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Sample records for intervjueerinud joel kukk

  1. Remembering Joel: A Story of Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diakiw, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Joel seemed blessed with remarkable talents, but they did not reveal themselves in any obvious way in a school or class setting. Although he had been given an IQ test, his exact score could not be calculated--but it was well over 160. On a test of musical ability, Joel had attained a perfect score on all four musical attributes--a first for the…

  2. Joel Stebbins and Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstang, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    Joel Stebbins (1878 - 1966), Director of the Washburn Observatory of the University of Wisconsin, pioneered the use of photocells for astronomical brightness measurements. He seems to have been the first to use photocells to measure night sky brightnesses. He was a Research Associate of the Mount Wilson Observatory. During a visit to Pasadena in the winter of 1931-32 he measured the night sky brightness with a portable photometer on Palomar Mountain and at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The latter had begun to be affected by light pollution even at that early date. He does not seem to have published his results in detail, but reported them in a letter that he sent on 1932 October 5 to John A. Anderson, the Executive Officer of the Palomar Observatory Council. Donald Osterbrock recently found a copy of the letter in the Washburn Observatory archives, and kindly communicated the details to me for analysis. Stebbins' most important result was that the night sky near the North Pole at Mount Wilson was 0.38 magnitude brighter than the night sky at Palomar. He also stated that in the evening at Mount Wilson the sky at altitude 10 deg over Pasadena and Los Angeles could be as much as 5 times as bright as at the Pole. I have used my light pollution model to analyze these and other results of Stebbins. I estimate that the light emission of the cities in 1932 was about 220 lumens per capita. Using this emission I calculated the Mount Wilson sky brightness at 10 deg altitude over Pasadena and Los Angeles as about 5.4 times the brightness at the Pole, in excellent agreement with Stebbins. This light emission may be compared with 1000 lumens per capita that my earlier analyses indicated for 1970.

  3. Joel C. Wordekemper Greeted By Astronauts and MSFC Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    West Point, Nebraska high school student, Joel C. Wordekemper, is greeted by (left to right): Astronauts Russell L. Schweickart, and Owen K. Garriott; Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Skylab Program Manager, Leland Belew; and MSFC Director of Administration and Technical Services, David Newby, during a tour of MSFC. Wordekemper was among 25 winners of a contest in which some 3,500 high school students proposed experiments for the following year's Skylab mission. The nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The winning students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited MSFC where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment.

  4. A New Way of Thinking about Technology: An Interview with Futurists Joel Barker and Scott Erickson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Barker, Joel; Erickson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Editor-in-chief James Morrison interviews Joel Barker and Scott Erickson, co-authors of the book "Five Regions of the Future: A New Way to Think about Technology". In their book, the authors propose an ecological model that classifies technology according to different clusters or regions, each of which entails its own perspective of technology and…

  5. An Interview with Joel McIntosh: Reflections on Gifted Education and the History of "JOAA"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Joel McIntosh, the publisher at Prufrock Press, whose publications reach more than 50,000 individuals and libraries. McIntosh started Prufrock in 1988 with a vision of making a powerful difference in the lives of gifted and talented children by striving to provide quality materials and cutting-edge research…

  6. Amoralist rationalism? A response to Joel Marks: commentary on "Animal abolitionism meets moral abolitionism: cutting the Gordian knot of applied ethics" by Joel Marks.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Zohar

    2014-06-01

    In a recent article, Joel Marks presents the amoralist argument against vivisection, or animal laboratory experimentation. He argues that ethical theories that seek to uncover some universal morality are in fact useless and unnecessary for ethical deliberations meant to determine what constitutes an appropriate action in a specific circumstance. I agree with Marks' conclusion. I too believe that vivisection is indefensible, both from a scientific and philosophical perspective. I also believe that we should become vegan (unfortunately, like the two philosophers mentioned by Marks, I too am still struggling to reduce my meat and dairy consumption). However, I am in the dark as to Marks' vision of normative deliberations in the spirit of amoralism and desirism.

  7. A semi-centennial report on the participants depicted in Joel Babb's portrait, 'the first successful kidney transplantation'.

    PubMed

    Desai, S P; Desai, M S; Wood, D N; Maddi, R; Leeson, S; Tilney, N L

    2007-07-01

    Joseph Murray performed the first successful human kidney transplant on December 23, 1954. Forty-three years later, he along with participants Francis Moore and Leroy Vandam, commissioned a painting of the event from artist Joel Babb (1). To document this unique record of medical history, we identify all those present at the operation and depicted in the portrait, describe how the artist created the work, explain irregularities and inaccuracies in the painting, provide a 50-year follow-up on everyone involved, and comment on any influence this landmark event may have had on their subsequent careers. PMID:17532749

  8. The Consequence of Sustaining a Pathology: Scientific Stagnation--A Commentary on the Target Article "Is Psychometrics a Pathological Science?" by Joel Michell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Paul

    2008-01-01

    For more than 20 years, Joel Michell has explicated the properties and requirements of quantitative measurement, in books, papers, conference papers, and workshops. In 1997, he published "Quantitative Science and the Definition of Measurement in Psychology." In his paper, Michell deals with facts about measurement. The author of this article…

  9. Green leviathan? Thomas hobbes, joel bakan and Arnold schwarzenegger.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2007-02-01

    Thomas Hobbes postulates that men are driven by "a perpetual and restless desire of power after power, that ceaseth only in death." The miserable consequences of this drive for power and the competing "desire of ease and sensual delight" and "fear of death and wounds" lead them to establish and obey. Substituting "profit" for "power" yields a description of the modern corporation, but without the desires or fears of natural persons. Such "unnatural persons" lack the Hobbesian ground of obligation, yet have appropriated the privileges and protections of natural persons. They challenge or undermine the sovereign wherever it limits their profits. Governor Schwarzenegger's re-election in California, however, on a strong anti-CO(2) program, suggests a willingness by threatened natural persons to re-empower Leviathan.

  10. Mick Jagger as Herodotus and Billy Joel as Thucydides? A Rock Music Perspective 1950-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, B. Lee

    1985-01-01

    Five "rock music as history" teaching units, each revolving around a particular socio-political theme, are presented. The themes are civil authorities, military involvements, the public education system, railroads, and representative government. (RM)

  11. Stumbling Through: How Joel Klein Reinvented the New York City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viteritti, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the author reviews "Education Reform in New York City: Ambitious Change in the Nation's Most Complex School System," by Jennifer A. O'Day, Catherine S. Bitter, and Louis Gomez. The book under review explores a larger set of issues, and some time has passed. But many of the issues studied remain relevant and the consistent responses…

  12. Ground-water appraisal for the community of Kiryas Joel, Orange County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Roger M.

    1979-01-01

    A major fracture system in indurated sedimentary rocks forms a moderately extensive aquifer yielding 100-300 gallons per minute to wells 160 to 420 feet deep. Pumping-test data show that the fracture system is interconnected to distances more than 1,000 feet from the wells. Recharge occurs through overlying clayey till, and continuous pumping may induce recharge from surface-water sources. Chemical analyses indicate no water-quality problems. Systematic collection of data on pumpage , water level, and chemical quality could help to determine the long-term adequacy of the aquifer system. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. A Response to Joel Bowman on "Beyond the You-Attitude."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eldon C.

    1985-01-01

    States that Bowman has identified a number of serious problems in our social and business environments and supports his adaptation of Maslow's model of human motivation as a communication theory and his interpretation of self-actualization beyond its popularized notion as simply a self-centered desire to develop one's own capabilities. (EL)

  14. New frontiers in fibrotic disease therapies: The focus of the Joan and Joel Rosenbloom Center for Fibrotic Diseases at Thomas Jefferson University.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Joel; Ren, Shumei; Macarak, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Fibrotic diseases constitute a world-wide major health problem, but research support remains inadequate in comparison to the need. Although considerable understanding of the pathogenesis of fibrotic reactions has been attained, no completely effective therapies exist. Although fibrotic disorders are diverse, it is universally appreciated that a particular cell type with unique characteristics, the myofibroblast, is responsible for replacement of functioning tissue with non-functional scar tissue. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the creation of myofibroblasts and their activities is central to the development of therapies. Critical signaling cascades, initiated primarily by TGF-β, but also involving other cytokines which stimulate pro-fibrotic reactions in the myofibroblast, offer potential therapeutic targets. However, because of the multiplicity and complex interactions of these signaling pathways, it is very unlikely that any single drug will be successful in modifying a major fibrotic disease. Therefore, we have chosen to examine the effectiveness of administration of several drug combinations in a mouse pneumoconiosis model. Such treatment proved to be effective. Because fibrotic diseases that tend to be chronic, are difficult to monitor, and are patient variable, implementation of clinical trials is difficult and expensive. Therefore, we have made efforts to identify and validate non-invasive biomarkers found in urine and blood. We describe the potential utility of five such markers: (i) the EDA form of fibronectin (Fn(EDA)), (ii) lysyl oxidase (LOX), (iii) lysyl oxidase-like protein 2 (LoxL2), (iv) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCNII), and (v) the N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP).

  15. Reply to "comment on 'falsification of the Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within the Frame of Physics' by Joshua B. Halpern, Christopher M. Colose, Chris Ho-Stuart Joel D. Shore, Arthur P. Smith, JÖRG Zimmermann"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlich, Gerhard; Tscheuschner, Ralf D.

    It is shown that the notorious claim by Halpern et al. recently repeated in their comment that the method, logic, and conclusions of our "Falsification Of The CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics" would be in error has no foundation. Since Halpern et al. communicate our arguments incorrectly, their comment is scientifically vacuous. In particular, it is not true that we are "trying to apply the Clausius statement of the Second Law of Thermodynamics to only one side of a heat transfer process rather than the entire process" and that we are "systematically ignoring most non-radiative heat flows applicable to Earth's surface and atmosphere". Rather, our falsification paper discusses the violation of fundamental physical and mathematical principles in 14 examples of common pseudo-derivations of fictitious greenhouse effects that are all based on simplistic pictures of radiative transfer and their obscure relation to thermodynamics, including but not limited to those descriptions (a) that define a "Perpetuum Mobile Of The 2nd Kind", (b) that rely on incorrectly calculated averages of global temperatures, (c) that refer to incorrectly normalized spectra of electromagnetic radiation. Halpern et al. completely missed an exceptional chance to formulate a scientifically well-founded antithesis. They do not even define a greenhouse effect that they wish to defend. We take the opportunity to clarify some misunderstandings, which are communicated in the current discussion on the non-measurable, i.e., physically non-existing influence of the trace gas CO2 on the climates of the Earth.

  16. The Internet as a Glocal Discourse Environment: A Commentary on "Second Language Socialization in a Bilingual Chat Room" by Wan Shun Eva Lam and "Second Language Cyberhetoric: A Study of Chinese L2 Writers in an Online Usenet Group" by Joel Bloch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsogiannis, Dimitris; Mitsikopoulou, Bessie

    2004-01-01

    The Internet as a worldwide literacy practice environment has created a new situation in communication, providing a new dynamic field for research. On the basis of the two articles under discussion, this commentary develops three main aspects of the Internet: as an informal learning environment for English as a second/foreign language; as a…

  17. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  18. ISS Update: Suitport Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Joel Maganza, Test Director, about thermal vacuum chambers and unmanned and human-testing with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Jo...

  19. Grepping Life: A New Paradigm for Analyzing Metagenomic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Berendzen, Joel

    2010-06-04

    Joel Berendzen of Los Alamos National Laboratory discusses a phylogenetic method based on answering the question "What Would Google Do?" on June 4, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  20. Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Research Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Parkinson's Patient Active as Research Advocate Joel Grace Photo courtesy of Parkinson's Disease ...

  1. 76 FR 2686 - Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Blindness--Louis Herrera AT&T--Leonardo Velazquez Audio Description Associates--Joel Snyder Bright House... Accessible Media--Larry Goldberg World Wide Web Consortium--Judy Brewer To request materials in...

  2. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  3. 76 FR 36100 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... multi-purpose facility for DOE and community needs. Recommendation 11.05--Defined Future Use at the...-3822, Joel.Bradburne@lex.doe.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Board: The purpose of...

  4. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... re-evaluating your fitness to dive. Thyroid Conditions Fitness to Dive Asthma and Scuba Diving Bone Considerations ... Healthy, But Overweight DAN Discusses the Issue of Fitness and Diving By Joel Dovenbarger, Vice President, DAN ...

  5. Reforming Welfare in America. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Edward T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews three books on welfare reform: "The Poverty of Welfare Reform" (Joel F. Handler); "The Politics of Welfare Reform" (Donald F. Norris, Lyke Thompson, editors); and "Living on the Edge: The Realities of Welfare in America" (Mark Robert Rank). (JOW)

  6. The fiftieth anniversary of the first public announcement of the successful test of fission: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report contains comments and discussions on the history of fission. The following people comments and lectures are discussed in this report: Remarks and introduction of Maxine F. Singer; president's message, Maxine F. Singer; introduction of Stephen Joel Trachtenberg; President's message, Stephen Joel Trachtenberg; introduction of Frederick Seitz; lecture: Nuclear Science: Promises and Perceptions, '' Frederick Seitz; introduction of K. Alex Mueller; lecture: High Temperature Ferroelectricity and Superconductivity,'' introduction of Edward Teller; and lecture: Toward a More Secure World,'' Edward Teller.

  7. The fiftieth anniversary of the first public announcement of the successful test of fission: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    This report contains comments and discussions on the history of fission. The following people comments and lectures are discussed in this report: Remarks and introduction of Maxine F. Singer; president`s message, Maxine F. Singer; introduction of Stephen Joel Trachtenberg; President`s message, Stephen Joel Trachtenberg; introduction of Frederick Seitz; lecture: ``Nuclear Science: Promises and Perceptions, `` Frederick Seitz; introduction of K. Alex Mueller; lecture: ``High Temperature Ferroelectricity and Superconductivity,`` introduction of Edward Teller; and lecture: ``Toward a More Secure World,`` Edward Teller.

  8. Functionalism, Ideology, and the Theory of Schooling: A Review of Studies in the History of American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, H. Svi

    1982-01-01

    Provides a sociological analysis of the works of Bernard Bailyn, Lawrence Cremin, Joel Spring, Samuel Bowles, and Herbert Gintis. Maintains that even though there are ideological differences among these authors, their themes are all informed by a functionalist perspective. Argues that their works lead to a deterministic, fatalistic, and…

  9. The Meaning of "Success" for First Nations Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churcher, Kassandra

    2010-01-01

    When the First Nations Student Success Program (FNSSP) was first introduced in September 2009, the author's initial thought was: "No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has finally arrived in Canada." It seemed prophetic that the 2010 spring issue of "Education Canada" contained both a piece by Joel Westheimer warning against the pitfalls of constant…

  10. The Benefits and Limitations of Formality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Michael Kane comments on three articles in this issue: (1) "Is Psychometrics Pathological Science?" (Joel Mitchell); (2) "Latent Variable Theory" (Denny Borsboom); and (3) "Constructs, Concepts, and the Worlds of Possibility" (Keith Markus). He states that the common thread in these three articles is the goal of putting measurement practice on a…

  11. Fountain of Knowledge: IR Collaboration for Effective Change. [Proceedings of the] Annual NEAIR Conference (37th, Saratoga Springs, New York, November 13-16, 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, Beth, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The NEAIR 2010 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Saratoga Springs, New York conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Collaboration Between Student Affairs and Institutional Research: A Model for the Successful Assessment of Students' College Experience (Michael N. Christakis and Joel D. Bloom); (2)…

  12. Education Networks: Power, Wealth, Cyberspace, and the Digital Mind. Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Joel

    2012-01-01

    "Education Networks" is a critical analysis of the emerging intersection among the global power elite, information and communication technology, and schools. Joel Spring documents and examines the economic and political interests and forces--including elite networks, the for-profit education industry, data managers, and professional…

  13. How to Fix Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Joel Klein, chancellor of the New York City public school system, and Michelle Rhee, who resigned October 13 as Washington, DC, chancellor, published a "manifesto" in the "Washington Post" claiming that the difficulty of removing incompetent teachers "has left school districts impotent and, worse, has robbed millions of children of a real future."…

  14. 75 FR 4805 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... Subcommittee: The purpose of the subcommittee is to focus on waste disposition and recycling issues at the... Bradburne at least five days in advance of the meetings at the phone number listed above. Written statements.... Minutes: Minutes will be available by writing or calling Joel Bradburne at the address and phone...

  15. Bullying in New York City Schools: Educators Speak out, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    On September 3, 2008, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Joel Klein announced Chancellor's Regulation A-832, which established a procedure for preventing and addressing student-to-student bias-based harassment in New York City public schools. Community members and advocates stood with the mayor and chancellor as they announced this…

  16. Cross-Battery Assessment? XBA PSW? A Case of Mistaken Identity: A Commentary on Kranzler and Colleagues' "Classification Agreement Analysis of Cross-Battery Assessment in the Identification of Specific Learning Disorders in Children and Youth"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Dawn P.; Schneider, W. Joel

    2016-01-01

    When education works, it creates productive, innovative citizens eager to contribute to a well-functioning democracy. In contrast, educational failure has lifelong consequences, with some individuals experiencing decades of preventable hardship. Dawn Flanagan and Joel Schneider write in this response that, like Kranzler, Floyd, Benson, Zabowski,…

  17. Reinterpreting Globalization in Multilingual Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shohamy, Elana

    2007-01-01

    Joel Spring (2007/this issue) argues that in most nation states around the world today, English plays a central role primarily as a commodity of globalization. At the same time in the United States, English is being perpetuated in nationalistic terms as the only legitimate language. This is done through a variety of mechanisms such as language…

  18. Higher Education 2000: What Will Be New? What Will Be Different? Proceedings of the Annual Accreditation and Quality Assurance Conference (1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Higher Education, Philadelphia, PA. Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

    This collection of essays from the 1999 Annual Accreditation and Quality Assurance Conference includes: "Wanted: President for the New Millennium" (Stephen Joel Trachtenberg); "Medium and Message: Passion, Values, and Quality in the New Academy" (John Daniel); "The 100th Anniversary of the College Board" (Nicholas Murray Butler, Joseph Hankin, and…

  19. Developing strategies for aquatic invasive species early detection in the Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a webinar round-table discussion of invasive species and ballast water research, Dr. Trebitz will be giving a short overview of the research that she and co-PIs Jack Kelly, Joel Hoffman, and Greg Peterson are conducting in this area. Key findings from the 2005-2007 sam...

