specific T and B-cell responses. HLA Class 2 tetrameric complexes have been used to characterise antigen specific T-cell responses in a variety of models of infection. We therefore sought to determine the frequency and phenotype of pneumococcal specific T-cells, using a novel HLA-DRB1*1501 tetramer complex incorporating a recently defined T-cell epitope derived from the conserved pneumococcal serine/threonine kinase (StkP). We were able to detect direct ex-vivo StkP446–60-tetramer binding in HLA-DRB1*1501 adults. These StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells had increased CD38 expression and were enriched in CCR7- CD45RA+ expression indicating recent and on-going activation and differentiation. Furthermore, these StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells demonstrated rapid effector function by secreting interferon-gamma on stimulation with recombinant StkP. This is the first study to directly enumerate and characterise pneumococcal specific T-cells using HLA class 2 tetrameric complexes. We found that ex-vivo pneumococcal-specific T cells were detectable in healthy adults and that they were enriched with cell surface markers associated with recent antigen exposure and later stages of antigen-driven differentiation. It is likely that these activated pneumococcal specific T-cells reflect recent immunostimulatory pneumococcal exposure in the nasopharynx and it is possible that they may be preventing subsequent colonisation and disease. PMID:22039412

  1. Respiratory-Gated Helical Computed Tomography of Lung: Reproducibility of Small Volumes in an Ex Vivo Model

    SciTech Connect

    Biederer, Juergen Dinkel, Julien; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata M.Sc.; Thierfelder, Carsten; Mende, Ulrich; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Motion-adapted radiotherapy with gated irradiation or tracking of tumor positions requires dedicated imaging techniques such as four-dimensional (4D) helical computed tomography (CT) for patient selection and treatment planning. The objective was to evaluate the reproducibility of spatial information for small objects on respiratory-gated 4D helical CT using computer-assisted volumetry of lung nodules in a ventilated ex vivo system. Methods and Materials: Five porcine lungs were inflated inside a chest phantom and prepared with 55 artificial nodules (mean diameter, 8.4 mm {+-} 1.8). The lungs were respirated by a flexible diaphragm and scanned with 40-row detector CT (collimation, 24 x 1.2 mm; pitch, 0.1; rotation time, 1 s; slice thickness, 1.5 mm; increment, 0.8 mm). The 4D-CT scans acquired during respiration (eight per minute) and reconstructed at 0-100% inspiration and equivalent static scans were scored for motion-related artifacts (0 or absent to 3 or relevant). The reproducibility of nodule volumetry (three readers) was assessed using the variation coefficient (VC). Results: The mean volumes from the static and dynamic inspiratory scans were equal (364.9 and 360.8 mm{sup 3}, respectively, p = 0.24). The static and dynamic end-expiratory volumes were slightly greater (371.9 and 369.7 mm{sup 3}, respectively, p = 0.019). The VC for volumetry (static) was 3.1%, with no significant difference between 20 apical and 20 caudal nodules (2.6% and 3.5%, p = 0.25). In dynamic scans, the VC was greater (3.9%, p = 0.004; apical and caudal, 2.6% and 4.9%; p = 0.004), with a significant difference between static and dynamic in the 20 caudal nodules (3.5% and 4.9%, p = 0.015). This was consistent with greater motion-related artifacts and image noise at the diaphragm (p <0.05). The VC for interobserver variability was 0.6%. Conclusion: Residual motion-related artifacts had only minimal influence on volumetry of small solid lesions. This indicates a high

  2. Bioluminescence-mediated longitudinal monitoring of adipose-derived stem cells in a large mammal ex vivo organ culture.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Mirte; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; Paul, Cornelis P L; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Wurdinger, Thomas; Helder, Marco N

    2015-09-09

    Recently, ex vivo three-dimensional organ culture systems have emerged to study the physiology and pathophysiology of human organs. These systems also have potential as a translational tool in tissue engineering; however, this potential is limited by our ability to longitudinally monitor the fate and action of cells used in regenerative therapies. Therefore, we investigated luciferase-mediated bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive technique to continuously monitor cellular behavior in ex vivo whole organ culture. Goat adipose-derived stem cells (gADSCs) were transduced with either Firefly luciferase (Fluc) or Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) reporter genes and injected in isolated goat intervertebral discs (IVD). Luciferase activity was monitored by BLI for at least seven days of culture. Additionally, possible confounders specific to avascular organ culture were investigated. Gluc imaging proved to be more suitable compared to Fluc in monitoring gADSCs in goat IVDs. We conclude that BLI is a promising tool to monitor spatial and temporal cellular behavior in ex vivo organ culture. Hence, ex vivo organ culture systems allow pre-screening and pre-validation of novel therapeutic concepts prior to in vivo large animal experimentation. Thereby, organ culture systems can reduce animal use, and improve the speed of innovation by overcoming technological, ethical and financial challenges.

  3. Bioluminescence-mediated longitudinal monitoring of adipose-derived stem cells in a large mammal ex vivo organ culture

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Mirte; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A.; Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Noske, David P.; Peter Vandertop, W.; Wurdinger, Thomas; Helder, Marco N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, ex vivo three-dimensional organ culture systems have emerged to study the physiology and pathophysiology of human organs. These systems also have potential as a translational tool in tissue engineering; however, this potential is limited by our ability to longitudinally monitor the fate and action of cells used in regenerative therapies. Therefore, we investigated luciferase-mediated bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive technique to continuously monitor cellular behavior in ex vivo whole organ culture. Goat adipose-derived stem cells (gADSCs) were transduced with either Firefly luciferase (Fluc) or Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) reporter genes and injected in isolated goat intervertebral discs (IVD). Luciferase activity was monitored by BLI for at least seven days of culture. Additionally, possible confounders specific to avascular organ culture were investigated. Gluc imaging proved to be more suitable compared to Fluc in monitoring gADSCs in goat IVDs. We conclude that BLI is a promising tool to monitor spatial and temporal cellular behavior in ex vivo organ culture. Hence, ex vivo organ culture systems allow pre-screening and pre-validation of novel therapeutic concepts prior to in vivo large animal experimentation. Thereby, organ culture systems can reduce animal use, and improve the speed of innovation by overcoming technological, ethical and financial challenges. PMID:26350622

  4. An organotypic slice model for ex vivo study of neural, immune, and microbial interactions of mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Schwerdtfeger, Luke A; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Tobet, Stuart A

    2016-02-15

    Organotypic tissue slices provide seminatural, three-dimensional microenvironments for use in ex vivo study of specific organs and have advanced investigative capabilities compared with isolated cell cultures. Several characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract have made in vitro models for studying the intestine challenging, such as maintaining the intricate structure of microvilli, the intrinsic enteric nervous system, Peyer's patches, the microbiome, and the active contraction of gut muscles. In the present study, an organotypic intestinal slice model was developed that allows for functional investigation across regions of the intestine. Intestinal tissue slices were maintained ex vivo for several days in a physiologically relevant environment that preserved normal enterocyte structure, intact and proliferating crypt cells, submucosal organization, and muscle wall composure. Cell death was measured by a membrane-impermeable DNA binding indicator, ethidium homodimer, and less than 5% of cells were labeled in all regions of the villi and crypt epithelia at 24 h ex vivo. This tissue slice model demonstrated intact myenteric and submucosal neuronal plexuses and functional interstitial cells of Cajal to the extent that nonstimulated, segmental contractions occurred for up to 48 h ex vivo. To detect changes in physiological responses, slices were also assessed for segmental contractions in the presence and absence of antibiotic treatment, which resulted in slices with lesser or greater amounts of commensal bacteria, respectively. Segmental contractions were significantly greater in slices without antibiotics and increased native microbiota. This model renders mechanisms of neuroimmune-microbiome interactions in a complex gut environment available to direct observation and controlled perturbation.

  5. Pharmacological preconditioning for short-term ex vivo expansion of human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells by filgrastim

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, Nikolaos G; Grigoriadis, Ioannis G; Markoula, Sofia; Paschopoulos, Minas; Zikopoulos, Konstantinos; Apostolakopoulos, Panagiotis Gr; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Georgiou, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Although umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (UCBT) has emerged as a promising haematological reconstitution therapy for leukemias and other related disorders, the insufficient UCB stem cell dosage still hinders better clinical outcomes. Previous research efforts, by focusing on ex vivo UCB expansion capabilities have sought to benefit from well-known mechanisms of self-renewal characteristics of UCB stem cells. However, the long-term (> 21 days) in vitro culture period and the low neutrophil recovery significantly reduce the transplantability of such ex vivo expanded UCB stem cells. To overcome the latter hurdles in this study, a post-thaw, short-term ex vivo expansion methodology of UCB mononuclear (UCB-MN) and CD34+ cells has been established. Notably, such effort was achieved through pharmacological preconditioned of UCB cultures by filgrastim agent already used in the clinical setting. In crucial cell populations implicated in the promotion of functional engraftment, the progression of free survival rates (PFS), a marked increase of 6.65 to 9.34 fold for UCB-MN and 35 to 49 fold for CD34+ cells has been noticed. Overall, these results indicate that transplantation of pharmacologically-preconditioned ex vivo expansion of UCB stem and progenitor cells keep high promise upon transplantation to enhance therapeutic potential in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27335700

  6. Curative ex vivo liver-directed gene therapy in a pig model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Raymond D; Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime; Elgilani, Faysal; Amiot, Bruce; Chen, Harvey; Rinaldo, Piero; Marler, Ronald; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; O'Connor, Michael K; Freeman, Brittany L; Ibrahim, Samar H; Peng, Kah Whye; Harding, Cary O; Ho, Chak-Sum; Grompe, Markus; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Lillegard, Joseph B; Russell, Stephen J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2016-07-27

    We tested the hypothesis that ex vivo hepatocyte gene therapy can correct the metabolic disorder in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (Fah(-/-)) pigs, a large animal model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1). Recipient Fah(-/-) pigs underwent partial liver resection and hepatocyte isolation by collagenase digestion. Hepatocytes were transduced with one or both of the lentiviral vectors expressing the therapeutic Fah and the reporter sodium-iodide symporter (Nis) genes under control of the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter. Pigs received autologous transplants of hepatocytes by portal vein infusion. After transplantation, the protective drug 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC) was withheld from recipient pigs to provide a selective advantage for expansion of corrected FAH(+) cells. Proliferation of transplanted cells, assessed by both immunohistochemistry and noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of NIS-labeled cells, demonstrated near-complete liver repopulation by gene-corrected cells. Tyrosine and succinylacetone levels improved to within normal range, demonstrating complete correction of tyrosine metabolism. In addition, repopulation of the Fah(-/-) liver with transplanted cells inhibited the onset of severe fibrosis, a characteristic of nontransplanted Fah(-/-) pigs. This study demonstrates correction of disease in a pig model of metabolic liver disease by ex vivo gene therapy. To date, ex vivo gene therapy has only been successful in small animal models. We conclude that further exploration of ex vivo hepatocyte genetic correction is warranted for clinical use.

  7. Photonic Characteristics and Ex Vivo Imaging of Escherichia coli-Xen14 Within the Bovine Reproductive Tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the photonic properties of Escherichia coli-Xen14 and (2) conduct photonic imaging of E. coli-Xen14 within bovine reproductive tract segments (RTS) ex vivo (Bos indicus). E. coli-Xen14 was grown for 24 h in Luria Bertani medium (LB), with or with...

  8. Curative ex vivo liver-directed gene therapy in a pig model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Raymond D; Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime; Elgilani, Faysal; Amiot, Bruce; Chen, Harvey; Rinaldo, Piero; Marler, Ronald; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; O'Connor, Michael K; Freeman, Brittany L; Ibrahim, Samar H; Peng, Kah Whye; Harding, Cary O; Ho, Chak-Sum; Grompe, Markus; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Lillegard, Joseph B; Russell, Stephen J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2016-07-27

    We tested the hypothesis that ex vivo hepatocyte gene therapy can correct the metabolic disorder in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (Fah(-/-)) pigs, a large animal model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1). Recipient Fah(-/-) pigs underwent partial liver resection and hepatocyte isolation by collagenase digestion. Hepatocytes were transduced with one or both of the lentiviral vectors expressing the therapeutic Fah and the reporter sodium-iodide symporter (Nis) genes under control of the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter. Pigs received autologous transplants of hepatocytes by portal vein infusion. After transplantation, the protective drug 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC) was withheld from recipient pigs to provide a selective advantage for expansion of corrected FAH(+) cells. Proliferation of transplanted cells, assessed by both immunohistochemistry and noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of NIS-labeled cells, demonstrated near-complete liver repopulation by gene-corrected cells. Tyrosine and succinylacetone levels improved to within normal range, demonstrating complete correction of tyrosine metabolism. In addition, repopulation of the Fah(-/-) liver with transplanted cells inhibited the onset of severe fibrosis, a characteristic of nontransplanted Fah(-/-) pigs. This study demonstrates correction of disease in a pig model of metabolic liver disease by ex vivo gene therapy. To date, ex vivo gene therapy has only been successful in small animal models. We conclude that further exploration of ex vivo hepatocyte genetic correction is warranted for clinical use. PMID:27464750

  9. Optimized magnetic resonance diffusion protocol for ex-vivo whole human brain imaging with a clinical scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Stamm, Aymeric; Singh, Jolene; Warfield, Simon K.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) provides a novel insight into the brain to facilitate our understanding of the brain connectivity and microstructure. While in-vivo DW-MRI enables imaging of living patients and longitudinal studies of brain changes, post-mortem ex-vivo DW-MRI has numerous advantages. Ex-vivo imaging benefits from greater resolution and sensitivity due to the lack of imaging time constraints; the use of tighter fitting coils; and the lack of movement artifacts. This allows characterization of normal and abnormal tissues with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity, facilitating our ability to investigate anatomical structures that are inaccessible in-vivo. This also offers the opportunity to develop today novel imaging biomarkers that will, with tomorrow's MR technology, enable improved in-vivo assessment of the risk of disease in an individual. Post-mortem studies, however, generally rely on the fixation of specimen to inhibit tissue decay which starts as soon as tissue is deprived from its blood supply. Unfortunately, fixation of tissues substantially alters tissue diffusivity profiles. In addition, ex-vivo DW-MRI requires particular care when packaging the specimen because the presence of microscopic air bubbles gives rise to geometric and intensity image distortion. In this work, we considered the specific requirements of post-mortem imaging and designed an optimized protocol for ex-vivo whole brain DW-MRI using a human clinical 3T scanner. Human clinical 3T scanners are available to a large number of researchers and, unlike most animal scanners, have a bore diameter large enough to image a whole human brain. Our optimized protocol will facilitate widespread ex-vivo investigations of large specimen.

  10. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations: oxygen dependent ex vivo expansion and transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Bath, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Corneal epithelium is being regenerated throughout life by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) believed to be located in histologically defined stem cell niches in corneal limbus. Defective or dysfunctional LESCs result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) causing pain and decreased visual acuity. Since the first successful treatment of LSCD by transplantation of ex vivo expanded LESCs in 1997, many attempts have been carried out to optimize culture conditions to improve the outcome of surgery. To date, progress in this field of bioengineering is substantially hindered by both the lack of specific biomarkers of LESCs and the lack of a precise molecular characterization of in situ epithelial subpopulations. The aim of this dissertation was to optimize culture systems with regard to the environmental oxygen concentration for selective ex vivo expansion of LESCs and to analyse in situ subpopulations in human corneal epithelium using a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA sequencing for global transcriptomic profiling. We compared dissociation cultures, using either expansion on γ-irradiated NIH/3T3 feeder cells in serum-rich medium or expansion directly on plastic in serum-free EpiLife medium, using a range of physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations (2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). Using immunocytochemistry and advanced fluorescence microscopy, cells were characterized regarding growth, cell cycle distribution, colony-forming efficiency (CFE), phenotypes and cytomorphometry. Limbal epithelial cells expanded in 2% O2 exhibited slow growth, low fraction of cells in S/G2 , high CFE, high expression of stem cell markers ABCG2 and p63α, and low fraction of differentiation marker CK3 resembling a LESC phenotype. The effect of hypoxia to maintain LESCs in culture was not dependent on the system used for propagation (Bath et al. 2013a). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate cellular subpopulations in situ from the spatially defined

  11. Photoacoustic tomography of joints aided by an Etanercept-conjugated gold nanoparticle contrast agent—an ex vivo preliminary rat study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, David L.; Agarwal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2008-03-01

    Monitoring of anti-rheumatic drug delivery in experimental models and in human diseases would undoubtedly be very helpful for both basic research and clinical management of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we have investigated the potential of an emerging hybrid imaging technology—photoacoustic tomography—in noninvasive monitoring of anti-TNF drug delivery. After the contrast agent composed of gold nanorods conjugated with Etanercept molecules was produced, ELISA experiments were performed to prove the conjugation and to show that the conjugated anti-TNF-α drug was biologically active. PAT of ex vivo rat tail joints with the joint connective tissue enhanced by intra-articularly injected contrast agent was conducted to examine the performance of PAT in visualizing the distribution of the gold-nanorod-conjugated drug in articular tissues. By using the described system, gold nanorods with a concentration down to 1 pM in phantoms or 10 pM in biological tissues can be imaged with good signal-to-noise ratio and high spatial resolution. This study demonstrates the feasibility of conjugating TNF antagonist pharmaceutical preparations with gold nanorods, preservation of the mechanism of action of TNF antagonist along with preliminary evaluation of novel PAT technology in imaging optical contrast agents conjugated with anti-rheumatic drugs. Further in vivo studies on animals are warranted to test the specific binding between such conjugates and targeted antigen in joint tissues affected by inflammation.

  12. Multi-Angle Switched HIFU: A New Ultrasound Device for Controlled Non-Invasive Induction of Small Spherical Ablation Zones—Simulation and Ex-Vivo Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Petr; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Benson, Donny G.; Webber, Jessica S.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Shafirstein, Gal; Griffin, Robert J.

    2009-04-01

    Current HIFU devices produce elongated elliptical lesions (cigar shaped) in a single energy deposition. This prohibits the effective use of HIFU in small animal research as well as in clinical treatment where small volumes of tissue surrounded by critical structures need to be destroyed. We developed an ultrasound ablation device that non-invasively creates spheroidal lesions of an arbitrary diameter of up to 1 cm in a depth of up to 5 cm. The device consists of two focused ultrasound transducers aimed to the ablation target volume from two directions at a 90 degree angle. The operation of the transducers is switched back and forth so that only one transducer is energized at a time. A transient analysis of this ablation approach was performed using coupled simulations of acoustical pressure distributions, resulting temperature distributions, and thermal dose deposited to soft tissue. A prototype of the device was developed and tested in-vitro in a phantom and later in ex-vivo experiments in pig liver. The experimental results agreed with the numerical simulations and confirmed the ability of the multi-angle switched HIFU (MASH) device to create small spheroidal lesions in soft tissue within 2 minutes without significantly affecting the surrounding tissues.

  13. Sensitivity and ex vivo validation of finite element models of the domestic pig cranium

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2011-01-01

    A finite element (FE) validation and sensitivity study was undertaken on a modern domestic pig cranium. Bone strain data were collected ex vivo from strain gauges, and compared with results from specimen-specific FE models. An isotropic, homogeneous model was created, then input parameters were altered to investigate model sensitivity. Heterogeneous, isotropic models investigated the effects of a constant-thickness, stiffer outer layer (representing cortical bone) atop a more compliant interior (representing cancellous bone). Loading direction and placement of strain gauges were also varied, and the use of 2D membrane elements at strain gauge locations as a method of projecting 3D model strains into the plane of the gauge was investigated. The models correctly estimate the loading conditions of the experiment, yet at some locations fail to reproduce correct principal strain magnitudes, and hence strain ratios. Principal strain orientations are predicted well. The initial model was too stiff by approximately an order of magnitude. Introducing a compliant interior reported strain magnitudes more similar to the ex vivo results without notably affecting strain orientations, ratios or contour patterns, suggesting that this simple heterogeneity was the equivalent of reducing the overall stiffness of the model. Models were generally insensitive to moderate changes in loading direction or strain gauge placement, except in the squamosal portion of the zygomatic arch. The use of membrane elements made negligible differences to the reported strains. The models therefore seem most sensitive to changes in material properties, and suggest that failure to model local heterogeneity in material properties and structure of the bone may be responsible for discrepancies between the experimental and model results. This is partially attributable to a lack of resolution in the CT scans from which the model was built, and partially due to an absence of detailed material properties data

  14. Ex-vivo assessment of chronic toxicity of low levels of cadmium on testicular meiotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy-Siraudin, Cendrine; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, Rahma; Ali, Sazan; Chaspoul, Florence; Lanteaume, André; Achard, Vincent; Gallice, Philippe; Durand, Philippe; and others

    2012-08-01

    Using a validated model of culture of rat seminiferous tubules, we assessed the effects of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L cadmium (Cd) on spermatogenic cells over a 2‐week culture period. With concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/L in the culture medium, the Cd concentration in the cells, determined by ICP-MS, increased with concentration in the medium and the day of culture. Flow cytometric analysis enabled us to evaluate changes in the number of Sertoli cells and germ cells during the culture period. The number of Sertoli cells did not appear to be affected by Cd. By contrast, spermatogonia and meiotic cells were decreased by 1 and 10 μg/L Cd in a time and dose dependent manner. Stage distribution of the meiotic prophase I and qualitative study of the synaptonemal complexes (SC) at the pachytene stage were performed by immunocytochemistry with an anti SCP3 antibody. Cd caused a time-and-dose-dependent increase of total abnormalities, of fragmented SC and of asynapsis from concentration of 0.1 μg/L. Additionally, we observed a new SC abnormality, the “motheaten” SC. This abnormality is frequently associated with asynapsis and SC widening which increased with both the Cd concentration and the duration of exposure. This abnormality suggests that Cd disrupts the structure and function of proteins involved in pairing and/or meiotic recombination. These results show that Cd induces dose-and-time-dependent alterations of the meiotic process of spermatogenesis ex-vivo, and that the lowest metal concentration, which induces an adverse effect, may vary with the cell parameter studied. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium induces ex-vivo severe time- and dose-dependent germ cell abnormalities. ► Cadmium at very low concentration (0.1 µg/l) induces synaptonemal complex abnormalities. ► The lowest concentration inducing adverse effect varied with the cell parameter studied. ► Cadmium alters proteins involved in pairing and recombination. ► Cadmium leads to achiasmate univalents and

  15. Ex Vivo Innate Immune Cytokine Signature of Enhanced Risk of Relapsing Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Kristyn E.; Loriaux, Paul M.; Saito, Mayuko; Tuero, Iskra; Villaverde, Homarh; Siva, Tenaya; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucellosis, a zoonotic infection caused by one of the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria of the Brucella genus, is an ongoing public health problem in Perú. While most patients who receive standard antibiotic treatment recover, 5–40% suffer a brucellosis relapse. In this study, we examined the ex vivo immune cytokine profiles of recovered patients with a history of acute and relapsing brucellosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood was taken from healthy control donors, patients with a history of acute brucellosis, or patients with a history of relapsing brucellosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and remained in culture without stimulation or were stimulated with a panel of toll-like receptor agonists or heat-killed Brucella melitensis (HKBM) isolates. Innate immune cytokine gene expression and protein secretion were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and a multiplex bead-based immunoassay, respectively. Acute and relapse patients demonstrated consistently elevated cytokine gene expression and secretion levels compared to controls. Notably, these include: basal and stimulus-induced expression of GM-CSF, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in response to LPS and HKBM; basal secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α; and HKBM or Rev1-induced secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, GM-CSF, IFN-Υ, and TNF-α. Although acute and relapse patients were largely indistinguishable by their cytokine gene expression profiles, we identified a robust cytokine secretion signature that accurately discriminates acute from relapse patients. This signature consists of basal IL-6 secretion, IL-1β, IL-2, and TNF-α secretion in response to LPS and HKBM, and IFN-γ secretion in response to HKBM. Conclusions/Significance This work demonstrates that informative cytokine variations in brucellosis patients can be detected using an ex vivo assay system and used to identify patients with differing infection histories. Targeted diagnosis of this signature may

  16. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  17. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in human ex vivo and porcine in vivo lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sonography has become the imaging technique of choice for guiding intraoperative interventions in abdominal surgery. Due to artefacts from residual air content, however, videothoracoscopic and open intraoperative ultrasound-guided thermoablation of lung malignancies are impossible. Lung flooding is a new method that allows complete ultrasound imaging of lungs and their tumours. Methods Fourteen resected tumourous human lung lobes were examined transpleurally with B-mode ultrasound before (in atelectasis) and after lung flooding with isotonic saline solution. In two swine, the left lung was filled with 15 ml/kg isotonic saline solution through the left side of a double-lumen tube. Lung tumours were simulated by transthoracic ultrasound-guided injection of 5 ml of purified bovine serum albumin in glutaraldehyde, centrally into the left lower lung lobe. The rate of tumour detection, the severity of disability caused by residual gas, and sonomorphology of the lungs and tumours were assessed. Results The ex vivo tumour detection rate was 100% in flooded human lung lobes and 43% (6/14) in atelectatic lungs. In all cases of atelectasis, sonographic tumour imaging was impaired by residual gas. Tumours and atelectatic tissue were isoechoic. In 28% of flooded lungs, a little residual gas was observed that did not impair sonographic tumour imaging. In contrast to tumours, flooded lung tissue was hyperechoic, homogeneous, and of fine-grained structure. Because of the bronchial wall three-laminar structure, sonographic differentiation of vessels and bronchi was possible. In all cases, malignant tumours in the flooded lung appeared well-demarcated from the lung parenchyma. Adenocarcinoma, squamous, and large cell carcinomas were hypoechoic. Bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma was slightly hyperechoic. Transpleural sonography identifies endobronchial tumour growth and bronchial wall destruction. With transthoracic sonography, the flooded animal lung can be completely

  18. Synovitis biomarkers: ex vivo characterization of three biomarkers for identification of inflammatory osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; Christiansen, Thorbjørn; Ladel, Christoph; Karsdal, Morten; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Characterize biomarkers measuring extracellular matrix turnover of inflamed osteoarthritis synovium. Methods: Human primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes and synovial membrane explants (SMEs) treated with various cytokines and growth factors were assessed by C1M, C3M, and acMMP3 in the conditioned medium. Results: TNFα significantly increased C1M up to seven-fold (p = 0.0002), C3M up to 24-fold (p = 0.0011), and acMMP3 up to 14-fold (p < 0.0001) in SMEs. IL-1β also significantly increased C1M up to five-fold (p = 0.00094), C3M four-fold (p = 0.007), and acMMP3 18-fold (p < 0.0001) in SMEs. Conclusion: The biomarkers C1M, C3M, and acMMP-3 were synovitis biomarkers ex vivo and provide a translational tool together with the SME model. PMID:26863055

  19. Studying the penetration of fatty acids into human skin by ex vivo TOF-SIMS imaging.

    PubMed

    Kezutyte, Toma; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Brunelle, Alain; Briedis, Vitalis

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids classified as chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) might cause the fluidization and perturbation of stratum corneum (SC) lipid matrix. The penetration of oleic, linoleic, lauric and capric acids into human skin was studied by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging and related to fatty acids enhancing effect on lipophilic model drug tolnaftate penetration into human epidermis and dermis ex vivo. Fatty acid enhancing effect on tolnaftate penetration into human skin was evaluated using Bronaugh-type flow-through diffusion cells. After in vitro penetration studies visualization and spatial localization of fatty acid molecules in human skin were performed using TOF-SIMS. Penetration of oleic, linoleic, lauric and capric acids into human skin was compared to the control skin sections by ion images and intensity profiles. Only oleic acid significantly (P<0.05) enhanced tolnaftate penetration into epidermis (enhancing ratio equal to 1.867). CPE might have no effect on model drug penetration enhancement, but might penetrate itself into the skin.

  20. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10 min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼ 13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3 min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥ 30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures.

  1. Assembly and characterization of a nonlinear optical microscopy for in vivo and ex vivo tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratavieira, S.; Buzzá, H. H.; Jorge, A. E.; Grecco, C.; Pires, L.; Cosci, A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is the assembly and characterization of a custom-made non-linear microscope. The microscope allows the adjustment for in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo imaging of biological samples. Two galvanometer mirrors conjugated by two spherical mirrors are used for the lateral scan and for the axial scan a piezoeletric stage is utilized. The excitation is done using a tunable femtosecond Ti: Sapphire laser. The light is focused in tissue by an objective lens 20X, water immersion, numerical aperture of 1.0, and working distance of 2.0 mm. The detection system is composed by a cut off filter that eliminates laser light back reflections and diverse dichroic filters can be chosen to split the emitted signal for the two photomultiplier detector. The calibration and resolution of the microscope was done using a stage micrometer with 10 μm divisions and fluorescent particle slide, respectively. Fluorescence and second harmonic generation images were performed using epithelial and hepatic tissue, the images have a sub-cellular spatial resolution. Further characterization and differentiation of tissue layers can be obtained by performing axial scanning. By means of the microscope it is possible to have a three dimensional reconstruction of tissues with sub-cellular resolution.