  20. Media Leader Tapped to Head New York City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    When Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg sought a leader for the New York City schools in 2002, his outside-the-box choice was Joel I. Klein, a former assistant U.S. attorney general who had no experience as a school administrator. Eight years later, in seeking a replacement for Mr. Klein, Mr. Bloomberg has tapped yet another person from outside education:…

  1. New York City's Smaller Schools Movement: Bronx Lab School, New York City Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles the 5-year-old Bronx Lab School, a shining achievement in Chancellor Joel Klein's aggressive program of creating new, small schools, almost 400 of which have opened over the past seven years. It's unprecedented anywhere in America. Bronx Lab--which shares the building with similarly sized schools focused on areas such as…

  2. Secondary Vocational Education and the National Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magisos, Joel H.; And Others

    This collection comprises five papers that were prepared in response to the recent series of national reports criticizing American secondary education. In "A General Overview," Joel H. Magisos uses previous analyses and syntheses of the recommendations contained in the group of national studies to draw implications for vocational education.…

  3. How to Fix Our Schools: It's More Complicated, and More Work, than the Klein-Rhee "Manifesto" Wants You to Believe. EPI Issue Brief #286

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Joel Klein, chancellor of the New York City public school system, and Michelle Rhee, who resigned October 13 as Washington, D.C. chancellor, published a "manifesto" in the "Washington Post" claiming that the difficulty of removing incompetent teachers "has left our school districts impotent and, worse, has robbed millions of children of a real…

  4. 75 FR 12536 - City of Tenakee Springs; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments, Protests...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ...) 258-2419; e- mail: joel@polarconsult.net . i. FERC Contact: Any questions on this notice should be...- comments.asp. Please include the docket number (DI10-8-000) on any comments, protests, and/or motions filed...://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/esubscription.asp to be notified via e-mail of new filings and...

  5. Poor Schools or Poor Kids?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joe; Noguera, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Since the run-up to the 2008 election, the Democratic Party has been home to two prominent and very different reform wings. One, spearheaded by the group Democrats for Education Reform and notable school-district chiefs like New York's Joel Klein and Washington, D.C.'s Michelle Rhee, is the Education Equality Project (EEP). The other, A Broader,…

  6. 77 FR 50763 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ..., room 6129, 1111 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20224, or through the Internet, at Joel.P... corporations effective for post-2002 tax years, and the GOZA permitted taxpayers to elect to defer the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. Open-Source Unionism: New Workers, New Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Julie M.

    2004-01-01

    In "Open-Source Unionism: Beyond Exclusive Collective Bargaining," published in fall 2002 in the journal Working USA, labor scholars Richard B. Freeman and Joel Rogers use the term "open-source unionism" to describe a form of unionization that uses Web technology to organize in hard-to-unionize workplaces. Rather than depend on the traditional…

  8. World Citizenship: A Humane Alternative to "Drill and Kill"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Even though Joel lived a continent away, many sixth-graders at a Title I school in California could easily identify with his life of poverty. Their empathy motivated them to launch an ambitious charitable project, which, Mr. Mitchell argues, had far greater educational value than the relentless test preparation that is standard fare in most…

  9. Echoes at Ground Zero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    An excerpt from the opening piece in "Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences" by Lawrence Weschler is presented where the author is talking with Joel Meyerowitz, the only photographer granted unimpeded access to the clean-up operations at ground zero after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The two discuss the parallels between…

  10. 76 FR 32404 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8864

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Form 8864, Biodiesel Fuels Credit... Internet at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Biodiesel Fuels Credit. OMB..., added new code section 40A, credit for biodiesel used as a fuel. Form 8864 has been developed to...

  11. Campus Bargaining at the Crossroads. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions (10th, New York, New York, April 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    Twelve papers from the 1982 conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions are presented. Following an introduction by Joel M. Douglas, the following papers and authors are presented: "Campus Bargaining and the Law: A Decade of Higher Education Collective Bargaining--1972-1982"…

  12. The Uniqueness of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education. Proceedings, Sixth Annual Conference, April 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Aaron, Ed.; Lang, Theodore H.

    The proceedings of a conference on collective bargaining in higher education sponsored by the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education are presented. The contents are as follows: an introduction; welcoming address by Joel Segall; keynote address by Harold Newman; "The Impact of Collective Bargaining Upon Those Who…

  13. One Step Forward--Half a Step Back: A Status Report on Bias-Based Bullying of Asian American Students in New York City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In September 2008, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former Schools Chancellor, Joel Klein announced Chancellor's Regulation A-832, which established policies and procedures on how New York City schools should respond to bias-based harassment, intimidation, and bullying in schools. The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), the…

  14. Bias-Based Harassment in New York City Public Schools: A Report Card on the Department of Education's Implementation of Chancellor's Regulation A-832

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, 2009

    2009-01-01

    On September 3, 2008, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Joel Klein announced Chancellor's Regulation A-832, which established a procedure for addressing student-to-student bias-based harassment, intimidation, and bullying. Community groups and advocates stood with the Mayor and Department of Education (DOE) leadership in announcing…

  15. CEI-PEA Alert, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Chancellor Joel I. Klein Announces New Accountability System for NYC Schools; (2) Students Achieve Record-High Scores!; (3) Use Data to Help Your Child Improve Performance; (4) Are…

  16. Cooking and Science. Ideas in Science. Notes for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Pat, Ed.

    Presented are seven articles (reprinted from "The Exploratorium" magazine) which focus on the scientific explanations for the specific (and oftentimes peculiar) instructions and procedures called for in many recipes. "Baking, Boiling, and Other Hot Topics" (Joel Myerson) discusses different methods of cooking. "The Culinary Alchemy of Eggs"…

  17. Waiver Given for New York Schools Chief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on a promise to name a chief academic officer as second in charge of the New York City schools which paved the way for Cathleen P. Black to succeed Joel I. Klein as the district's next chancellor. The compromise plan, announced amid intensifying debate over her selection by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, won a state waiver…

  18. 75 FR 69160 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Sven Erik Farrell Douglas John Fay Mary Susan Standish Fernandez-Bianci Jorge Miguel Ferro Patricia... Rose Mary Andreen Clas Svante Joel Ang Diana Shu-Zhen Angelini Kevin Yang Aomori Miki Arakaki Shigeo.... Bozicevich Mario S. Brady Mary I. Brandl Marilyn Hester Bratsberg Bo Magnus Braziunas Darius Bree...

  19. Status on U.S. Marine Research. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oceanography of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on U.S. Marine Scientific Research Capabilities Oversight (September 26, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries.

    These hearings focused on the major problems and opportunities in marine research and on the role of both the government and the scientific community in responding to future needs. Included are statements by: James Baker; Donald Boesch; Robert Corell; Tudor Davies; M. Grant Gross; G. Ross Heath; Joel Pritchard; David Ross; J. R. Schubel; Gerry…

  20. 21 CFR 510.600 - Names, addresses, and drug labeler codes of sponsors of approved applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Leicestershire, England LE13 0PB 062408 American Pharmaceuticals and Cosmetics, Inc., 1401 Joel East Rd., Fort...., Manhattan, KS 66503 052923 Thorn Bioscience LLC, 1044 East Chestnut St., Louisville, KY 40204 051330... Wyeth Laboratories, Division American Home Products Corp., P.O. Box 8299, Philadelphia, PA 19101....

  1. Humanists in High Dudgeon: The CFR-ALSCW Standoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2013-01-01

    When "Academic Questions" editor Peter Wood asked the author to give some thought to the dispute between the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers (ALSCW), he thought he should say no. Well, what did the CFR report prepared by an independent task force chaired by Joel I. Klein, former…

  2. 76 FR 10669 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8896

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Form 8896, Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel... Internet at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Production... refiners to claim a credit for the production of low sulfur diesel fuel. The American Jobs Creation Act...

  3. The Georgia Perimeter College MESA Program: Propelling STEM Students to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Kouok K.

    2011-01-01

    From 2006 to 2008, while taking courses at Georgia Perimeter College (GPC), Joel Toussaint worked two jobs, one was at night. Now, he has graduated from Georgia Institute of Technology majoring in mechanical engineering, and he has been admitted to graduate school in mechanical engineer there. His plan for the future is to get his Ph. D. in…

  4. Underneath Hypercapitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Allan

    2007-01-01

    As Joel Spring's (2007/this issue) description of Singapore's Orchard Road suggests, Benetton, Zara, Nike, BMW, LG, and Microsoft dominate the visual and textual landscape where signage, advertising, packaging, labeling, and the environments of the connected underground malls and walkways merge into a wall-to-wall, 24/7 print and visual…

  5. Equal Educational Opportunity: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity of the United States Senate, Ninety-Seond Congress, First Session on Equal Educational Opportunity. Part 16D-1--Inequality in School Finance: General Appendixes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity.

    Appendix One, items pertinent to the hearing of September 21, 1971, includes material supplied by Dr. Robert W. Blanchard concerning allocations from Oregon's basic school support fund. Appendix Two, items pertinent to the hearing of September 22, 1971, includes material supplied by Joel B. Berke on "The Current Crisis in School Finance:…

  6. Equal Educational Opportunity: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity of the United States Senate, Ninety-Second Congress, First Session on Equal Educational Opportunity. Part 16A--Inequality in School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity.

    Testimony recorded in these hearings was presented by: Dr. Mark Shedd, Superintendent of Schools, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Dr. Robert Blanchard, Superintendent of Schools, Portland Public Schools, Portland Oregon; Joel Berke, Director, Educational Finance and Governance Program, Policy Institute of the Syracuse University Research Corp.; James…

  7. 76 FR 72767 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... real estate mortgage conduits; reporting requirements and other administrative matters; and allocation..., at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: T.D. 8366, Real Estate Mortgage... regulations relating to real estate mortgage investment conduits (REMICS). T.D. 8431 contains...

  8. [Book Review] The Dead Sea, the lake and its setting, edited by T. Niemi, Z. Ben-Avraham, J. Gat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri

    1998-01-01

    Review of The Dead Sea, the Lake and its Setting. Tina M. Niemi, Zvi Ben-Avraham, and Joel R. Gat (Editors). Oxford Monographs on Geology and Geophysics No. 36. Oxford University Press, N.Y. 286 pp. ISBN 0-19-508703-8, 1997. $75.

  9. 75 FR 11996 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... regulation, REG-103330-97 (TD 8839), IRS Adoption Taxpayer Identification Numbers (Sec. 301.6109-3). DATES... Internet, at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: IRS Adoption Taxpayer... regulations provide rules for obtaining IRS adoption taxpayer identification numbers (ATINs), which are...

  10. 75 FR 51879 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...-91 and PS-101-90 (TD 8448), Enhanced Oil Recovery Credit (Section 1.43-3(a)(3) and 1.43-3(b)(3... Internet at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Enhanced Oil Recovery Credit. OMB... guidance concerning the costs subject to the enhanced oil recovery credit, the circumstances under...

  11. Achievement Growth: International and U.S. State Trends in Student Performance. PEPG Report No.: 12-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Peterson, Paul E.; Woessmann, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    "The United States' failure to educate its students leaves them unprepared to compete and threatens the country's ability to thrive in a global economy." Such was the dire warning recently issued by a task force sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations. Chaired by former New York City schools chancellor Joel I. Klein and former U.S. secretary…

  12. Boundary Spanners, Network Capital and the Rise of Edu-Businesses: The Case of News Corporation and Its Emerging Education Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a critical analysis of News Corporation and argues that through the acquisition of high profile policy actor, Joel Klein, News Corporation has been able to assemble significant "network capital" to position itself as an entity apparently responsible for the public good and with a role to play in public policymaking.…

  13. A Promising Professor Backs a T.A. Union Drive and Is Rejected for Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how Joel Westheimer, a rising star at New York University who had published and won the support of his department and outside reviewers, was denied tenure after he backed graduate students in a union drive. The university denies a connection. (EV)

  14. Little Choice for the Chumash: Colonialism, Cattle, and Coercion in Mission Period California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dartt-Newton, Deana; Erlandson, Jon M.

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with the Chumash people, their history, as well as colonization and coercion during the mission period in California. In this article, the authors examine a complex paper on the missionization of the Chumash Indians of the California Coast published in American Anthropologist by Daniel O. Larson, John R. Johnson, and Joel C.…

  15. JUSTEC 2000: Japan-United States Teacher Education Consortium International Seminar on Teacher Education (Tokyo, Japan, July 12-15, 2000). Proposals for the Renewal of Teacher Education: Japanese and American Perspectives. Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This collection of abstracts and papers includes: "Classroom Lesson Planning Using Constructivist Principles" (Richard K. Gordon, Stephen Lee, and Joel Colbert); "Students' Perception of Experiential Learning and Assessment of Own Learning at the Physically Handicapped School" (Shigeru Shimizu; Minoru Umezawa, and Yumiko Ono); "Constructivist…

  16. Coping with Illegal Immigrants in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Superintendent Steve Joel had reason to be concerned when he got a call from the police chief telling him that federal immigration authorities were coming to the local Swift & Company meat-packing plant to round up undocumented workers as part of a six-state raid. Of the 8,000 students in the Grand Island School District in Central Nebraska, some…

  17. Winning physician support for your quality initiatives.

    PubMed

    Mattison, J

    2001-03-01

    Joel Mattison, MD, a member of Hospital Peer Review's editorial board, offers practical tips for bringing physicians on board for hospital quality initiatives. He is the physician advisor in the department of clinical resource management and medical director at St. Joseph's Hospital in Tampa, FL.

  18. Career Academies as Instruments of School Reform and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomenkamp, Joel

    2009-01-01

    For many, today's classroom is a relic of an industrial-age school system that, perhaps, has outlived its usefulness. Educator Joel Blomenkamp suggests that the career academy model is one way to enter a new age of education and learning--one in which students are excited about the acquisition of knowledge because they are learning in a dynamic…

  19. 75 FR 69741 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP- 127367-07), 9100... comments concerning Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under Sections 897 and 1445. DATES... Internet at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Rev. Proc. 2007-99...

  20. The Principals' Perspective of Sustainable Partnerships in New York City's New School Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Robert

    2010-01-01

    New York City's Mayor Michael Bloomberg and school's Chancellor Joel Klein made the creation of new schools an essential part of their Children First reform policy. In September 2002, 13 high schools opened replacing the lowest performing large high schools throughout the City. As of 2010, more than 400 new district and charter schools are in…

  1. Towards a Pedagogical Paradigm Rooted in Multilinguality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnihotri, R. K.

    2007-01-01

    Choosing any one alternative out of the three educational models provided by Joel Spring (2007/this issue) may not really be adequate for a new social-sociolinguistic theory for a potentially just world order. In this article, the author contends that as an alternative to the persistently degenerating consumerist model of the education security…

  2. Alcohol advertising and youth.

    PubMed

    Martin, Susan E; Snyder, Leslie B; Hamilton, Mark; Fleming-Milici, Fran; Slater, Michael D; Stacy, Alan; Chen, Meng-Jinn; Grube, Joel W

    2002-06-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2001 Research Society on Alcoholism meeting in Montreal, Canada. The symposium was organized and chaired by Joel W. Grube. The presentations and presenters were (1) Introduction and background, by Susan E. Martin; (2) The effect of alcohol ads on youth 15-26 years old, by Leslie Snyder, Mark Hamilton, Fran Fleming-Milici, and Michael D. Slater; (3) A comparison of exposure to alcohol advertising and drinking behavior in elementary versus middle school children, by Phyllis L. Ellickson and Rebecca L. Collins; (4) USC health and advertising project: assessment study on alcohol advertisement memory and exposure, by Alan Stacy; and (5) TV beer and soft drink advertising: what young people like and what effects? by Meng-Jinn Chen and Joel W. Grube. PMID:12068260

  3. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  4. The way to win in cross-border alliances.

    PubMed

    Bleeke, J; Ernst, D

    1991-01-01

    Global competition has paved the way to new corporate combinations--and opened up new pitfalls along the way. In "The Way to Win in Cross-Border Alliances," Joel Bleeke and David Ernst offer the unconventional lessons of their study of 49 cross-border alliances. For example, alliances between a weak and a strong company usually don't work; but fifty-fifty ownership of joint ventures actually improves decision making. PMID:10114925

  5. Collecting Longitudinal Data Through Childhood, Adolescence, and Young Adulthood: Methodological Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Vivian B.; Day, Nancy L.; Windle, Michael; Windle, Rebecca; Grube, Joel W.; Molina, Brooke S.G.; Pelham, William E.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Wilson, Tracey K.; Jackson, Kristina M.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2003 Research Society on Alcoholism meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The organizers and chairs were Vivian Faden and Nancy Day. The presentations were (1) Lessons Learned From the Lives Across Time Longitudinal Study, by Michael Windle and Rebecca Windle; (2) Methodological Issues in Longitudinal Surveys With Children and Adolescents, by Joel Grube; (3) The Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study: Methodological and Conceptual Challenges, by Brooke Molina, William Pelham, Elizabeth Gnagy, and Tracey Wilson; and (4) Lessons learned in Conducting Longitudinal Research on Alcohol Involvement: If Only I Had Known Before Hand! by Kristina Jackson and Kenneth Sher. PMID:15112941

  6. The humanity of a Baylor surgeon: a tribute to Zeck Lieberman

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Editor's note: On March 25, 2008, Zelig (“Zeck”) Lieberman, MD, was recognized at a reception at the Crescent Club marking his 50th anniversary at Baylor University Medical Center. More than 115 friends, family members, and associates gathered to pay tribute to Dr. Lieberman for his commitment to the surgical oncology profession as well as his dedication to Baylor. Dr. Fordtran delivered the following tribute during the event. Culminating the evening's celebrations, Rowland K. Robinson, president of the Baylor Health Care System Foundation, and Joel Allison, president and chief executive officer of the Baylor Health Care System, presented Dr. Lieberman with a plaque for his extraordinary service.

  7. Two advertisements for TV drug ads.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The paper by Joel Weissman and colleagues addresses the increasingly important topic of the effects of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) by pharmaceutical companies. The authors claim that their results should be reassuring to "those concerned about potential adverse health care consequences of DTCA". However, the study and analysis of the data are marred by several flaws that diminish the importance and relevance of the findings, including weakness in design, overgenerous interpretations, and failure to address key questions. Rather than informing the debate, the study amounts to little more than an advertisement for drug advertisements. PMID:14527241

  8. X-ray FEL induced multiphton ionization and molecular dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li

    2014-05-01

    X-ray Free electron lasers (FELs) enable multiphoton absorption at the core levels which is not possible with conventional light sources. Multiphoton ionization and the subsequent core-hole states relaxation lead to dramatic dynamics of the molecules. We present our experimental as well as theoretical results on multiphoton ionization and molecular fragmentation dynamics with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Laboratory. We investigated simple diatomic system, N2 molecules, where we used multiphoton ionization as an internal clock for imaging the dynamics in time and the internuclear separation domain. We observed the modification of the ionization dynamic by varying the x-ray beam parameters and the effect of the spatial distribution on the ionization. We also investigated a complex system, C60, where we developed a full model to simulate the multiphoton ionization that results in various molecular ions and atomic carbon ions up to charge 6+. The calculation agrees well with our experimental results in ion kinetic energy distribution and charge state distribution. Moreover, our model provides further insights into the photoionization and dissociation dynamics as a function of time and molecular size. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Thank T. Osipov, B. Murphy, Z. Jurek, S.-K. Son, R. Santra, and N. Berrah, M. Hoener, O. Gessner, F. Tarantelli, S.T. Pratt, O. Kornilov, C. Buth, M. Güehr, E. Kanter, C. Bostedt, J. D. Bozek, P. H. Bucksbaum, M. Chen, R. Coffee, J. Cryan, L. DiMauro, M. Glownia, E. Kukk, S.R. Leone, L. Avaldi, P. Bolognesi, J. Eland, J. Farrell, R. Feifel, L. Frasinski, D.T. Ha, K. Hoffmann, B. McFarland, C. Miron, M. Mucke, R. Squibb, K. Ueda for their contributions to this work.

  9. What veterinary practice managers can learn from other health care professions.

    PubMed

    Wood, F

    1996-02-01

    Joel Barker, a noted futurist, points out that the best ideas usually come from outside an industry or profession. As a management consultant, I often get new ideas from industries completely unrelated to my clients' industry. For example, companies interested in offering outstanding customer service might study Nordstrom's, L.L. Bean, or Lexus. Those interested in world class distribution might research Federal Express or United Parcel Service. Airlines, trying to minimize downtime of jets at the terminal, learn secrets from Indianapolis 500 pit crews. Similarly, in observing optometrists and dentists, there are valuable lessons for veterinarians. Dentists identified a business model or organizational structure that generates healthy profits. Independent optometrists experienced the onslaught of intense competition from huge corporate players and weathered the storm. The veterinary profession is not so unique. By studying other professions, we need not recreate the wheel. PMID:8778948

  10. Report from the field

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Denice; Levitz, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference, hosted by the Institute for Immunology and Informatics (iCubed) at the University of Rhode Island (URI), took place on October 15–17, 2012. This conference provides a forum for the review of current progress in the discovery and development of vaccines, and creates an environment for the exchange of ideas. Dr. Joel McCleary opened the conference with a warning about the importance of preparing for well-defined biowarfare threats, including tularemia and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Following the keynote address, sessions explored biodefense and preparation for pandemic and biowarfare threats; vaccines for emerging and re-emerging neglected tropical diseases; animal vaccines and human health; and vaccine vectors and the human microbiome. In this issue of Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, seven Vaccine Renaissance Conference speakers will showcase their work; here, we describe a few of the conference highlights. PMID:23732897

  11. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2016-07-12

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  12. Report from the field: Overview of the Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference.

    PubMed

    Spero, Denice; Levitz, Lauren; De Groot, Anne S

    2013-07-01

    The Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference, hosted by the Institute for Immunology and Informatics (iCubed) at the University of Rhode Island (URI), took place on October 15-17, 2012. This conference provides a forum for the review of current progress in the discovery and development of vaccines, and creates an environment for the exchange of ideas. Dr. Joel McCleary opened the conference with a warning about the importance of preparing for well-defined biowarfare threats, including tularemia and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Following the keynote address, sessions explored biodefense and preparation for pandemic and biowarfare threats; vaccines for emerging and re-emerging neglected tropical diseases; animal vaccines and human health; and vaccine vectors and the human microbiome. In this issue of Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, seven Vaccine Renaissance Conference speakers will showcase their work; here, we describe a few of the conference highlights.

  13. Paternalism and egregious harm: Prader-Willi Syndrome and the importance of care.

    PubMed

    Groarke, Louis

    2000-07-01

    Paternalism clashes with the usual liberal model. In this paper I argue that attempts to defend even a limited form of paternalism by liberal authors such as Joel Feinberg, Gerald Dworkin and H.L.A. Hart fail. I propose instead a bivalent model for paternalism that appeals to two separate principles: the no-harm principle and the care-principle. The notion of care discussed by contemporary feminist authors is a fundamental moral archetype that permeates history and culture. I go on to consider the case of patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome and argue that paternalism is not only permissible but imperative in cases in egregious harm. This view is enshrined in common law jurisprudence which dismisses consent as a justification in serious crime.

  14. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  15. The Relative Humidity of the Atmosphere in the Encasements Containing the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution (Pages 1 and 4), and the Bill of Rights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, James W.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Levine, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    In 1951, the four pages of the US Constitution, the Letter of Transmittal, the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence, collectively called the 'Charters of Freedom,' were hermetically sealed individually in glass encasements. The atmosphere in the encasements consisted of a mixture of helium with water vapor at a relative humidity between 25 and 35% at room temperature. In 1998, Margaret Kelly of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), contacted Dr. Joel S. Levine at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to request assistance in determining the chemical composition of the atmosphere inside the encasements. Several different Langley learns were assembled to address that request. each using a different measurement technique. This report describes the method and results of one team's relative humidity measurements on encasements containing pages 1 and 4 of the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence performed at NARA, College Park. Maryland, on July 23, 2001.

  16. Report from the field: Overview of the Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference.

    PubMed

    Spero, Denice; Levitz, Lauren; De Groot, Anne S

    2013-07-01

    The Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference, hosted by the Institute for Immunology and Informatics (iCubed) at the University of Rhode Island (URI), took place on October 15-17, 2012. This conference provides a forum for the review of current progress in the discovery and development of vaccines, and creates an environment for the exchange of ideas. Dr. Joel McCleary opened the conference with a warning about the importance of preparing for well-defined biowarfare threats, including tularemia and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Following the keynote address, sessions explored biodefense and preparation for pandemic and biowarfare threats; vaccines for emerging and re-emerging neglected tropical diseases; animal vaccines and human health; and vaccine vectors and the human microbiome. In this issue of Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, seven Vaccine Renaissance Conference speakers will showcase their work; here, we describe a few of the conference highlights. PMID:23732897

  17. Quantum Process Tomography for Energy Transfer Systems via Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel

    2012-02-01

    The description of excited state dynamics in energy transfer systems constitutes a theoretical and experimental challenge in modern chemical physics. A spectroscopic protocol that systematically characterizes both coherent and dissipative processes of the probed chromophores is desired [1,2]. In this talk, I show that a set of two-color photon-echo experiments performs quantum state tomography (QST) of the one-exciton manifold of a dimer by reconstructing its density matrix in real time. This possibility in turn allows for a complete description of excited state dynamics via quantum process tomography (QPT). Simulations of a noisy QPT experiment for an inhomogeneously broadened ensemble of model excitonic dimers show that the protocol distills rich information about dissipative excitonic dynamics, which appears nontrivially hidden in the signal monitored in single realizations of four-wave mixing experiments Progress on the experimental side will be discussed, as well as new insights that QPT has offered on the understanding of 2D electronic and vibrational spectroscopy. [1] J. Yuen-Zhou, J. J. Krich, A. Aspuru-Guzik, Quantum state and process tomography of energy transfer systems via ultrafast spectroscopy Joel Yuen-Zhou, Jacob J. Krich, Masoud Mohseni and Al'an Aspuru-Guzik Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, Early Edition (2011). [2] J. Yuen-Zhou, A. Aspuru-Guzik, Quantum process tomography of molecular dimers from two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy I: General theory and application to homodimers Joel Yuen-Zhou and Al'an Aspuru-Guzik . Chem. Phys. 134, 134505 (2011).

  18. First Results on Ultrafast and Ultraintense X-Ray Studies of Molecular Photoabsorption using the LCLS Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2010-03-01

    collaboration with L. Fang, M. Hoener, O. Kornilov, M. Guehr, O. Gessner, S.T. Pratt, C. Blaga, C. Bostedt, J.D. Bozek, P. Bucksbaum, C. Buth, R. Coffee, J. Cryan, L. DiMauro, J. Glownia, E. Hosler, E. Kanter, , E. Kukk, B. Murphy and D. Rolles and N. Berrah.

  19. Communicating Science; a collaborative approach through Art, Dance, Music and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Sarah-Jane; Mortimer, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    A collaborative approach to communicating our amazing science. RAL Space at the Rutherford Appleton Lab, has initiated a unique collaboration with a team of award-winning performing artists with the aim of making space science research engaging and accessible to a wide audience. The collaboration has two distinct but connected strands one of which is the development of a contemporary dance work inspired by solar science and including images and data from the Space Physics Division of STFC RAL Space. The work has been commissioned by Sadler's Wells, one of the world's leading dance venues. It will be created by choreographer Alexander Whitley, video artist Tal Rosner and composers Ella Spira and Joel Cadbury and toured throughout the UK and internationally by the Alexander Whitley Dance Company (AWDC). The work will come about through collaboration with the work of the scientists of RAL Space and in particular the SOHO, CDS and STEREO missions, taking a particular interest in space weather. Choreographer Alexander Whitley and composers Ella Spira and Joel Cadbury will take their inspiration from the images and data that are produced by the solar science within RAL Space. Video artist Tal Rosner will use these spectacular images to create an atmospheric backdrop to accompany the work, bringing the beauty and wonder of space exploration to new audiences. Funding for the creation and touring of the work will be sought from Arts Council England, the British Council, partner organisations, trusts and foundations and private donors.The world premiere of the work will take place at Sadler's Wells in June 2017. It will then tour throughout the UK and internationally to theatres, science conferences and outreach venues with the aim of bringing the work of STFC RAL Space and the science behind solar science and space weather to new audiences. An education programme will combine concepts of choreography and space science aimed at young people in year 5 Key Stage 2 and be

  20. Beyond the EX1 limit: probing the structure of high-energy states in protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Cliff, Matthew J; Higgins, Lee D; Sessions, Richard B; Waltho, Jon P; Clarke, Anthony R

    2004-02-13

    increased, this limit is breached and the rate begins to rise again. This unintuitive behaviour does not result from pH instability, rather it is a consequence of amide groups experiencing two processes; rapid fluctuation of structure and crossing the global barrier for unfolding. The boundary at which the EX1 limit is overcome is determined by the equilibrium distribution of the fluctuating open and closed states (K(O/C)) and the rate constant for unfolding (k(u)). This critical boundary is reached when k(int)K(O/C)=k(u). Given that, in a simple transition state formalism: k(u)=K(#)k' (where K(#) describes the equilibrium distribution between the transition and ground state and k' describes the rate of a barrierless rearrangement), it follows that if the pH is raised to a level where k(int)=k', then the entire free energy spectrum from ground state to transition state could be sampled.

  1. L'Astronomia del Venerdí Santo, l'eclissi di Luna e l'ora della Sindone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    Dating the crucifixion on friday 3 April 33, when, at sunset a partially eclipsed Moon rised allows to interprete the speech of Saint Peter (Acts 2:20=Joel 3:4) on the day of Pentecost as including an account of this eclipse, as fulfillment of the Scriptures. Few minutes later the apparition of a third star of medium magnitude stated the beginning of the sabbatical rest: before that time Jesus has been buried, wrapped into the shroud. The observations of the equinoctial moonrise from the Mount of Olives on September 2013 are strongly in favour of the hypotehsis of possible observation of the lunar eclipse of 33 AD by Jewish people, as well as the sunrises observed from the Temple Institute terrace in Southern-East Jerusalem demonstrated that this eclipse could have been seen from Jerusalem. The depression of the horizon and the refraction allow to see Sun and Moon more than 1 degree below the geometrical horizon in the azimuthal direction ranging from 90 to 116, prologing to 16 minutes the duration of the partial lunar eclipse observed in 33AD. Texts of Matthew, Mark and Cyrillus of Jerusalem are also commented.

  2. W. M. KECK TELESCOPE CAPTURES THE IMPACT OF COMET SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 FRAGMENT-R ON JUPITER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    MAUNA KEA, HAWAII Astronomers: Imke de Pater, James R. Graham, Garrett Jernigan University of California, Berkeley with support from Wendy Harrison, Joel Aycock, David Vezie and the staff of the Keck Observatory The movie shows the impact of Fragment-R of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. The impact was observed at near-infrared wavelengths, 2.3 microns. In the beginning of the movie, only part of the Southern hemisphere is visible with two former impact sites. The former impact site of Fragments P and Q appears on the left side. R hits this same spot. The movie covers a timespan of approximately half an hour. At 5:33 UT a first flash is detected just above the impact site, lasting for approximately 20 seconds. A second flash is detected about 20 seconds later, lasting for about a minute. Several minutes later the fireball becomes visible as a bright spot, increasing rapidly in intensity. Within a few minutes it is outshining the entire planet. The rise and fall in intensity takes about 8 minutes.

  3. Thinking theologically about reproductive and genetic enhancements: the challenge.

    PubMed

    Khushf, George

    1999-08-01

    Current philosophical and legal bioethical reflections on reprogenetics provides little more than a rationalization of the interests of science. There are two reasons for this. First, bioethicists attempt to address ethical issues in a "language of precision" that characterizes science, and this works against analogical and narratological modes of discourse that have traditionally provided guidance for understanding human nature and purpose. Second, the current ethical and legal debate is framed by a public/private distinction that banishes robust norms to the private realm, and leaves a minimalist public discourse of harm avoidance that is insuffucient for regulating the science. In this essay, I argue that Mark Hanson's account of anxiety provides a valuable starting point for addressing deficiencies in the current philosophical and legal debate, and it highlights the need for a theological discourse on genetic enhancements. Through an assessment of Joel Shuman's criticism of the public/private distinction, I show how the needed theological discourse should be situated in the context of robust communities, and how such a communitarian inter-ethic is compatible with a variant of liberalism. Finally, I critically assess James Keenan's account of virtue and perfection, in order to outline what a sufficient discourse on reproductive and genetic enhancements requires.

  4. Emmanuel Levinas and the face of Terri Schiavo: bioethical and phenomenological reflections on a private tragedy and public spectacle.

    PubMed

    Dahnke, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    The controversial case of Terri Schiavo came to a close on March 31, 2005, with her death following the removal of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. This event followed years of controversy and social upheaval. Voices from across the entire political and cultural spectrums filled the airwaves and op-ed pages of major newspapers. Protests ensued outside of Ms. Schiavo's care facility. Ms. Schiavo's parents published videos of their daughter on the internet in an effort to prove that she was not in a vegetative state and could potentially recover. There is a certain mystery to the entire controversy given the fact that, legally, it was largely a matter of settled law. Precedent cases and legal statutes clearly set out the proper procedures and decisions to be followed in this case. Nonetheless, powerful challenges and virulent opposition to these standards arose. Through an investigation of this case as well as a comparative study of the case of Dax Cowart (in particular, the documentary depictions of Dax Cowart's case) and of a photograph by Joel-Peter Witkin, I plan to investigate the source of these social upheavals and hypothesize that they were largely the result of a phenomenological reaction to the human face.

  5. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  6. PREFACE: HITES 2012: 'Horizons of Innovative Theories, Experiments, and Supercomputing in Nuclear Physics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    This volume contains the contributions of the speakers of an international conference in honor of Jerry Draayer's 70th birthday, entitled 'Horizons of Innovative Theories, Experiments and Supercomputing in Nuclear Physics'. The list of contributors includes not only international experts in these fields, but also many former collaborators, former graduate students, and former postdoctoral fellows of Jerry Draayer, stressing innovative theories such as special symmetries and supercomputing, both of particular interest to Jerry. The organizers of the conference intended to honor Jerry Draayer not only for his seminal contributions in these fields, but also for his administrative skills at departmental, university, national and international level. Signed: Ted Hecht University of Michigan Conference photograph Scientific Advisory Committee Ani AprahamianUniversity of Notre Dame Baha BalantekinUniversity of Wisconsin Bruce BarrettUniversity of Arizona Umit CatalyurekOhio State Unversity David DeanOak Ridge National Laboratory Jutta Escher (Chair)Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jorge HirschUNAM, Mexico David RoweUniversity of Toronto Brad Sherill & Michigan State University Joel TohlineLouisiana State University Edward ZganjarLousiana State University Organizing Committee Jeff BlackmonLouisiana State University Mark CaprioUniversity of Notre Dame Tomas DytrychLouisiana State University Ana GeorgievaINRNE, Bulgaria Kristina Launey (Co-chair)Louisiana State University Gabriella PopaOhio University Zanesville James Vary (Co-chair)Iowa State University Local Organizing Committee Laura LinhardtLouisiana State University Charlie RascoLouisiana State University Karen Richard (Coordinator)Louisiana State University

  7. Automation of MCDOR at NMT-3 Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1997-01-01

    The automation of various parts of multiple--cycle direct oxide reduction (MCDOR) at LANL`s NMT-3 was the goal of this research and development activities. In particular, originally the following goals were assigned to the author by the NMT-3 technical staff leaders (Greg Bird, Jim McNeese, Joel Williams): (1) Design and fabricate an automation set up; (2) Step-wise automation is preferred; (3) Step 1 involves automatic metering and mixing of powders; and (4) Step 2-automatic transport of powder to furnace location The initial task assigned in May 91 was to get the appropriate design developed and order equipment and parts to automatically weight powders. In fact the work statement read {open_quotes}Create an experimental automation set up in the ME Department at UNM to automatically weigh powders using an electronic balance. Further, design the set up such that the electronic balance is reprogrammable for specific weight set points. Thus, when a set point in weight is reached by means of a vibratory feeder feeding a container on the balance, the electronic balance will send an electronic signal out to switch off the vibratory feeder{close_quotes}. The automation of the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium is described.

  8. Effects of increased pumpage on a fractured-bedrock aquifer system in central Orange County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garber, Murray

    1985-01-01

    The bedrock in central Orange County consists of highly indurated siltstone, shale, and conglomerate containing two major fault systems and extensive fracturing; it is overlain by 50 to 100 feet of till. The fracturing permits unusually high well yields. Wells tapping the bedrock yield 75 to 200 gallons per minute; those tapping bedrock in adjacent areas yield only a few tens of gallons per minute. The bedrock aquifer is recharged mainly by percolation of water from precipitation through the till. In 1983, the U.S. Geological Survey studied the hydrologic effects of increased pumpage on the fractured bedrock aquifer system near the Village of Kiryas Joel, in the Town of Monroe. Water levels were measured in several wells in the village 's two well fields from February to October 1983, and pumpage data from the same period were tabulated. Water levels responded to variations in both pumpage and precipitation. Pumping tests and water levels in the southeastern well field in 1983 had no effect on the northwestern well field. An observation well between the two fields shows about 20 feet of seasonal fluctuation from recharge and the effects of pumping at the northwestern well field. Aquifer-test data indicate a transmissivity of 900 feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 0.0001. (USGS)

  9. Classical Molecular Dynamics and Self-Consistent Tight-Binding Simulations of Si-Si Wafer Bonding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, J. G.; Kim, Jeongnim; Wilkins, John W.; Kirchhoff, Florian

    2000-03-01

    We have carried out a series of atomistic simulations of the room temperature bonding of clean, defect-free Si wafers under UHV conditions using Classical Molecular Dynamics (CMD) and Self-Consistent Tight-Binding (SCTB) Our simulations indicate that even when the wafers are perfectly aligned, bonding does not typically result in the formation of bulk crystalline Si. Instead, the basic geometry of the original dimerized surface tends to persist, producing an interface characterized by linked dimers. As the wafers bond, considerable chemical energy is released resulting in rapid heating (up to 800 K) at the interface. However, this heat is rapidly conducted away from the interface and so does not have an appreciable annealing effect. Large-scale CMD calculations show that the ground state energy of the bonded system is sensitively dependent on twist angle. The SCTB calculations were performed using the using the parameterization of Lenosky et al.( Thomas J. Lenosky, Joel D. Kress, Inhee Kwon, Arthur F. Voter, Byard Edwards, David F. Richards, Sang Yang, and James B. Adams, Phys. Rev. B 55), 1528 (1997).