  2. Lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of human neural progenitor cells for ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Capowski, Elizabeth E; Schneider, Bernard L; Ebert, Allison D; Seehus, Corey R; Szulc, Jolanta; Zufferey, Romain; Aebischer, Patrick; Svendsen, Clive N

    2007-07-30

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) hold great potential as an ex vivo system for delivery of therapeutic proteins to the central nervous system. When cultured as aggregates, termed neurospheres, hNPC are capable of significant in vitro expansion. In the current study, we present a robust method for lentiviral vector-mediated gene delivery into hNPC that maintains the differentiation and proliferative properties of neurosphere cultures while minimizing the amount of viral vector used and controlling the number of insertion sites per population. This method results in long-term, stable expression even after differentiation of the hNPC to neurons and astrocytes and allows for generation of equivalent transgenic populations of hNPC. In addition, the in vitro analysis presented predicts the behavior of transgenic lines in vivo when transplanted into a rodent model of Parkinson's disease. The methods presented provide a powerful tool for assessing the impact of factors such as promoter systems or different transgenes on the therapeutic utility of these cells.

  3. Virulence Diversity among Bacteremic Aeromonas Isolates: Ex Vivo, Animal, and Clinical Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Lin; Wu, Chi-Jung; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lee, Nan-Yao; Lee, Ching-Chi; Li, Chia-Wen; Li, Ming-Chi; Chen, Chi-Chung; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Ou, Chun-Chun; Chen, Chang-Shi; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to compare virulence among different Aeromonas species causing bloodstream infections. Methodology/Principal Findings Nine of four species of Aeromonas blood isolates, including A. dhakensis, A. hydrophila, A. veronii and A. caviae were randomly selected for analysis. The species was identified by the DNA sequence matching of rpoD. Clinically, the patients with A. dhakensis bacteremia had a higher sepsis-related mortality rate than those with other species (37.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.028). Virulence of different Aeromonas species were tested in C. elegans, mouse fibroblast C2C12 cell line and BALB/c mice models. C. elegans fed with A. dhakensis and A. caviae had the lowest and highest survival rates compared with other species, respectively (all P values <0.0001). A. dhakensis isolates also exhibited more cytotoxicity in C2C12 cell line (all P values <0.0001). Fourteen-day survival rate of mice intramuscularly inoculated with A. dhakensis was lower than that of other species (all P values <0.0001). Hemolytic activity and several virulence factor genes were rarely detected in the A. caviae isolates. Conclusions/Significance Clinical data, ex vivo experiments, and animal studies suggest there is virulence variation among clinically important Aeromonas species. PMID:25375798

  4. Ex vivo study of bacterial coronal leakage in indirect pulp treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Pilar; Pardo-Ridao, Maria M.; Arias-Moliz, Maria T.; Ferrer-Luque, Carmen M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, ex vivo, bacterial coronal leakage with different antimicrobial agents applied to the dentine for indirect pulp treatment (IPT). Study Design: Sixty extracted teeth were prepared and randomly distributed into 5 groups (n=10): Group 1: no antimicrobial dentine treatment; group 2: 1% chlorhexidine (CHX)+1% thymol varnish (Cervitec®); group 3: 2 % CHX solution; group 4: 40% CHX varnish (EC40™) and group 5: Clearfil™ Protect Bond (CPB). Ten teeth served as controls. The teeth were restored using a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GIC) and then mounted in a two-chamber device. The coronal access was exposed to Streptococcus mutans for 45 days. The appearance of turbidity in the BHI broth of the lower chamber was considered as specimen leakage. Results: Survival analysis, determined by non parametric Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests, showed that the best results were for groups EC40™+GIC and GIC alone; yet there were not statistically significant differences between them. All specimens of CPB+GIC and 2% CHX+GIC, leaked at 45 days. Conclusions: In IPT the use of GIC without pretreatment of the dentine and pretreatment with 40% CHX varnish resulted in a significant delay of bacterial coronal leakage. Key words:Streptococcus mutans, bacterial leakage, resin-modified glass ionomer cement, indirect pulp treatment. PMID:23229261

  5. The ex vivo neurotoxic, myotoxic and cardiotoxic activity of cucurbituril-based macrocyclic drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Oun, Rabbab; Floriano, Rafael S; Isaacs, Lyle; Rowan, Edward G; Wheate, Nial J

    2014-11-01

    The cucurbituril family of drug delivery vehicles have been examined for their tissue specific toxicity using ex vivo models. Cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]), cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and the linear cucurbituril-derivative Motor2 were examined for their neuro-, myo- and cardiotoxic activity and compared with β-cyclodextrin. The protective effect of drug encapsulation by CB[7] was also examined on the platinum-based anticancer drug cisplatin. The results show that none of the cucurbiturils have statistically measurable neurotoxicity as measured using mouse sciatic nerve compound action potential. Cucurbituril myotoxicity was measured by nerve-muscle force of contraction through chemical and electrical stimulation. Motor2 was found to display no myotoxicity, whereas both CB[6] and CB[7] showed myotoxic activity via a presynaptic effect. Finally, cardiotoxicity, which was measured by changes in the rate and force of right and left atria contraction, was observed for all three cucurbiturils. Free cisplatin displays neuro-, myo- and cardiotoxic activity, consistent with the side-effects seen in the clinic. Whilst CB[7] had no effect on the level of cisplatin's neurotoxic activity, drug encapsulation within the macrocycle had a marked reduction in both the drug's myo- and cardiotoxic activity. Overall the results are consistent with the relative lack of toxicity displayed by these macrocycles in whole animal acute systemic toxicity studies and indicate continued potential of cucurbiturils as drug delivery vehicles for the reduction of the side effects associated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

  6. Effects of zinc ex vivo on taurine uptake in goldfish retinal cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Taurine and zinc exert neurotrophic effects in the central nervous system. Current studies demonstrate that Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporters, similar to that of taurine, are modulated by micromolar concentrations of zinc. This study examined the effect of zinc sulfate ex vivo on [3H]taurine transport in goldfish retina. Methods Isolated cells were incubated in Ringer with zinc (0.1–100 µM). Taurine transport was done with 50 nM [3H]taurine or by isotopic dilution with taurine (0.001–1 mM) and 50 nM [3H]taurine. Results Zinc reduced the capacity of taurine transport without changes in affinity, and caused a noncompetitive inhibition of high affinity taurine transport, with an EC50= 0.072 µM. The mechanism by which zinc affects taurine transport is unknown at the present. Conclusions There may be a binding site of zinc in the transporter that affects union or translocation of taurine, or possibly the formation of taurine-zinc complexes, rather than free zinc, could affect the operation of the transporter. PMID:20804587

  7. Flagellin Induces β-Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Ex vivo Infection with Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steven B; Prior, Alison; Ellis, Samuel J; Cook, Vivienne; Chan, Simon S M; Gelson, William; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen in the developed world and can cause life-threatening disease particularly in children. EHEC persists in the human gut by adhering intimately to colonic epithelium and forming characteristic attaching/effacing lesions. In this study, we investigated the innate immune response to EHEC infection with particular focus on antimicrobial peptide and protein expression by colonic epithelium. Using a novel human colonic biopsy model and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells, we found that EHEC infection induced expression of human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), whereas hBD1, hBD3, LL-37, and lysozyme remained unchanged. Infection with specific EHEC deletion mutants demonstrated that this was dependent on flagellin, and apical exposure to purified flagellin was sufficient to stimulate hBD2 and also interleukin (IL)-8 expression ex vivo and in vitro. Flagellin-mediated hBD2 induction was significantly reduced by inhibitors of NF-κB, MAP kinase p38 and JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, IL-8 secretion by polarized T84 cells was vectorial depending on the side of stimulation, and apical exposure to EHEC or flagellin resulted in apical IL-8 release. Our results demonstrate that EHEC only induces a modest immune response in human colonic epithelium characterized by flagellin-dependent induction of hBD2 and low levels of IL-8. PMID:27446815

  8. Blind source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral images.

    PubMed

    Galeano, July; Perez, Sandra; Montoya, Yonatan; Botina, Deivid; Garzón, Johnson

    2015-05-01

    Blind Source Separation methods (BSS) aim for the decomposition of a given signal in its main components or source signals. Those techniques have been widely used in the literature for the analysis of biomedical images, in order to extract the main components of an organ or tissue under study. The analysis of skin images for the extraction of melanin and hemoglobin is an example of the use of BSS. This paper presents a proof of concept of the use of source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral Images. The images are acquired with an interference filter-based imaging system. The images are processed by means of two algorithms: Independent Components analysis and Non-negative Matrix Factorization. In both cases, it is possible to obtain maps that quantify the concentration of the main chromophores present in aortic tissue. Also, the algorithms allow for spectral absorbance of the main tissue components. Those spectral signatures were compared against the theoretical ones by using correlation coefficients. Those coefficients report values close to 0.9, which is a good estimator of the method's performance. Also, correlation coefficients lead to the identification of the concentration maps according to the evaluated chromophore. The results suggest that Multi/hyper-spectral systems together with image processing techniques is a potential tool for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue.

  9. Blind source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral images

    PubMed Central

    Galeano, July; Perez, Sandra; Montoya, Yonatan; Botina, Deivid; Garzón, Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Blind Source Separation methods (BSS) aim for the decomposition of a given signal in its main components or source signals. Those techniques have been widely used in the literature for the analysis of biomedical images, in order to extract the main components of an organ or tissue under study. The analysis of skin images for the extraction of melanin and hemoglobin is an example of the use of BSS. This paper presents a proof of concept of the use of source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral Images. The images are acquired with an interference filter-based imaging system. The images are processed by means of two algorithms: Independent Components analysis and Non-negative Matrix Factorization. In both cases, it is possible to obtain maps that quantify the concentration of the main chromophores present in aortic tissue. Also, the algorithms allow for spectral absorbance of the main tissue components. Those spectral signatures were compared against the theoretical ones by using correlation coefficients. Those coefficients report values close to 0.9, which is a good estimator of the method’s performance. Also, correlation coefficients lead to the identification of the concentration maps according to the evaluated chromophore. The results suggest that Multi/hyper-spectral systems together with image processing techniques is a potential tool for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue. PMID:26137366

  10. Cholesterol-lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum in vitro, ex vivo, and in hamsters and minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Berger, A; Rein, D; Kratky, E; Monnard, I; Hajjaj, H; Meirim, I; Piguet-Welsch, C; Hauser, J; Mace, K; Niederberger, P

    2004-01-01

    Introduction There has been renewed interest in mushroom medicinal properties. We studied cholesterol lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum (Gl), a renowned medicinal species. Results Organic fractions containing oxygenated lanosterol derivatives inhibited cholesterol synthesis in T9A4 hepatocytes. In hamsters, 5% Gl did not effect LDL; but decreased total cholesterol (TC) 9.8%, and HDL 11.2%. Gl (2.5 and 5%) had effects on several fecal neutral sterols and bile acids. Both Gl doses reduced hepatic microsomal ex-vivo HMG-CoA reductase activity. In minipigs, 2.5 Gl decreased TC, LDL- and HDL cholesterol 20, 27, and 18%, respectively (P < 0.05); increased fecal cholestanol and coprostanol; and decreased cholate. Conclusions Overall, Gl has potential to reduce LDL cholesterol in vivo through various mechanisms. Next steps are to: fully characterize bioactive components in lipid soluble/insoluble fractions; evaluate bioactivity of isolated fractions; and examine human cholesterol lowering properties. Innovative new cholesterol-lowering foods and medicines containing Gl are envisioned. PMID:14969592

  11. Robust registration of sparsely sectioned histology to ex-vivo MRI of temporal lobe resections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubran, Maged; Khan, Ali R.; Crukley, Cathie; Buchanan, Susan; Santyr, Brendan; deRibaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Surgical resection of epileptic foci is a typical treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, however, accurate preoperative localization is challenging and often requires invasive sub-dural or intra-cranial electrode placement. The presence of cellular abnormalities in the resected tissue can be used to validate the effectiveness of multispectralMagnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in pre-operative foci localization and surgical planning. If successful, these techniques can lead to improved surgical outcomes and less invasive procedures. Towards this goal, a novel pipeline is presented here for post-operative imaging of temporal lobe specimens involving MRI and digital histology, and present and evaluate methods for bringing these images into spatial correspondence. The sparsely-sectioned histology images of resected tissue represents a challenge for 3D reconstruction which we address with a combined 3D and 2D rigid registration algorithm that alternates between slice-based and volume-based registration with the ex-vivo MRI. We also evaluate four methods for non-rigid within-plane registration using both images and fiducials, with the top performing method resulting in a target registration error of 0.87 mm. This work allows for the spatially-local comparison of histology with post-operative MRI and paves the way for eventual registration with pre-operative MRI images.

  12. Plaque characterization in ex vivo MRI evaluated by dense 3D correspondence with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, Arna; de Bruijne, Marleen; Klein, Stefan; Verhagen, Hence; Groen, Harald; Wentzel, Jolanda; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro

    2011-03-01

    Automatic quantification of carotid artery plaque composition is important in the development of methods that distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques. MRI has shown to be capable of imaging different components noninvasively. We present a new plaque classification method which uses 3D registration of histology data with ex vivo MRI data, using non-rigid registration, both for training and evaluation. This is more objective than previously presented methods, as it eliminates selection bias that is introduced when 2D MRI slices are manually matched to histological slices before evaluation. Histological slices of human atherosclerotic plaques were manually segmented into necrotic core, fibrous tissue and calcification. Classification of these three components was voxelwise evaluated. As features the intensity, gradient magnitude and Laplacian in four MRI sequences after different degrees of Gaussian smoothing, and the distances to the lumen and the outer vessel wall, were used. Performance of linear and quadratic discriminant classifiers for different combinations of features was evaluated. Best accuracy (72.5 +/- 7.7%) was reached with the linear classifier when all features were used. Although this was only a minor improvement to the accuracy of a classifier that only included the intensities and distance features (71.6 +/- 7.9%), the difference was statistically significant (paired t-test, p<0.05). Good sensitivity and specificity for calcification was reached (83% and 95% respectively), however, differentiation between fibrous (sensitivity 85%, specificity 60%) and necrotic tissue (sensitivity 49%, specificity 89%) was more difficult.

  13. Improved ex vivo blood compatibility of central venous catheter with noble metal alloy coating

    PubMed Central

    Vafa Homann, Manijeh; Johansson, Dorota; Wallen, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality induced by the use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Nobel metal alloy (NMA) coating is an advanced surface modification that prevents microbial adhesion and growth on catheters and thereby reduces the risk of infection. In vitro microbiological analyses have shown up to 90% reduction in microbial adhesion on coated CVC compared to uncoated ones. This study aimed to assess the blood compatibility of NMA‐coated CVC according to ISO 10993‐4. Hemolysis, thrombin–antithrombin (TAT) complex, platelet counts, fibrin deposition, and C3a and SC5b‐9 complement activation were analyzed in human blood exposed to the NMA‐coated and control CVCs using a Chandler‐loop model. NMA‐coated CVC did not induce hemolysis and fell in the “nonhemolytic” category according to ASTM F756‐00. Significantly lower amounts of TAT were generated and less fibrin was deposited on NMA‐coated CVC than on uncoated ones. Slightly higher platelet counts and lower complement markers were observed for NMA‐coated CVC compared to uncoated ones. These data suggest that the NMA‐coated CVC has better ex vivo blood compatibility compared to uncoated CVC. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1359–1365, 2016. PMID:26698606

  14. Investigation of temperature-dependent viscoelastic properties of thermal lesions in ex vivo animal liver tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Miklos Z.; Daniels, Matthew J.; Varghese, Tomy

    2009-01-01

    The viscoelastic characteristics of thermal lesions in ex vivo animal liver are investigated in this paper. Characterization of the moduli of thermal lesions prepared at several temperatures will provide additional information for the elastographic monitoring of radio frequency ablation of hepatic tumors. In this study, the frequency-dependent complex modulus of thermal lesions prepared at temperatures ranging from 60–90 °C over a frequency range from 0.1–50 Hz are presented. Lesions were prepared using either radio frequency ablation or double immersion boiling. It was found that both the magnitude and phase of the modulus increase with frequency, a behavior that has been noted in the literature. A new result reported shows that the modulus dependence on temperature reveals a local maximum around 70–75 °C corresponding to the temperature at which tissue has released most of its water content. The modulus values at temperatures higher than 70 °C continued to increase, but the extent of increase depend on animal species and other factors. PMID:19362313

  15. Interleukin-3 and ex vivo maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Although the utilization of IL-3 in the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells has been considered as an attractive possibility, its mode of action remains unclear and controversial. Some reports show that IL-3 maintains or even enhances primitive stem cell activity, whereas others show the opposite. The presence of serum in culture media enhances the pro-differentiating effect of IL-3 on stem cells. Conversely, addition of IL-3 to serum-free cultures improves the capacity of TPO, SCF and Flt3-ligand to promote the self-renewal of primitive stem cells. The presence or absence of serum or of some serum substitutes (in serum-free cultures), as well as other culture parameters are probably responsible for these contrasting effects of IL-3 on stem cells. However, none of the data presently evaluated bring a clear, definitive explanation to this apparent paradox. Those data that appear to be the most informative are presented and discussed in this "technical review". PMID:15217747

  16. Invasion of Wolbachia into Anopheles and Other Insect Germlines in an Ex vivo Organ Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ping; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2012-01-01

    The common bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia manipulates its host's reproduction to promote its own maternal transmission, and can interfere with pathogen development in many insects making it an attractive agent for the control of arthropod-borne disease. However, many important species, including Anopheles mosquitoes, are uninfected. Wolbachia can be artificially transferred between insects in the laboratory but this can be a laborious and sometimes fruitless process. We used a simple ex vivo culturing technique to assess the suitability of Wolbachia-host germline associations. Wolbachia infects the dissected germline tissue of multiple insect species when the host tissue and bacteria are cultured together. Ovary and testis infection occurs in a density-dependent manner. Wolbachia strains are more capable of invading the germline of their native or closely related rather than divergent hosts. The ability of Wolbachia to associate with the germline of novel hosts is crucial for the development of stably-transinfected insect lines. Rapid assessment of the suitability of a strain-host combination prior to transinfection may dictate use of a particular Wolbachia strain. Furthermore, the cultured germline tissues of two major Anopheline vectors of Plasmodium parasites are susceptible to Wolbachia infection. This finding further enhances the prospect of using Wolbachia for the biological control of malaria. PMID:22558418

  17. Improved ex vivo blood compatibility of central venous catheter with noble metal alloy coating.

    PubMed

    Vafa Homann, Manijeh; Johansson, Dorota; Wallen, Håkan; Sanchez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality induced by the use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Nobel metal alloy (NMA) coating is an advanced surface modification that prevents microbial adhesion and growth on catheters and thereby reduces the risk of infection. In vitro microbiological analyses have shown up to 90% reduction in microbial adhesion on coated CVC compared to uncoated ones. This study aimed to assess the blood compatibility of NMA-coated CVC according to ISO 10993-4. Hemolysis, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex, platelet counts, fibrin deposition, and C3a and SC5b-9 complement activation were analyzed in human blood exposed to the NMA-coated and control CVCs using a Chandler-loop model. NMA-coated CVC did not induce hemolysis and fell in the "nonhemolytic" category according to ASTM F756-00. Significantly lower amounts of TAT were generated and less fibrin was deposited on NMA-coated CVC than on uncoated ones. Slightly higher platelet counts and lower complement markers were observed for NMA-coated CVC compared to uncoated ones. These data suggest that the NMA-coated CVC has better ex vivo blood compatibility compared to uncoated CVC. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1359-1365, 2016. PMID:26698606

  18. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT ), retardance (RT ), depolarization(ΔT ), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT , ΔL, RT ,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DTa nd DL showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues. PMID:26021717

  19. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT), retardance (RT), depolarization (ΔT), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT, ΔL, RT,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DT and D showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues.

  20. Successful emergent lung transplantation after remote ex vivo perfusion optimization and transportation of donor lungs.

    PubMed

    Wigfield, C H; Cypel, M; Yeung, J; Waddell, T; Alex, C; Johnson, C; Keshavjee, S; Love, R B

    2012-10-01

    A recent clinical trial provided evidence that ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) results in optimized human donor lungs for transplantation. Excellent recipient outcomes were documented after 4 h of normothermic perfusion. We report a clinical case utilizing remote EVLP to assess and improve function of initially otherwise unacceptable injured donor lungs followed by transportation and subsequent bilateral lung transplantation in a patient with virally induced refractory respiratory failure supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This is the first lung transplantation with the application of remote EVLP, wherein the donor lungs were transported from the donor hospital to a center for EVLP and then transported to another hospital for transplantation. It is also the first case of lung transplantation in the United States utilizing EVLP for functional optimization leading to successful transplantation. Organ procurement data, EVLP assessment, and the pre- and postoperative course of the recipient are presented. The available evidence supporting EVLP, the humanitarian and cooperative utilization of lungs otherwise discarded, are discussed. PMID:23009140

  1. Ex Vivo Confocal Spectroscopy of Autofluorescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, Joel; Purta, Patryk; Poskin, Zach; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the autofluorescence (AF) signature of the microscopic features of retina with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 488 nm excitation. Methods The globes of four donors with AMD and four age-matched controls were embedded in paraffin and sectioned through the macula. Sections were excited using a 488 nm argon laser, and the AF emission was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (496–610 nm, 6 nm resolution). The data cubes were then analyzed to compare peak emission spectra between the AMD and the controls. Microscopic features, including individual lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin granules, Bruch’s Membrane, as well macroscopic features, were considered. Results Overall, the AMD eyes showed a trend of blue-shifted emission peaks compared with the controls. These differences were statistically significant when considering the emission of the combined RPE/Bruch’s Membrane across all the tissue cross-sections (p = 0.02). Conclusions The AF signatures of ex vivo AMD RPE/BrM show blue-shifted emission spectra (488 nm excitation) compared with the control tissue. The magnitude of these differences is small (~4 nm) and highlights the potential challenges of detecting these subtle spectral differences in vivo. PMID:27631087

  2. Flagellin Induces β-Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Ex vivo Infection with Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steven B.; Prior, Alison; Ellis, Samuel J.; Cook, Vivienne; Chan, Simon S. M.; Gelson, William; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen in the developed world and can cause life-threatening disease particularly in children. EHEC persists in the human gut by adhering intimately to colonic epithelium and forming characteristic attaching/effacing lesions. In this study, we investigated the innate immune response to EHEC infection with particular focus on antimicrobial peptide and protein expression by colonic epithelium. Using a novel human colonic biopsy model and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells, we found that EHEC infection induced expression of human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), whereas hBD1, hBD3, LL-37, and lysozyme remained unchanged. Infection with specific EHEC deletion mutants demonstrated that this was dependent on flagellin, and apical exposure to purified flagellin was sufficient to stimulate hBD2 and also interleukin (IL)-8 expression ex vivo and in vitro. Flagellin-mediated hBD2 induction was significantly reduced by inhibitors of NF-κB, MAP kinase p38 and JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, IL-8 secretion by polarized T84 cells was vectorial depending on the side of stimulation, and apical exposure to EHEC or flagellin resulted in apical IL-8 release. Our results demonstrate that EHEC only induces a modest immune response in human colonic epithelium characterized by flagellin-dependent induction of hBD2 and low levels of IL-8. PMID:27446815

  3. Refinement of treatment strategies in ex vivo T-cell-depleted haploidentical SCT for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Im, H J; Koh, K N; Suh, J K; Lee, S W; Choi, E S; Jang, S; Kwon, S W; Park, C-J; Seo, J J

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of T-cell-depleted haploidentical hematopoietic SCT (HHCT) in pediatric patients. Between July 2008 and January 2013, 28 patients underwent ex vivo T-cell-depleted HHCT; 9 had hematologic malignancy, 18 had nonmalignant hematologic disease, and 1 had refractory neuroblastoma. Twenty-six patients achieved neutrophil engraftment at a median of 11 days (range, 9-15 days). Two patients failed to achieve primary engraftment and five experienced graft rejection after primary engraftment. These seven patients achieved stable engraftment after a second HHCT. The cumulative incidences (CIs) of⩾grade II and⩾grade III acute GVHD were 33.3% and 14.3%, respectively, and the 1-year CI of extensive chronic GVHD was 11.1%. Four patients died of non-relapse-related causes (two of CMV disease, one of encephalopathy and one of autoimmune hemolytic anemia) and one of leukemia relapse. Non-relapse mortality at 100 days, 1 year and 2 years was 0.0%, 10.7% and 14.3%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 32.8 months (range, 17.0-72.5 months), the 2-year OS was 82.1%. OSs for nonmalignant diseases and malignant diseases were 94.4% and 60.0%, respectively (P=0.019). Thus, HHCT is a realistic alternative for patients with malignant or nonmalignant diseases who lack a suitable donor.

  4. Ex vivo imaging of early dental caries within the interproximal space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark D.; Dufour, Marc L.; Fulton, Crystal; Qiu, Pingli; Gauthier, Bruno; Padioleau, Christian; Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Dong, Cecilia; Cleghorn, Blaine M.; Lamouche, Guy; Sowa, Michael G.

    2009-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is emerging as a technology that can potentially be used for the detection and monitoring of early dental enamel caries since it can provide high-resolution depth imaging of early lesions. To date, most caries detection optical technologies are well suited for examining caries at facial, lingual, incisal and occlusal surfaces. The approximal surfaces between adjacent teeth are difficult to examine due to lack of visual access and limited space for these new caries detection tools. Using a catheter-style probe developed at the NRC-Industrial Materials Institute, the probe was inserted into the interproximal space to examine the approximal surfaces with OCT imaging at 1310 nm. The probe was rotated continuously and translated axially to generate depth images in a spiral fashion. The probe was used in a mock tooth arch model consisting of extracted human teeth mounted with dental rope wax in their anatomically correct positions. With this ex vivo model, the probe provided images of the approximal surfaces revealing morphological structural details, regions of calculus, and especially regions of early dental caries (white spot lesions). Results were compared with those obtained from OCT imaging of individual samples where the approximal surfaces of extracted teeth are accessible on a lab-bench. Issues regarding access, regions of interest, and factors to be considered in an in vivo setting will be discussed. Future studies are aimed at using the probe in vivo with patient volunteers.

  5. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  6. Odorant Metabolism Analysis by an Automated Ex Vivo Headspace Gas-Chromatography Method.

    PubMed

    Faure, Philippe; Legendre, Arièle; Hanser, Hassan-Ismail; Andriot, Isabelle; Artur, Yves; Guichard, Elisabeth; Coureaud, Gérard; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), odorant metabolizing enzymes have the dual function of volatile component detoxification and active clearance of odorants from the perireceptor environment to respectively maintain the integrity of the tissues and the sensitivity of the detection. Although emphasized by recent studies, this enzymatic mechanism is poorly documented in mammals. Thus, olfactory metabolism has been characterized mainly in vitro and for a limited number of odorants. The automated ex vivo headspace gas-chromatography method that was developed here was validated to account for odorant olfactory metabolism. This method easily permits the measurement of the fate of an odorant in the OE environment, taking into account the odorant gaseous state and the cellular structure of the tissue, under experimental conditions close to physiological conditions and with a high reproducibility. We confirmed here our previous results showing that a high olfactory metabolizing activity of the mammary pheromone may be necessary to maintain a high level of sensitivity toward this molecule, which is critical for newborn rabbit survival. More generally, the method that is presented here may permit the screening of odorants metabolism alone or in mixture or studying the impact of aging, pathology, polymorphism or inhibitors on odorant metabolism. PMID:26446453

  7. Blind source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral images.

    PubMed

    Galeano, July; Perez, Sandra; Montoya, Yonatan; Botina, Deivid; Garzón, Johnson

    2015-05-01

    Blind Source Separation methods (BSS) aim for the decomposition of a given signal in its main components or source signals. Those techniques have been widely used in the literature for the analysis of biomedical images, in order to extract the main components of an organ or tissue under study. The analysis of skin images for the extraction of melanin and hemoglobin is an example of the use of BSS. This paper presents a proof of concept of the use of source separation of ex-vivo aorta tissue multispectral Images. The images are acquired with an interference filter-based imaging system. The images are processed by means of two algorithms: Independent Components analysis and Non-negative Matrix Factorization. In both cases, it is possible to obtain maps that quantify the concentration of the main chromophores present in aortic tissue. Also, the algorithms allow for spectral absorbance of the main tissue components. Those spectral signatures were compared against the theoretical ones by using correlation coefficients. Those coefficients report values close to 0.9, which is a good estimator of the method's performance. Also, correlation coefficients lead to the identification of the concentration maps according to the evaluated chromophore. The results suggest that Multi/hyper-spectral systems together with image processing techniques is a potential tool for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue. PMID:26137366

  8. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Jaedicke, Volker; Stroop, Ralf; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2015-07-01

    Non-contact imaging methods to distinguish between healthy tissue and brain tumor tissue during surgery would be highly desirable but are not yet available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technology with a resolution around 1-15 μm and a penetration depth of 1-2 mm that may satisfy the demands. To analyze its potential, we measured ex vivo human brain tumor tissue samples from 10 patients with a Spectral Domain OCT system (Thorlabs Callisto: center wavelength of 930 nm) and compared the results with standard histology. In detail, three different measurements were made for each sample. First the sample was measured directly after surgery. Then it was embedded in paraffin (also H and E staining) and examined for the second time. At last, the slices of each paraffin block cut by the pathology were measured. Each time a B-scan was created and for a better comparison with the histology a 3D image was generated, in order to get the corresponding en face images. In both, histopathological diagnosis and the analysis of the OCT images, different types of brain tumor showed difference in structure. This has been affirmed by two blinded investigators. Nevertheless the difference between two images of samples taken directly after surgery is less distinct. To enhance the contrast in the images further, we employ Spectroscopic OCT and pattern recognition algorithms and compare these results to the histopathological standard.