  10. Scaled-down program for expanding Superfund urged

    SciTech Connect

    Ember, L.

    1984-09-24

    In a statement to several Senators, an Office of Technology Assessment analyst says the Superfund program to clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites is likely to be a multidecade effort, encompassing at least 10,000 sites, and costing $50 billion to $100 billion. But throwing vast sums of money at the Environmental Protection Agency now would be throwing money down a black hole, says OTA senior associate Joel S. Hirschhorn. He says this is the first time OTA, the research arm of Congress, has put a price tag on the cost of cleaning up the disposal mistakes of the past. But he is quick to add that OTA's staggering estimate of total cleanup costs should in no way influence funding levels in pending bills to reauthorize Superfund. Hirschhorn says EPA is not now capable of spending efficiently more than $1 billion per year. And by so saying, he reaffirmed what EPA has been declaring all year to House and Senate committees working on legislation to reauthorize Superfund before the November elections and one year before it expires in 1985.

  11. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  12. A Defence of the Counterfactual Account of Harm.

    PubMed

    Purshouse, Craig

    2016-05-01

    In order to determine whether a particular course of conduct is ethically permissible it is important to have a concept of what it means to be harmed. The dominant theory of harm is the counterfactual account, most famously proposed by Joel Feinberg. This determines whether harm is caused by comparing what actually happened in a given situation with the 'counterfacts' i.e. what would have occurred had the putatively harmful conduct not taken place. If a person's interests are worse off than they otherwise would have been, then a person will be harmed. This definition has recently faced challenges from bioethicists such as John Harris, Guy Kahane and Julian Savulescu who, believing it to be severely flawed, have proposed their own alternative theories of the concept. In this article I will demonstrate that the shortcomings Harris, Kahane and Savulescu believe are present in Feinberg's theory are illusory and that it is their own accounts of harm that are fraught with logical errors. I maintain that the arguments presented to refute Feinberg's theory not only fail to achieve this goal and can be accommodated within the counterfactual account but that they actually undermine the theories presented by their respective authors. The final conclusion will be that these challenges are misconceived and fail to displace the counterfactual theory.

  13. Evolution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel

    2006-04-01

    Cosmology is in the midst of a scientific revolution that is establishing its lasting foundations. The good agreement between many different sorts of observations and the predictions of the now-standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory gives us hope that this is humanity's first picture of the history of the universe as a whole that might actually be true. An unexpected feature of this new picture is that we humans appear to be central or special in many ways -- for example, we are made of the rarest stuff in the universe (stardust); we are intermediate in size between the smallest possible size (the Planck length) and the largest size (the cosmic horizon); and we are living at a pivotal time: the period in the history of the universe when its expansion began to accelerate rather than slow down, and in the middle of the ten-billion-year lifetime of our solar system and of the billion year most habitable period of our planet, and at what must be the end of the exponential growth of human impact on the earth. This talk will review key observations that support modern cosmology, describe some symbolic ways of understanding the modern cosmos, and discuss some possible implications of a cosmic perspective for our 21st century worldview. Based on a new book, The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos, by Joel R. Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams (Riverhead Books, April 2006).

  14. Use of single large or several small policies as strategies to manage people-park interactions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catrina A; Baird, Timothy D; Hartter, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Biodiversity conservation has been criticized for undermining or ignoring social well-being. Currently efforts to mutually promote social justice, rural development, and biodiversity conservation, which have been contentious and yielded mixed results, continue to spread despite a general dearth of effective management strategies. We contend that social and economic concerns should be integral to conservation planning and propose that the scale of these phenomena is also critical. To evaluate the merit of this proposal, we adopted and expanded a conservation management strategy framework developed by Joel Heinen and examined how population density, economic disparity, and ethnic heterogeneity vary spatially surrounding 2 contrasting protected areas in East Africa: Kibale National Park in Uganda and Tarangire National Park in Tanzania. Analyses of demographic, wealth, and ethnicity data from regional censuses and household surveys conducted in 2009 and 2010 indicated that choice of scale (landscape or community) changed the management strategies recommended by the model. Therefore, "several small" people-park management strategies varying around a given protected area may be more appropriate than a "single large" people-park strategy applied across an entire protected area. Correspondingly, scale adjusted Heinen recommendations offered new strategies for effective conservation management within these human landscapes not incorporated in current in situ management plans.

  15. Oxidants from Pulverized Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2007-06-01

    Joel Hurowitz (previously at State University of New York at Stony Brook and now at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Nick Tosca, Scott McLennan, and Martin Schoonen (SUNY at Stony Brook) studied the production of hydrogen peroxide from freshly pulverized minerals in solution. Their experiments focused on olivine, augite, and labradorite; silicate minerals of basaltic planetary surfaces, such as the Moon and Mars, that are exposed to the intense crushing and grinding of impact cratering processes. The hydrogen peroxide produced in the experiments was enough to adequately explain the oxidizing nature of Martian regolith first determined by the Viking Landers and the results suggest, for the first time, that mechanically activated mineral surfaces may be an important part of the overall explanation for the Viking Lander biology experiment results. Hurowitz and coauthors further showed that when the pulverized minerals are heat-treated to high temperature under vacuum (to cause dehydroxylation) there is almost a 20 times increase in hydrogen peroxide production, a result which may be highly relevant to lunar dust. These careful studies demonstrate the importance of and concern about reactive dusts on planetary surfaces from two standpoints: the health of astronauts on surface maneuvers who may inadvertently breath it and the viability of possible Martian organic species to survive in such a corrosive, antiseptic surface environment.

  16. To See Ourselves as Others See Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilhaus, Fred

    2005-03-01

    Earth and space scientists and the 2004 AGU Fall Meeting were the subject of a recent column in The Washington Post Magazine (30 January 2005) by Post writer Joel Achenbach. Eos is taking the unusual step of reprinting the entire article to stimulate discussion of our role in society. Are we doing what we should to inform the public of what we know and don't know about looming natural hazards, resource shortages, and threats to the environment? If not, what more could and should we do within our purview and appropriate role as scientists? Achenbach is a long-time observer of AGU. He is the recipient of the 1990 AGU Walter Sullivan Award for journalism, the second writer to be given this award for making geophysical information accessible and interesting to the general public. This Union award is named for the renowned New York Times science writer who was its first recipient in 1989. Achenbach won the award for an article titled ``Second Thoughts,'' which was reprinted in Eos (vol. 71, no. 25, 19 June 1990).

  17. Harnessing the complexity of gene expression data from cancer: from single gene to structural pathway methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-dimensional gene expression data provide a rich source of information because they capture the expression level of genes in dynamic states that reflect the biological functioning of a cell. For this reason, such data are suitable to reveal systems related properties inside a cell, e.g., in order to elucidate molecular mechanisms of complex diseases like breast or prostate cancer. However, this is not only strongly dependent on the sample size and the correlation structure of a data set, but also on the statistical hypotheses tested. Many different approaches have been developed over the years to analyze gene expression data to (I) identify changes in single genes, (II) identify changes in gene sets or pathways, and (III) identify changes in the correlation structure in pathways. In this paper, we review statistical methods for all three types of approaches, including subtypes, in the context of cancer data and provide links to software implementations and tools and address also the general problem of multiple hypotheses testing. Further, we provide recommendations for the selection of such analysis methods. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Byung-Soo Kim and Joel Bader. PMID:23227854

  18. BioPartsBuilder: a synthetic biology tool for combinatorial assembly of biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Luo, Jingchuan; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Combinatorial assembly of DNA elements is an efficient method for building large-scale synthetic pathways from standardized, reusable components. These methods are particularly useful because they enable assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one reaction, at the cost of requiring that each fragment satisfies design constraints. We developed BioPartsBuilder as a biologist-friendly web tool to design biological parts that are compatible with DNA combinatorial assembly methods, such as Golden Gate and related methods. It retrieves biological sequences, enforces compliance with assembly design standards and provides a fabrication plan for each fragment. Availability and implementation: BioPartsBuilder is accessible at http://public.biopartsbuilder.org and an Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (AMI ID: ami-508acf38). Source code is released under the MIT license, and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsbuilder. Contact: joel.bader@jhu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26568632

  19. Structural influence of gene networks on their inference: analysis of C3NET

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of large-scale high-throughput data possesses considerable challenges toward their functional analysis. For this reason gene network inference methods gained considerable interest. However, our current knowledge, especially about the influence of the structure of a gene network on its inference, is limited. Results In this paper we present a comprehensive investigation of the structural influence of gene networks on the inferential characteristics of C3NET - a recently introduced gene network inference algorithm. We employ local as well as global performance metrics in combination with an ensemble approach. The results from our numerical study for various biological and synthetic network structures and simulation conditions, also comparing C3NET with other inference algorithms, lead a multitude of theoretical and practical insights into the working behavior of C3NET. In addition, in order to facilitate the practical usage of C3NET we provide an user-friendly R package, called c3net, and describe its functionality. It is available from https://r-forge.r-project.org/projects/c3net and from the CRAN package repository. Conclusions The availability of gene network inference algorithms with known inferential properties opens a new era of large-scale screening experiments that could be equally beneficial for basic biological and biomedical research with auspicious prospects. The availability of our easy to use software package c3net may contribute to the popularization of such methods. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lev Klebanov, Joel Bader and Yuriy Gusev. PMID:21696592

  20. Gauge fields, strings, solitons, anomalies, and the speed of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    Joel Cohen proposed that "mathematics is biology's next microscope, only better; biology is mathematics' next physics, only better." Here, we aim for something even better. We try to combine mathematical physics and biology into a picoscope of life. For this, we merge techniques that were introduced and developed in modern mathematical physics, largely by Ludvig Faddeev, to describe objects such as solitons and Higgs and to explain phenomena such as anomalies in gauge fields. We propose a synthesis that can help to resolve the protein folding problem, one of the most important conundrums in all of science. We apply the concept of gauge invariance to scrutinize the extrinsic geometry of strings in three-dimensional space. We evoke general principles of symmetry in combination with Wilsonian universality and derive an essentially unique Landau-Ginzburg energy that describes the dynamics of a generic stringlike configuration in the far infrared. We observe that the energy supports topological solitons that relate to an anomaly similarly to how a string is framed around its inflection points. We explain how the solitons operate as modular building blocks from which folded proteins are composed. We describe crystallographic protein structures by multisolitons with experimental precision and investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of proteins under temperature variations. We simulate the folding process of a protein at in vivo speed and with close to picoscale accuracy using a standard laptop computer. With picobiology as next pursuit of mathematical physics, things can only get better.

  1. In vivo stimulation of connective tissue accumulation by the tripeptide-copper complex glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu2+ in rat experimental wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Maquart, F X; Bellon, G; Chaqour, B; Wegrowski, J; Patt, L M; Trachy, R E; Monboisse, J C; Chastang, F; Birembaut, P; Gillery, P

    1993-01-01

    The tripeptide-copper complex glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu2+ (GHK-Cu) was first described as a growth factor for differentiated cells. Recent in vitro data showed that it possesses several properties of a potential activator of wound repair. We investigated the effects of GHK-Cu in vivo, using the wound chamber model described previously (Schilling, J.A., W. Joel, and M.T. Shurley, 1959. Surgery [St. Louis]. 46:702-710). Stainless steel wire mesh cylinders were implanted subcutaneously on the back of rats. The animals were divided into groups that received sequential injections into the wound chamber of either saline (control group) or various concentrations of GHK-Cu. At the end of the experiments, rats were killed, wound chambers were collected, and their content was analyzed for dry weight, total proteins, collagen, DNA, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, and specific mRNAs for collagens and TGF beta. In the GHK-Cu-injected wound chambers, a concentration-dependent increase of dry weight, DNA, total protein, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan contents was found. The stimulation of collagen synthesis was twice that of noncollagen proteins. Type I and type III collagen mRNAs were increased but not TGF beta mRNAs. An increase of the relative amount of dermatan sulfate was also found. A control tripeptide, L-glutamyl-L-histidyl-L-proline, had no significant effect. These results demonstrate that GHK-Cu is able to increase extracellular matrix accumulation in wounds in vivo. Images PMID:8227353

  2. In vivo stimulation of connective tissue accumulation by the tripeptide-copper complex glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu2+ in rat experimental wounds.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Bellon, G; Chaqour, B; Wegrowski, J; Patt, L M; Trachy, R E; Monboisse, J C; Chastang, F; Birembaut, P; Gillery, P

    1993-11-01

    The tripeptide-copper complex glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu2+ (GHK-Cu) was first described as a growth factor for differentiated cells. Recent in vitro data showed that it possesses several properties of a potential activator of wound repair. We investigated the effects of GHK-Cu in vivo, using the wound chamber model described previously (Schilling, J.A., W. Joel, and M.T. Shurley, 1959. Surgery [St. Louis]. 46:702-710). Stainless steel wire mesh cylinders were implanted subcutaneously on the back of rats. The animals were divided into groups that received sequential injections into the wound chamber of either saline (control group) or various concentrations of GHK-Cu. At the end of the experiments, rats were killed, wound chambers were collected, and their content was analyzed for dry weight, total proteins, collagen, DNA, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, and specific mRNAs for collagens and TGF beta. In the GHK-Cu-injected wound chambers, a concentration-dependent increase of dry weight, DNA, total protein, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan contents was found. The stimulation of collagen synthesis was twice that of noncollagen proteins. Type I and type III collagen mRNAs were increased but not TGF beta mRNAs. An increase of the relative amount of dermatan sulfate was also found. A control tripeptide, L-glutamyl-L-histidyl-L-proline, had no significant effect. These results demonstrate that GHK-Cu is able to increase extracellular matrix accumulation in wounds in vivo. PMID:8227353

  3. Emmanuel Levinas and the face of Terri Schiavo: bioethical and phenomenological reflections on a private tragedy and public spectacle.

    PubMed

    Dahnke, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    The controversial case of Terri Schiavo came to a close on March 31, 2005, with her death following the removal of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. This event followed years of controversy and social upheaval. Voices from across the entire political and cultural spectrums filled the airwaves and op-ed pages of major newspapers. Protests ensued outside of Ms. Schiavo's care facility. Ms. Schiavo's parents published videos of their daughter on the internet in an effort to prove that she was not in a vegetative state and could potentially recover. There is a certain mystery to the entire controversy given the fact that, legally, it was largely a matter of settled law. Precedent cases and legal statutes clearly set out the proper procedures and decisions to be followed in this case. Nonetheless, powerful challenges and virulent opposition to these standards arose. Through an investigation of this case as well as a comparative study of the case of Dax Cowart (in particular, the documentary depictions of Dax Cowart's case) and of a photograph by Joel-Peter Witkin, I plan to investigate the source of these social upheavals and hypothesize that they were largely the result of a phenomenological reaction to the human face. PMID:22983869

  4. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  5. Bruce Medalists at the Mt. Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    The institution which succeeded the Mt. Wilson Station of Yerkes Observatory in 1904 has had six names and three sites. From 1948-1980 it was united with Caltech's Palomar Observatory, and since then its main observatory has been in Chile, though still headquartered on Santa Barbara Street in Pasadena. For more than half of the twentieth century it was the leading observatory in the world. One bit of evidence for this is the amazing number of its staff members awarded the Bruce Medal. The Catherine Wolfe Bruce Gold Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been awarded for lifetime contributions to astronomy since 1898. It is an international award. It wasn't until 1963 that the number of medalists who had worked primarily in the United States reached half the total. Yet fourteen of the first 87 medalists spent most of their careers at Mt. Wilson, including the period when it was Mt. Wilson and Palomar, and another three were Caltech observers who used the telescopes of the jointly operated observatory. Several more medalists made substantial use of the telescopes on Mt. Wilson and Palomar Mountain. We will discuss highlights of the careers of a number of these distinguished astronomers: directors George Ellery Hale, Walter Adams, Ira Bowen, and Horace Babcock; solar observer and satellite discoverer Seth Nicholson; instrument builder Harold Babcock; galactic and cosmological observers Frederick Seares, Edwin Hubble, Walter Baade, Rudolph Minkowski, and Allan Sandage; and spectroscopists Paul Merrill, Alfred Joy, Olin Wilson, Jesse Greenstein, Maarten Schmidt, and Wallace Sargent. We will touch briefly on others who used Mt. Wilson and/or Palomar, including Harlow Shapley, Joel Stebbins, Charlotte Moore Sitterly, Donald Osterbrock, and Albert Whitford.

  6. Book reviews.

    PubMed

    Dein, S; Dein, S; Littlewood, R; Oloyede, Y; Krause, I B; Argenti, N

    1998-04-01

    Millennialism and violence Michael Barkun (Ed.) London, Frank Cass, 1996, 177 pp. Evil and suffering in Jewish philosophy Oliver Leaman Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, 157 pp. Religion and the clinical practice of psychology Edward P. Shafranski (ed.) Washington DC, American Psychological Association, 1996, 619 pp., index, bibliographies, figures. Beyond reason: art and psychosis: works from the Prinzhorn Collection London, Hayward Gallery, 1997, £12.95, 195 pp., index, bibliography Madness and art: the life and works of Adolf Wölfli Walter Morgenthaler Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press, 1992, $35.00, xviii, 127 pp., index, bibliography. The encyclopaedia of cultural anthropology David Levinson & Melvin Ember (Eds) New York, Holt/London, Macmillan, 1996, £299, 1486 pp., index, figures, 4 volumes Encyclopaedia of social and cultural anthropology Alan Barnard & Jonathan Spencer (Eds) London, Routledge, 1996, £25, 658 pp., index, figures Hystories: hysterical epidemics and modern culture Elaine Showalter London, Picador, 1997, £16.99 x + 244 pp., index, notes. Charred lullabies: chapters in an anthropology of violence E. Valentine Daniel Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1997, £17.95 (pbk), £35.00 (hbk), xii + 252 pp., maps, notes, bibliog., index Women in pain: gender and morbidity in Mexico Kaja Finkler University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994, xvii + 238 pp., index, bibliog. Reason and necessity in the specification of the multiple self Roland Littlewood. Occasional Paper No. 43. London, Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, 1996 £10.00 (pbk), 75 pp., notes index, bibliog. Mental illness and bodily cures: psychiatric treatment in the first half of the twentieth century Joel Braslow Berkeley, California University Press, 1997, £30.00 xiv + 240pp., ind., notes, tables Mimesis: culture, art, society. Gunter Gebauer & Christoph Wulf Translated from German by Don Reneau Berkeley, University of California Press, 1995.