  9. Elastic Cherenkov effects in transversely isotropic soft materials-II: Ex vivo and in vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Yang; He, Qiong; Qian, Lin-Xue; Geng, Huiying; Liu, Yanlin; Yang, Xue-Yi; Luo, Jianwen; Cao, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    In part I of this study, we investigated the elastic Cherenkov effect (ECE) in an incompressible transversely isotropic (TI) soft solid using a combined theoretical and computational approach, based on which an inverse method has been proposed to measure both the anisotropic and hyperelastic parameters of TI soft tissues. In this part, experiments were carried out to validate the inverse method and demonstrate its usefulness in practical measurements. We first performed ex vivo experiments on bovine skeletal muscles. Not only the shear moduli along and perpendicular to the direction of muscle fibers but also the elastic modulus EL and hyperelastic parameter c2 were determined. We next carried out tensile tests to determine EL, which was compared with the value obtained using the shear wave elastography method. Furthermore, we conducted in vivo experiments on the biceps brachii and gastrocnemius muscles of ten healthy volunteers. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first attempt to determine EL of human muscles using the dynamic elastography method and inverse analysis. The significance of our method and its potential for clinical use are discussed.

  10. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions.

    PubMed

    Salas, Nelson; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J; Denham, David B; Minhaj, Ahmed M; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S

    2004-05-01

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 degrees C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 x 10(3) mm3) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  11. Nerve damage assessment following implant placement in human cadaver jaws: an ex vivo comparative study.

    PubMed

    Murat, Sema; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Kılıç, Cenk; Ozen, Tuncer; Gurbuz, Ayhan

    2014-02-01

    The present study compared the use of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images and intra-oral radiographs in the placement of final implant drills in terms of nerve damage to cadaver mandibles. Twelve cadaver hemimandibles obtained from 6 cadavers were used. Right hemimandibles were imaged using peri-apical radiography and left hemimandibles using CBCT, and the images obtained were used in treatment planning for the placement of implant drills (22 for each modality, for a total of 44 final drills). Specimens were dissected, and the distances between the apex of the final implant drill and the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle and incisive nerve were measured using a digital calliper. Nerves were assessed as damaged or not damaged, and the Chi-square test was used to compare nerve damage between modalities (P < 0.05). Nerve damage occurred with 7 final drills placed based on peri-apical radiography (31.8%) and 1 final drill placed using CBCT images (4.5%). The difference in nerve damage between imaging modalities was statistically significant (P = 0.023), with CBCT outperforming intraoral film in the placement of final implant drills ex vivo. In order to prevent nerve damage, CBCT is recommended as the principal imaging modality for pre-implant assessment. PMID:22150347

  12. Optical assessment of tissue anisotropy in ex vivo distended rat bladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Sanaz; Aitken, Karen J.; Shröder, Annette; Bagli, Darius J.; Alex Vitkin, I.

    2012-08-01

    Microstructural remodelling in epithelial layers of various hollow organs, including changes in tissue anisotropy, are known to occur under mechanical distension and during disease processes. In this paper, we analyze how bladder distension alters wall anisotropy using polarized light imaging (followed by Mueller matrix decomposition). Optical retardance values of different regions of normal rat bladders under different distension pressures are derived. Then optical coherence tomography is used to measure local bladder wall thicknesses, enabling the calculation of the tissue birefringence maps as a measure of the tissue anisotropy. Selected two-photon microscopy is also performed to better understand the compositional origins of the obtained anisotropy results. The dome region of the bladder shows maximum birefringence when the bladder is distended to high pressures, whereas the ventral remains roughly isotropic during distension. In addition, the average anisotropy direction is longitudinal, along the urethra to dome. The derived wall anisotropy trends are based on birefringence as an intrinsic property of the tissue organization independent of its thickness, to aid in understanding the structure-functions relation in healthy bladders. These new insights into the wall microstructure of ex vivo distending bladders may help improve the functionality of the artificially engineered bladder tissues.

  13. Furosemide Loaded Silica-Lipid Hybrid Microparticles: Formulation Development, in vitro and ex vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sambaraj, Swapna; Ammula, Divya; Nagabandi, Vijaykumar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of the current research work was to formulate and evaluate furosemide loaded silica lipid hybrid microparticles for improved oral delivery. A novel silica-lipid hybrid microparticulate system is used for enhancing the oral absorption of low solubility and low permeability of (BCS Class IV) drugs. Silica-lipid hybrid microparticles include the drug solubilising effect of dispersed lipids and stabilizing effect of hydrophilic silica particles to increase drug solubilisation, which leads to enhanced oral bioavailability. Methods: The slica lipid hybrid (SLH) microparticles were composed of poorly soluble drug (furosemide), dispersion of oil phase (Soya bean oil and miglyol) in lecithin (Phospholipoid 90H), non-ionic surfactant (Polysorbate 80) and adsorbent (Aerosol 380). Saturation solubility studies were performed in different oils and surfactants with increased concentration of drug revealed increased solubility of furosemide. Results: In vitro dissolution studies conducted under simulated gastric medium revealed 2-4 fold increase in dissolution efficiencies for SLH microparticles compared to that of pure drug (furosemide) and marketed formulation Lasix®. Ex vivo studies showed enhanced lipid digestibility, which improved drug permeability. Solid-state characterization of SLH microparticles by X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis confirmed non-crystalline nature and more compatibility of furosemide in silica-lipid hybrid microparticles. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the role of lipids and hydrophilic silica based carrier highlighted in enhancing solubility and permeability, and hence the oral bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:26504763

  14. In vitro and ex vivo activity of peptide deformylase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshika; Sharma, Sadhna; Khuller, G K; Kanwar, A J

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyses removal of the N-terminal formyl group of proteins and is essential for protein maturation, growth and survival of bacteria. Thus, PDF appears to be a good antimycobacterial drug target. In the present study, various well-known PDF inhibitors, such as BB-3497, actinonin, 1,10-phenanthroline, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and galardin, were selected to evaluate their inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. All compounds were found to be active against M. tuberculosis, with MIC(90) values (lowest drug concentration at which 90% of growth was inhibited on the basis of CFU enumeration) ranging from 0.2 mg/L to 74 mg/L. BB-3497 and 1,10-phenanthroline exhibited potent in vitro antimycobacterial activity, and also showed synergism with isoniazid and rifampicin. All compounds showed a bacteriostatic mode of inhibition. Under ex vivo conditions and short-course chemotherapy, BB-3497 and actinonin were found to be significantly active, with BB-3497 exhibiting comparable efficacy to that of isoniazid. Collectively, promising activities of PDF inhibitors such as BB-3497 and actinonin suggest their potential use against M. tuberculosis.

  15. Bridging the gap: functional healing of embryonic small intestine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Riccardo; Roberts, Neil A; Oltrabella, Francesca; Khalil, Basem A; Morabito, Antonino; Woolf, Adrian S

    2016-02-01

    The ability to grow embryonic organs ex vivo provides an opportunity to follow their differentiation in a controlled environment, with resulting insights into normal development. Additionally, similar strategies can be used to assess effects on organogenesis of physical and chemical manipulations. This study aimed to create an organ culture model with which to test physical manipulations to enhance healing of gut segments, thus generating a single functional organ. Embryonic mouse jejunum was isolated and cut into 2-3 mm tubes, which were placed in pairs, separated by a small gap, on semi-permeable supports. Each pair was linked by a nylon suture threaded through their lumens. After 3 days in organ culture fed by defined serum-free media, the rudiments differentiated to form tubes of smooth muscle surrounding a core of rudimentary villi. Of 34 such pairs, 74% had touching and well aligned proximate ends. Of these joined structures, 80% (59% of the total pairs) had a continuous lumen, as assessed by observing the trajectories of fluorescent dextrans injected into their distal ends. Fused organ pairs formed a single functional unit, as assessed by spontaneous contraction waves propagated along their lengths. In these healed intestines, peripherin(+) neurons formed a nexus in the zone of fusion, linking the rudiment pairs. In future, this system could be used to test whether growth factors enhance fusion. Such results should in turn inform the design of novel treatments for short bowel syndrome, a potentially fatal condition with a currently limited and imperfect range of therapies.

  16. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26185756

  17. Long-term ex vivo maintenance of testis tissues producing fertile sperm in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Komeya, Mitsuru; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroko; Yokonishi, Tetsuhiro; Sato, Takuya; Kojima, Kazuaki; Hayashi, Kazuaki; Katagiri, Kumiko; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Sanjo, Hiroyuki; Yao, Masahiro; Kamimura, Satoshi; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Ogura, Atsuo; Fujii, Teruo; Ogawa, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to cell cultures, particularly to cell lines, tissues or organs removed from the body cannot be maintained for long in any culture conditions. Although it is apparent that in vivo regional homeostasis is facilitated by the microvascular system, mimicking such a system ex vivo is difficult and has not been proved effective. Using the culture system of mouse spermatogenesis, we addressed this issue and devised a simple microfluidic device in which a porous membrane separates a tissue from the flowing medium, conceptually imitating the in vivo relationship between the microvascular flow and surrounding tissue. Testis tissues cultured in this device successfully maintained spermatogenesis for 6 months. The produced sperm were functional to generate healthy offspring with micro-insemination. In addition, the tissue kept producing testosterone and responded to stimulation by luteinizing hormone. These data suggest that the microfluidic device successfully created in vivo-like conditions, in which testis tissue maintained its physiologic functions and homeostasis. The present model of the device, therefore, would provide a valuable foundation of future improvement of culture conditions for various tissues and organs, and revolutionize the organ culture method as a whole. PMID:26892171

  18. In vivo, Ex Vivo, and In Vitro Approaches to Study Intermediate Filaments in the Eye Lens.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Miguel; Young, Laura; Wu, Weiju; Girkin, John M; Quinlan, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    The role of the eye lens is to focus light into the retina. To perform this unique function, the ocular lens must be transparent. Previous studies have demonstrated the expression of vimentin, BFSP1, and BFSP2 in the eye lens. These intermediate filament (IF) proteins are essential to the optical properties of the lens. They are also important to its biomechanical properties, to the shape of the lens fiber cells, and to the organization and function of the plasma membrane. The eye lens is an iconic model in developmental studies, as a result different vertebrate models, including zebrafish, have been developed to study lens formation. In the present chapter, we have summarized the new approaches and the more breakthrough models (e.g., iPSc) that can be used to study the function of IFs in the ocular lens. We have presented three different groups of models. The first group includes in vitro models, where IFs can be studied and manipulated in lens cell cultures. The second includes ex vivo models. These replicate better the complex lens cell differentiation processes and the role(s) played by IFs. The third class is the in vivo models, and here, we have focused on Zebrafish and new imaging approaches using selective plane illumination microscopy. Finally, we present protocols on how to use these lens models to study IFs.

  19. Effect of cord blood serum on ex vivo human limbal epithelial cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anindita; Dutta, Jayanta; Das, Sumantra; Datta, Himadri

    2012-12-01

    Limbal cell transplantation is an efficacious procedure for rehabilitation of visual acuity in patients with severe ocular surface disorders. Cultivation of limbal epithelial stem cell with fetal bovine serum for transplantation has been a promising treatment for reconstructing the ocular surface in severe limbal stem cell deficiency caused by Steven Johnson syndrome, chemical or thermal injury. This technique of "cell therapy" has been accepted worldwide but the cost of cultivating the cells for transplantation is high. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cord blood serum in place of fetal bovine serum on the growth of human limbal epithelial cell culture. Our group has experimented with human cord blood serum which was obtained free of cost from willing donors. The use of human cord blood serum in place of fetal bovine serum for ex vivo culture of limbal stem cell has helped us in reducing the cost of culture. Fresh human limbal tissues from donor cadavers were cultured on intact and denuded amniotic membrane. Cells were proliferated in vitro with cell culture media containing human cord blood serum. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence cytochemistry of cultured human limbal epithelial stem cell was done for characterization of the cells.

  20. Generation of islet-like cells from mouse gall bladder by direct ex vivo reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Raymond D; Galivo, Feorillo; Schug, Jonathan; Brehm, Michael A; Haft, Annelise; Wang, Yuhan; Benedetti, Eric; Gu, Guoqiang; Magnuson, Mark A; Shultz, Leonard D; Lagasse, Eric; Greiner, Dale L; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Cell replacement is an emerging therapy for type 1 diabetes. Pluripotent stem cells have received a lot of attention as a potential source of transplantable β-cells, but their ability to form teratomas poses significant risks. Here, we evaluated the potential of primary mouse gall bladder epithelial cells (GBCs) as targets for ex vivo genetic reprogramming to the β-cell fate. Conditions for robust expansion and genetic transduction of primary GBCs by adenoviral vectors were developed. Using a GFP reporter for insulin, conditions for reprogramming were then optimized. Global expression analysis by RNA-sequencing was used to quantitatively compare reprogrammed GBCs (rGBCs) to true β-cells, revealing both similarities and differences. Adenoviral-mediated expression of NEUROG3, Pdx1, and MafA in GBCs resulted in robust induction of pancreatic endocrine genes, including Ins1, Ins2, Neurod1, Nkx2-2 and Isl1. Furthermore, expression of GBC-specific genes was repressed, including Sox17 and Hes1. Reprogramming was also enhanced by addition of retinoic acid and inhibition of Notch signaling. Importantly, rGBCs were able to engraft long term in vivo and remained insulin-positive for 15 weeks. We conclude that GBCs are a viable source for autologous cell replacement in diabetes, but that complete reprogramming will require further manipulations. PMID:23562832

  1. Odorant Metabolism Analysis by an Automated Ex Vivo Headspace Gas-Chromatography Method.

    PubMed

    Faure, Philippe; Legendre, Arièle; Hanser, Hassan-Ismail; Andriot, Isabelle; Artur, Yves; Guichard, Elisabeth; Coureaud, Gérard; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), odorant metabolizing enzymes have the dual function of volatile component detoxification and active clearance of odorants from the perireceptor environment to respectively maintain the integrity of the tissues and the sensitivity of the detection. Although emphasized by recent studies, this enzymatic mechanism is poorly documented in mammals. Thus, olfactory metabolism has been characterized mainly in vitro and for a limited number of odorants. The automated ex vivo headspace gas-chromatography method that was developed here was validated to account for odorant olfactory metabolism. This method easily permits the measurement of the fate of an odorant in the OE environment, taking into account the odorant gaseous state and the cellular structure of the tissue, under experimental conditions close to physiological conditions and with a high reproducibility. We confirmed here our previous results showing that a high olfactory metabolizing activity of the mammary pheromone may be necessary to maintain a high level of sensitivity toward this molecule, which is critical for newborn rabbit survival. More generally, the method that is presented here may permit the screening of odorants metabolism alone or in mixture or studying the impact of aging, pathology, polymorphism or inhibitors on odorant metabolism.

  2. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging and Intravascular Ultrasound: Co-Registration Study Using Ex Vivo Human Coronaries

    PubMed Central

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has demonstrated potential for robust assessment of atherosclerotic plaques biochemical composition and for complementing conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides information on plaque morphology. The success of such a bi-modal imaging modality depends on accurate segmentation of the IVUS images and proper angular registration between these two modalities. This paper reports a novel IVUS segmentation methodology addressing this issue. The image preprocessing consisted of denoising, using the Wiener filter, followed by image smoothing, implemented through the application of the alternating sequential filter on the edge separability metric images. Extraction of the lumen/intima and media/adventitia boundaries was achieved by tracing the gray-scale peaks over the A-lines of the IVUS preprocessed images. Cubic spline interpolation, in both cross-sectional and longitudinal directions, ensured boundary smoothness and continuity. The detection of the guide-wire artifact in both modalities is used for angular registration. Intraluminal studies were conducted in 13 ex vivo segments of human coronaries. The IVUS segmentation accuracy was assessed against independent manual tracings, providing 91.82% sensitivity and 97.55% specificity. The proposed methodology makes the bi-modal FLIM and IVUS approach feasible for comprehensive intravascular diagnosis by providing co-registered biochemical and morphological information of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25163056

  3. Biomarkers in bladder cancer: A metabolomic approach using in vitro and ex vivo model systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Belo, Luís; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Carvalho, Márcia

    2016-07-15

    Metabolomics has recently proved to be useful in the area of biomarker discovery for cancers in which early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed, as is the case of bladder cancer (BC). This article presents a comprehensive review of the literature on the metabolomic studies on BC, highlighting metabolic pathways perturbed in this disease and the altered metabolites as potential biomarkers for BC detection. Current disease model systems used in the study of BC metabolome include in vitro-cultured cancer cells, ex vivo neoplastic bladder tissues and biological fluids, mainly urine but also blood serum/plasma, from BC patients. The major advantages and drawbacks of each model system are discussed. Based on available data, it seems that BC metabolic signature is mainly characterized by alterations in metabolites related to energy metabolic pathways, particularly glycolysis, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, known to be crucial for cell proliferation, as well as glutathione metabolism, known to be determinant in maintaining cellular redox balance. In addition, purine and pyrimidine metabolism as well as carnitine species were found to be altered in BC. Finally, it is emphasized that, despite the progress made in respect to novel biomarkers for BC diagnosis, there are still some challenges and limitations that should be addressed in future metabolomic studies to ensure their translatability to clinical practice. PMID:26804544

  4. [Use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for ex vivo cartilage regeneration].

    PubMed

    Grässel, S; Ahmed, N

    2007-03-01

    Articular cartilage disorders and injuries often result in lifelong chronic pain and compromised quality of life. When it comes to local articular cartilage defects, modern medicine is limited to short-term pain relief and inflammation control. In extreme cases the affected tissue is surgically removed and replaced by a synthetic prosthesis of limited durability. Cell-based therapies to regenerate articular cartilage have been in use since 1994. Such therapies provide a healthy population of cells to the injured site and require differentiated chondrocytes from the uninjured site as base material. Their usage often leads to donor site morbidity and they generate rigid fibrous cartilage where more flexible hyaline cartilage is required. The major restrictive factors for such methods are inadequate number and limited proliferation capacity of chondrocytes in vitro. Tissue engineering of adult marrow stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with their almost unlimited proliferation potential and proven capability to differentiate into chondrocytes for ex vivo generation of cartilage tissue still remains a vision. For optimal harnessing of MSCs as chondroprogenitor cells, basic background information regarding commitment to the lineage, cartilage differentiation and the regulatory factors and molecules involved is essential.

  5. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic plaques: ex-vivo study using a rabbit model of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, S.; Mallidi, S.; Aglyamov, S. R.; Amirian, J. H.; Litovsky, S.; Smalling, R. W.; Emelianov, S. Y.

    2007-02-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis necessitates the detection and differentiation of rupture prone plaques. In principle, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has the ability to simultaneously visualize the structure and composition of atherosclerotic plaques by utilizing the difference in optical absorption. Extensive studies are required to validate the utility of IVPA imaging in detecting vulnerable plaques and address issues associated with the clinical implementation of the technique. In this work, we performed ex vivo imaging studies using a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. The intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) images of the normal aorta and aorta with plaque were obtained and compared with histological slices of the tissue. The results indicate that IVPA imaging is capable of detecting plaques and showed potential in determining the composition. Furthermore, we initially addressed several aspects of clinical implementation of the IVPA imaging. Specifically, the configuration of combined IVPA and IVUS catheter was investigated and the effect of the optical absorption of the luminal blood on the IVPA image quality was evaluated. Overall, this study suggests that IVPA imaging can become a unique and important clinical tool.

  6. Ex Vivo Assessment of a Parabolic-Tip Inflow Cannula for Pediatric Continuous-Flow VADs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael T; Grzywinski, Matthew F; Voorhees, Hannah J; Kameneva, Marina V; Olia, Salim E

    2016-01-01

    To address the challenge of unloading the left ventricle during pediatric mechanical circulatory support using next-generation rotary blood pumps, a novel inflow cannula was developed. This unique inflow cannula for pediatric, continuous-flow, left ventricular assist devices (VADs) with a parabolic-shaped inlet entrance was evaluated alongside a bevel-tip and fenestrated-tip cannula via an ex vivo, isolated-heart experimental setup. Performance was characterized using two clinical scenarios of over-pumping and hypovolemia, created by varying pump speed and filling preload pressure, respectively, at ideal and off-axis cannula placement to assess ventricular unloading and positional sensitivity. Quantitative and qualitative assessments were performed on the resultant hemodynamics and intra-ventricular boroscopic images to classify conditions of nonsuction, partial, gradual or severe entrainment, and ventricular collapse. The parabolic-tip cannula was found to be significantly less sensitive to placement position (p < 0.001) than the bevel-tip cannula under all conditions, while not statistically different from the fenestrated cannula. Visual analysis of the parabolic-tip cannula showed complete resistance to entrainment, whereas the fenestrated-tip had partial entrainment in 90% and 87% of the over-pumping and hypovolemic studies, respectively. We conclude that future pediatric VAD designs may benefit from incorporating the parabolic-tip inflow cannula design to maximize unloading of the left ventricle in ideal and nonoptimal conditions.

  7. Prostate Cryotherapy Monitoring Using Vibroacoustography: Preliminary Results of an Ex Vivo Study and Technical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian J.; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James F.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Mynderse, Lance A.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research is to prospectively evaluate the feasibility of vibroacoustography (VA) imaging in monitoring prostate cryotherapy in an ex vivo model. Baseline scanning of an excised human prostate is accomplished by a VA system apparatus in a tank of degassed water. Alcohol and dry ice mixture are used to freeze two prostate tissue samples. The frozen prostates are subsequently placed within the water tank at 27°C and rescanned. VA images were acquired at prescribed time intervals to characterize the acoustic properties of the partially frozen tissue. The frozen prostate tissue appears in the images as hypoemitting signal. Once the tissue thaws, previously frozen regions show coarser texture than prior to freezing. The margin of the frozen tissue is delineated with a well-defined rim. The thawed cryolesions show a different contrast compared with normal unfrozen prostate. In conclusion, this pilot study shows that VA produces clear images of a frozen prostate at different temperature stages. The frozen tissue appears as a uniform region with well-defined borders that are readily identified. These characteristic images should allow safer and more efficient application of prostatic cryosurgery. These results provide substantial motivation to further investigate VA as a potential modality to monitor prostate cryotherapy intraoperatively. PMID:18990628

  8. Biosafety in Ex Vivo Gene Therapy and Conditional Ablation of Lentivirally Transduced Hepatocytes in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Olivier; Birraux, Jacques; Wildhaber, Barbara E; Jond, Caty; Lasne, Françoise; Habre, Walid; Trono, Didier; Nguyen, Tuan H; Chardot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy is an interesting alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for treating metabolic liver diseases. In this study, we investigated its efficacy and biosafety in nonhuman primates. Hepatocytes isolated from liver lobectomy were transduced in suspension with a bicistronic liver-specific lentiviral vector and immediately autotransplanted (SLIT) into three cynomolgus monkeys. The vector encoded cynomolgus erythropoietin (EPO) and the conditional suicide gene herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). Survival of transduced hepatocytes and vector dissemination were evaluated by detecting transgene expression and vector DNA. SLIT was safely performed within a day in all three subjects. Serum EPO and hematocrit rapidly increased post-SLIT and their values returned to baseline within about 1 month. Isoforms of EPO detected in monkeys' sera differed from the physiological renal EPO. In liver biopsies at months 8 and 15, we detected EPO protein, vector mRNA and DNA, demonstrating long-term survival and functionality of transplanted lentivirally transduced hepatocytes. Valganciclovir administration resulted in complete ablation of the transduced hepatocytes. We demonstrated the feasibility and biosafety of SLIT, and the long term (>1 year) functionality of lentivirally transduced hepatocytes in nonhuman primates. The HSV-TK/valganciclovir suicide strategy can increase the biosafety of liver gene therapy protocols by safely and completely ablating transduced hepatocytes on demand. PMID:19568222

  9. Engineering a human bone marrow model: a case study on ex vivo erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Mantalaris, A; Keng, P; Bourne, P; Chang, A Y; Wu, J H

    1998-01-01

    Bone marrow, with its intricate, three-dimensional tissue structure facilitating cell-cell interactions, provides a microenvironment supporting the production of hundreds of billions of multilineal blood cells everyday. We have developed a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system in which marrow cells are cultured in a reactor packed with porous microspheres. The culture supports a three-dimensional growth configuration and multilineal hemopoiesis mimicking the bone marrow in vivo. We studied ex vivo human erythropoiesis using the three-dimensional culture system. The system sustained extensive erythropoiesis at low erythropoietin concentrations (0.2 U/mL), plus stem cell factor, interleukin-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and insulin-like growth factor-I. Erythroid cell production lasted for more than 5 weeks, and the percentage of erythroid cells in the nonadherent cell population was approximately 60%. Flow cytometric analysis using cell surface markers specific for erythroid cells (CD71 and glycophorin-A) indicated that the culture produced early, intermediate, and late erythroid cells. As the culture progressed, the erythroid cell population shifted gradually toward mature cell types. When compared to the three-dimensional culture, the traditional flask cultures failed to support extensive erythropoiesis under the same conditions. This indicates that the three-dimensional bone marrow culture system provides a microenvironment conducive to erythropoiesis under more physiological conditions and is a better bone marrow model.

  10. CRITICAL ROLE OF ACROLEIN IN SECONDARY INJURY FOLLOWING EX VIVO SPINAL CORD TRAUMA

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Kristin; Durkes, Abigail; Ouyang, Hui; Pond, Amber

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the initial, primary injury followed by secondary injury processes in which oxidative stress is a critical component. Secondary injury processes not only exacerbate pathology at the site of primary injury, but also result in spreading of injuries to the adjacent, otherwise healthy tissue. The lipid peroxidation byproduct acrolein has been implicated as one potential mediator of secondary injury. In order to further and rigorously elucidate the role of acrolein in secondary injury, a unique ex vivo model is utilized to isolate the detrimental effects of mechanical injury from toxins such as acrolein that are produced endogenously following SCI. We demonstrate that: 1) acrolein-lys adducts are capable of diffusing from compressed tissue to adjacent, otherwise uninjured tissue; 2) secondary injury by itself produces significant membrane damage and increased superoxide production; and 3) these injuries are significantly attenuated by the acrolein scavenger hydralazine. Furthermore, hydralazine treatment results in significantly less membrane damage 2 hours following compression injury, but not immediately after. These findings support our hypothesis that, following SCI, acrolein is increased to pathologic concentrations, contributes significantly to secondary injury, and thus represents a novel target for scavenging to promote improved recovery. PMID:18710419

  11. Ex vivo absorption of thymol and thymol-β-D-glucopyranoside in piglet everted jejunal segments.

    PubMed

    Petrujkić, Branko T; Sedej, Ivana; Beier, Ross C; Anderson, Robin C; Harvey, Roger B; Epps, Sharon V R; Stipanovic, Robert D; Krueger, Nathan A; Nisbet, David J

    2013-04-17

    Food-producing animals are reservoirs of Campylobacter, a leading bacterial cause of human foodborne illness. The natural product thymol can reduce the survivability of Campylobacter, but its rapid absorption in the proximal gastrointestinal tract may preclude its use as a feed additive to reduce intestinal colonization of these pathogens. This work examined the ex vivo absorption of thymol and thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside in everted porcine jejunal segments, as the latter was hypothesized to be more resistant to absorption. A modified gas chromatography and extraction method was developed to determine 1.0-500 mg/L thymol. From 1 and 3 mM solutions, 0.293 ± 0.04 and 0.898 ± 0.212 mM thymol, respectively, p = 0.0347, were absorbed, and 0.125 ± 0.041 and 0.317 ± 0.143 mM thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside, respectively, p = 0.0892, were absorbed. Results indicate that thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside was absorbed 2.3 to 2.8 times less effectively than thymol, thus providing evidence that thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside may potentially be used as a feed additive to transport thymol to the piglet lower gut. PMID:23551201

  12. Long Term Ex Vivo Culture and Live Imaging of Drosophila Larval Imaginal Discs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Ming; Huang, Yu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Continuous imaging of live tissues provides clear temporal sequence of biological events. The Drosophila imaginal discs have been popular experimental subjects for the study of a wide variety of biological phenomena, but long term culture that allows normal development has not been satisfactory. Here we report a culture method that can sustain normal development for 18 hours and allows live imaging. The method is validated in multiple discs and for cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. However, it does not support disc growth and cannot support cell proliferation for more than 7 to 12 hr. We monitored the cellular behavior of retinal basal glia in the developing eye disc and found that distinct glia type has distinct properties of proliferation and migration. The live imaging provided direct proof that wrapping glia differentiated from existing glia after migrating to the anterior front, and unexpectedly found that they undergo endoreplication before wrapping axons, and their nuclei migrate up and down along the axons. UV-induced specific labeling of a single carpet glia also showed that the two carpet glia membrane do not overlap and suggests a tiling or repulsion mechanism between the two cells. These findings demonstrated the usefulness of an ex vivo culture method and live imaging. PMID:27685172

  13. Detection of Calcifications In Vivo and Ex Vivo After Brain Injury in Rat Using SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Sierra, Alejandra; Corum, Curtis Andrew; Zhang, Jinjin; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Pitkänen, Asla; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Calcifications represent one component of pathology in many brain diseases. With MRI, they are most often detected by exploiting negative contrast in magnitude images. Calcifications are more diamagnetic than tissue, leading to a magnetic field disturbance that can be seen in phase MR images. Most phase imaging studies use gradient recalled echo based pulse sequences. Here, the phase component of SWIFT, a virtually zero acquisition delay sequence, was used to detect calcifications ex vivo and in vivo in rat models of status epilepticus and traumatic brain injury. Calcifications were detected in phase and imaginary SWIFT images based on their dipole like magnetic field disturbances. In magnitude SWIFT images, calcifications were distinguished as hypointense and hyperintense. Hypointense calcifications showed large crystallized granules with few surrounding inflammatory cells, while hyperintense calcifications contained small granules with the presence of more inflammatory cells. The size of the calcifications in SWIFT magnitude images correlated with that in Alizarin stained histological sections. Our data indicate that SWIFT is likely to better preserve signal in the proximity of a calcification or other field perturber in comparison to gradient echo due to its short acquisition delay and broad excitation bandwidth. Furthermore, a quantitative description for the phase contrast near dipole magnetic field inhomogeneities for the SWIFT pulse sequence is given. In vivo detection of calcifications provides a tool to probe the progression of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, it appears to provide a surrogate marker for inflammatory cells around the calcifications after brain injury. PMID:22425671

  14. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26241918

  15. Comparison of ex vivo cultivated human limbal epithelial stem cell viability and proliferation on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anindita; Dutta, Jayanta; Das, Sumantra; Datta, Himadri

    2013-12-01

    Ocular surface injury causes serious vision-related problems especially when limbal stem cells are affected. Treatment lies in the transplantation of viable donor cells. Various substrates are used for the cultivation of limbal epithelial stem cells. In the present study, viability and proliferation of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial stem cells were examined on a variety of substrates like collagen type IV, direct plastic Petri plate, intact amniotic membrane and denuded amniotic membrane. Viability and proliferation of cells were examined by colorimetric assay and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation study. Furthermore, matrix metalloproteinase is known to be a key regulator in stem cell migration and proliferation. This enzyme activity was studied by gelatinolytic zymography. It was found from this study that although human limbal epithelial stem cells could be cultivated on different substrates such as collagen type IV, direct plastic Petri plate, intact amniotic membrane and denuded amniotic membrane, maximum growth and proliferation was observed when cultured on intact amniotic membrane. The number of patients suffering from limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency is large compared to donor tissues available for transplantation. Hence, increased cell viability and proliferation is required to serve more patients.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction by pro-oxidant vanadium: ex vivo assessment of individual susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Visalli, Giuseppa; Bertuccio, Maria Paola; Picerno, Isa; Spataro, Pasquale; Di Pietro, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the individual susceptibility to mitochondrial impairment induced by ex vivo exposure to vanadium, an airborne pro-oxidant pollutant. In lymphocyte cultures V(IV)-treated of forty-five healthy subjects, we evaluated the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) and the H2O2 in comparison to background values. As variables, we included both lifestyle factors and genetic polymorphisms (GSTM1 and GSTT1 variants, and C677T and A1298C variants of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase MTHFR). H2O2 mitochondrial content increased significantly (P<0.05) after metal exposure while, in comparison to basal Δψm, both depolarisation and hyperpolarisation were recorded. This underlined the mitochondrial dysfunction vanadium-induced that worsens the redox imbalance by endogenous ROS overproduction. Only age was found to contribute significantly to the high inter-individual variability, as assessed by multivariate analysis. In older subjects, the H2O2/Δψm values underline the organelle impairment and, under V-exposure, Δψm values were inversely related to age (R=-0.591; P=0.012).

  17. Functionally competent eosinophils differentiated ex vivo in high purity from normal mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kimberly D.; Moser, Jennifer M.; Czapiga, Meggan; Siegel, Steven J.; Percopo, Caroline M.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    We have devised an ex vivo culture system which generates large numbers of eosinophils at high purity (>90%) from unselected mouse bone marrow progenitors. In response to four days of culture with recombinant mouse (rm)FLT3-L and rmSCF followed by rmIL-5 alone thereafter, the resulting bone-marrow derived eosinophils (bmEos) express immunoreactive major basic protein, Siglec F, IL-5 receptor alpha chain, and transcripts encoding mouse eosinophil peroxidase, CC chemokine receptor 3, the IL-3/IL-5/GMCSF receptor common beta-chain (βc), and the transcription factor GATA-1. BmEos are functionally competent: they undergo chemotaxis toward mouse eotaxin-1 and produce characteristic cytokines, including interferon-γ, IL-4, MIP-1α and IL-6. The rodent pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) replicates in bmEos, and elevated levels of IL-6 are detected in supernatants of bmEos cultures in response to active infection. Finally, differentiating bmEos are readily transfected with lentiviral vectors, suggesting a means for rapid production of genetically manipulated cells. PMID:18768855

  18. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J.; Denham, David B.; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S.

    2004-05-01

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 °C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 × 103 mm3) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  19. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Lentivirus-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giulia; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Chan, Mario; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Brody, Steven L; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Alton, Eric W F W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis is to provide long-term correction of the genetic defect. This may be achievable by targeting airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells with an integrating vector. Here, we evaluated the ability of a lentiviral vector, derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus and pseudotyped with F and HN envelope proteins from Sendai virus, to transduce progenitor basal cells of the mouse nasal airways. We first transduced basal cell-enriched cultures ex vivo and confirmed efficient transduction of cytokeratin-5 positive cells. We next asked whether progenitor cells could be transduced in vivo. We evaluated the transduction efficiency in mice pretreated by intranasal administration of polidocanol to expose the progenitor cell layer. Compared to control mice, polidocanol treated mice demonstrated a significant increase in the number of transduced basal cells at 3 and 14 days post vector administration. At 14 days, the epithelium of treated mice contained clusters (4 to 8 adjacent cells) of well differentiated ciliated, as well as basal cells suggesting a clonal expansion. These results indicate that our lentiviral vector can transduce progenitor basal cells in vivo, although transduction required denudation of the surface epithelium prior to vector administration. PMID:26471068

  20. Ex vivo adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and immunomodulatory protein production in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Oral, H B; Larkin, D F; Fehervari, Z; Byrnes, A P; Rankin, A M; Haskard, D O; Wood, M J; Dallman, M J; George, A J

    1997-07-01

    One attractive strategy to prevent or control allograft rejection is to genetically modify the donor tissue before transplantation. In this study, we have examined the feasibility of gene transfer to human corneal endothelium, using a number of recombinant adenovirus constructs. Ex vivo infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors containing lacZ, under transcriptional control of either cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoters, provided high-level gene expression, which was largely restricted to endothelium. Expression of the reporter gene persisted at relatively high levels for up to 7 days, followed by a decline to indetectable levels by 28 days. RT-PCR analysis of lacZ transcription showed a similar picture with a short period (3-7 days) of RNA transcription after infection. In contrast, adenoviral DNA persisted for at least 56 days. Subsequently, we examined the expression of a potential therapeutic gene, CTLA-4 Ig fusion protein. Following infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors encoding CTLA-4 Ig protein, high levels of the fusion protein were detected in corneal culture supernatants for up to 28 days. This protein was functionally active, as determined by binding to B7.1 (CD80)-expressing transfectants. This study suggests that genetic alteration of donor cornea before transplantation is a feasible approach for preventing or controlling allograft rejection. Similar gene-based strategies might also be feasible to prevent rejection of other transplanted tissues or organs. PMID:9282165

  1. Antibody discovery ex vivo accelerated by the LacO/LacI regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Munehisa; Cummings, W Jason; Leppard, John B; Immormino, Robert M; Wood, Christi L; Allison, Daniel S; Gray, Patrick W; Tjoelker, Larry W; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be potent and highly specific therapeutics, diagnostics and research reagents. Nonetheless, mAb discovery using current in vivo or in vitro approaches can be costly and time-consuming, with no guarantee of success. We have established a platform for rapid discovery and optimization of mAbs ex vivo. This DTLacO platform derives from a chicken B cell line that has been engineered to enable rapid selection and seamless maturation of high affinity mAbs. We have validated the DTLacO platform by generation of high affinity and specific mAbs to five cell surface targets, the receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR2 and TIE2, the glycoprotein TROP2, the small TNF receptor family member FN14, and the G protein-coupled receptor FZD10. mAb discovery is rapid and humanization is straightforward, establishing the utility of the DTLacO platform for identification of mAbs for therapeutic and other applications. PMID:22558313

  2. Titanium dioxide nanoparticle impact and translocation through ex vivo, in vivo and in vitro gut epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TiO2 particles are commonly used as dietary supplements and may contain up to 36% of nano-sized particles (TiO2-NPs). Still impact and translocation of NPs through the gut epithelium is poorly documented. Results We show that, in vivo and ex vivo, agglomerates of TiO2-NPs cross both the regular ileum epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and alter the paracellular permeability of the ileum and colon epithelia. In vitro, they accumulate in M-cells and mucus-secreting cells, much less in enterocytes. They do not cause overt cytotoxicity or apoptosis. They translocate through a model of FAE only, but induce tight junctions remodeling in the regular ileum epithelium, which is a sign of integrity alteration and suggests paracellular passage of NPs. Finally we prove that TiO2-NPs do not dissolve when sequestered up to 24 h in gut cells. Conclusions Taken together these data prove that TiO2-NPs would possibly translocate through both the regular epithelium lining the ileum and through Peyer’s patches, would induce epithelium impairment, and would persist in gut cells where they would possibly induce chronic damage. PMID:24666995

  3. The effect of ex vivo anticoagulants on whole blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Madeleine L; Potura, Lukasz; Scharbert, Gisela; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A

    2009-02-01

    Pre- and intraoperative platelet function monitoring is increasingly recommended in order to detect risk factors for bleeding and to target coagulation management. The ideal anticoagulant for accurate platelet aggregometry remains controversial. The aim of this experimental trial was to compare platelet aggregability in whole blood stored in citrate, heparin and direct thrombin inhibitors. Whole blood was drawn from 11 healthy adult volunteers who had not taken any medication in the previous 14 days. Blood was stored in trisodium citrate, unfractionated heparin, melagatran, lepirudin and argatroban. Platelet aggregation was performed using the impedance aggregometer Multiplate (Dynabyte, Munich, Germany) with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP), collagen, arachidonic acid and ristocetin as agonists. Samples were analysed immediately after blood sampling (baseline), as well as 30 and 120 min afterwards. At baseline there were no significant differences in aggregability between samples containing direct thrombin inhibitors and heparin. In contrast, aggregation in response to all agonists except for ristocetin was significantly impaired in citrated blood. During storage the response to arachidonic acid and collagen was maintained by direct thrombin inhibitors and heparin, whereas ADP-, TRAP- and ristocetin-induced aggregation varied considerably over time in all ex vivo anticoagulants tested. Pre-analytical procedures should be standardized because storage duration and anticoagulants significantly affect platelet aggregability in whole blood. For point-of-care monitoring with immediate analysis after blood withdrawal all tested direct thrombin inhibitors as well as unfractionated heparin can be used as anticoagulants whereas citrate is not recommended. PMID:19172515

  4. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E. J.; Coussios, C.-C.; Cleveland, R. O.

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  5. Three dimensional microfluidic cell arrays for ex vivo drug screening with mimicked vascular flow.

    PubMed

    Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Akaydin, H Dogus; Ahmed, A H Rezwanuddin; Jiang, Xuejun; Wang, Sihong

    2014-03-18

    Currently, there are no reliable ex vivo models that predict anticancer drug responses in human tumors accurately. A comprehensive method of mimicking a 3D microenvironment to study effects of anticancer drugs on specific cancer types is essential. Here, we report the development of a three-dimensional microfluidic cell array (3D μFCA), which reconstructs a 3D tumor microenvironment with cancer cells and microvascular endothelial cells. To mimic the in vivo spatial relationship between microvessels and nonendothelial cells embedded in extracellular matrix, three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers were built into this array. The multilayer property of the device enabled the imitation of the drug delivery in a microtissue array with simulated blood circulation. This 3D μFCA system may provide better predictions of drug responses and identification of a suitable treatment for a specific patient if biopsy samples are used. To the pharmaceutical industry, the scaling-up of our 3D μFCA system may offer a novel high throughput screening tool. PMID:24568664

  6. Hybrid System for Ex Vivo Hemorheological and Hemodynamic Analysis: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Jun Kang, Yang; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurement of biophysical properties is important to understand the relation between these properties and the outbreak of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, a systematic measurement for these biophysical parameters under in vivo conditions is nearly impossible because of complex vessel shape and limited practicality. In vitro measurements can provide more biophysical information, but in vitro exposure changes hemorheological properties. In this study, a hybrid system composed of an ultrasound system and microfluidic device is proposed for monitoring hemorheological and hemodynamic properties under more reasonable experimental conditions. Biophysical properties including RBC aggregation, viscosity, velocity, and pressure of blood flows are simultaneously measured under various conditions to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this measurement system. The proposed technique is applied to a rat extracorporeal loop which connects the aorta and jugular vein directly. As a result, the proposed system is found to measure biophysical parameters reasonably without blood collection from the rat and provided more detailed information. This hybrid system, combining ultrasound imaging and microfluidic techniques to ex vivo animal models, would be useful for monitoring the variations of biophysical properties induced by chemical agents. It can be used to understand the relation between biophysical parameters and CVDs. PMID:26090816

  7. Ex Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury in Rats of Varying Degrees of Severity

    PubMed Central

    Jirjis, Michael B.; Kurpad, Shekar N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to characterize magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in proximal regions of the spinal cord following a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Sprague–Dawley rats (n=40) were administered a control, mild, moderate, or severe contusion injury at the T8 vertebral level. Six direction diffusion weighted images (DWIs) were collected ex vivo along the length of the spinal cord, with an echo/repetition time of 31.6 ms/14 sec and b=500 sec/mm2. Diffusion metrics were correlated to hindlimb motor function. Significant differences were found for whole cord region of interest (ROI) drawings for fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusion coefficient (LD), and radial diffusion coefficient (RD) at each of the cervical levels (p<0.01). Motor function correlated with MD in the cervical segments of the spinal cord (r2=0.80). The diffusivity of water significantly decreased throughout “uninjured” portions of the spinal cord following a contusion injury (p<0.05). Diffusivity metrics were found to be altered following SCI in both white and gray matter regions. Injury severity was associated with diffusion changes over the entire length of the cord. This study demonstrates that DTI is sensitive to SCI in regions remote from injury, suggesting that the diffusion metrics may be used as a biomarker for severity of injury. PMID:23782233

  8. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. XTT assay of ex vivo saliva biofilms to test antimicrobial influences

    PubMed Central

    Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Welk, Alexander; Sietmann, Rabea; Lademann, Jürgen; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Many dental diseases are attributable to biofilms. The screening of antimicrobial substances, in particular, requires a high sample throughput and a realistic model, the evaluation must be as quick and as simple as possible. For this purpose, a colorimetric assay of the tetrazolium salt XTT (sodium 3'-[1-[(phenylamino)-carbony]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate) converted by saliva biofilms is recommended. Cleavage of XTT by dehydrogenase enzymes of metabolically active cells in biofilms yields a highly colored formazan product which is measured photometrically. Materials and method: The suitability of the XTT assay for detecting the vitality of ex vivo saliva biofilms was tested to determine the efficacy of chlorhexidine and ozone versus saliva biofilms grown on titanium discs. Results: The XTT method lends itself to testing the vitality of microorganisms in saliva biofilms. The sensitivity of the arrays requires a specific minimum number of pathogens, this number being different for planktonic bacteria and those occurring in biofilms. The antibacterial effect after treatment with chlorhexidine or ozone was measured by XTT conversion that was significantly reduced. The antimicrobial efficacy of 60 s 0.5% and 0.1% chlorhexidine treatment was equal and comparable with 60 s ozone treatment. Conclusion: The XTT assay is a suitable method to determine the vitality in saliva biofilms, permitting assessment of the efficacy of antimicrobial substances. Its quick and easy applicability renders it especially suitable for screening. PMID:22558040

  10. In vitro antioxidant and ex vivo protective activities of green and roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Daglia, M; Papetti, A; Gregotti, C; Bertè, F; Gazzani, G

    2000-05-01

    The antioxidant properties of green and roasted coffee, in relation to species (Coffea arabica and Coffea robusta) and degree of roasting (light, medium, dark), were investigated. These properties were evaluated by determining the reducing substances (RS) of coffee and its antioxidant activity (AA) in vitro (model system beta-carotene-linoleic acid) and ex vivo as protective activity (PA) against rat liver cell microsome lipid peroxidation measured as TBA-reacting substances. RS of C. robustasamples were found to be significantly higher when compared to those of C. arabica samples (p < 0.001). AA for green coffee samples were slightly higher than for the corresponding roasted samples while PA was significantly lower in green coffee compared to that of all roasted samples (p < 0.001). Extraction with three different organic solvents (ethyl acetate, ethyl ether, and dichloromethane) showed that the most protective compounds are extracted from acidified dark roasted coffee solutions with ethyl acetate. The analysis of acidic extract by gel filtration chromatography (GFC) gave five fractions. Higher molecular mass fractions were found to possess antioxidant activity while the lower molecular mass fractions showed protective activity. The small amounts of these acidic, low molecular mass protective fractions isolated indicate that they contain very strong protective agents. PMID:10820041

  11. The Use of Herpes Simplex Virus in Ex Vivo Slice Culture

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Allyson K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) can be used for a wide range of genetic manipulation in ex vivo slices of central nervous system tissue from both young and adult rodents. The fast expression of the HSV viral mediated gene transfer, which can be engineered to produce cell-type specificity, can be utilized in slice cultures for a variety of purposes over a 1-4 day period with spatial and temporal specificity. This protocol exploits the rapid expression of HSV viral vectors by utilizing slice culture for electrophysiological recordings, avoiding the need to do intra-cranial viral injections. Brain slice cultures maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for quick access to evaluate expression effects of HSV viral mediated gene transfer on the molecular and cellular properties of specific neurons. This protocol provides an easy way to study neuronal function following expression of these HSV viruses. PMID:26131662

  12. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with <4 μm axial resolution (OCT and OCM), and 14 μm (OCT) and <2 μm (OCM) transverse resolution. The system allows seamless switching between low and high magnifications in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence is observed between optical images and histological sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  13. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  14. High contrast photoacoustic imaging with dual apodization with cross-correlation: ex-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Chi Hyung; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) images generally suffer from high clutter levels since only one-way acoustic beam forming is used to reconstruct an image. Several methods have been presented in the ultrasound (US) literature to suppress sidelobes and reduce artifacts due to phase aberrations. Notable is a class of methods using the dual apodization with cross-correlation (DAX) method. Although a very powerful tool, DAX weighting can create artifacts in complex source environments, generally underestimating the strength of weak point scatterers and speckle regions while overestimating noise signals. This fact can work to our advantage, however, in visualizing microvessels or locating regions with a significant concentration of contrast agents using PA imaging. We examined the use of PA imaging combined with DAX processing to obtain high-contrast images of a black dye inclusion placed ex vivo into fresh bovine tissue. The tissue sample was imaged with an interleaved, real-time US/PA system including a pulse laser source operating at 20 Hz. A 5MHz linear array transducer was used both for conventional US imaging and to detect the PA signal at 720 nm wavelength. Results suggest that PA imaging with DAX combined with ultrasound imaging can produce high-contrast and high-spatial-resolution visualization of particle inclusions.

  15. Ex vivo micro-CT imaging of murine brain models using non-ionic iodinated contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bautista, N.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, J.; Franco-Pérez, J.; Calvillo-Velasco, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical investigation of brain tumors is frequently carried out by means of intracranial implantation of brain tumor xenografts or allografts, with subsequent analysis of tumor growth using conventional histopathology. However, very little has been reported on the use contrast-enhanced techniques in micro-CT imaging for the study of malignant brain tumors in small animal models. The aim of this study has been to test a protocol for ex vivo imaging of murine brain models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after treatment with non-ionic iodinated solution, using an in-house developed laboratory micro-CT. We have found that the best compromise between acquisition time and image quality is obtained using a 50 kVp, 0.5 mAs, 1° angular step on a 360 degree orbit acquisition protocol, with 70 μm reconstructed voxel size using the Feldkamp algorithm. With this parameters up to 4 murine brains can be scanned in tandem in less than 15 minutes. Image segmentation and analysis of three sample brains allowed identifying tumor volumes as small as 0.4 mm3.

  16. Repopulating Decellularized Kidney Scaffolds: An Avenue for Ex Vivo Organ Generation

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Robert A.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that fully developed organs can be decellularized, resulting in a complex scaffold and extracellular matrix (ECM) network capable of being populated with other cells. This work has resulted in a growing field in bioengineering focused on the isolation, characterization, and modification of organ derived acellular scaffolds and their potential to sustain and interact with new cell populations, a process termed reseeding. In this review, we cover contemporary advancements in the bioengineering of kidney scaffolds including novel work showing that reseeded donor scaffolds can be transplanted and can function in recipients using animal models. Several major areas of the field are taken into consideration, including the decellularization process, characterization of acellular and reseeded scaffolds, culture conditions, and cell sources. Finally, we discuss future avenues based on the advent of 3D bioprinting and recent developments in kidney organoid cultures as well as animal models of renal genesis. The ongoing mergers and collaborations between these fields hold the potential to produce functional kidneys that can be generated ex vivo and utilized for kidney transplantations in patients suffering with renal disease. PMID:27375844

  17. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  18. Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Aaron D.; Chen, Yu; Bryan, Bradley; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Huang, Qin; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex vivo imaging of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract tissues, to establish correlations between OCM imaging and histology, and to provide a baseline for future endoscopic studies. Co-registered OCM and OCT imaging were performed on fresh surgical specimens and endoscopic biopsy specimens, and images were correlated with histology. Imaging was performed at 1.06-μm wavelength with <2-μm transverse and <4-μm axial resolution for OCM, and at 14-μm transverse and <3-μm axial resolution for OCT. Multiple sites on 75 tissue samples from 39 patients were imaged. OCM enabled cellular imaging of specimens from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts over a smaller field of view compared to OCT. Squamous cells and their nuclei, goblet cells in Barrett’s esophagus, gastric pits and colonic crypts, and fine structures in adenocarcinomas were visualized. OCT provided complementary information through assessment of tissue architectural features over a larger field of view. OCM may provide a complementary imaging modality to standard OCT approaches for endoscopic microscopy. PMID:20210470

  19. Influence of massage and occlusion on the ex vivo skin penetration of rigid liposomes and invasomes.

    PubMed

    Trauer, Sindy; Richter, Heike; Kuntsche, Judith; Büttemeyer, Rolf; Liebsch, Manfred; Linscheid, Michael; Fahr, Alfred; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Lademann, Jürgen; Patzelt, Alexa

    2014-02-01

    Liposomes are frequently described as drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal applications. Recently, it has been shown that particulate substances penetrate effectively into hair follicles and that the follicular penetration depth can be increased by massaging the skin, which simulates the in vivo movement of hairs in the hair follicles. In the present study, massage was applied to skin mounted to Franz diffusion cells. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, the influence of massage and occlusion on the follicular penetration depths of rigid and flexible liposomes loaded with a hydrophilic and lipophilic dye was investigated. The application of massage increased follicular penetration significantly. Occlusion resulted in an increased follicular penetration depth only for rigid liposomes, whereas invasomes did not penetrate more effectively if occlusion was applied. The results confirm that massage is an important tool for increasing follicular penetration in ex vivo studies using Franz diffusion cells. Occlusion may reduce the efficacy of follicular penetration depending on the specific liposomal preparation. Rigidity in particular appears to be a relevant parameter.