  7. Comparative analyses of population-scale phenomic data in electronic medical records reveal race-specific disease networks

    PubMed Central

    Glicksberg, Benjamin S.; Li, Li; Badgeley, Marcus A.; Shameer, Khader; Kosoy, Roman; Beckmann, Noam D.; Pho, Nam; Hakenberg, Jörg; Ma, Meng; Ayers, Kristin L.; Hoffman, Gabriel E.; Dan Li, Shuyu; Schadt, Eric E.; Patel, Chirag J.; Chen, Rong; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Underrepresentation of racial groups represents an important challenge and major gap in phenomics research. Most of the current human phenomics research is based primarily on European populations; hence it is an important challenge to expand it to consider other population groups. One approach is to utilize data from EMR databases that contain patient data from diverse demographics and ancestries. The implications of this racial underrepresentation of data can be profound regarding effects on the healthcare delivery and actionability. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first attempt to perform comparative, population-scale analyses of disease networks across three different populations, namely Caucasian (EA), African American (AA) and Hispanic/Latino (HL). Results: We compared susceptibility profiles and temporal connectivity patterns for 1988 diseases and 37 282 disease pairs represented in a clinical population of 1 025 573 patients. Accordingly, we revealed appreciable differences in disease susceptibility, temporal patterns, network structure and underlying disease connections between EA, AA and HL populations. We found 2158 significantly comorbid diseases for the EA cohort, 3265 for AA and 672 for HL. We further outlined key disease pair associations unique to each population as well as categorical enrichments of these pairs. Finally, we identified 51 key ‘hub’ diseases that are the focal points in the race-centric networks and of particular clinical importance. Incorporating race-specific disease comorbidity patterns will produce a more accurate and complete picture of the disease landscape overall and could support more precise understanding of disease relationships and patient management towards improved clinical outcomes. Contacts: rong.chen@mssm.edu or joel.dudley@mssm.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307606

  8. The 2014 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, John D.; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Tuthill, Peter G.; Wittkowski, Markus; Grellmann, Rebekka; Müller, André; Renganswany, Sridhar; Hummel, Christian; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Young, John; Buscher, David; Sanchez-Bermudez, Joel; Alberdi, Antxon; Schoedel, Rainer; Köhler, Rainer; Soulez, Ferréol; Thiébaut, Éric; Kluska, Jacques; Malbet, Fabien; Duvert, Gilles; Kraus, Stefan; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Baron, Fabien; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Rivinius, Thomas; Merand, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    Here we present the results of the 6th biennial optical interferometry imaging beauty contest. Taking advantage of a unique opportunity, the red supergiant VY CMa and the Mira variable R Car were observed in the astronomical H-band with three 4-telescope configurations of the VLTI-AT array using the PIONIER instrument. The community was invited to participate in the subsequent image reconstruction and interpretation phases of the project. Ten groups submitted entries to the beauty contest, and we found reasonable consistency between images obtained from independent workers using quite different algorithms. We also found that significant differences existed between the submitted images, much greater than in past beauty contests that were all based on simulated data. A novel crowd-sourcing" method allowed consensus median images to be constructed, filtering likely artifacts and retaining real features." We definitively detect strong spots on the surfaces of both stars as well as distinct circumstellar shells of emission (likely water/CO) around R Car. In a close contest, Joel Sanchez (IAA-CSIC/Spain) was named the winner of the 2014 interferometric imaging beauty contest. This process has shown that new comers" can use publicly-available imaging software to interpret VLTI/PIONIER imaging data, as long as sufficient observations are taken to have complete uv coverage { a luxury that is often missing. We urge proposers to request adequate observing nights to collect sufficient data for imaging and for time allocation committees to recognise the importance of uv coverage for reliable interpretation of interferometric data. We believe that the result of the proposed broad international project will contribute to inspiring trust in the image reconstruction processes in optical interferometry.

  9. Scientific Goals and Objectives for the Human Exploration of Mars: 1. Biology and Atmosphere/Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Garvin, J. B.; Anbar, A. D.; Beaty, D. W.; Bell, M. S.; Clancy, R. T.; Cockell, C. S.; Connerney, J. E.; Doran, P. T.; Delory, G.; Dickson, J. T.; Elphic, R. C.; Eppler, D. B.; Fernandez-Remolar, D. C.; Head, J. W.; Helper, M.; Gruener, J. E.; Heldmann, J.; Hipkin, V.; Lane, M. D.; Levy, J.; Moersch, J.; Ori, G. G.; Peach, L.; Poulet, F.

    2008-01-01

    To prepare for the exploration of Mars by humans, as outlined in the new national vision for Space Exploration (VSE), the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG), chartered by NASA's Mars Exploration Program (MEP), formed a Human Exploration of Mars Science Analysis Group (HEM-SAG), in March 2007. HEM-SAG was chartered to develop the scientific goals and objectives for the human exploration of Mars based on the Mars Scientific Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities.1 The HEM-SAG is one of several humans to Mars scientific, engineering and mission architecture studies chartered in 2007 to support NASA s plans for the human exploration of Mars. The HEM-SAG is composed of about 30 Mars scientists representing the disciplines of Mars biology, climate/atmosphere, geology and geophysics from the U.S., Canada, England, France, Italy and Spain. MEPAG selected Drs. James B. Garvin (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) and Joel S. Levine (NASA Langley Research Center) to serve as HEMSAG co-chairs. The HEM-SAG team conducted 20 telecons and convened three face-to-face meetings from March through October 2007. The management of MEP and MEPAG were briefed on the HEM-SAG interim findings in May. The HEM-SAG final report was presented on-line to the full MEPAG membership and was presented at the MEPAG meeting on February 20-21, 2008. This presentation will outline the HEM-SAG biology and climate/atmosphere goals and objectives. A companion paper will outline the HEM-SAG geology and geophysics goals and objectives.

  10. 2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials, February 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Joel; Rabe, Karin; Nayak, Chetan; Troyer, Matthias

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DOE Budget Period: 10/1/2011 to 9/30/2012 Contract # DE-SC0007479 New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Condensed Matter Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 5 to 10, 2012. Seventy-four participants from seven countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials. There were 34 formal talks, and a number of informal discussions held during the week. Talks covered a variety of topics related to DOE BES priorities, including, for example, advanced photon techniques (Hasan, Abbamonte, Orenstein, Shen, Ghosh) and predictive theoretical modeling of materials properties (Rappe, Pickett, Balents, Zhang, Vanderbilt); the full conference schedule is provided with this report. The week's events included a public lecture (Quantum Matters given by Chetan Nayak from Microsoft Research) and attended by 234 members of the public, and a physics caf© geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Kathryn Moler (Stanford University) and Andrew M. Rappe (University of Pennsylvania) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by Joel Moore (University of California Berkeley), Chetan Nayak (Microsoft Research), Karin Rabe (Rutgers University), and Matthias Troyer (ETH Zurich). Two organizers who did not attend the conference were Gabriel Aeppli (University College London & London Centre for Nanotechnology) and Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford University & Max Planck Hamburg).

  11. G x E: a NIAAA workshop on gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Gunzerath, Lorraine; Goldman, David

    2003-03-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) sponsored a May 2002 workshop on gene-environment interaction (G x E) research to identify potential roadblocks to further research and to propose solutions to those roadblocks, to optimize investigative opportunities and multidisciplinary or multi-institution collaborations, and to explore ways that NIAAA can facilitate G x E studies. Sessions included panels on animal models; phenotypes; genetic findings in humans; study designs and analytical methods; and assessment of environmental risk. Key among the identified challenges to progress in G x E research were issues of study design and sampling strategies; logistic and methodological costs and constraints; availability and understanding of data analysis techniques; potential stigmatization of study populations; and organizational/bureaucratic structures that are inadequate to address the unique needs of large-scale, multicenter, longitudinal projects. Participants proposed a series of recommendations to address these issues. Session coordinators included: Gayle Boyd, Kendall Bryant, Page Chiapella, Vivian Faden, David Goldman, and Antonio Noronha. Session participants included: Laura Almasy, Henri Begleiter, Raul Caetano, Bruce Dudek, Mary Dufour, Cindy Ehlers, Mary-Anne Enoch, Joel Gelernter, David Goldman, Bridget Grant, Lorraine Gunzerath, Deborah Hasin, Andrew Heath, Victor Hesselbrock, J. Dee Higley, Shirley Hill, Kerry Jang, Raynard S. Kington, Rick Kittles, George Koob, Kenneth Leonard, Ting-Kai Li, Jeffrey Long, William McBride, Matthew McGue, Kathleen Merikangas, Tamara Phillips, Bernice Porjesz, Carol Prescott, Theodore Reich, John Rice, Richard Rose, Charmaine Royal, Arnold Sameroff, Marc Schuckit, Kenneth Sher, Renee Sieving, Robert Taylor, Michael Windle, and Robert Zucker. PMID:12658122

  12. Vigor in the face of fluctuating rates of reward: an experimental examination.

    PubMed

    Guitart-Masip, Marc; Beierholm, Ulrik R; Dolan, Raymond; Duzel, Emrah; Dayan, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Two fundamental questions underlie the expression of behavior, namely what to do and how vigorously to do it. The former is the topic of an overwhelming wealth of theoretical and empirical work particularly in the fields of reinforcement learning and decision-making, with various forms of affective prediction error playing key roles. Although vigor concerns motivation, and so is the subject of many empirical studies in diverse fields, it has suffered a dearth of computational models. Recently, Niv et al. [Niv, Y., Daw, N. D., Joel, D., & Dayan, P. Tonic dopamine: Opportunity costs and the control of response vigor. Psychopharmacology (Berlin), 191, 507-520, 2007] suggested that vigor should be controlled by the opportunity cost of time, which is itself determined by the average rate of reward. This coupling of reward rate and vigor can be shown to be optimal under the theory of average return reinforcement learning for a particular class of tasks but may also be a more general, perhaps hard-wired, characteristic of the architecture of control. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that healthy human participants would adjust their RTs on the basis of the average rate of reward. We measured RTs in an odd-ball discrimination task for rewards whose magnitudes varied slowly but systematically. Linear regression on the subjects' individual RTs using the time varying average rate of reward as the regressor of interest, and including nuisance regressors such as the immediate reward in a round and in the preceding round, showed that a significant fraction of the variance in subjects' RTs could indeed be explained by the rate of experienced reward. This validates one of the key proposals associated with the model, illuminating an apparently mandatory form of coupling that may involve tonic levels of dopamine. PMID:21736459

  13. G x E: a NIAAA workshop on gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Gunzerath, Lorraine; Goldman, David

    2003-03-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) sponsored a May 2002 workshop on gene-environment interaction (G x E) research to identify potential roadblocks to further research and to propose solutions to those roadblocks, to optimize investigative opportunities and multidisciplinary or multi-institution collaborations, and to explore ways that NIAAA can facilitate G x E studies. Sessions included panels on animal models; phenotypes; genetic findings in humans; study designs and analytical methods; and assessment of environmental risk. Key among the identified challenges to progress in G x E research were issues of study design and sampling strategies; logistic and methodological costs and constraints; availability and understanding of data analysis techniques; potential stigmatization of study populations; and organizational/bureaucratic structures that are inadequate to address the unique needs of large-scale, multicenter, longitudinal projects. Participants proposed a series of recommendations to address these issues. Session coordinators included: Gayle Boyd, Kendall Bryant, Page Chiapella, Vivian Faden, David Goldman, and Antonio Noronha. Session participants included: Laura Almasy, Henri Begleiter, Raul Caetano, Bruce Dudek, Mary Dufour, Cindy Ehlers, Mary-Anne Enoch, Joel Gelernter, David Goldman, Bridget Grant, Lorraine Gunzerath, Deborah Hasin, Andrew Heath, Victor Hesselbrock, J. Dee Higley, Shirley Hill, Kerry Jang, Raynard S. Kington, Rick Kittles, George Koob, Kenneth Leonard, Ting-Kai Li, Jeffrey Long, William McBride, Matthew McGue, Kathleen Merikangas, Tamara Phillips, Bernice Porjesz, Carol Prescott, Theodore Reich, John Rice, Richard Rose, Charmaine Royal, Arnold Sameroff, Marc Schuckit, Kenneth Sher, Renee Sieving, Robert Taylor, Michael Windle, and Robert Zucker.

  14. George C. Comstock: Wisconsin Astronomer, Observatory Director, Graduate School Dean, and AAS Officer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1996-05-01

    George C. Comstock, the third director of Washburn Observatory, had a long and interesting career at Wisconsin. Born in Madison, he did his undergraduate work at Michigan under James Watson. From him Comstock learned the classical astronomy of stellar positions and celestial mechanics. He had one year of graduate work at Michigan before going to Madison as Watson's assistant in 1880, and remained after the latter's death as E.S. Holden's assistant. At Wisconsin, Comstock also studied law at the UW Law School in his ``spare time", to have an alternate career path. He was admitted to the bar in 1883 but never practiced. From 1885-7 he was on the Ohio State faculty with a summer working at Lick Observatory; then in 1887 became associate director back at Washburn Observatory. Two years later he succeeded to the full directorship, and kept the post until he retired in 1922 at the age of 67. All Comstock's research was in positional astronomy, and he considered his most important work to be the measurement of stellar aberration and atmospheric refraction. He also measured double stars with the 15-inch Washburn refractor. His main duty at UW was teaching, mostly ``practical astronomy" for civil engineering students. Comstock wrote several text books on astronomy, surveying, and least squares. He was the first head of the UW Graduate School, set up by President Charles R. Van Hise in 1904. Comstock was a highly effective administrator, and did much to build up research at UW. His own most successful students were Sidney D. Townley, Joel Stebbins, and Sebastian Albrecht. Because of his legal training, Comstock was involved as an officer in many scientific societies. He was one of the organizers of the AAS, its first secretary, and later its vice president, then president. He retired in 1922, and was succeeded by Stebbins, whom he helped to bring back to Madison from Illinois. After his retirement, Comstock lived in Beloit until his death in 1934.

  15. Review of Cold war social science: Knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature, and Working knowledge: Making the human sciences from Parsons to Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature by Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (2012) and Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences From Parsons to Kuhn by Joel Isaac (see record 2012-13212-000). Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics in the Anglo American world during the 20th century. To date, histories of these fields have drawn on a number of fairly well-established punctuation marks to assist in periodization: the shift from interwar institutionalism in economics to postwar neoclassicism, with its physics-like emphasis on mathematical theory-building; the transition from the regnant prewar behaviorism through a postwar "cognitive revolution" in American psychology; and the move in fields like sociology and anthropology away from positivism and the pursuit of what has sometimes been called "grand theory" in the early postwar era toward a period defined by intellectual and political fragmentation, the reemergence of interpretive approaches and a reaction to the scientistic pretensions of the earlier period. These books, by contrast, provide perspectives orthogonal to such existing narrative frameworks by adopting cross-cutting lenses like the "Cold War" and the working practices of researchers in the social and behavioral sciences. As a result, they do much to indicate the value of casting a historiographical net beyond individual disciplines, or even beyond the "social sciences" or the "human sciences" sensu stricto, in the search for deeper patterns of historical development in these fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Vigor in the face of fluctuating rates of reward: an experimental examination.

    PubMed

    Guitart-Masip, Marc; Beierholm, Ulrik R; Dolan, Raymond; Duzel, Emrah; Dayan, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Two fundamental questions underlie the expression of behavior, namely what to do and how vigorously to do it. The former is the topic of an overwhelming wealth of theoretical and empirical work particularly in the fields of reinforcement learning and decision-making, with various forms of affective prediction error playing key roles. Although vigor concerns motivation, and so is the subject of many empirical studies in diverse fields, it has suffered a dearth of computational models. Recently, Niv et al. [Niv, Y., Daw, N. D., Joel, D., & Dayan, P. Tonic dopamine: Opportunity costs and the control of response vigor. Psychopharmacology (Berlin), 191, 507-520, 2007] suggested that vigor should be controlled by the opportunity cost of time, which is itself determined by the average rate of reward. This coupling of reward rate and vigor can be shown to be optimal under the theory of average return reinforcement learning for a particular class of tasks but may also be a more general, perhaps hard-wired, characteristic of the architecture of control. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that healthy human participants would adjust their RTs on the basis of the average rate of reward. We measured RTs in an odd-ball discrimination task for rewards whose magnitudes varied slowly but systematically. Linear regression on the subjects' individual RTs using the time varying average rate of reward as the regressor of interest, and including nuisance regressors such as the immediate reward in a round and in the preceding round, showed that a significant fraction of the variance in subjects' RTs could indeed be explained by the rate of experienced reward. This validates one of the key proposals associated with the model, illuminating an apparently mandatory form of coupling that may involve tonic levels of dopamine.

  17. Project EDoLMI: Instrumentation for electron diffraction of trapped, massive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelle Buford, C.; Whetten, R. L.

    2000-11-01

    Project EDoLMI (``Electron Diffraction of Levitated Massive Ions") is a large ($1.4M) NSF-funded instrumentation development project which should result in the first application of the trapped-ion electron diffraction method in an academic institution. The instrument will be developed collaboratively by research teams at the Rowland Institute of Science (Cambridge, MA) and at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and once operational will be located entirely at the Atlanta campus. This contributed paper will describe the theory and practice of the trapped-ion electron diffraction method, as implemented in the Cambridge instrument by Parks etal.,(2-4) as well as descrbing progress toward the Atlanta instrument. The method will also be illustrated by recent results obtained using the Cambridge instrument,(2-4) as well as by theoretical calculations of diffraction results using hypothetical structural models and temperature-ranges of interest. Acknowledgement: We are grateful for the cooperation of EDoLMI team partners at the Rowland Institute of Science, including Dr. Joel H. Parks and Dr. Joseph T. Khoury in particular. 1. ``Collaborative development of a heavy-ion trap electron diffractometer for structure determination of selected nanoparticles, aerosol particles, and biomolecular assemblies," NSF CHE-0079678, by R. L. Whetten, J. H. Parks et al., funding period August 2000 to January 2003. 2. M. Maier-Borst, D. B. Cameron, M. Rokni, J. H. Parks, Phys. Rev. A59, R3162 (1999). 3. J. H. Parks, presented at the Third International Symposium on Theory of Atomic and Molecular Clusters," Berlin (1999), unpublished document. 4. S. Krückeberg, D. Schooss, M. Maier-Borst, J. H. Parks, ``Diffraction of trapped CsI clusters: The appearance of the bulk structure," submitted.

  18. Now We Are Ten: The AAS Tenth, Decennial Meeting at Yerkes Observatory in August 1909

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1997-12-01

    The tenth meeting of the Astronomical and Astrophysical Society of America (later to become the AAS), held in August 1909, was also its tenth-anniversary (or decennial) meeting. Fifty-three members were present, as contrasted with the 1400 expected for the 194th, Centennial meeting to be held in Chicago in May-June 1999, and forty-one papers were presented, rather than the 1000 predicted for next year. Other similarities and differences between meetings then and now will be described and illustrated. Simon Newcomb, the first AAS President, had died in July 1909, and Edward C. Pickering, who had succeeded him in 1905 and was to remain President until 1919, eulogized him at the Yerkes meeting. Two Committees, on Luminous Meteors and on Comets, respectively, presented their reports, the latter's dealing mostly with plans for Comet Halley at its 1910 apparition. A high-level Special Committee issued a statement decrying a newspaper furor over establishing communication with Mars, which they said was then ``outside the range of contemporary science." Six of the members present at the 1909 meeting were women. Joel Stebbins, later to be Councilor, Secretary, Vice President and President, presented his first AAS paper, on his new selenium (photo-resistive) photometry. Frank Schlesinger, another future Society President, was also present and read an instrument-design paper. Ten of the papers were given by Yerkes and University of Chicago astronomers, including three by E. E. Barnard and two by Kurt Laves. Another six papers from distant Lick Observatory members were read in absentia. S. W. Burnham, who was at the Yerkes meeting, was the one famous astronomer who never joined the Society. Finally, the Council authorized publication of a Decennial Book, to provide a record of the first ten years of the young Society.