  20. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles for enhancing oral absorption of docetaxel: preparation, in vitro and ex vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Shahrooz; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Akhlaghi, Seyedeh Parinaz; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate mucoadhesive core-shell nanoparticles based on copolymerization of thiolated chitosan coated on poly methyl methacrylate cores as a carrier for oral delivery of docetaxel. Docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles with various concentrations were prepared via a radical emulsion polymerization method using cerium ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The physicochemical properties of the obtained nanoparticles were characterized by: dynamic light-scattering analysis for their mean size, size distribution, and zeta potential; scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for surface morphology; and differential scanning calorimetry analysis for confirmation of molecular dispersity of docetaxel in the nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were spherical with mean diameter below 200 nm, polydispersity of below 0.15, and positive zeta potential values. The entrapment efficiency of the nanoparticles was approximately 90%. In vitro release studies showed a sustained release characteristic for 10 days after a burst release at the beginning. Ex vivo studies showed a significant increase in the transportation of docetaxel from intestinal membrane of rat when formulated as nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of nanoparticles was investigated using fluoresceinamine-loaded nanoparticles. Docetaxel nanoparticles showed a high cytotoxicity effect in the Caco-2 and MCF-7 cell lines after 72 hours. It can be concluded that by combining the advantages of both thiolated polymers and colloidal particles, these nanoparticles can be proposed as a drug carrier system for mucosal delivery of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:21289989

  1. Metabolic profiling during ex vivo machine perfusion of the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Sridharan, Gautham V.; Weeder, Pepijn D.; Avruch, James H.; Saeidi, Nima; Özer, Sinan; Geerts, Sharon; Porte, Robert J.; Heger, Michal; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Martins, Paulo N.; Markmann, James F.; Yeh, Heidi; Uygun, Korkut

    2016-01-01

    As donor organ shortages persist, functional machine perfusion is under investigation to improve preservation of the donor liver. The transplantation of donation after circulatory death (DCD) livers is limited by poor outcomes, but its application may be expanded by ex vivo repair and assessment of the organ before transplantation. Here we employed subnormothermic (21 °C) machine perfusion of discarded human livers combined with metabolomics to gain insight into metabolic recovery during machine perfusion. Improvements in energetic cofactors and redox shifts were observed, as well as reversal of ischemia-induced alterations in selected pathways, including lactate metabolism and increased TCA cycle intermediates. We next evaluated whether DCD livers with steatotic and severe ischemic injury could be discriminated from ‘transplantable’ DCD livers. Metabolomic profiling was able to cluster livers with similar metabolic patterns based on the degree of injury. Moreover, perfusion parameters combined with differences in metabolic factors suggest variable mechanisms that result in poor energy recovery in injured livers. We conclude that machine perfusion combined with metabolomics has significant potential as a clinical instrument for the assessment of preserved livers. PMID:26935866

  2. In vivo and Ex vivo MR Imaging of Slowly Cycling Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnitsky, S.; Roesch, A.; Herlyn, M.; Glickson, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Slowly cycling cells are believed to play a critical role in tumor progression and metastatic dissemination. The goal of this study was to develop a method for in vivo detection of slowly cycling cells. To distinguish these cells from more rapidly proliferating cells that constitute the vast majority of cells in tumors, we utilized the well-known effect of label dilution due to division of cells with normal cycle and retention of contrast agent in slowly dividing cells. To detect slowly cycling cells melanoma cells were labeled with iron oxide particles. After labeling, we observed dilution of contrast agent in parallel with cell proliferation in the vast majority of normally cycling cells. A small and distinct sub-population of iron-retaining cells was detected by flow cytometry after 20 days of in vitro proliferation. These iron-retaining cells exhibited high expression of a biological marker of slowly cycling cells, JARID1B. After implantation of labeled cells as xenografts into immunocompromised mice, iron-retaining cells were detected in vivo and ex vivo by MRI that was confirmed by Prussian Blue staining. MR imaging detects not only iron retaining melanoma cells but also iron positive macrophages. Proposed method opens up opportunities to image subpopulation of melanoma cells, which is critical for continuous tumor growth. PMID:21523820

  3. Organ-derived coatings on electrospun nanofibers as ex vivo microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sara N.; Johnson, Jed K.; Baran, Christopher P.; Newland, Christie A.; Marsh, Clay B.; Lannutti, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an interstitial lung disease characterized by irreversible scarring. Collagen deposition, myofibroblast expansion, and the development of fibroblastic foci are the hallmark pathological events. The origin and mechanism of recruitment of myofibroblasts, the key cell contributing to these events, is unknown. We hypothesize that the fibrotic lung microenvironment causes differentiation of arriving bone marrow-derived cells into myofibroblasts. Therefore, a method of isolating the effects of fibrotic microenvironment components on various cell types was developed. Electrospun nanofibers were coated with lung extracts from fibrotic or nonfibrotic mice and used to determine effects on bone marrow cells from naïve mice. Varying moduli nanofibers were also employed to determine matrix stiffness effects on these cells. At structured time points, bone marrow cell morphology was recorded and changes in fibrotic gene expression determined by real-time PCR. Cells plated on extracts isolated from fibrotic murine lungs secreted larger amounts of extracellular matrix, adopted a fibroblastic morphology, and exhibited increased myofibroblast gene expression after 8 and 14 days; cells plated on extracts from nonfibrotic lungs did not. Similar results were observed when the nanofiber modulus was increased. This ex vivo system appears to recapitulate the three-dimensional fibrotic lung microenvironment. PMID:20875916

  4. An ex Vivo Model for Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Efflux, and Drug Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Karin; Aadal Nielsen, Peter; Ek, Fredrik; Olsson, Roger

    2016-05-18

    The metabolism of drugs in the brain is difficult to study in most species because of enzymatic instability in vitro and interference from peripheral metabolism in vivo. A locust ex vivo model that combines brain barrier penetration, efflux, metabolism, and analysis of the unbound fraction in intact brains was evaluated using known drugs. Clozapine was analyzed, and its major metabolites, clozapine N-oxide (CNO) and N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC), were identified and quantified. The back-transformation of CNO into clozapine observed in humans was also observed in locusts. In addition, risperidone, citalopram, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were studied, and one preselected metabolite for each drug was analyzed, identified, and quantified. Metabolite identification studies of clozapine and midazolam showed that the locust brain was highly metabolically active, and 18 and 14 metabolites, respectively, were identified. The unbound drug fraction of clozapine, NDMC, carbamazepine, and risperidone was analyzed. In addition, coadministration of drugs with verapamil or fluvoxamine was performed to evaluate drug-drug interactions in all setups. All findings correlated well with the data in the literature for mammals except for the stated fact that CNO is a highly blood-brain barrier permeant compound. Overall, the experiments indicated that invertebrates might be useful for screening of blood-brain barrier permeation, efflux, metabolism, and analysis of the unbound fraction of drugs in the brain in early drug discovery. PMID:26930271

  5. Ex Vivo Adenoviral Vector Gene Delivery Results in Decreased Vector-associated Inflammation Pre- and Post–lung Transplantation in the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  6. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  7. Measurements of fluorine in contemporary urban Canadians: a comparison of the levels found in human bone using in vivo and ex vivo neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Wainman, B C; Pidruczny, A E; Prestwich, W V

    2015-03-01

    content of the tea drinkers and the non-tea drinkers were found to be 0.127 (± 0.029) and 0.050 (± 0.009) mg F/g Ca per year respectively. Finally, we also obtained twelve bone samples from cadavers' skulls. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the fluorine levels in these ex vivo samples. The rate of increase of fluorine content versus age for in vivo and ex vivo measurements were found to be 0.078  ±  0.014 and 0.078  ±  0.050 mg F/g Ca per year respectively. Excellent agreement was found between the fluorine levels determined in vivo and ex vivo using the two separate systems, providing confidence in the fluorine concentration data being measured in vivo.

  8. Accurate in vivo dielectric properties of liver from 500 MHz to 40 GHz and their correlation to ex vivo measurements.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, L; Wismayer, P Schembri; Mangion, L Zammit; Sammut, C V

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report on the characterization of the dielectric properties of in vivo rat liver at 36.4°C from 500 MHz up to 40 GHz with less than 5% uncertainty. The measured data were fitted to a Cole-Cole model and dielectric parameters are presented together with their respective 95% confidence interval. The root mean square error is 0.42. Moreover, ex vivo measurements were conducted in situ at 1, 2, 4 and 6 min after animal death and are compared to in vivo measurements. The results show that immediate changes in [Formula: see text]and [Formula: see text] are within experimental uncertainty, and therefore changes between in vivo and published ex vivo dielectric properties can be attributed to tissue hydration.

  9. [How to increase availability of grafts in lung transplantion: ex vivo lung reconditioning - cardiac death donors - high emergency list].

    PubMed

    Souilamas, R; Souilamas, J; Saueressig, M; Pison, C; Briot, R

    2010-02-01

    Lung transplantation has become an established treatment for end-stage pulmonary failure refractory to medical management. However, the scarcity of lung grafts and the growing number of candidates has led to an increase in deaths among patients on waiting lists. Despite improvements in donor management, organ preservation, and the use of marginal and cardiac death donors, only about 20% of candidate lungs are currently being transplanted. A new ex vivo "reconditioning" technique is opening up new perspectives. Indeed, a significant number of rejected lungs can now be retrieved and transplanted with acceptable results. Given the longer storage times provided by this technique, transplantation can be programmed, with better surgical efficiency. A new mobile organ-care machine is currently under evaluation. In near future, a pilot laboratory will be created and dedicated to ex vivo reconditionning of all lung grafts before transplantation and grafts will be sent to lung transplant centers after immunologic cross-matching.

  10. Scalable ex vivo expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in microcarrier-based stirred culture systems.

    PubMed

    Carmelo, Joana G; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Cabral, Joaquim M S; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato

    2015-01-01

    The clinical demand for human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) drives the need for reproducible, cost-effective, and good manufacturing practices (GMP)-compliant ex vivo expansion protocols. Bioprocess engineering strategies, namely controlled stirred bioreactor systems combined with the use of xenogeneic(xeno)-free materials, provide proper tools to develop and optimize cell manufacturing for the rapid expansion of human MSC for cellular therapies. Herein we describe a microcarrier-based stirred culture system operating under xeno-free conditions using a controlled stirred-tank bioreactor for an efficient and controlled ex vivo expansion of human MSC. This culture platform can be applied to MSC from different human sources, as well as different microcarriers and xeno-free medium formulations.

  11. [How to increase availability of grafts in lung transplantion: ex vivo lung reconditioning - cardiac death donors - high emergency list].

    PubMed

    Souilamas, R; Souilamas, J; Saueressig, M; Pison, C; Briot, R

    2010-02-01

    Lung transplantation has become an established treatment for end-stage pulmonary failure refractory to medical management. However, the scarcity of lung grafts and the growing number of candidates has led to an increase in deaths among patients on waiting lists. Despite improvements in donor management, organ preservation, and the use of marginal and cardiac death donors, only about 20% of candidate lungs are currently being transplanted. A new ex vivo "reconditioning" technique is opening up new perspectives. Indeed, a significant number of rejected lungs can now be retrieved and transplanted with acceptable results. Given the longer storage times provided by this technique, transplantation can be programmed, with better surgical efficiency. A new mobile organ-care machine is currently under evaluation. In near future, a pilot laboratory will be created and dedicated to ex vivo reconditionning of all lung grafts before transplantation and grafts will be sent to lung transplant centers after immunologic cross-matching. PMID:21353972

  12. Scalable ex vivo expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in microcarrier-based stirred culture systems.

    PubMed

    Carmelo, Joana G; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Cabral, Joaquim M S; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato

    2015-01-01

    The clinical demand for human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) drives the need for reproducible, cost-effective, and good manufacturing practices (GMP)-compliant ex vivo expansion protocols. Bioprocess engineering strategies, namely controlled stirred bioreactor systems combined with the use of xenogeneic(xeno)-free materials, provide proper tools to develop and optimize cell manufacturing for the rapid expansion of human MSC for cellular therapies. Herein we describe a microcarrier-based stirred culture system operating under xeno-free conditions using a controlled stirred-tank bioreactor for an efficient and controlled ex vivo expansion of human MSC. This culture platform can be applied to MSC from different human sources, as well as different microcarriers and xeno-free medium formulations. PMID:25063496

  13. Ex vivo uranium decontamination efficiency on wounded skin and in vitro skin toxicity of a calixarene-loaded nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Grives, Sophie; Phan, Guillaume; Morat, Guillaume; Suhard, David; Rebiere, Francois; Fattal, Elias

    2015-06-01

    The present work aims at studying the decontamination efficacy of a calixarene-loaded nanoemulsion on two ex vivo wounded skin models mimicking superficial stings or cuts contaminated with uranium, and on a third model using excoriation. The decontaminating formulation was compared with the currently used radio-decontaminating soapy water (Trait rouge®) treatment. Moreover, to assess skin damage potentially induced by the undiluted nanoemulsion, in vitro toxicity studies were conducted on an in vitro reconstructed human epidermis, coupled with three different toxicity tests [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase, and interleukin-1-α]. This work demonstrated not only a significant decontamination activity of the calixarene nanoemulsion on wounded skin, ranging from 92% to 94% of the applied uranium solution according to the ex vivo model used, but also the absence of side effects of this promising treatment.

  14. Ex vivo expansion of bovine corneal endothelial cells in xeno-free medium supplemented with platelet releasate.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ming-Li; Burnouf, Thierry; Wang, Tsung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Clinical-grade ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelial cells can increase the availability of corneal tissues for transplantation and treatment of corneal blindness. However, these cells have very limited proliferative capacity. Successful propagation has required so far to use very complex growth media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and other xenocomponents. We hypothesized that human platelet releasates rich in multiple growth factors, and in particular neurotrophins, could potentially be a useful supplement for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells due to their neural crest origin. Platelet releasates were prepared by calcium salt activation of apheresis platelet concentrates, subjected or not to complement inactivation by heat treatment at 56°C for 30 minutes. Platelet releasates were characterized for their content in proteins and were found to contain high amount of growth factors including platelet-derived growth factor-AB (30.56 to 39.08 ng/ml) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (30.57 to 37.11 ng/ml) neurotrophins. We compared the growth and viability of corneal endothelium cells in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with different combinations of components, including 2.5%∼10% of the platelet releasates. Corneal endothelium cells expanded in platelet releasates exhibited good adhesion and a typical hexagonal morphology. Their growth and viability were enhanced when using the complement-inactivated platelet releasate at a concentration of 10%. Immunostaining and Western blots showed that CECs maintained the expressions of four important membrane markers: Na-K ATPase α1, zona occludens-1, phospho-connexin 43 and N-cadherin. In conclusion, our study provides the first proof-of-concept that human platelet releasates can be used for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells. These findings open a new paradigm for ex vivo propagation protocols of corneal endothelium cells in compliance with good tissue culture practices and regulatory

  15. Cryopreserved Ex Vivo-Expanded Allogeneic Myeloid Progenitor Cell Product Protects Neutropenic Mice From a Lethal Fungal Infection.

    PubMed

    Domen, Jos; Christensen, Julie L; Gille, Daphne; Smith-Berdan, Stephanie; Fong, Timothy; Brown, Janice M Y; Sedello, Anna K

    2016-01-01

    Severe neutropenia induced by chemotherapy or conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation often results in morbidity and mortality due to infection by opportunistic pathogens. A system has been developed to generate ex vivo-expanded mouse myeloid progenitor cells (mMPCs) that produce functional neutrophils in vivo upon transplantation in a pathogen challenge model. It has previously been demonstrated that transplantation of large numbers of freshly isolated myeloid progenitors from a single donor provides survival benefit in radiation-induced neutropenic mice. In the present work, an ex vivo-expanded and cryopreserved mMPC product generated from an allogeneic donor pool retains protective activity in vivo in a lethal fungal infection model. Infusion of the allogeneic pooled mMPC product is effective in preventing death from invasive Aspergillus fumigatus in neutropenic animals, and protection is dose dependent. Cell progeny from the mMPC product is detected in the bone marrow, spleen, blood, and liver by flow cytometry 1 week postinfusion but is no longer evident in most animals 4 weeks posttransplant. In this model, the ex vivo-generated pooled allogeneic mMPC product (i) expands and differentiates in vivo; (ii) is functional and prevents death from invasive fungal infection; and (iii) does not permanently engraft or cause allosensitization. These data suggest that an analogous ex vivo-expanded human myeloid progenitor cell product may be an effective off-the-shelf bridging therapy for the infectious complications that develop during hematopoietic recovery following hematopoietic cell transplantation or intensive chemotherapy. PMID:25812169

  16. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD−/− colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  17. Towards a PBMC “virogram assay” for precision medicine: concordance between ex vivo and in vivo viral infection transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Gardeux, Vincent; Bosco, Anthony; Li, Jianrong; Halonen, Marilyn J.; Jackson, Daniel; Martinez, Fernando D.; Lussier, Yves A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding individual patient host-response to viruses is key to designing optimal personalized therapy. Unsurprisingly, in vivo human experimentation to understand individualized dynamic response of the transcriptome to viruses are rarely studied because of the obviously limitations stemming from ethical considerations of the clinical risk. Objective In this rhinovirus study, we first hypothesized that ex vivo human cells response to virus can serve as proxy for otherwise controversial in vivo human experimentation. We further hypothesized that the N-of-1-pathways framework, previously validated in cancer, can be effective in understanding the more subtle individual transcriptomic response to viral infection. Method N-of-1-pathways computes a significance score for a given list of gene sets at the patient level, using merely the ‘omics profiles of two paired samples as input. We extracted the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of four human subjects, aliquoted in two paired samples, one subjected to ex vivo rhinovirus infection. Their dysregulated genes and pathways were then compared to those of 9 human subjects prior and after intranasal inoculation in vivo with rhinovirus. Additionally, we developed the Similarity Venn Diagram, a novel visualization method that goes beyond conventional overlap to show the similarity between two sets of qualitative measures. Results We evaluated the individual N-of-1-pathways results using two established cohort-based methods: GSEA and enrichment of differentially expressed genes. Similarity Venn Diagrams and individual patient ROC curves illustrate and quantify that the in vivo dysregulation is recapitulated ex vivo both at the gene and pathway level (p-values≤0.004). Conclusion We established the first evidence that an interpretable dynamic transcriptome metric, conducted as an ex vivo assays for a single subject, has the potential to predict individualized response to infectious disease without the

  18. Recent advances in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using ex vivo T cell-depleted graft in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Seo, Jong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for children and adolescents with various malignant and non-malignant diseases. While human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor is the preferred choice, matched unrelated volunteer donor is another realistic option for successful HSCT. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to find a HLA-matched donor for patients requiring HSCT, leading to a considerable number of deaths of patients without undergoing transplantation. Alternatively, allogeneic HSCT from haploidentical family members could provide donors for virtually all patients who need HSCT. Although the early attempts at allogeneic HSCT from haploidentical family donor (HFD) were disappointing, recent advances in the effective ex vivo depletion of T cells or unmanipulated in vivo regulation of T cells, better supportive care, and optimal conditioning regimens have significantly improved the outcomes of haploidentical HSCT. The ex vivo techniques used to remove T cells have evolved from the selection of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell progenitors to the depletion of CD3+ cells, and more recently to the depletion of αβ+ T cells. The recent emerging evidence for ex vivo T cell-depleted haploidentical HSCT has provided additional therapeutic options for pediatric patients with diseases curable by HSCT but has not found a suitable related or unrelated donor. This review discusses recent advances in haploidentical HSCT, focusing on transplant using ex vivo T cell-depleted grafts. In addition, our experiences with this novel approach for the treatment of pediatric patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases are described. PMID:27104186

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Ex Vivo Pharmacodynamic Antimalarial Activity of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Patients with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Vietnam ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dao Van Hoang; Nguyen, Quoc Phuc; Nguyen, Ngoa Dang; Le, Thuy Thi Thanh; Nguyen, The Duy; Dinh, Duy Ngoc; Nguyen, Thanh Xuan; Bui, Dai; Chavchich, Marina; Edstein, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to healthy subjects, malaria patients show a reduction in the mean oral clearance (1.19 versus 5.87 liters/h/kg of body weight) and apparent volume of distribution (1.47 versus 8.02 liters/kg) of dihydroartemisinin in Vietnamese patients following treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (Artekin) for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum. Dihydroartemisinin is responsible for most of the ex vivo antimalarial activity of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. PMID:19528277

  20. Expression of Plasmodium vivax crt-o Is Related to Parasite Stage but Not Ex Vivo Chloroquine Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pava, Zuleima; Handayuni, Irene; Wirjanata, Grennady; To, Sheren; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is present in most countries where P. vivax infection is endemic, but the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Increased expression of P. vivax crt-o (pvcrt-o) has been correlated with in vivo CQ resistance in an area with low-grade resistance. We assessed pvcrt-o expression in isolates from Papua (Indonesia), where P. vivax is highly CQ resistant. Ex vivo drug susceptibilities to CQ, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate were determined using a modified schizont maturation assay. Expression levels of pvcrt-o were measured using a novel real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Large variations in pvcrt-o expression were observed across the 51 isolates evaluated, with the fold change in expression level ranging from 0.01 to 59 relative to that seen with the P. vivax β-tubulin gene and from 0.01 to 24 relative to that seen with the P. vivax aldolase gene. Expression was significantly higher in isolates with the majority of parasites at the ring stage of development (median fold change, 1.7) compared to those at the trophozoite stage (median fold change, 0.5; P < 0.001). Twenty-nine isolates fulfilled the criteria for ex vivo drug susceptibility testing and showed high variability in CQ responses (median, 107.9 [range, 6.5 to 345.7] nM). After controlling for the parasite stage, we found that pvcrt-o expression levels did not correlate with the ex vivo response to CQ or with that to any of the other antimalarials tested. Our results highlight the importance of development-stage composition for measuring pvcrt-o expression and suggest that pvcrt-o transcription is not a primary determinant of ex vivo drug susceptibility. A comprehensive transcriptomic approach is warranted for an in-depth investigation of the role of gene expression levels and P. vivax drug resistance. PMID:26525783

  1. Recent advances in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using ex vivo T cell-depleted graft in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Im, Ho Joon; Koh, Kyung-Nam; Seo, Jong Jin

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for children and adolescents with various malignant and non-malignant diseases. While human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor is the preferred choice, matched unrelated volunteer donor is another realistic option for successful HSCT. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to find a HLA-matched donor for patients requiring HSCT, leading to a considerable number of deaths of patients without undergoing transplantation. Alternatively, allogeneic HSCT from haploidentical family members could provide donors for virtually all patients who need HSCT. Although the early attempts at allogeneic HSCT from haploidentical family donor (HFD) were disappointing, recent advances in the effective ex vivo depletion of T cells or unmanipulated in vivo regulation of T cells, better supportive care, and optimal conditioning regimens have significantly improved the outcomes of haploidentical HSCT. The ex vivo techniques used to remove T cells have evolved from the selection of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cell progenitors to the depletion of CD3(+) cells, and more recently to the depletion of αβ(+) T cells. The recent emerging evidence for ex vivo T cell-depleted haploidentical HSCT has provided additional therapeutic options for pediatric patients with diseases curable by HSCT but has not found a suitable related or unrelated donor. This review discusses recent advances in haploidentical HSCT, focusing on transplant using ex vivo T cell-depleted grafts. In addition, our experiences with this novel approach for the treatment of pediatric patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases are described.

  2. Expression of Plasmodium vivax crt-o Is Related to Parasite Stage but Not Ex Vivo Chloroquine Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pava, Zuleima; Handayuni, Irene; Wirjanata, Grennady; To, Sheren; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2015-11-02

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is present in most countries where P. vivax infection is endemic, but the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Increased expression of P. vivax crt-o (pvcrt-o) has been correlated with in vivo CQ resistance in an area with low-grade resistance. We assessed pvcrt-o expression in isolates from Papua (Indonesia), where P. vivax is highly CQ resistant. Ex vivo drug susceptibilities to CQ, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate were determined using a modified schizont maturation assay. Expression levels of pvcrt-o were measured using a novel real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Large variations in pvcrt-o expression were observed across the 51 isolates evaluated, with the fold change in expression level ranging from 0.01 to 59 relative to that seen with the P. vivax β-tubulin gene and from 0.01 to 24 relative to that seen with the P. vivax aldolase gene. Expression was significantly higher in isolates with the majority of parasites at the ring stage of development (median fold change, 1.7) compared to those at the trophozoite stage (median fold change, 0.5; P < 0.001). Twenty-nine isolates fulfilled the criteria for ex vivo drug susceptibility testing and showed high variability in CQ responses (median, 107.9 [range, 6.5 to 345.7] nM). After controlling for the parasite stage, we found that pvcrt-o expression levels did not correlate with the ex vivo response to CQ or with that to any of the other antimalarials tested. Our results highlight the importance of development-stage composition for measuring pvcrt-o expression and suggest that pvcrt-o transcription is not a primary determinant of ex vivo drug susceptibility. A comprehensive transcriptomic approach is warranted for an in-depth investigation of the role of gene expression levels and P. vivax drug resistance.

  3. Prediction of In Vivo Radiation Dose Status in Radiotherapy Patients using Ex Vivo and In Vivo Gene Expression Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Barker, Christopher A.; Turner, Helen C.; McLane, Amanda; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2011-01-01

    After a large-scale nuclear accident or an attack with an improvised nuclear device, rapid biodosimetry would be needed for triage. As a possible means to address this need, we previously defined a gene expression signature in human peripheral white blood cells irradiated ex vivo that predicts the level of radiation exposure with high accuracy. We now demonstrate this principle in vivo using blood from patients receiving total-body irradiation (TBI). Whole genome microarray analysis has identified genes responding significantly to in vivo radiation exposure in peripheral blood. A 3-nearest neighbor classifier built from the TBI patient data correctly predicted samples as exposed to 0, 1.25 or 3.75 Gy with 94% accuracy (P < 0.001) even when samples from healthy donor controls were included. The same samples were classified with 98% accuracy using a signature previously defined from ex vivo irradiation data. The samples could also be classified as exposed or not exposed with 100% accuracy. The demonstration that ex vivo irradiation is an appropriate model that can provide meaningful prediction of in vivo exposure levels, and that the signatures are robust across diverse disease states and independent sample sets, is an important advance in the application of gene expression for biodosimetry. PMID:21388269

  4. Sustained Growth of the Ex Vivo Ablation Zones' Critical Short Axis Using Gas-cooled Radiofrequency Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Hansjoerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Voigtlaender, Matthias; Schraml, Christina; Schmidt, Diethard; Fend, Falko; Claussen, Claus D.; Enderle, Markus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Clasen, Stephan

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ablation zones created with a gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 320 ablations with an internally gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator were performed on fresh ex vivo bovine liver tissue, varying the ablation time (5, 10, 15, and 20 min), power (20, 30, 40, and 50 W), and gas pressure of the CO{sub 2} used for cooling (585, 600, 615, 630, 645 psi), leading to a total of 80 different parameter combinations. Size and shape of the white coagulation zone were assessed. Results: The largest complete ablation zone was achieved after 20 min of implementing 50 W and 645 psi, resulting in a short axis of mean 46 {+-} 1 mm and a long axis of 56 {+-} 2 mm (mean {+-} standard deviation). Short-axis diameters increased between 5 and 20 min of ablation time at 585 psi (increase of the short axis was 45% at 30 W, 29% at 40 W, and 39% at 50 W). This increase was larger at 645 psi (113% at 30 W, 67% at 40 W, and 70% at 50 W). Macroscopic assessment and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) staining revealed incompletely ablated tissue along the needle track in 18 parameter combinations including low-power settings (20 and 30 W) and different cooling levels and ablation times. Conclusion: Gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators increase the short-axis diameter of coagulation in an ex vivo setting if appropriate parameters are selected.

  5. Numerical and ex vivo studies of a bioprobe developed for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in contact with liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Chartier, T; Carpentier, O; Genestie, B; Hornez, J-C; Monchau, F

    2016-08-01

    This work is based on the production of a bioprobe that is compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in liver cancer laser therapy. This probe is made of an alumina tube (3-mm diameter) in which an optical fibre is centred and fixed. A shooting window (20mm) is created using a mechanical rectifier. The device is then consolidated by the injection of a transparent and heat-resistant resin. Through numerical modelling, the thermal power damping of the laser source is evaluated as well as the propagation of the heat in the ex vivo liver tissue according to different heating scenarios. These analyses allow for an estimation of the irradiated volume. Ex vivo tests were performed on bovine liver to confirm the adequacy of the bioprobe for LITT and of the irradiated volumes predicted by the numerical model. There was a difference of 8% between the simulations and ex vivo experiments. The pulsed mode heating scenario was the most effective under the experimental conditions. PMID:27212211

  6. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry.

  7. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. PMID:25014874

  8. Analysis of Endothelial Adherence of Bartonella henselae and Acinetobacter baumannii Using a Dynamic Human Ex Vivo Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Weidensdorfer, Marko; Chae, Ju Ik; Makobe, Celestine; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Müller, Volker; Schürmann, Christoph; Brandes, Ralf P.; Wilharm, Gottfried; Ballhorn, Wibke; Christ, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Fischer, Doris; Göttig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adherence determines the virulence of many human-pathogenic bacteria. Experimental approaches elucidating this early infection event in greater detail have been performed using mainly methods of cellular microbiology. However, in vitro infections of cell monolayers reflect the in vivo situation only partially, and animal infection models are not available for many human-pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, ex vivo infection of human organs might represent an attractive method to overcome these limitations. We infected whole human umbilical cords ex vivo with Bartonella henselae or Acinetobacter baumannii under dynamic flow conditions mimicking the in vivo infection situation of human endothelium. For this purpose, methods for quantifying endothelium-adherent wild-type and trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA)-deficient bacteria were set up. Data revealed that (i) A. baumannii binds in a TAA-dependent manner to endothelial cells, (ii) this organ infection model led to highly reproducible adherence rates, and furthermore, (iii) this model allowed to dissect the biological function of TAAs in the natural course of human infections. These findings indicate that infection models using ex vivo human tissue samples (“organ microbiology”) might be a valuable tool in analyzing bacterial pathogenicity with the capacity to replace animal infection models at least partially. PMID:26712205

  9. Ex vivo human trabecular bone model for biocompatibility evaluation of calcium phosphate composites modified with spray dried biodegradable microspheres.

    PubMed

    Schnieders, Julia; Gbureck, Uwe; Germershaus, Oliver; Kratz, Marita; Jones, David B; Kissel, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to study the suitability of the ex-vivo human trabecular bone bioreactor ZetOS to test the biocompatibility of calcium phosphate bone cement composites modified with spray dried, drug loaded microspheres. We hypothesized, that this bone bioreactor could be a promising alternative to in vivo assessment of biocompatibility in living human bone over a defined time period. Composites consisting of tetracycline loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres and calcium phosphate bone cement, were inserted into in vitro cultured human femora head trabecular bone and incubated over 30 days at 37°C in the incubation system. Different biocompatibility parameters, such as lactate dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase release and the expression of relevant cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, were measured in the incubation medium. No significant differences in alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured compared to control samples. Tetracycline was released from the microspheres, delivered and incorporated into newly formed bone. In this study we demonstrated that ex vivo biocompatibility testing using human trabecular bone in a bioreactor is a potential alternative to animal experiments since bone metabolism is still maintained in a physiological environment ex vivo.

  10. Dynamic impact force and association with structural damage to the knee joint: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Brill, Richard; Wohlgemuth, Walther A; Hempfling, Harald; Bohndorf, Klaus; Becker, Ursula; Welsch, Ulrich; Kamp, Alexander; Roemer, Frank W

    2014-12-01

    No systematic, histologically confirmed data are available concerning the association between magnitude of direct dynamic impact caused by vertical impact trauma and the resulting injury to cartilage and subchondral bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dynamic impact and the resulting patterns of osteochondral injury in an ex-vivo model. A mechanical apparatus was employed to perform ex-vivo controlled dynamic vertical impact experiments in 110 pig knees with the femur positioned in a holding fixture. A falling body with a thrust plate and photo sensor was applied. The direct impact to the trochlear articular surface was registered and the resulting osteochondral injuries macroscopically and histologically correlated and categorized. The relationship between magnitude of direct impact and injury severity could be classified as stage I injuries (impact <7.3MPa): elastic deformation, no histological injury; stage II injuries (impact 7.3-9.6MPa): viscoelastic imprint of the cartilaginous surface, subchondral microfractures; stage III injuries (impact 9.6-12.7MPa): disrupted cartilage surface, chondral fissures and subchondral microfractures; stage IV injuries (impact >12.7MPa): osteochondral impression, histologically imprint and osteochondral macrofractures. The impact ranges and histologic injury stages determined from this vertical dynamic impact experiment allowed for a biomechanical classification of direct, acute osteochondral injury. In contrast to static load commonly applied in ex-vivo experiments, dynamic impact more realistically represents actual trauma to the knee joint.

  11. Ex vivo digestion of carp muscle tissue--ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the obtained hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Borawska, J; Darewicz, M; Vegarud, G E; Iwaniak, A; Minkiewicz, P

    2015-01-01

    In the digestive tract of humans, bioactive peptides, i.e. protein fragments impacting the physiological activity of the body, may be released during the digestion of food proteins, including those of fish. The aim of the study was to establish the method of human ex vivo digestion of carp muscle tissue and evaluate the angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities of hydrolysates obtained after digestion. It was found that the hydrolysates of carp muscle tissue obtained with the three-stage method of simulated ex vivo digestion showed ACE inhibitory as well as antioxidative activities. It was demonstrated that the degree of hydrolysis depended on the duration of individual stages and the degree of comminution of the examined material. Although the applied gastric juices initiated the process of hydrolysis of carp muscle tissue, the duodenal juices caused a rapid increase in the amount of hydrolysed polypeptide bonds. The antihypertensive and antioxidative activities of the hydrolysates of carp muscle tissue increased together with progressive protein degradation. However, the high degree of protein hydrolysis does not favour an increase in the activity of free radical scavenging. The presented results are an example of the first preliminary screening of the potential health-promoting biological activity of carp muscle tissue in an ex vivo study.

  12. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity.

  13. Bifunctional staining for ex vivo determination of area at risk in rabbits with reperfused myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuanbo; Ma, Zhan-Long; Chen, Feng; Yu, Jie; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Xie, Yi; Li, Yue; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To develop a method for studying myocardial area at risk (AAR) in ischemic heart disease in correlation with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). METHODS: Nine rabbits were anesthetized, intubated and subjected to occlusion and reperfusion of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCx) to induce myocardial infarction (MI). ECG-triggered cMRI with delayed enhancement was performed at 3.0 T. After euthanasia, the heart was excised with the LCx re-ligated. Bifunctional staining was performed by perfusing the aorta with a homemade red-iodized-oil (RIO) dye. The heart was then agar-embedded for ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging and sliced into 3 mm-sections. The AAR was defined by RIO-staining and digital radiography (DR). The perfusion density rate (PDR) was derived from DR for the AAR and normal myocardium. The MI was measured by in vivo delayed enhancement (iDE) and ex vivo delayed enhancement (eDE) cMRI. The AAR and MI were compared to validate the bifunctional straining for cardiac imaging research. Linear regression with Bland-Altman agreement, one way-ANOVA with Bonferroni’s multiple comparison, and paired t tests were applied for statistics. RESULTS: All rabbits tolerated well the surgical procedure and subsequent cMRI sessions. The open-chest occlusion and close-chest reperfusion of the LCx, double suture method and bifunctional staining were successfully applied in all animals. The percentage MI volumes globally (n = 6) and by slice (n = 25) were 36.59% ± 13.68% and 32.88% ± 12.38% on iDE, and 35.41% ± 12.25% and 32.40% ± 12.34% on eDE. There were no significant differences for MI determination with excellent linear regression correspondence (rglobal = 0.89; rslice = 0.9) between iDE and eDE. The percentage AAR volumes globally (n = 6) and by slice (n = 25) were 44.82% ± 15.18% and 40.04% ± 13.64% with RIO-staining, and 44.74% ± 15.98% and 40.48% ± 13.26% by DR showing high correlation in linear regression analysis (rglobal = 0.99; rslice

  14. The effect of phosphorylated Akt inhibition on posterior capsule opacification in an ex vivo canine model

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Terah R.; Barden, Curtis A.; Thangavelu, Mirunalni; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Colitz, Carmen M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether inhibition of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) would reduce or prevent posterior capsule opacification (PCO) in an ex vivo canine lens capsule model. Methods Normal and cataractous lenses (n=6) were evaluated for pAkt via immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Primary cultures of lens epithelial cells (LEC) were exposed to ultraviolet light (UV) to induce pAkt. Cultures were then incubated in 0, 2.5, 5, or 10 µM (n=6) of a novel Akt inhibitor (AR-12) for either 8 or 24 h. Cultures were harvested and pAkt expression and telomerase activity examined by immunoblotting and telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP)-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Lens capsules were harvested post-sham cataract surgery and exposed to 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10 μM (n=8) of AR-12 for a total of 14 days treatment. Additional lens capsules (n=6) were exposed to 10 μM of AR-12 for 1 week followed by media alone for 1 week; or exposed to media alone for 1 week followed by 10 μM of AR-12 for 1 week. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining were performed to evaluate PCO formation. Analysis of telomerase activity on the lens capsules was performed by TRAP-ELISA. Results pAkt protein expression was increased in clinical samples of canine cataracts compared to normal lenses. Following exposure to UV, cultures of LEC significantly (p<0.05) increased expression of pAkt and telomerase activity. Treatment with AR-12 for both 8 and 24 h following UV irradiation significantly (p<0.01) decreased pAkt expression. When UV-exposed LEC were allowed to recover in the presence of either 5.0 or 10.0 µM AR-12, there was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in telomerase activity. In the ex vivo model of PCO, within the region of the capsulorhexis, PCO inhibition was maximally achieved with 10 μM of AR-12. A significant decrease in LEC was noted on the posterior capsules containing 5.0, 7.5, and 10 μM AR-12 compared to the control capsules (p<0

  15. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  16. An ex vivo gene therapy approach in X-linked retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Bashar, Abu E.; Metcalfe, Andrew L.; Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A.; Yanai, Anat; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is juvenile-onset macular degeneration caused by haploinsufficiency of the extracellular cell adhesion protein retinoschisin (RS1). RS1 mutations can lead to either a non-functional protein or the absence of protein secretion, and it has been established that extracellular deficiency of RS1 is the underlying cause of the phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesized that an ex vivo gene therapy strategy could be used to deliver sufficient extracellular RS1 to reverse the phenotype seen in XLRS. Here, we used adipose-derived, syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that were genetically modified to secrete human RS1 and then delivered these cells by intravitreal injection to the retina of the Rs1h knockout mouse model of XLRS. Methods MSCs were electroporated with two transgene expression systems (cytomegalovirus (CMV)-controlled constitutive and doxycycline-induced Tet-On controlled inducible), both driving expression of human RS1 cDNA. The stably transfected cells, using either constitutive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) or inducible MSC cassettes, were assayed for their RS1 secretion profile. For single injection studies, 100,000 genetically modified MSCs were injected into the vitreous cavity of the Rs1h knockout mouse eye at P21, and data were recorded at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-injection. The control groups received either unmodified MSCs or vehicle injection. For the multiple injection studies, the mice received intravitreal MSC injections at P21, P60, and P90 with data collection at P120. For the single- and multiple-injection studies, the outcomes were measured with electroretinography, optokinetic tracking responses (OKT), histology, and immunohistochemistry. Results Two lines of genetically modified MSCs were established and found to secrete RS1 at a rate of 8 ng/million cells/day. Following intravitreal injection, RS1-expressing MSCs were found mainly in the inner retinal layers. Two weeks after a single injection of MSCs, the

  17. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo characterization of PLGA nanoparticles loading pranoprofen for ocular administration.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, Cristina; Alvarado, Helen; Calpena, Ana C; Silva, Amélia M; Souto, Eliana B; García, Maria L; Abrego, Guadalupe

    2016-09-25

    Pranoprofen (PF) is a NSAID considered as a safe anti-inflammatory treatment for strabismus and/or cataract surgery. The drug has been formulated in poly (lactic/glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (PF-F1NPs with cPF 1.5mg/mL, PF-F2NPs with cPF 1mg/mL) produced by solvent displacement technique and tested the in vitro cytotoxicity, ex vivo corneal permeation, in vivo ocular tolerance and in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy of PF-F1NPs, PF-F2NPs, in comparison to eye drops conventional dosage form (Oftalar(®), PF 1mg/mL) and free drug solution (PF dissolved in PBS, 1.5mg/mL). The mean particle size of both formulations was around 350nm, with polydispersity index below 0.1, and a net negative charge of -7.41mV and -8.5mV for PF-F1NPs and PF-F2NPs, respectively. Y-79 human retinoblastoma cell line was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of PF-F1NPs and PF-F2NPs, which were compared to blank NPs and free drug solution (PF dissolved in PBS, 1.5mg/mL). Concentrations up to 75μg/mL exhibited no toxicity to Y-79 cells, whereas at 150μg/mL a decrease of about 80% on the cell viability was observed after exposing the cells to PF-F1NPs. When treating the Y-79 cells with concentrations of PF-F2NPs between 1μg/mL to 100μg/mL, the cell viability was similar to control values after 24h and 48h of exposure. An ex vivo corneal permeation study was carried out in New Zealand rabbits. A very similar profile has been observed for the permeation of PF through the cornea when administered as eye drops and as free drug solution, which was kept much lower in comparison to PF-NPs formulations. The permeated amount of PF from the PF-F1NPs was slightly smaller than from PF-F2NPs, attributed to the increase of viscosity of the formulations with the increase of cPVA concentration. New Zealand white rabbits were also used to evaluate the irritancy of PF-F1NPs and PF-F2NPs, which demonstrated to be well-tolerated to the eye (i.e. the mean total score (MTS) was 0). PF-F2NPs exhibited the

  18. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  19. Adenosine A2A Agonist Improves Lung Function During Ex-vivo Lung Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Emaminia, Abbas; LaPar, Damien J.; Zhao, Yunge; Steidle, John F.; Harris, David A.; Linden, Joel; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel technique to assess, and potentially repair marginal lungs that may otherwise be rejected for transplantation. Adenosine has been shown to protect against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury through its A2A receptor. We hypothesized that combining EVLP with adenosine A2A receptor agonist treatment would enhance lung functional quality and increase donor lung usage. Methods Eight bilateral pig lungs were harvested and flushed with cold Perfadex. After 14 hours storage at 4°C, EVLP was performed for 5 hours on two explanted lung groups: 1) Control group lungs (n=4), were perfused with Steen Solution and Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and 2) treated group lungs (n=4) received 10μM CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor agonist, in a Steen Solution-primed circuit. Lung histology, tissue cytokines, gas analysis and pulmonary function were compared between groups. Results Treated lungs demonstrated significantly less edema as reflected by wet-dry weight ratio (6.6 vs. 5.2, p<0.03) and confirmed by histology. In addition, treated lung demonstrated significantly lower levels of interferon gamma (45.1 vs. 88.5, p<0.05). Other measured tissue cytokines (interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8) were lower in treatment group, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Oxygenation index was improved in the treated group (1.5 vs. 2.3, p<0.01) as well as mean airway pressure (10.3 vs. 13 p<0.009). Conclusions EVLP is a novel and efficient way to assess and optimize lung function and oxygen exchange within donor lungs, and the use of adenosine A2A agonist potentiates its potential. EVLP with the concomitant administration of A2A agonist may enhance donor lung quality and could increase the donor lung pool for transplantation. PMID:22051279

  20. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies.

    PubMed

    Cilip, Christopher M; Rosenbury, Sarah B; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C; Schweinsberger, Gino R; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578 ± 154, 530 ± 171, and 426 ± 174  mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0 ± 0.4  mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4  mm outer diameter). PMID:23640080

  1. Manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles induce ex vivo, but not in vivo, cardiovascular effects

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Allancer DC; Ramalho, Laylla S; Souza, Álvaro PS; Mendes, Elizabeth P; Colugnati, Diego B; Zufelato, Nícholas; Sousa, Marcelo H; Bakuzis, Andris F; Castro, Carlos H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used for various biomedical applications. Importantly, manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles have useful magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and potential for hyperthermia treatment, but their effects in the cardiovascular system are poorly reported. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the cardiovascular effects of three different types of manganese ferrite-based magnetic nanoparticles: citrate-coated (CiMNPs); tripolyphosphate-coated (PhMNPs); and bare magnetic nanoparticles (BaMNPs). The samples were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The direct effects of the MNPs on cardiac contractility were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts. The CiMNPs, but not PhMNPs and BaMNPs, induced a transient decrease in the left ventricular end-systolic pressure. The PhMNPs and BaMNPs, but not CiMNPs, induced an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, which resulted in a decrease in a left ventricular end developed pressure. Indeed, PhMNPs and BaMNPs also caused a decrease in the maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise (+dP/dt) and maximal rate of left ventricular pressure decline (−dP/dt). The three MNPs studied induced an increase in the perfusion pressure of isolated hearts. BaMNPs, but not PhMNPs or CiMNPs, induced a slight vasorelaxant effect in the isolated aortic rings. None of the MNPs were able to change heart rate or arterial blood pressure in conscious rats. In summary, although the MNPs were able to induce effects ex vivo, no significant changes were observed in vivo. Thus, given the proper dosages, these MNPs should be considered for possible therapeutic applications. PMID:25031535

  2. Assessing leukocyte-endothelial interactions under flow conditions in an ex vivo autoperfused microflow chamber assay.

    PubMed

    Mulki, Lama; Sweigard, J Harry; Connor, Kip M

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte-endothelial interactions are early and critical events in acute and chronic inflammation and can, when dysregulated, mediate tissue injury leading to permanent pathological damage. Existing conventional assays allow the analysis of leukocyte adhesion molecules only after the extraction of leukocytes from the blood. This requires the blood to undergo several steps before peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) can be ready for analysis, which in turn can stimulate PBLs influencing the research findings. The autoperfused micro flow chamber assay, however, allows scientists to study early leukocytes functional dysregulation using the systemic flow of a live mouse while having the freedom of manipulating a coated chamber. Through a disease model, the functional expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules can be assessed and quantified in a micro-glass chamber coated with immobilized endothelial adhesion molecules ex vivo. In this model, the blood flows between the right common carotid artery and left external jugular vein of a live mouse under anesthesia, allowing the interaction of native PBLs in the chamber. Real-time experimental analysis is achieved with the assistance of an intravital microscope as well as a Harvard Apparatus pressure device. The application of a flow regulator at the input point of the glass chamber allows comparable physiological flow conditions amongst the experiments. Leukocyte rolling velocity is the main outcome and is measured using the National Institutes of Health open-access software ImageJ. In summary, the autoperfused micro flow chamber assay provides an optimal physiological environment to study leukocytes endothelial interaction and allows researchers to draw accurate conclusions when studying inflammation.

  3. Ex vivo 3D osteocyte network construction with primary murine bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiaoling; Gu, Yexin; Zhang, Wenting; Dziopa, Leah; Zilberberg, Jenny; Lee, Woo

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as three-dimensionally (3D) networked cells in the lacunocanalicular structure of bones and regulate bone and mineral homeostasis. Despite of their important regulatory roles, in vitro studies of osteocytes have been challenging because: (1) current cell lines do not sufficiently represent the phenotypic features of mature osteocytes and (2) primary cells rapidly differentiate to osteoblasts upon isolation. In this study, we used a 3D perfusion culture approach to: (1) construct the 3D cellular network of primary murine osteocytes by biomimetic assembly with microbeads and (2) reproduce ex vivo the phenotype of primary murine osteocytes, for the first time to our best knowledge. In order to enable 3D construction with a sufficient number of viable cells, we used a proliferated osteoblastic population of healthy cells outgrown from digested bone chips. The diameter of microbeads was controlled to: (1) distribute and entrap cells within the interstitial spaces between the microbeads and (2) maintain average cell-to-cell distance to be about 19 µm. The entrapped cells formed a 3D cellular network by extending and connecting their processes through openings between the microbeads. Also, with increasing culture time, the entrapped cells exhibited the characteristic gene expressions (SOST and FGF23) and nonproliferative behavior of mature osteocytes. In contrast, 2D-cultured cells continued their osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation. This 3D biomimetic approach is expected to provide a new means of: (1) studying flow-induced shear stress on the mechanotransduction function of primary osteocytes, (2) studying physiological functions of 3D-networked osteocytes with in vitro convenience, and (3) developing clinically relevant human bone disease models. PMID:26421212

  4. In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo Determination of Thyroid Hormone Modulating Activity of Benzothiazoles.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Michael W; Kosian, Patricia A; Haselman, Jonathan T; Korte, Joseph J; Challis, Katie; Macherla, Chitralekha; Nevalainen, Erica; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2015-08-01

    As in vitro assays are increasingly used to screen chemicals for their potential to produce endocrine disrupting adverse effects, it is important to understand their predictive capacity. The potential for a set of 6 benzothiazoles to affect endpoints related to thyroid hormone synthesis inhibition were assessed using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo assays. Inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) derived from pig thyroid glands was determined for benzothiazole (BTZ), 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (CMBT), 2-aminobenzothiazole (ABT), 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (HBT), and 2-methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT). Their rank order potency for TPO inhibition was MBT=CMBT>ABT>BTZ, whereas HBT and MTBT exhibited no inhibitory activity. The benzothiazoles were tested further in a Xenopus laevis thyroid gland explant culture assay in which inhibition of thyroxine (T4) release was the measured endpoint. In this assay all 6 benzothiazoles inhibited T4 release. The activity of the benzothiazoles for disrupting thyroid hormone activity was verified in vivo using X. laevis tadpoles in a 7-day assay. The 2 most potent chemicals for TPO inhibition, MBT and CMBT, produced responses in vivo indicative of T4 synthesis inhibition including induction of sodium iodide symporter mRNA and decreases in glandular and circulating thyroid hormones. The capability to measure thyroid hormone levels in the glands and blood by ultrahigh performance LC-MS/MS methods optimized for small tissue samples was critical for effects interpretation. These results indicate that inhibition of TPO activity in vitro was a good indicator of a chemical's potential for thyroid hormone disruption in vivo and may be useful for prioritizing chemicals for further investigation. PMID:25953703

  5. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Devendra; Ave, Patrick; Kerneis, Sophie; Frileux, Pascal; Boché, Olivier; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Dubost, Geneviève; Leguern, Anne-Sophie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2009-11-17

    Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year) is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase) and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor) were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon) was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5), which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus) and mucus degradation, respectively) were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  6. Lyophilized phytosomal nanocarriers as platforms for enhanced diosmin delivery: optimization and ex vivo permeation

    PubMed Central

    Freag, May S; Elnaggar, Yosra SR; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2013-01-01

    Diosmin (DSN) is an outstanding phlebotonic flavonoid with a tolerable potential for the treatment of colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. Being highly insoluble, DSN bioavailability suffers from high inter-subject variation due to variable degrees of permeation. This work endeavored to develop novel DSN loaded phytosomes in order to improve drug dissolution and intestinal permeability. Three preparation methods (solvent evaporation, salting out, and lyophilization) were compared. Nanocarrier optimization encompassed different soybean phospholipid (SPC) types, different solvents, and different DSN:SPC molar ratios (1:1, 1:2, and 1:4). In vitro appraisal encompassed differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and in vitro stability. Comparative dissolution studies were performed under sink versus non-sink conditions. Ex vivo intestinal permeation studies were performed on rats utilizing noneverted sac technique and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The results revealed lyophilization as the optimum preparation technique using SPC and solvent mixture (Dimethyl sulphoxide:t-butylalchol) in a 1:2 ratio. Complex formation was contended by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared data. Optimal lyophilized phytosomal nanocarriers (LPNs) exhibited the lowest particle size (316 nm), adequate zeta-potential (−27 mV), and good in vitro stability. Well formed, discrete vesicles were revealed by transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and in vitro stability. Comparative dissolution studies were performed. LPNs demonstrated significant enhancement in DSN dissolution compared to crude drug, physical mixture, and generic and brand DSN products. Permeation studies revealed 80% DSN permeated from LPNs via oxygenated rat intestine compared to non-detectable amounts from suspension. In this study, LPNs (99% drug loading) could be successfully

  7. Reversal of dabigatran anticoagulation ex vivo: Porcine study comparing prothrombin complex concentrates and idarucizumab.

    PubMed

    Honickel, Markus; Treutler, Stefanie; van Ryn, Joanne; Tillmann, Sabine; Rossaint, Rolf; Grottke, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Urgent surgery or life-threatening bleeding requires prompt reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran. This study assessed the ability of three- and four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and idarucizumab (specific antidote for dabigatran) to reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in a porcine model of trauma. Twelve animals were given dabigatran etexilate (DE) orally and dabigatran intravenously, before infliction of trauma. Six animals received tranexamic acid plus fibrinogen concentrate 12 minutes post-injury. Six PCCs (each 30 and 60 U/kg) and idarucizumab (30 and 60 mg/kg) were added to blood samples ex vivo. Coagulation was assessed by several coagulation assays. All coagulation parameters were altered after dabigatran infusion (plasma level: 442 ± 138 ng/ml). Both three- and four-factor PCCs mostly or completely reversed the effects of dabigatran on thromboelastometry variables and PT but not on aPTT. Idarucizumab neutralised plasma concentrations of dabigatran, and reversed the effects of the drug on coagulation variables. Thrombin generation showed dose-dependent over-correction following the addition of PCC, implying that elevated levels of thrombin are required to overcome dabigatran-induced coagulopathy. In contrast, treatment with idarucizumab returned thrombin generation to baseline levels. Following trauma, therapy with tranexamic acid plus fibrinogen improved correction of coagulation parameters by PCC, and thromboelastometry parameters by idarucizumab. All investigated PCCs improved dabigatran- and trauma-induced coagulopathy to a similar degree. In conclusion, this study shows that three- and four-factor PCCs are similarly effective for dabigatran reversal. Idarucizumab also reversed the effects of dabigatran and, unlike PCCs, was not associated with over-correction of thrombin generation.

  8. A novel method for determining human ex vivo submaximal skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Gram, Martin; Jensen, Martin Borch; Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Dela, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    The present study utilized a novel method aiming to investigate mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle at submaximal levels and at a predefined membrane potential. The effect of age and training status was investigated using a cross-sectional design. Ageing was found to be related to decreased leak regardless of training status. Increased training status was associated with increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide emission. Despite numerous studies, there is no consensus about whether mitochondrial function is altered with increased age. The novelty of the present study is the determination of mitochondrial function at submaximal activity rates, which is more physiologically relevant than the ex vivo functionality protocols used previously. Muscle biopsies were taken from 64 old or young male subjects (aged 60-70 or 20-30 years). Aged subjects were recruited as trained or untrained. Muscle biopsies were used for the isolation of mitochondria and subsequent measurements of DNA repair, anti-oxidant capacity and mitochondrial protein levels (complexes I-V). Mitochondrial function was determined by simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption, membrane potential and hydrogen peroxide emission using pyruvate + malate (PM) or succinate + rotenone (SR) as substrates. Proton leak was lower in aged subjects when determined at the same membrane potential and was unaffected by training status. State 3 respiration was lower in aged untrained subjects. This effect, however, was alleviated in aged trained subjects. H2 O2 emission with PM was higher in aged subjects, and was exacerbated by training, although it was not changed when using SR. However, with a higher manganese superoxide dismuthase content, the trained aged subjects may actually have lower or similar mitochondrial superoxide emission compared to the untrained subjects. We conclude that ageing and the physical activity level in aged subjects are both related to changes in the intrinsic functionality of

  9. Detrimental arterial inflammatory effect of microparticles circulating in preeclamptic women: ex vivo evaluation in human arteries.

    PubMed

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Meziani, Ferhat; Sananès, Nicolas; Boisramé, Thomas; Langer, Bruno; Schneider, Francis; Ragot, Thierry; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Tesse, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Elevated plasmatic levels of lympho-monocyte and platelet microparticles (MPs) have been reported in preeclampsia. Previous studies suggest that MPs could participate in preeclampsia vascular impairment. In this study, we investigated the ex vivo vascular effects of MPs from preeclamptic women on arteries from normotensive pregnant women. Omental arteries were collected from normal pregnant women undergoing cesarean section and incubated during 24 h with MPs from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. Vascular contraction to serotonin and phenylephrine was studied on a wire myograph with or without pharmacological selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and/or cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2). Expression of iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB and production of superoxide anion and 8-isoprostane were also assessed by immunohistological or biochemical staining and/or Western blot or ELISA assay, respectively. Microparticles from preeclamptic women, but not those from normal pregnant women, induced hyporeactivity to vasocontracturant agonists in omental arteries. Selective inhibitor of iNOS partially restored this arterial contraction, suggesting that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in vascular contractility alteration. Conversely, COX-2 induced 8-isoprostane release, a vasoconstricting metabolite modulating the agonist-induced contraction. COX-2 selective inhibitor almost abolished the arterial contraction in the same vessels. Interestingly, the association of iNOS and COX-2 selective inhibitors restored the contraction to control levels. Moreover, iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB expressions are upregulated and superoxide anion levels increased in vessels incubated with MPs from preeclamptic women. In conclusion, circulating MPs from preeclamptic women induce vascular inflammation and enhance oxidative stress. These results suggest a possible role of MPs during preeclampsia-induced arterial dysfunction.

  10. Confocal raman microspectral imaging of ex vivo human spinal cord tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Liang, Zhuowen; Gong, Yuzhe; Yin, Yaning; Wang, Kaige; He, Qingli; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jintao

    2016-10-01

    Confocal Raman microspectral imaging (CRMI) provides a versatile tool to illustrate the biochemical nature and structure of biological tissue without introducing any external labels. In this work, a precise correlation was established between the biochemical profile and histological architecture of ex vivo human spinal cord tissue by using CRMI with 633nm excitation. After precisely linking the spectral features to the chemical constituents, much information about the molecular composition of both gray and white matter were revealed. Two-dimensional Raman images were generated by integrating the intensities of the characteristic Raman bands in the area of the intermediate column and ventral horn. K-mean cluster analysis was further applied to visualize the underlying morphological basis of spinal cord tissue by chemical component types and their distribution pattern. Lipid-rich white matter could be visually distinguished from gray matter considering a CH2 bending/scissoring band at 1445cm(-1) and an amide III band at 1250cm(-1). Meanwhile, the formation and distribution pattern of perineuronal nets (PNNs) in the scanning area was validated by the integration of saccharides (617cm(-1)) and amide III bands. Moreover, the heme profile indicated a higher degree of vascularization in gray matter. All of the results obtained testified to the possibility that gray matter could be more susceptible to spinal cord injury (SCI) because of capillary network distribution and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) aggregation. These findings are important for interpreting the morphological specificity of human spinal cord tissue, and also for studying the molecular basis of SCI. PMID:27588715

  11. Ex vivo and in vivo diffusion of ropivacaine through spinal meninges: influence of absorption enhancers.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Dollo, Gilles; Ratajczak-Enselme, Maja; Deniau, Anne Laure; Chevanne, François; Estèbe, Jean Pierre; Legrand, Alain; Le Corre, Pascal

    2011-02-14

    Following epidural administration, cerebrospinal fluid bioavailability of local anesthetics is low, one major limiting factor being diffusion across the arachnoid mater barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of absorption enhancers on the meningeal permeability of epidurally administered ropivacaine. Five enhancers known for their ability to increase drug permeability via transcellular and/or paracellular pathways, i.e. palmitoyl carnitine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium caprate, dodecylphosphocholine and pentylglycerol, were tested ex vivo on fresh specimen of meninges removed from cervical to lumbar level of rabbit spine following laminectomy and placed in diffusion chambers. Among them, sodium caprate lead to the best permeability improvement for both marker and drug (440% and 112% for mannitol and ropivacaine, respectively) and was therefore selected for in vivo study in a sheep model using microdialysis technique to evaluate epidural and intrathecal ropivacaine concentrations following epidural administration. Resulting dialysate and plasma concentrations were used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. Following sodium caprate pre-treatment, ropivacaine intrathecal maximal concentration (Cmax) was 1.6 times higher (78 ± 16 μg ml(-1) vs 129 ± 26 μg ml(-1), p<0.05) but the influence of the absorption enhancer was only effective the first 30 min following ropivacaine injection, as seen with the significantly increase of intrathecal AUC(0-30 min) (1629 ± 437 μg min ml(-1) vs 2477 ± 559 μg min ml(-1), p<0.05) resulting in a bioavailable fraction 130% higher 30 min after ropivavaine administration. Co-administration of local anesthetics with sodium caprate seems to allow a transient and reversible improvement of transmeningeal passage into intrathecal space.

  12. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  13. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each). Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates). Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h) to 91 µm (72 h) covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  14. Human Dupuytren's Ex Vivo Culture for the Study of Myofibroblasts and Extracellular Matrix Interactions.