  19. Physics and Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandy, W. T., Jr.; Milonni, P. W.

    2004-12-01

    Preface; 1. Recollection of an independent thinker Joel A. Snow; 2. A look back: early applications of maximum entropy estimation to quantum statistical mechanics D. J. Scalapino; 3. The Jaynes-Cummings revival B. W. Shore and P. L. Knight; 4. The Jaynes-Cummings model and the one-atom-master H. Walther; 5. The Jaynes-Cummings model is alive and well P. Meystre; 6. Self-consistent radiation reaction in quantum optics - Jaynes' influence and a new example in cavity QED J. H. Eberly; 7. Enhancing the index of refraction in a nonabsorbing medium: phaseonium versus a mixture of two-level atoms M. O. Scully, T. W. Hänsch, M. Fleischhauer, C. H. Keitel and Shi-Yao Zhu; 8. Ed Jaynes' steak dinner problem II Michael D. Crisp; 9. Source theory of vacuum field effects Peter W. Milonni; 10. The natural line shape Edwin A. Power; 11. An operational approach to Schrödinger's cat L. Mandel; 12. The classical limit of an atom C. R. Stroud, Jr.; 13. Mutual radiation reaction in spontaneous emission Richard J. Cook; 14. A model of neutron star dynamics F. W. Cummings; 15. The kinematic origin of complex wave function David Hestenes; 16. On radar target identification C. Ray Smith; 17. On the difference in means G. Larry Bretthorst; 18. Bayesian analysis, model selection and prediction Arnold Zellner and Chung-ki Min; 19. Bayesian numerical analysis John Skilling; 20. Quantum statistical inference R. N. Silver; 21. Application of the maximum entropy principle to nonlinear systems far from equilibrium H. Haken; 22. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics Baldwin Robertson; 23. A backward look to the future E. T. James; Appendix. Vita and bibliography of Edwin T. Jaynes; Index.

  20. Review of Cold war social science: Knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature, and Working knowledge: Making the human sciences from Parsons to Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature by Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (2012) and Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences From Parsons to Kuhn by Joel Isaac (see record 2012-13212-000). Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics in the Anglo American world during the 20th century. To date, histories of these fields have drawn on a number of fairly well-established punctuation marks to assist in periodization: the shift from interwar institutionalism in economics to postwar neoclassicism, with its physics-like emphasis on mathematical theory-building; the transition from the regnant prewar behaviorism through a postwar "cognitive revolution" in American psychology; and the move in fields like sociology and anthropology away from positivism and the pursuit of what has sometimes been called "grand theory" in the early postwar era toward a period defined by intellectual and political fragmentation, the reemergence of interpretive approaches and a reaction to the scientistic pretensions of the earlier period. These books, by contrast, provide perspectives orthogonal to such existing narrative frameworks by adopting cross-cutting lenses like the "Cold War" and the working practices of researchers in the social and behavioral sciences. As a result, they do much to indicate the value of casting a historiographical net beyond individual disciplines, or even beyond the "social sciences" or the "human sciences" sensu stricto, in the search for deeper patterns of historical development in these fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24245858

  1. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Study of Aerosol Sources and Processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2014-07-28

    This project funded the participation of scientists from seven research groups, running more than thirty instruments, in the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 km southeast of central London. The primary science questions for the ClearfLo Winter IOP were, 1) what is the urban increment of particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants in the greater London area, and, 2) what is the contribution of solid fuel use for home heating to wintertime PM? An additional motivation for the Detling measurements was the question of whether coatings on black carbon particles enhance absorption. The following four key accomplishments have been identified so far: 1) Chemical, physical and optical characterization of PM from local and regional sources (Figures 2, 4, 5 and 6). 2) Measurement of urban increment in particulate matter and gases in London (Figure 3). 3) Measurement of optical properties and chemical composition of coatings on black carbon containing particles indicates absorption enhancement. 4) First deployment of chemical ionization instrument (MOVI-CI-TOFMS) to measure both particle-phase and gas-phase organic acids. (See final report from Joel Thornton, University of Washington, for details.) Analysis of the large dataset acquired in Detling is ongoing and will yield further key accomplishments. These measurements of urban and rural aerosol properties will contribute to improved modeling of regional aerosol emissions, and of atmospheric aging and removal. The measurement of absorption enhancement by coatings on black carbon will contribute to improved modeling of the direct radiative properties of PM.

  2. The AAS ``Semi-centennial" Meeting: Northwestern University and Yerkes Observatory, September 1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS celebrated its "semi-centennial" fifty-two years ago! It was actually the fiftieth anniversary of the "First Conference" of astronomers and astrophysicists held at the dedication of Yerkes Observatory in 1897, which led to the actual formation of the Society two years later. Otto Struve, president of the AAS, was publicizing the fiftieth anniversary of his Yerkes Observatory in 1947, and he simply announced it was also the semi-centennial of the Society. Joel Stebbins, the grand old man of the AAS who had joined it as a graduate student in 1900, and held nearly every office in the Society from councilor to president, supported Struve's early celebration of the anniversary, probably largely because he was to retire himself in 1948. The meeting was held at Northwestern University and at Yerkes. There were then 625 AAS members. About 140 of them attended the meeting, and presented some 50 papers, all oral, with no parallel sessions. Struve organized a symposium on stellar atmospheres, with 5 invited speakers, and the great majority of the contributed papers were also on stars, a few on nebulae and interstellar matter, one on galaxies, and none on cosmology. Not to be outdone, Gerard P. Kuiper, who had recently succeeded Struve as director of Yerkes Observatory, organized a second symposium on the atmospheres of the planets, held at Yerkes immediately after the AAS meeting. After two days of sessions at Evanston, the members had driven to Williams Bay for the closing session Saturday, at which Struve and Stebbins gave their versions of the history of the observatory and of the Society. The two symposia formed the bases for two important books, Astrophysics: A Topical Symposium, and The Atmospheres of the Earth and the Planets, edited by J. Allen Hynek and Kuiper respectively.

  3. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1994-01-20

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual

  4. Potential disturbance interactions with a single IGV in an F109 turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Joel F.

    A common cause of aircraft engine failure is the high cycle fatigue of engine blades and stators. One of the primary causes of these failures is due to blade row interactions, which cause an aerodynamic excitation to be resonant with a mechanical natural frequency. Traditionally, the primary source of such aerodynamic excitations has been practically limited to viscous wakes from upstream components. However, more advanced designs require that blade rows be very highly loaded and closely spaced. This results in aerodynamic excitation from potential fields of down stream engine components, in addition to the known wake excitations. An experimental investigation of the potential field from the fan of a Honeywell F109 turbofan engine has been completed. The investigation included velocity measurements upstream of the fan, addition of an airfoil shaped probe upstream of the fan on which surface pressure measurements were acquired, and measurement of the velocity in the interaction region between the probe and the fan. This investigation sought to characterize the response on the upstream probe due to the fan potential field and the interaction between a viscous wake and the potential field; as such, all test conditions were for subsonic fan speeds. The results from the collected data show that fan-induced potential disturbances propagate upstream at acoustic velocities, to produce vane surface-pressure amplitudes as high as 40 percent Joel F. Kirk of the inlet, mean total pressure. Further, these fan-induced pressure amplitudes display large variations between the two vane surfaces. An argument is made that the structure of the pressure response is consistent with the presence of two distinct sources of unsteady forcing disturbances. The disturbances on the incoming-rotation-facing surface of the IGV propagated upstream at a different speed than those on the outgoing-rotation-facing surface, indicating that one originated from a rotating source and the other from a

  5. Eclipses and the Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2000-12-01

    Like returns of Halley's comet the Olympic games occur periodically, though not as regularly in antiquity. Dates were also imprecise due to the chaotic calendars in use. Reported sightings of comets and eclipses can be used with game dates to help fix ancient events. However some reported darkening of the sun, e.g., after Julius Caesar's murder in 44 BC, was due to volcanic eruptions. A red comet, visible in daylight, first appeared during the games that year. It was also seen from China and Korea (Pang, Sciences 31, 30). Phlegon's ``Olympiads" (2nd century) says that Christ's crucifixion was in the 4th year of the 202nd Olympiad (AD 29-33), when a total solar eclipse occurred in the 6th hour. Only the Nov. 24, AD 29 eclipse over Asia Minor can match that, and Joel's prophecy (Acts 2, 14-21) that ``the sun will be turned to darkness and moon to blood." However it conflicts with ``the first day of Passover," as recorded by Mathew, Mark and Luke, i.e., full moon in early spring. Humphreys and Waddington (Nature 306, 743) have suggested meteorological darkening and the April 3, AD 33 lunar eclipse instead. Schaefer has questioned the eclipse's visibility from Jerusalem (31.46N, 35.14E). The six computations he cited gave dissimilar answers due to the imprecise rates of the secular lunar acceleration, and lengthening of the day used (Q.Jl.R.astr.Soc. 31, 53). Lunar laser ranging has since fixed the former at -26"/cen2. Analysis of ancient Chinese solar eclipse records, e.g., the April 21, 899 BC and April 4, AD 368 ``double dawns" over Zheng, has given us a delta T (in sec) = 30t2, where t is centuries before 1800 (Pang, Yau and Chou, in ``Dynamics of Ice Age Earth: A Modern Perspective," 1998). Our computations show that the moon rose over Jerusalem, with 1/3 still in the umbra and the rest in penumbra. Holdover meteorological darkening with long absorption air mass could have help reddened the moon also. Finally the first ``eclipse season" (the Aug. 21 lunar, and

  6. Eclipsing and density effects on the spectral behavior of Beta Lyrae binary system in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanad, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze both long and short high resolution ultraviolet spectrum of Beta Lyrae eclipsing binary system observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) between 1980 and 1989. The main spectral features are P Cygni profiles originating from different environments of Beta Lyrae. A set of 23 Mg II k&h spectral lines at 2800 Å, originating from the extended envelope [Hack, M., 1980. IAUS, 88, 271H], have been identified and measured to determine their fluxes and widths. We found that there is spectral variability for these physical parameters with phase, similar to that found for the light curve [Kondo, Y., McCluskey, G.E., Jeffery, M.M.S., Ronald, S.P., Carolina, P.S. McCluskey, Joel, A.E., 1994. ApJ, 421, 787], which we attribute to the eclipse effects [Ak, H., Chadima, P., Harmanec, P., Demircan, O., Yang, S., Koubský, P., Škoda, P., Šlechta, M., Wolf, M., Božić, H., 2007. A&A, 463, 233], in addition to the changes of density and temperature of the region from which these lines are coming, as a result of the variability of mass loss from the primary star to the secondary [Hoffman, J.L., Nordsieck, K.H., Fox, G.K., 1998. AJ, 115, 1576; Linnell, A.P., Hubeny, I., Harmanec, P., 1998. ApJ, 509, 379]. Also we present a study of Fe II spectral line at 2600 Å, originating from the atmosphere of the primary star [Hack, M., 1980. IAUS, 88, 271H]. We found spectral variability of line fluxes and line widths with phase similar to that found for Mg II k&h lines. Finally we present a study of Si IV spectral line at 1394 Å, originating from the extended envelope [Hack, M., 1980. IAUS, 88, 271H]. A set of 52 Si IV spectral line at 1394 Å have been identified and measured to determine their fluxes and widths. Also we found spectral variability of these physical parameters with phase similar to that found for Mg II k&h and Fe II spectral lines.

  7. Complex Protein Structures by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glusker, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    Neutron scattering by an atom, unlike X-ray scattering, does not depend on the atomic number of that atom. Deuterium atoms scatter neutrons to the same extent as carbon or oxygen atoms and give positive peaks in a nuclear density map, while its isotope, hydrogen, gives a negative peak. Therefore neutron diffraction provides two results that are difficult to obtain from macromolecular X-ray diffraction studies: (1) the locations of hydrogen atoms, including the more mobile ones, and (2) the extent to which a hydrogen atom can be replaced by deuterium. The method shows whether an amino acid side chain (at a given pH value) is ionized or not. For example, one can ascertain whether histidine residues are singly or doubly protonated at the pH of study. Neutron diffraction studies can also be used to determine the absolute configuration of the course of a biochemical reaction by anomalous scattering and enzymatic deuteration of the substrate. Neutron diffraction experiments, however, require large crystals and these are often impossible to obtain for many macromolecules. Examples of reports of the use of neutron diffraction to provide information on enzymatic mechanism will be presented. This includes descriptions of our work on the enzyme D-xylose isomerase for which the orientation of a metal ion-bound water molecule in the active site was found. This water, thought to be involved in the isomerization step, was shown to be water (rather than hydroxyl) at pH 8.0. This analysis also revealed that one lysine has two rather than three attached hydrogen atoms and therefore lacks a positive charge. High-resolution X-ray studies (at 0.94 å) indicate how some side chains might move during catalysis. This combination of neutron and X-ray diffraction can contribute greatly to the elucidation of enzyme mechanisms. I thank Amy Katz, Xinmin Li, H. L. Carrell, Leighton Coates, Leif Hanson, Joel Harp, Paul Langan, and Benno Schoenborn who were involved in many of the described

  8. The health care response to pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Barnitz, Laura; Berkwits, Michael

    2006-07-18

    (Chair); David L. Bronson, MD (Vice Chair); CPT Julie Ake, MD; Patricia P. Barry, MD; Molly Cooke, MD; Herbert S. Diamond, MD; Joel S. Levine, MD; Mark E. Mayer, MD; Thomas McGinn, MD; Robert M. McLean, MD; Ashley E. Starkweather; and Frederick E. Turton, MD. It was approved by the Board of Regents on 3 April 2006. PMID:16801625

  9. NASA's New Technology Reporting System: A Review and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Richard L.

    1985-01-01

    indebted to dozens of persons in both NASA and industry who took time to assist in the data collection by being interviewed, and through answering follow up questions on the telephone. Individuals interviewed and their affiliations are shown in Appendix A. I am most grateful to them for their kind assistance. A note of thanks is due to the other members of the DRI study team: Jody Briles, Kathy Hirst, and Joel Johnson. The responsibility for this report, its accuracy, and the nature of the observations and conclusions rest solely with the author. Text or citations in the numbered footnotes are to be found at the end of each chapter.

  10. Preservation of Near-Earth Space for Future Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John A.

    2007-05-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Introduction J. A. Simpson; Part II. Defining the Problem: 2. The Earth satellite population: official growth and constituents Nicholas L. Johnson; 3. The current and future environment: an overall assessment Donald J. Kessler; 4. The current and future space debris environment as assessed in Europe Dietrich Rex; 5. Human survivability issues in the low Earth orbit space debris environment Bernard Bloom; 6. Protecting the space environment for astronomy Joel R. Primack; 7. Effects of space debris on commercial spacecraft - the RADARSAT example H. Robert Warren and M. J. Yelle; 8. Potential effects of the space debris environment on military space systems Albert E. Reinhardt; Part III. Mitigation of and Adaptation to the Space Environment: Techniques and Practices: 9. Precluding post-launch fragmentation of delta stages Irvin J. Webster and T. Y. Kawamura; 10. US international and interagency cooperation in orbital debris Daniel V. Jacobs; 11. ESA concepts for space debris mitigation and risk reduction Heiner Klinkrad; 12. Space debris: how France handles mitigation and adaptation Jean-Louis Marcé; 13. Facing seriously the issue of protection of the outer space environment Qi Yong Liang; 14. Space debris - mitigation and adaptation U. R. Rao; 15. Near Earth space contamination and counteractions Vladimir F. Utkin and S. V. Chekalin; 16. The current and future space debris environment as assessed in Japan Susumu Toda; 17. Orbital debris minimization and mitigation techniques Joseph P. Loftus Jr, Philip D. Anz-Meador and Robert Reynolds; Part IV. Economic Issues: 18. In pursuit of a sustainable space environment: economic issues in regulating space debris Molly K. Macauley; 19. The economics of space operations: insurance aspects Christopher T. W. Kunstadter; Part V. Legal Issues: 20. Environmental treatymaking: lessons learned for controlling pollution of outer space Winfried Lang; 21. Regulation of orbital

  11. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes

  12. The health care response to pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Barnitz, Laura; Berkwits, Michael

    2006-07-18

    (Chair); David L. Bronson, MD (Vice Chair); CPT Julie Ake, MD; Patricia P. Barry, MD; Molly Cooke, MD; Herbert S. Diamond, MD; Joel S. Levine, MD; Mark E. Mayer, MD; Thomas McGinn, MD; Robert M. McLean, MD; Ashley E. Starkweather; and Frederick E. Turton, MD. It was approved by the Board of Regents on 3 April 2006.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  14. X-Ray Outburst from Young Star in McNeil's Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    Observations with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory captured an X-ray outburst from a young star, revealing a probable scenario for the intermittent brightening of the recently discovered McNeil's Nebula. It appears the interaction between the young star's magnetic field and an orbiting disk of gas can cause dramatic, episodic increases in the light from the star and disk, illuminating the surrounding gas. "The story of McNeil's Nebula is a wonderful example of the importance of serendipity in science," said Joel Kastner of the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York, lead author of a paper in the July 22 issue of Nature describing the X-ray results. "Visible-light images were made of this region several months before Jay McNeil made his discovery, so it could be determined approximately when and by how much the star flared up to produce McNeil's Nebula." The small nebula, which lies in the constellation Orion about 1300 light years from Earth, was discovered with a 3-inch telescope by McNeil, an amateur astronomer from Paducah, Kentucky, in January 2004. In November 2002, a team led by Ted Simon of the Institute for Astronomy in Hawaii had observed the star-rich region with Chandra in search of young, X-ray emitting stars, and had detected several objects. Optical and infrared astronomers had, as part of independent surveys, also observed the region about a year later, in 2003. After the announcement of McNeil's discovery, optical, infrared and X-ray astronomers rushed to observe the region again. They found that a young star buried in the nebula had flared up, and was illuminating the nebula. This star was coincident with one of the X-ray sources discovered earlier by Simon. Chandra observations obtained by Kastner's group just after the optical outburst showed that the source had brightened fifty-fold in X-rays when compared to Simon's earlier observation. The visible-light eruption provides evidence that the cause of the X-ray outburst is the