    PubMed

    Karkampouna, Sofia; Kloen, Peter; Obdeijn, Miryam C; Riester, Scott M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Organ fibrosis or "scarring" is known to account for a high death toll due to the extensive amount of disorders and organs affected (from cirrhosis to cardiovascular diseases). There is no effective treatment and the in vitro tools available do not mimic the in vivo situation rendering the progress of the out of control wound healing process still enigmatic. To date, 2D and 3D cultures of fibroblasts derived from DD patients are the main experimental models available. Primary cell cultures have many limitations; the fibroblasts derived from DD are altered by the culture conditions, lack cellular context and interactions, which are crucial for the development of fibrosis and weakly represent the derived tissue. Real-time PCR analysis of fibroblasts derived from control and DD samples show that little difference is detectable. 3D cultures of fibroblasts include addition of extracellular matrix that alters the native conditions of these cells. As a way to characterize the fibrotic, proliferative properties of these resection specimens we have developed a 3D culture system, using intact human resections of the nodule part of the cord. The system is based on transwell plates with an attached nitrocellulose membrane that allows contact of the tissue with the medium but not with the plastic, thus, preventing the alteration of the tissue. No collagen gel or other extracellular matrix protein substrate is required. The tissue resection specimens maintain their viability and proliferative properties for 7 days. This is the first "organ" culture system that allows human resection specimens from DD patients to be grown ex vivo and functionally tested, recapitulating the in vivo situation.

  15. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E J; Coussios, C-C; Cleveland, R O

    2014-06-21

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  16. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine. PMID:26564721

  17. A Comparison of Direct Heating During Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation in Ex Vivo Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Andreano, Anita; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of temperature elevations when using 480 kHz RF and 2.45 GHz microwave energy in ex vivo liver models. A total of 60 heating cycles (20 s at 90 W) were performed in normal, RF-ablated, and microwave-ablated liver tissues (n = 10 RF and n = 10 microwave in each tissue type). Heating cycles were performed using a 480-kHz generator and 3-cm cooled-tip electrode (RF) or a 2.45-GHz generator and 14-gauge monopole (microwave) and were designed to isolate direct heating from each energy type. Tissue temperatures were measured by using fiberoptic thermosensors 5, 10, and 15 mm radially from the ablation applicator at the depth of maximal heating. Power delivered, sensor location, heating rates, and maximal temperatures were compared using mixed effects regression models. No significant differences were noted in mean power delivered or thermosensor locations between RF and microwave heating groups (P > 0.05). Microwaves produced significantly more rapid heating than RF at 5, 10, and 15 mm in normal tissue (3.0 vs. 0.73, 0.85 vs. 0.21, and 0.17 vs. 0.09 Degree-Sign C/s; P < 0.05); and at 5 and 10 mm in ablated tissues (2.3 {+-} 1.4 vs. 0.7 {+-} 0.3, 0.5 {+-} 0.3 vs. 0.2 {+-} 0 Degree-Sign C/s, P < 0.05). The radial depth of heating was {approx}5 mm greater for microwaves than RF. Direct heating obtained with 2.45-GHz microwave energy using a single needle-like applicator is faster and covers a larger volume of tissue than 480-kHz RF energy.

  18. Laser-assisted cryosurgery in ex vivo mice hepatic tissue: viability assays using green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Suástegui, L; Duperray, B; Godinez, F; Guillén, G; Slade, A; Aguilar, G

    2011-02-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to develop a novel approach to cryosurgery, where laser heating counteracts tissue freezing to better confine damage to the targeted cancerous tissue within a lethal low-temperature isothermal boundary-an approach we refer to as laser-assisted cryosurgery (LAC). The advantage of this procedure relative to conventional cryosurgery assisted with urethral warmers or cryoheaters is that laser heating provides volumetric rather than superficial heating, which leads to deeper penetration, more homogeneous tissue protection and better demarcation of the destructive freezing effect to a well-defined targeted volume. Tissue viability assays are performed using green fluorescence protein (GFP) as a viability marker and correlated with temperature history after performing LAC procedures on ex vivo mice hepatic tissue. The limit for cell denaturation at the irradiated surface predicted by GFP analysis is further confirmed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, the correlation between GFP fluorescence and cell viability and loss of GFP fluorescence in non-viable cells has been tested and validated by histological analysis using a standard cell viability measuring method (hematoxylin and eosin staining). Analysis of our experimental measurements show that reproducible thermal gradients (of 236 °C/cm) and predictable tissue necrosis can be reliably produced by LAC without exceeding temperature thresholds for cell denaturation (of T (surf) ≈ 48 °C) beyond preset tissue boundaries (with resolution of 0.1 °C/mm). The results have shown the feasibility of controlling temperatures at specified tissue locations to prevent hyperthermal or freezing damage. PMID:20963494

  19. Isolation and characterization of ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells obtained from a surgical patient

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JIA; SHA, HUIFAN; WANG, GUAN; BAO, GUOLIANG; LU, SHUN; LUO, QINGQUAN; TAN, QIANG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics and pluripotent differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Bone marrow cells were isolated from a rib fragment of an adult surgical patient, hBMMSCs were isolated based on plastic adherence and expanded ex vivo and phenotyping was performed. Pluripotent differentiation assays for adipogenesis, myogenesis and osteogenesis were conducted. Hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated nude mice was performed by infusion of hBMMSCs. The gene expression profiles of early and late hBMMSCs were examined. The rate of CD31-positive cells was 31.1% in passage (P)4 hBMMSCs and 18.6% in P10 hBMMSCs. CD105 and CD106 were expressed in 99 and 95% of P25 hBMMSCs, respectively. Lipid droplets appeared at day 18 post induction. For osteogenesis, palpable masses were grossly observed from day 35 post inoculation of hBMMSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining further revealed chondrocytes and bone tissues. For myogenesis, at day six post subcutaneous inoculation, hBMMSCs differentiated into myocytes and were positive for myoglobin and MyoD1. In irradiated nude mice reconstituted by hBMMSCs, the white blood cell count briefly decreased following irradiation; however, it gradually recovered. In the irradiated nude mice reconstituted with hBMMSCs, CD45- and CD34-positive cells were detected 72 h post induction. Gene microarray analysis of P7 and P57 hBMMSCs demonstrated that 20 genes were upregulated >2 fold and 40 genes were downregulated >2 fold in P57 hBMMSCs. In conclusion, the isolated HBMMSCs possessed pluripotent differentiation potential and it was feasible and safe to use hBMMSCs within 30 passages. PMID:25376882

  20. Use of formalin-fixed tissues for ex-vivo imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortkroff, Sonya; Goodwin, Alicia; Giattina, Susanne; Liu, Bin; Brezinski, Mark E.

    2006-02-01

    Structural and compositional analysis of normal and pathological tissues by OCT often is performed ex vivo and subsequently compared to the histology. Many of the tissues of interest require immediate fixation to prevent degradation of the sample. Frequently, samples are obtained up to a week prior to procuring images by OCT. We investigated whether fixation affects OCT image analysis by acquiring images of freshly isolated bovine ligament samples and repeating OCT imaging of the same area after fixation at 24 hours and at one week. Samples were divided into two groups: group one was fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for 24 hours and placed in normal saline while group two remained in formalin for one week. Tissue samples were processed for paraffin embedment and stained with Masson's trichrome or with picrosirius red. The banding pattern contrast ratio of the OCT images before and after fixation for both groups was measured and compared for possible differences. Histology was evaluated for tissue integrity and compared to the OCT images. The mean contrast ratio at time 0 was 5.41 +/- 1.1 and 5.31 +/- 0.6 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Results at 1 week were slightly lower with 5.11 +/- 0.3 and 5.20 +/- 0.7, respectively. Statistical analysis of the data by ANOVA showed no difference in the contrast ratios with time or with treatment. This data indicates that 24 hours in formalin is sufficient to fix these small ligament samples with little effect on imaging up to one week after fixation.

  1. A single epidermal stem cell strategy for safe ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Droz-Georget Lathion, Stéphanie; Rochat, Ariane; Knott, Graham; Recchia, Alessandra; Martinet, Danielle; Benmohammed, Sara; Grasset, Nicolas; Zaffalon, Andrea; Besuchet Schmutz, Nathalie; Savioz-Dayer, Emmanuelle; Beckmann, Jacques Samuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barrandon, Yann

    2015-02-27

    There is a widespread agreement from patient and professional organisations alike that the safety of stem cell therapeutics is of paramount importance, particularly for ex vivo autologous gene therapy. Yet current technology makes it difficult to thoroughly evaluate the behaviour of genetically corrected stem cells before they are transplanted. To address this, we have developed a strategy that permits transplantation of a clonal population of genetically corrected autologous stem cells that meet stringent selection criteria and the principle of precaution. As a proof of concept, we have stably transduced epidermal stem cells (holoclones) obtained from a patient suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Holoclones were infected with self-inactivating retroviruses bearing a COL7A1 cDNA and cloned before the progeny of individual stem cells were characterised using a number of criteria. Clonal analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity among transduced stem cells in their capacity to produce functional type VII collagen (COLVII). Selected transduced stem cells transplanted onto immunodeficient mice regenerated a non-blistering epidermis for months and produced a functional COLVII. Safety was assessed by determining the sites of proviral integration, rearrangements and hit genes and by whole-genome sequencing. The progeny of the selected stem cells also had a diploid karyotype, was not tumorigenic and did not disseminate after long-term transplantation onto immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, a clonal strategy is a powerful and efficient means of by-passing the heterogeneity of a transduced stem cell population. It guarantees a safe and homogenous medicinal product, fulfilling the principle of precaution and the requirements of regulatory affairs. Furthermore, a clonal strategy makes it possible to envision exciting gene-editing technologies like zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and homologous recombination for next-generation gene therapy.

  2. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies.

    PubMed

    Cilip, Christopher M; Rosenbury, Sarah B; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C; Schweinsberger, Gino R; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578 ± 154, 530 ± 171, and 426 ± 174  mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0 ± 0.4  mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4  mm outer diameter).

  3. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  4. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ropivacaine: preparation, characterization and ex vivo penetration properties.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yingjie; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zimin; Zhai, Guangxi

    2015-01-01

    Ropivacaine, a novel long-acting local anesthetic, has been proved to own superior advantage. However, Naropin® Injection, the applied form in clinic, can cause patient non-convenience. The purpose of this study was to formulate ropivacaine (RPV) in ethosomes and evaluate the potential of ethosome formulation in delivering RPV transdermally. The RPV-loaded ethosomes were prepared with thin-film dispersion technique and the formulation was characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The results showed that the optimized RPV-ethosomes displayed a typical lipid bilayer structure with a narrow size distribution of 73.86 ± 2.40 nm and drug loading of 8.27 ± 0.37%, EE of 68.92 ± 0.29%. The results of DSC and XRD study indicated that RPV was in amorphous state when encapsulated into ethosomes. Furthermore, the results of ex vivo permeation study proved that RPV-ethosomes could promote the permeability in a high-efficient, rapid way (349.0 ± 11.5 μg cm(-2) at 12 h and 178.8 ± 7.1 μg cm(-2) at 0.5 h). The outcomes of histopathology study forecasted that the interaction between ethosomes and skin could loosen the tight conjugation of corneocyte layers and weaken the permeation barrier. In conclusion, RPV-ethosomes could be a promising delivery system to encapsulate RPV and deliver RPV for transdermal administration.

  5. Development of an Ex Vivo Tissue Platform To Study the Human Lung Response to Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Joseph G.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Kurten, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute debilitating flu-like illness that can also present as chronic endocarditis. Disease typically occurs following inhalation of contaminated aerosols, resulting in an initial pulmonary infection. In human cells, C. burnetii generates a replication niche termed the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) by directing fusion with autophagosomes and lysosomes. C. burnetii requires this lysosomal environment for replication and uses a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to generate the large PV. However, we do not understand how C. burnetii evades the intracellular immune surveillance that triggers an inflammatory response. We recently characterized human alveolar macrophage (hAM) infection in vitro and found that avirulent C. burnetii triggers sustained interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Here, we evaluated infection of ex vivo human lung tissue, defining a valuable approach for characterizing C. burnetii interactions with a human host. Within whole lung tissue, C. burnetii preferentially replicated in hAMs. Additionally, IL-1β production correlated with formation of an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC)-dependent inflammasome in response to infection. We also assessed potential activation of a human-specific noncanonical inflammasome and found that caspase-4 and caspase-5 are processed during infection. Interestingly, although inflammasome activation is closely linked to pyroptosis, lytic cell death did not occur following C. burnetii-triggered inflammasome activation, indicating an atypical response after intracellular detection. Together, these studies provide a novel platform for studying the human innate immune response to C. burnetii. PMID:26902725

  6. Impact of AQP3 inducer treatment on cultured human keratinocytes, ex vivo human skin and volunteers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, N; Gondran, C; Menon, G; Mur, L; Oberto, G; Guerif, Y; Dal Farra, C; Domloge, N

    2011-10-01

    One of the main functions of the skin is to protect the organism against environmental threats, such as thermal stress. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) facilitates water and glycerol transport across cell membranes and therefore regulates osmotic balance in different situations of stress. This mechanism seems to be particularly important for the resistance of different organisms to cold stress. Consequently, we were interested in investigating the effect of cold and osmotic stress on AQP3 expression in normal human keratinocytes. We developed a new active ingredient to stimulate aquaporins in skin and demonstrated the partial restoration of AQP3 expression in keratinocytes transfected with AQP3 siRNA. Moreover, we examined the effect of cold stress on cell morphology and the impact of a pre-treatment with the active ingredient. Our results indicated that induction of AQP3 helped maintain a correct organization of the actin cytoskeleton, preserving cell morphology and preventing cells from rounding. Immunofluorescent staining revealed cytoplasmic localization of AQP3 and its translocation to the cell membrane following osmotic stress. Histological ex vivo studies of skin under different conditions, such as cold environment and tape-stripping, indicated that increase in AQP3 expression appears to be involved in skin protection and showed that the pattern of AQP3 expression was more enhanced in the active ingredient-treated samples. In vivo confocal microscopy by Vivascope showed a generally healthier appearance of the skin in the treated areas. These results attest to the potential value of the active ingredient in optimizing environmental stress resistance and protecting the skin from stratum corneum damage.

  7. 24(S)-Hydroxycholesterol protects the ex vivo rat retina from injury by elevated hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Zorumski, Charles F.; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system, 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol (24(S)-HC) is an oxysterol synthesized from cholesterol by cholesterol 24-hydroxylase (CYP46A1) encoded by the cyp46a1 gene. In the present study using a rat ex vivo glaucoma model, we found that retinal 24(S)-HC synthesis is facilitated by pressure elevation. Moreover, we found that 24(S)-HC is neuroprotective against pressure mediated retinal degeneration. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry revealed that elevated pressure facilitated the expression of cyp46a1 and CYP46A1. Immunohistochemically, the enhanced expression of CYP46A1 was mainly observed in retinal ganglion cells (RGC). LC-MS/MS revealed that 24(S)-HC levels increased in a pressure-dependent manner. Axonal injury and apoptotic RGC death induced by 75 mmHg high pressure was ameliorated by exogenously administered 1 μM 24(S)-HC. In contrast, voriconazole, a CYP46A1 inhibitor, was severely toxic even at normobaric pressure. Under normobaric conditions, 30 μM 24(S)-HC was required to prevent the voriconazole-mediated retinal damage. Taken together, our findings indicate that 24(S)-HC is facilitated by elevated pressure and plays a neuroprotective role under glaucomatous conditions, while voriconazole, an antifungal drug, is retinotoxic. 24(S)-HC and related compounds may serve as potential therapeutic targets for protecting glaucomatous eyes from pressure-induced injuries. PMID:27653972

  8. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment. PMID:27086034

  9. Hydrogen sulfide activates the carotid body chemoreceptors in cat, rabbit and rat ex vivo preparations.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yingfu; Li, Qian; Sun, Biying; Zhang, Guohua; Rong, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    We and others previously reported experimental evidence suggesting an important role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oxygen sensing in murine carotid body chemoreceptors. More recent data implicated abnormal H2S-mediated chemoreceptor signaling in pathological conditions such as chronic heart failure and hypertension. However, the idea of H2S as a mediator of oxygen-sensing in chemoreceptors has been challenged. In particular, it was shown that exogenous H2S inhibited the release of neurotransmitters (ACh and ATP) from the cat carotid body, raising the possibility that there exists significant species difference in H2S-mediated signaling in chemoreceptors. This study was designed specifically to determine the effect of H2S on chemoreceptors in different species. We conducted multiunit extracellular recordings of the sinus nerve in the ex vivo carotid body preparation taken from the rat, the cat and the rabbit. As observed in the mouse carotid body, H2S donors (NaHS or Na2S) evoked qualitatively similar excitatory responses of the afferent sinus nerves of the species studied here. The excitatory effects of the H2S donors were concentration-dependent and reversible. The sinus nerve responses to H2S donors were prevented by blockade of the transmission between type I cells and the afferent terminals, as was the response to hypoxia. These results demonstrate that exogenous H2S exerts qualitatively similar excitatory effects on chemoreceptor afferents of different species. The role of endogenous H2S-mediated signaling in carotid body function in different species awaits further investigation.

  10. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Devendra; Ave, Patrick; Kerneis, Sophie; Frileux, Pascal; Boché, Olivier; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Dubost, Geneviève; Leguern, Anne-Sophie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year) is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase) and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor) were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon) was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5), which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus) and mucus degradation, respectively) were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. PMID:19936071

  11. Ex-Vivo Uterine Environment (EVE) Therapy Induced Limited Fetal Inflammation in a Premature Lamb Model

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yuichiro; Saito, Masatoshi; Usuda, Haruo; Woodward, Eleanor; Rittenschober-Böhm, Judith; Kannan, Paranthaman S.; Musk, Gabrielle C.; Matsuda, Tadashi; Newnham, John P.; Kemp, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ex-vivo uterine environment (EVE) therapy uses an artificial placenta to provide gas exchange and nutrient delivery to a fetus submerged in an amniotic fluid bath. Development of EVE may allow us to treat very premature neonates without mechanical ventilation. Meanwhile, elevations in fetal inflammation are associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. In the present study, we analysed fetal survival, inflammation and pulmonary maturation in preterm lambs maintained on EVE therapy using a parallelised umbilical circuit system with a low priming volume. Methods Ewes underwent surgical delivery at 115 days of gestation (term is 150 days), and fetuses were transferred to EVE therapy (EVE group; n = 5). Physiological parameters were continuously monitored; fetal blood samples were intermittently obtained to assess wellbeing and targeted to reference range values for 2 days. Age-matched animals (Control group; n = 6) were surgically delivered at 117 days of gestation. Fetal blood and tissue samples were analysed and compared between the two groups. Results Fetal survival time in the EVE group was 27.0 ± 15.5 (group mean ± SD) hours. Only one fetus completed the pre-determined study period with optimal physiological parameters, while the other 4 animals demonstrated physiological deterioration or death prior to the pre-determined study end point. Significant elevations (p<0.05) in: i) inflammatory proteins in fetal plasma; ii) selected cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression levels in fetal tissues; and iii) histological inflammatory score in fetal lung, were observed in the EVE group compared to the Control group. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in surfactant protein mRNA expression level between the two groups. Conclusion In this study, we achieved limited fetal survival using EVE therapy. Despite this, EVE therapy only induced a modest fetal inflammatory response and did not promote lung maturation. These data provide additional insight into

  12. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šnjarić, Damir; Čarija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kovačević, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  13. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ropivacaine: preparation, characterization and ex vivo penetration properties.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yingjie; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zimin; Zhai, Guangxi

    2015-01-01

    Ropivacaine, a novel long-acting local anesthetic, has been proved to own superior advantage. However, Naropin® Injection, the applied form in clinic, can cause patient non-convenience. The purpose of this study was to formulate ropivacaine (RPV) in ethosomes and evaluate the potential of ethosome formulation in delivering RPV transdermally. The RPV-loaded ethosomes were prepared with thin-film dispersion technique and the formulation was characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The results showed that the optimized RPV-ethosomes displayed a typical lipid bilayer structure with a narrow size distribution of 73.86 ± 2.40 nm and drug loading of 8.27 ± 0.37%, EE of 68.92 ± 0.29%. The results of DSC and XRD study indicated that RPV was in amorphous state when encapsulated into ethosomes. Furthermore, the results of ex vivo permeation study proved that RPV-ethosomes could promote the permeability in a high-efficient, rapid way (349.0 ± 11.5 μg cm(-2) at 12 h and 178.8 ± 7.1 μg cm(-2) at 0.5 h). The outcomes of histopathology study forecasted that the interaction between ethosomes and skin could loosen the tight conjugation of corneocyte layers and weaken the permeation barrier. In conclusion, RPV-ethosomes could be a promising delivery system to encapsulate RPV and deliver RPV for transdermal administration. PMID:25625544

  14. A versatile ex vivo technique for assaying tumor angiogenesis and microglia in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Ghoochani, Ali; Yakubov, Eduard; Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Hock, Stefan; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are hallmarked for their destructive activity on the microenvironment and vasculature. However, solely few experimental techniques exist to access the tumor microenvironment under anatomical intact conditions with remaining cellular and extracellular composition. Here, we detail an ex vivo vascular glioma impact method (VOGIM) to investigate the influence of gliomas and chemotherapeutics on the tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis under conditions that closely resemble the in vivo situation. We generated organotypic brain slice cultures from rats and transgenic mice and implanted glioma cells expressing fluorescent reporter proteins. In the VOGIM, tumor-induced vessels presented the whole range of vascular pathologies and tumor zones as found in human primary brain tumor specimens. In contrast, non-transformed cells such as primary astrocytes do not alter the vessel architecture. Vascular characteristics with vessel branching, junctions and vessel length are quantitatively assessable as well as the peritumoral zone. In particular, the VOGIM resembles the brain tumor microenvironment with alterations of neurons, microglia and cell survival. Hence, this method allows live cell monitoring of virtually any fluorescence-reporter expressing cell. We further analyzed the vasculature and microglia under the influence of tumor cells and chemotherapeutics such as Temozolamide (Temodal/Temcad®). Noteworthy, temozolomide normalized vasculare junctions and branches as well as microglial distribution in tumor-implanted brains. Moreover, VOGIM can be facilitated for implementing the 3Rs in experimentations. In summary, the VOGIM represents a versatile and robust technique which allows the assessment of the brain tumor microenvironment with parameters such as angiogenesis, neuronal cell death and microglial activity at the morphological and quantitative level. PMID:26673818

  15. Multidimensional immunolabeling and 4D time-lapse imaging of vital ex vivo lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vierkotten, Sarah; Lindner, Michael; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, the study of cell behavior was largely accomplished in uncoated or extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated plastic dishes. To date, considerable cell biological efforts have tried to model in vitro the natural microenvironment found in vivo. For the lung, explants cultured ex vivo as lung tissue cultures (LTCs) provide a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model containing all cells in their natural microenvironment. Techniques for assessing the dynamic live interaction between ECM and cellular tissue components, however, are still missing. Here, we describe specific multidimensional immunolabeling of living 3D-LTCs, derived from healthy and fibrotic mouse lungs, as well as patient-derived 3D-LTCs, and concomitant real-time four-dimensional multichannel imaging thereof. This approach allowed the evaluation of dynamic interactions between mesenchymal cells and macrophages with their ECM. Furthermore, fibroblasts transiently expressing focal adhesions markers incorporated into the 3D-LTCs, paving new ways for studying the dynamic interaction between cellular adhesions and their natural-derived ECM. A novel protein transfer technology (FuseIt/Ibidi) shuttled fluorescently labeled α-smooth muscle actin antibodies into the native cells of living 3D-LTCs, enabling live monitoring of α-smooth muscle actin-positive stress fibers in native tissue myofibroblasts residing in fibrotic lesions of 3D-LTCs. Finally, this technique can be applied to healthy and diseased human lung tissue, as well as to adherent cells in conventional two-dimensional cell culture. This novel method will provide valuable new insights into the dynamics of ECM (patho)biology, studying in detail the interaction between ECM and cellular tissue components in their natural microenvironment. PMID:26092995

  16. Removing Biofilms from Microstructured Titanium Ex Vivo: A Novel Approach Using Atmospheric Plasma Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each). Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates). Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h) to 91 µm (72 h) covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease. PMID:22016784

  17. Improving donor lung suitability: from protective strategies to ex-vivo reconditioning.

    PubMed

    Solidoro, Paolo; Schreiber, Annia; Boffini, Massimo; Braido, Fulvio; DI Marco, Fabiano

    2016-06-01

    Lung transplant is a therapeutic option for end stage lung diseases, but only a limited number of lung grafts is considered suitable for transplantation. It has been recently suggested an approach to improve and maximize donor lung suitability, namely ventilation strategies to prevent lung damage and preserve function before transplantation. In potential lung donor patients, the use of lung-protective ventilatory strategies may protect against and at least partially reverse some conditions, such as ventilator-induced lung injury, atelectasis and neurogenic pulmonary edema, resulting in improved donor organ procurement. The novelty recently proposed lies in the integration of ventilatory strategies of previous studies, using an algorithmic approach for the management of potential donors, based on their clinical response and PaO2/FiO2 ratio. This approach could be further improved by using lung ultrasound (LUS) which demonstrated to be more accurate than bedside chest radiography in detecting and distinguishing different degrees of aeration loss, and could be useful in the evaluation of alveolar recruitment following the application of PEEP or after performing any recruitment maneuver. Finally, the close future is the exploration of ex-vivo reconditioning which introduces the exciting concept of both a protective ventilation and a protective perfusion, reducing the risk of ventilation associated damage, and, on the other hand, washing out potential inflammatory cytokines by low volume high oncotic pressure perfusion, managing the risk of edema by capillary leakage. Addressing these challenges will allow more patients with end-stage lung disease access to a lung transplant. PMID:27424500

  18. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-01-01

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the present study, precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from the jejunum of 18 human donors were used as an ex vivo model to investigate whether DCF intestinal metabolites are responsible for its intestinal toxicity in man. PCIS were incubated with a concentration range of DCF (0-600 µM) up to 24 h. DCF (≥400 µM) caused direct toxicity to the intestine as demonstrated by ATP depletion, morphological damage, caspase 3 activation, and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Three main metabolites produced by PCIS (4'-hydroxy DCF, 5-hydroxy DCF, and DCF acyl glucuronide) were detected by HPLC. Protein adducts were detected by immunohistochemical staining and showed correlation with the intestinal metabolites. DCF induced similar toxicity to each of the samples regardless of the variation in metabolism among them. Less metabolites were produced by slices incubated with 400 µM DCF than with 100 µM DCF. The addition of the metabolic inhibitors such as ketoconazole, cimetidine, or borneol decreased the metabolite formation but increased the toxicity. The results suggest that DCF can induce intestinal toxicity in human PCIS directly at therapeutically relevant concentrations, independent of the reactive metabolites 4'-OH DCF, 5-OH DCF, or diclofenac acylglucuronide produced by the liver or formed in the intestine.

  19. Spatiotemporal Mapping of Motility in Ex Vivo Preparations of the Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Kendig, Derek M.; Hurst, Norm R.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple approaches have been used to record and evaluate gastrointestinal motility including: recording changes in muscle tension, intraluminal pressure, and membrane potential. All of these approaches depend on measurement of activity at one or multiple locations along the gut simultaneously which are then interpreted to provide a sense of overall motility patterns. Recently, the development of video recording and spatiotemporal mapping (STmap) techniques have made it possible to observe and analyze complex patterns in ex vivo whole segments of colon and intestine. Once recorded and digitized, video records can be converted to STmaps in which the luminal diameter is converted to grayscale or color [called diameter maps (Dmaps)]. STmaps can provide data on motility direction (i.e., stationary, peristaltic, antiperistaltic), velocity, duration, frequency and strength of contractile motility patterns. Advantages of this approach include: analysis of interaction or simultaneous development of different motility patterns in different regions of the same segment, visualization of motility pattern changes over time, and analysis of how activity in one region influences activity in another region. Video recordings can be replayed with different timescales and analysis parameters so that separate STmaps and motility patterns can be analyzed in more detail. This protocol specifically details the effects of intraluminal fluid distension and intraluminal stimuli that affect motility generation. The use of luminal receptor agonists and antagonists provides mechanistic information on how specific patterns are initiated and how one pattern can be converted into another pattern. The technique is limited by the ability to only measure motility that causes changes in luminal diameter, without providing data on intraluminal pressure changes or muscle tension, and by the generation of artifacts based upon experimental setup; although, analysis methods can account for these issues

  20. Fabrication of Large Size Ex Vivo-Produced Oral Mucosal Equivalents for Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroko; Marcelo, Cynthia L; Washington, James B; Bingham, Eve L; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2015-09-01

    The soft tissue reconstruction of significant avulsed and/or surgically created tissue defects requires the ability to manufacture substantial soft tissue constructs for repair of the resulting wounds. In this study, we detail the issues that need to be addressed in upsizing the manufacture of larger tissue-engineered devices (ex vivo-produced oral mucosa equivalent [EVPOME]) in vitro from a methodology previously used for smaller constructs. The larger-sized EVPOME, consisting of autologous human oral keratinocytes and a dermal substitute, AlloDerm(®), was fabricated for the purpose of reconstructing large clinical defects. Regulated as an autologous somatic cell therapy product, the fabrication process abided by current Good Manufacturing Practices and current Good Tissue Practices as required by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Successful fabrication of large EVPOMEs utilized a higher cell seeding density (5.3×10(5) cells/cm(2)) with a relatively thinner AlloDerm, ranging from 356.6 to 508.0 μm in thickness. During the air-liquid interface culture, the thickness of the scaffold affected the medium diffusion rate, which, in turn, resulted in changes of epithelial stratification. Histologically, keratinocyte progenitor (p63), proliferation (Ki-67), and late differentiation marker (filaggrin) expression showed differences correlating with the expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) in the EVPOMEs from the thickest (550-1020 μm) to the thinnest (228.6-330.2 μm) AlloDerm scaffold. Glucose consumption and 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake showed direct correlation with scaffold thickness. The scaffold size and thickness have an impact on the cellular phenotype and epithelial maturation in the manufacturing process of the EVPOME due to the glucose accessibility influenced by the diffusion rate. These outcomes provide basic strategies to manufacture a large-sized, healthy EVPOME

  1. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine.

  2. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment.

  3. Ex vivo effects of naphthoquinones on allergen-sensitized mononuclear cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Inoue, K; Shimada, A; Takano, H

    2016-09-01

    Naphthoquinone (NQ), one of the extractable chemical compounds of diesel exhaust particles, enhances allergic asthma traits in mice. However, it remains unknown whether: (1) several types of NQs have the same potential to facilitate allergies; and (2) NQs synergistically disrupt the functional phenotypes of immune cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of two types (1,2- and 1,4-) of NQs on sensitized mononuclear cells using an ex vivo assay. Male BALB/c mice were repeatedly and intraperitoneally administered ovalbumin (OVA: 20 µg) plus alum with or without two different doses of each NQ. After the final administration, splenocytes (mononuclear cells) were isolated from these mice and cultured in the presence of OVA. Helper T-related cytokines in the culture supernatants and downstream molecules were then evaluated. Protein levels of interferon-γ were higher in the supernatants from 1,2-NQ and 1,4-NQ at low dose + OVA-exposed mononuclear cells following the OVA stimulation than in those from OVA-exposed mononuclear cells. Interleukin (IL)-13 levels were higher in the supernatants from low dose NQs + OVA-exposed mononuclear cells. IL-17 levels were significantly higher in the supernatants from low dose 1,2-NQ + OVA-exposed mononuclear cells. The quantity of phosphorylated STAT6 in the nuclei of these cells was significantly greater in the low dose NQ + OVA groups than in the OVA group. These findings suggest NQs differently enhance allergen sensitization in the context of the Th response against mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes. PMID:26884456

  4. Rapid infrared laser sealing and cutting of porcine renal vessels, ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Nicholas C.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Perkins, William C.; Latimer, Cassandra; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Suture ligation with subsequent cutting of blood vessels to maintain hemostasis during surgery is time consuming and skill intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical and ultrasonic devices are often used to replace sutures and mechanical clips to provide rapid hemostasis, and decrease surgical time. Some of these devices may create undesirably large collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis, or require separate mechanical blades for cutting. Infrared lasers are currently being explored as alternative energy sources for vessel sealing applications. In a previous study, a 1470-nm laser was used to seal vessels of 1-6 mm in diameter in 5 s, yielding burst pressures of ~ 500 mmHg. The purpose of this study was to provide faster sealing, incorporate transection of the sealed vessels, and increase the burst pressure. A 110-Watt, 1470-nm laser beam was transmitted through a fiber and beam shaping optics, producing a linear beam 3.0 mm by 9.5 mm for sealing, and 1.1 mm by 9.6 mm for cutting (FWHM). A twostep process sealed then transected ex vivo porcine renal vessels (1-8.5 mm diameter) in a bench top setup. Seal and cut times were 1.0 s each. A standard burst pressure system measured resulting seal strength, and gross and histologic thermal damage measurements were also recorded. All blood vessels tested (n = 30) were sealed and cut, with total irradiation times of 2.0 s, mean burst pressures > 1000 mmHg (compared to normal systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg), and combined seal/collateral thermal coagulation zones of 2-3 mm. The results of this study demonstrated that an optical-based system is capable of precisely sealing and cutting a wide range of porcine renal vessel sizes, and with further development, may provide an alternative to radiofrequency and ultrasound-based vessel sealing devices.

  5. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578±154, 530±171, and 426±174 mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0±0.4 mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4 mm outer diameter).

  6. Ex vivo reversal of effects of rivaroxaban evaluated using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assay

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, B.; Würtinger, P.; Streif, W.; Sturm, W.; Fries, D.; Bachler, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In major bleeding events, the new direct oral anticoagulants pose a great challenge for physicians. The aim of the study was to test for ex vivo reversal of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban with various non-specific reversal agents: prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC), recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), and fibrinogen concentrate (FI). Methods Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers and from patients treated with rivaroxaban. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were spiked with rivaroxaban to test the correlation between rivaroxaban concentration and coagulation tests. Patient blood samples were spiked with various concentrations of the above-mentioned agents and analysed using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation. Results When added in vitro, rivaroxaban was significantly (P<0.05) correlated with ROTEM® thromboelastometry EXTEM (extrinsic coagulation pathway) clotting time (CT), time to maximal velocity (MaxV−t), and with all measured thrombin generation parameters. In vivo, CT, MaxV−t, lag time, and peak thrombin generation (Cmax) were significantly correlated with rivaroxaban concentrations. Regarding reversal of rivaroxaban, all tested agents significantly (P<0.05) reduced EXTEM CT, but to different extents: rFVIIa by 68%, aPCC by 47%, PCC by 17%, and FI by 9%. Only rFVIIa reversed EXTEM CT to baseline values. Both PCC (+102%) and aPCC (+232%) altered overall thrombin generation (area under the curve) and increased Cmax (+461% for PCC, +87.5% for aPCC). Conclusions Thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assays do not favour the same reversal agents for rivaroxaban anticoagulation. Controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to establish doses and clinical efficacy of potential reversal agents. Clinical trial registration EudracCT trial no. 213-00474-30. PMID:27623677

  7. Ex vivo effects of lysine clonixinate on cyclooxygenases in rat lung and stomach preparations.

    PubMed

    Franchi, A M; Di Girolamo, G; De los Santos, A R; Marti, M L; Gimeno, M A

    1999-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is an anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic drug with minor digestive side effects, which might suggest a weak COX-1 inhibitor. The aim of this study focused on ex vivo effects of LC 40 mg/kg ip and indomethacin (INDO) 10 mg/kg ip in lung and stomach preparations of control rats and LPS-treated rats (5 mg/kg ip). The non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs were administered concomitantly, following three hours and before one, two or three hours of LPS treatment. Tissues were weighed and incubated in 2 ml of Kress Ringer Bicarbonate buffer containing glucose (11 mM) under an atmosphere of 95% oxygen and 5% CO(2). Approximately 200 mg of tissue were used for each determination; 0.25 microCi of (14)C-arachidonic acid was added to each tube and the tissues were incubated for 60 min. Prostanoids were extracted from the incubation medium and separated by TLC. Results were expressed as a percentage of the total radioactivity of the plates (% of cpm on plate/100 mg ww). It was found that LC animals that were not given LPS did not modify the synthesis of PGE(2); in lung and stomach tissues showing that did not inhibit COX-1 activity. However, LC inhibited clearly the synthesis of PGE(2) in both preparations obtained from LPS-treated animals. The inhibition was shown when the rats were treated concomitantly, 3 h after or 1 or 2 h before the injection of LPS. PMID:17657442

  8. LANTCET: laser nanotechnology for screening and treating tumors ex vivo and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri O.; Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Zhdanok, Sergei A.; Hafner, Jason H.; Rostro, Betty C.; Scully, Peter; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Li, Chun; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2007-06-01

    LANTCET (laser-activated nano-thermolysis as cell elimination technology) was developed for selective detection and destruction of individual tumor cells through generation of photothermal bubbles around clusters of light absorbing gold nanoparticles (nanorods and nanoshells) that are selectively formed in target tumor cells. We have applied bare nanoparticles and their conjugates with cell-specific vectors such as monoclonal antibodies CD33 (specific for Acute Myeloid Leukemia) and C225 (specific for carcinoma cells that express epidermal growth factor -EGF). Clusters were formed by using vector-receptor interactions with further clusterization of nanoparticles due to endocytosis. Formation of clusters was verified directly with optical resonance scattering microscopy and microspectroscopy. LANTCET method was tested in vitro for living cell samples with: (1) model myeloid K562 cells (CD33 positive), (2) primary human bone marrow CD33-positive blast cells from patients with the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, (3) monolayers of living EGF-positive carcinoma cells (Hep-2C), (4) human lymphocytes and red blood cells as normal cells. The LANTCET method was also tested in vivo using rats with experimental polymorphic sarcoma. Photothermal bubbles were generated and detected in vitro with a photothermal microscope equipped with a tunable Ti-Sa pulsed laser. We have found that cluster formation caused an almost 100-fold decrease in the bubble generation threshold of laser pulse fluence in tumor cells compared to the bubble generation threshold for normal cells. The animal tumor that was treated with a single laser pulse showed a necrotic area of diameter close to the pump laser beam diameter and a depth of 1-2 mm. Cell level selectivity of tumor damage with single laser pulse was demonstrated. Combining lightscattering imaging with bubble imaging, we introduced a new image-guided mode of the LANTCET operation for screening and treatment of tumors ex vivo and in vivo.

  9. EX VIVO CORRELATION OF ULTRASONOGRAPHIC SMALL INTESTINAL WALL LAYERING WITH HISTOLOGY IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Alexandre B; Granger, L Abbigail; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Kearney, Michael T; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-09-01

    Canine ultrasonographic intestinal layers have been reported to correlate with histological layering. However, discrepancies have been reported in people, and additional layers visualized. The aim of this method comparison study was to describe ex vivo canine small intestinal layering and correlate it with histology. Small intestinal samples of 12 adult dogs euthanized for reasons unrelated to gastrointestinal disease were resected immediately following euthanasia, pinned on a Petri dish, and transverse ultrasonographic images acquired in a water bath, using a high-frequency linear transducer. Transverse histological sections were obtained at the same level. Measurements of the intestinal layers were performed on the ultrasonographic and histological images. No significant statistical differences were noted between the ultrasonographic and histological measurements and strong to very strong (r > 0.7) positive correlation was observed for all layers, except for the serosa, which had a low moderate positive correlation (r = 0.479). In addition to the five established layers, a dual mucosal echogenicity was consistently observed, with seven samples presenting an additional inner mucosal severe hyperechogenicity. Histologically, this dual echogenicity was attributed to the intestinal villi (mildly echogenic) and lamina propria (hypoechoic). The additional inner mucosal severe hyperechogenicity observed in seven samples was attributed to mild-to-moderate lacteal dilation histologically. In 4/12 ileal samples, an additional hyperechoic mucosal line was also observed parallel to the submucosa, corresponding histologically to prominent Peyer's patches. Finally, a hyperechoic line was observed within the muscularis of all samples, corresponding histologically to the interface between the muscularis longitudinal and circular layers. PMID:27377194

  10. Ex-vivo tissue classification of cell surface receptor concentrations using kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Wang, Yu; Yang, Cynthia; Khan, Altaz; Liu, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major challenges in the complete resection of cancer is the difficulty of distinctly classifying tumor and healthy tissue. This paper investigates the capability of competing kinetic modeling approaches for identifying different tissue types based on differential cell-surface receptor expressions. These approaches require fresh resected tissues to be stained with a mixture of two probes: one targeted to a cancer specific cell-surface receptor, and another left "untargeted" to account for nonspecific retention of the targeted agent, with subsequent repeated rinsing and imaging of the probe concentrations. Analysis of the results were carried out in simulations and in animal experiments for the cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell surface receptor overexpressed by many cancers. In the animal experiments, subcutaneous xenografts of human glioma (U251; moderate EGFR) and human epidermoid (A431; high EGFR) tumors, grown in six athymic mice, were excised and stained with an EGFR targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticle (SERS NP) and untargeted SERS NP pair. The salient finding in this study was that significant non-specific retention was observed for the EGFR targeted probe [anti-EGFR antibody labeled with a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle], but could be corrected for by the equivalent non-specific retention of the untargeted probe (isotype control antibody labeled with a different SERS nanoparticle). Once this non-specific binding was accounted for, the kinetic model was able to predict the expected differences in EGFR concentration among different tissue types: healthy, U251, and A431 in accordance with an ex vivo flow cytometry analysis, successfully classifying different tissue types.

  11. Direct Effective Dose Calculations in Pediatric Fluoroscopy-Guided Abdominal Interventions with Rando-Alderson Phantoms – Optimization of Preset Parameter Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Müller-Wille, René; Goessmann, Holger; Uller, Wibke; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to calculate the effective dose during fluoroscopy-guided pediatric interventional procedures of the liver in a phantom model before and after adjustment of preset parameters. Methods Organ doses were measured in three anthropomorphic Rando-Alderson phantoms representing children at various age and body weight (newborn 3.5kg, toddler 10kg, child 19kg). Collimation was performed focusing on the upper abdomen representing mock interventional radiology procedures such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage placement (PTCD). Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions were performed in a posterior-anterior geometry using a state of the art flat-panel detector. Effective dose was directly measured from multiple incorporated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) using two different parameter settings. Results Effective dose values for each pediatric phantom were below 0.1mSv per minute fluoroscopy, and below 1mSv for a 1 minute DSA acquisition with a frame rate of 2 f/s. Lowering the values for the detector entrance dose enabled a reduction of the applied effective dose from 12 to 27% for fluoroscopy and 22 to 63% for DSA acquisitions. Similarly, organ doses of radiosensitive organs could be reduced by over 50%, especially when close to the primary x-ray beam. Conclusion Modification of preset parameter settings enabled to decrease the effective dose for pediatric interventional procedures, as determined by effective dose calculations using dedicated pediatric Rando-Alderson phantoms. PMID:27556584

  12. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng‐Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. Materials and Methods A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co‐electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. Results The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4‐month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10‐4 mm2/s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet‐normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. Conclusion A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:594–600. PMID:26213152

  13. Ex Vivo Host and Parasite Response to Antileishmanial Drugs and Immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    antimoniate. However, pentoxifylline diminished secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-13, cytokines associated with the outcome of infection by species of the Viannia subgenus. Exposure to CpG diminished the leishmanicidal effect of meglumine antimoniate, but not miltefosine, and significantly reduced secretion of IL -10, alone and in combination with either antileishmanial drug. IL-13 increased in response to CpG plus miltefosine. Conclusions and Significance Human PBMCs allow integrated ex vivo assessment of antileishmanial treatments, providing information on host and parasite determinants of therapeutic response that may be used to tailor therapeutic strategies to optimize clinical resolution. PMID:26024228

  14. Environmentally-controlled microtensile testing of mechanically-adaptive polymer nanocomposites for ex vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Hess, Allison E; Potter, Kelsey A; Tyler, Dustin J; Zorman, Christian A; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2013-08-20

    Implantable microdevices are gaining significant attention for several biomedical applications. Such devices have been made from a range of materials, each offering its own advantages and shortcomings. Most prominently, due to the microscale device dimensions, a high modulus is required to facilitate implantation into living tissue. Conversely, the stiffness of the device should match the surrounding tissue to minimize induced local strain. Therefore, we recently developed a new class of bio-inspired materials to meet these requirements by responding to environmental stimuli with a change in mechanical properties. Specifically, our poly(vinyl acetate)-based nanocomposite (PVAc-NC) displays a reduction in stiffness when exposed to water and elevated temperatures (e.g. body temperature). Unfortunately, few methods exist to quantify the stiffness of materials in vivo, and mechanical testing outside of the physiological environment often requires large samples inappropriate for implantation. Further, stimuli-responsive materials may quickly recover their initial stiffness after explantation. Therefore, we have developed a method by which the mechanical properties of implanted microsamples can be measured ex vivo, with simulated physiological conditions maintained using moisture and temperature control. To this end, a custom microtensile tester was designed to accommodate microscale samples with widely-varying Young's moduli (range of 10 MPa to 5 GPa). As our interests are in the application of PVAc-NC as a biologically-adaptable neural probe substrate, a tool capable of mechanical characterization of samples at the microscale was necessary. This tool was adapted to provide humidity and temperature control, which minimized sample drying and cooling. As a result, the mechanical characteristics of the explanted sample closely reflect those of the sample just prior to explantation. The overall goal of this method is to quantitatively assess the in vivo mechanical

  15. Amplitude and frequency content analysis of optoacoustic signals in laser heated ex-vivo tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laderoute, Annie

    Laser thermal therapy involves heating tissue using light to temperatures between 55 °C and 95 °C for several minutes resulting in coagulation and cell death. This treatment method has been under investigation for use as a minimally invasive method for eradicating solid tumors and cancer cells. Optoacoustic imaging involves exposing optically absorbing media to nanosecond pulsed laser light causing rapid localized heating and inducing acoustic waves to be detected by wideband transducers. It has been proposed as a real-time, noninvasive method for monitoring laser thermal therapy. This thesis investigates the use of optoacoustics to discriminate between native and coagulated ex-vivo tissues (porcine tenderloin muscle, bovine liver and bovine kidney). Tissues were heated using a 1000 mum core optical fibre coupled to an 810 nm diode laser to generate lesions. Samples were scanned at 1064 nm using a prototype reverse-mode optoacoustic system consisting of a pulsed laser coupled to a bifurcated fibre bundle, and an 8 element annular array wideband ultrasound transducer with a central frequency of ˜5 MHz. Thermal coagulation effects were analyzed using optoacoustic signal amplitude-based and frequency-based analysis. Significant differences (p<0.05) in optoacoustic signals, between native and coagulated porcine muscle, were observed with both amplitude-based and frequency-based analysis methods. Inconsistencies in the amplitude-based analysis were observed in the bovine liver and bovine kidney. Significant differences between native and coagulated bovine liver tissues were observed in two of the three frequency parameters of interest (slope and midband fit, p<0.05). No significant differences between native and coagulated bovine kidney tissues using frequency-based analysis. Amplitude-based analysis methods take advantage of the optical and thermo-mechanical properties of the tissues, while the frequency-based method extracts metrics related physical parameters of

  16. Membrane-bound IL-21 promotes sustained ex vivo proliferation of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Denman, Cecele J; Senyukov, Vladimir V; Somanchi, Srinivas S; Phatarpekar, Prasad V; Kopp, Lisa M; Johnson, Jennifer L; Singh, Harjeet; Hurton, Lenka; Maiti, Sourindra N; Huls, M Helen; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N; Lee, Dean A

    2012-01-01

    NK cells have therapeutic potential for a wide variety of human malignancies. However, because NK cells expand poorly in vitro, have limited life spans in vivo, and represent a small fraction of peripheral white blood cells, obtaining sufficient cell numbers is the major obstacle for NK-cell immunotherapy. Genetically-engineered artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) expressing membrane-bound IL-15 (mbIL15) have been used to propagate clinical-grade NK cells for human trials of adoptive immunotherapy, but ex vivo proliferation has been limited by telomere shortening. We developed K562-based aAPCs with membrane-bound IL-21 (mbIL21) and assessed their ability to support human NK-cell proliferation. In contrast to mbIL15, mbIL21-expressing aAPCs promoted log-phase NK cell expansion without evidence of senescence for up to 6 weeks of culture. By day 21, parallel expansion of NK cells from 22 donors demonstrated a mean 47,967-fold expansion (median 31,747) when co-cultured with aAPCs expressing mbIL21 compared to 825-fold expansion (median 325) with mbIL15. Despite the significant increase in proliferation, mbIL21-expanded NK cells also showed a significant increase in telomere length compared to freshly obtained NK cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for their sustained proliferation. NK cells expanded with mbIL21 were similar in phenotype and cytotoxicity to those expanded with mbIL15, with retained donor KIR repertoires and high expression of NCRs, CD16, and NKG2D, but had superior cytokine secretion. The mbIL21-expanded NK cells showed increased transcription of the activating receptor CD160, but otherwise had remarkably similar mRNA expression profiles of the 96 genes assessed. mbIL21-expanded NK cells had significant cytotoxicity against all tumor cell lines tested, retained responsiveness to inhibitory KIR ligands, and demonstrated enhanced killing via antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Thus, aAPCs expressing mbIL21 promote improved proliferation of

  17. Preserved ex vivo inflammatory status and cytokine responses in naturally long-lived mice

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Lorena; Lord, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Preserved immune cell function has been reported in mice that achieve extreme longevity. Since cytokines are major modulators of immune responses, we aimed to determine the levels of 21 cytokines secreted ex vivo by peritoneal leukocytes cultured under basal- and mitogen- (conconavalin A (ConA) and LPS) stimulated conditions in middle-aged (44 ± 4 weeks), old (69 ± 4 weeks), very old (92 ± 4 weeks), and extreme long-lived (125 ± 4 weeks) ICR (CD1) female mice. The secretion of cytokines was measured by multiplex luminometry. Increased basal levels of proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 (p70), IFN-γ, and TNF-α were seen in the old and very old animals, accompanied by decreased IL-10. In contrast, the extreme long-lived mice maintained the overall cytokine profile of middle-aged mice, though the basal secretion of IL-2, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-12 (p40) was raised. Under LPS- and/or ConA-stimulated conditions, leukocytes from old and very old animals showed a significantly impaired response with respect to secretion of Th1 cytokines IL-3, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, and TNF-α; Th2 cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13; and the regulatory cytokines IL-2, IL-5, and IL-17. Extreme long-lived mice preserved the middle-aged-like cytokine profile, with the most striking effect seen for the IL-2 response to ConA, which was minimal in the old and very old mice but increased with respect to the middle-aged level in extreme long-lived mice. Chemokine responses in regard to KC, MCP-1, MIP1β, and RANTES were more variable, though similar secretion of LPS-induced KC and MCP-1 and ConA-induced MCP-1, MIP-1β, and RANTES was found in long-lived and middle-aged mice. Thus, extreme long-lived animals showed only a minimal inflammatory profile, much lower than the old and very old groups and also lower than the middle-aged, which is likely mediated by the increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. This was coupled to a robust response to immune stimuli

  18. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-01

    .037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis.

  19. A novel method for determining human ex vivo submaximal skeletal muscle mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Gram, Martin; Jensen, Martin Borch; Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite numerous studies, there is no consensus about whether mitochondrial function is altered with increased age. The novelty of the present study is the determination of mitochondrial function at submaximal activity rates, which is more physiologically relevant than the ex vivo functionality protocols used previously. Muscle biopsies were taken from 64 old or young male subjects (aged 60–70 or 20–30 years). Aged subjects were recruited as trained or untrained. Muscle biopsies were used for the isolation of mitochondria and subsequent measurements of DNA repair, anti-oxidant capacity and mitochondrial protein levels (complexes I–V). Mitochondrial function was determined by simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption, membrane potential and hydrogen peroxide emission using pyruvate + malate (PM) or succinate + rotenone (SR) as substrates. Proton leak was lower in aged subjects when determined at the same membrane potential and was unaffected by training status. State 3 respiration was lower in aged untrained subjects. This effect, however, was alleviated in aged trained subjects. H2O2 emission with PM was higher in aged subjects, and was exacerbated by training, although it was not changed when using SR. However, with a higher manganese superoxide dismuthase content, the trained aged subjects may actually have lower or similar mitochondrial superoxide emission compared to the untrained subjects. We conclude that ageing and the physical activity level in aged subjects are both related to changes in the intrinsic functionality of the mitochondrion in skeletal muscle. Both of these changes could be important factors in determining the metabolic health of the aged skeletal muscle cell. Key points The present study utilized a novel method aiming to investigate mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle at submaximal levels and at a predefined membrane potential. The effect of age and training status was investigated using a cross

  20. Ex vivo corneal epithelial wound healing following exposure to ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Keping; McDermott, Mark; Villanueva, Linda; Schiffman, Rhett M; Hollander, David A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ketorolac 0.45% is a new formulation of topical ketorolac in which preservative (benzalkonium chloride, BAK) was removed and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was added to improve tolerability and reduce dosing frequency. This study compared the effects of ketorolac 0.45% on corneal wound healing to prior ketorolac formulations (0.4% and 0.5%), bromfenac 0.09%, and nepafenac 0.1%. Methods: Two parallel-group comparisons were performed in series. A 5-mm central epithelial wound was made in fresh porcine corneas. After 24 hours in minimum essential medium (MEM), corneas were incubated for 10 minutes with study drugs, Triton X-100 1% (positive control), or MEM (negative control), followed by 24 hours in MEM. The remaining wound area was stained, photographed, and quantified (pixels). Study 1 compared ketorolac 0.45% to ketorolac 0.4% and ketorolac 0.5%. Study 2 compared ketorolac 0.45% to bromfenac 0.09% and nepafenac 0.1%. Results: The mean (±SD) original wound area was 200,506 ± 4,363 pixels, which was reduced to 59,509 ± 4850 at 48 hours after exposure to Triton X-100 1%. In study 1, the mean remaining wound areas at 48 hours in pixels were 2969 ± 1633 with MEM, 586 ± 299 with ketorolac 0.45% (significantly reduced, P < 0.05 vs all other treatments), 10,228 ± 7541 with ketorolac 0.4%, and 50,674 ± 33,409 with ketorolac 0.5% (significantly enlarged, P < 0.05 vs MEM). In study 2, the mean remaining wound areas at 48 hours were 565 ± 1263 with MEM, 322 ± 229 with ketorolac 0.45% (significantly reduced, P < 0.01 vs bromfenac 0.09% and nepafenac 0.1%), 29,093 ± 14,295 with bromfenac 0.09% (significantly enlarged, P <0.01 vs MEM) and 47,322 ± 13,736 with nepafenac 0.1% (significantly enlarged, P < 0.01 vs MEM and vs bromfenac 0.09%). Conclusion: Corneas treated with ketorolac 0.45% healed as rapidly as those treated with MEM, likely secondary to addition of CMC and removal of BAK. In the ex vivo corneal organ culture model, ketorolac 0.45% had

  1. Ex Vivo Signaling Protein Mapping in T Lymphocytes in the Psoriatic Arthritis Joints.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Molena, Beatrice; Zambello, Renato; Ramonda, Roberta; Cozzi, Franco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We assessed signaling protein mapping in total T cells, to analyze the proportions of T regulatory (Treg) and TCD4+ effector (Teff) cell phenotypes, and the respective interleukin 6Rα (IL-6Rα) expression in the inflammatory microenvironment of synovial fluid (SF) of patients with sustained psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Our approach was to measure the IL-6 level in SF using a multiplex bead immunoassay. Reverse-phase protein array was used to assess Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK2, extra-cellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), signal transducer and activator and transcription (STAT) 1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of patients with PsA. Frequencies of CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17A and IL-17F (Th17) and CD4+CD25high intracellular forkhead box transcription factor+ (FOXP3+) phenotypes, and the percentage of Treg- and Teff- cells were quantified in SF and matched peripheral blood (PB) of patients with PsA and PB of healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometry. Our results were the following: In PsA SF samples, a coordinate increase of JAK1, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins was found in total T cells in SF of PsA; where IL-6 levels were higher than in PB from HC. Expanded CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ Th17, CD4+ CD25- Teff- and CD4+CD25(high) FoxP3+Treg subsets, showing similar levels of enhanced IL-6Rδ expression, were confined to PsA joints. In our studies, the transcriptional network profile identified by ex vivo signaling protein mapping in T lymphocytes in PsA joints revealed the complex interplay between IL-1, IL-6, and IL-23 signaling and differentiation of Th17 cells and CD4+Tregs in sustained joint inflammation in PsA. PMID:26523057

  2. Facilitating endoscopic submucosal dissection: the suture-pulley method significantly improves procedure time and minimizes technical difficulty compared with conventional technique: an ex vivo study (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Aihara, Hiroyuki; Kumar, Nitin; Ryou, Marvin; Abidi, Wasif; Ryan, Michele B.; Thompson, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The lack of countertraction in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) results in increased technical demand and procedure time. Although the suture-pulley method for countertraction has been reported, its effectiveness compared with the traditional ESD technique remains unclear. Objective To objectively analyze efficacy of countertraction using the suture-pulley method for ESD. Design Prospective ex vivo animal study. Setting Animal laboratory. Interventions Twenty simulated gastric lesions were created in porcine stomachs by using a standard circular template 30 mm in diameter. In the control arm (n = 10), ESD was performed by using the standard technique. In the suture-pulley arm (N = 10), a circumferential incision was made, and an endoscopic suturing device was used to place the suture pulley. Main Outcome Measurements The primary outcome of this study was total procedure time. Results The median total procedure time with the suture-pulley method was significantly shorter than the traditional ESD technique (median, 25% to 75%, interquartile range [IQR]: 531 seconds [474.3–549.3 seconds] v