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    The quest for the nature of dark matter has reached a historical point in time, with several different and complementary experiments on the verge of conclusively exploring large portions of the parameter space of the most theoretically compelling particle dark matter models. This focus issue on dark matter and particle physics brings together a broad selection of invited articles from the leading experimental and theoretical groups in the field. The leitmotif of the collection is the need for a multi-faceted search strategy that includes complementary experimental and theoretical techniques with the common goal of a sound understanding of the fundamental particle physical nature of dark matter. These include theoretical modelling, high-energy colliders and direct and indirect searches. We are confident that the works collected here present the state of the art of this rapidly changing field and will be of interest to both experts in the topic of dark matter as well as to those new to this exciting field. Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics Contents DARK MATTER AND ASTROPHYSICS Scintillator-based detectors for dark matter searches I S K Kim, H J Kim and Y D Kim Cosmology: small-scale issues Joel R Primack Big Bang nucleosynthesis and particle dark matter Karsten Jedamzik and Maxim Pospelov Particle models and the small-scale structure of dark matter Torsten Bringmann DARK MATTER AND COLLIDERS Dark matter in the MSSM R C Cotta, J S Gainer, J L Hewett and T G Rizzo The role of an e+e- linear collider in the study of cosmic dark matter M Battaglia Collider, direct and indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter Howard Baer, Eun-Kyung Park and Xerxes Tata INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS PAMELA and indirect dark matter searches M Boezio et al An indirect search for dark matter using antideuterons: the GAPS experiment C J Hailey Perspectives for indirect dark matter search with AMS-2 using cosmic-ray electrons and positrons B Beischer, P von

  16. Determination of rare earth elements, uranium and thorium in geological samples by ICP-MS, using an automatic fusion machine as an alkaline digestion tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, Luis; Rivera, Maria; Velasquez, Colon; Barona, Diego; Carpintero, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    nitric acid solution . After an incorporation time, a fraction of this sample was then diluted 20 times in ultrapure deionized water ( resistivity greater 18.2 megohms / cm ). The diluted sample was analized in the ICP- MS, which was setted in high sensitivity mode. The results were compared through cross samples (the same samples tested in the laboratory were sent to another international laboratory, which works under accreditation ISO 17025 ) and no major deviations (5%) was obtained by making comparisons between the two laboratories. When comparing the results and evaluated the development of the art, it is concluded that this is an alternative that allows performing samples up to 50 alkaline fusions per day with great accuracy, saving resources and time. References: (1) British Geological Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, , Minerals UK Centre of Sustainable mineral development: Rare Earth Elements, p18-22, 2011 (2) Germain Bayon, Jean Alix Barrat, Joel Etoubleau, Mathieu Benoit ,Claire Bollinger, and Sidonie Revillon: Determination of Rare Earth Elements, Sc, Y, Zr, Ba, Hf and Th in Geological Samples by ICP-MS after Tm Addition and Alkaline Fusion, Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, vol 33-N1, p51-62, 2008

  17. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Eighth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop and first The National Map Users Conference, Denver, Colorado, May 10-13, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Dietterle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    other Federal Agencies, GIS related companies, and academia; and to network with other professionals to develop collaborative opportunities. Specific conference topics include scientific and modeling applications using The National Map, opportunities for partnerships, and advances in geospatial technologies. The first part of the week will be the GIS Workshop, offered as a pre-conference seminar. It will focus on hands-on GIS training and seminars concerning current topics of geospatial interest. The focus of the USGS GIS Workshop is to showcase specific techniques and concepts for using GIS in support of science. The presentations will be educational and not a marketing endeavor. To promote awareness of and interaction with selected USGS corporate and local science center data products, as well as promoting collaboration, a “GIS Olympics” event will be held Tuesday evening during the GIS Workshop. The second part of the week will feature interactive briefings and discussions on issues and opportunities of The National Map. The focus of the Users Conference will be on the role of The National Map in supporting science initiatives, emergency response, land and wildlife management, and other activities. All presentations at the Users Conference include use or innovations related to a The National Map data theme or application. On Wednesday evening, a poster session is being held as a combined event for all attendees and as a juncture between the events. On Thursday evening, the Henry Gannett Award will be presented. Additionally, poster awards will be presented. Several prominent speakers are featured at plenary sessions at The National Map Users Conference, including Deanna A. Archuleta, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, Department of the Interior; Dr. Barbara P. Buttenfield, Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado in Boulder; best-selling author Frederick Reuss; and Dr. Joel Scheraga, Senior Advisor for Climate Adaptation, U

  18. Astronomers Find New Evidence for the Violent Demise of Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Two astronomers have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to discover a shell of superheated gas around a dying star in the Milky Way galaxy. Joel Kastner, professor of imaging science at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and Rodolpho Montez, a graduate student in physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, will present their results today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Minneapolis. Their discovery shows how material ejected at two million miles per hour during the final, dying stages of sun-like stars can heat previously ejected gas to the point where it will emit X-rays. The study also offers new insight into how long the ejected gas around dying stars can persist in such a superheated state. According to Kastner, the hot gas shows up in high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the planetary nebula NGC 40, which is located about 3,000 light years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Cepheus. Chandra X-ray & NOAO Optical Composite of NGC 40 Chandra X-ray & NOAO Optical Composite of NGC 40 "Planetary nebulae are shells of gas ejected by dying stars," Kastner explains. "They offer astronomers a 'forecast' of what could happen to our own sun about five billion years from now - when it finally exhausts the reservoir of hydrogen gas at its core that presently provides its source of nuclear power." In his research, Montez discovered the X-ray emitting shell in NGC 40 by generating an image that uses only specific energy-selected X-rays - revealing a ring of superheated gas that lies just within the portions of the nebula that appear in optical and infrared images. "This hot bubble of gas vividly demonstrates how, as a planetary nebula forms, the gas ejection process of the central, dying star becomes increasingly energetic," Kastner notes. "Mass ejection during stellar death can result in violent collisions that can heat the ejected gas up to temperatures of more than a million degrees." The detection of X-rays from NGC

  19. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    of Alabama who led the study. Irwin and his colleagues obtained optical spectra of the object using the Magellan I and II telescopes in Las Campanas, Chile. These data reveal emission from gas rich in oxygen and nitrogen but no hydrogen, a rare set of signals from globular clusters. The physical conditions deduced from the spectra suggest that the gas is orbiting a black hole of at least 1,000 solar masses. The abundant amount of oxygen and absence of hydrogen indicate that the destroyed star was a white dwarf, the end phase of a solar-type star that has burned its hydrogen leaving a high concentration of oxygen. The nitrogen seen in the optical spectrum remains an enigma. "We think these unusual signatures can be explained by a white dwarf that strayed too close to a black hole and was torn apart by the extreme tidal forces," said coauthor Joel Bregman of the University of Michigan. Theoretical work suggests that the tidal disruption-induced X-ray emission could stay bright for more than a century, but it should fade with time. So far, the team has observed there has been a 35% decline in X-ray emission from 2000 to 2008. The ULX in this study is located in NGC 1399, an elliptical galaxy about 65 million light years from Earth. Irwin presented these results at the 215th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. More information, including images and other multimedia, can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  20. PREFACE: XV Chilean Physics Symposium, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Ávila, Ricardo; Cubillos, Karla

    2008-02-01

    initial contact with the journal. Leopoldo Soto President, Chilean Physical Society Head of Plasma Department, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission Editors: Leopoldo Soto, José Moreno, Ricardo Ávila, Karla Cubillos Scientific Committee Physicists from various research institutions, specialty areas, and regions of the country were invited by the Board of SOCHIFI to join the Symposium Scientific Committee, which was formed by: Julio Yánez, Universidad de Antofagasta Sergio del Campo, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Patricio Vargas, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María Rodrigo Soto, Universidad de Chile Ulrich Volkmann, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Víctor Muñoz, Universidad de Chile Rodrigo Aros, Universidad Andrés Bello Leopoldo Soto (Chairman), Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Luis Huerta, Universidad de Talca Patricio Salgado, Universidad de Concepción Luis Roa, Universidad de Concepción Asticio Vargas, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco Cristian Martínez, Centro de Estudios Científicos, Valdivia Organizing Commitee Leopoldo Soto (Chairman), Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Erik Herrera, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear José Moreno, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Andrea Rozas, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Rodrigo Aros, Universidad Andrés Bello Gonzalo Gutiérrez, Universidad de Chile Executive Board, Chilean Physical Society April 2006 - April 2008 Leopoldo Soto, President Joel Saavedra, Secretary Rodrigo Aros: Treasurer Rodolfo Figueroa: Director Luis Huerta: Director Conference photograph

  1. Obituary: Beth Brown (1969-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The astronomical community lost one of its most buoyant and caring individuals when Beth Brown died, unexpectedly, at the age of 39 from a pulmonary embolism. Beth Brown was born in Roanoke, Virginia where she developed a deep interest in astronomy, science, and science fiction (Star Trek). After graduating as the valedictorian of William Fleming High School's Class of 1987, she attended Howard University, where she graduated summa cum laude in 1991 with a bachelor's degree in astrophysics. Following a year in the graduate physics program at Howard, she entered the graduate program in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Michigan, the first African-American woman in the program. She received her PhD in 1998, working with X-ray observations of elliptical galaxies from the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT; Joel Bregman was her advisor). She compiled and analyzed the first large complete sample of such galaxies with ROSAT and her papers in this area made an impact in the field. Following her PhD, Beth Brown held a National Academy of Science & National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Subsequently, she became a civil servant at the National Space Science Data Center at GSFC, where she was involved in data archival activities as well as education and outreach, a continuing passion in her life. In 2006, Brown became an Astrophysics Fellow at GSFC, during which time she worked as a visiting Assistant Professor at Howard University, where she taught and worked with students and faculty to improve the teaching observatory. At the time of her death, she was eagerly looking forward to a new position at GSFC as the Assistant Director for Science Communications and Higher Education. Beth Brown was a joyous individual who loved to work with people, especially in educating them about our remarkable field. Her warmth and openness was a great aid in making accessible explanations of otherwise daunting astrophysical

  2. Advanced Covariance-Based Stochastic Inversion and Neuro-Genetic Optimization for Rosetta CONSERT Radar Data to Improve Spatial Resolution of Multi-Fractal Depth Profiles for Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenhofer, Peter; Ulamec, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The paper is devoted to results of doctoral research work at University of Bochum as applied to the radar transmission experiment CONSERT of the ESA cometary mission Rosetta. This research aims at achieving the limits of optimum spatial (and temporal) resolution for radar remote sensing by implementation of covariance informations concerned with error-balanced control as well as coherence of wave propagation effects through random composite media involved (based on Joel Franklin's approach of extended stochastic inversion). As a consequence the well-known inherent numerical instabilities of remote sensing are significantly reduced in a robust way by increasing the weight of main diagonal elements of the resulting composite matrix to be inverted with respect to off-diagonal elements following synergy relations as to the principle of correlation receiver in wireless telecommunications. It is shown that the enhancement of resolution for remote sensing holds for an integral and differential equation approach of inversion as well. In addition to that the paper presents a discussion on how the efficiency of inversion for radar data gets achieved by an overall optimization of inversion due to a novel neuro-genetic approach. Such kind of approach is in synergy with the priority research program "Organic Computing" of DFG / German Research Organization. This Neuro-Genetic Optimization (NGO) turns out, firstly, to take into account more detailed physical informations supporting further improved resolution such as the process of accretion for cometary nucleus, wave propagation effects from rough surfaces, ground clutter, nonlinear focusing, etc. as well as, secondly, to accelerate the computing process of inversion in a really significantly enhanced and fast way, e.g., enabling online-control of autonomous processes such as detection of unknown objects, navigation, etc. The paper describes in some detail how this neuro-genetic approach of optimization is incorporated into the

  3. AIRS Water Vapor and Cloud Products Validate and Explain Recent Negative Global and Tropical OLR Trends Observed by CERES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, J.; Molnar, G. I.; Iredell, L. F.; Sounder Research Team

    2010-12-01

    Joel Susskind, Gyula Molnar, and Lena Iredell NASA GSFC Sounder Research Team Abstract This paper compares spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over the time period September 2002 - February 2010. This time period is marked by a substantial decreasing OLR trend on the order of -0.1 W/m2/yr averaged over the globe. There are very large spatial variations of these trends however, with local values ranging from -2.6 W/m2/yr to +3.0 W/m2/yr in the tropics. The spatial patterns of the AIRS and CERES trends are in essentially perfect agreement with each other, as are the anomaly time series averaged over different spatial regions. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate. The agreement of anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed from AIRS derived products also indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of the AIRS derived products as well. We used the anomalies and trends of AIRS derived water vapor and cloud products to explain why global OLR has had a large negative trend over the time period September 2002 through February 2010. Tropical OLR began to decrease significantly at the onset of a strong La Niña in mid-2007. AIRS products show that cloudiness and mid-tropospheric water vapor began to increase in the region 5°N - 20°S latitude extending eastward from 150°W - 30°E longitude at that time, with a corresponding very large drop in OLR in this region. Late 2009 is characterized by a strong El-Niño, with a corresponding change in sign of observed anomalies of mid-tropospheric water vapor, cloud cover, and OLR in this region, as well as that of OLR anomalies in the tropics and globally. Monthly mean anomalies of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover

  4. Socorro Students Translate NRAO Web Pages Into Spanish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-07-01

    Six Socorro High School students are spending their summer working at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) on a unique project that gives them experience in language translation, World Wide Web design, and technical communication. Under the project, called "Un puente a los cielos," the students are translating many of NRAO's Web pages on astronomy into Spanish. "These students are using their bilingual skills to help us make basic information about astronomy and radio telescopes available to the Spanish-speaking community," said Kristy Dyer, who works at NRAO as a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow and who developed the project and obtained funding for it from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The students are: Daniel Acosta, 16; Rossellys Amarante, 15; Sandra Cano, 16; Joel Gonzalez, 16; Angelica Hernandez, 16; and Cecilia Lopez, 16. The translation project, a joint effort of NRAO and the NM Tech physics department, also includes Zammaya Moreno, a teacher from Ecuador, Robyn Harrison, NRAO's education officer, and NRAO computer specialist Allan Poindexter. The students are translating NRAO Web pages aimed at the general public. These pages cover the basics of radio astronomy and frequently-asked questions about NRAO and the scientific research done with NRAO's telescopes. "Writing about science for non-technical audiences has to be done carefully. Scientific concepts must be presented in terms that are understandable to non-scientists but also that remain scientifically accurate," Dyer said. "When translating this type of writing from one language to another, we need to preserve both the understandability and the accuracy," she added. For that reason, Dyer recruited 14 Spanish-speaking astronomers from Argentina, Mexico and the U.S. to help verify the scientific accuracy of the Spanish translations. The astronomers will review the translations. The project is giving the students a broad range of experience. "They are

  5. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    display the large num- ber of flights in which EVA played a role. This approach also makes apparent significant EVA gaps, for example, the U.S. gap between 1985 and 1991 following the Challenger accident. This NASA History Monograph is an edited extract from an extensive EVA Chronology and Reference Book being produced by the EVA Project Office, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. The larger work will be published as part of the NASA Formal Series in 1998. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered by Max Ary, Ashot Bakunts, Gert-Jan Bartelds, Frank Cepollina, Andrew Chaikin, Phillip Clark, Richard Fullerton, Steven Glenn, Linda Godwin, Jennifer Green, Greg Harris, Clifford Hess, Jeffrey Hoffman, David Homan, Steven Hopkins, Nicholas Johnson, Eric Jones, Neville Kidger, Joseph Kosmo, Alexei Lebedev, Mark Lee, James LeBlanc, Dmitri Leshchenskii, Jerry Linenger, Igor Lissov, James McBarron, Clay McCullough, Joseph McMann, Story Musgrave, Dennis Newkirk, James Oberg, Joel Powell, Lee Saegesser, Andy Salmon, Glen Swanson, Joseph Tatarewicz, Kathy Thornton, Chris Vandenberg, Charles Vick, Bert Vis, David Woods, Mike Wright, John Young, and Keith Zimmerman. Special thanks to Laurie Buchanan, John Charles, Janet Kovacevich, Joseph Loftus, Sue McDonald, Martha Munies, Colleen Rapp, and Jerry Ross. Any errors remain the responsibility of the authors.

  6. Origin of nitrocatechols and alkylated-nitrocatechols in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Sylvestre, Alexandre; Ravier, Sylvain; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Slowik, Jay; El Haddad, Imad; Prevot, Andre

    2013-04-01

    burning aerosol. If their biomass burning origin's is clearly established, their secondary origin remains still not totally clear. Smog chamber experiments were then conducted in the PSI facilities to investigate the aging of biomass burning emissions. The analysis of samples collected during these experiments using the DART/Q-ToF approach, confirmed that nitrocatechols and methylated nitrocatechols originate from biomass burning processes. More importantly our results confirm that nitrocatechols and their methylated derivatives are quasi exclusively from secondary origin. Considering the abundance of biomass burning primary aerosol, and the large fraction of unexplained SOA, this result is of prime importance. Cody. R., Laramée J. Nilles J. and Durst H. : Direct Analysis in Real Time (DARTtm) Mass Spectrometry, JOEL news, 2005, 40, 1, 8-12. Kitanovski Z., Grgic I., Yasmeen F., Claeys M. and Cusak A.: Development of a liquid chromatographic method based on ultraviolet-visible and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection for the identification of nitrocatechols and related tracers ion biomass burning atmospheric organic aerosol, Rapid Communication in Mass Spectrometry, 2012, 26, 793-804. Iinuma Y., Boge O., Grafe R. and Herrmann H.: Methyl-nitrocatechols : Atmospheric tracer coumpounds for biomass burnig secondary organic aerosols, Environmental Science and Technology, 2010, 44, 8453-8459.

  7. Black Holes In Distant Galaxies Point To Wild Youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    single star or pulled it away from its original companion. Normally, the distances between stars in galaxies are too great for capture to occur, but in the extraordinarily dense environment of globular clusters they may be much more common. "Chandra has shown us that the birthplace of these exotic black hole binary systems are in the dense globular clusters," said Joel Bregman, a collaborator at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. NGC 4649 Press Image and Caption "Globular clusters appear to be the 'singles bars' of the stellar world," said Sarazin, "where a lonely black hole can go to find a companion." Other members of the research team include Elizabeth L. Blanton, Scott W. Randall, and Gregory R. Sivakoff, all of University of Virginia, and Jimmy Irwin of University of Michigan. The observations were made with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which was built for NASA by Penn State and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass.

  8. Langston University - High Energy Physics (LU-HEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Dr., Joel

    2012-08-13

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data

  9. NRAO Scientists on Team Receiving International Astronautics Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    , a radio telescope bigger than the Earth." In addition to Fomalont and Romney, they are: Hisashi Hirabayashi, of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), Haruto Hirosawa (ISAS/JAXA), Peter Dewdney of Canada's Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Leonid Gurvits of the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE, The Netherlands), Makoto Inoue of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), David Jauncey of the Australia Telescope National Facility, Noriyuki Kawaguchi (NAOJ), Hideyuki Kobayashi (NAOJ), Kazuo Miyoshi (Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Japan), Yasuhiro Murata (ISAS/JAXA), Takeshi Orii (NEC, Japan) Robert Preston of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Joel Smith (JPL). The International Academy of Astronautics was founded in August 1960 in Stockholm, Sweden, during the 11th International Astronautical Congress. The Academy aims to foster the development of astronautics for peaceful purposes; recognize individuals who have distinguished themselves in a related branch of science or technology; provide a program through which members may contribute to international endeavours; cooperation in the advancement of aerospace science. Previous recipients of the Laurels for Team Achievement Award are the Russian Mir Space Station Team (2001), the U.S. Space Shuttle Team (2002), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Team (2003), and the Hubble Space Telescope Team (2004). The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  10. Chandra Discovers "Rivers Of Gravity" That Define Cosmic Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-07-01

    Earth, the X-rays from a distant quasar dim as they pass through a cloud of the intergalactic gas. By measuring the amount of dimming due to oxygen and other elements in the cloud, astronomers were able to estimate the temperature, density and mass of the absorbing gas. Observations of the quasars PKS 2155-304 by the MIT and Harvard-Smithsonian groups, and H1821+643 by an Ohio State group, revealed various parts of the hot gas system. One of these appears to be a filament in which the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are embedded, whereas other detected portions are at distances of a few billion light years from Earth. Rivers of Gravity Animation Still Stills from Rivers of Gravity Animation Still Stills from Rivers of Gravity Animation These results confirm earlier work by Joel Bregman and Jimmy Irwin of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, who flipped the normal procedure, and used the fact that the hot gas is itself a source of X-rays. By observing the absorption of X-rays from the hot gas by a foreground galaxy, they were able to deduce presence of hot gas behind the galaxy. “Normally the doctor studies the X-ray shadow produced by your bones to learn about your bones,” said Bregman. “In essence, we used the shadow to learn about the X-ray machine.” During the first few billion years of the universe, about 20 percent of the matter came together under the influence of gravity to form groups and clusters of galaxies. Theories predict that most of the remaining normal matter and dark matter formed an immense filamentary web connecting the groups and clusters of galaxies, predicted to be so hot that it would be invisible to optical, infrared, and radio telescopes. “Computer simulations have been telling us for several years that most of the ‘missing’ gas in the universe should be in hot filaments,“ said Smita Mathur, leader of the Ohio State team. “Most of those filaments are too faint to see, but it looks like we are finally finding their shadows

  11. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  13. Obituary: Joseph Wyan Chamberlain, 1928-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    2004-12-01

    the method by which the exospheric temperature can be calculated and applies it to Mars; it has been the basis of subsequent papers by many workers. After he returned to academic life at Rice in 1973, he collected his notes from a graduate course into the 1978 book Theory of Planetary Atmospheres, a second edition of which appeared in 1987 (with the collaboration of the undersigned). His other interest included early studies of changes in the ozone layer and the possible devastating effects from what has now become recognized as global warming. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Marilyn; daughter Joy of London; sons David of Austin and Jeffrey (Joel) of Seattle; and granddaughter Jacqueline. His brother Gilbert and numerous nieces and nephews also survive him.

  14. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Eighth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop and first The National Map Users Conference, Denver, Colorado, May 10-13, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Dietterle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    other Federal Agencies, GIS related companies, and academia; and to network with other professionals to develop collaborative opportunities. Specific conference topics include scientific and modeling applications using The National Map, opportunities for partnerships, and advances in geospatial technologies. The first part of the week will be the GIS Workshop, offered as a pre-conference seminar. It will focus on hands-on GIS training and seminars concerning current topics of geospatial interest. The focus of the USGS GIS Workshop is to showcase specific techniques and concepts for using GIS in support of science. The presentations will be educational and not a marketing endeavor. To promote awareness of and interaction with selected USGS corporate and local science center data products, as well as promoting collaboration, a “GIS Olympics” event will be held Tuesday evening during the GIS Workshop. The second part of the week will feature interactive briefings and discussions on issues and opportunities of The National Map. The focus of the Users Conference will be on the role of The National Map in supporting science initiatives, emergency response, land and wildlife management, and other activities. All presentations at the Users Conference include use or innovations related to a The National Map data theme or application. On Wednesday evening, a poster session is being held as a combined event for all attendees and as a juncture between the events. On Thursday evening, the Henry Gannett Award will be presented. Additionally, poster awards will be presented. Several prominent speakers are featured at plenary sessions at The National Map Users Conference, including Deanna A. Archuleta, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, Department of the Interior; Dr. Barbara P. Buttenfield, Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado in Boulder; best-selling author Frederick Reuss; and Dr. Joel Scheraga, Senior Advisor for Climate Adaptation, U

  15. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    Williams, H M Quiney, A G Peele and K A Nugent Imaging of complex density in silver nanocubes by coherent x-ray diffraction R Harder, M Liang, Y Sun, Y Xia and I K Robinson Methodology for studying strain inhomogeneities in polycrystalline thin films during in situ thermal loading using coherent x-ray diffraction N Vaxelaire, H Proudhon, S Labat, C Kirchlechner, J Keckes, V Jacques, S Ravy, S Forest and O Thomas Ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging of weakly scattering specimens Martin Dierolf, Pierre Thibault, Andreas Menzel, Cameron M Kewish, Konstantins Jefimovs, Ilme Schlichting, Konstanze von König, Oliver Bunk and Franz Pfeiffer Dose requirements for resolving a given feature in an object by coherent x-ray diffraction imaging Andreas Schropp and Christian G Schroer FLASH: new opportunities for (time-resolved) coherent imaging of nanostructures R Treusch and J Feldhaus Structure of a single particle from scattering by many particles randomly oriented about an axis: toward structure solution without crystallization? D K Saldin, V L Shneerson, M R Howells, S Marchesini, H N Chapman, M Bogan, D Shapiro, R A Kirian, U Weierstall, K E Schmidt and J C H Spence Analysis of strain and stacking faults in single nanowires using Bragg coherent diffraction imaging V Favre-Nicolin, F Mastropietro, J Eymery, D Camacho, Y M Niquet, B M Borg, M E Messing, L-E Wernersson, R E Algra, E P A M Bakkers, T H Metzger, R Harder and I K Robinson Coherent science at the SwissFEL x-ray laser B D Patterson, R Abela, H-H Braun, U Flechsig, R Ganter, Y Kim, E Kirk, A Oppelt, M Pedrozzi, S Reiche, L Rivkin, Th Schmidt, B Schmitt, V N Strocov, S Tsujino and A F Wrulich Energy recovery linac (ERL) coherent hard x-ray sources Donald H Bilderback, Joel D Brock, Darren S Dale, Kenneth D Finkelstein, Mark A Pfeifer and Sol M Gruner Statistical and coherence properties of radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers E L Saldin, E A Schneidmiller and M V Yurkov Microscopic return point memory in Co

  16. Obituary: Michael John Klein, 1940-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    Michael John Klein died on 14 May 2005 at home in South Pasadena, California. The cause of death was tongue cancer that metastasized to the lungs. He was a non-smoker. Mike was a passionate radio astronomer, a trusted astronomical observer, an educator and a family man. Mike was born on 19 January 1940 in Ames, Iowa, the son of Florence Marie (Graf) and Fred Michael Klein. His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a banker. Mike had two older sisters, Lois Jean (Klein) Flauher and Marilyn June (Klein) Griffin. In 1962, Mike married his high school sweetheart Barbara Dahlberg, who survives him along with their three children, Kristin Marie (Klein) Shields, Michael John Klein Jr., Timothy Joel Klein, and six grandchildren. Mike developed a love for astronomy early in his life, and credited an early morning, newspaper-delivery route that he had at age twelve, which took him outside well before sunrise. He told family members that as he walked along his route, he stared into the sky and wondered what everything was. He studied sky charts, located stars, and began to understand how the planets shifted their positions relative to the stars each day. Another big influence in Mike's life was his brother in-law, Jim Griffin. Jim helped Mike understand that his passion for science did not have to remain a hobby, but could and should become a career. Jim's encouragement led Mike to attend Iowa State University in Ames, where he earned a BS in electrical engineering in 1962. Mike then started graduate school in electrical engineering at Michigan State, but after one semester transferred to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned an MS (1966) and PhD (1968) in astronomy. His doctoral dissertation, under the direction of Professor Fred Haddock, was based on extensive observations of the planets and examined the physical and thermal properties of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. Mike was awarded a Resident Research Associate position at JPL by the National

  17. PREFACE Proceedings of GDR-AFPAC Meeting, January 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Mike; Saffari, Nader; Lhemery, Alain; Deschamps, Marc; Leger, Alain; Abrahams, David

    2011-01-01

    research communities have established collaborations between researchers in France and the UK, and both are concerned with the science and applications of ultrasound. Although there are some differences in scope, there is also very significant overlap, and much shared interest. Furthermore, the possibilities to extend contacts between the members in both countries, and between disciplines, was an additional benefit of a joint conference. The suggestion of a joint meeting was therefore met with enthusiasm from both sides. The conference was arranged as a single-stream series of presentations and discussions in the style of a workshop. Four leading authorities in their fields were invited to give 50-minute keynote addresses; these were Joel Gilbert (Université du Maine, France), Peter Wells (Cardiff University, UK), John Willis (Cambridge University, UK), and Philippe Destuynder (Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, France). Other participants gave 20-minute oral presentations or posters. There were 82 contributions in total. Participants were given the option to submit manuscripts to be peer-reviewed for publication in these proceedings. The cost of participation at the conference was part-supported by the GDR for all attendees. The conference was a great success, and it was widely acknowledged that it achieved all the hopes for communication, collaboration, and new contacts and opportunities. However, the attendees of the conference are also left with a very sad memory. This was the last working engagement of Andrew Temple, who died suddenly on 6 February 2010. Andrew was the Chairman of the PAG of the Institute of Physics and an enthusiast for both AFPAC and GDR activities. He was the central organiser of this conference, across all aspects, from his technical contributions as a member of the technical committee, to his provision of local information and plans for social activities and outings. He was a highly accomplished and respected scientist who was also a

  18. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baseline Interferometry project at JPL. "Observations of cosmic masers -- naturally-occurring microwave radio amplifiers -- will tell us new things about the process of star formation and activity in the heart of other galaxies." "By the 1980s, radio astronomers were observing the universe with assemblages of radio telescopes whose resolving power was limited only by the size of the Earth. Now, through a magnificent international effort, we will be able to break this barrier and see fine details of celestial objects that are beyond the reach of a purely ground-based telescope array. We anticipate a rich harvest of new scientific knowledge from VSOP," said Dr. Paul Vanden Bout, Director of NRAO. In the first weeks after launch, scientists and engineers will "test the deployment of the reflecting mesh telescope in orbit, the wide-band data link from the satellite to the ground, the performance of the low noise amplifiers in orbit, and the high-precision orbit determination and attitude control necessary for VLBI observations with an orbiting telescope," according to Dr. Joel Smith, manager of the U.S. Space VLBI project at JPL. Scientific observations are expected to begin in May. The 26-foot diameter orbiting radio telescope will observe celestial radio sources in concert with a number of the world's ground-based radio telescopes. The 1,830-pound satellite will be launched from ISAS' Kagoshima Space Center, at the southern tip of Kyushu, one of Japan's main islands, and will be the first launch with ISAS' new M-5 series rocket. The satellite will go into an elliptical orbit, varying between 620 to 12,400 miles above the Earth's surface. This orbit provides a wide range of distances between the satellite and ground-based telescopes, which is important for producing a high-quality image of the radio source being observed. One orbit of the Earth will take about six hours. The satellite's observations will concentrate on some of the most distant and intriguing objects in the

  19. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa, Gaasterand; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    the EasyChair submission and reviewing system; Mona Singh and Joel S. Bader for sharing their experience from last year; the team at Oxford University Press for typesetting the papers; Conference Chairs Burkhard Rost, Michal Linial, Peter Schuster and Kurt Zatloukal, as well as the ISMB/ECCB 2011 Steering Committee, for their valuable input; and Steven Leard for helping us oversee the process.

  20. Obituary: Maurice M. Shapiro, 1915-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, Gaurang B.

    2009-01-01

    detailed analysis of the so- called Slab-model, and re-acceleration of cosmic rays (Shapiro, Silberberg, and Tsao in Cosmology, Fusion and other Matters, edited by Fred Reines, 1972). When he became emeritus, Maury was still very active both in research and in running the Erice School of Cosmic Ray Astrophysics (after 1982). He was interested in having a base of operations for the school. He approached me asking whether Maryland would be a possibility. I was delighted and suggested a Visiting professorship to be able to continue his work (without having to move out of the Washington, DC, area). Thus started Maury's association with Maryland which continued until his death. Maury was not only an outstanding scientist, but he was a true gentleman and a good friend. He was an ambassador for the field of Cosmic Rays. His friendly personality, always warm and kind to students and colleagues, was quite infectious. Maury contributed to both experimental and theoretical investigations of cosmic rays and their central role in connecting many diverse disciplines in particle physics, astrophysics, geophysics, acoustical physics. He was outstanding scientist and was greatly concerned about world peace and human affairs. Maury passed away on 27 February 2008, at the age of 92, in Alexandria, Virginia. Four years prior to his death he was still swimming in the Mediterranean during the Cosmic Ray School sessions at Erice. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Auslander, and children Joel N. Shapiro, Elana Ashley, Raquel T. Kislinger, Mark and Bonnie Auslander, Beth Kessler, Lionel Ames, and Naomi Mirvis and grand children.

  1. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baseline Interferometry project at JPL. "Observations of cosmic masers -- naturally-occurring microwave radio amplifiers -- will tell us new things about the process of star formation and activity in the heart of other galaxies." "By the 1980s, radio astronomers were observing the universe with assemblages of radio telescopes whose resolving power was limited only by the size of the Earth. Now, through a magnificent international effort, we will be able to break this barrier and see fine details of celestial objects that are beyond the reach of a purely ground-based telescope array. We anticipate a rich harvest of new scientific knowledge from VSOP," said Dr. Paul Vanden Bout, Director of NRAO. In the first weeks after launch, scientists and engineers will "test the deployment of the reflecting mesh telescope in orbit, the wide-band data link from the satellite to the ground, the performance of the low noise amplifiers in orbit, and the high-precision orbit determination and attitude control necessary for VLBI observations with an orbiting telescope," according to Dr. Joel Smith, manager of the U.S. Space VLBI project at JPL. Scientific observations are expected to begin in May. The 26-foot diameter orbiting radio telescope will observe celestial radio sources in concert with a number of the world's ground-based radio telescopes. The 1,830-pound satellite will be launched from ISAS' Kagoshima Space Center, at the southern tip of Kyushu, one of Japan's main islands, and will be the first launch with ISAS' new M-5 series rocket. The satellite will go into an elliptical orbit, varying between 620 to 12,400 miles above the Earth's surface. This orbit provides a wide range of distances between the satellite and ground-based telescopes, which is important for producing a high-quality image of the radio source being observed. One orbit of the Earth will take about six hours. The satellite's observations will concentrate on some of the most distant and intriguing objects in the

  2. Obituary: Arthur Dodd Code (1923-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marché, Jordan D., II

    2009-12-01

    , thereby supporting its possible composition as graphite. Code was the recipient of numerous awards, including the Professional Achievement Award of the University of Chicago Alumni Association (1969), NASA's Public Service Award (1970), and its highest honor, the Distinguished Public Service Medal (1992). He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (1971), the International Academy of Astronautics (1972), chosen a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1974), and elected vice president (1976-78) and president (1982-84) of the AAS. He was a member of the Board of Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council and served for many years on the board of directors (and later was appointed chairman, 1977-80) of AURA, Inc. Code was closely involved with AURA's bid to manage the Space Telescope Science Institute and served as the latter's interim director (15 January - 1 September 1981). He also played a significant role in establishing the WIYN (Wisconsin, Indiana, Yale, and NOAO) consortium and Observatory. Code's numerous achievements reflect his competencies as both a theorist and experimentalist/observer, along with noted administrative skills. During his lengthy career at Wisconsin, Code supervised twenty doctoral dissertations (one of which was co-directed with Robert Bless). Following his retirement in 1995, he and his wife relocated to Tucson, Arizona, where he was appointed adjunct professor at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory and concurrently WIYN Observatory Scientist. At the time of his death, he was the Joel Stebbins and Hilldale Professor of Astronomy Emeritus at UW-Madison. Code belonged to the First Unitarian Church of Madison. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Mary Guild Code, their four children, Alan, Douglas, Edith, and David, and six grandchildren. Among other sources, this essay draws upon the 1982 oral history interview with Code, conducted by David H. DeVorkin (National Air and Space Museum

  3. Chandra Observatory Uncovers Hot Stars In The Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    their type," said Norbert S. Schulz, MIT research scientist at the Chandra X-ray Center, who leads the Orion Project. "And by extreme, we mean temperatures which are in some cases well above 60 million degrees." The hottest massive star known so far has been around 25 million degrees. The great Orion Nebula harbors the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), a loose association of around 2,000 mostly very young stars of a wide range of mass confined within a radius of less than 10 light years. The Orion Trapezium Cluster is a younger subgroup of stars at the core of the ONC confined within a radius of about 1.5 light years. Its median age is around 300,000 years. The constant bright light of the Trapezium and its surrounding stars at the heart of the Orion nebula (M42) are visible to the naked eye on clear nights. In X-rays, these young stars are constantly active and changing in brightness, sometimes within half a day, sometimes over weeks. "Never before Chandra have we seen images of stellar activity with such brilliance," said Joel Kastner, professor at the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. "Here the combination of very high angular resolution, with high quality spectra that Chandra offers, clearly pays off." The observation was performed using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and the X-ray spectra were recorded with the spectroscopic array of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The ACIS detector is a sophisticated version of the CCD detectors commonly used in video cameras or digital cameras. The orion stars are so bright in X-rays that they easily saturate the ccds. Here the team used the gratings as a blocking filter. Orion Trapezium - X-ray & Optical JPEG, TIFF, PS X-ray contours of the Chandra observation overlaid onto the optical Hubble image (courtesy of J. Bally, CASA Colorado). The field of view is 30"x30". Besides the bright main Trapezium stars, which were found to be extremely

  4. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    tendency to prefer sugars and proteins that are one chirality only, but it is unknown whether this is a universal preference or a quirk of Earth-based life. Carroll and McGuires new detection in a star-forming cloud of material near the center of the Milky Way does not distinguish whether the propylene oxide is left- or right-handed, but it does show that the cosmos is capable of producing complex molecules that are essential to biology. In the future, they hope to use polarized light to directly measure chirality.Next, Joel Green from STScI presented how a young star surrounded by a bright protoplanetary disk, FU Orionis, has changed since a bright outburst in 1936. Since then, it has consumed some 80 Jupiters worth of material! By comparing observations of the disks brightness taken twelve years apart, Green showed that the hottest inner regions of the disk have faded significantly while the cooler regions farther out have not. In other words, the star has consumed the hot parts of the disk closest to it and altered the chemical composition in the disk that remains. This is likely what our own Sun experienced as a young star, and has implications for planet formation because the chemical composition of the disk affects what materials are available for forming planets. Green hopes that future observations with the Webb telescope will complement existing Spitzer and SOFIA data.A gluttonous star may hold clues to #planet formation: https://t.co/bTcFJM3xcY#aas228pic.twitter.com/nDWLF3bXVN NASA PlanetQuest (@PlanetQuest) June 14, 2016

  5. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal