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Sample records for intestinal mucosa barrier

  1. Effects of Probiotics on Intestinal Mucosa Barrier in Patients With Colorectal Cancer after Operation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dun; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Lan-Shu; Song, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many studies have found that probiotics or synbiotics can be used in patients with diarrhea or inflammatory bowel disease for the prevention and treatment of some pathologies by improving gastrointestinal barrier function. However, there are few studies availing the use of probiotics in patients with colorectal cancer. To lay the foundation for the study of nutritional support in colorectal cancer patients, a meta-analysis has been carried out to assess the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation. To estimate the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials has been conducted. Databases including PubMed, Ovid, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure have been searched to identify suitable studies. Stata 12.0 was used for statistical analysis, and sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Six indicators were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Ratios of lactulose to mannitol (L/M) and Bifidobacterium to Escherichia (B/E), occludin, bacterial translocation, and levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Seventeen studies including 1242 patients were selected for meta-analysis, including 5 English studies and 12 Chinese studies. Significant effects were found in ratios of L/M (standardized mean difference = 3.83, P = 0.001) and B/E (standardized mean difference = 3.91, P = 0.000), occludin (standardized mean difference = 4.74, P = 0.000), bacterial translocation (standardized mean difference = 3.12, P = 0.002), and levels of SIgA (standardized mean

  2. Changes of the immunological barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Long-yuan; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Tian-en; Yang, Zheng-fei; Wen, Li-qiang; Chang, Jian-xing

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis has become the greatest threat to in-patients, with a mortality of over 25%. The dysfunction of gut barrier, especially the immunological barrier, plays an important role in the development of sepsis. This dysfunction occurs after surgery, but the magnitude of change does not differentiate patients with sepsis from those without sepsis. Increased intestinal permeability before surgery is of no value in predicating sepsis. The present study aimed to observe the changes of intestinal mucosal immunologic barrier in rat models of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. METHODS: Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sepsis group (n=45) and a control group (n=15). The rats in the sepsis group were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), whereas the rats in the control group underwent a sham operation. The ileac mucosa and segments were harvested 3, 6 and 12 hours after CLP, and blood samples were collected. Pathological changes, protein levels of defensin-5 (RD-5) and trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) mRNA, and lymphocytes apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa were determined. In an additional experiment, the gut-origin bacterial DNA in blood was detected. RESULTS: The intestinal mucosa showed marked injury with loss of ileal villi, desquamation of epithelium, detachment of lamina propria, hemorrhage and ulceration in the sepsis group. The expression of TFF3 mRNA and level of RD-5 protein were decreased and the apoptosis of mucosal lymphocyte increased (P<0.05) in the sepsis group compared with the control group. Significant differences were observed in RD-5 and TFF3 mRNA 3 hours after CLP and they were progressively increased 6 and 12 hours after CLP in the sepsis group compared with the control group (P<0.05, RD-5 F=11.76, TFF3 F=16.86 and apoptosis F=122.52). In addition, the gut-origin bacterial DNA detected in plasma was positive in the sepsis group. CONCLUSION: The immunological function of the intestinal mucosa was impaired in

  3. Effects of Probiotics on Intestinal Mucosa Barrier in Patients With Colorectal Cancer after Operation: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dun; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Lan-Shu; Song, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have found that probiotics or synbiotics can be used in patients with diarrhea or inflammatory bowel disease for the prevention and treatment of some pathologies by improving gastrointestinal barrier function. However, there are few studies availing the use of probiotics in patients with colorectal cancer. To lay the foundation for the study of nutritional support in colorectal cancer patients, a meta-analysis has been carried out to assess the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation. To estimate the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials has been conducted. Databases including PubMed, Ovid, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure have been searched to identify suitable studies. Stata 12.0 was used for statistical analysis, and sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Six indicators were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Ratios of lactulose to mannitol (L/M) and Bifidobacterium to Escherichia (B/E), occludin, bacterial translocation, and levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Seventeen studies including 1242 patients were selected for meta-analysis, including 5 English studies and 12 Chinese studies. Significant effects were found in ratios of L/M (standardized mean difference = 3.83, P = 0.001) and B/E (standardized mean difference = 3.91, P = 0.000), occludin (standardized mean difference = 4.74, P = 0.000), bacterial translocation (standardized mean difference = 3.12, P = 0.002), and levels of SIgA (standardized mean

  4. Effects of Probiotics on Intestinal Mucosa Barrier in Patients With Colorectal Cancer after Operation: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dun; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Lan-Shu; Song, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have found that probiotics or synbiotics can be used in patients with diarrhea or inflammatory bowel disease for the prevention and treatment of some pathologies by improving gastrointestinal barrier function. However, there are few studies availing the use of probiotics in patients with colorectal cancer. To lay the foundation for the study of nutritional support in colorectal cancer patients, a meta-analysis has been carried out to assess the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation. To estimate the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials has been conducted. Databases including PubMed, Ovid, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure have been searched to identify suitable studies. Stata 12.0 was used for statistical analysis, and sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Six indicators were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Ratios of lactulose to mannitol (L/M) and Bifidobacterium to Escherichia (B/E), occludin, bacterial translocation, and levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Seventeen studies including 1242 patients were selected for meta-analysis, including 5 English studies and 12 Chinese studies. Significant effects were found in ratios of L/M (standardized mean difference = 3.83, P = 0.001) and B/E (standardized mean difference = 3.91, P = 0.000), occludin (standardized mean difference = 4.74, P = 0.000), bacterial translocation (standardized mean difference = 3.12, P = 0.002), and levels of SIgA (standardized mean

  5. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, L E M; Schreurs, C C H M; Kroes, H; Spillenaar Bilgen, E J; Van Deventer, S J H; Van Tol, E A F

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co myofibroblasts was established in order to mimic the in situ spatial interactions between these cell types and to evaluate their role in barrier: integrity. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were introduced in co- and monocultures. Effects of immune cells on barrier integrity was determined by measuring resistance and permeability for macromolecules. Introduction of LPMC in both culture systems caused a time-dependent decrease in barrier integrity. This was found to be less pronounced in cocultures indicating a regulatory role for mesenchymal cells. The effects were also found to depend on the route of LPMC stimulation. Additional analyses suggested that the regulatory role of myofibroblasts in barrier integrity involves production of growth factors. PMID:12395905

  6. Effects of n-3 PUFAs on Intestinal Mucosa Innate Immunity and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice after Hemorrhagic Shock Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Gao, Xuejin; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xinying; Wan, Xiao; Jiang, Tingting; Wu, Chao; Bi, Jingcheng; Lei, Qiucheng

    2016-01-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can improve the function of the intestinal barrier after damage from ischemia-reperfusion or hemorrhagic shock resuscitation (HSR). However, the effects of n-3 PUFAs on intestinal microbiota and the innate immunity of the intestinal mucosa after HSR remain unclear. In the present study, 40 C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to five groups: control, sham, HSR, HSR + n-3 PUFAs and HSR + n-6 PUFAs. Mice were sacrificed 12 h after HSR. Liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and terminal ileal tissues were collected. Intestinal mucosae were scraped aseptically. Compared with the HSR group, the number of goblet cells increased, expression of mucin 2 was restored and disturbed intestinal microbiota were partly stabilized in the PUFA-administered groups, indicating that both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs reduced overproliferation of Gammaproteobacteria while promoting the growth of Bacteroidetes. Notably, n-3 PUFAs had an advantage over n-6 PUFAs in improving ileal tissue levels of lysozyme after HSR. Thus, PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFAs, partly improved the innate immunity of intestinal mucosa in mice after HSR. These findings suggest a clinical rationale for providing n-3 PUFAs to patients recovering from ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:27690096

  7. The quantitative assessment of normal canine small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hart, I R; Kidder, D E

    1978-09-01

    Quanitative methods of assessing the architecture of small intestinal mucosa have been applied to biopsy material from normal dogs. Mucosal samples taken from four predetermined sites show that there are significant quantitative differences between the various levels of the small bowel. Animals of one year of age and older show no correlation between age or weight and mucosal dimensions. The significance of these findings, in relation to examination of biopsy material from cases of clinical small intestinal disease, is discussed. PMID:364574

  8. Dosimetry Model for Radioactivity Localized to Intestinal Mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Rajon, Didier; Breitz, Hazel B.; Goris, Michael L.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Knox, Susan J.

    2004-06-30

    This paper provides a new model for calculating radiation absorbed dose to the full thickness of the small and large intestinal walls, and to the mucosal layers. The model was used to estimate the intestinal radiation doses from yttrium-90-labeled-DOTA-biotin binding to NR-LU-10-streptavidin in patients. We selected model parameters from published data and observations and used the model to calculate energy absorbed fractions using the EGS4 radiation transport code. We determined the cumulated 90Y activity in the small and large intestines of patients from gamma camera images and calculated absorbed doses to the mucosal layer and to the whole intestinal wall. The mean absorbed dose to the wall of the small intestine was 16.2 mGy/MBq (60 cGy/mCi) administered from 90Y localized in the mucosa and 70 mGy/MBq (260 cGy/mCi) to the mucosal layer within the wall. Doses to the large intestinal wall and to the mucosa of the large intestine were lower than those for small intestine by a factor of about 2.5. These doses are greater by factors of about 5 to 6 than those that would have been calculated using the standard MIRD models that assume the intestinal activity is in the bowel contents. The specific uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in mucosal tissues may lead to dose-related intestinal toxicities. Tissue dosimetry at the sub-organ level is useful for better understanding intestinal tract radiotoxicity and associated dose-response relationships.

  9. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  10. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These includ...

  11. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  12. Luminal sulfide and large intestine mucosa: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Davila, Anne-Marie; Mimoun, Sabria; Benetti, Pierre-Henri; Atanasiu, Calina; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Benamouzig, Robert; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is present in the lumen of the human large intestine at millimolar concentrations. However, the concentration of free (unbound) sulfide is in the micromolar range due to a large capacity of fecal components to bind the sulfide. H(2)S can be produced by the intestinal microbiota from alimentary and endogenous sulfur-containing compounds including amino acids. At excessive concentration, H(2)S is known to severely inhibit cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and thus mitochondrial oxygen (O(2)) consumption. However, the concept that sulfide is simply a metabolic troublemaker toward colonic epithelial cells has been challenged by the discovery that micromolar concentration of H(2)S is able to increase the cell respiration and to energize mitochondria allowing these cells to detoxify and to recover energy from luminal sulfide. The main product of H(2)S metabolism by the colonic mucosa is thiosulfate. The enzymatic activities involved in sulfide oxidation by the colonic epithelial cells appear to be sulfide quinone oxidoreductase considered as the first and rate-limiting step followed presumably by the action of sulfur dioxygenase and rhodanese. From clinical studies with human volunteers and experimental works with rodents, it appears that H(2)S can exert mostly pro- but also anti-inflammatory effects on the colonic mucosa. From the available data, it is tempting to propose that imbalance between the luminal concentration of free sulfide and the capacity of colonic epithelial cells to metabolize this compound will result in an impairment of the colonic epithelial cell O(2) consumption with consequences on the process of mucosal inflammation. In addition, endogenously produced sulfide is emerging as a prosecretory neuromodulator and as a relaxant agent toward the intestinal contractibility. Lastly, sulfide has been recently described as an agent involved in nociception in the large intestine

  13. Do Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement Collaborate in the Intestinal Mucosa?

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Zoë A.; Jain, Umang; Van Limbergen, Johan; Stadnyk, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    It is well understood that multiple antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are constitutively deployed by the epithelium to bolster the innate defenses along the entire length of the intestines. In addition to this constitutive/homeostatic production, AMPs may be inducible and levels changed during disease. In contrast to this level of knowledge on AMP sources and roles in the intestines, our understanding of the complement cascade in the healthy and diseased intestines is rudimentary. Epithelial cells make many complement proteins and there is compelling evidence that complement becomes activated in the lumen. With the common goal of defending the host against microbes, the opportunities for cross-talk between these two processes is great, both in terms of actions on the target microbes but also on regulating the synthesis and secretion of the alternate family of molecules. This possibility is beginning to become apparent with the finding that colonic epithelial cells possess anaphylatoxin receptors. There still remains much to be learned about the possible points of collaboration between AMPs and complement, for example, whether there is reciprocal control over expression in the intestinal mucosa in homeostasis and restoring the balance following infection and inflammation. PMID:25688244

  14. Research Advance in Intestinal Mucosal Barrier and Pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuan; Wu, Lu-Yi; Dou, Chuan-Zi; Guan, Xin; Wu, Huan-Gan; Liu, Hui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) have not been fully elucidated. It is widely accepted that genetic, immune, and environment factors are closely related to the development of CD. As an important defensive line for human body against the environment, intestinal mucosa is able to protect the homeostasis of gut bacteria and alleviate the intestinal inflammatory and immune response. It is evident that the dysfunction of intestinal mucosa barriers plays a crucial role in CD initiation and development. Yet researches are insufficient on intestinal mucosal barrier's action in the prevention of CD onset. This article summarizes the research advances about the correlations between the disorders of intestinal mucosal barriers and CD. PMID:27651792

  15. Research Advance in Intestinal Mucosal Barrier and Pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Chuan-zi; Guan, Xin; Wu, Huan-gan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) have not been fully elucidated. It is widely accepted that genetic, immune, and environment factors are closely related to the development of CD. As an important defensive line for human body against the environment, intestinal mucosa is able to protect the homeostasis of gut bacteria and alleviate the intestinal inflammatory and immune response. It is evident that the dysfunction of intestinal mucosa barriers plays a crucial role in CD initiation and development. Yet researches are insufficient on intestinal mucosal barrier's action in the prevention of CD onset. This article summarizes the research advances about the correlations between the disorders of intestinal mucosal barriers and CD.

  16. Research Advance in Intestinal Mucosal Barrier and Pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Chuan-zi; Guan, Xin; Wu, Huan-gan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) have not been fully elucidated. It is widely accepted that genetic, immune, and environment factors are closely related to the development of CD. As an important defensive line for human body against the environment, intestinal mucosa is able to protect the homeostasis of gut bacteria and alleviate the intestinal inflammatory and immune response. It is evident that the dysfunction of intestinal mucosa barriers plays a crucial role in CD initiation and development. Yet researches are insufficient on intestinal mucosal barrier's action in the prevention of CD onset. This article summarizes the research advances about the correlations between the disorders of intestinal mucosal barriers and CD. PMID:27651792

  17. Oxytocin evokes a pulsatile PGE2 release from ileum mucosa and is required for repair of intestinal epithelium after injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Zhao, Junhan; Wang, Haoyi; An, Ning; Zhou, Yuping; Fan, Jiahui; Luo, Junwen; Su, Wenlong; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-07-10

    We measured the short-circuit current (Isc) in rat ileum mucosa to identify the effect of oxytocin (OT) on mucosal secretion in small intestine. We identified a COX-2-derived pulsatile PGE2 release triggered by OT in rat ileum mucosa. OT receptors (OTR) are expressed in intestine crypt epithelial cells. Notably, OT evoked a dynamic change of [Ca(2+)]i in ileum crypts, which was responsible for this pulsatile release of PGE2. OT ameliorated 5-FU-, radiation- or DSS- induced injury in vivo, including the improvement of weight loss, reduced villus height and impaired survival of crypt transit-amplifying cells as well as crypt. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against intestinal injury were eliminated by coadministration of a selective inhibitor of PGE2, AH6809. Our findings strongly suggest that OT, a novel and important regulator of intestine mucosa barrier, is required for repair of intestinal epithelium after injury. Considering that OT is an FDA-approved drug, this work reveals a potential novel and safe way to combat or prevent chemo-radiotherapy induced intestine injury or to treat IBD.

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng; Fang, Rejun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  20. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  1. [THE INTESTINAL BARRIER, THE MICROBIOTA, MICROBIOME].

    PubMed

    Mar'yanovich, A T

    2016-01-01

    The review examined modern condition of development directions physiology of digestion, like structure and function of the intestinal barrier, the microbiota of the digestive tract in its relations with the microorganism.

  2. A novel method for the culture and polarized stimulation of human intestinal mucosa explants.

    PubMed

    Tsilingiri, Katerina; Sonzogni, Angelica; Caprioli, Flavio; Rescigno, Maria

    2013-05-01

    Few models currently exist to realistically simulate the complex human intestine's micro-environment, where a variety of interactions take place. Proper homeostasis directly depends on these interactions, as they shape an entire immunological response inducing tolerance against food antigens while at the same time mounting effective immune responses against pathogenic microbes accidentally ingested with food. Intestinal homeostasis is preserved also through various complex interactions between the microbiota (including food-associated beneficial bacterial strains) and the host, that regulate the attachment/degradation of mucus, the production of antimicrobial peptides by the epithelial barrier, and the "education" of epithelial cells' that controls the tolerogenic or immunogenic phenotype of unique, gut-resident lymphoid cells' populations. These interactions have been so far very difficult to reproduce with in vitro assays using either cultured cell lines or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, mouse models differ substantially in components of the intestinal mucosa (mucus layer organization, commensal bacteria community) with respect to the human gut. Thus, studies of a variety of treatments to be brought in the clinics for important stress-related or pathological conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer have been difficult to carry out. To address these issues, we developed a novel system that enables us to stimulate explants of human intestinal mucosa that retain their in situ conditioning by the host microbiota and immune response, in a polarized fashion. Polarized apical stimulation is of great importance for the outcome of the elicited immune response. It has been repeatedly shown that the same stimuli can produce completely different responses when they bypass the apical face of the intestinal epithelium, stimulating epithelial cells basolaterally or coming into direct contact with lamina

  3. Metabolic regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Sean P; Curtis, Valerie F; Lanis, Jordi M; Glover, Louise E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa has proven to be an interesting tissue for which to investigate disease-related metabolism. In this review, we outline some evidence that implicates metabolic signaling as important features of barrier in the healthy and disease. Studies from cultured cell systems, animal models and human patients have revealed that metabolites generated within the inflammatory microenvironment are central to barrier regulation. These studies have revealed a prominent role for hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) at key steps in adenine nucleotide metabolism and within the creatine kinase pathway. Results from animal models of intestinal inflammation have demonstrated an almost uniformly beneficial influence of HIF stabilization on disease outcomes and barrier function. Studies underway to elucidate the contribution of immune responses will provide additional insight into how metabolic changes contribute to the complexity of the gastrointestinal tract and how such information might be harnessed for therapeutic benefit. PMID:25838978

  4. The role of immunomodulators on intestinal barrier homeostasis in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Maria Emília Rabelo; Araújo, Raquel Silva; de Barros, Patrícia Aparecida Vieira; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Abrantes, Fernanda Alves; Generoso, Simone de Vasconcelos; Fernandes, Simone Odília Antunes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal epithelium is composed of specialized epithelial cells that form a physical and biochemical barrier to commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. However, dysregulation of the epithelial barrier function can lead to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation across the intestinal mucosa, which contributes to local and systemic immune activation. The increase in these parameters is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, physical exercise under heat stress, intestinal obstruction, ischemia, and mucositis, among other conditions. Lately, there has been growing interest in immunomodulatory nutrients and probiotics that can regulate host immune and inflammatory responses and possibly restore the intestinal barrier. Immunomodulators such as amino acids (glutamine, arginine, tryptophan, and citrulline), fatty acids (short-chain and omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids), and probiotics (Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, and Lactobacillus) have been reported in the literature. Here, we review the critical roles of immunomodulatory nutrients in supporting gut barrier integrity and function. PMID:25660317

  5. Increased Intestinal Permeability Correlates with Sigmoid Mucosa alpha-Synuclein Staining and Endotoxin Exposure Markers in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shannon, Kathleen M.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Voigt, Robin M.; Shaikh, Maliha; Jaglin, Jean A.; Estes, Jacob D.; Dodiya, Hemraj B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder of aging. The pathological hallmark of PD is neuronal inclusions termed Lewy bodies whose main component is alpha-synuclein protein. The finding of these Lewy bodies in the intestinal enteric nerves led to the hypothesis that the intestine might be an early site of PD disease in response to an environmental toxin or pathogen. One potential mechanism for environmental toxin(s) and proinflammatory luminal products to gain access to mucosal neuronal tissue and promote oxidative stress is compromised intestinal barrier integrity. However, the role of intestinal permeability in PD has never been tested. We hypothesized that PD subjects might exhibit increased intestinal permeability to proinflammatory bacterial products in the intestine. To test our hypothesis we evaluated intestinal permeability in subjects newly diagnosed with PD and compared their values to healthy subjects. In addition, we obtained intestinal biopsies from both groups and used immunohistochemistry to assess bacterial translocation, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress), and alpha-synuclein. We also evaluated serum markers of endotoxin exposure including LPS binding protein (LBP). Our data show that our PD subjects exhibit significantly greater intestinal permeability (gut leakiness) than controls. In addition, this intestinal hyperpermeability significantly correlated with increased intestinal mucosa staining for E. coli bacteria, nitrotyrosine, and alpha-synuclein as well as serum LBP levels in PD subjects. These data represent not only the first demonstration of abnormal intestinal permeability in PD subjects but also the first correlation of increased intestinal permeability in PD with intestinal alpha–synuclein (the hallmark of PD), as well as staining for gram negative bacteria and tissue oxidative stress. Our study may thus shed new light on PD pathogenesis as well as provide a new method for earlier diagnosis of PD and

  6. Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefania; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Mastronardi, Mauro; Jirillo, Emilio; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response toward these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take place to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune, and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients are now growing. Fecal therapy has been recently used for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy. In the present review, we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from dietary intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the integrity of the epithelial barrier. PMID:26697008

  7. Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Frauwallner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream. Key components that determine intestinal barrier function and GI permeability are tight junctions, protein structures located in the paracellular channels between epithelial cells of the intestinal wall. The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Probiotic supplements are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals that could offer positive effects on athlete's gut and entire health. Some results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use on the athlete's immune system. There is also evidence that probiotic supplementation can beneficially influence intestinal barrier integrity in acute diseases. With regard to exercise-induced GI permeability problems, there is still a lack of studies with appropriate data and a gap to understand the underlying mechanisms to support such health beneficial statements implicitly. This article refers (i) to exercise-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction, (ii) provides suggestions to estimate increased gut barrier permeability in athletes, and (iii) discusses the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut. PMID:23075554

  8. Screening for Intestinal Microflora Influencing Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Mouse Cecal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    DOBASHI, Yuu; ITOH, Kikuji; TOHEI, Atsushi; AMAO, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have suggested that intestinal microflora reduces the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the mouse cecal mucosa. In this study, gnotobiotic mice were used to examine the species of intestinal microflora influencing SOD activity in the cecal mucosa. The total SOD activity in the cecal mucosa of each germ-free (GF), gnotobiotic mouse with Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bacteroides was significantly higher than that in the cecal mucosa of gnotobiotic mice with chloroform-treated feces (CHF), conventionalized (CVz) mice and conventional (CV) mice (P<0.05). In addition, CuZnSOD mRNA expression showed similar tendencies. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense status in the cecal mucosa is influenced by CHF inoculation. PMID:24225363

  9. Dietary inulin alters the intestinal absorptive and barrier function of piglet intestine after weaning.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Ghareeb, Khaled; Paßlack, Nadine; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary inulin supplementation on the electrophysiological properties of small intestine of suckling and weaned piglets as indicators for glucose absorption and barrier function. Ten sows were divided into two groups, receiving either a control diet, or a diet with 3% inulin. The diets were fed from 3 weeks ante partum to 6 weeks post partum. In the first 2 weeks of life, piglets received only sow's milk. Irrespective to sex and without castration of males, four piglets (one piglet of each litter) from each group were selected and sacrificed on day 10 of age. The gastrointestinal tract of each piglet was removed and segments were immediately taken from the mid-jejunum and mounted in Ussing chambers. Furthermore, at weaning (6 weeks old) 8 piglets were randomly selected irrespective to sex and males were un-castrated (4 animals from sows received control diet and 4 animals from sows received 3% inulin supplemented diet) and fed for 2 weeks either control weaning diet or inulin supplemented diet. Thereafter segments of the mid-jejunum were used to investigate the effect of inulin on the gut electrophysiology of weaned piglets. The increase in short-circuit current (Isc) after the addition of glucose is an indicator of higher glucose absorption and the higher tissue conductance (Gt) of the epithelium suggested a higher intestinal permeability to paracellular Na(+). In suckling piglets, the addition of d-glucose on the luminal side of the isolated jejunal mucosa increased (P<0.001) the Isc in the inulin-supplemented and control groups compared to basal values. Electrogenic glucose transport (ΔIsc) was similar in suckling piglets from sows fed inulin or control diet, suggesting that feeding of inulin to the mother sows had no effect on glucose absorption across the jejunal mucosa of suckling piglets. However, the dietary inulin supplementation after weaning increased the ΔIsc (P<0.001) compared with the controls

  10. Intestinal barrier homeostasis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Goll, Rasmus; van Beelen Granlund, Atle

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell thick intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lining with its protective layer of mucus is the primary barrier protecting the organism from the harsh environment of the intestinal lumen. Today it is clear that the balancing act necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis is dependent on the coordinated action of all cell types of the IEC, and that there are no passive bystanders to gut immunity solely acting as absorptive or regenerative cells: Mucin and antimicrobial peptides on the epithelial surface are continually being replenished by goblet and Paneth's cells. Luminal antigens are being sensed by pattern recognition receptors on the enterocytes. The enteroendocrine cells sense the environment and coordinate the intestinal function by releasing neuropeptides acting both on IEC and inflammatory cells. All this while cells are continuously and rapidly being regenerated from a limited number of stem cells close to the intestinal crypt base. This review seeks to describe the cell types and structures of the intestinal epithelial barrier supporting intestinal homeostasis, and how disturbance in these systems might relate to inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. Organotypical tissue cultures from adult murine colon as an in vitro model of intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bareiss, Petra M.; Metzger, Marco; Sohn, Kai; Rupp, Steffen; Frick, Julia S.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Lang, Florian; Schwarz, Heinz; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Together with animal experiments, organotypical cell cultures are important models for analyzing cellular interactions of the mucosal epithelium and pathogenic mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional culture model from the adult mouse colon for cell biological investigations in an in vivo-like environment. These explant cultures were cultured for up to 2 weeks and maintained typical characteristics of the intestinal mucosa, including a high-prismatic epithelium with specific epithelial cell-to-cell connections, a basal lamina and various connective tissue cell types, as analyzed with immunohistological and electron microscopic methods. The function of the epithelium was tested by treating the cultures with dexamethasone, which resulted in a strong upregulation of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 similar to that found in vivo. The culture system was investigated in infection experiments with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Wildtype but not Δcph1/Δefg1-knockout Candida adhered to, penetrated and infiltrated the epithelial barrier. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of this intestinal in vitro model for studying epithelial cell-cell interactions, cellular signaling and microbiological infections in a three-dimensional cell arrangement. PMID:18320204

  12. Intestinal REG3 Lectins Protect against Alcoholic Steatohepatitis by Reducing Mucosa-Associated Microbiota and Preventing Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirui; Fouts, Derrick E; Stärkel, Peter; Hartmann, Phillipp; Chen, Peng; Llorente, Cristina; DePew, Jessica; Moncera, Kelvin; Ho, Samuel B; Brenner, David A; Hooper, Lora V; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-02-10

    Approximately half of all deaths from liver cirrhosis, the tenth leading cause of mortality in the United States, are related to alcohol use. Chronic alcohol consumption is accompanied by intestinal dysbiosis and bacterial overgrowth, yet little is known about the factors that alter the microbial composition or their contribution to liver disease. We previously associated chronic alcohol consumption with lower intestinal levels of the antimicrobial-regenerating islet-derived (REG)-3 lectins. Here, we demonstrate that intestinal deficiency in REG3B or REG3G increases numbers of mucosa-associated bacteria and enhances bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes and liver, promoting the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver disease toward steatohepatitis. Overexpression of Reg3g in intestinal epithelial cells restricts bacterial colonization of mucosal surfaces, reduces bacterial translocation, and protects mice from alcohol-induced steatohepatitis. Thus, alcohol appears to impair control of the mucosa-associated microbiota, and subsequent breach of the mucosal barrier facilitates progression of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26867181

  13. Stobadine attenuates impairment of an intestinal barrier model caused by 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Cindric, Marina; Cipak, Ana; Zapletal, Emilija; Jaganjac, Morana; Milkovic, Lidija; Waeg, Georg; Stolc, Svorad; Zarkovic, Neven; Suzana Borovic, Sunjic

    2013-02-01

    Alterations in the intestinal barrier permeability occur in a broad spectrum of abdominally related pathologies, mostly due to disturbed oxidative homeostasis and increased lipid peroxidation. 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), a major lipid peroxidation product, is physiologically present in healthy gastric mucosa, but is increased in early stages of colon cancer and patients with duodenal peptic ulcer. Nevertheless, such supraphysiological levels of HNE have not yet been associated with increased intestinal permeability, even though, as we have described in this paper, they could play important role. In vitro model of intestinal barrier was established by growing Caco-2 cell line on cell culture permeable inserts. The pyridoindole derivative stobadine in hydrophilic and lipophilic form was used for barrier model protection. Both forms of stobadine were able to prevent damaging HNE effects, and reduce generation of reactive oxygen species and permeability of the intestinal barrier. Immunocytochemical analysis has confirmed beneficial effect of stobadine in reducing the formation of HNE-protein conjugates in the cells. Lipophilic form of stobadine proved to be more efficient than hydrophilic, implying importance of lipids in maintaining barrier function. The results obtained indicate that HNE might be important factor affecting intestinal barrier integrity, while stobadine could efficiently protect intestinal cells against harmful HNE effects.

  14. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  15. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Xuan; Wu, Wan-Chun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress. METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10), bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10(CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related to the

  16. Propolis aqueous extract preserves functional integrity of murine intestinal mucosa after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, Mohamed T; El-Hazek, Rania M; El-Ghazaly, Mona A

    2015-11-01

    The ability of a specially prepared water propolis extract (PWE) to preserve the functional activity of the intestinal mucosa after radiation exposure was studied. PWE was given orally (650 mg/kg) to rats five days prior to irradiation by 6 Gy and continued for further two days. Rats were sacrificed 24h later, intestinal segments were examined histologically and homogenates were used to assess relevant biochemical parameters reflecting intestinal injury. Irradiation led to a rise in the histological damage score, a rise in tissue TNF-α and TBARS, and a decrease in sucrase, alkaline phosphatase, GSH and cholecystokinin as well as a decrease in plasma citrulline. The findings reflect a decrease in intestinal functional activity. PWE preserved the intestinal integrity and largely protected against the changes induced in the histology damage score and all parameters measured, possibly as a result of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action of its caffeic acid content.

  17. Familial hypophosphatemic rickets: defective transport of inorganic phosphate by intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Short, E M; Binder, H J; Rosenberg, L E

    1973-02-16

    Uptake of inorganic phosphate is impared in intestinal mucosa from hemizygous males and heterozygous females with X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets. Considerable intrafamilial and interfamilial variation in uptake of inorganic phosphate is observed in affected patients. Uptake by normal mucosa is concentrative and energy-dependent, and is mediated by at least two systems with widely different affinities. These results lend direct support to the thesis that the primary metabolic disturbance in this disease results from impaired transport of inorganic phosphate in kidney and gut.

  18. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequentially from the crypt-villus axis of the rat small intestine. In separate experiments, urokinase activity and epithelial kinetics (measured stathmokinetically) were measured in homogenates of distal colonic mucosa of 14 groups of eight rats fed diets known to alter epithelial turnover. 
Results—From the crypt base, an ascending gradient of expression and activity of urokinase was associated with the epithelial cells. Median mucosal urokinase activities in each of the dietary groups of rats correlated positively with autologous median number of metaphase arrests per crypt (r=0.68; p<0.005) and per 100 crypt cells (r=0.75; p<0.001), but not with crypt column height. 
Conclusions—Localisation of an enzyme capable of leading to digestion of cell substratum in the region where cells are loosely attached to their basement membrane, and the association of its activity with indexes of cell turnover, suggest a role for urokinase in facilitating epithelial cell loss in the intestine. 

 Keywords: urokinase; intestinal epithelium; colon; epithelial proliferation PMID:9824347

  19. Mechanisms of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yoseph, Benyam P; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Burd, Eileen M; Mittal, Rohit; Dominguez, Jessica A; Petrie, Benjamin; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is thought to contribute to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in sepsis. Although there are similarities in clinical course following sepsis, there are significant differences in the host response depending on the initiating organism and time course of the disease, and pathways of gut injury vary widely in different preclinical models of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the timecourse and mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction are similar in disparate mouse models of sepsis with similar mortalities. FVB/N mice were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy, and permeability was measured to fluoresceinisothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FD-4) six to 48 h later. Intestinal permeability was elevated following CLP at all timepoints measured, peaking at 6 to 12 h. Tight junction proteins claudin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, and 15, Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), occludin, and ZO-1 were than assayed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry 12 h after CLP to determine potential mechanisms underlying increases in intestinal permeability. Claudin 2 and JAM-A were increased by sepsis, whereas claudin-5 and occludin were decreased by sepsis. All other tight junction proteins were unchanged. A further timecourse experiment demonstrated that alterations in claudin-2 and occludin were detectable as early as 1 h after the onset of sepsis. Similar experiments were then performed in a different group of mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Mice with pneumonia had an increase in intestinal permeability similar in timecourse and magnitude to that seen in CLP. Similar changes in tight junction proteins were seen in both models of sepsis although mice subjected to pneumonia also had a marked decrease in ZO-1 not seen in CLP. These results indicate that two disparate, clinically relevant models of sepsis

  20. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: not just trefoil peptides.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios-F; Scopa, Chrisoula-D; Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki-N; Vagianos, Constantine-E

    2008-06-14

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials. PMID:18567096

  1. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  2. The influence of gut function on lymphoid cell populations in the intestinal mucosa of lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J D; Morris, B

    1983-01-01

    The number and type of lymphoid cells in the intestinal mucosa of lambs change during the first weeks after birth. The influence of gut function on these changes was examined by comparing the evolution of lymphoid cell populations in normal ileum with that in lengths of ileum which had been isolated surgically from the functional intestinal tract of the lamb before birth. The isolated lengths of ileum had a normal blood and nerve supply and they remained healthy throughout a period of at least 2 years, although they did not have a normal histological development. In comparison with normal ileum, the villi of the isolated ileal segments were much smaller and there were many fewer intraepithelial lymphocytes; the lamina propria had significantly fewer lymphocytes than the functional ileum and only a few plasma cells. When isolated ileal segments were reconnected into the intestinal tract after having been isolated from it for 1-3 months, the histology of the mucosa reverted to that of the normal gut, with the same number and types of lymphoid cells. Radiolabelled lymphoblasts collected from intestinal lymph and injected intravenously accumulated to only a small extent in isolated segments of ileum compared with either the normal or the reconnected segments of ileum. This suggested that the paucity of lymphocytes in the mucosa of the isolated segments was due to a reduced extravasation of these cells there. The influence which the gut contents exert on the lymphoid cell population in the mucosa is probably associated with antigenic stimulation but may also be related to other factors concerned in the normal digestive functions of the gut. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6862523

  3. Intestinal mucosa in diabetes: synthesis of total proteins and sucrase-isomaltase

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, W.A.; Perchellet, E.; Malinowski, R.L.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of insulin deficiency on nitrogen metabolism in muscle and liver have been extensively studied with recent in vivo demonstration of impaired protein synthesis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Despite the significant contribution of small intestinal mucosa to overall protein metabolism, the effect of insulin deficiency on intestinal protein synthesis have not been completely defined. The authors studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on total protein synthesis by small intestinal mucosa and on synthesis of a single enzyme protein of the enterocyte brush-border membrane sucrase-isomaltase. They used the flood-dose technique to minimize the difficulties of measuring specific radioactivity of precursor phenylalanine and determined incorporation into mucosal proteins and sucrase-isomaltase 20 min after injection of the labeled amino acid. Diabetes did not alter mucosal mass as determined by weight and content of protein and DNA during the 5 days after injection of streptozotocin. Increased rates of sucrase-isomaltase synthesis developed beginning on day 3, and those of total protein developed on day 5. Thus intestinal mucosal protein synthesis is not an insulin-sensitive process.

  4. Hormone-sensitive lipase is a cholesterol esterase of the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Grober, Jacques; Lucas, Stéphanie; Sörhede-Winzell, Maria; Zaghini, Isabelle; Mairal, Aline; Contreras, Juan-Antonio; Besnard, Philippe; Holm, Cecilia; Langin, Dominique

    2003-02-21

    The identity of the enzymes responsible for lipase and cholesterol esterase activities in the small intestinal mucosa is not known. Because hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylglycerols and cholesteryl esters, we sought to determine whether HSL could be involved. HSL mRNA and protein were detected in all segments of the small intestine by Northern and Western blot analyses, respectively. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed that HSL was expressed in the differentiated enterocytes of the villi and was absent in the undifferentiated cells of the crypt. Diacylglycerol lipase and cholesterol esterase activities were found in the different segments. Analysis of gut from HSL-null mice showed that diacylglycerol lipase activity was unchanged in the duodenum and reduced in jejunum. Neutral cholesterol esterase activity was totally abolished in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of HSL-null mice. Analysis of HSL mRNA structure showed two types of transcripts expressed in equal amounts with alternative 5'-ends transcribed from two exons. This work demonstrates that HSL is expressed in the mucosa of the small intestine. The results also reveal that the enzyme participates in acylglycerol hydrolysis in jejunal enterocytes and cholesteryl ester hydrolysis throughout the small intestine. PMID:12482847

  5. Serum anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies detected during febrile illness may not be produced by the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    De Leo, Luigina; Quaglia, Sara; Ziberna, Fabiana; Vatta, Serena; Martelossi, Stefano; Maschio, Massimo; Not, Tarcisio

    2015-03-01

    Anti-transglutaminase antibodies are the diagnostic marker of celiac disease, and are considered to be synthesized only by intestinal B-lymphocytes. During an infectious disease, these antibodies are transiently detected in serum. We show that these infection-triggered antibodies may not originate in the intestinal mucosa and are not an indication of celiac disease. PMID:25722272

  6. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte-Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair.

    PubMed

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2016-10-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte-epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. PMID:27436072

  7. A surface energy analysis of mucoadhesion: contact angle measurements on polycarbophil and pig intestinal mucosa in physiologically relevant fluids.

    PubMed

    Lehr, C M; Bouwstra, J A; Boddé, H E; Junginger, H E

    1992-01-01

    The possible role of surface energy thermodynamics in mucoadhesion was investigated with Polycarbophil and pig intestinal mucosa. In separate experiments, the surface energy parameters of the substrate (mucosa) and the adhesive (polymer film) were determined by contact angle measurements on captive air/octane bubbles in three physiologically relevant test fluids (isotonic saline, artificial gastric fluid, and artificial intestinal fluid). Whereas the swollen Polycarbophil films were relatively hydrophilic as indicated by small water contact angles (22, 23, and 16 degrees), the water contact angles measured on mucosal tissue were significantly larger (61, 48, and 57 degrees). Hence, mucus was found to possess an appreciable hydrophobicity. The measured adhesive performance (force of detachment) between Polycarbophil and pig small intestinal mucosa was highest in nonbuffered saline medium, intermediate in gastric fluid, and minimal in intestinal fluid. In agreement with this trend, the mismatch in surface polarities between substrate and adhesive, calculated from the contact angle data, increased in the same order.

  8. Characterization and distribution of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the human intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Valet, P; Senard, J M; Devedjian, J C; Planat, V; Salomon, R; Voisin, T; Drean, G; Couvineau, A; Daviaud, D; Denis, C

    1993-01-01

    The subtype and the expression of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor were investigated in the normal mucosa from human intestine by means of radioligand binding, RNase mapping, and measurement of adenylate cyclase activity. The study of the binding of the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist, [3H]RX821002, to epithelial cell membranes indicated the existence of a single class of noninteracting sites displaying a high affinity for the radioligand (Kd = 1.1 +/- 0.5 nM). The rank order of potency of antagonists to inhibit [3H]RX821002 binding (RX821002 > yohimbine = rauwolscine > phentolamine approximately idazoxan >> chlorpromazine > prazosin) suggested that the receptor is of the alpha 2A subtype. A conclusion which is confirmed by the fact that only alpha 2C10 transcripts were found in the human intestine mucosa. Competition curves with (-)-norepinephrine demonstrated that 60% of the receptor population exhibited high affinity for agonists. This high-affinity state was abolished by the addition of GTP plus Na+ or by prior treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin indicating it corresponded to G protein-coupled receptors. [32P]ADP-ribosylation and immunoblotting experiments identified two pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins corresponding to Gi2 and Gi3. The study of the distribution of the receptor indicated that (a) the proximal colon is the intestine segment exhibiting the highest receptor density and (b) the receptor is predominantly expressed in crypts and is preferentially located in the basolateral membrane of the polarized cell. The distribution of the receptor along the crypt-surface axis of the colon mucosa can be correlated with a higher level of alpha 2C10-specific mRNA and a higher efficiency of UK14304 to inhibit adenylate cyclase in crypt cells. Images PMID:8098045

  9. IBD Candidate Genes and Intestinal Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F.

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the large scale analysis of human genetics have generated profound insights into possible genetic contributions to chronic diseases including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. To date, 163 distinct genetic risk loci have been associated with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with a substantial degree of genetic overlap between these 2 conditions. Although many risk variants show a reproducible correlation with disease, individual gene associations only affect a subset of patients, and the functional contribution(s) of these risk variants to the onset of IBD is largely undetermined. Although studies in twins have demonstrated that the development of IBD is not mediated solely by genetic risk, it is nevertheless important to elucidate the functional consequences of risk variants for gene function in relevant cell types known to regulate key physiological processes that are compromised in IBD. This article will discuss IBD candidate genes that are known to be, or are suspected of being, involved in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier and several of the physiological processes presided over by this dynamic and versatile layer of cells. This will include assembly and regulation of tight junctions, cell adhesion and polarity, mucus and glycoprotein regulation, bacterial sensing, membrane transport, epithelial differentiation, and restitution. PMID:25215613

  10. The effect of probiotics for preventing radiation-induced morphological changes in intestinal mucosa of rats.

    PubMed

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Kijung; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Dongwon

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment modality for abdominal or pelvic cancer, but there is a common and serious complication such as radiation-induced enteritis. Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy. In this study, morphological changes of bowel mucosa were analyzed in rats to presume the effect of probiotics on radiation-induced enteritis and its correlation with radiation dose. A total of 48 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received a solution containing 1.0×10(8) colony-forming units of Lactiobacillus acidophilus or water once daily for 10 days. Each of two groups was divided into three subgroups and abdomino-pelvic area of each subgroup was irradiated with 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively on the seventh day of feeding the solutions. All rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation and the mucosal thickness and villus height of jejunum, ileum and colon were measured. The morphological parameters of the small intestine represented significant differences between two solution groups irradiated 10 or 15 Gy, except for villus height of jejunum in 15 Gy-subgroup (P=0.065). There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation. Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy. PMID:25368490

  11. Regeneration of the intestinal mucosa in Eimeria and E. Coli challenged broilers supplemented with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, E T; Prokoski, K; Horn, D; Viott, A D; Santos, T C; Fernandes, J I M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of the intestinal mucosa in Eimeria and E. coli challenged broilers supplemented with glutamine, arginine, and threonine. Six hundred male broilers at one d of age from the Cobb strain were utilized. The design was completely randomized using a 2×3 factorial design (unchallenged and challenged and 3 diets). A commercial diet was used as a control and 2 other diets were formulated with glutamine (1.5 and 3% Aminogut®), arginine (1 and 2% L-Arginine), and threonine (1 and 2% L-threonine). The animals that consumed diets supplemented with amino acids presented better (P<0.05) feed conversion in the period from one to 42 d of age. The ability of cell proliferation and the villus:crypt ratio in response to enteric challenge were greater (P<0.05) for broilers that received diets supplemented with amino acids. High levels of amino acids in the experimental feeds reflected in greater protein levels in poultry house litter, and they did not interfere with ammonia production. The supplementation of diets with trophic amino acids can positively contribute to the regeneration and proliferation of the intestinal mucosa in broilers and to the maintenance of zootechnical performance when submitted to enteric challenges.

  12. Basement membrane and connective tissue proteins in intestinal mucosa of patients with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, S; Gotteland, M; Fernández, M; Bremer, J; Ríos, G; Brunser, O

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Gluten ingestion in coeliac disease is associated with alterations of the intestinal mucosa, especially the expansion of the lamina propria. Antiendomysium and antireticulin antibodies may result from interactions between gliadin and extracellular matrix components. By behaving as autoantigens, connective tissue proteins could initiate mucosal damage. This study evaluates changes in the distribution of laminin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin in the mucosa of patients with coeliac disease in an attempt to explain the alterations of mucosal morphology. Methods: Intestinal biopsies were obtained from patients with coeliac disease on admission and while on a gluten free diet. The distribution of type IV collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin was evaluated by immunofluorescence and by immunogold labelling and electron microscopy. Results: In patients with coeliac disease, the intensity of type IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin immunofluorescent staining was decreased and less well defined than in controls, with frequent breaches in the basement membrane; fibronectin staining was weak in the distal third of the elongated crypts and absent under the flat surface. The distribution of smooth muscle fibre in the distal lamina propria of flat mucosae was altered. The distribution of these proteins was normal as assessed by immunoelectron microscopy. Conclusions: The intensity of staining of some components of the basement membrane is decreased in coeliac disease and the distribution of smooth muscle fibres is altered. These changes may result from interactions between gliadin and components of the extracellular matrix and may play a role in the genesis of mucosal lesions and in the damage to the epithelium. PMID:12037027

  13. Sodium butyrate protects the intestinal barrier function in peritonitic mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaofeng; Song, Huimin; Wang, Yunlei; Sheng, Yingmo; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peritonitis is a commonly seen disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is prevalently considered that the impaired intestinal barrier during peritonitis is the access point of gut microbes into the blood system, and acts as the engine of the following systemic infection. In our previous study, we found that Sodium Butyrate (NaB) was protective on intestinal barrier function. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of NaB on overwhelming infection animal models of peritonitis. Methods: Mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model was used to study the effects of NaB on the intestinal barrier. Experimental animals were fed of NaB by gavage. Post-CLP mortality, gut permeability and intestinal histological alterations were studied. Results: Gastrointestinal NaB pharmacodynamics profiles after medication were studied. Measurements of NaB concentration in chyme showed significantly higher intestinal concentration of NaB in the NaB treated group than that of the control group. CLP-induced mortality was significantly decreased by oral NaB treatments. Gut permeability was largely increased after CLP, which was partially prevented by NaB feeding. Histological study showed that intestinal, especially ileal injury following peritonitis was substantially alleviated by NaB treatments. Moreover, tissue regeneration was also prompted by NaB. Conclusion: NaB has a potential protective effect on intestinal barrier function in peritonitis. PMID:26064302

  14. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  15. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  16. Influence of sublethal total-body irradiation on immune cell populations in the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sarita; Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Fu, Qiang; Loose, David S; Kumar, K Sree; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-04-01

    The intestinal immune system is the largest in the body. This study analyzed changes in intestinal immune cell populations, cytokine protein levels, and transcript profiles after total-body irradiation (TBI) in CD2F1 mice. A single dose of 8.0 Gy gamma radiation caused negligible 30-day lethality but induced significant histological damage in jejunal mucosa that was maximal at 3.5 days and that had seemingly recovered by day 21 after irradiation. These changes were accompanied by decreased numbers of mucosal macrophages, neutrophils, and B and T lymphocytes, mostly coinciding with similar reductions in peripheral blood cell counts. Recovery of mucosal macrophages occurred within 1 week, whereas mucosal granulocytes and lymphocytes remained low until 3 weeks after TBI. Maximal suppression of T-helper cell (T(H))-related transcripts occurred at 3.5 days, but there was no obvious T(H)1 or T(H)2 bias. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed a preponderance of differentially regulated genes involved in cell cycle control, cell death and DNA repair between 4 h and 3.5 days after irradiation. Genes involved in tissue recovery predominated from day 7 onward. We conclude that the intestinal immune system undergoes profound changes after sublethal TBI and that these changes likely contribute to postirradiation pathophysiological manifestations.

  17. CELLULAR DYNAMICS IN THE INTESTINAL MUCOSA: THE EFFECT OF IRRADIATION ON EPITHELIAL MATURATION AND MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Nathan B.

    1945-01-01

    Although irradiation of the duodenum of rats inhibits mitosis in the crypts and halts the normal passage of cells up the villi, the maturation of goblet cells is not affected. The ripening of mucous elements while arrested in the crypts, where they form, instead of during their migration along the villi, results in the so called mucous change, which has hitherto been considered a form of degeneration. During the phase of recovery, the reestablishment of normal migration and desquamation is marked by the appearance of strata of fully formed goblet cells at successive levels out along the villi. It is suggested that some gastrointestinal disturbances known to occur in spontaneous and experimental vitamin deficiency might be explained in terms of aberrations in the cellular replacement of the intestinal mucosa. PMID:19871475

  18. [T lymphocyte populations of the intestinal mucosa in celiac disease in children. Immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Olives, J P; Voigt, J J; al Saati, T; Nonnenmacher, L; Brousset, P; Delsol, G; Ghisolfi, J

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in a pathologic intestinal mucosa, the authors, instead of using the classic method by counting the number of lymphocytes, present an original method permitting the exploitation of quantified data from labelled surface cells by texture analyser coupled with a computerized system. We investigated 25 children presenting with chronic diarrhea and villous atrophy and 5 control subjects. Fifteen of the 25 children had celiac disease (10 active with total villous atrophy and 5, celiac disease in remission with healing mucosa), 5 cow's milk protein intolerance with total or partial villous atrophy and 5, chronic diarrhea with partial villous atrophy. Immunohistochemical study with monoclonal antibodies was carried out on frozen sections using a three-step immunoperoxidase technique. Compared with the 5 controls, patients with food intolerance (celiac disease and cow's milk protein intolerance) showed a significant increase of T suppressor lymphocytes (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05) in the epithelium, whereas there were more T helper lymphocytes in the lamina propria (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01). Non-treated celiac disease was distinguished from treated celiac disease by a marked increase in intra-epithelial T cytotoxic-suppressors. These results suggest that T cytotoxic-suppressors may be the mediators of the lesions observed in celiac disease. PMID:2179007

  19. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  20. Evidence against T-cell development in the adult human intestinal mucosa based upon lack of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, M E; Frantz, M E; Canning, C; Ritz, J; Blumberg, R S; Balk, S P

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that a subset of murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIEL), particularly those which express the CD8 alpha alpha homodimer, mature extrathymically. This study confirms that a small fraction of adult human iIEL also express the CD8 alpha alpha homodimer and demonstrates that most of these cells in the small intestine are T cells using the alpha beta T-cell receptor (TCR). Whether these cells or other subsets of adult human iIEL mature extrathymically in the intestine was assessed by measuring the expression of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT), an enzyme expressed exclusively by immature lymphocytes. Very low levels of TdT message could be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification in some iIEL samples. The level of TdT expression was assayed by competitive PCR amplification and compared with thymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. These measurements indicated that the number of immature T cells expressing TdT in the intestinal epithelium was less than one cell per 10(7) lymphocytes. This demonstrates that there are few if any TdT expressing immature T cells in the adult human intestinal mucosa and indicates, therefore, that T-cell development in the intestinal mucosa does not contribute significantly to the T-cell repertoire of the adult human intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8778025

  1. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii supernatant improves intestinal barrier function in mice DSS colitis.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders H; Yakymenko, Olena; Olivier, Isabelle; Håkansson, Fathima; Postma, Emily; Keita, Asa V; Söderholm, Johan D

    2013-10-01

    OBJECTIVE. The intestinal microbiota plays a substantial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (FP) is underrepresented in IBD patients and have been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects in mice. Increased intestinal permeability is common in IBD but the relationship between FP and intestinal barrier function has not been investigated. Our aim was to study treatment with FP supernatant on intestinal barrier function in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis mice model. MATERIAL AND METHODS. C57BL/6 mice received 3% DSS in tap water ad libitum during five days to induce colitis. From day 3 the mice received a daily gavage with FP supernatant or broth during seven days. Ileum and colon were mounted in Ussing chambers for permeability studies with (51)Cr-EDTA and Escherichia coli K-12. Colon was saved for Western blot analyses of tight junction proteins. RESULTS. DSS-treated mice showed significant weight loss and colon shortening. Gavage with FP supernatant resulted in a quicker recovery after DSS treatment and less extensive colonic shortening. Ileal mucosa of DSS mice showed a significant increase in (51)Cr-EDTA-passage compared to controls. (51)Cr-EDTA passage was significantly decreased in mice receiving FP supernatant. No significant differences were observed in passage of E. coli K12. Western blots showed a trend to increased claudin-1 and claudin-2 expressions in DSS mice. CONCLUSIONS. Supernatant of FP enhances the intestinal barrier function by affecting paracellular permeability, and may thereby attenuate the severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice. These findings suggest a potential role of FP in the treatment of IBD.

  2. Effect of cryoprotectants for maintaining drug permeability barriers in porcine buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Eva; Axelsen, Mary Carlos; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Jacobsen, Jette

    2016-09-10

    Ex vivo drug permeation studies are useful for early screening of drug candidates for buccal delivery. However, it is not always feasible to obtain fresh tissue for each experiment. Therefore, a method for storing excised tissue for later use is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine if permeability barriers for small molecules (nicotine and diazepam) were maintained after freezing porcine buccal mucosa with cryoprotectants to -80°C. Combinations of dimethyl sulfoxide, bovine serum albumin, glycerol and sucrose were used as cryoprotectants. The permeability of nicotine and diazepam across fresh or frozen/thawed tissue was determined using modified Ussing chambers. Haematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections for histology were prepared. The permeability of nicotine across tissue frozen without cryoprotectants was significantly higher compared to tissue frozen with cryoprotectants or fresh tissue. Freezing with or without cryoprotectants did not significantly affect the flux of diazepam compared to fresh tissue. Only minor histological changes were seen in frozen/thawed porcine buccal mucosa compared to fresh tissue. In conclusion, permeability barriers for nicotine and diazepam were preserved after freezing with any of the combinations of cryoprotectants; however, the barrier may be damaged when freezing without cryoprotectants. PMID:27426107

  3. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Tebbutt, Niall C; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W; Scott, Andrew M; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K

    2015-08-01

    The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33(-/-) mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33(-/-) mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33(-/-) mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33(-/-) mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33(-/-) mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33(-/-) mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking intestinal

  4. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in vivo and Plays a Protective Role During Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Nayden G; Feygin, Alex; Wang, Dongdong; Kuemmerle, John F; Harris, Gianni; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a critical regulator of intestinal mucosal barrier permeability, and the integrity of epithelial adherens junctions (AJ) and tight junctions (TJ). Non muscle myosin II (NM II) is a key cytoskeletal motor that controls actin filament architecture and dynamics. While NM II has been implicated in the regulation of epithelial junctions in vitro, little is known about its roles in the intestinal mucosa in vivo. In this study, we generated a mouse model with an intestinal epithelial-specific knockout of NM IIA heavy chain (NM IIA cKO) and examined the structure and function of normal gut barrier, and the development of experimental colitis in these animals. Unchallenged NM IIA cKO mice showed increased intestinal permeability and altered expression/localization of several AJ/TJ proteins. They did not develop spontaneous colitis, but demonstrated signs of a low-scale mucosal inflammation manifested by prolapses, lymphoid aggregates, increased cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration in the gut. NM IIA cKO animals were characterized by a more severe disruption of the gut barrier and exaggerated mucosal injury during experimentally-induced colitis. Our study provides the first evidence that NM IIA plays important roles in establishing normal intestinal barrier, and protection from mucosal inflammation in vivo. PMID:27063635

  5. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in vivo and Plays a Protective Role During Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Naydenov, Nayden G.; Feygin, Alex; Wang, Dongdong; Kuemmerle, John F.; Harris, Gianni; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S.; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a critical regulator of intestinal mucosal barrier permeability, and the integrity of epithelial adherens junctions (AJ) and tight junctions (TJ). Non muscle myosin II (NM II) is a key cytoskeletal motor that controls actin filament architecture and dynamics. While NM II has been implicated in the regulation of epithelial junctions in vitro, little is known about its roles in the intestinal mucosa in vivo. In this study, we generated a mouse model with an intestinal epithelial-specific knockout of NM IIA heavy chain (NM IIA cKO) and examined the structure and function of normal gut barrier, and the development of experimental colitis in these animals. Unchallenged NM IIA cKO mice showed increased intestinal permeability and altered expression/localization of several AJ/TJ proteins. They did not develop spontaneous colitis, but demonstrated signs of a low-scale mucosal inflammation manifested by prolapses, lymphoid aggregates, increased cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration in the gut. NM IIA cKO animals were characterized by a more severe disruption of the gut barrier and exaggerated mucosal injury during experimentally-induced colitis. Our study provides the first evidence that NM IIA plays important roles in establishing normal intestinal barrier, and protection from mucosal inflammation in vivo. PMID:27063635

  6. Activation of Immune and Defense Responses in the Intestinal Mucosa by Outer Membrane Vesicles of Commensal and Probiotic Escherichia coli Strains.

    PubMed

    José Fábrega, María; Aguilera, Laura; Giménez, Rosa; Varela, Encarna; Alexandra Cañas, María; Antolín, María; Badía, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbiota in human health is well-known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although, there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well-known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii) apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii) colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas, both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27242727

  7. Activation of Immune and Defense Responses in the Intestinal Mucosa by Outer Membrane Vesicles of Commensal and Probiotic Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    José Fábrega, María; Aguilera, Laura; Giménez, Rosa; Varela, Encarna; Alexandra Cañas, María; Antolín, María; Badía, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbiota in human health is well-known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although, there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well-known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii) apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii) colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas, both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27242727

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  9. Myenteric neurons and intestinal mucosa of diabetic rats after ascorbic acid supplementation

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Priscila; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Pereira, Renata Virginia Fernandes; Neto, Marcilio Hubner Miranda; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) dietary supplementation on myenteric neurons and epithelial cell proliferation of the jejunum of adult rats with chronic diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Thirty rats at 90 d of age were divided into three groups: Non-diabetic, diabetic and diabetic treated with AA (DA) (1 g/L). After 120 d of treatment with AA the animals were killed. The myenteric neurons were stained for myosin-V and analyzed quantitatively in an area of 11.2 mm2/animal. We further measured the cellular area of 500 neurons per group. We also determined the metaphasic index (MI) of the jejunum mucosa layer of about 2500 cells in the intestinal crypts, as well as the dimensions of 30 villi and 30 crypts/animal. The data area was analyzed using the Olympus BX40 microscope. RESULTS: There was an increase of 14% in the neuronal density (792.6 ± 46.52 vs 680.6 ± 30.27) and 4.4% in the cellular area (303.4 ± 5.19 vs 291.1 ± 6.0) respectively of the diabetic group treated with AA when compared to control diabetic animals. There were no significant differences in MI parameters, villi height or crypt depths among the groups. CONCLUSION: Supplementation with AA in the diabetic animal promoted moderate neuroprotection. There was no observation of alteration of the cellular proliferation of the jejunum mucosa layer of rats with chronic diabetes mellitus with or without supplementation with AA. PMID:19030205

  10. Host-microbial interactions and regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier function: From physiology to pathology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Wang, Jin-Town; Wei, Shu-Chen; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the largest reservoir of commensal bacteria in the human body, providing nutrients and space for the survival of microbes while concurrently operating mucosal barriers to confine the microbial population. The epithelial cells linked by tight junctions not only physically separate the microbiota from the lamina propria, but also secrete proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species in response to pathogen invasion and metabolic stress and serve as a sentinel to the underlying immune cells. Accumulating evidence indicates that commensal bacteria are involved in various physiological functions in the gut and microbial imbalances (dysbiosis) may cause pathology. Commensal bacteria are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell turnover, promotion of epithelial restitution and reorganization of tight junctions, all of which are pivotal for fortifying barrier function. Recent studies indicate that aberrant bacterial lipopolysaccharide-mediated signaling in gut mucosa may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Our perception of enteric commensals has now changed from one of opportunistic pathogens to active participants in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. This review attempts to explain the dynamic interaction between the intestinal epithelium and commensal bacteria in disease and health status. PMID:22368784

  11. Effects of simulated weightlessness on the intestinal mucosal barrier of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Chun-min; Mao, Gao-ping; Liu, Qing-sen; Guo, Ming-zhou

    2011-07-01

    This study employed a rat tail-suspension model to investigate the effects of simulated weightlessness on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Twenty-four Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CON), 14-day tail-suspension (SUS-14d), and 21-day tail-suspension (SUS-21d) groups ( n = 8 per group). Expression of occludin and zonula occludins-1 (ZO-1), proteins of the tight junction (TJ), in the intestinal mucosa was measured by immunohistochemical analysis, Western blotting, and mRNA fluorescent quantitation PCR. Plasma concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and D-lactate were determined using an enzymatic spectrophotometric assay. Expression of occludin and ZO-1 was reduced in the SUS-14d and SUS-21d groups as compared to the CON group, with lowest expression observed in the SUS-21d group ( P < 0.01). Examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the jejunal epithelium revealed increased intercellular space, decreased TJ and desmosome densities, and destruction of microvilli in the SUS-14d and SUS-21d groups. Plasma DAO and D-lactate concentrations in the SUS-21d group were higher than those in SUS-14d group and significantly higher than those in the CON group ( P < 0.01). In all three groups, the expression of occludin and ZO-1 was found to correlate negatively with DAO ( P < 0.01) and D-lactate ( P < 0.01) concentrations. It is concluded that simulated weightless results in down-regulation of expression of TJ proteins in the rat intestinal mucosa. Simulated weightlessness is proposed to increase intestinal permeability through damage to the TJ.

  12. Autophagy enhances intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier function by targeting claudin-2 protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant K; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Ma, Thomas Y

    2015-03-13

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway and is considered to be an essential cell survival mechanism. Defects in autophagy are implicated in many pathological processes, including inflammatory bowel disease. Among the innate defense mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, a defective tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated as a key pathogenic factor in the causation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease by allowing increased antigenic permeation. The cross-talk between autophagy and the TJ barrier has not yet been described. In this study, we present the novel finding that autophagy enhances TJ barrier function in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient starvation-induced autophagy significantly increased transepithelial electrical resistance and reduced the ratio of sodium/chloride paracellular permeability. Nutrient starvation reduced the paracellular permeability of small-sized urea but not larger molecules. The role of autophagy in the modulation of paracellular permeability was confirmed by pharmacological induction as well as pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. Consistent with the autophagy-induced reduction in paracellular permeability, a marked decrease in the level of the cation-selective, pore-forming TJ protein claudin-2 was observed after cell starvation. Starvation reduced the membrane presence of claudin-2 and increased its cytoplasmic, lysosomal localization. Therefore, our data show that autophagy selectively reduces epithelial TJ permeability of ions and small molecules by lysosomal degradation of the TJ protein claudin-2.

  13. Autophagy Enhances Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction Barrier Function by Targeting Claudin-2 Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Nighot, Prashant K.; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway and is considered to be an essential cell survival mechanism. Defects in autophagy are implicated in many pathological processes, including inflammatory bowel disease. Among the innate defense mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, a defective tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated as a key pathogenic factor in the causation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease by allowing increased antigenic permeation. The cross-talk between autophagy and the TJ barrier has not yet been described. In this study, we present the novel finding that autophagy enhances TJ barrier function in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient starvation-induced autophagy significantly increased transepithelial electrical resistance and reduced the ratio of sodium/chloride paracellular permeability. Nutrient starvation reduced the paracellular permeability of small-sized urea but not larger molecules. The role of autophagy in the modulation of paracellular permeability was confirmed by pharmacological induction as well as pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. Consistent with the autophagy-induced reduction in paracellular permeability, a marked decrease in the level of the cation-selective, pore-forming TJ protein claudin-2 was observed after cell starvation. Starvation reduced the membrane presence of claudin-2 and increased its cytoplasmic, lysosomal localization. Therefore, our data show that autophagy selectively reduces epithelial TJ permeability of ions and small molecules by lysosomal degradation of the TJ protein claudin-2. PMID:25616664

  14. RNA-binding protein HuR promotes growth of small intestinal mucosa by activating the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Christodoulou-Vafeiadou, Eleni; Rao, Jaladanki N; Zou, Tongtong; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Yang, Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2014-11-01

    Inhibition of growth of the intestinal epithelium, a rapidly self-renewing tissue, is commonly found in various critical disorders. The RNA-binding protein HuR is highly expressed in the gut mucosa and modulates the stability and translation of target mRNAs, but its exact biological function in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of HuR in intestinal homeostasis using a genetic model and further defined its target mRNAs. Targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells caused significant mucosal atrophy in the small intestine, as indicated by decreased cell proliferation within the crypts and subsequent shrinkages of crypts and villi. In addition, the HuR-deficient intestinal epithelium also displayed decreased regenerative potential of crypt progenitors after exposure to irradiation. HuR deficiency decreased expression of the Wnt coreceptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) in the mucosal tissues. At the molecular level, HuR was found to bind the Lrp6 mRNA via its 3'-untranslated region and enhanced LRP6 expression by stabilizing Lrp6 mRNA and stimulating its translation. These results indicate that HuR is essential for normal mucosal growth in the small intestine by altering Wnt signals through up-regulation of LRP6 expression and highlight a novel role of HuR deficiency in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal atrophy under pathological conditions.

  15. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment. PMID:27083829

  16. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects. PMID:22272087

  17. Herbal prescription Chang'an II repairs intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with post-inflammation irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-yun; Su, Min; Zheng, Yong-qiu; Wang, Xiao-ge; Kang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, En-lin; Bian, Zhao-xiang; Tang, Xu-dong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The herbal prescription Chang'an II is derived from a classical TCM formula Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang for the treatment of liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency syndrome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we investigated the effects of Chang'an II on the intestinal mucosal immune barrier in a rat post-inflammation IBS (PI-IBS) model. Methods: A rat model of PI-IBS was established using a multi-stimulation paradigm including early postnatal sibling deprivation, bondage and intrarectal administration of TNBS. Four weeks after TNBS administration, the rats were treated with Chang'an II (2.85, 5.71 and 11.42 g·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 14 d. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and fecal water content. Open field test and two-bottle sucrose intake test were used to evaluate the behavioral changes. CD4+ and CD8+ cells were counted and IL-1β and IL-4 levels were measured in intestinal mucosa. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural changes of the intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: PI-IBS model rats showed significantly increased AWR reactivity and fecal water content, and decreased locomotor activity and sucrose intake. Chang'an II treatment not only reduced AWR reactivity and fecal water content, but also suppressed the anxiety and depressive behaviors. Ultrastructural study revealed that the gut mucosal barrier function was severely damaged in PI-IBS model rats, whereas Chang'an II treatment relieved intestinal mucosal inflammation and repaired the gut mucosal barrier. Furthermore, PI-IBS model rats showed a significantly reduced CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in lamina propria and submucosa, and increased IL-1β and reduced IL-4 expression in intestinal mucosa, whereas Chang'an II treatment reversed PI-IBS-induced changes in CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and expression of IL-1β and IL-4. Conclusion: Chang'an II treatment protects the intestinal mucosa against PI-IBS through anti

  18. Mechanism of intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiaofeng; Dai, Wei; Wu, Jie; Fang, Liping; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Pengpeng; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=40) were evenly randomized into control and COPD groups and the COPD model was established by regulated exposure to cigarette smoke for 6 months. Histopathological changes of the lung and intestinal tissues were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) in the intestinal tissues were analyzed by western blotting, serum diamine oxidase (DAO) activity was detected by spectrophotometry, the urinary lactulose to mannitol ratio (L/M) was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography, and intestinal tissue secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-8 were detected by ELISA. Lung histopathology revealed thinned alveolar walls, ruptured alveolar septa, enlarged and deformed alveoli, and the formation of bullae and emphysema due to alveolar fusion in the COPD group, while intestinal histopathology indicated clearly swollen intestines with darkened and gray mucosa, neutrophil infiltration of the intestinal mucosal and regional epithelial shedding. The occludin and ZO-1 expression levels were significantly lower in the COPD group compared with those in the corresponding control group (P<0.05), while the urinary L/M ratio was significantly higher (P<0.05). Furthermore, the serum DAO activity and secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-8 in the intestinal tissues were significantly higher in the COPD group than in the control group (each P<0.05). Dysfunctional and structural changes were observed in the intestinal mucosal barrier in COPD model rats, which may be associated with the increased intestinal inflammatory responses. PMID:27588054

  19. Protective Effect of Huoxiang Zhengqi Oral Liquid on Intestinal Mucosal Mechanical Barrier of Rats with Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Induced by Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Wei; Peng, Qiu-Xian; Peng, Jiang-Li; Yu, Lin-Zhong; Hu, Jian-Lan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a rat model with acetic acid-induced PI-IBS was used to study the role of HXZQ oral liquid in repairing the colonic epithelial barrier and reducing intestinal permeability. Pathomorphism of colonic tissue, epithelial ultrastructure, DAO activity in serum, and the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin were examined to investigate protective effect mechanisms of HXZQ on intestinal mucosa barrier and then present experimental support for its use for prevention and cure of PI-IBS. PMID:25254052

  20. DHA protects against experimental colitis in IL-10-deficient mice associated with the modulation of intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Shi, Peiliang; Sun, Ye; Sun, Jing; Dong, Jian-Ning; Wang, Hong-Gang; Zuo, Lu-Gen; Gong, Jian-Feng; Li, Yi; Gu, Li-Li; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-Shou; Zhu, Wei-Ming

    2015-07-01

    A defect in the intestinal barrier is one of the characteristics of Crohn's disease (CD). The tight junction (TJ) changes and death of epithelial cells caused by intestinal inflammation play an important role in the development of CD. DHA, a long-chain PUFA, has been shown to be helpful in treating inflammatory bowel disease in experimental models by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. The present study aimed at investigating the specific effect of DHA on the intestinal barrier function in IL-10-deficient mice. IL-10-deficient mice (IL-10(-/-)) at 16 weeks of age with established colitis were treated with DHA (i.g. 35.5 mg/kg per d) for 2 weeks. The severity of their colitis, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, epithelial gene expression, the distributions of TJ proteins (occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1), and epithelial apoptosis in the proximal colon were measured at the end of the experiment. DHA treatment attenuated the established colitis and was associated with reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the colonic mucosa, lower mean histological scores and decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-17, TNF-α and interferon-γ). Moreover, enhanced barrier function was observed in the DHA-treated mice that resulted from attenuated colonic permeability, rescued expression and corrected distributions of occludin and ZO-1. The results of the present study indicate that DHA therapy may ameliorate experimental colitis in IL-10(-/-) mice by improving the intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  1. Effects of ε-viniferin, a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, on transepithelial active ion transport and ion permeability in the rat small and large intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Junji; Tomizawa, Yuka; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2016-05-01

    ε-Viniferin is a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, a polyphenol synthesized in many plants, including grapevine. The present study investigated the effects of ε-viniferin and resveratrol on epithelial secretory and barrier functions in isolated rat small and large intestinal mucosa. Mucosa-submucosa tissue preparations of various segments of the rat large and small intestines were mounted on Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (Isc) and tissue conductance (Gt) were continuously measured. The mucosal addition of ε-viniferin (>10(-5) mol/L) and resveratrol (>10(-4) mol/L) to the cecal mucosa, which was the most sensitive region, induced an increase in Isc and a rapid phase decrease (P-1) followed by rapid (P-2) and broad (P-3) peak increases in Gt in concentration-dependent manners. Mucosal ε-viniferin (10(-4) mol/L), but not resveratrol (10(-4) mol/L), increased the permeability of FITC-conjugated dextran (4 kDa). The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked changes in Isc (Cl(-) secretion), but not in Gt, were attenuated by a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor and a selective EP4 prostaglandin receptor. The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked increase in Isc was partially attenuated, and P-2, but not P-1 or P-3, change in Gt was abolished by a transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) inhibitor. Moreover, the mucosal ε-viniferin concentration-dependently attenuated the mucosal propionate (1 mmol/L)-evoked increases in Isc and Gt Immunohistochemical studies revealed COX-1-immunoreactive epithelial cells in the cecal crypt. The present study showed that mucosal ε-viniferin modulated transepithelial ion transport and permeability, possibly by activating sensory epithelial cells expressing COX-1 and TRPA1. Moreover, mucosal ε-viniferin decreased mucosal sensitivity to other luminal molecules such as short-chain fatty acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that ε-viniferin modifies intestinal mucosal transport and barrier

  2. Enteral feeding and its impact on the gut immune system and intestinal mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kruszewski, Wiesław J.; Buczek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Enteral feeding is the preferred method of nutritional therapy. Mucosal lack of contact with nutrients leads do lymphoid tissue atrophy, immune system functional decline, and intensification in bacterial translocation. Currently, it is assumed that microbiome is one of the body organs that has a significant impact on health. The composition of microbiome is not affected by age, sex, or place of residence, although it changes rapidly after diet modification. The composition of the microbiome is determined by enterotype, which is specific for each organism. It has a significant impact on the risk of diabetes, cancer, atherosclerosis, and other diseases. This review gathers data on interaction between gut-associated lymphoid tissue, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, microbiome, and the intestinal mucosal barrier. Usually, the information on the aforementioned is scattered in specialist-subject magazines such as gastroenterology, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry, and others. PMID:26557936

  3. The feed contaminant deoxynivalenol affects the intestinal barrier permeability through inhibition of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Zentek, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has critical health effects if the contaminated grains consumed by humans or animals. DON can have negative effects on the active transport of glucose and amino acids in the small intestine of chickens. As the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated, the present study was performed to delineate more precisely the effects of cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor, CHX) and DON on the intestinal absorption of nutrients. This was to confirm whether DON effects on nutrient absorption are due to an inhibition of protein synthesis. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (Isc) and transepithelial ion conductance (Gt) in Ussing chambers. Addition of D-glucose or L-glutamine to the luminal side of the isolated mucosa of the jejunum increased (P < 0.001) the Isc compared with basal conditions in the control tissues. However, the Isc was not increased by the glucose or glutamine addition after pre-incubation of tissues with DON or CHX. Furthermore, both DON and CHX reduced Gt, indicating that the intestinal barrier is compromised and consequently induced a greater impairment of the barrier function. The remarkable similarity between the activity of CHX and DON on nutrient uptake is consistent with their common ability to inhibit protein synthesis. It can be concluded that the decreases in transport activity by CHX was evident in this study using the chicken as experimental model. Similarly, DON has negative effects on the active transport of some nutrients, and these can be explained by its influence on protein synthesis. PMID:24888376

  4. The feed contaminant deoxynivalenol affects the intestinal barrier permeability through inhibition of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Zentek, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has critical health effects if the contaminated grains consumed by humans or animals. DON can have negative effects on the active transport of glucose and amino acids in the small intestine of chickens. As the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated, the present study was performed to delineate more precisely the effects of cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor, CHX) and DON on the intestinal absorption of nutrients. This was to confirm whether DON effects on nutrient absorption are due to an inhibition of protein synthesis. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (Isc) and transepithelial ion conductance (Gt) in Ussing chambers. Addition of D-glucose or L-glutamine to the luminal side of the isolated mucosa of the jejunum increased (P < 0.001) the Isc compared with basal conditions in the control tissues. However, the Isc was not increased by the glucose or glutamine addition after pre-incubation of tissues with DON or CHX. Furthermore, both DON and CHX reduced Gt, indicating that the intestinal barrier is compromised and consequently induced a greater impairment of the barrier function. The remarkable similarity between the activity of CHX and DON on nutrient uptake is consistent with their common ability to inhibit protein synthesis. It can be concluded that the decreases in transport activity by CHX was evident in this study using the chicken as experimental model. Similarly, DON has negative effects on the active transport of some nutrients, and these can be explained by its influence on protein synthesis.

  5. Nano-hydroxyapatite–thermally denatured small intestine sub-mucosa composites for entheses applications

    PubMed Central

    Perla, Venu; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present in vitro study was to estimate the adhesion strength of nanometer crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA)–small intestine sub-mucosa (SIS) composites on model implant surfaces. Techniques of thermal denaturation (60°C, 20 min) of SIS were used to enhance the adhesion strength of entheses materials to underlying implants. Specifically, results indicated that the adhesion strength of thermally denatured SIS was 2–3 times higher than that for normal unheated SIS. In addition, aqua-sonicated, hydrothermally treated nano-HA dispersions enhanced the adhesion strength of SIS on implant surfaces. Importantly, results of the present study demonstrated that human skeletal muscle cell (hSkMC) numbers were not affected by thermally denaturing SIS in nano-HA composite coatings; however, they increased on aqua-sonicated nano-HA/SIS composites compared with SIS alone. Interestingly, thermally denatured SIS that contained aqua-sonicated, hydrothermally treated nano-HA decreased human osteoblasts (hOBs) numbers compared with respective unheated composites; all other composites when thermally denatured did not influence hOB numbers. Results also showed that the number of hOBs increased on nano-HA/SIS composites compared with SIS composites alone. Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) numbers were not affected by the presence of nano-HA in SIS composites. For these reasons, the collective results of this in vitro study demonstrated a technique to increase the coating strength of entheses coatings on implant surfaces (using thermally denatured SIS and aqua-sonicated, hydrothermally prepared nano-HA) while, at the same time, supporting cell functions important for entheses regeneration. PMID:17717975

  6. Automated measurement of intestinal mucosa electrical parameters using a new digital clamp.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Julien; Mammar, Saïd; Eto, Bruno

    2008-10-01

    Electrophysiological studies that include measurements of the electrical parameters of the epithelium offer insight into the cell's ability to react to different biological effectors and their functional viability. These parameters are commonly measured using a Ussing permeation chamber; however, most Ussing permeation chambers currently available must follow a strict operational protocol, and the type of electrodes used has to be taken into special consideration. The purpose of this study was to develop a new Ussing permeation chamber device with an automatic digital clamp which uses a microcontroller. Conventional electrodes, such as platinum or Ag/AgCl electrodes, are replaced by stainless steel 316L working electrodes. The electrode-electrolyte interface (inox-Ringer's) study was performed by impedance spectroscopy in the range of 1-10 kHz. The determination of Warburg's model electrical parameters was inferred from the Nyquist diagram. The model validation of the new digital clamp was performed experimentally on isolated segments of mouse jejunum. Two main study results should be mentioned. One is that impedance spectroscopy on stainless steel electrodes has provided Warburg's parameters, allowing the development of a transfer function model. The other is that the new digital clamp can simultaneously measure or calculate conductance, potential difference and short-circuit current. These results have also confirmed the great importance of Warburg's model for determining the electrical parameters of the electrode-electrolyte interface, and have shown that the measurement of intestinal mucosa electrical parameters can be achieved with a digital correction. Finally, the results suggest that stainless steel electrodes can be used successfully in a Ussing permeation chamber as working electrodes.

  7. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Promotes Intestinal Barrier Homeostasis and Protection Against Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S.; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R.; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S.; Yu, Hong B.; Waterhouse, Chris C. M.; Buchan, Allison M. J.; Popescu, Oana E.; Gibson, William T.; Waschek, James A.; Vallance, Bruce A.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP’s role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP’s role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  8. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  9. Effect of wild-type Shigella species and attenuated Shigella vaccine candidates on small intestinal barrier function, antigen trafficking, and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Maria; Levine, Myron M; Sztein, Marcelo B; Fasano, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial dysentery due to Shigella species is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathogenesis of Shigella is based on the bacteria's ability to invade and replicate within the colonic epithelium, resulting in severe intestinal inflammatory response and epithelial destruction. Although the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Shigella in the colon have been extensively studied, little is known on the effect of wild-type Shigella on the small intestine and the role of the host response in the development of the disease. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge no studies have described the effects of apically administered Shigella flexneri 2a and S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine strains on human small intestinal enterocytes. The aim of this study was to assess the coordinated functional and immunological human epithelial responses evoked by strains of Shigella and candidate vaccines on small intestinal enterocytes. To model the interactions of Shigella with the intestinal mucosa, we apically exposed monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells to increasing bacterial inocula. We monitored changes in paracellular permeability, examined the organization of tight-junctions and the pro-inflammatory response of epithelial cells. Shigella infection of Caco2 monolayers caused severe mucosal damage, apparent as a drastic increase in paracellular permeability and disruption of tight junctions at the cell-cell boundary. Secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-8 was independent of epithelial barrier dysfunction. Shigella vaccine strains elicited a pro-inflammatory response without affecting the intestinal barrier integrity. Our data show that wild-type Shigella infection causes a severe alteration of the barrier function of a small intestinal cell monolayer (a proxy for mucosa) and might contribute (along with enterotoxins) to the induction of watery diarrhea. Diarrhea may be a mechanism by which the host attempts to eliminate harmful bacteria and transport them from the small to

  10. Campylobacter infection in chickens modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Molnár, Andor; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Ghareeb, Khaled; Khayal, Basel; Hess, Claudia; Liebhart, Dieter; Dublecz, Károly; Hess, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Asymptomatic carriage of Campylobacter jejuni is highly prevalent in chicken flocks. Thus, we investigated whether chronic Campylobacter carriage affects chicken intestinal functions despite the absence of clinical symptoms. An experiment was carried out in which commercial chickens were orally infected with C. jejuni (1 × 10(8) CFU/bird) at 14 days of life. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial ion conductance (G(t)) in Ussing chambers. G(t) increased in cecum and colon of Campylobacter-infected chicken 7 d post-infection (DPI), whereas G t initially decreased in the jejunum at 7 DPI and increased thereafter at 14 DPI. The net charge transfer across the epithelium was reduced or tended to be reduced in all segments, as evidenced by a decreased I sc. Furthermore, the infection induced intestinal histomorphological changes, most prominently including a decrease in villus height, crypt depth and villus surface area in the jejunum at 7 DPI. Furthermore, body mass gain was decreased by Campylobacter carriage. This study demonstrates, for the first time, changes in the intestinal barrier function in Campylobacter-infected chickens and these changes were associated with a decrease in growth performance in otherwise healthy-appearing birds.

  11. Homeostasis alteration within small intestinal mucosa after acute enteral refeeding in total parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongjia; Barrett, Meredith; Hou, Yue; Yoon, Hong Keun; Ochi, Takanori; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2016-02-15

    Feeding strategies to care for patients who transition from enteral nutrient deprivation while on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to enteral feedings generally proceed to full enteral nutrition once the gastrointestinal tract recovers; however, an increasing body of literature suggests that a subgroup of patients may actually develop an increased incidence of adverse events, including death. To examine this further, we studied the effects of acute refeeding in a mouse model of TPN. Interestingly, refeeding led to some beneficial effects, including prevention in the decline in intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation. However, refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as an upregulation in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). Refeeding also failed to prevent TPN-associated increases in IEC apoptosis, loss of epithelial barrier function, and failure of the leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5-positive stem cell expression. Transitioning from TPN to enteral feedings led to a partial restoration of the small bowel microbial population. In conclusion, while acute refeeding led to some restoration of normal gastrointestinal physiology, enteral refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal inflammatory markers and may suggest alternative strategies to enteral refeeding should be considered.

  12. Spray-dried animal plasma prevents the effects of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B on intestinal barrier function in weaned rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Campbell, Joy M; Crenshaw, Joe; Russell, Louis; Moretó, Miquel

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated intestinal barrier function during inflammation as well as the effects of dietary supplementation with porcine spray-dried animal plasma (SDAP) proteins and porcine immunoglobulin concentrate (IC). Wistar Lewis rats were fed from d 21 (weaning) until d 34 or 35 either a control diet or a diet containing SDAP or IC. On d 30 and d 33, rats received an intraperitoneal dose of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB; 0.5 mg/kg body wt; groups SEB, SEB-SDAP, and SEB-IC). SEB reduced the potential difference across the jejunum by 60%, the short-circuit current by 70%, and Na-K-ATPase activity in intestinal mucosa (all P < 0.05). The fluxes of dextran flux (4 kDa) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 40 kDa) across the intestinal wall also increased in SEB-treated rats (P < 0.01, P = 0.068, respectively). SEB also increased HRP flux across the paracellular space (P < 0.05). Moreover, SEB-treated rats had a reduced expression of tight junction proteins, such as ZO-1 (10% reduction; P < 0.05) and beta-catenin (20% reduction; P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation with SDAP or IC prevented dextran (P < 0.05) and HRP (P < 0.05) paracellular flux across the intestinal epithelium. SDAP supplementation also prevented SEB effects on Na-K-ATPase activity (P < 0.05). In our model of SEB-induced intestinal inflammation, the increased permeability across the intestinal mucosa was due to the lower expression of tight junction proteins, an effect that can be prevented by both SDAP and IC supplementation.

  13. Selective mineral elements concentration of the intestinal mucosa role of the lysosomes of duodenal enterocytes in the handling of mineral elements after intragastric administration.

    PubMed

    Tekaya, L; Ayadi, A; Fehri, E; El Hili, A

    2005-01-01

    Intragastric administration to rats of four soluble lanthanides cerium, lanthanum, europium, thulium and of three soluble elements of group IIIA aluminium, indium and gallium has been shown in previous studies. In this work two new rare earths gadolinium and terbium were studied using the same protocols and the same methods (transmission electron microscopy and ion microanalysis). among the previously studied elements, some of them were administered simultaneously on the one hand aluminium and indium, and on the other hand, lanthanum and cerium. These metals were looked for in intestinal mucosa, liver and kidney. The results showed: a) gadolinium and terbium were selectively concentrated in lysosomes of duodenal enterocytes, precipitated as non-soluble phosphate salts and eliminated with the cell's turn-over in less than 48 hr; b) Administered simultaneously, they precipitated in the same lysosome. c/ none of them was observed in the liver or kidney even with high dose. This study brings up to nine the number of elements forming a non-soluble phosphate salts, explaining their precipitation in lysosomes. None of them have a physiological role, two are toxic (aluminium and indium). This rapid intralysosomal concentration is an efficient mechanism which limits the diffusion of the foreign substances through the digestive barrier, then permits their elimination along with the cytoptose phenomenon in the intestinal lumen. PMID:16375818

  14. A new role for reticulon-4B/NOGO-B in the intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Feo, Juan Antonio; Puerto, Marta; Fernández-Mena, Carolina; Verdejo, Cristina; Lara, José Manuel; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Álvarez, Emilio; Vaquero, Javier; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Bañares, Rafael; Menchén, Luis

    2015-06-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impaired intestinal barrier function. We aimed to investigate the role of reticulon-4B (RTN-4B/NOGO-B), a structural protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, in intestinal barrier function and IBD. We used immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting to study tissue distribution and expression levels of RTN-4B/NOGO-B in control and IBD samples from mouse and humans. We also targeted RTN-4B/NOGO-B using siRNAs in cultured human intestinal epithelial cell (IECs). Epithelial barrier permeability was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement. RTN-4B/NOGO-B is expressed in the intestine mainly by IECs. Confocal microscopy revealed a colocalization of RTN-4B, E-cadherin, and polymerized actin fibers in tissue and cultured IECs. RTN-4B mRNA and protein expression were lower in the colon of IL-10(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Colocalization of RTN-4B/E-cadherin/actin was reduced in the colon of IL-10(-/-) mice. Analysis of endoscopic biopsies from IBD patients showed a significant reduction of RTN-4B/NOGO-B expression in inflamed mucosa compared with control. Treatment of IECs with H2O2 reduced TEER values and triggered phosphorylation of RTN-4B in serine 107 residues as well as downregulation of RTN-4B expression. Acute RTN-4B/NOGO-B knockdown by siRNAs resulted in a decreased TEER values and reduction of E-cadherin and α-catenin expression and in the amount of F-actin-rich filaments in IECs. Epithelial RTN-4B/NOGO-B was downregulated in human and experimental IBD. RTN-4B participates in the intestinal epithelial barrier function, most likely via its involvement in E-cadherin, α-catenin expression, and actin cytoskeleton organization at sites of cell-to-cell contacts.

  15. The role of intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of NEC

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Melissa D; Denning, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays an important role in maintaining host health. Breakdown of intestinal barrier function is known to play a role in many diseases such as infectious enteritis, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases. Recently, increasing research has demonstrated the importance of understanding how intestinal epithelial barrier function develops in the premature neonate in order to develop strategies to promote its maturation. Optimizing intestinal barrier function is thought to be key to preventing neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis. In this review, we will first summarize the key components of the intestinal epithelial barrier, what is known about its development, and how this may explain NEC pathogenesis. Finally, we will review what therapeutic strategies may be used to promote optimal development of neonatal intestinal barrier function in order to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:25927016

  16. Intestinal metaplasia with a high salt diet induces epithelial proliferation and alters cell composition in the gastric mucosa of mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Crissey, Mary Ann S; Lynch, John P; Kaestner, Klaus H; Silberg, Debra G; Suh, Eunran

    2005-06-01

    Intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa is an important component in the pathway to adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that induce the progression from intestinal metaplasia to cancer have not been elucidated. High dietary salt has been known as one of the risk factors for gastric cancer development in humans. Therefore, we investigated the role of high salt diet on gastric epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation, using our mouse model that ectopically expressed Cdx2 homeodomain transcription factor and induced an intestinal metaplastic phenotype in the gastric epithelia. Sixty Cdx2 transgenic and sixty age-matched wild-type littermates were studied. Fifty-percent Cdx2 transgenic and wild type mice were administered a high-salt diet and the other fifty-percent was fed a standard diet starting at 12 weeks after birth. At 10, 20 and 40 weeks after initiation of the diets, histopathological changes were determined by Hemotoxylin and Eosin, alcian blue, and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. Cell types and cell kinetics were assessed by immunohistochemistry. At 52 weeks, significant alterations in pathology were observed in the Cdx2 transgenic mice fed a high-salt diet, including elongation of gastric pits, reduction of the glandular zone in the gastric corpus, and deepening of glands in the antrum. In the Cdx2 transgenic mice fed a high salt diet, the parietal and chief cells were significantly decreased in the gastric corpus. A significant increase in cell proliferation and apoptosis in the corpus and antrum were observed in Cdx2 transgenic mice fed a high-salt diet as compared to wild-type littermates. Taken together, these data implicate that intestinal metaplasia in concert with a high-salt diet induces epithelial proliferation, apoptosis, and alters cellular types in the gastric mucosa of mice. Alteration in the composition of the gastric epithelium may play a role in influencing the microenvironment to engender susceptibility to carcinogens.

  17. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Proteomic analysis of the inflamed intestinal mucosa reveals distinctive immune response profiles in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Uta; Bartsch, Sebastian; Philipsen, Lars; Danese, Silvio; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Dignass, Axel U; Hämmerle, Marcus; Sturm, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    Although Crohn's disease (CrD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) share several clinical features, the mechanisms of tissue injury differ. Because the global cellular function depends upon the protein network environment as a whole, we explored changes in the distribution and association of mucosal proteins to define key events involved in disease pathogenesis. Endoscopic biopsies were taken from CrD, UC, and control colonic mucosa, and Multi-Epitope-Ligand-Cartographie immunofluorescence microscopy with 32 different Abs was performed. Multi-Epitope-Ligand-Cartographie is a novel, highly multiplexed robotic imaging technology which allows integrating cell biology and biomathematical tools to visualize dozens of proteins simultaneously in a structurally intact cell or tissue. In CrD, the number of CD3+CD45RA+ naive T cells was markedly increased, but only activated memory, but not naive, T cells expressed decreased levels of Bax, active caspase-3 or -8. In UC, only CD4+ T cells coexpressing NF-kappaB were caspase-8 and poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase positive. Furthermore, the number of CD4+CD25+ T cells was elevated only in UC, whereas in CrD and controls, the number of these cells was similar. By using hub analysis, we also identified that the colocalization pattern with NF-kappaB+ and poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase+ as base motifs distinguished CrD from UC. High-content proteomic analysis of the intestinal mucosa demonstrated for the first time that different T cell populations within the intestinal mucosa express proteins translating distinct biological functions in each form of inflammatory bowel disease. Thus, topological proteomic analysis may help to unravel the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease by defining distinct immunopathogenic profiles in CrD and UC. PMID:17579049

  19. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. PMID:25501338

  20. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-05-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally.

  1. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K.; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally. PMID:26884465

  2. [Atrophy in the mucosa neighboring an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma by comparing the Sydney vs. OLGA systems].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mendoza, Pablo; Hernández-Briseño, Liliana; Casarrubias-Ramírez, Moisés; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Ángeles-Garay, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el carcinoma gástrico ocasiona al año unas 700 000 muertes en el mundo. El objetivo de este artículo es evaluar la atrofia en la mucosa vecina al adenocarcinoma gástrico tipo intestinal comparando los sistemas Sídney y OLGA. Diferencias en el rendimiento diagnóstico impulsarían el empleo de alguno. Métodos: estudiamos 28 sujetos con adenocarcinoma gástrico tipo intestinal (Lauren), que comparamos con 32 casos sin neoplasia, ambos grupos con gastrectomía total. Dos patólogos evaluaron la atrofia en el epitelio de cuerpo y antro no neoplásico con los sistemas Sídney y OLGA. Se obtuvieron la media, mediana y distribución de frecuencias por escala de medición, así como la distribución de las variables del estudio. Se calculó la sensibilidad, especificidad y los valores predictivos para cáncer gástrico gracias a dicotomizar las escalas con resultado positivo y negativo para atrofia avanzada. Resultados: veinticuatro de 28 casos con adenocarcinoma gástrico tipo intestinal mostraron atrofia avanzada con OLGA con una sensibilidad y especificidad de 77 y 85 % respectivamente. Con el sistema Sídney, 4 de 28 mostraron atrofia avanzada con una sensibilidad y especificidad de 14 y 100 % respectivamente. Conclusiones: el sistema OLGA tiene elevada sensibilidad y especificidad (77 y 85 % respectivamente) para reconocer cambios preneoplásicos en la mucosa vecina al cáncer gástrico. Empero, OLGA no mostró atrofia avanzada en adenomas foveolares con displasia de alto grado, ni en adenocarcinomas en las porciones proximales del estómago.

  3. [Maintenance of intestinal barrier function in patients with chronic critical illness].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuwen; Ren, Jianan; Li, Jieshou

    2016-07-01

    The syndrome known as chronic critical illness (CCI) is defined as that critically ill patients survive their initial acute illness but go on to experience persistent organ failures necessitating prolonged intensive care. Intestinal barrier is the physical barrier that separates the internal and external environments and prevents the invasion of pathogenic antigens. Due to its pathogenesis, many CCI patients have injured intestinal barrier. Gut is the motor organ of stress responses, and gut-associated infections may initiate multiple organ dysfunction. In this way, it is important to maintain intestinal barrier of such patients. Apart from treatment for underlying diseases, resuscitation aiming at improving tissue perfusion, appropriate nutritional support, protection of normal intestinal flora, and provision of probiotics can maintain intestinal barrier of CCI patients. The maintenance and support of barrier function requires attention. PMID:27452748

  4. Probiotic strains and their combination inhibit in vitro adhesion of pathogens to pig intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Collado, M C; Grześkowiak, Łukasz; Salminen, Seppo

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the protective effect of commercial probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG) alone and in combination on the adhesion of pathogenic strains as Salmonella, Clostridium, and Escherichia coli to pig intestinal mucus obtained from different intestinal regions. In combination, probiotic strains enhanced each other's adhesion, mainly in large intestinal mucus. Treatment of intestinal mucus with Bb12 and LGG, alone or in combination, significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the adhesion of the tested pathogens. The ability to inhibit pathogen adhesion appears to depend on the specific probiotics and pathogens and on the mucosal site. B. lactis Bb12 and L. rhamnosus LGG in combination revealed a better ability to inhibit adhesion of all pathogens tested to pig intestinal mucus than probiotic strains. Probiotic combinations could be useful for counteracting disease-associated aberrations in intestinal microbiota. Specific protective probiotics could be selected for particular pig pathogens. Probiotic strains from human origin and intended for human use also adhere to pig intestinal mucus and are able to displace and inhibit pathogens. PMID:17657533

  5. Uptake and storage of vitamin A as lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of cells in the lamina propria mucosae of the rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Haruki; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Hebiguchi, Taku; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin A (retinyl palmitate) was injected subcutaneously or administered to rats by tube feeding. After subcutaneous injection, vitamin A was taken up and stored in cells of the lamina propria mucosae of the rat intestine. After oral administration, vitamin A was absorbed by the intestinal absorptive epithelial cells and transferred to cells of the lamina propria mucosae, where cells took up and stored the transferred vitamin A. The morphology of these cells was similar to that of hepatic stellate cells (also called vitamin A-storing cells, lipocytes, interstitial cells, fat-storing cells or Ito cells). Thus, these cells in the intestine could take up vitamin A from the systemic circulation and as well as by intestinal absorption, and store the vitamin in the lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. The data suggest that these cells are extrahepatic stellate cells of the digestive tract that may play roles in both the absorption and homeostasis of vitamin A. PMID:23765517

  6. Uptake and storage of vitamin A as lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of cells in the lamina propria mucosae of the rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Haruki; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Hebiguchi, Taku; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin A (retinyl palmitate) was injected subcutaneously or administered to rats by tube feeding. After subcutaneous injection, vitamin A was taken up and stored in cells of the lamina propria mucosae of the rat intestine. After oral administration, vitamin A was absorbed by the intestinal absorptive epithelial cells and transferred to cells of the lamina propria mucosae, where cells took up and stored the transferred vitamin A. The morphology of these cells was similar to that of hepatic stellate cells (also called vitamin A-storing cells, lipocytes, interstitial cells, fat-storing cells or Ito cells). Thus, these cells in the intestine could take up vitamin A from the systemic circulation and as well as by intestinal absorption, and store the vitamin in the lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. The data suggest that these cells are extrahepatic stellate cells of the digestive tract that may play roles in both the absorption and homeostasis of vitamin A.

  7. Laminin α5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Zhen X.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mammalian intestine displays two distinct patterns of mucosal organization. The small intestine contains mucosal epithelial invaginations called crypts of Lieberkühn that are continuous with evaginations into the lumen called villi. The colon also contains crypts, but its epithelial surface is lined by flat surface cuffs. The epithelial cells of both organs communicate with the underlying mesenchyme through a basement membrane that is composed of a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, including members of the laminin family. The basement membranes of the small intestine and colon contain distinct laminin subtypes; notably, the villus basement membrane is rich in laminin α5. Here we show that diminution of laminin α5 in a mouse model led to a compensatory deposition of colonic laminins that resulted in a transformation from a small intestinal to a colonic mucosal architecture. The alteration in mucosal architecture was associated with reduced levels of nuclear p27Kip1, a cell cycle regulator, and altered intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our results suggest that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine. PMID:18628307

  8. Paneth cells, defensins, and the commensal microbiota: a hypothesis on intimate interplay at the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Nita H; Underwood, Mark A; Bevins, Charles L

    2007-04-01

    Mucosal surfaces are colonized by a diverse and dynamic microbiota. Much investigation has focused on bacterial colonization of the intestine, home to the vast majority of this microbiota. Experimental evidence has highlighted that these colonizing microbes are essential to host development and homeostasis, but less is known about host factors that may regulate the composition of this ecosystem. While evidence shows that IgA has a role in shaping this microbiota, it is likely that effector molecules of the innate immune system are also involved. One hypothesis is that gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides, key elements of innate immunity throughout nature, have an essential role in this regulation. These effector molecules characteristically have activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria and other microbes. At mucosal surfaces, antimicrobial peptides may affect the numbers and/or composition of the colonizing microbiota. In humans and other mammals, defensins are a predominant class of antimicrobial peptides. In the small intestine, Paneth cells (specialized secretory epithelial cells) produce high quantities of defensins and several other antibiotic peptides and proteins. Data from murine models indicate that Paneth cell defensins play a pivotal role in defense from food and water-borne pathogens in the intestinal lumen. Recent studies in humans provide evidence that reduced Paneth cell defensin expression may be a key pathogenic factor in ileal Crohn's disease, a subgroup of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and changes in the colonizing microbiota may mediate this pathogenic mechanism. It is also possible that low levels of Paneth cell defensins, characteristic of normal intestinal development, may predispose premature neonates to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) through similar close links with the composition of the intestinal microbiota. Future studies to further define mechanisms by which defensins and other host factors regulate the composition of the

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of measles related antigen in the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, M; Chiba, M; Yukawa, M; Nakagomi, T; Fukushima, T; Watanabe, S; Nakagomi, O

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Measles virus is implicated in the aetiology of Crohn's disease. This measles hypothesis is mainly supported by immunohistochemical findings that the measles related antigen is present in the intestine of patients with Crohn's disease. Recently we isolated this antigen from the intestine of a patient with Crohn's disease using a molecular cloning technique and produced the monoclonal antibody against it (designated 4F12).
AIM—To discover whether the measles related antigen is uniquely present in Crohn's disease.
SUBJECTS/METHODS—Colonic mucosa samples from 20 patients with Crohn's disease, 20 with ulcerative colitis, 11 with non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) colitis, and nine controls were immunohistochemically stained with the anti-measles monoclonal antibody 4F12. The numbers of positive cells, the ratio of positive cells to nucleated cells, and the staining intensity of the positive cells were compared. Furthermore, the distribution of the measles antigen in other human organs was examined.
RESULTS—Both the number of positive cells and the ratio of positive cells to nucleated cells were significantly increased in Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and non-IBD colitis compared with controls (p<0.05) but were similar among the three disease groups. The staining intensity of the positive cells was also similar among the three disease groups. Small numbers of positive cells were observed in the oesophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, and lung.
CONCLUSIONS—The presence of the measles related antigen in the colonic mucosa was not unique to Crohn's disease. These results, together with the observation that such a measles related antigen was derived from host protein, do not support the hypothesis that measles virus causes Crohn's disease.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; measles virus; immunohistochemistry; ulcerative colitis; inflammatory bowel disease; molecular mimicry PMID:10644308

  10. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  11. Effect of level of alimentation on visceral organ mass and the morphology and Na+, K+ adenosinetriphosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa in lambs.

    PubMed

    Rompala, R E; Hoagland, T A

    1987-10-01

    Changes in ovine visceral organ mass and small intestinal mucosa morphology and metabolism due to short-term and prolonged modifications in level of alimentation were studied. Thirty-six lambs were fed for 21 d at either 100 or 50% ad libitum levels of intake. For the next 5 d, lambs either remained on the same intake levels or were switched from 100 or 50% or from 50 to 100% ad libitum intake levels and were subsequently slaughtered. Levels of alimentation the last 5 d before slaughter had a significant effect on weights of the large intestine, small intestine, stomach complex and liver, while only the weight of the liver was affected by 21-d adaptation period. Weights of the heart, lungs, carcass and visceral fat were not affected by level of alimentation. Villus height and mucosal mass at a constant intestinal tissue weight were modified by level of alimentation 5 d before slaughter but static to the previous 21-d nutritional plane. Activity of Na+, K+ ATPase of jejunal mucosa was not influenced by level of alimentation 5 d before slaughter, but was influenced by 21-d adapted level of alimentation. Results from this study are interpreted to indicate that weights of the liver and alimentary tract and small intestinal mucosa development are highly sensitive to changes in level of alimentation.

  12. Improved Gene Delivery to Intestinal Mucosa by Adenoviral Vectors Bearing Subgroup B and D Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lecollinet, S.; Gavard, F.; Havenga, M. J. E.; Spiller, O. B.; Lemckert, A.; Goudsmit, J.; Eloit, M.; Richardson, J.

    2006-01-01

    A major obstacle to successful oral vaccination is the lack of antigen delivery systems that are both safe and highly efficient. Conventional replication-incompetent adenoviral vectors, derived from human adenoviruses of subgroup C, are poorly efficient in delivering genetic material to differentiated intestinal epithelia. To date, 51 human adenovirus serotypes have been identified and shown to recognize different cellular receptors with different tissue distributions. This natural diversity was exploited in the present study to identify suitable adenoviral vectors for efficient gene delivery to the human intestinal epithelium. In particular, we compared the capacities of a library of adenovirus type 5-based vectors pseudotyped with fibers of several human serotypes for transduction, binding, and translocation toward the basolateral pole in human and murine tissue culture models of differentiated intestinal epithelia. In addition, antibody-based inhibition was used to gain insight into the molecular interactions needed for efficient attachment. We found that vectors differing merely in their fiber proteins displayed vastly different capacities for gene transfer to differentiated human intestinal epithelium. Notably, vectors bearing fibers derived from subgroup B and subgroup D serotypes transduced the apical pole of human epithelium with considerably greater efficiency than a subgroup C vector. Such efficiency was correlated with the capacity to use CD46 or sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates as opposed to CAR as attachment receptors. These results suggest that substantial gains could be made in gene transfer to digestive epithelium by exploiting the tropism of existing serotypes of human adenoviruses. PMID:16501084

  13. Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-. beta. -carotene to retinal by a cytosolic enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshman, M.R.; Mychkovsky, I.; Attlesey, M. )

    1989-12-01

    Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-{beta}-carotene to retinal by a partially purified enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa was demonstrated. The enzymatic product was characterized based on the following evidence: (i) the product gave rise to its O-ethyloxime by treatment with O-ethylhydroxylamine with an absorption maximum at 363 nm in ethanol characteristics of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of this derivative yielded a sharp peak with a retention time of 7.99 min corresponding to the authentic compound; (ii) the mass spectrum of the O-ethyloxime of the enzymatic product was identical to that of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime; (iii) the specific activity of the enzymatically formed ({sup 14}C)retinal O-ethyloxime remained constant even after repeated crystallization; (iv) the enzymatic product exhibited an absorption maximum at 370 nm in light petroleum characteristic of authentic retinal. This retinol was enzymatically esterified to retinyl palmitate by rat pancreatic esterase with a retention time of 10 min on HPLC corresponding to authentic retinyl palmitate. Thus, the enzymatic product of {beta}-carotene cleavage by the partially purified intestinal enzyme was unequivocally confirmed to be retinal.

  14. Intestinal Diffusion Barrier: Unstirred Water Layer or Membrane Surface Mucous Coat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithson, Kenneth W.; Millar, David B.; Jacobs, Lucien R.; Gray, Gary M.

    1981-12-01

    The dimensions of the small intestinal diffusion barrier interposed between luminal nutrients and their membrane receptors were determined from kinetic analysis of substrate hydrolysis by integral surface membrane enzymes. The calculated equivalent thickness of the unstirred water layer was too large to be compatible with the known dimensions of rat intestine. The discrepancy could be reconciled by consideration of the mucous coat overlying the intestinal surface membrane. Integral surface membrane proteins could not be labeled by an iodine-125 probe unless the surface coat was first removed. The mucoprotein surface coat appears to constitute an important diffusion barrier for nutrients seeking their digestive and transport sites on the outer intestinal membrane.

  15. Intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and loss of barrier function in the setting of altered microbiota with enteral nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, Farokh R.; Barrett, Meredith; Ralls, Matthew W.; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Feng, Yongjia; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), a commonly used treatment for patients who cannot receive enteral nutrition, is associated with significant septic complications due in part to a loss of epithelial barrier function (EBF). While the underlying mechanisms of TPN-related epithelial changes are poorly understood, a mouse model of TPN-dependence has helped identify several contributing factors. Enteral deprivation leads to a shift in intestinal microbiota to predominantly Gram-negative Proteobacteria. This is associated with an increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines within the mucosa, including interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. A concomitant loss of epithelial growth factors leads to a decrease in epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. The resulting loss of epithelial tight junction proteins contributes to EBF dysfunction. These mechanisms identify potential strategies of protecting against TPN-related complications, such as modification of luminal bacteria, blockade of proinflammatory cytokines, or growth factor replacement. PMID:24392360

  16. Evaluation of the mRNA and Protein Expressions of Nutritional Biomarkers in the Gastrointestinal Mucosa of Patients with Small Intestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanao; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of biomarkers related to absorption in the small intestinal mucosa of humans and determine the relationships between small intestinal diseases and nutrition. Methods The study subjects consisted of patients scheduled to undergo double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) or total colonoscopy for suspected gastrointestinal disorder in a clinical practice. Biopsies were taken from apparently normal mucosa in the visible areas of 6 parts of the intestines from the duodenum to the colon. The mRNA expression of specific biomarkers (SGLT1, SGLT5, GIP, GLP, LAT1, LAT2, and NPC1L1) in the mucosa was compared among three patient groups: Inflammation, Tumor, and Control. Results Sixty-six patients participated in this study. Both routes of DBE were performed in 20 patients, in whom biopsy samples were obtained from the mucosa for all sections. There were no remarkable differences in the mRNA expression levels among the 3 groups. However, SGLT1, GIP, GLP, and NPC1L1 exhibited specific distribution patterns. The expression levels of GIP and NPC1L1 were highest in the upper jejunum, but were extremely low in the terminal ileum and colon. A comparison of the mRNA expression profile in each intestinal section revealed that the SGLT1 mRNA expression in the Tumor group and the GIP mRNA expression in the Inflammation group were significantly higher than the corresponding levels in the Control group in the upper jejunum. Conclusion The gastrointestinal mucosa of patients with small bowel diseases can maintain proper nutrient absorption, except in the upper jejunum. PMID:27522989

  17. Microbial Amyloids Induce Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 Responses via Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation in the Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Nishimori, Jessalyn H.; Newman, Tiffanny N.; Oppong, Gertrude O.; Rapsinski, Glenn J.; Yen, Jui-Hung; Biesecker, Steven G.; Wilson, R. Paul; Butler, Brian P.; Winter, Maria G.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Ganea, Doina

    2012-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)/TLR1 receptor complex responds to amyloid fibrils, a common component of biofilm material produced by members of the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. To determine whether this TLR2/TLR1 ligand stimulates inflammatory responses when bacteria enter intestinal tissue, we investigated whether expression of curli amyloid fibrils by the invasive enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium contributes to T helper 1 and T helper 17 responses by measuring cytokine production in the mouse colitis model. A csgBA mutant, deficient in curli production, elicited decreased expression of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 in the cecal mucosa compared to the S. Typhimurium wild type. In TLR2-deficient mice, IL-17A and IL-22 expression was blunted during S. Typhimurium infection, suggesting that activation of the TLR2 signaling pathway contributes to the expression of these cytokines. T cells incubated with supernatants from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with curli fibrils released IL-17A in a TLR2-dependent manner in vitro. Lower levels of IL-6 and IL-23 production were detected in the supernatants of the TLR2-deficient BMDCs treated with curli fibrils. Consistent with this, three distinct T-cell populations—CD4+ T helper cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, and γδ T cells—produced IL-17A in response to curli fibrils in the intestinal mucosa during S. Typhimurium infection. Notably, decreased IL-6 expression by the dendritic cells and decreased IL-23 expression by the dendritic cells and macrophages were observed in the cecal mucosa of mice infected with the curli mutant. We conclude that TLR2 recognition of bacterial amyloid fibrils in the intestinal mucosa represents a novel mechanism of immunoregulation, which contributes to the generation of inflammatory responses, including production of IL-17A and IL-22, in response to bacterial entry into the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23027540

  18. Secreted adhesion molecules of Strongyloides venezuelensis are produced by oesophageal glands and are components of the wall of tunnels constructed by adult worms in the host intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, H; El-Malky, M; Kumagai, T; Ohta, N

    2003-02-01

    The parasitic female of Strongyloides venezuelensis keeps invading the epithelial layer of the host intestinal mucosa. Upon invasion, it adheres to the surface of the intestinal epithelial cells with adhesion molecules secreted from the mouth. It has been demonstrated that S. venezuelensis are expelled from the intestine because mucosal mast cells inhibit the attachment of adult worms to the mucosal surface. In the present study, we generated specific antibodies against secreted adhesion molecules to investigate their function in vivo, because these molecules have been demonstrated only in vitro in spite of the importance in the infection processes. A mouse monoclonal antibody specific to S. venezuelensis adhesion molecules inhibited the attachment of adult worms to plastic dishes and the binding of adhesion molecules to rat intestinal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemical study revealed that adhesion molecules were produced by oesophageal glands and were continuously secreted in vivo to line the wall of the tunnels formed by adult worms in the intestinal mucosa. Our findings indicate that adhesion molecules play essential roles in the infection processes of S. venezuelensis in the host intestine. PMID:12636354

  19. Propionate Ameliorates Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis by Improving Intestinal Barrier Function and Reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling-Chang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Liu, Wei-Ye; Sun, Sheng; Li, Ling; Su, Ding-Feng; Zhang, Li-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Propionate is a short chain fatty acid that is abundant as butyrate in the gut and blood. However, propionate has not been studied as extensively as butyrate in the treatment of colitis. The present study was to investigate the effects of sodium propionate on intestinal barrier function, inflammation and oxidative stress in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice. Animals in DSS group received drinking water from 1 to 6 days and DSS [3% (w/v) dissolved in double distilled water] instead of drinking water from 7 to 14 days. Animals in DSS+propionate (DSS+Prop) group were given 1% sodium propionate for 14 consecutive days and supplemented with 3% DSS solution on day 7-14. Intestinal barrier function, proinflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in the colon were determined. It was found that sodium propionate ameliorated body weight loss, colon-length shortening and colonic damage in colitis mice. Sodium propionate significantly inhibited the increase of FITC-dextran in serum and the decrease of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin expression in the colonic tissue. It also inhibited the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and phosphorylation of STAT3 in colitis mice markedly, reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level, and increased the superoxide dismutase and catalase level in colon and serum compared with DSS group. Sodium propionate inhibited macrophages with CD68 marker infiltration into the colonic mucosa of colitis mice. These results suggest that oral administration of sodium propionate could ameliorate DSS-induced colitis mainly by improving intestinal barrier function and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via the STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27574508

  20. Propionate Ameliorates Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis by Improving Intestinal Barrier Function and Reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ling-chang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhi-bin; Liu, Wei-ye; Sun, Sheng; Li, Ling; Su, Ding-feng; Zhang, Li-chao

    2016-01-01

    Propionate is a short chain fatty acid that is abundant as butyrate in the gut and blood. However, propionate has not been studied as extensively as butyrate in the treatment of colitis. The present study was to investigate the effects of sodium propionate on intestinal barrier function, inflammation and oxidative stress in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice. Animals in DSS group received drinking water from 1 to 6 days and DSS [3% (w/v) dissolved in double distilled water] instead of drinking water from 7 to 14 days. Animals in DSS+propionate (DSS+Prop) group were given 1% sodium propionate for 14 consecutive days and supplemented with 3% DSS solution on day 7–14. Intestinal barrier function, proinflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in the colon were determined. It was found that sodium propionate ameliorated body weight loss, colon-length shortening and colonic damage in colitis mice. Sodium propionate significantly inhibited the increase of FITC-dextran in serum and the decrease of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin expression in the colonic tissue. It also inhibited the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and phosphorylation of STAT3 in colitis mice markedly, reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level, and increased the superoxide dismutase and catalase level in colon and serum compared with DSS group. Sodium propionate inhibited macrophages with CD68 marker infiltration into the colonic mucosa of colitis mice. These results suggest that oral administration of sodium propionate could ameliorate DSS-induced colitis mainly by improving intestinal barrier function and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via the STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27574508

  1. Preventive oral supplementation with glutamine and arginine has beneficial effects on the intestinal mucosa and inflammatory cytokines in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Cui; He, Liuqin

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with a combination of arginine and glutamine on the intestinal mucosa and inflammatory cytokines of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced adult rats. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats (average weight of 185 ± 15 g) were randomly divided into five groups: control group A (CA) and control group B (CB), both orally supplemented with 0.9% saline; group Arg, supplemented with 300 mg/kg day(-1) arginine; group Gln, supplemented with 300 mg/kg day(-1) glutamine; group AG, supplemented with 150 mg/kg day(-1) arginine and 150 mg/kg day(-1) glutamine. The experiment lasted for 2 weeks. Food intake and body weight were measured during the experiment. At 10.00 h of day 15, animals were injected with 4 mg/kg LPS (group CB, Arg, Gln, and AG) or sterile saline (group CA) after supplementation. Then at 14.00 h, all animals were killed and blood and tissue collected. The results showed that compared with group CB, arginine concentration tended to be increased (P > 0.05) in group Arg and AG, while there was no significant difference in glutamine concentration among the groups challenged with LPS. Oral supplementation with arginine or/and glutamine mitigated morphology impairment (lower villus height, P < 0.05) in the jejunum and ileum induced by LPS challenge. LPS administration resulted in a significant increase in TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA abundance. Arginine only significantly decreased TNF-α mRNA abundance in the ileum, while glutamine significantly decreased both TNF-α and IL-10 mRNA in the ileum. A combination of arginine and glutamine significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA abundance in both the jejunum and ileum, while they also significantly decreased anti-inflammatory IL-10 in the ileum. These results revealed that an oral supply of combined arginine and glutamine had more favorable effects on the intestinal mucosa and inflammatory cytokines than a supply of arginine or glutamine alone.

  2. Intestinal mucosa permeability following oral insulin delivery using core shell corona nanolipoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuying; Guo, Shiyan; Zhu, Chunliu; Zhu, Quanlei; Gan, Yong; Rantanen, Jukka; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2013-12-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (NC) have excellent capacity for protein entrapment, favorable epithelial permeability, and are regarded as promising nanocarriers for oral protein delivery. Herein, we designed and evaluated a class of core shell corona nanolipoparticles (CSC) to further improve the absorption through enhanced intestinal mucus penetration. CSC contains chitosan nanoparticles as a core component and pluronic F127-lipid vesicles as a shell with hydrophilic chain and polyethylene oxide PEO as a corona. These particles were developed by hydration of a dry pluronic F127-lipid film with NC suspensions followed by extrusion. Insulin nested inside CSC was well protected from enzymatic degradation. Compared with NC, CSC exhibited significantly higher efficiency of mucosal penetration and, consequently, higher cellular internalization of insulin in mucus secreting E12 cells. The cellular level of insulin after CSC treatment was 36-fold higher compared to treatment with free insulin, and 10-fold higher compared to NC. CSC significantly facilitated the permeation of insulin across the ileum epithelia, as demonstrated in an ex vivo study and an in vivo absorption study. CSC pharmacological studies in diabetic rats showed that the hypoglycemic effects of orally administrated CSC were 2.5-fold higher compared to NC. In conclusion, CSC is a promising oral protein delivery system to enhance the stability, intestinal mucosal permeability, and oral absorption of insulin.

  3. Probiotics modify human intestinal mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Wu, Wen; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-10-01

    Studies using animal models have demonstrated that probiotics may have a beneficial role in the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects of interventional probiotic treatment on gut microbiota has remained elusive. In the present study, pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes was conducted in order to determine the extent to which probiotics alter the microbiota. The observations of the present study indicated that the microbial structure of cancerous tissue differed significantly from that of healthy individuals and that the CRC microbiota exhibited lower diversity. It was indicated that interventional treatment with probiotics increased the density and diversity of mucosal microbes, and altered the mucosa‑associated microbiota. Pyrosequencing demonstrated that probiotics significantly reduced (5‑fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to the genus Fusobacterium, which had been previously suggested to be a contributing factor to increase tumorigenesis. Accordingly, interventional probiotic therapy is suggested to be able to improve the composition of the mucosal microbial flora and significantly reduce the abundance of mucosa-associated pathogens in patients with CRC.

  4. Increased intestinal barrier function in the small intestine of formula-fed neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Huygelen, V; De Vos, M; Willemen, S; Tambuyzer, B; Casteleyn, C; Knapen, D; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2012-12-01

    Within-litter birth weight variation is adversely correlated to piglet survival and postnatal growth. A less efficient epithelial barrier function in light piglets may partly explain this inverse relationship between birth weight and zootechnical performance. A compromised epithelial barrier increases paracellular permeability; consequently, toxins, allergenic compounds, or bacteria may enter systemic circulation and induce inflammatory responses. Dietary effects on function of gut epithelium of piglet are largely unknown. This study investigated epithelial barrier function of the small intestine of normal birth weight (NBW) piglets (1.46 ± 0.10 kg) and low birth weight (LBW) piglets (<1 kg at birth) in relation to their diet. Sixteen pairs of 3-d-old LBW and NBW piglets were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a sow-fed control group euthanized at day 3 of age (SOW3), piglets sow fed until day 10 (SOW10), and formula-fed piglets fed formula from day 3 until day 10 (FOR10). To measure gut permeability, piglets were dosed intragastrically with 0.75 g lactulose/kg BW and 0.3 g mannitol/kg BW 4 h before euthanasia. Urinary sugar excretion was measured using enzymatic spectrophotometry. Irrespective of birth weight, lactulose levels of FOR10 (4.4 ± 2.3 mmol/L) tended to be lower (P = 0.07) than SOW10 (26.4 ± 10.2 mmol/L) indicating a reduced paracellular intestinal permeability in FOR10. This reduction was associated with a 6-fold elevated (P < 0.01) protein expression of occludin, an important tight junction protein, in FOR10 compared to SOW10. Mannitol levels in FOR10 (31.0 ± 18.2 mmol/L) did not differ (P = 0.28) from SOW10 (61.1 ± 10.2 mmol/L). However, shorter villi (P < 0.01) in FOR10 indicated a reduced absorptive capacity. In conclusion, formula feeding caused minor symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction compared to sow-fed piglets irrespective of their birth weight.

  5. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects the intestinal mucosal barrier following peritoneal air exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Peichen; Chen, Xiaoxi; Yan, Jingyi; Yao, Jiangao; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1), which is one of the main ingredients derived from Panax ginseng, has been widely used to treat various gastrointestinal disorders. The present study aimed to determine whether GRb1 was able to prevent intestinal mucosal barrier damage in rats following peritoneal air exposure for 3 h. GRb1 (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) was orally administrated via gavage four times prior to and following surgery. Blood and terminal ileum were sampled 24 h following surgery. Levels of serum D-lactate (D-LA) were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Intestinal permeability was assessed by determining the intestinal clearance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD4). Activity of intestinal myeloperoxidase was measured to assess intestinal inflammation, and intestinal histopathology was assessed by light microscopy. The results showed that GRb1 reduced the level of serum D-LA, intestinal clearance of FD4, and the activity of intestinal myeloperoxidase. Intestinal edema and inflammation were also ameliorated by GRb1, and the Chiu's scores employed for assessing intestinal mucosal damage were also reduced in the GRb1-treated peritoneal air exposure group. In addition, GRb1 induced a significant difference at 10 and 20 mg/kg, indicating a dose-dependent effect. The results of the present study suggest that GRb1 may be able to protect the intestinal mucosal barrier against damage induced by peritoneal air exposure, which may be associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27703510

  6. Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-beta-carotene to retinal by a cytosolic enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, M R; Mychkovsky, I; Attlesey, M

    1989-01-01

    Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-beta-carotene to retinal by a partially purified enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa was demonstrated. The enzymatic product was characterized based on the following evidence: (i) The product gave rise to its O-ethyloxime by treatment with O-ethylhydroxylamine with an absorption maximum at 363 nm in ethanol characteristic of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of this derivative yielded a sharp peak with a retention time of 7.99 min corresponding to the authentic compound. The enzyme blank and boiled enzyme blank failed to show any significant HPLC peaks corresponding to retinal O-ethyloxime, retinal, or retinol. (ii) The mass spectrum of the O-ethyloxime of the enzymatic product was identical to that of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime (m/z 327: 45%, M+. and m/z 282: 100%, M--ethoxy). (iii) The specific activity of the enzymatically formed [14C]retinal O-ethyloxime remained constant even after repeated crystallization. (iv) The enzymatic product exhibited an absorption maximum at 370 nm in light petroleum characteristic of authentic retinal. Furthermore, it was reduced by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase to retinol with an absorption maximum at 326 nm in light petroleum. This retinol was enzymatically esterified to retinyl palmitate by rat pancreatic esterase with a retention time of 10 min on HPLC corresponding to authentic retinyl palmitate. Thus, the enzymatic product of beta-carotene cleavage by the partially purified intestinal enzyme was unequivocally confirmed to be retinal. PMID:2594754

  7. Development of a Multicellular Three-dimensional Organotypic Model of the Human Intestinal Mucosa Grown Under Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Fasano, Alessio; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2016-01-01

    Because cells growing in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment have the potential to bridge many gaps of cell cultivation in 2-D environments (e.g., flasks or dishes). In fact, it is widely recognized that cells grown in flasks or dishes tend to de-differentiate and lose specialized features of the tissues from which they were derived. Currently, there are mainly two types of 3-D culture systems where the cells are seeded into scaffolds mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM): (a) static models and (b) models using bioreactors. The first breakthrough was the static 3-D models. 3-D models using bioreactors such as the rotating-wall-vessel (RWV) bioreactors are a more recent development. The original concept of the RWV bioreactors was developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center in the early 1990s and is believed to overcome the limitations of static models such as the development of hypoxic, necrotic cores. The RWV bioreactors might circumvent this problem by providing fluid dynamics that allow the efficient diffusion of nutrients and oxygen. These bioreactors consist of a rotator base that serves to support and rotate two different formats of culture vessels that differ by their aeration source type: (1) Slow Turning Lateral Vessels (STLVs) with a co-axial oxygenator in the center, or (2) High Aspect Ratio Vessels (HARVs) with oxygenation via a flat, silicone rubber gas transfer membrane. These vessels allow efficient gas transfer while avoiding bubble formation and consequent turbulence. These conditions result in laminar flow and minimal shear force that models reduced gravity (microgravity) inside the culture vessel. Here we describe the development of a multicellular 3-D organotypic model of the human intestinal mucosa composed of an intestinal epithelial cell line and primary human lymphocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts cultured under microgravity provided by the RWV bioreactor. PMID:27500889

  8. Monoclonal antibody to alkaline phosphatase from the intestinal mucosa of the harp seal, Phoca groenlandica.

    PubMed

    Sakharov IYu; Mechetner, E B; Stepanova, I E; Shekhonin, B V; Pletjushkina OYu

    1992-04-01

    1. Hybridoma secreting a monoclonal antibody APP.1 to the harp seal alkaline phosphatase (A1Ph) was obtained by fusing murine myeloma Sp 2/0 cells with the splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with purified isozyme K. 2. The antibody has no effect on the enzyme activity and shows a high affinity for harp seal A1Ph (KD = 8.5 x 10(-10) M). The antibody has similar affinities for the AlPh of harp seal, fur seal, common seal and deer. 3. The antibody APP.1 was coupled to Sepharose and employed in chromatographic purification of the harp seal intestinal AlPh. Alkaline phosphatase isolated on this immunosorbent has a spec. act. of 20,800 units per mg of protein. 4. The antibody-enzyme complex gives an excellent immunocytochemical labeling of tissue sections, cell cultures and smears.

  9. Effect of hyperglycaemia on sugar transport in the isolated mucosa of guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, E; Lauterbach, F

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hyperglycaemia on sugar transport was studied by comparing transepithelial permeation and tissue content of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3-O-MG), beta-methyl-D-glucoside (beta-MDG) and D-glucose in isolated mucosae of guinea-pig jejunum mounted in a flux chamber. Sugars were administered either to the luminal or the blood side of mucosae prepared either from normal animals or those maintained in a hyperglycaemic state by I.V. glucose infusion for 12 h. In control animals, absorptive sugar fluxes increased in the order glucose greater than beta-MDG greater than 3-O-MG. Only beta-MDG was accumulated in the tissue beyond the medium concentration. Permeation of 3-O-MG and beta-MDG in the direction blood-to-lumen was mainly paracellular as indicated by the strict correlation with the simultaneous permeation of polyethylene glycol (mol. wt. 900). Luminal addition of 10(-3) M-phlorhizin increased permeation and decreased tissue content of beta-MDG and D-glucose when administered on the blood side, suggesting that these sugars are recaptured at the brush border even from vigorously mixed solutions. For flux coefficient calculation the preparation was regarded as a three-compartment system. With all three sugars, the influx coefficient was higher at the luminal, but lower at the basolateral membrane than the corresponding efflux coefficient. 3-O-MG displayed the highest basolateral influx coefficient of all three sugars, being even higher than its luminal influx coefficient. The luminal influx coefficient of beta-MDG was 22 times greater, and its basolateral efflux coefficient 2.5 times less than the corresponding values for 3-O-MG, resulting in cellular beta-MDG accumulation. D-Glucose was suited best for transepithelial transport, having a luminal influx coefficient only 1.6 times less, and a basolateral efflux coefficient almost 10 times greater than those for beta-MDG. Prolonged hyperglycaemia increased the lumen-to-blood permeation of all three sugars 1.3-2-fold

  10. Neurokinin A increases short-circuit current across rat colonic mucosa: a role for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Tien, X Y; Wallace, L J; Kachur, J F; Won-Kim, S; Gaginella, T S

    1991-01-01

    1. Neurokinin A (NKA) is a mammalian tachykinin distributed principally in the nervous system, including the myenteric innervation of the gut. 2. NKA may be involved in neurogenic inflammation and as a modulatory factor in the diarrhoea associated with mucosal inflammation of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis). 3. We evaluated the effect of NKA on the short-circuit current ISC, assumed to reflect electrogenic chloride secretion, across muscle-stripped rat colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. 4. Serosal addition of NKA produced a concentration-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in ISC with an EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) value of 7.5 nM. The maximum (mean +/- S.E.M.) increase in ISC (microA/cm2) for NKA was 111 +/- 10. 5. Tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM) and bumetanide (10 microM), but not atropine (1.0 microM), hexamethonium (100 microM) or pyrilamine (10 microM), significantly inhibited NKA-induced increases in ISC. 6. The response to NKA was attenuated by 45 min pre-treatment with antisera raised against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Moreover, prior desensitization to VIP attenuated the effect of NKA. 7. These studies suggest that NKA increases ISC in rat colon, in part, through a non-cholinergic neural mechanism involving VIP. PMID:1653854

  11. WISP1 Is Increased in Intestinal Mucosa and Contributes to Inflammatory Cascades in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Xiaoyu; Yu, Yanan; Liang, Kun; Shan, Xinzhi; Zhao, Kun; Niu, Qinghui; Tian, Zibin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is mainly characterized by intestinal tissue damage, which is caused by excessive autoimmune responses poorly controlled by corresponding regulatory mechanisms. WISP1, which belongs to the CCN protein family, is a secreted matricellular protein regulating several inflammatory pathways, such as Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and has been reported in several diseases including cancer. Here we examined the expression, regulatory mechanisms, and functions of WISP1 in IBD. WISP1 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated in colonic biopsies and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of IBD patients compared with those of healthy controls. Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α induced WISP1 expression in LPMC from healthy controls. Consistently, WISP1 mRNA expression was downregulated in colonic biopsies from IBD patients who had achieved clinical remission with infliximab (IFX). Furthermore, WISP1 expression was also found to be increased in colons from 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced mice compared with those from control mice. Further studies confirmed that administration of rWISP1 could aggravate TNBS-induced colitis in vivo. Therefore, we concluded that WISP1 is increased in IBD and contributes to the proinflammatory cascades in the gut. PMID:27403031

  12. Element concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the mouse as measured by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    von Zglinicki, T; Roomans, G M

    1989-06-01

    Subcellular ion distribution in villus, crypt, Paneth and smooth muscle cells of the mouse small intestine under resting conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin cryosections. In addition, the mass distribution was estimated by measuring the optical transmission of the compartments in transmission electron micrographs. Each cell type is characterized by a special composition in terms of the major monovalent ions Na, K, and Cl. In particular, among crypt epithelial cells, those cells containing small secretion granula (termed crypt A cells) also display cytoplasmic ion concentrations significantly different from crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula (crypt B cells). Monovalent ion concentrations in the cytoplasm of Paneth cells, muscle cells, and crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula are higher than expected from osmotic considerations. Hence, significant binding of ions to cytoplasmic polyelectrolytes is assumed in these cells. There are gradients of dry mass and K concentration from the luminal to the basal side of the cell, both in crypt and in villus cells. The terminal web in these cells is rich in Na and Cl. The elemental composition of the large, dark secretion granula in Paneth cells is similar to that of the small dark granula in crypt cells. However, the two morphologically different types of granula within the Paneth cells have a significantly different elemental composition, which might reflect maturation of secretion granula.

  13. Impact of Toxoplasma gondii on Dendritic Cell Subset Function in the Intestinal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sara B; Denkers, Eric Y

    2015-09-15

    The function of mucosal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in immunity and inflammation is not well understood. In this study, we define four DC subsets present within the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node compartments based on expression of CD103 and CD11b. Using IL-12p40 YFP (Yet40) reporter mice, we show that CD103(+)CD11b(-) mucosal DCs are primary in vivo sources of IL-12p40; we also identified CD103(-)CD11b(-) mucosal DCs as a novel population producing this cytokine. Infection was preferentially found in CD11b(+) DCs that were negative for CD103. Lamina propria DCs containing parasites were negative for IL-12p40. Instead, production of the cytokine was strictly a property of noninfected cells. We also show that vitamin A metabolism, as measured by ALDH activity, was preferentially found in CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC and was strongly downregulated in all mucosal DC subsets during infection. Finally, overall apoptosis of lamina propria DC subsets was increased during infection. Combined, these results highlight the ability of intestinal Toxoplasma infection to alter mucosal DC activity at both the whole population level and at the level of individual subsets. PMID:26283477

  14. Element concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the mouse as measured by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    von Zglinicki, T; Roomans, G M

    1989-06-01

    Subcellular ion distribution in villus, crypt, Paneth and smooth muscle cells of the mouse small intestine under resting conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin cryosections. In addition, the mass distribution was estimated by measuring the optical transmission of the compartments in transmission electron micrographs. Each cell type is characterized by a special composition in terms of the major monovalent ions Na, K, and Cl. In particular, among crypt epithelial cells, those cells containing small secretion granula (termed crypt A cells) also display cytoplasmic ion concentrations significantly different from crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula (crypt B cells). Monovalent ion concentrations in the cytoplasm of Paneth cells, muscle cells, and crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula are higher than expected from osmotic considerations. Hence, significant binding of ions to cytoplasmic polyelectrolytes is assumed in these cells. There are gradients of dry mass and K concentration from the luminal to the basal side of the cell, both in crypt and in villus cells. The terminal web in these cells is rich in Na and Cl. The elemental composition of the large, dark secretion granula in Paneth cells is similar to that of the small dark granula in crypt cells. However, the two morphologically different types of granula within the Paneth cells have a significantly different elemental composition, which might reflect maturation of secretion granula. PMID:2814397

  15. Is intestinal inflammation linking dysbiosis to gut barrier dysfunction during liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the intestinal microbiota composition contribute to the pathogenesis of many disorders including gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of the “gut-liver” axis. Dietary changes, other environmental and genetic factors can lead to alterations in the microbiota. Dysbiosis can further disrupt the integrity of the intestinal barrier leading to pathological bacterial translocation and the initiation of an inflammatory response in the liver. In this article, the authors dissect the different steps involved in disease pathogenesis to further refine approaches for the medical management of liver diseases. The authors will specifically discuss the role of dysbiosis in inducing intestinal inflammation and increasing intestinal permeability. PMID:26088524

  16. Mice lacking myosin IXb, an inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility gene, have impaired intestinal barrier function and superficial ulceration in the ileum.

    PubMed

    Hegan, Peter S; Chandhoke, Surjit K; Barone, Christina; Egan, Marie; Bähler, Martin; Mooseker, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Genetic studies have implicated MYO9B, which encodes myosin IXb (Myo9b), a motor protein with a Rho GTPase activating domain (RhoGAP), as a susceptibility gene for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Moreover, we have recently shown that knockdown of Myo9b in an intestinal epithelial cell line impairs wound healing and barrier function. Here, we investigated whether mice lacking Myo9b have impaired intestinal barrier function and features of IBD. Myo9b knock out (KO) mice exhibit impaired weight gain and fecal occult blood (indicator of gastrointestinal bleeding), and increased intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis could be detected along the entire intestinal axis. Histologic analysis revealed intestinal mucosal damage, most consistently observed in the ileum, which included superficial ulceration and neutrophil infiltration. Focal lesions contained neutrophils and ultrastructural examination confirmed epithelial discontinuity and the deposition of extracellular matrix. We also observed impaired mucosal barrier function in KO mice. Transepithelial electrical resistance of KO ileum is >3 fold less than WT ileum. The intestinal mucosa is also permeable to high molecular weight dextran, presumably due to the presence of mucosal surface ulcerations. There is loss of tight junction-associated ZO-1, decreased lateral membrane associated E-cadherin, and loss of terminal web associated cytokeratin filaments. Consistent with increased Rho activity in the KO, there is increased subapical expression of activated myosin II (Myo2) based on localization of phosphorylated Myo2 regulatory light chain. Except for a delay in disease onset in the KO, no difference in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and lethality was observed between wild-type and Myo9b KO mice.

  17. The difference in sensitivity to cardiac steriods of (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and amino acid transport in the intestinal mucosa of the rat and other species

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. W. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of various cardioactive steroids on the activity of a microsomal (Na+ + K+)-activated ATPase from rat intestinal mucosa has been studied and compared with their effects on L-phenylalanine and D-galactose transport by rings of rat intestine in vitro. A similar comparison between the sensitivities to ouabain of microsomal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and of phenylalanine transport in the intestines of the mouse, guinea-pig and toad has been made. 2. The rat intestinal enzyme is 50% inhibited by a concentration of 1 × 10-4M ouabain, 1 × 10-5M scillaren A and 4 × 10-6M scilliroside. At concentrations which almost completely inhibit the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity, these steroids have no effect on the transport of phenylalanine or galactose by the rat intestine. Only at concentrations of 1 × 10-3M are scillaren A and scilliroside able to reduce phenylalanine accumulation significantly, the same concentration of ouabain being effective only in the absence of external potassium ions. Digitoxin, 1 × 10-4M, a comparatively apolar glycoside, had no action on phenylalanine transport in the rat intestine. 3. The effect of ouabain on the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and phenylalanine transport system in the mouse intestine is completely analogous to its effect on these parameters in the rat. 4. A half-maximal inhibition of guinea-pig intestinal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase by ouabain occurs at an inhibitor concentration of 2 × 10-6M, but phenylalanine transport by this tissue is only half-maximally reduced at a concentration of 3 × 10-5M. Similarly, in the rabbit intestine, there appears to be a difference of an order of magnitude between the sensitivities of the two parameters. 5. In the toad, 50% inhibition of the enzymic activity is observed at a concentration of 3 × 10-5M ouabain, whereas a concentration of 8 × 10-4M is required to reduce phenylalanine accumulation by one half. 6. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that an (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase is not the only

  18. Hydrolyzed porcine mucosa in broiler diets: effects on growth performance, nutrient retention, and histomorphology of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Frikha, M; Mohiti-Asli, M; Chetrit, C; Mateos, G G

    2014-02-01

    The effect of including hydrolyzed porcine mucosa sprayed into soybean meal (HPM) in the diet was studied in broilers. In experiment 1 (pen study), 1,080 one-day-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 8 treatments arranged as a 4 × 2 factorial with 4 levels of HPM (0, 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5%) and 2 levels of Lys (1.23 and 1.38%). From d 1 to 22, HPM inclusion quadratically improved BW gain (BWG, P < 0.01) and feed conversion ratio (FCR, P < 0.01). From d 1 to 8, birds fed 1.38% Lys had higher BWG (P < 0.05) and better FCR (P < 0.05) than birds fed 1.23% Lys but only a trend (P < 0.08) for improved BWG was detected from d 1 to 22. From d 22 to 37, a period in which all birds received a common finisher diet, growth performance was not affected by the previous starter diet. In experiment 2 (battery study), birds were fed for 37 d the same diets used in the starter period of experiment 1. Broilers fed HPM had higher BWG (linear, P < 0.05; Quadratic, P < 0.05) than birds fed control diet, and birds fed 1.38% Lys had higher BWG (P < 0.01) than birds fed 1.23% Lys. From d 1 to 22, BWG (P < 0.05) and ADFI (P < 0.01) increased quadratically and FCR improved linearly (P < 0.05) with HPM inclusion. Also in this period, BWG was higher at the higher Lys level (P < 0.01). Diet did not affect intestinal histomorphology of broilers on d 8 or nutrient retention on d 22. We conclude that the inclusion of 2.5 to 5% HPM in the diet improved growth performance of broilers from d 1 to 22. An increase in Lys from 1.23 to 1.38% improved growth performance up to 15 d of age, but not thereafter. Diet did not affect villus histomorphology or nutrient retention of the small intestine.

  19. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:8575807

  20. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities.

  1. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  2. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  3. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  4. Nivalenol Has a Greater Impact than Deoxynivalenol on Pig Jejunum Mucosa in Vitro on Explants and in Vivo on Intestinal Loops

    PubMed Central

    Cheat, Sophal; Gerez, Juliana R.; Cognié, Juliette; Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. L.; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Kolf-Clauw, Martine

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV), worldwide cereal contaminants, raise concerns for animal and human gut health, following contaminated food or feed ingestion. The impact of DON and NIV on intestinal mucosa was investigated after acute exposure, in vitro and in vivo. The histological changes induced by DON and NIV were analyzed after four-hour exposure on pig jejunum explants and loops, two alternative models. On explants, dose-dependent increases in the histological changes were induced by DON and NIV, with a two-fold increase in lesion severity at 10 µM NIV. On loops, NIV had a greater impact on the mucosa than DON. The overall proliferative cells showed 30% and 13% decrease after NIV and DON exposure, respectively, and NIV increased the proliferative index of crypt enterocytes. NIV also increased apoptosis at the top of villi and reduced by almost half the proliferative/apoptotic cell ratio. Lamina propria cells (mainly immune cells) were more sensitive than enterocytes (epithelial cells) to apoptosis induced by NIV. Our results demonstrate a greater impact of NIV than DON on the intestinal mucosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and highlight the need of a specific hazard characterization for NIV risk assessment. PMID:26035490

  5. Nivalenol has a greater impact than deoxynivalenol on pig jejunum mucosa in vitro on explants and in vivo on intestinal loops.

    PubMed

    Cheat, Sophal; Gerez, Juliana R; Cognié, Juliette; Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Bracarense, Ana Paula F L; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Oswald, Isabelle P; Kolf-Clauw, Martine

    2015-05-29

    The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV), worldwide cereal contaminants, raise concerns for animal and human gut health, following contaminated food or feed ingestion. The impact of DON and NIV on intestinal mucosa was investigated after acute exposure, in vitro and in vivo. The histological changes induced by DON and NIV were analyzed after four-hour exposure on pig jejunum explants and loops, two alternative models. On explants, dose-dependent increases in the histological changes were induced by DON and NIV, with a two-fold increase in lesion severity at 10 µM NIV. On loops, NIV had a greater impact on the mucosa than DON. The overall proliferative cells showed 30% and 13% decrease after NIV and DON exposure, respectively, and NIV increased the proliferative index of crypt enterocytes. NIV also increased apoptosis at the top of villi and reduced by almost half the proliferative/apoptotic cell ratio. Lamina propria cells (mainly immune cells) were more sensitive than enterocytes (epithelial cells) to apoptosis induced by NIV. Our results demonstrate a greater impact of NIV than DON on the intestinal mucosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and highlight the need of a specific hazard characterization for NIV risk assessment.

  6. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  7. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2009-05-15

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  8. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E.; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2009-05-15

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  9. IL-9 regulates intestinal barrier function in experimental T cell-mediated colitis.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Katharina; McKenzie, Andrew N; Neurath, Markus F; Weigmann, Benno

    2015-01-01

    As previous studies suggested that IL-9 may control intestinal barrier function, we tested the role of IL-9 in experimental T cell-mediated colitis induced by the hapten reagent 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The deficiency of IL-9 suppressed TNBS-induced colitis and led to lower numbers of PU.1 expressing T cells in the lamia propria, suggesting a regulatory role for Th9 cells in the experimental TNBS colitis model. Since IL-9 is known to functionally alter intestinal barrier function in colonic inflammation, we assessed the expression of tight junction molecules in intestinal epithelial cells of TNBS-inflamed mice. Therefore we made real-time PCR analyses for tight junction molecules in the inflamed colon from wild-type and IL-9 KO mice, immunofluorescent stainings and investigated the expression of junctional proteins directly in intestinal epithelial cells of TNBS-inflamed mice by Western blot studies. The results demonstrated that sealing proteins like occludin were up regulated in the colon of inflamed IL-9 KO mice. In contrast, the tight junction protein Claudin1 showed lower expression levels when IL-9 is absent. Surprisingly, the pore-forming molecule Claudin2 revealed equal expression in TNBS-treated wild-type and IL-9-deficient animals. These results illustrate the pleiotropic functions of IL-9 in changing intestinal permeability in experimental colitis. Thus, modulation of IL-9 function emerges as a new approach for regulating barrier function in intestinal inflammation.

  10. Yersinia enterocolitica Affects Intestinal Barrier Function in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hering, Nina A; Fromm, Anja; Kikhney, Judith; Lee, In-Fah M; Moter, Annette; Schulzke, Jörg D; Bücker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica causes acute diarrhea in early childhood. A mouse infection model presents new findings on pathological mechanisms in the colon. Symptoms involve diarrhea with watery feces and weight loss that have their functional correlates in decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein permeability. Y. enterocolitica was present within the murine mucosa of both ileum and colon. Here, the bacterial insult was of focal nature and led to changes in tight junction protein expression and architecture. These findings are in concordance with observations from former cell culture studies and suggest a leak flux mechanism of diarrhea.

  11. Identification of the major regenerative III protein (RegIII) in the porcine intestinal mucosa as RegIIIγ, not RegIIIα.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; Miller, I; Nöbauer, K; Carpentier, S; Niewold, T

    2015-09-15

    During the last years, an antimicrobial protein from the RegIII family has been consistently identified as one of the main up-regulated mRNA transcripts in the pig small intestinal mucosa during different infections such as enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). This transcript has been mainly referred to in the literature as pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP/RegIIIα). However, the identity of this transcript has not been confirmed, and no evidence of its expression at the protein level is available in the literature, because the absence of a specific antibody. In this study, we first unequivocally identified the PAP/RegIII family protein mainly expressed in ETEC infected pig intestine as RegIIIγ by 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF. This shows that the pig differs from species like human and mice in that RegIIIγ (and not RegIIIα) might be the major RegIII isotype during intestinal infection. Immunoblotting analysis with a specifically generated polyclonal rabbit antibody revealed that pig RegIIIγ is expressed throughout the intestinal tract, but most abundantly in the ileum. Although a higher abundance of mRNA was paralleled by higher protein abundance, a lack of linear relationship was found between RegIIIγ mRNA and protein abundances in the jejunal mucosa, the latter most pronounced in the case of natural infection. This may be related to the secretory nature of RegIIIγ. This would mean that the antimicrobial protein RegIIIγ is a good candidate as a non-invasive faecal intestinal health biomarker in swine. PMID:26187439

  12. Net replication of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Choleraesuis in porcine intestinal mucosa and nodes is associated with their differential virulence.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Susan M; Jagannathan, Aparna; Campbell, June; Wallis, Timothy S; Stevens, Mark P

    2007-08-01

    Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen of worldwide importance and causes a spectrum of diseases depending on serovar- and host-specific factors. Oral infection of pigs with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 4/74 produces acute enteritis but is rarely fatal, whereas serovar Choleraesuis strain A50 causes systemic disease with a high mortality rate. With a porcine ligated ileal loop model, we observed that systemic virulence of serovar Choleraesuis A50 is not associated with enhanced intestinal invasion, secretory responses, or neutrophil recruitment compared to serovar Typhimurium 4/74. The net growth in vivo of serovar Choleraesuis A50 and serovar Typhimurium 4/74 was monitored following oral inoculation of pigs with strains harboring pHSG422, which exhibits temperature-sensitive replication. Analysis of plasmid partitioning revealed that the enteric virulence of serovar Typhimurium 4/74 relative to that of serovar Choleraesuis A50 is associated with rapid replication in the intestinal wall, whereas systemic virulence of serovar Choleraesuis A50 is associated with enhanced persistence in intestinal mesenteric lymph nodes. Faster replication of serovar Typhimurium, compared to that of serovar Choleraesuis, in the intestinal mucosa was associated with greater induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-18 as detected by reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of transcripts from infected mucosa. During replication in batch culture and porcine alveolar macrophages, transcription of genes encoding components of type III secretion systems 1 (sipC) and 2 (sseC) was observed to be significantly higher in serovar Typhimurium 4/74 than in serovar Choleraesuis A50, and this may contribute to the differences in epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation. The rapid induction of proinflammatory responses by strain 4/74 may explain why pigs confine serovar Typhimurium infection to the

  13. Effects of l-carnitine and/or maize distillers dried grains with solubles in diets of gestating and lactating sows on the intestinal barrier functions of their offspring.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bingdong; Nie, Shaoping; Meng, Qingwei; Qu, Zhe; Shan, Anshan; Chen, Zhihui

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of l-carnitine and/or maize distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) in diets of gestating and lactating sows on the intestinal barrier functions of their offspring. The experiment was designed as a 2×2 factorial with two dietary treatments (soyabean meal v. DDGS) and two l-carnitine levels (0 v. 100 mg/kg in gestating diets and 0 v. 200 mg/kg in lactating diets). Sows (Landrace×Large White) with an average parity of 4·2 with similar body weight were randomly assigned to four groups of thirty each. Dietary supplementation with l-carnitine increased the total superoxide dismutase activity but decreased the concentration of malondialdehyde of the jejunal mucosa in newborn piglets and weaning piglets on day 21. Dietary supplementation with l-carnitine decreased the concentrations of IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α in the jejunal mucosa of newborn piglets and decreased the concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α in the jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets on day 21. There was an interaction between dietary treatment and l-carnitine on the bacterial numbers of total eubacteria in the digesta of caecum in weaning piglets on day 21. Bacterial numbers of total eubacteria in weaning piglets on day 21 were significantly increased by l-carnitine only in soyabean meal diet, but there was no significant effect of l-carnitine in DDGS-based diet. Dietary supplementation with l-carnitine increased the bacterial numbers of Lactobacillus spp. and bifidobacteria spp. in the digesta of caecum in weaning piglets on day 21. Dietary supplementation with l-carnitine in sows affected the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin 1, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) in the jejunal mucosa of their offspring by increasing the expression of ZO-1 mRNA in the jejunal mucosa of newborn piglets, and by increasing the expression of ZO-1 and occludin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets on day 21. In conclusion, dietary

  14. Death following traumatic brain injury in Drosophila is associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Chtarbanova, Stanislava; Rimkus, Stacey A; Fischer, Julie A; Kaur, Gulpreet; Seppala, Jocelyn M; Swanson, Laura C; Zajac, Jocelyn E; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Unfavorable TBI outcomes result from primary mechanical injuries to the brain and ensuing secondary non-mechanical injuries that are not limited to the brain. Our genome-wide association study of Drosophila melanogaster revealed that the probability of death following TBI is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in tissue barrier function and glucose homeostasis. We found that TBI causes intestinal and blood–brain barrier dysfunction and that intestinal barrier dysfunction is highly correlated with the probability of death. Furthermore, we found that ingestion of glucose after a primary injury increases the probability of death through a secondary injury mechanism that exacerbates intestinal barrier dysfunction. Our results indicate that natural variation in the probability of death following TBI is due in part to genetic differences that affect intestinal barrier dysfunction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04790.001 PMID:25742603

  15. High-throughput sequencing reveals differing immune responses in the intestinal mucosa of two inbred lines afflicted with necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Truong, Anh Duc; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2015-08-15

    We investigated the necrotic enteritis (NE)-induced transcripts of immune-related genes in the intestinal mucosa of two highly inbred White Leghorn chicken lines, line 6.3 and line 7.2, which share the same MHC haplotype and show different levels of NE susceptibility using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. NE was induced by the previously described co-infection model using Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens. The RNA-Seq generated over 38 million sequence reads for Marek's disease (MD)-resistant line 6.3 and over 40 million reads for the MD-susceptible line 7.2. Alignment of these sequences with the Gallus gallus genome database revealed the expression of over 29,900 gene transcripts induced by NE in these two lines, among which 7,841 genes were significantly upregulated and 2,919 genes were downregulated in line 6.3 chickens and 6,043 genes were significantly upregulated and 2,764 genes were downregulated in NE-induced line 7.2 compared with their uninfected controls. Analysis of 560 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using the gene ontology database revealed annotations for 246 biological processes, 215 molecular functions, and 81 cellular components. Among the 53 cytokines and 96 cytokine receptors, 15 cytokines and 29 cytokine receptors were highly expressed in line 6.3, whereas the expression of 15 cytokines and 15 cytokine receptors was higher in line 7.2 than in line 6.3 (fold change ≥ 2, p<0.01). In a hierarchical cluster analysis of novel mRNAs, the novel mRNA transcriptome showed higher expression in line 6.3 than in line 7.2, which is consistent with the expression profile of immune-related target genes. In qRT-PCR and RNA-Seq analysis, all the genes examined showed similar responses to NE (correlation coefficient R=0.85-0.89, p<0.01) in both lines 6.3 and 7.2. This study is the first report describing NE-induced DEGs and novel transcriptomes using RNA-seq data from two inbred chicken lines showing different levels of NE

  16. LIGHT signals directly to intestinal epithelia to cause barrier dysfunction via cytoskeletal and endocytic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Brad T.; Wang, Fengjun; Shen, Le; Clayburgh, Daniel R.; Su, Liping; Wang, Yingmin; Fu, Yang-Xin; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS LIGHT (lymphotoxin-like inducible protein that competes with glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry on T cells) is a TNF core family member that regulates T cell activation and causes experimental inflammatory bowel disease. Additional data suggest that LIGHT may be involved in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to determine if LIGHT was capable of signaling directly to intestinal epithelia and to define the mechanisms and consequences of such signaling. METHODS The effects of LIGHT and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) on barrier function, cytoskeletal regulation, and tight junction structure were assessed in mice and intestinal epithelial monolayers. RESULTS LIGHT induced barrier loss in cultured epithelia via myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation; both barrier loss and MLC phosphorylation were reversed by MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibition. IFN-γ pretreatment, which induced lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) expression, was required for these effects and neither barrier dysfunction nor intestinal epithelial MLC phosphorylation occurred in LTβR-knockout mice. In cultured monolayers, endocytosis of the tight junction protein occludin correlated with barrier loss. Internalized occludin co-localized with caveolin-1. LIGHT-induced occludin endocytosis and barrier loss were both prevented by inhibition of caveolar endocytosis. CONCLUSIONS T cell-derived LIGHT activates intestinal epithelial LTβR to disrupt barrier function. This requires MLCK activation and caveolar endocytosis. These data suggest a novel role for LIGHT in disease pathogenesis and suggest that inhibition of MLCK-dependent caveolar endocytosis may represent an approach to restoring barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17570213

  17. Electroacupuncture at Bilateral Zusanli Points (ST36) Protects Intestinal Mucosal Immune Barrier in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei-fei; Xing, Xi; Lei, Shu; Wu, Jian-nong; Wang, Ling-cong; Huang, Li-quan; Jiang, Rong-lin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis results in high morbidity and mortality. Immunomodulation strategies could be an adjunctive therapy to treat sepsis. Acupuncture has also been used widely for many years in China to treat sepsis. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well-defined. We demonstrated here that EA preconditioning at ST36 obviously ameliorated CLP-induced intestinal injury and high permeability and reduced the mortality of CLP-induced sepsis rats. Moreover, electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment exerted protective effects on intestinal mucosal immune barrier by increasing the concentration of sIgA and the percentage of CD3+, γ/δ, and CD4+ T cells and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells. Although EA at ST36 treatments immediately after closing the abdomen in the CLP procedure with low-frequency or high-frequency could not reduce the mortality of CLP-induced sepsis in rats, these EA treatments could also significantly improve intestinal injury index in rats with sepsis and obviously protected intestinal mucosal immune barrier. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that EA at ST36 could improve intestinal mucosal immune barrier in sepsis induced by CLP, while the precise mechanism underlying the effects needs to be further elucidated. PMID:26346309

  18. Heparan sulfate and syndecan-1 are essential in maintaining murine and human intestinal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Lars; Salvestrini, Camilla; Park, Pyong Woo; Li, Jin-Ping; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Murch, Simon; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) fail to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function and develop an excessive and potentially fatal efflux of plasma proteins. PLE occurs in ostensibly unrelated diseases, but emerging commonalities in clinical observations recently led us to identify key players in PLE pathogenesis. These include elevated IFN-γ, TNF-α, venous hypertension, and the specific loss of heparan sulfate proteoglycans from the basolateral surface of intestinal epithelial cells during PLE episodes. Here we show that heparan sulfate and syndecan-1, the predominant intestinal epithelial heparan sulfate proteoglycan, are essential in maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier function. Heparan sulfate– or syndecan-1–deficient mice and mice with intestinal-specific loss of heparan sulfate had increased basal protein leakage and were far more susceptible to protein loss induced by combinations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased venous pressure. Similarly, knockdown of syndecan-1 in human epithelial cells resulted in increased basal and cytokine-induced protein leakage. Clinical application of heparin has been known to alleviate PLE in some patients but its unknown mechanism and severe side effects due to its anticoagulant activity limit its usefulness. We demonstrate here that non-anticoagulant 2,3-de-O-sulfated heparin could prevent intestinal protein leakage in syndecan-deficient mice, suggesting that this may be a safe and effective therapy for PLE patients. PMID:18064305

  19. Heat Stress Reduces Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Favors Intestinal Glucose Transport in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L.; Johnson, Jay S.; Weber, Thomas E.; Ross, Jason W.; Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35–50% humidity; n = 8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24–43% humidity; n = 8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (P<0.05). As expected, HS decreased feed intake by 53% (P<0.05) and body weight (P<0.05) compared to TN pigs. Ileum heat shock protein 70 expression increased (P<0.05), while intestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; P<0.05). Furthermore, HS increased serum endotoxin concentrations (P = 0.05). Intestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (P<0.05) and casein kinase II-α (P = 0.06). Protein expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the ileum revealed claudin 3 and occludin expression to be increased overall due to HS (P<0.05), while there were no differences in claudin 1 expression. Intestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (P<0.05). This was supported by increased ileum Na+/K+ ATPase activity in HS pigs. SGLT-1 protein expression was unaltered; however, HS increased ileal GLUT-2 protein expression (P = 0.06). Altogether, these data indicate that HS reduce intestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport. PMID:23936392

  20. Heat stress reduces intestinal barrier integrity and favors intestinal glucose transport in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Sarah C; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Johnson, Jay S; Weber, Thomas E; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Gabler, Nicholas K

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35-50% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24-43% humidity; n=8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (P<0.05). As expected, HS decreased feed intake by 53% (P<0.05) and body weight (P<0.05) compared to TN pigs. Ileum heat shock protein 70 expression increased (P<0.05), while intestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; P<0.05). Furthermore, HS increased serum endotoxin concentrations (P=0.05). Intestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (P<0.05) and casein kinase II-α (P=0.06). Protein expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the ileum revealed claudin 3 and occludin expression to be increased overall due to HS (P<0.05), while there were no differences in claudin 1 expression. Intestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (P<0.05). This was supported by increased ileum Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity in HS pigs. SGLT-1 protein expression was unaltered; however, HS increased ileal GLUT-2 protein expression (P=0.06). Altogether, these data indicate that HS reduce intestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport.

  1. Zinc’s impact on intestinal barrier function and zinc trafficking during coccidial caccine challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to evaluate the effects of Zn supplementation on intestinal barrier function and Zn trafficking, three dietary regimens were formulated: a basal corn/SBM diet formulated with a Zn-free vitamin/mineral premix (Basal), and two Zn regimens formulated to provide 90 mg/kg total dietary Zn from ...

  2. Enhancing Effect of Trachelogenin from Trachelospermi caulis Extract on Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Bae, Min-Jung; Jung, Sun Young; See, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Yun Tai; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Back, Su Yeon; Choi, Sang-Won; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Trachelospermi caulis is used widely as an herbal medicine in oriental countries to attenuate fever and pain. We wished to reveal the novel function of this herb and its active component on barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. Monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) were used to evaluate the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and quantity of permeated ovalbumin (OVA) as indices of barrier function. T. caulis increased TEER values on cell monolayers and decreased OVA permeation across cell monolayers. To ascertain the active component of T. caulis, the extract was isolated to five fractions, and the effect of each of these fractions on intestinal barrier function examined. Chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions showed increased TEER values and decreased OVA flux. Chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions contained mainly trachelogenin and its glycoside, tracheloside. Trachelogenin increased TEER values and decreased OVA flux by enhancing the tight-junction protein occludin (but not tracheloside) in Caco-2 monolayers. These findings demonstrated that trachelogenin, an active component of T. caulis, might help to attenuate food allergy or inflammatory bowel disease through inhibition of allergen permeation or enhancement of the intestinal barrier. PMID:26268064

  3. Probiotics Prevent Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Acute Pancreatitis in Rats via Induction of Ileal Mucosal Glutathione Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Sandström, Per A.; Trulsson, Lena M.; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Timmerman, Harro M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Söderholm, Johan D.

    2009-01-01

    Background During acute pancreatitis (AP), oxidative stress contributes to intestinal barrier failure. We studied actions of multispecies probiotics on barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress in experimental AP. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-three male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups: 1) controls, non-operated, 2) sham-operated, 3) AP, 4) AP and probiotics and 5) AP and placebo. AP was induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion and intravenous cerulein (6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting five days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, ileal mucosa was collected for measurements of E. coli K12 and 51Cr-EDTA passage in Ussing chambers. Tight junction proteins were investigated by confocal immunofluorescence imaging. Ileal mucosal apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels were determined and glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity and expression were quantified. AP-induced barrier dysfunction was characterized by epithelial cell apoptosis and alterations of tight junction proteins (i.e. disruption of occludin and claudin-1 and up-regulation of claudin-2) and correlated with lipid peroxidation (r>0.8). Probiotic pre-treatment diminished the AP-induced increase in E. coli passage (probiotics 57.4±33.5 vs. placebo 223.7±93.7 a.u.; P<0.001), 51Cr-EDTA flux (16.7±10.1 vs. 32.1±10.0 cm/s10−6; P<0.005), apoptosis, lipid peroxidation (0.42±0.13 vs. 1.62±0.53 pmol MDA/mg protein; P<0.001), and prevented tight junction protein disruption. AP-induced decline in glutathione was not only prevented (14.33±1.47 vs. 8.82±1.30 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001), but probiotics even increased mucosal glutathione compared with sham rats (14.33±1.47 vs. 10.70±1.74 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001). Glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, which is rate-limiting in glutathione biosynthesis, was enhanced in probiotic pre-treated animals (probiotics 2.88±1.21 vs. placebo 1.94±0.55 nmol/min/mg protein; P<0

  4. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora.

    PubMed

    Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Jeppsson, B; Nobaek, S; Ahrné, S; Bengmark, S

    1993-01-01

    In vivo colonization by different Lactobacillus strains on human intestinal mucosa of healthy volunteers was studied together with the effect of Lactobacillus administration on different groups of indigenous bacteria. A total of 19 test strains were administered in fermented oatmeal soup containing 5 x 10(6) CFU of each strain per ml by using a dose of 100 ml of soup per day for 10 days. Biopsies were taken from both the upper jejunum and the rectum 1 day before administration was started and 1 and 11 days after administration was terminated. The administration significantly increased the Lactobacillus counts on the jejunum mucosa, and high levels remained 11 days after administration was terminated. The levels of streptococci increased by 10- to 100-fold in two persons, and the levels of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the jejunum decreased by 10- to 100-fold in three of the volunteers 1 day after administration was terminated. In recta, the anaerobic bacterium counts and the gram-negative anaerobic bacterium counts decreased significantly by the end of administration. Furthermore, a decrease in the number of members of the Enterobacteriaceae by 1,000-fold was observed on the rectal mucosa of two persons. Randomly picked Lactobacillus isolates were identified phenotypically by API 50CH tests and genotypically by the plasmid profiles of strains and by restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Effects of Fuzheng Paidu tablet on peripheral blood T lymphocytes, intestinal mucosa T lymphocytes, and immune organs in cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppressed mice

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mingsan; Cheng, Bolin; Guo, Lin; Shi, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a Fuzheng Paidu tablet on peripheral blood T lymphocytes, intestinal mucosa T lymphocytes, and immune organs in cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced immunosuppressed mice. Methods: The experimental mice (but not the control mice) were intraperitoneally injected with 80 mg/kg of CY solution every day for 3 consecutive days. Meanwhile, each mouse was administered with corresponding drugs for 7 continuous days. Then, 1 h after the last administration, each index was detected. Results: The Fuzheng Paidu tablet significantly increases the CD4+/CD8+ ratio (P < 0.01) and the number of CD3+ and CD4+ cells in immunosuppressed mice (P < 0.01). In addition, the tablet apparently enhances the CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ levels in the intestinal mucosal immune system (P < 0.01) as well as reverses the reduction of spleen lymphoid nodules and lymphocytes (P < 0.01). It also significantly improves intestinal inflammation, thymic atrophy, and sparse thymocytes in immunosuppressed mice (P < 0.01). Discussion: The Fuzheng Paidu tablet greatly increases the levels of peripheral blood T lymphocytes and intestinal mucosal T lymphocytes as well as impoves atrophied thymuses and spleens in CY-induced immunosuppressed mice. PMID:26317776

  6. Intestinal barrier loss as a critical pathogenic link between inflammatory bowel disease and graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nalle, S C; Turner, J R

    2015-07-01

    Compromised intestinal barrier function is a prominent feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, links between intestinal barrier loss and disease extend much further, including documented associations with celiac disease, type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Intestinal barrier loss has also been proposed to have a critical role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious, potentially fatal consequence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Experimental evidence has begun to support this view, as barrier loss and its role in initiating and establishing a pathogenic inflammatory cycle in GVHD is emerging. Here we discuss similarities between IBD and GVHD, mechanisms of intestinal barrier loss in these diseases, and the crosstalk between barrier loss and the immune system, with a special focus on natural killer (NK) cells. Unanswered questions and future research directions on the topic are discussed along with implications for treatment.

  7. Hydroxyethyl Starch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Metabolic Function: Findings from a Mouse Model of the Isolated Perfused Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowsky, Heike; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Krause, Thorsten; Goldmann, Torsten; Frerichs, Inez; Steinfath, Markus; Weiler, Norbert; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine. Methods An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7) or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7). Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio), edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio), morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis), fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation) were evaluated in both groups. Results Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01), an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001), an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001) and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001). Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces. Conclusion A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small

  8. High therapeutic efficacy of Cathelicidin-WA against postweaning diarrhea via inhibiting inflammation and enhancing epithelial barrier in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hongbo; Zhang, Lin; Gan, Zhenshun; Xiong, Haitao; Yu, Caihua; Du, Huahua; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of death among young mammals, especially during weaning. Here, we investigated the effects of Cathelicidin-WA (CWA) on diarrhea, intestinal morphology, inflammatory responses, epithelial barrier and microbiota in the intestine of young mammals during weaning. Piglets with clinical diarrhea were selected and treated with saline (control), CWA or enrofloxacin (Enro) for 4 days. Both CWA and Enro effectively attenuated diarrhea. Compared with the control, CWA decreased IL-6, IL-8 and IL-22 levels and reduced neutrophil infiltration into the jejunum. CWA inhibited inflammation by down-regulating the TLR4-, MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent pathways. Additionally, CWA improved intestinal morphology by increasing villus and microvillus heights and enhancing intestinal barrier function by increasing tight junction (TJ) protein expression and augmenting wound-healing ability in intestinal epithelial cells. CWA also improved microbiota composition and increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels in feces. By contrast, Enro not only disrupted the intestinal barrier but also negatively affected microbiota composition and SCFA levels in the intestine. In conclusion, CWA effectively attenuated inflammation, enhanced intestinal barrier function, and improved microbiota composition in the intestines of weaned piglets. These results suggest that CWA could be an effective and safe therapy for diarrhea or other intestinal diseases in young mammals. PMID:27181680

  9. Impact of oral bisphenol A at reference doses on intestinal barrier function and sex differences after perinatal exposure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Braniste, Viorica; Jouault, Aurore; Gaultier, Eric; Polizzi, Arnaud; Buisson-Brenac, Claire; Leveque, Mathilde; Martin, Pascal G.; Theodorou, Vassilia; Fioramonti, Jean; Houdeau, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical estrogen widely used in the food-packaging industry and baby bottles, is recovered in human fluids (0.1–10 nM). Recent studies have reported that BPA is hormonally active at low doses, emphasizing the debate of a risk for human health. Estrogen receptors are expressed in the colon, and although the major route of BPA exposure is food, the effects on gut have received no attention. We first examined the endocrine disrupting potency of BPA on colonic paracellular permeability (CPP), experimental colitis, and visceral sensitivity in ovariectomized rats orally exposed to 5 mg/kg/d BPA (i.e., the no observed adverse effect level), 50 μg/kg/d BPA (i.e., tolerable daily intake), or lower doses. BPA dose-dependently decreased basal CPP, with a half-maximal inhibitory dose of 5.2 μg/kg/d, 10-fold below the tolerable daily intake. This correlated with an increase in epithelial tight junction sealing, also observed in Caco-2 cells exposed to 10 nM BPA. When ovariectomized rats were fed with BPA at the no observed adverse effect level, the severity of colitis was reduced, whereas the same dose increased pain sensitivity to colorectal stimuli. We then examined the impact of perinatal exposure to BPA on intestinal permeability and inflammatory response in the offspring. In female rats, but not in male rats, perinatal BPA evoked a decrease of CPP in adulthood, whereas the proinflammatory response of colonic mucosa was strengthened. This study first demonstrates that the xenoestrogen BPA at reference doses influences intestinal barrier function and gut nociception. Moreover, perinatal exposure promotes the development of severe inflammation in adult female offspring only. PMID:20018722

  10. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  11. Subacute stress and chronic stress interact to decrease intestinal barrier function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lauffer, Adriana; Vanuytsel, Tim; Vanormelingen, Christophe; Vanheel, Hanne; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Tack, Jan; Fornari, Fernando; Farré, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress increases intestinal permeability, potentially leading to low-grade inflammation and symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We assessed the effect of subacute, chronic and combined stress on intestinal barrier function and mast cell density. Male Wistar rats were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 8/group): 1/sham; 2/subacute stress (isolation and limited movement for 24 h); 3/chronic crowding stress for 14 days and 4/combined subacute and chronic stress. Jejunum and colon were collected to measure: transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER; a measure of epithelial barrier function); gene expression of tight junction molecules; mast cell density. Plasma corticosterone concentration was increased in all three stress conditions versus sham, with highest concentrations in the combined stress condition. TEER in the jejunum was decreased in all stress conditions, but was significantly lower in the combined stress condition than in the other groups. TEER in the jejunum correlated negatively with corticosterone concentration. Increased expression of claudin 1, 5 and 8, occludin and zonula occludens 1 mRNAs was detected after subacute stress in the jejunum. In contrast, colonic TEER was decreased only after combined stress, and the expression of tight junction molecules was unaltered. Increased mast cell density was observed in the chronic and combined stress condition in the colon only. In conclusion, our data show that chronic stress sensitizes the gastrointestinal tract to the effects of subacute stress on intestinal barrier function; different underlying cellular and molecular alterations are indicated in the small intestine versus the colon.

  12. Live Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in an apical anaerobic model of the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Ulluwishewa, Dulantha; Anderson, Rachel C; Young, Wayne; McNabb, Warren C; van Baarlen, Peter; Moughan, Paul J; Wells, Jerry M; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-02-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, an abundant member of the human commensal microbiota, has been proposed to have a protective role in the intestine. However, it is an obligate anaerobe, difficult to co-culture in viable form with oxygen-requiring intestinal cells. To overcome this limitation, a unique apical anaerobic model of the intestinal barrier, which enabled co-culture of live obligate anaerobes with the human intestinal cell line Caco-2, was developed. Caco-2 cells remained viable and maintained an intact barrier for at least 12 h, consistent with gene expression data, which suggested Caco-2 cells had adapted to survive in an oxygen-reduced atmosphere. Live F. prausnitzii cells, but not ultraviolet (UV)-killed F. prausnitzii, increased the permeability of mannitol across the epithelial barrier. Gene expression analysis showed inflammatory mediators to be expressed at lower amounts in Caco-2 cells exposed to live F. prausnitzii than UV-killed F. prausnitzii, This, consistent with previous reports, implies that live F. prausnitzii produces an anti-inflammatory compound in the culture supernatant, demonstrating the value of a physiologically relevant co-culture system that allows obligate anaerobic bacteria to remain viable.

  13. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  14. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits zymosan-induced intestinal inflammation and barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Meng; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zheng, Jin-Guang; Bai, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Zeng-Kai; Li, Jing-Yuan; Hu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) inhibits gut inflammation and barrier dysfunction following zymosan-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham with administration of normal saline (SS group); sham with administration of DMSO (SD group); zymosan with administration of normal saline (ZS group); and zymosan with administration of DMSO (ZD group). Each group contained three subgroups according to 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after surgery. At 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of zymosan (750 mg/kg), the levels of intestinal inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-10] and oxides (myeloperoxidase, malonaldehyde, and superoxide dismutase) were examined. The levels of diamine oxidase (DAO) in plasma and intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF) were determined. Intestinal injury was also evaluated using an intestinal histological score and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells was determined by deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The intestinal epithelial tight junction protein, ZO-1, was observed by immunofluorescence. RESULTS: DMSO decreased TNF-α and increased IL-10 levels in the intestine compared with the ZS group at the corresponding time points. The activity of intestinal myeloperoxidase in the ZS group was higher than that in the ZD group 24 h after zymosan administration (P < 0.05). DMSO decreased the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased the activity of superoxide dehydrogenase (SOD) 24 h after zymosan administration. The IMBF was lowest at 24 h and was 49.34% and 58.26% in the ZS group and ZD group, respectively (P < 0.05). DMSO alleviated injury in intestinal villi, and the gut injury score was significantly lower than the ZS group (3.6 ± 0.2 vs 4.2 ± 0.3, P < 0.05). DMSO decreased the level of DAO in plasma compared with the ZS

  15. Partial Enteral Nutrition Mitigated Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage of Rat Small Intestinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Li, Chaojun; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study was designed to investigate a relatively optimum dose of partial enteral nutrition (PEN) which effectively attenuates intestinal barrier dysfunction initiated by ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Methods: In experiment 1, 60 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to intestinal IRI and assigned to six groups according to the different proportion of EN administrations: namely total parenteral nutrition (TPN or 0%EN), 10%EN, 20%EN, 40%EN, 60%EN, and total enteral nutrition (TEN or 100%) groups, the deficits of intraluminal calorie were supplemented by PN. In experiment 2, 50 male SD rats were subjected to intestinal IRI and divided into five groups based on the results of experiment 1: TPN, TEN, 20%EN, TPN plus pretreatment with NF-κB antagonist 30 min before IRI (TPN+PDTC), and TPN plus pretreatment with HIF-1α antagonist 30 min before IRI (TPN+YC-1) groups. Results: In experiment 1, previous IRI combined with subsequent EN shortage disrupted the structure of intestinal epithelial cell and tight junctions (TJs). While 20% dose of EN had an obviously protective effect on these detrimental consequences. In experiment 2, compared with TPN only, 20%EN exerted a significant protection of barrier function of intestinal epithelium. Analogous results were observed when TPN combined with specific NF-κB/HIF-1α inhibitors (PDTC and YC-1). Meanwhile, the expression of NF-κB/HIF-1α had a similar trend among the groups. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that 20%EN is the minimally effective dosage of EN which promotes the recovery of intestinal barrier function after IRI in a rat model. Furthermore, we discreetly speculate that this benefit is, at least partly, related to NF-κB/HIF-1α pathway expression. PMID:27548209

  16. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model

    PubMed Central

    FENG, SISI; LIU, WEIDONG; ZUO, SHENGNAN; XIE, TINGYAN; DENG, HUI; ZHANG, QIUHUAN; ZHONG, BAIYUN

    2016-01-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub-health model, the rats were subjected to a high-fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D-lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti-apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub-health rat model was successfully established, and sub-health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub-health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub-health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub-health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  17. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sisi; Liu, Weidong; Zuo, Shengnan; Xie, Tingyan; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Qiuhuan; Zhong, Baiyun

    2016-04-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub‑health model, the rats were subjected to a high‑fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D‑lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti‑apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub‑health rat model was successfully established, and sub‑health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub‑health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub‑health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub‑health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  18. Wild jujube polysaccharides protect against experimental inflammatory bowel disease by enabling enhanced intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Wu, Shuangchan; Li, Zhike; Li, Jian; Li, Xiaofei; Xiang, Jin; Ding, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Dietary polysaccharides provide various beneficial effects for our health. We investigated the protective effects of wild jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. spinosa (Bunge) Hu ex H. F. Chou) sarcocarp polysaccharides (WJPs) against experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by enabling enhanced intestinal barrier function. Colitis was induced in rats by the intrarectal administration of TNBS. We found that WJPs markedly ameliorated the colitis severity, including less weight loss, decreased disease activity index scores, and improved mucosal damage in colitis rats. Moreover, WJPs suppressed the inflammatory response via attenuation of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MPO activity in colitis rats. And then, to determine the effect of WJPs on the intestinal barrier, we measured the effect of WJPs on the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-conjugated dextran permeability in Caco-2 cell stimulation with TNF-α. We further demonstrated that the alleviation of WJPs to colon injury was associated with barrier function by assembly of tight junction proteins. Moreover, the effect of WJPs on TER was eliminated by the specific inhibitor of AMPK. AMPK activity was also up-regulated by WJPs in Caco-2 cell stimulation with TNF-α and in colitis rats. This study demonstrates that WJPs protect against IBD by enabling enhanced intestinal barrier function involving the activation of AMPK.

  19. Pregnane X receptor agonists enhance intestinal epithelial wound healing and repair of the intestinal barrier following the induction of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Terc, Joshua; Hansen, Ashleigh; Alston, Laurie; Hirota, Simon A

    2014-05-13

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays a key role in the maintenance of homeostasis within the gastrointestinal tract. Barrier dysfunction leading to increased epithelial permeability is associated with a number of gastrointestinal disorders including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. It is thought that the increased permeability in patients with IBD may be driven by alterations in the epithelial wound healing response. To this end considerable study has been undertaken to identify signaling pathways that may accelerate intestinal epithelial wound healing and normalize the barrier dysfunction observed in IBD. In the current study we examined the role of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) in modulating the intestinal epithelial wound healing response. Mutations and reduced mucosal expression of the PXR are associated with IBD, and others have reported that PXR agonists can dampen intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, stimulation of the PXR has been associated with increased cell migration and proliferation, two of the key processes involved in wound healing. We hypothesized that PXR agonists would enhance intestinal epithelial repair. Stimulation of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells with rifaximin, rifampicin and SR12813, all potent agonists of the PXR, significantly increased wound closure. This effect was driven by p38 MAP kinase-dependent cell migration, and occurred in the absence of cell proliferation. Treating mice with a rodent specific PXR agonist, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), attenuated the intestinal barrier dysfunction observed in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) model of experimental colitis, an effect that occurred independent of the known anti-inflammatory effects of PCN. Taken together our data indicate that the activation of the PXR can enhance intestinal epithelial repair and suggest that targeting the PXR may help to normalize intestinal barrier dysfunction observed in patients with IBD

  20. Casein glycomacropeptide in the diet may reduce Escherichia coli attachment to the intestinal mucosa and increase the intestinal lactobacilli of early weaned piglets after an enterotoxigenic E. coli K88 challenge.

    PubMed

    Gustavo Hermes, Rafael; Molist, Francesc; Francisco Pérez, José; Gómez de Segura, Arantza; Ywazaki, Mauro; Davin, Roger; Nofrarías, Miquel; Korhonen, Timo K; Virkola, Ritva; Martín-Orúe, Susana María

    2013-03-28

    Casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP), a glycoprotein originating during cheese manufacture, has shown promising effects by promoting the growth of some beneficial bacteria in vitro, although its activity has not been well explored. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of CGMP against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 in vitro (Trial 1) and in vivo (Trial 2). In Trial 1, increasing concentrations of CGMP (0, 0.5, 1.5 or 2.5 mg/ml) were tested regarding its ability to block the attachment of ETEC K88 to ileal mucosa tissues obtained from piglets. Increasing the concentration of CGMP resulted in a gradual decrease in ETEC K88 attachment to the epithelial surface. In Trial 2, seventy-two piglets were distributed in a 2 × 2 factorial combination including or omitting CGMP in the diet (control diet v. CGMP) and challenged or not with ETEC K88 (yes v. no). Inclusion of CGMP increased crude protein, ammonia and isoacid concentrations in colon digesta. CGMP also increased lactobacilli numbers in ileum and colon digesta, and reduced enterobacteria counts in mucosa scrapings and the percentage of villi with E. coli adherence measured by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The inclusion of CGMP in the diets of challenged animals also prevented the increase of enterobacteria in ileal digesta. We can conclude that CGMP may improve gut health by diminishing the adhesion of ETEC K88 to the intestinal mucosa, by increasing the lactobacilli population in the intestine and by reducing the overgrowth of enterobacteria in the digestive tract of piglets after an ETEC K88 challenge. PMID:22850079

  1. Polyphenol-Rich Propolis Extracts Strengthen Intestinal Barrier Function by Activating AMPK and ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; Chen, Yifan; Song, Zehe; Jiang, Xiasen; Hu, Fuliang; Conlon, Michael A.; Topping, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has abundant polyphenolic constituents and is used widely as a health/functional food. Here, we investigated the effects of polyphenol-rich propolis extracts (PPE) on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, as well as in rats. In Caco-2 cells, PPE increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased lucifer yellow flux. PPE-treated cells showed increased expression of the tight junction (TJ) loci occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1. Confocal microscopy showed organized expressions in proteins related to TJ assembly, i.e., occludin and ZO-1, in response to PPE. Furthermore, PPE led to the activation of AMPK, ERK1/2, p38, and Akt. Using selective inhibitors, we found that the positive effects of PPE on barrier function were abolished in cells in which AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling were inhibited. Moreover, rats fed a diet supplemented with PPE (0.3% in the diet) exhibited increased colonic epithelium ZO-1 expression. Overall, these data suggest that PPE strengthens intestinal barrier function by activating AMPK and ERK signaling and provide novel insights into the potential application of propolis for human gut health. PMID:27164138

  2. Effect of γ-aminobutyric acid on digestive enzymes, absorption function, and immune function of intestinal mucosa in heat-stressed chicken.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xie, J; Wang, B; Tang, J

    2014-10-01

    To explore the effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on digestive enzyme activity, absorption function and immune function of intestinal mucosa in heat-stressed Wenchang chicken were studied. One-day-old male Wenchang chickens were randomly divided into a control group (CK), heat stress group (HS), and GABA+HS group. The chickens from the GABA+HS group were administered with 0.2 mL of GABA solution daily. Chickens from HS and GABA+HS groups were subjected to heat stress treatment at 40 ± 0.5°C for 2 h during 1300 to 1500 h every day. Blood was drawn and 0.5 cm-long duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were collected from the chickens on d 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 15. Results showed that the activity of Ca²⁺-Mg²⁺-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, maltase, sucrase, and alkaline phosphatase, the contents of secretory IgA, glutathione, and d-xylose, and the number of lymphocytes in HS group were significantly lower than those in the CK group. Among them, some were rescued after the treatment of GABA as the time extension. For maltase, d-xylose, alkaline phosphatase, and Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, it required 5 to 7 d for achieving the significant effect. For sucrase, 12 d for the alleviation effect was required. In the case of other parameters, no alleviation was observed during the whole period of the study. We have concluded that HS can inhibit the activity of digestive enzymes and reduce absorption and immune functions of intestinal mucosa. γ-Aminobutyric acid can effectively alleviate these inhibitory effects.

  3. Delivery of a mucin domain enriched in cysteine residues strengthens the intestinal mucous barrier

    PubMed Central

    Gouyer, Valérie; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Neut, Christel; Singer, Elisabeth; Plet, Ségolène; Geboes, Karel; Desreumaux, Pierre; Gottrand, Frédéric; Desseyn, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A weakening of the gut mucous barrier permits an increase in the access of intestinal luminal contents to the epithelial cells, which will trigger the inflammatory response. In inflammatory bowel diseases, there is an inappropriate and ongoing activation of the immune system, possibly because the intestinal mucus is less protective against the endogenous microflora. General strategies aimed at improving the protection of the intestinal epithelium are still missing. We generated a transgenic mouse that secreted a molecule consisting of 12 consecutive copies of a mucin domain into its intestinal mucus, which is believed to modify the mucus layer by establishing reversible interactions. We showed that the mucus gel was more robust and that mucin O-glycosylation was altered. Notably, the gut epithelium of transgenic mice housed a greater abundance of beneficial Lactobacillus spp. These modifications were associated with a reduced susceptibility of transgenic mice to chemically induced colitis. Furthermore, transgenic mice cleared faster Citrobacter rodentium bacteria which were orally given and mice were more protected against bacterial translocation induced by gavage with adherent–invasive Escherichia coli. Our data show that delivering the mucin CYS domain into the gut lumen strengthens the intestinal mucus blanket which is impaired in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25974250

  4. Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins Alter the Extrinsic Component of Intestinal Barrier in Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Janssens, Geert P J; De Baere, Siegrid; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Su, Shengchen; Wong, Eric A; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Verlinden, Marc; Devreese, Mathias; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Novak, Barbara; Dohnal, Ilse; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2015-12-23

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FBs) are secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium fungi that frequently contaminate broiler feed. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of DON and/or FBs on the intestinal barrier in broiler chickens, more specifically on the mucus layer and antioxidative response to oxidative stress. One-day-old broiler chicks were divided into four groups, each consisting of eight pens of seven birds each, and were fed for 15 days either a control diet, a DON-contaminated diet (4.6 mg DON/kg feed), a FBs-contaminated diet (25.4 mg FB1 + FB2/kg feed), or a DON+FBs-contaminated diet (4.3 mg DON and 22.9 mg FB1 + FB2/kg feed). DON and FBs affected the duodenal mucus layer by suppressing intestinal mucin (MUC) 2 gene expression and altering the mucin monosaccharide composition. Both mycotoxins decreased gene expression of the intestinal zinc transporter (ZnT)-1 and regulated intracellular methionine homeostasis, which are both important for preserving the cell's critical antioxidant activity. Feeding a DON- and/or FBs-contaminated diet, at concentrations close to the European Union maximum guidance levels (5 mg DON and 20 mg FB1 + FB2/kg feed) changes the intestinal mucus layer and several intestinal epithelial antioxidative mechanisms.

  5. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)/sub 3/ was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of /sup 125/I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured.

  6. Activation of muscarinic cholinoceptor ameliorates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rafiqul Islam; Uwada, Junsuke; Yazawa, Takashi; Islam, Md Tariqul; Krug, Susanne M; Fromm, Michael; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Yuichi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Sada, Kiyonao; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2015-11-30

    Impaired intestinal barrier function is one of the critical issues in inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate muscarinic cholinoceptor (mAChR)-mediated signaling for the amelioration of cytokine-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelium. Rat colon challenged with TNF-α and interferon γ reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). This barrier injury was attenuated by muscarinic stimulation. In HT-29/B6 intestinal epithelial cells, muscarinic stimulation suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption. Finally, muscarinic stimulation promoted the shedding of TNFR1, which would be a mechanism for the attenuation of TNF-α/NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption via mAChR.

  7. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall’Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  8. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  9. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D’Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  10. SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) of the intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti is involved in mucosa-associated parasite-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Anandarajah, Emmanuela M; Ditgen, Dana; Hansmann, Jan; Erttmann, Klaus D; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2016-06-01

    The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), found in the excretory/secretory products of Strongyloides ratti, is most strongly expressed in parasitic females. Since SPARC proteins are involved in the modulation of cell-matrix interactions, a role of the secreted S. ratti SPARC (Sr-SPARC) in the manifestation of the parasite in the host's intestine is postulated. The full-length cDNA of Sr-SPARC was identified and the protein was recombinantly expressed. The purified protein was biologically active, able to bind calcium, and to attach to mucosa-associated human cells. Addition of Sr-SPARC to an in vitro mucosal three-dimensional-cell culture model led to a time-dependent release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-22, IL-10 and TSLP. Of importance, exposure with Sr-SPARC fostered wound closure in an intestinal epithelial cell model. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SPARC released from the nematode is a multifunctional protein affecting the mucosal immune system. PMID:27268729

  11. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D'Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  12. Human intestinal mucosa-associated Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains with probiotic properties modulate IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12 gene expression in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Čitar, M; Hacin, B; Tompa, G; Štempelj, M; Rogelj, I; Dolinšek, J; Narat, M; Matijašić, B Bogovič

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are considered one of the permanent genera of the physiological human intestinal microbiota and represent an enormous pool of potential probiotic candidates. Approximately 450 isolates of presumptive Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium strains were obtained from bioptic samples of colonic and ileal mucosa from 15 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. On the basis of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, 20 strains were selected for further taxonomic classification and characterisation, as well as assessment of probiotic properties and safety. Importantly, selected strains showed the capability of colonising different parts of the intestine. The most frequently isolated species was Lactobacillus paracasei followed by Lactobacillus fermentum. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials of human and veterinary importance, however, tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistance was observed in Lactobacillus plantarum and L. fermentum strains. Thirteen strains were able to ferment more than 19 different carbon sources and three out of five tested strains exerted antagonistic activity against several different indicator strains. Two Lactobacillus isolates (L. paracasei L350 and L. fermentum L930 bb) and one Bifidobacterium isolate (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis IM386) fulfilled in vitro selection criteria for probiotic strains and exhibited strong downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12 and upregulation of anti-inflammatory IL-10. The selected strains represent suitable candidates for further studies regarding their positive influence on host health and could play an important role in ameliorating the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. THE ROLE OF MIR-212 AND INOS IN ALCOHOL-INDUCED INTESTINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION AND STEATOHEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yueming; Zhang, Lijuan; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Song, Shiwen; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is commonly associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. Alcohol-induced dysregulation of intestinal tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1), plays an important role in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. However, the mechanism of alcohol-induced disruption of TJ proteins is not well established. The goal of this study was to elucidate this mechanism by studying the role of MicroRNA 212 (miR-212) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. Methods The permeability of the Caco-2 monolayer was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and flux of fluorescein sulfonic acid (FSA). miR-212 was measured by real time PCR. The wild type, iNOS knockout, and miR-212 knockdown mice were fed with alcohol diet (29% of total calories, 4.5% v/v) for 8 weeks. The LNA-anti-miR-212 was used to inhibit miR-212 expression in mice. The alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, miR-212 expression and liver injuries in mice were measured. Results Our in vitro monolayer and in vivo mice studies showed that: (1) alcohol-induced over-expression of the intestinal miR-212 and intestinal hyperpermeability is prevented by using miR-212 knock-down techniques; and (2). iNOS is upregulated in the intestine by alcohol and that iNOS signaling is required for alcohol-induced miR-212 over-expression, ZO-1 disruption, gut leakiness and steatohepatis. Conclusions These studies thus support a novel miR-212 mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness and a potential target that could be exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent leaky gut and liver injury in alcoholics. PMID:26207424

  14. The Vi Capsular Antigen of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Reduces Toll-Like Receptor-Dependent Interleukin-8 Expression in the Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Raffatellu, Manuela; Chessa, Daniela; Wilson, R. Paul; Dusold, Richard; Rubino, Salvatore; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2005-01-01

    Human infections with nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes, such as S. enterica serotype Typhimurium, are characterized by a massive neutrophil influx in the colon and terminal ileum. In contrast, neutrophils are scarce in intestinal infiltrates of typhoid fever patients. Here, we show that in S. enterica serotype Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, expression of the Vi capsular antigen reduced expression of the neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin-8 (IL-8) in host cells. Capsulated bacteria elicited IL-8 expression in polarized human epithelial cells (T84) and human macrophage-like cells (THP-1) in vitro at significantly reduced levels compared to noncapsulated bacteria. Experiments with a human cell line (HEK293) transfected with human Toll-like receptors (TLRs) demonstrated that in the presence of TLR5 or TLR4/MD2/CD14, a noncapsulated serotype Typhi mutant was able to induce the expression of IL-8, while this host response was significantly reduced when cells were infected with the capsulated serotype Typhi wild type. The relevance of these in vitro observations for the interaction of serotype Typhi with its human host was further studied ex vivo using human colonic tissue explants. Expression of IL-8 was detected in human colonic tissue explants infected with serotype Typhimurium or a noncapsulated serotype Typhi mutant. In contrast, infection with the serotype Typhi wild type did not elicit IL-8 expression in colonic tissue explants. Collectively, these data suggest that the scarcity of neutrophils in intestinal infiltrates of typhoid fever patients is due to a capsule-mediated reduction of TLR-dependent IL-8 production in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:15908363

  15. Spatial Localization and Binding of the Probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis to the Rat Intestinal Mucosa: Influence of Chronic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Arthur; Mercade-Loubière, Myriam; Salvador-Cartier, Christel; Ringot, Bélinda; Léonard, Renaud; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Ait-Belgnaoui, Afifa; Loubière, Pascal; Théodorou, Vassilia; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at detecting the exogenously applied probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis in rats, after exposure to IBS-like chronic stress, based on 4-day Water Avoidance Stress (WAS). The presence of L. farciminis in both ileal and colonic mucosal tissues was demonstrated by FISH and qPCR, with ileum as the preferential niche, as for the SFB population. A different spatial distribution of the probiotic was observed: in the ileum, bacteria were organized in micro-colonies more or less close to the epithelium whereas, in the colon, they were mainly visualized far away from the epithelium. When rats were submitted to WAS, the L. farciminis population substantially decreased in both intestinal regions, due to a stress-induced increase in colonic motility and defecation, rather than a modification of bacterial binding to the intestinal mucin Muc2. PMID:26367538

  16. Effect of fermented oatmeal soup on the cholesterol level and the Lactobacillus colonization of rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Molin, G; Andersson, R; Ahrné, S; Lönner, C; Marklinder, I; Johansson, M L; Jeppsson, B; Bengmark, S

    1992-04-01

    Rats were fed with freeze-dried oatmeal soup fermented by six different Lactobacillus strains from rat and man; the formula is intended for enteral feeding. The serum cholesterol levels after 10 d were lower for rats eating oatmeal as compared to a commercial product, Biosorb Sond. Colonizing ability of the administered strains were evaluated in vivo. Only Lactobacillus reuteri R21c were able to, effectively, colonizing the mucosa; it represented about 30% of the Lactobacillus population 24 d after termination of the administration. L. reuteri R21c was easily recognized by the ability to produce a yellow pigment on agar plates. The identity was confirmed by carbohydrate fermentations (API 50CH), plasmid pattern and endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA. PMID:1519914

  17. Effect of fermented oatmeal soup on the cholesterol level and the Lactobacillus colonization of rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Molin, G; Andersson, R; Ahrné, S; Lönner, C; Marklinder, I; Johansson, M L; Jeppsson, B; Bengmark, S

    1992-04-01

    Rats were fed with freeze-dried oatmeal soup fermented by six different Lactobacillus strains from rat and man; the formula is intended for enteral feeding. The serum cholesterol levels after 10 d were lower for rats eating oatmeal as compared to a commercial product, Biosorb Sond. Colonizing ability of the administered strains were evaluated in vivo. Only Lactobacillus reuteri R21c were able to, effectively, colonizing the mucosa; it represented about 30% of the Lactobacillus population 24 d after termination of the administration. L. reuteri R21c was easily recognized by the ability to produce a yellow pigment on agar plates. The identity was confirmed by carbohydrate fermentations (API 50CH), plasmid pattern and endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA.

  18. Anti-mouse CD52 monoclonal antibody ameliorates intestinal epithelial barrier function in interleukin-10 knockout mice with spontaneous chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honggang; Dong, Jianning; Shi, Peiliang; Liu, Jianhui; Zuo, Lugen; Li, Yi; Gong, Jianfeng; Gu, Lili; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes tight junction changes and death of epithelial cells, and plays an important role in the development of Crohn's disease (CD). CD52 monoclonal antibody (CD52 mAb) directly targets the cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting mature lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo, leading to long-lasting changes in adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of CD52 mAb on epithelial barrier function in animal models of IBD. Interleukin-10 knockout mice (IL-10(-/-) ) of 16 weeks with established colitis were treated with CD52 mAb once a week for 2 weeks. Severity of colitis, CD4(+) lymphocytes and cytokines in the lamina propria, epithelial expression of tight junction proteins, morphology of tight junctions, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA expression, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression and activity, as well as epithelial apoptosis in proximal colon were measured at the end of the experiment. CD52 mAb treatment effectively attenuated colitis associated with decreased lamina propria CD4(+) lymphocytes and interferon-γ/IL-17 responses in colonic mucosa in IL-10(-/-) mice. After CD52 mAb treatment, attenuation of colonic permeability, increased epithelial expression and correct localization of tight junction proteins (occludin and zona occludens protein-1), as well as ameliorated tight junction morphology were observed in IL-10(-/-) mice. CD52 mAb treatment also effectively suppressed the epithelial apoptosis, mucosa TNF-α mRNA expression, epithelial expression of long MLCK, TNFR2 and phosphorylation of MLC. Our results indicated that anti-CD52 therapy may inhibit TNF-α/TNFR2-mediated epithelial apoptosis and MLCK-dependent tight junction permeability by depleting activated T cells in the gut mucosa.

  19. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghua; Yuan, Lixia; Deng, Jun; Yang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells), or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus) C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK, and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection. PMID:25859435

  20. Checkpoint Kinase 1 Activation Enhances Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via Regulation of Claudin-5 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Maki; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2016-01-01

    Several stressors are known to influence epithelial tight junction (TJ) integrity, but the association between DNA damage and TJ integrity remains unclear. Here we examined the effects of daunorubicin and rebeccamycin, two anti-tumor chemicals that induce DNA damage, on TJ integrity in human intestinal epithelial cells. Daunorubicin and rebeccamycin dose-dependently enhanced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and decreased flux of the 4 kDa FITC-dextran in Caco-2 cell monolayer. Daunorubicin- or rebeccamycin-induced enhancement of the TJ barrier function partly rescued attenuation of the barrier function by the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ. Daunorubicin and rebeccamycin increased claudin-5 expression and the product was distributed in the actin cytoskeleton fraction, which was enriched with TJ proteins. Caffeine, which is an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related protein (ATR), and the Chk1 inhibitor inhibited the TER increases induced by daunorubicin and rebeccamycin, whereas a Chk2 inhibitor did not. Treatment with Chk1 siRNA also significantly inhibited the TER increases. Induction of claudin-5 expression was inhibited by Chk1 inhibitor and by siRNA treatment. Our results suggest that Chk1 activation by daunorubicin and rebeccamycin induced claudin-5 expression and enhanced TJ barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayer, which suggests a link between DNA damage and TJ integrity in the human intestine. PMID:26727128

  1. Berberine ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis‑induced intestinal barrier dysfunction via a myosin light chain phosphorylation‑dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong-Yin; Chen, Tao; Yan, Hong-Tao; Huang, Zhu; Tang, Li-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Berberine is a traditional drug used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in China and has been demonstrated to attenuate intestinal barrier dysfunction in certain animal models. However, the effects of berberine on pancreatitis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction are yet to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of berberine pretreatment on the attenuation of intestinal barrier dysfunction induced by severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 36 rats were randomly divided into Sham, SAP and SAP plus berberine groups. Pancreatitis was induced using retrograde injection of 3% Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Histological examinations of the pancreas were performed and intestinal barrier dysfunction was characterized by histological measurements and the assessment of serum diamine oxidase activity and endotoxin levels. Zonula occludens-1 and occludin mRNA and protein expression, as well as myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, were assessed. SAP rat models were successfully established. Berberine treatment was found to have no significant effect on the histological changes in the pancreas, but was observed to ameliorate the intestinal mucosal barrier damage and membrane permeability associated with SAP. Although berberine exerted minimal effects on tight junction proteins in the ilea of SAP rats, it was observed to significantly inhibit SAP-induced MLC phosphorylation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that berberine attenuates SAP‑induced intestinal barrier dysfunction in vivo. In addition, this study shows that the effect of berberine on intestinal barrier function may be associated with the inhibition of SAP‑induced upregulation of MLC phosphorylation.

  2. CXCR4 Antagonist AMD3100 Modulates Claudin Expression and Intestinal Barrier Function in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xian-Ming; Wang, Fang-Yu; Zhou, Ju; Hu, Kai-Feng; Li, Su-Wen; Zou, Bing-Bing

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by local inflammation and impaired epithelial barrier. Previous studies demonstrated that CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists could reduce colonic inflammation and mucosal damage in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Whether CXCR4 antagonist has action on intestinal barrier and the possible mechanism, is largely undefined. In the present study, the experimental colitis was induced by administration of 5% DSS for 7 days, and CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 was administered intraperitoneally once daily during the study period. For in vitro study, HT-29/B6 colonic cells were treated with cytokines or AMD3100 for 24 h until assay. DSS-induced colitis was characterized by morphologic changes in mice. In AMD3100-treated mice, epithelial destruction, inflammatory infiltration, and submucosal edema were markedly reduced, and the disease activity index was also significantly decreased. Increased intestinal permeability in DSS-induced colitis was also significantly reduced by AMD3100. The expressions of colonic claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-5, claudin-7 and claudin-8 were markedly decreased after DSS administration, whereas colonic claudin-2 expression was significantly decreased. Treatment with AMD3100 prevented all these changes. However, AMD3100 had no influence on claudin-3, claudin-5, claudin-7 and claudin-8 expression in HT-29/B6 cells. Cytokines as TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ increased apoptosis and monolayer permeability, inhibited the wound-healing and the claudin-3, claudin-7 and claudin-8 expression in HT-29/B6 cells. We suggest that AMD3100 acted on colonic claudin expression and intestinal barrier function, at least partly, in a cytokine-dependent pathway. PMID:22073304

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction induced by unconjugated bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yukun; Qin, Huanlong; Zhang, Ming; Shen, Tongyi; Chen, Hongqi; Ma, Yanlei; Chu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Zhihua

    2010-08-01

    Although a large number of in vitro and in vivo tests have confirmed that taking probiotics can improve the intestinal barrier, few studies have focused on the relationship between probiotics and the intestinal epithelial barrier in hyperbilirubinaemia. To investigate the effects of and mechanisms associated with probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum; LP) and unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) on the intestinal epithelial barrier, we measured the viability, apoptotic ratio and protein kinase C (PKC) activity of Caco-2 cells. We also determined the distribution and expression of tight junction proteins such as occludin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-1, claudin-4, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-1 and F-actin using confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and real-time quantitative PCR. The present study demonstrated that high concentrations of UCB caused obvious cytotoxicity and decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. Low concentrations of UCB inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins and PKC but could induce UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1 family-polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) expression. UCB alone caused decreased PKC activity, serine phosphorylated occludin and ZO-1 levels. After treatment with LP, the effects of UCB on TER and apoptosis were mitigated; LP also prevented aberrant expression and rearrangement of tight junction proteins. Moreover, PKC activity and serine phosphorylated tight junction protein levels were partially restored after treatment with LP, LP exerted a protective effect against UCB damage to Caco-2 monolayer cells, and it restored the structure and distribution of tight junction proteins by activating the PKC pathway. In addition, UGT1A1 expression induced by UCB in Caco-2 cells could ameliorate the cytotoxicity of UCB. PMID:20412608

  4. Recipient NK cell inactivation and intestinal barrier loss are required for MHC-matched graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nalle, Sam C; Kwak, H Aimee; Edelblum, Karen L; Joseph, Nora E; Singh, Gurminder; Khramtsova, Galina F; Mortenson, Eric D; Savage, Peter A; Turner, Jerrold R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have shown a correlation between pretransplant conditioning intensity, intestinal barrier loss, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) severity. However, because irradiation and other forms of pretransplant conditioning have pleiotropic effects, the precise role of intestinal barrier loss in GVHD pathogenesis remains unclear. We developed GVHD models that allowed us to isolate the specific contributions of distinct pretransplant variables. Intestinal damage was required for the induction of minor mismatch [major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched] GVHD, but was not necessary for major mismatch GVHD, demonstrating fundamental pathogenic distinctions between these forms of disease. Moreover, recipient natural killer (NK) cells prevented minor mismatch GVHD by limiting expansion and target organ infiltration of alloreactive T cells via a perforin-dependent mechanism, revealing an immunoregulatory function of MHC-matched recipient NK cells in GVHD. Minor mismatch GVHD required MyD88-mediated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling on donor cells, and intestinal damage could be bypassed by parenteral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration, indicating a critical role for the influx of bacterial components triggered by intestinal barrier loss. In all, the data demonstrate that pretransplant conditioning plays a dual role in promoting minor mismatch GVHD by both depleting recipient NK cells and inducing intestinal barrier loss.

  5. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  6. The First Line of Defense: The Effects of Alcohol on Post-Burn Intestinal Barrier, Immune Cells, and Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Adam M; Morris, Niya L; Earley, Zachary M; Choudhry, Mashkoor A

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is one of the most globally abused substances, and is one of the leading causes of premature death in the world. As a result of its complexity and direct contact with ingested alcohol, the intestine represents the primary source from which alcohol-associated pathologies stem. The gut is the largest reservoir of bacteria in the body, and under healthy conditions, it maintains a barrier preventing bacteria from translocating out of the intestinal lumen. The intestinal barrier is compromised following alcohol exposure, which can lead to life-threatening systemic complications including sepsis and multiple organ failure. Furthermore, alcohol is a major confounding factor in pathology associated with trauma. Experimental data from both human and animal studies suggest that alcohol perturbs the intestinal barrier and its function, which is exacerbated by a "second hit" from traumatic injury. This article highlights the role of alcohol-mediated alterations of the intestinal epithelia and its defense against bacteria within the gut, and the impact of alcohol on intestinal immunity, specifically on T cells and neutrophils. Finally, it discusses how the gut microbiome both contributes to and protects the intestines from dysbiosis after alcohol exposure and trauma.

  7. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji; Wullaert, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  8. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  9. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the damage to small intestinal mucosa following X irradiation or hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, K.E.; Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.; Michalowski, A.

    1982-01-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (S.E.M. and T.E.M.) and resin histology have been used to investigate the effects on mouse small intestinal villi of heating at 43 degrees C for 20 minutes and of irradiation with 10 Gy X-rays. Damage after irradiation included conical villi and giant cells. Damage after heating included the production of conical and rudimentary villi and the stacking of enterocytes. Individual cells showed signs of abnormalities in their cell membranes, nuclei and cytoplasmic components. The differences in the response after irradiation and hyperthermia are linked to the fact that heating has a primary effect on villous structure, whereas irradiation mainly affects the proliferative pool of crypt cells.

  10. Protective effect of Enterococcus faecalis DAPTO 512 on the intestinal tract and gut mucosa: milk allergy application.

    PubMed

    Belkaaloul, K; Haertlé, T; Chobert, J M; Merah, R; Taibi, K; Saad El Hachemi, H A; Hemch, S; Amier, L; Chekroun, A; Saidi, D; Kheroua, O

    2015-01-01

    The allergenicity of β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) was studied by using Ussing chamber in a murine model of β-Lg allergy supplemented with hydrolysates obtained after fermentation of milk for 48 h at 37 (°)C with Enterococcus faecalis DAPTO 512, isolated from cow milk and identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Balb/c mice were sensitised intraperitoneally with β-Lg. Three groups of mice were formed: group 1, composed of naive mice used as control received only NaCl; group 2, positive control composed of mice sensitised intraperitoneally with β-Lg; group 3, formed by mice which were given hydrolysates of 48 h then sensitised with β-Lg. After 48 h of fermentation β-casein and β-Lg were degraded by E. faecalis DAPTO 512. β-Lg immunisation was associated with strong IgG and IgE production in case of positive controls and a significant increase in short current circuit (Isc) and high conductance (G) responses were observed. The control and the hydrolysate groups showed a significant decrease in the production of IgG and IgE anti β-Lg compared to the positive control. The allergenic potential of β-Lg was markedly reduced in the group that received hydrolysates (Isc and G remained unchanged after intestine challenge with β-Lg). The histological scrutiny showed villi atrophy, lymphocyte hyperplasia and a significant chorion detachment in the positive control group. In the group administered with hydrolysates of fermented milk, inflammatory signs were lower, the villi were long and thin and lymphocytes were less dense. The results showed that feeding of milk fermented with E. faecalis DAPTO 512 during 18 days prior to β-Lg allergy induction exerts a protecting effect on the murine intestine and induces a significant decrease in the β-Lg allergenicity.

  11. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanhui; Li, Guanya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS) and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group) or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group) for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P < 0.05) and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO) activity (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P < 0.05) and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P < 0.05). The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements. PMID:27610376

  12. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guiping; Wang, Hongbing; Peng, Hanhui; Li, Guanya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS) and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group) or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group) for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P < 0.05) and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO) activity (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P < 0.05) and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P < 0.05). The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements. PMID:27610376

  13. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanhui; Li, Guanya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS) and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group) or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group) for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P < 0.05) and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO) activity (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P < 0.05) and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P < 0.05). The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements.

  14. Absorption by the rhesus monkey of phenylalanine methyl ester and species differences in its metabolism by blood, plasma and intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Burton, E G; Dal Monte, P; Spears, C; Frank, P; Oppermann, J A

    1984-10-01

    Phenylalanine methyl ester (PM) is a decomposition product of the sweetening agent aspartame. The potential for absorption of PM was examined following intragastric and intraduodenal administration of 20-mg doses of [14C]PM to rhesus monkeys implanted with hepatic portal vein cannulae. Small amounts of unchanged PM (less than 0.1 micrograms/ml) were detected in portal and peripheral blood samples during the first 1-2 hours after administration, but none was detectable (less than 0.001 micrograms/ml) at later times. Comparison of the areas under the PM and total 14C blood concentration-time curves indicated that only 0.2% of the administered PM reached the portal blood unchanged, and 0.1% or less reached the peripheral blood unchanged. Blood and plasma from monkeys and humans hydrolyzed PM in vitro at very similar rates, but plasma PMase activity was much higher in the dog and rat than in the monkey or human. Hydrolysis of PM by intestinal mucosa homogenates was also faster for the rat and dog than for the monkey. The in vitro results suggest that absorption of intact PM in the human would be no greater than that found in the monkey.

  15. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  16. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model

    PubMed Central

    Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01). Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01) and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05). In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01) and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05) and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01), decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05), normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may protect against

  17. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiang; Linglong, Peng; Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01). Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01) and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05). In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01) and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05) and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01), decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05), normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may protect against

  18. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-08-01

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Bacterial translocation, the levels of lysozyme, mucin 2 (MUC2), and IAP were analyzed. The composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Compared with chow, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) resulted in a dysfunctional mucosal barrier, as evidenced by increased bacterial translocation (p < 0.05), loss of lysozyme, MUC2, and IAP, and changes in the gut microbiota (p < 0.001). Administration of 20% EN supplemented with PN significantly increased the concentrations of lysozyme, MUC2, IAP, and the mRNA levels of lysozyme and MUC2 (p < 0.001). The percentages of Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes were significantly lower in the 20% EN group than in the TPN group (p < 0.001). These changes were accompanied by maintained barrier function in bacterial culture (p < 0.05). Supplementation of PN with 20% EN preserves gut barrier function, by way of maintaining innate immunity, IAP and intestinal microbiota.

  19. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Bacterial translocation, the levels of lysozyme, mucin 2 (MUC2), and IAP were analyzed. The composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Compared with chow, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) resulted in a dysfunctional mucosal barrier, as evidenced by increased bacterial translocation (p < 0.05), loss of lysozyme, MUC2, and IAP, and changes in the gut microbiota (p < 0.001). Administration of 20% EN supplemented with PN significantly increased the concentrations of lysozyme, MUC2, IAP, and the mRNA levels of lysozyme and MUC2 (p < 0.001). The percentages of Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes were significantly lower in the 20% EN group than in the TPN group (p < 0.001). These changes were accompanied by maintained barrier function in bacterial culture (p < 0.05). Supplementation of PN with 20% EN preserves gut barrier function, by way of maintaining innate immunity, IAP and intestinal microbiota. PMID:26247961

  20. Epithelium-intrinsic NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome drives infected enterocyte expulsion to restrict Salmonella replication in the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Mikael E; Müller, Anna A; Felmy, Boas; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Diard, Médéric; Tardivel, Aubry; Maslowski, Kendle M; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-08-13

    The gut mucosal epithelium separates the host from the microbiota, but enteropathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) can invade and breach this barrier. Defenses against such acute insults remain incompletely understood. Using a murine model of Salmonella enterocolitis, we analyzed mechanisms limiting pathogen loads in the epithelium during early infection. Although the epithelium-invading S.Tm replicate initially, this intraepithelial replicative niche is restricted by expulsion of infected enterocytes into the lumen. This mechanism is compromised if inflammasome components (NAIP1-6, NLRC4, caspase-1/-11) are deleted, or ablated specifically in the epithelium, resulting in ∼100-fold higher intraepithelial loads and accelerated lymph node colonization. Interestingly, the cytokines downstream of inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1α/β and IL-18, appear dispensable for epithelial restriction of early infection. These data establish the role of an epithelium-intrinsic inflammasome, which drives expulsion of infected cells to restrict the pathogen's intraepithelial proliferation. This may represent a general defense mechanism against mucosal infections. PMID:25121751

  1. Ethanol and dietary unsaturated fat (corn oil/linoleic acid enriched) cause intestinal inflammation and impaired intestinal barrier defense in mice chronically fed alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kirpich, Irina A; Feng, Wenke; Wang, Yuhua; Liu, Yanlong; Beier, Juliane I; Arteel, Gavin E; Falkner, K Cameron; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol and dietary fat both play an important role in alcohol-mediated multi-organ pathology, including gut and liver. In the present study we hypothesized that the combination of alcohol and dietary unsaturated fat (USF) would result in intestinal inflammatory stress and mucus layer alterations, thus contributing to disruption of intestinal barrier integrity. C57BL/6N mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing EtOH and enriched in USF (corn oil/linoleic acid) or SF (medium chain triglycerides: beef tallow) for 8 weeks. Intestinal histology, morphometry, markers of inflammation, as well as levels of mucus protective factors were evaluated. Alcohol and dietary USF triggered an intestinal pro-inflammatory response, characterized by increase in Tnf-α, MCP1, and MPO activity. Further, alcohol and dietary USF, but not SF, resulted in alterations of the intestinal mucus layer, characterized by decreased expression of Muc2 in the ileum. A strong correlation was observed between down-regulation of the antimicrobial factor Cramp and increased Tnf-α mRNA. Therefore, dietary unsaturated fat (corn oil/LA enriched) is a significant contributing factor to EtOH-mediated intestinal inflammatory response and mucus layer alterations in rodents.

  2. Characterization of mucosa-associated bacterial communities of the mouse intestine by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism: Utility of sampling strategies and methods to reduce single-stranded DNA artifacts.

    PubMed

    Costa, Estela; Puhl, Nathan J; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2009-08-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) is a molecular technique used for comparative analysis of microbial community structure and dynamics. We evaluated three sampling methods for recovering bacterial community DNA associated with intestinal mucosa of mice (i.e. mechanical agitation with PBS, hand washing with PBS containing Tween 80, and direct DNA extraction from mucosal plugs). In addition, the utility of two methods (i.e. Klenow fragment and mung-bean nuclease) to reduce single-stranded DNA artifacts was tested. T-RFLP analysis indicated that diverse communities of bacteria are associated with mucosa of the ileum, cecum, and descending colon of mice. Although there was no significant difference in bacterial community structure between the mechanical agitation and direct DNA extraction methods regardless of intestinal location, community diversity was reduced for the hand wash method in the colon. The use of Klenow fragment and mung-bean nuclease have been reported to eliminate single-stranded DNA artifacts (i.e. pseudo-T-restriction fragments), but neither method was beneficial for characterizing mucosa-associated bacterial communities of the mouse cecum. Our study showed that the mechanical agitation and direct plug extraction methods yielded equivalent bacterial community DNA from the mucosa of the small and large intestines of mice, but the latter method was superior for logistical reasons. We also applied a combination of different statistical approaches to analyze T-RFLP data, including statistical detection of true peaks, analysis of variance for peak number, and group significance test, which provided a quantitative improvement for the interpretation of the T-RFLP data.

  3. Delivery of berberine using chitosan/fucoidan-taurine conjugate nanoparticles for treatment of defective intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Jung; Don, Trong-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can cause defective intestinal barrier function and play an important role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, a nanocarrier based on chitosan and fucoidan was developed for oral delivery of berberine (Ber). A sulfonated fucoidan, fucoidan-taurine (FD-Tau) conjugate, was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The FD-Tau conjugate was self-assembled with berberine and chitosan (CS) to form Ber-loaded CS/FD-Tau complex nanoparticles with high drug loading efficiency. Berberine release from the nanoparticles had fast release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4), while the release was slow in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 2.0). The effect of the berberine-loaded nanoparticles in protecting intestinal tight-junction barrier function against nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines released from LPS-stimulated macrophage was evaluated by determining the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability of a model macromolecule fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) in a Caco-2 cells/RAW264.7 cells co-culture system. Inhibition of redistribution of tight junction ZO-1 protein by the nanoparticles was visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The results suggest that the nanoparticles may be useful for local delivery of berberine to ameliorate LPS-induced intestinal epithelia tight junction disruption, and that the released berberine can restore barrier function in inflammatory and injured intestinal epithelial. PMID:25421323

  4. Identification of novel lymphoid tissues in murine intestinal mucosa where clusters of c-kit+ IL-7R+ Thy1+ lympho-hemopoietic progenitors develop

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have revealed that about one and a half thousand tiny clusters, filled with one thousand closely packed lymphocytes, can be found throughout the murine small and large intestinal mucosa. They are located in crypt lamina propria (cryptopatches; CP) and can be first detected at 14-17 d after birth. A large fraction of lymphocytes in CP expresses c-kit, IL-7R, Thy1 and a lymphocyte function-associated antigen, LFA-1, whereas most of them remain CD3-, TCR alpha beta-, TCR gamma delta-, sIgM-, and B220-. The population size of IL-2R alpha+, HSA+ and Pgp-1+ subsets is variable (20-50%) and the composition of CD8+, Ly-1+, and CD4+ subsets is smaller but also variable (3-20%). In the small intestine, CP do not contain cells undergoing apoptosis nor cells bearing RAG-1 molecules, but do contain dendritic stromal cells bearing CD11c/CD18 molecules. The frequency of DNA replicating cells in CP is higher than that in Peyer's patches (PP), is lower than that in the thymic cortex and is almost comparable with that in the thymic medulla. The numbers of CP remain the same in aged mice (> 114 wk) but double after estrogen treatment even though the thymi are attenuated sharply in both conditions. Thus, with respect to histogenesis, lymphocyte composition and tissue level of cellular behavior, neither PP, isolated lymphoid follicles, peripheral LNs, nor thymus are identical with CP. Finally, CP are virtually absent in lamina propria of IL-7R-deficient mice that display a profound reduction in thymic and peripheral lymphoid cellularity. By contrast, CP are present in germ- free mice and in athymic (nu/nu), SCID, TCR beta x delta-/-, RAG-2-/-, PP-deficient (aly/aly), stem cell factor (Sl/Sld) and c-kit (W/Wv) mutant mice. Taking all of these results together, CP are the first identification of gut-associated murine lymphoid tissues where the generation of IL-7-dependent lympho-hematopoietic progenitors for T and/or B cell descendants may start to take place at the age of

  5. Acute effects of rotavirus and malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in neonatal piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Rhoads, J Marc; Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Odle, Jack

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of protein-energy malnutrition on intestinal barrier function during rotavirus enteritis in a piglet model. METHODS: Newborn piglets were allotted at day 4 of age to the following treatments: (1) full-strength formula (FSF)/noninfected; (2) FSF/rotavirus infected; (3) half-strength formula (HSF)/noninfected; or (4) HSF/rotavirus infected. After one day of adjustment to the feeding rates, pigs were infected with rotavirus and acute effects on growth and diarrhea were monitored for 3 d and jejunal samples were collected for Ussing-chamber analyses. RESULTS: Piglets that were malnourished or infected had lower body weights on days 2 and 3 post-infection (P < 0.05). Three days post-infection, marked diarrhea and weight loss were accompanied by sharp reductions in villus height (59%) and lactase activity (91%) and increased crypt depth (21%) in infected compared with non-infected pigs (P < 0.05). Malnutrition also increased crypt depth (21%) compared to full-fed piglets. Villus:crypt ratio was reduced (67%) with viral infection. There was a trend for reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance with rotavirus infection and malnutrition (P = 0.1). 3H-mannitol flux was significantly increased (50%; P < 0.001) in rotavirus-infected piglets compared to non-infected piglets, but there was no effect of nutritional status. Furthermore, rotavirus infection reduced localization of the tight junction protein, occludin, in the cell membrane and increased localization in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: Overall, malnutrition had no additive effects to rotavirus infection on intestinal barrier function at day 3 post-infection in a neonatal piglet model. PMID:23964143

  6. Intestinal and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Ginkgolides and Bilobalide: In Vitro and In Vivo Approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study intestinal and blood brain barrier (BBB) transport of ginkgolides A, B, C, J and bilobalide, isolated from Ginkgo biloba (Family-Ginkgoaceae), was evaluated in Caco-2 and MDR1-MDCK cell monolayer models. Transepithelial transport was examined for 2 hours in both absorptive and secretor...

  7. MicroRNAs as regulators of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions: implication for intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kenji; Iwamoto, Takuya; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions in the small intestine function as an absorption barrier and sometimes as a facilitator of orally administered drugs. The expression of these proteins often fluctuates and thereby causes individual pharmacokinetic variability. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small non-coding RNAs, have recently emerged as a new class of gene regulator. MiRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to target mRNA to suppress its translation or regulate its degradation. They have been shown to be key regulators of proteins associated with pharmacokinetics. Moreover, the role of miRNAs on the expression of some proteins expressed in the small intestine has recently been clarified. In this review, we summarize current knowledge regarding the role of miRNAs in the regulation of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions as well as its implication for intestinal barrier function. MiRNAs play vital roles in the differentiation, architecture, and barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells, and directly and/or indirectly regulate the expression and function of proteins associated with drug absorption in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the variation of miRNA expression caused by pathological and physiological conditions as well as genetic factors should affect the expression of these proteins. Therefore, miRNAs could be significant factors affecting inter- and intra-individual variations in the pharmacokinetics and intestinal absorption of drugs. Overall, miRNAs could be promising targets for personalized pharmacotherapy or other attractive therapies through intestinal absorption of drugs.

  8. Identification of a new fimbrial structure in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) serotype O148:H28 which adheres to human intestinal mucosa: a potentially new human ETEC colonization factor.

    PubMed

    Knutton, S; Lloyd, D R; McNeish, A S

    1987-01-01

    Three important fimbrial colonization factor antigens (CFAs) designated CFA/I, CFA/II, and E8775 were identified originally in some human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains because of their mannose-resistant hemagglutination properties. To identify CFA, in strains lacking mannose-resistant hemagglutination properties we exploited the ability of human ETEC strains to adhere to human proximal small intestinal mucosa. ETEC strain B7A (O148:H28) was selected for study because it belongs to an epidemiologically important serotype and does not produce a known CFA, and yet it is known to be pathogenic and cause diarrheal disease in human volunteers. Results of an human enterocyte adhesion assay indicated that some bacteria in cultures of B7A produced adhesive factors. To select for such bacteria, cultured human duodenal mucosal biopsy samples were infected with B7A for up to 12 h, after which time a large percentage of the mucosal surface became colonized by bacteria. A new fimbrial structure morphologically distinct from CFA/I, CFA/II, and E8775 fimbriae and consisting of curly fibrils (approximately 3 nm in diameter) was readily identified when bacteria were subcultured from the mucosa and examined by electron microscopy. Identical fimbriae were produced by ETEC strain 1782-77 of the same serotype. Identification of these fimbriae only on bacteria subcultured from human intestinal mucosa strongly suggests that they promote mucosal adhesion of ETEC serotype O148:H28 and thus represent a potentially new human ETEC CFA.

  9. Cellular uptake and transcytosis of lipid-based nanoparticles across the intestinal barrier: Relevance for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Rute; Queiroz, Joana Fontes; Costa Lima, Sofia A; Figueiredo, Francisco; Fernandes, Rui; Reis, Salette

    2016-02-01

    Oral administration is the preferred route for drug delivery and nanosystems represent a promising tool for protection and transport of hardly soluble, chemically unstable and poorly permeable drugs through the intestinal barrier. In the present work, we have studied lipid nanoparticles cellular uptake, internalization pathways and transcytosis routes through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Both lipid nanosystems presented similar size (∼180nm) and surface charge (-30mV). Nanostructured lipid carriers showed a higher cellular uptake and permeability across the barrier, but solid lipid nanoparticles could enter cells faster than the former. The internalization of lipid nanoparticles occurs mainly through a clathrin-mediated endocytosis mechanism, although caveolae-mediated endocytosis is also involved in the uptake. Both lipid nanoparticles were able to cross the intestinal barrier by a preferential transcellular route. This work contributed to a better knowledge of the developed nanosystems for the oral delivery of a wide spectrum of drugs.

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes barrier maturation and wound healing in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meir, Michael; Flemming, Sven; Burkard, Natalie; Bergauer, Lisa; Metzger, Marco; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Schlegel, Nicolas

    2015-10-15

    Recent data suggest that neurotrophic factors from the enteric nervous system are involved in intestinal epithelial barrier regulation. In this context the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was shown to affect gut barrier properties in vivo directly or indirectly by largely undefined processes in a model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We further investigated the potential role and mechanisms of GDNF in the regulation of intestinal barrier functions. Immunostaining of human gut specimen showed positive GDNF staining in enteric neuronal plexus and in enterocytes. In Western blots of the intestinal epithelial cell lines Caco2 and HT29B6, significant amounts of GDNF were detected, suggesting that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF. Application of recombinant GDNF on Caco2 and HT29B6 cells for 24 h resulted in significant epithelial barrier stabilization in monolayers with immature barrier functions. Wound-healing assays showed a significantly faster closure of the wounded areas after GDNF application. GDNF augmented cAMP levels and led to significant inactivation of p38 MAPK in immature cells. Activation of p38 MAPK signaling by SB-202190 mimicked GDNF-induced barrier maturation, whereas the p38 MAPK activator anisomycin blocked GDNF-induced effects. Increasing cAMP levels had adverse effects on barrier maturation, as revealed by permeability measurements. However, increased cAMP augmented the proliferation rate in Caco2 cells, and GDNF-induced proliferation of epithelial cells was abrogated by the PKA inhibitor H89. Our data show that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF synthesis. GDNF contributes to wound healing in a cAMP/PKA-dependent manner and promotes barrier maturation in immature enterocytes cells by inactivation of p38 MAPK signaling.

  11. In Vivo and In Vitro Antinociceptive Effect of Fagopyrum cymosum (Trev.) Meisn Extracts: A Possible Action by Recovering Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lina; Cai, Xueting; Yan, Jing; Luo, Yi; Shao, Ming; Lu, Yin; Sun, Zhiguang; Cao, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Fagopyrum cymosum (Trev.) Meisn (Fag) is a herb rhizome which has been widely used to treat diseases. To investigate the effects and mechanisms of the Fag on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), in vivo neonatal pups maternal separation (NMS) combined with intracolonic infusion of acetic acid (AA) was employed to establish IBS rat models. Fag reduced their visceral hyperalgesia and the whole gut permeability, ameliorated colonic mucosa inflammation and injury, and upregulated the expression of decreased tight junction proteins (TJs) of claudin-1, occludin, and ZO-1 (except ZO-2) in colonic epithelium. Caco-2 monolayer cells were incubated with TNF-α and IFN-γ  in vitro to establish an epithelial barrier dysfunction model whose transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) depended more on dose of Fag than that of the controls, and whose TJs levels were lower than those of the controls. Fag upregulated the NP-40 insoluble and soluble components of the four TJs markedly in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that Fag alleviated the hyperalgesia of IBS rats by reducing intestinal inflammation and enhancing mucosal epithelial function after regulating the structure and function of TJs. PMID:23365604

  12. In Vivo and In Vitro Antinociceptive Effect of Fagopyrum cymosum (Trev.) Meisn Extracts: A Possible Action by Recovering Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lina; Cai, Xueting; Yan, Jing; Luo, Yi; Shao, Ming; Lu, Yin; Sun, Zhiguang; Cao, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Fagopyrum cymosum (Trev.) Meisn (Fag) is a herb rhizome which has been widely used to treat diseases. To investigate the effects and mechanisms of the Fag on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), in vivo neonatal pups maternal separation (NMS) combined with intracolonic infusion of acetic acid (AA) was employed to establish IBS rat models. Fag reduced their visceral hyperalgesia and the whole gut permeability, ameliorated colonic mucosa inflammation and injury, and upregulated the expression of decreased tight junction proteins (TJs) of claudin-1, occludin, and ZO-1 (except ZO-2) in colonic epithelium. Caco-2 monolayer cells were incubated with TNF-α and IFN-γ  in vitro to establish an epithelial barrier dysfunction model whose transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) depended more on dose of Fag than that of the controls, and whose TJs levels were lower than those of the controls. Fag upregulated the NP-40 insoluble and soluble components of the four TJs markedly in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that Fag alleviated the hyperalgesia of IBS rats by reducing intestinal inflammation and enhancing mucosal epithelial function after regulating the structure and function of TJs.

  13. Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuli; Yin, Li; Li, Xing; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Dayong

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged exposure to 0.5-100 mg L-1 of GO caused damage on functions of both primary (intestine) and secondary (neuron and reproductive organ) targeted organs. In the intestine, ROS production was significantly correlated with the formation of adverse effects on functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs. GO could be translocated into intestinal cells with loss of microvilli, and distributed to be adjacent to or surrounding mitochondria. Prolonged exposure to GO resulted in a hyper-permeable state of the intestinal barrier, an increase in mean defecation cycle length, and alteration of genes required for intestinal development and defecation behavior. Thus, our data suggest that prolonged exposure to GO may cause potential risk to environmental organisms after release into the environment. GO toxicity may be due to the combinational effects of oxidative stress in the intestinal barrier, enhanced permeability of the biological barrier, and suppressed defecation behavior in C. elegans.Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged

  14. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans. PMID:27058607

  15. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans.

  16. Fermented Yupingfeng polysaccharides enhance immunity by improving the foregut microflora and intestinal barrier in weaning rex rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Ni, Xueqin; Song, Xu; Wen, Bin; Zhou, Yi; Zou, Fuqin; Yang, Mingyue; Peng, Zhirong; Zhu, Hui; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Hesong; Fu, Xiangchao; Shi, Yunduo; Yin, Zhongqiong; Pan, Kangcheng; Jing, Bo; Zeng, Dong; Wang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    Yupingfeng (YPF) is a kind of Astragali radix-based ancient Chinese herbal supplemented with Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Radix Saposhnikoviae. Increasing evidence has proven the beneficial immunomodulating activity of YPF. However, the action mechanism(s) of it is not known. Here, we explored the immunomodulatory activity of unfermented Yupingfeng polysaccharides (UYP) and fermented Yupingfeng polysaccharides (FYP) obtained using Rhizopus oligosporus SH in weaning Rex rabbits. The results showed that both UYP and FYP exhibited notable growth-promoting and immune-enhancing activities, improvement of the intestinal flora homeostasis, and maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity and functionality. Notably, compared with UYP, FYP effectively enhanced average daily gain, organ indices, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), TLR2, and TLR4 mRNA levels in spleen, IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ protein concentrations in serum, and TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expressions in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Moreover, FYP exhibited greater beneficial effects in improving the intestinal flora, including augment flora diversity and the abundance of cellulolytic bacteria, reduction the abundance of Streptococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. in the GIT, particularly the foregut and maintaining the intestinal barrier integrity and functionality by upregulating zonula occludens 1, claudin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, trefoil factor, and epidermal growth factor mRNA levels in the jejunum and ileum. Our results indicated the immunoenhancement effect of FYP is superior over that of UYP, which is probably related with the amelioration of the intestinal microflora and intestinal barrier in the foregut. PMID:27260288

  17. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Dai, Weiqi; Mao, Yuqing; Li, Sainan; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-02-27

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  18. Transcytosis of Listeria monocytogenes across the intestinal barrier upon specific targeting of goblet cell accessible E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Nikitas, Georgios; Deschamps, Chantal; Disson, Olivier; Niault, Théodora; Cossart, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a foodborne pathogen that crosses the intestinal barrier upon interaction between its surface protein InlA and its species-specific host receptor E-cadherin (Ecad). Ecad, the key constituent of adherens junctions, is typically situated below tight junctions and therefore considered inaccessible from the intestinal lumen. In this study, we investigated how Lm specifically targets its receptor on intestinal villi and crosses the intestinal epithelium to disseminate systemically. We demonstrate that Ecad is luminally accessible around mucus-expelling goblet cells (GCs), around extruding enterocytes at the tip and lateral sides of villi, and in villus epithelial folds. We show that upon preferential adherence to accessible Ecad on GCs, Lm is internalized, rapidly transcytosed across the intestinal epithelium, and released in the lamina propria by exocytosis from where it disseminates systemically. Together, these results show that Lm exploits intrinsic tissue heterogeneity to access its receptor and reveal transcytosis as a novel and unanticipated pathway that is hijacked by Lm to breach the intestinal epithelium and cause systemic infection. PMID:21967767

  19. Maternal exposure to carbamazepine at environmental concentrations can cross intestinal and placental barriers.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Huber, David P; Aho, Ken; Finney, Bruce; Bearden, Shawn; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Thomas, Michael A

    2016-05-27

    Psychoactive pharmaceuticals have been found as teratogens at clinical dosage during pregnancy. These pharmaceuticals have also been detected in minute (ppb) concentrations in drinking water in the US, and are environmental contaminants that may be complicit in triggering neurological disorders in genetically susceptible individuals. Previous studies have determined that psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine and carbamazepine) at environmentally relevant concentrations enriched sets of genes regulating development and function of the nervous system in fathead minnows. Altered gene sets were also associated with potential neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Subsequent in vitro studies indicated that psychoactive pharmaceuticals altered ASD-associated synaptic protein expression and gene expression in human neuronal cells. However, it is unknown if environmentally relevant concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are able to cross biological barriers from mother to fetus, thus potentially posing risks to nervous system development. The main objective of this study was to test whether psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and carbamazepine) administered through the drinking water at environmental concentrations to pregnant mice could reach the brain of the developing embryo by crossing intestinal and placental barriers. We addressed this question by adding (2)H-isotope labeled pharmaceuticals to the drinking water of female mice for 20 days (10 pre-and 10 post-conception days), and quantifying (2)H-isotope enrichment signals in the dam liver and brain of developing embryos using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Significant levels of (2)H enrichment was detected in the brain of embryos and livers of carbamazepine-treated mice but not in those of control dams, or for fluoxetine or venlafaxine application. These results provide the first evidence that carbamazepine in drinking water and at typical

  20. Severity of pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal barrier injury is reduced following treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenhong; Abliz, Ablikim; Xu, Sheng; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    intestinal barrier dysfunction in sodium taurocholate-induced SAP, presumably via its role in the prevention of reactive oxygen species generation and inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathway activation. These findings provide novel insight suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of NOX by apocynin may be considered a novel therapeutic method for the treatment of intestinal injury in SAP. PMID:27573037

  1. Severity of pancreatitis‑associated intestinal mucosal barrier injury is reduced following treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Abliz, Ablikim; Xu, Sheng; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing

    2016-10-01

    that apocynin may attenuate intestinal barrier dysfunction in sodium taurocholate‑induced SAP, presumably via its role in the prevention of reactive oxygen species generation and inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF‑κB pathway activation. These findings provide novel insight suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of NOX by apocynin may be considered a novel therapeutic method for the treatment of intestinal injury in SAP. PMID:27573037

  2. Macleaya cordata Extract Decreased Diarrhea Score and Enhanced Intestinal Barrier Function in Growing Piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Guan, Guiping; Fang, Jun; Martínez, Yordan; Chen, Shuai; Bin, Peng; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Gong, Ting; Tossou, Myrlene Carine B; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Macleaya cordata extract is of great scientific and practical interest to researchers, due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory responses within experimental animals. This study was designed to determine the diarrhea score and innate immunity of growing piglets after they had received Macleaya cordata extract supplements. A total of 240 growing pigs were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 10 piglets per replicate. All pigs received a basal diet containing similar amounts of nutrients. The three treatments were a control (no additive), an antibiotic (200 mg/kg colistin), and the Macleaya cordata extract supplement group (40 mg/kg Macleaya cordata extract). The diarrhea score was calculated after D 28. The jejunal samples were obtained from five piglets selected randomly from each treatment on D 28. In comparison with the control group, the dietary Macleaya cordata extract and colistin group demonstrated a substantially decreased diarrhea score. The introduction of Macleaya cordata extract supplements to the diet significantly increased volumes of ZO-1 and claudin-1, particularly in comparison with the pigs in the control group (P < 0.05). The findings indicate that Macleaya cordata extract does enhance intestinal barrier function in growing piglets and that it could be used as a viable substitute for antibiotics. PMID:27525260

  3. Macleaya cordata Extract Decreased Diarrhea Score and Enhanced Intestinal Barrier Function in Growing Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jun; Martínez, Yordan; Bin, Peng; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Macleaya cordata extract is of great scientific and practical interest to researchers, due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory responses within experimental animals. This study was designed to determine the diarrhea score and innate immunity of growing piglets after they had received Macleaya cordata extract supplements. A total of 240 growing pigs were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 10 piglets per replicate. All pigs received a basal diet containing similar amounts of nutrients. The three treatments were a control (no additive), an antibiotic (200 mg/kg colistin), and the Macleaya cordata extract supplement group (40 mg/kg Macleaya cordata extract). The diarrhea score was calculated after D 28. The jejunal samples were obtained from five piglets selected randomly from each treatment on D 28. In comparison with the control group, the dietary Macleaya cordata extract and colistin group demonstrated a substantially decreased diarrhea score. The introduction of Macleaya cordata extract supplements to the diet significantly increased volumes of ZO-1 and claudin-1, particularly in comparison with the pigs in the control group (P < 0.05). The findings indicate that Macleaya cordata extract does enhance intestinal barrier function in growing piglets and that it could be used as a viable substitute for antibiotics. PMID:27525260

  4. New advances in the pathophysiology of intestinal ion transport and barrier function in diarrhea and the impact on therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakraborty, Subhra; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Woodward, Owen M

    2012-06-01

    Diarrhea remains a continuous threat to human health worldwide. Scaling up the best practices for diarrhea prevention requires improved therapies. Diarrhea results from dysregulation of normal intestinal ion transport functions. Host-microbe contact is a key determinant of this response. Underlying mechanisms in the disease state are regulated by intracellular signals that modulate the activity of individual transport proteins responsible for ion transport and barrier function. Similarly, virulence factors of pathogens and their complex interaction with the host has shed light on the mechanism of enteric infection. Great advances in our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of epithelial transport, and host-microbe interaction have been made in recent years. Application of these new advances may represent strategies to decrease pathogen attachment, enhance intestinal cation absorption, decrease anion secretion and repair barrier function. This review highlights the new advances and better understanding in the pathophysiology of diarrheal diseases and their impact on therapy.

  5. The permeability of the plasma-lymph barrier of the small intestine of various species to macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Vogel, G; Martensen, I

    1982-03-01

    The filtration coefficients of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of molecular weight 10,000-110,000 were measured at the plasma-lymph barrier of the upper small intestine of rabbits, rats and cats. For this purpose the animals were given intravenous injections or infusions of PVP in such a way as to produce a constant blood level; PVP concentrations were measured in lymph obtained by cannulating the mesenteric duct and also in the plasma. In these species low molecular weight PVP had a filtration coefficient of 0.85-0.64, while high molecular weight PVP (MW 110,000) either had a very low filtration coefficient - 0.22 - or was not detectable in the intestinal lymph. The three species, representing herbivores, omnivores and carnivores, showed no differences in the penetration behavior of PVP, i.e., in the permeability of the plasma-lymph barrier to macromolecules.

  6. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Heat Stress-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Lei; Yin, Peng; Li, Deyin; Mei, Chen; Jiang, Linshu; Ma, Yunfei; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is important in the pathogenesis of intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid widely found in fruits and vegetables, can scavenge free radicals and activate cell stress responses. This study is aimed at investigating protective effects of FA on heat stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. Intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells were pretreated with FA for 4 h and then exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and increased permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (FD4). Both effects were inhibited by FA in a dose-dependent manner. FA significantly attenuated the decrease in occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression observed with heat stress. The distortion and redistribution of occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin proteins were also effectively prevented by FA pretreatment. Moreover, heat stress diminished electron-dense material detected in tight junctions (TJs), an effect also alleviated by FA in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo heat stress model, FA (50 mg/kg) was administered to male Sprague–Dawley rats for 7 consecutive days prior to exposure to heat stress. FA pretreatment significantly attenuated the effects of heat stress on the small intestine, including the increased FD4 permeability, disrupted tight junctions and microvilli structure, and reduced occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FA pretreatment is potentially protective against heat stress-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:26894689

  7. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Heat Stress-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Lei; Yin, Peng; Li, Deyin; Mei, Chen; Jiang, Linshu; Ma, Yunfei; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is important in the pathogenesis of intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid widely found in fruits and vegetables, can scavenge free radicals and activate cell stress responses. This study is aimed at investigating protective effects of FA on heat stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. Intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells were pretreated with FA for 4 h and then exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and increased permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (FD4). Both effects were inhibited by FA in a dose-dependent manner. FA significantly attenuated the decrease in occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression observed with heat stress. The distortion and redistribution of occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin proteins were also effectively prevented by FA pretreatment. Moreover, heat stress diminished electron-dense material detected in tight junctions (TJs), an effect also alleviated by FA in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo heat stress model, FA (50 mg/kg) was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 consecutive days prior to exposure to heat stress. FA pretreatment significantly attenuated the effects of heat stress on the small intestine, including the increased FD4 permeability, disrupted tight junctions and microvilli structure, and reduced occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FA pretreatment is potentially protective against heat stress-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:26894689

  8. Concepts and mechanisms: crossing host barriers.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly S; Banerjee, Anirban; Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2013-07-01

    The human body is bordered by the skin and mucosa, which are the cellular barriers that define the frontier between the internal milieu and the external nonsterile environment. Additional cellular barriers, such as the placental and the blood-brain barriers, define protected niches within the host. In addition to their physiological roles, these host barriers provide both physical and immune defense against microbial infection. Yet, many pathogens have evolved elaborated mechanisms to target this line of defense, resulting in a microbial invasion of cells constitutive of host barriers, disruption of barrier integrity, and systemic dissemination and invasion of deeper tissues. Here we review representative examples of microbial interactions with human barriers, including the intestinal, placental, and blood-brain barriers, and discuss how these microbes adhere to, invade, breach, or compromise these barriers.

  9. Diosmectite-zinc oxide composite improves intestinal barrier restoration and modulates TGF-β1, ERK1/2, and Akt in piglets after acetic acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Song, Z-H; Ke, Y-L; Xiao, K; Jiao, L-F; Hong, Q-H; Hu, C-H

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the beneficial effect of diosmectite-zinc oxide composite (DS-ZnO) on improving intestinal barrier restoration in piglets after acetic acid challenge and explored the underlying mechanisms. Twenty-four 35-d-old piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire), with an average weight of 8.1 kg, were allocated to 4 treatment groups. On d 1 of the trial, colitis was induced via intrarectal injection of acetic acid (10 mL of 10% acetic acid [ACA] solution for ACA, DS-ZnO, and mixture of diosmectite [DS] and ZnO [DS+ZnO] groups) and the control group was infused with saline. Twenty-four hours after challenged, piglets were fed with the following diets: 1) control group (basal diet), 2) ACA group (basal diet), 3) DS-ZnO group (basal diet supplemented with DS-ZnO), and 4) DS+ZnO group (mixture of 1.5 g diosmectite [DS]/kg and 500 mg Zn/kg from ZnO [equal amount of DS and ZnO in the DS-ZnO treatment group]). On d 8 of the trial, piglets were sacrificed. The results showed that DS-ZnO supplementation improved (P < 0.05) ADG, ADFI, and transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased (P < 0.05) fecal scores, crypt depth, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4 kDa (FD4) influx as compared with ACA group. Moreover, DS-ZnO increased (P < 0.05) occludin, claudin-1, and zonula occluden-1 expressions; reduced (P < 0.05) caspase-9 and caspase-3 activity and Bax expression; and improved (P < 0.05) Bcl2, XIAP, and PCNA expression. Diosmectite-zinc oxide composite supplementation also increased (P < 0.05) TGF-β1 expression and ERK1/2 and Akt activation. These results suggest that DS-ZnO attenuates the acetic acid-induced colitis by improving mucosa barrier restoration, inhibiting apoptosis, and improving intestinal epithelial cells proliferation and modulation of TGF-β1 and ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathway.

  10. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah; Daneshian, Mardas; Bouwstra, Joke; Caloni, Francesca; Constant, Samuel; Davies, Donna E; Dandekar, Gudrun; Guzman, Carlos A; Fabian, Eric; Haltner, Eleonore; Hartung, Thomas; Hasiwa, Nina; Hayden, Patrick; Kandarova, Helena; Khare, Sangeeta; Krug, Harald F; Kneuer, Carsten; Leist, Marcel; Lian, Guoping; Marx, Uwe; Metzger, Marco; Ott, Katharina; Prieto, Pilar; Roberts, Michael S; Roggen, Erwin L; Tralau, Tewes; van den Braak, Claudia; Walles, Heike; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields, ranging from the utilization of ex vivo tissue to reconstructed in vitro models, and further to chip-based technologies, synthetic membrane systems and, of increasing current interest, in silico modeling approaches. An international group of experts in the field of epithelial barriers was convened from academia, industry and regulatory bodies to present both the current state of the art of non-animal models of the skin, intestinal and pulmonary barriers in their various fields of application, and to discuss research-based, industry-driven and regulatory-relevant future directions for both the development of new models and the refinement of existing test methods. Issues of model relevance and preference, validation and standardization, acceptance, and the need for simplicity versus complexity were focal themes of the discussions. The outcomes of workshop presentations and discussions, in relation to both current status and future directions in the utilization and development of epithelial barrier models, are presented by the attending experts in the current report.

  11. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah; Daneshian, Mardas; Bouwstra, Joke; Caloni, Francesca; Constant, Samuel; Davies, Donna E; Dandekar, Gudrun; Guzman, Carlos A; Fabian, Eric; Haltner, Eleonore; Hartung, Thomas; Hasiwa, Nina; Hayden, Patrick; Kandarova, Helena; Khare, Sangeeta; Krug, Harald F; Kneuer, Carsten; Leist, Marcel; Lian, Guoping; Marx, Uwe; Metzger, Marco; Ott, Katharina; Prieto, Pilar; Roberts, Michael S; Roggen, Erwin L; Tralau, Tewes; van den Braak, Claudia; Walles, Heike; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields, ranging from the utilization of ex vivo tissue to reconstructed in vitro models, and further to chip-based technologies, synthetic membrane systems and, of increasing current interest, in silico modeling approaches. An international group of experts in the field of epithelial barriers was convened from academia, industry and regulatory bodies to present both the current state of the art of non-animal models of the skin, intestinal and pulmonary barriers in their various fields of application, and to discuss research-based, industry-driven and regulatory-relevant future directions for both the development of new models and the refinement of existing test methods. Issues of model relevance and preference, validation and standardization, acceptance, and the need for simplicity versus complexity were focal themes of the discussions. The outcomes of workshop presentations and discussions, in relation to both current status and future directions in the utilization and development of epithelial barrier models, are presented by the attending experts in the current report. PMID:26536291

  12. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the signatures of intestinal barrier alteration and pathogen entry in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) following Vibrio anguillarum challenge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengbin; Fu, Qiang; Su, Baofeng; Zhou, Shun; Liu, Fengqiao; Song, Lin; Zhang, Min; Ren, Yichao; Dong, Xiaoyu; Tan, Fenghua; Li, Chao

    2016-12-01

    The mucosal immune system serves as the frontline barriers of host defense against pathogen infection, especially for the fishes, which are living in the pathogen rich aquatic environment. The intestine constitutes the largest surface body area in constantly contact with the external pathogens, and plays a vital role in the immune defense against inflammation and pathogen infection. Previous studies have revealed that fish intestine might serves as the portal of entry for Vibrio anguillarum. To characterize the immune actors and their associated immune activities in turbot intestine barrier during bacterial infection, here we examined the gene expression profiles of turbot intestine at three time points following experimental infection with V. anguillarum utilizing RNA-seq technology. A total of 122 million reads were assembled into 183,101 contigs with an average length of 1151 bp and the N50 size of 2302 bp. Analysis of differential gene expression between control and infected samples at 1 h, 4 h, and 12 h revealed 2079 significantly expressed genes. Enrichment and pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed the centrality of the pathogen attachment and recognition, antioxidant/apoptosis, mucus barrier modification and immune activation/inflammation in the pathogen entry and host immune responses. The present study reported the novel gene expression patterns in turbot mucosal immunity, which were overlooked in previous studies. Our results can help to understand the mechanisms of turbot host defense, and may also provide foundation to identify the biomarkers for future selection of disease-resistant broodstock and evaluation of disease prevention and treatment options. PMID:27431928

  13. Cellular zinc is required for intestinal epithelial barrier maintenance via the regulation of claudin-3 and occludin expression.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Tanabe, Soichi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    Intracellular zinc is required for a variety of cell functions, but its precise roles in the maintenance of the intestinal tight junction (TJ) barrier remain unclear. The present study investigated the essential roles of intracellular zinc in the preservation of intestinal TJ integrity and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Depletion of intracellular zinc in both intestinal Caco-2 cells and mouse colons through the application of a cell-permeable zinc chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) induced a disruption of the TJ barrier, as indicated by increased FITC-labeled dextran flux and decreased transepithelial electrical resistance. The TPEN-induced TJ disruption is associated with downregulation of two TJ proteins, occludin and claudin-3. Biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that the zinc depletion induced the proteolysis of occludin but not claudin-3. Occludin proteolysis was sensitive to the inhibition of calpain activity, and increased calpain activity was observed in the zinc-depleted cells. Although quantitative PCR analysis and promoter reporter assay have demonstrated that the zinc depletion-induced claudin-3 downregulation occurred at transcriptional levels, a site-directed mutation in the egr1 binding site in the claudin-3 promoter sequence induced loss of both the basal promoter activity and the TPEN-induced decreases. Reduced egr1 expression by a specific siRNA also inhibited claudin-3 expression and transepithelial electrical resistance maintenance in cells. This study shows that intracellular zinc has an essential role in the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial TJ barrier through regulation of occludin proteolysis and claudin-3 transcription. PMID:27151944

  14. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction participates in the progress of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jing-Wei; Tang, Hai-Ying; Zhao, Ting; Tan, Xiao-Yan; Bi, Jian; Wang, Bing-Yuan; Wang, Ying-De

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is closely related to liver diseases, which implies impaired gut-liver axis may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In our study, rats were divided into three groups: normal chow diet (NCD) group, high-fat diet (HFD) group and TNBS-induced colitis with high-fat diet (C-HFD) group. Liver tissues were obtained for histological observation and TNF-α, IL-6 mRNA determination and blood samples were collected for liver enzymes and LPS analysis. Ultrastructural changes of jejuna epithelium, SIBO and amounts of CD103(+)MHCII(+)DCs and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)T-regs in terms of percentage in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were observed by electron microscope, bacterial cultivation and flow cytometry, respectively. The results demonstrated the pathological characteristics accorded with nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) and NASH in HFD group by week 8 and 12, respectively. Besides, the degree of hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis was more severe in C-HFD group compared with HFD-group at the same time point. NAFLD activity score (NAS), liver enzymes, concentration of LPS and mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 were higher significantly in C-HFD group compared with HFD and NCD group at week 4, 8 and 12, respectively. In HFD group, epithelium microvilli atrophy, disruptive tight junctions and SIBO were present, and these changes were more severe in NASH compared with NAFL. The percentage of CD103+MHCII+DCs and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T-regs decreased significantly in NAFL and NASH compared with NCD group. Our conclusion was that gut-liver axis was impaired in NAFLD, which played crucial role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:26097546

  15. Gut barrier structure, mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tincati, Camilla; Douek, Daniel C; Marchetti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, extensive work has been carried out in the field of microbial translocation in HIV infection, ranging from studies on its clinical significance to investigations on its pathogenic features. In the present work, we review the most recent findings on this phenomenon, focusing on the predictive role of microbial translocation in HIV-related morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms by which it arises and potential therapeutic approaches. From a clinical perspective, current work has shown that markers of microbial translocation may be useful in predicting clinical events in untreated HIV infection, while conflicting data exist on their role in cART-experienced subjects, possibly due to the inclusion of extremely varied patient populations in cohort studies. Results from studies addressing the pathogenesis of microbial translocation have improved our knowledge of the damage of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier occurring in HIV infection. However, the extent to which mucosal impairment translates directly to increased gastrointestinal permeability remains an open issue. In this respect, novel work has established a role for IL-17 and IL-22-secreting T cell populations in limiting microbial translocation and systemic T-cell activation/inflammation, thus representing a possible target of immune-therapeutic interventions shown to be promising in the animal model. Further, recent reports have not only confirmed the presence of a dysbiotic intestinal community in the course of HIV infection but have also shown that it may be linked to mucosal damage, microbial translocation and peripheral immune activation. Importantly, technical advances have also shed light on the metabolic activity of gut microbes, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches to correct the function, as well as the composition, of the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:27073405

  16. Effect of a probiotic mixture on intestinal microflora, morphology, and barrier integrity of broilers subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Song, J; Xiao, K; Ke, Y L; Jiao, L F; Hu, C H; Diao, Q Y; Shi, B; Zou, X T

    2014-03-01

    The current study investigated the efficacy of a probiotic mixture on ameliorating heat stress-induced impairment of intestinal microflora, morphology, and barrier integrity in broilers. The probiotic mixture contained Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Three hundred sixty 21-d-old Ross 308 male broilers were allocated in 4 experimental treatments, each of which was replicated 6 times with 15 broilers per replicate. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used in the study, and the main factors were composed of diet (basal diet or addition of 1.5 g/kg of probiotic mixture) and temperature (thermoneutral zone or heat stress). From d 22 to 42, birds were either raised in a thermoneutral zone (22°C) or subjected to cyclic heat stress by exposing them to 33°C for 10 h (from 0800 to 1800) and 22°C from 1800 to 0800. Compared with birds kept in the thermoneutral zone, birds subjected to heat stress had reduced ADG and ADFI; lower viable counts of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and increased viable counts of coliforms and Clostridium in small intestinal contents; shorter jejunal villus height, deeper crypt depth, and lower ratio of villus height to crypt depth; decreased jejunal transepithelial electrical resistance and a higher level of jejunal paracellular permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 4 kDa; and downregulated protein levels of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (P < 0.05). Supplemental probiotics increased (P < 0.05) small intestinal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, jejunal villus height, protein level of occludin, and decreased (P < 0.05) feed to gain ratio and small intestinal coliforms. These results indicate that dietary addition of probiotic mixture was effective in partially ameliorating intestinal barrier function. But no temperature × diet interaction was observed in the present study, revealing that the supplemented probiotics had the same effect at both temperatures.

  17. Fish oil enhances intestinal barrier function and inhibits corticotropin-releasing hormone/corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 signalling pathway in weaned pigs after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Yulan; Chen, Shaokui; Wang, Xiuying; Pi, Dingan; Leng, Weibo; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Kang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Stress induces injury in intestinal barrier function in piglets. Long-chain n-3 PUFA have been shown to exhibit potential immunomodulatory and barrier protective effects in animal models and clinical trials. In addition, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)/CRH receptor (CRHR) signalling pathways play an important role in stress-induced alterations of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesised that fish oil could affect intestinal barrier function and CRH/CRHR signalling pathways. In total, thirty-two weaned pigs were allocated to one of four treatments. The experiment consisted of a 2×2 factorial design, and the main factors included immunological challenge (saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and diet (5 % maize oil or 5 % fish oil). On d 19 of the trial, piglets were treated with saline or LPS. At 4 h after injection, all pigs were killed, and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen and intestinal samples were collected. Fish oil decreased bacterial translocation incidence and the number of translocated micro-organisms in the MLN. Fish oil increased intestinal claudin-1 protein relative concentration and villus height, as well as improved the intestinal morphology. In addition, fish oil supplementation increased intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte number and prevented elevations in intestinal mast cell and neutrophil numbers induced by LPS challenge. Moreover, fish oil tended to decrease the mRNA expression of intestinal CRHR1, CRH and glucocorticoid receptors. These results suggest that fish oil supplementation improves intestinal barrier function and inhibits CRH/CRHR1 signalling pathway and mast cell tissue density. PMID:27080003

  18. Cholera toxin disrupts barrier function by inhibiting exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins to intestinal cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Annabel; Moreno, Beatriz Cruz; Aguilar, Berenice; van Sorge, Nina M.; Kuang, Jennifer; Kurkciyan, Adrianne A.; Wang, Zhipeng; Hang, Saiyu; Pineton de Chambrun, Guillaume P.; McCole, Declan F.; Watnick, Paula; Nizet, Victor; Bier, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholera toxin (CT), a virulence factor elaborated by Vibrio cholerae, is sufficient to induce the severe diarrhea characteristic of cholera. The enzymatic moiety of CT (CtxA) increases cAMP synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells, leading to chloride ion (Cl−) efflux through the CFTR Cl− channel. To preserve electroneutrality and osmotic balance, sodium ions and water also flow into the intestinal lumen via a paracellular route. We find that CtxA-driven cAMP increase also inhibits Rab11/exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins including E-cadherin and Notch signaling components to cell-cell junctions in Drosophila, human intestinal epithelial cells, and ligated mouse ileal loops, thereby disrupting barrier function. Additionally, CtxA induces junctional damage, weight loss, and dye leakage in the Drosophila gut, contributing to lethality from live V. cholerae infection, all of which can be rescued by Rab11 over-expression. These barrier-disrupting effects of CtxA may act in parallel with Cl− secretion to drive the pathophysiology of cholera. PMID:24034615

  19. Cholera toxin disrupts barrier function by inhibiting exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins to intestinal cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Annabel; Cruz-Moreno, Beatriz; Cruz-Moreno, Beatriz Cruz; Aguilar, Berenice; van Sorge, Nina M; Kuang, Jennifer; Kurkciyan, Adrianne A; Wang, Zhipeng; Hang, Saiyu; Pineton de Chambrun, Guillaume P; McCole, Declan F; Watnick, Paula; Nizet, Victor; Bier, Ethan

    2013-09-11

    Cholera toxin (CT), a virulence factor elaborated by Vibrio cholerae, is sufficient to induce the severe diarrhea characteristic of cholera. The enzymatic moiety of CT (CtxA) increases cAMP synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells, leading to chloride ion (Cl(-)) efflux through the CFTR Cl(-) channel. To preserve electroneutrality and osmotic balance, sodium ions and water also flow into the intestinal lumen via a paracellular route. We find that CtxA-driven cAMP increase also inhibits Rab11/exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins including E-cadherin and Notch signaling components to cell-cell junctions in Drosophila, human intestinal epithelial cells, and ligated mouse ileal loops, thereby disrupting barrier function. Additionally, CtxA induces junctional damage, weight loss, and dye leakage in the Drosophila gut, contributing to lethality from live V. cholerae infection, all of which can be rescued by Rab11 overexpression. These barrier-disrupting effects of CtxA may act in parallel with Cl(-) secretion to drive the pathophysiology of cholera. PMID:24034615

  20. Baicalein induces CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy.

  1. Baicalein induces CD4+Foxp3+ T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  2. Baicalein induces CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  3. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Post-Operative Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Typpo, Katri V; Larmonier, Claire B.; Deschenes, Jendar; Redford, Daniel; Kiela, Pawel R.; Ghishan, Fayez K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) have loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function (EBF), which increases their risk for post-operative sepsis and organ dysfunction. We do not understand how post-operative cardiopulmonary support or the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) might alter intestinal EBF. We examined variation in a panel of plasma biomarkers to reflect intestinal EBF (cellular and paracellular structure and function) after CPB and in response to routine ICU care. Design Prospective cohort Setting University medical center cardiac intensive care unit Patients Twenty children aged newborn to 18 years undergoing repair or palliation of CHD with CPB. Interventions We measured baseline and repeated plasma FABP2, citrulline, claudin 3, and dual sugar permeability test (DSPT) to reflect intestinal epithelial integrity, epithelial function, paracellular integrity, and paracellular function, respectively. We measured baseline and repeated plasma pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10) cytokines, known to modulate intestinal EBF in murine models of CPB. Measurements and Main Results All patients had abnormal baseline FABP2 concentrations (mean 3815.5 pg/mL), (normal 41–336 pg/mL). Cytokine response to CPB was associated with early, but not late changes in plasma concentrations of FABP2 and citrulline. Variation in biomarker concentrations over time were associated with aspects of ICU care indicating greater severity of illness: claudin 3, FABP2, and DSPT ratio were associated with symptoms of feeding intolerance (p<0.05) while FABP2 was positively associated with vasoactive-inotrope score (VIS) (p=0.04). Citrulline was associated with larger arteriovenous O2 saturation difference (p=0.04) and had a complex relationship with VIS. Conclusions Children undergoing CPB for repair or palliation of CHD are at risk for intestinal injury and often present with evidence for loss of intestinal

  4. [Dilution of the toxic action of 5-fluorouracil on the mucosa of the small intestine in mice using the sap of plantain].

    PubMed

    Borovskaia, T G; Udintsev, S N; Zueva, E P; Fomina, T I; Neĭshtadt, E L

    1987-01-01

    The study was concerned with an attempt at reducing the acute toxic effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on gut mucosa in mice with Ehrlich ascites tumors. An official preparation of plantain sap was shown to ward off this effect and to contribute to the normalising of certain parameters of epithelial cells. The DNA level of tumor cells showed a more drastic decline after combined treatment with 5-FU and the preparation than after the cytostatic drug alone. PMID:3617613

  5. Fecal microbiota transplantation and bacterial consortium transplantation have comparable effects on the re-establishment of mucosal barrier function in mice with intestinal dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Liang, Pin; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Guobin; Gao, Hongwei; Wen, Shu; Tang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a promising therapy, despite some reports of adverse side effects. Bacterial consortia transplantation (BCT) for targeted restoration of the intestinal ecosystem is considered a relatively safe and simple procedure. However, no systematic research has assessed the effects of FMT and BCT on immune responses of intestinal mucosal barrier in patients. We conducted complementary studies in animal models on the effects of FMT and BCT, and provide recommendations for improving the clinical outcomes of these treatments. To establish the dysbiosis model, male BALB/c mice were treated with ceftriaxone intra-gastrically for 7 days. After that, FMT and BCT were performed on ceftriaxone-treated mice for 3 consecutive days to rebuild the intestinal ecosystem. Post-FMT and post-BCT changes of the intestinal microbial community and mucosal barrier functions were investigated and compared. Disruption of intestinal microbial homeostasis impacted the integrity of mucosal epithelial layer, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. These outcomes were accompanied by overexpression of Muc2, significant decrease of SIgA secretion, and overproduction of defensins and inflammatory cytokines. After FMT and BCT, the intestinal microbiota recovered quickly, this was associated with better reconstruction of mucosal barriers and re-establishment of immune networks compared with spontaneous recovery (SR). Although based on a short-term study, our results suggest that FMT and BCT promote the re-establishment of intestinal microbial communities in mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, and contribute to the temporal and spatial interactions between microbiota and mucosal barriers. The effects of BCT are comparable to that of FMT, especially in normalizing the intestinal levels of Muc2, SIgA, and defensins. PMID:26217323

  6. Characterization of the Adherence of Clostridium difficile Spores: The Integrity of the Outermost Layer Affects Adherence Properties of Spores of the Epidemic Strain R20291 to Components of the Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Uribe, Paola; Miranda-Cárdenas, Camila; Castro-Córdova, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Calderón, Iván; Fuentes, Juan A.; Rodas, Paula I.; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the causative agent of the most frequently reported nosocomial diarrhea worldwide. The high incidence of recurrent infection is the main clinical challenge of C. difficile infections (CDI). Formation of C. difficile spores of the epidemic strain R20291 has been shown to be essential for recurrent infection and transmission of the disease in a mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms of how these spores persist in the colonic environment remains unclear. In this work, we characterized the adherence properties of epidemic R20291 spores to components of the intestinal mucosa, and we assessed the role of the exosporium integrity in the adherence properties by using cdeC mutant spores with a defective exosporium layer. Our results showed that spores and vegetative cells of the epidemic R20291 strain adhered at high levels to monolayers of Caco-2 cells and mucin. Transmission electron micrographs of Caco-2 cells demonstrated that the hair-like projections on the surface of R20291 spores are in close proximity with the plasma membrane and microvilli of undifferentiated and differentiated monolayers of Caco-2 cells. Competitive-binding assay in differentiated Caco-2 cells suggests that spore-adherence is mediated by specific binding sites. By using spores of a cdeC mutant we demonstrated that the integrity of the exosporium layer determines the affinity of adherence of C. difficile spores to Caco-2 cells and mucin. Binding of fibronectin and vitronectin to the spore surface was concentration-dependent, and depending on the concentration, spore-adherence to Caco-2 cells was enhanced. In the presence of an aberrantly-assembled exosporium (cdeC spores), binding of fibronectin, but not vitronectin, was increased. Notably, independent of the exosporium integrity, only a fraction of the spores had fibronectin and vitronectin molecules binding to their surface. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the integrity of the exosporium layer of

  7. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (P<0.05), inhibited the increased transcript abundances of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) (P<0.05), decreased expression of claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO-1) (P<0.05) and protein expression of occludin (P<0.05) of IPEC-J2 cells caused by ETEC K88. Moreover, the mRNA expression of negative regulators of toll-like receptors (TLRs) [single Ig Il-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells pre-treated with L. plantarum were higher (P<0.05) compared with those in cells just exposed to K88. Furthermore, L. plantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  8. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  9. Effects of yeast products on the intestinal morphology, barrier function, cytokine expression, and antioxidant system of weaned piglets*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan-sheng; Wu, Fei; Long, Li-na; Li, Tie-jun; Xiong, Xia; Liao, Peng; Liu, Hong-nan; Yin, Yu-long

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a mixture of yeast culture, cell wall hydrolysates, and yeast extracts (collectively “yeast products,” YP) on the performance, intestinal physiology, and health of weaned piglets. A total of 90 piglets weaned at 21 d of age were blocked by body weight, sex, and litter and randomly assigned to one of three treatments for a 14-d feeding experiment, including (1) a basal diet (control), (2) 1.2 g/kg of YP, and (3) 20 mg/kg of colistin sulfate (CSE). No statistically significant differences were observed in average daily feed intake, average daily weight gain, or gain-to-feed ratio among CSE, YP, and control piglets. Increased prevalence of diarrhea was observed among piglets fed the YP diet, whereas diarrhea was less prevalent among those fed CSE. Duodenal and jejunal villus height and duodenal crypt depth were greater in the control group than they were in the YP or CSE groups. Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in the duodenal and jejunal villi were enhanced by YP, whereas IEL in the ileal villi were reduced in weaned piglets fed YP. Secretion of jejunal and ileal interleukin-10 (IL-10) was higher and intestinal and serum antioxidant indexes were affected by YP and CSE. In YP- and CSE-supplemented animals, serum D-lactate concentration and diamine oxidase (DAO) activity were both increased, and intestinal mRNA expressions of occludin and ZO-1 were reduced as compared to the control animals. In conclusion, YP supplementation in the diets of weaned piglets appears to increase the incidence of diarrhea and has adverse effects on intestinal morphology and barrier function. PMID:27704745

  10. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The other rats were given equal volume saline. The results showed that high altitude hypoxia caused the enlargement of heart, liver, lung and kidney, and intestinal villi damage. Supplementation with vitamin E significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs including intestine, increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05), diamino oxidase (DAO) (p< 0.01) levels, and decreased the serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) (p< 0.01), interleukin-4 (IL-4) (p<0.001), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) (p<0.01) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.001), and decreased the serum erythropoietin (EPO) activity (p<0.05). Administration of vitamin E significantly increased the S-IgA (p<0.001) in ileum and significantly improved the expression levels of occludin and IκBα, and decreased the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and 2 alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), Toll-like receptors (TLR4), P-IκBα and nuclear factor-κB p65(NF-κB P65) in ileum compared to the HH group. This study suggested that vitamin E protectis from intestinal injury caused by high altitude hypoxia environment. These effects may be related to the HIF and TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25177163

  11. Randomized Clinical Trial of Pre-operative Feeding to Evaluate Intestinal Barrier Function in Neonates Requiring Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Nietert, Paul J.; Graham, Eric M.; Taylor, Sarah N.; Atz, Andrew M.; Wagner, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intestinal barrier function in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery using lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio measurements and to determine correlations with early breast milk feeding. Study design This was a single-center, prospective, randomized pilot study of 27 term neonates (≥37 weeks gestation) requiring cardiac surgery who were randomized to one of two pre-operative feeding groups: 1) nil per os (NPO) vs. 2) trophic (10 cc/kg/day) breast milk feeds. At three time points (pre-op, post-op day 7, and post-op day 14), subjects were administered an oral lactulose/mannitol solution and subsequent L/M ratios were measured using gas chromatography, with higher ratios indicative of increased intestinal permeability. Trends over time in the mean urine L/M ratios for each group were estimated using a general linear mixed model. Results There were no adverse events related to pre-operative trophic feeding. In the NPO group (n=13), the mean urine L/M ratios at pre-op, post-op day 7, and post-op day 14 were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.17, respectively. In the trophic breast milk feeds group (n=14), the mean urine L/M ratios at pre-op, post-op day 7, and post-op day 14 were 0.09, 0.19, and 0.15, respectively. Both groups had significantly higher L/M ratios at post-op day 7 and 14 compared with pre-op (p<0.05). Conclusions Neonates have increased intestinal permeability after cardiac surgery extending to at least post-op day 14. This pilot study was not powered to detect differences in benefit or adverse events comparing NPO with breast milk feeds. Further studies to identify mechanisms of intestinal injury and therapeutic interventions are warranted. Trial registration Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01475357. PMID:25962930

  12. Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor Ameliorates Seawater Immersion-Induced Intestinal Mucosa Injury via Antioxidation, Modulation of NF-κB Activity, and Its Related Cytokines in Rats with Open Abdominal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing Jian; Wang, Ya Li; Zhou, Song; Xue, Xiaojun; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Wen Hua; Zheng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the role of oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and its related cytokines in the pathogenesis of seawater immersion after open abdominal injury (SI-OAI) and whether UTI treatment can attenuate SI-OAI induced IMI. Methods. Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: C group, S group, and U group. The rats in C group only suffered from anesthesia and surgical operation, whereas the rats in S group and U group received caudal vein injection of normal saline without/with 50,000 U/kg body weight of UTI. The activities of TNF-α, IL-6, SOD, MDA, ROS, NF-κB, and IκB-β were monitored by ELISA, biochemical methods, EMSA, and Western blot, respectively. Results. The plasma inflammatory mediators and the contents of MDA, ROS, and NF-κB in intestine as well as the pathological scores in ileal mucosa were significantly increased in rats after SI-OAI, accompanied by a reduction in SOD activities and IκB-β levels. UTI treatment significantly attenuated intestinal histopathological changes with evidence of a decrease in all of the parameters, except for upregulation of the levels of SOD and IκB-β protein. Conclusion. UTI can attenuate SI-OAI induced IMI via inhibition of NF-κB activity, subsequently inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and by combating oxidative stress. PMID:25210512

  13. FRET-based dual-emission and pH-responsive nanocarriers for enhanced delivery of protein across intestinal epithelial cell barrier.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Sung, Hsing-Wen; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-10-22

    The oral route is a convenient and commonly employed way for drug delivery. However, therapeutic proteins have poor bioavailability upon oral administration due to the impermeable barrier from intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ). Moreover, the pH of the small intestine varies among different regions of the intestinal tract where digestion and absorption occur at different levels. In this study, a tunable dual-emitting and pH-responsive nanocarrier that can alter the fluorescent color and emission intensity in response to pH changes and can trigger the opening of intestinal epithelial TJ at different levels were developed from chitosan-N-arginine and poly(γ-glutamic acid)-taurine conjugates. As pH increased from 6.0 to 8.0, the binding affinity of the oppositely charged polyions decreased, whereas the ratio of the intensity of the donor-to-acceptor emission intensity (ID/IA) increased by 27-fold. The fluorescent and pH-responsive nanocarrier was able to monitor the pH change of intestinal environment and to control the release of an anti-angiogenic protein in response to the pH gradient. The nanocarrier triggered the opening of intestinal epithelial TJ and consequently enhanced the permeation of the released protein through the intestinal epithelial barrier model (Caco-2 cell monolayer) to inhibit tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. PMID:25260022

  14. Protective effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Wen; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Zi-Yi; Chen, Guo-Wei; Wang, Xin; Pan, Yi-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Studies have suggested the role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) in protecting intestinal barrier function from injuries induced by multiple reagents. Vitamin D deficiency was reported to be associated with poor prognosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). This study is designed to investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms utilizing Caco-2 cell monolayers and a mouse model with acute ethanol injury. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol significantly increased monolayer permeability, disrupted TJ distribution, increased phosphorylation level of MLC, and induced generation of ROS compared with controls. However, pre-treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 greatly ameliorated the ethanol-induced barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption, phosphorylation level of MLC, and generation of ROS compared with ethanol-exposed monolayers. Mice fed with vitamin d-sufficient diet had a higher plasma level of 25(OH)D3 and were more resistant to ethanol-induced acute intestinal barrier injury compared with the vitamin d-deficient group. These results suggest that the suppression of generation of ROS and increased phosphorylation level of MLC might be one of the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on ethanol-induced intestinal barrier injury and provide evidence for the application of vitamin D as therapeutic factors against ethanol-induced gut leakiness.

  15. Effect of Lactobacillus Strains on Intestinal Microflora and Mucosa Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7-Induced Diarrhea in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin; Wang, Ting-Ting; Xu, Min; Evivie, Smith Etareri; Luo, Guang-Wen; Liang, Hong-Zhang; Yu, Shang-Fu; Huo, Gui-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 administrations by gavage on intestinal microflora and mucosal immunity in diarrhea mice infected by Escherichia coli O157:H7 compared to normal mice. The levels of E. coli, Enterobacteria, and Enterococcus decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while viable counts of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium increased in diarrhea mice. Moreover, KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 improved secretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and enhanced the levels of interferon-γ and interleukin. Results indicate that KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 could effectively alleviate diarrhea in mice via modulation of intestinal microflora and improve the function of immune system. The study on the effect of KLDS1.8701 and AD1 supplementation in human flora-associated animal models was recommended. PMID:27025726

  16. Candida albicans is able to use M cells as a portal of entry across the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albac, Sandrine; Schmitz, Antonin; Lopez-Alayon, Carolina; d'Enfert, Christophe; Sautour, Marc; Ducreux, Amandine; Labruère-Chazal, Catherine; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent yeast responsible for systemic infections in humans. These infections mainly originate from the gastrointestinal tract where C. albicans can invade the gut epithelial barrier to gain access to the bloodstream. Along the gut, pathogens can use Microfold (M) cells as a portal of entry to cross the epithelial barrier. M cells are specialized cells mainly located in the follicule-associated epithelium of Peyer patches. In this study, we used scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy, adhesion and invasion assays and fungal mutants to investigate the interactions of C. albicans with M cells obtained in an established in vitro model whereby enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells co-cultured with the Raji B cell line undergo a phenotypic switch to morphologically and functionally resembling M cells. Our data demonstrate that C. albicans co-localizes with and invades preferentially M cells, providing evidence that the fungus can use M cells as a portal of entry into the intestinal barrier. In addition to active penetration, F-actin dependent endocytosis contributes to internalization of the fungus into M cells through a mechanism involving hypha-associated invasins including Ssa1 and Als3. PMID:26242223

  17. Pasture v. standard dairy cream in high-fat diet-fed mice: improved metabolic outcomes and stronger intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Bérengère; Plaisancié, Pascale; Géloën, Alain; Estienne, Monique; Debard, Cyrille; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Loizon, Emmanuelle; Daira, Patricia; Bodennec, Jacques; Cousin, Olivier; Vidal, Hubert; Laugerette, Fabienne; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2014-08-28

    Dairy products derived from the milk of cows fed in pastures are characterised by higher amounts of conjugated linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid (ALA), and several studies have shown their ability to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, their specific metabolic effects compared with standard dairy in a high-fat diet (HFD) context remain largely unknown; this is what we determined in the present study with a focus on the metabolic and intestinal parameters. The experimental animals were fed for 12 weeks a HFD containing 20 % fat in the form of a pasture dairy cream (PDC) or a standard dairy cream (SDC). Samples of plasma, liver, white adipose tissue, duodenum, jejunum and colon were analysed. The PDC mice, despite a higher food intake, exhibited lower fat mass, plasma and hepatic TAG concentrations, and inflammation in the adipose tissue than the SDC mice. Furthermore, they exhibited a higher expression of hepatic PPARα mRNA and adipose tissue uncoupling protein 2 mRNA, suggesting an enhanced oxidative activity of the tissues. These results might be explained, in part, by the higher amounts of ALA in the PDC diet and in the liver and adipose tissue of the PDC mice. Moreover, the PDC diet was found to increase the proportions of two strategic cell populations involved in the protective function of the intestinal epithelium, namely Paneth and goblet cells in the small intestine and colon, compared with the SDC diet. In conclusion, a PDC HFD leads to improved metabolic outcomes and to a stronger gut barrier compared with a SDC HFD. This may be due, at least in part, to the protective mechanisms induced by specific lipids.

  18. Effect of tannic acid-fish scale gelatin hydrolysate hybrid nanoparticles on intestinal barrier function and α-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Jung; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Jiang, Shun-Zhou; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2015-07-01

    Practical application of tannic acid is limited because it readily binds proteins to form insoluble aggregates. In this study, tannic acid was self-assembled with fish scale gelatin hydrolysates (FSGH) to form stable colloidal complex nanoparticles. The nanoparticles prepared from 4 mg ml(-1) tannic acid and 4 mg ml(-1) FSGH had a mean particle size of 260.8 ± 3.6 nm, and showed a positive zeta potential (20.4 ± 0.4 mV). The nanoparticles acted as effective nano-biochelators and free radical scavengers because they provided a large number of adsorption sites for interaction with heavy metal ions and scavenging free radicals. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cu(2+) ions was 123.5 mg g(-1) and EC50 of DPPH radical scavenging activity was 21.6 ± 1.2 μg ml(-1). Hydroxyl radical scavenging effects of the nanoparticles were investigated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The copper-chelating capacity and free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were associated with their capacity to inhibit Cu(2+) ion-induced barrier impairment and hyperpermeability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ). However, α-amylase inhibitory activity of the nanoparticles was significantly lower than that of free tannic acid. The results suggest that the nanoparticles can ameliorate Cu(2+) ion induced intestinal epithelial TJ dysfunction without severely inhibiting the activity of the digestive enzymes. PMID:26069899

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 protects against bacterial translocation, preserves gut barrier integrity and stimulates the immune system in a murine intestinal obstruction model.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Simone V; Viana, Mirelle; Santos, Rosana; Martins, Flaviano S; Machado, José A N; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nicoli, Jacques R; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2010-06-01

    Probiotic is a preparation containing microorganisms that confers beneficial effect to the host. This work assessed whether oral treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 prevents bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal barrier integrity, and stimulates the immunity, in a murine intestinal obstruction (IO) model. Four groups of mice were used: mice undergoing only laparotomy (CTL), undergoing intestinal obstruction (IO) and undergoing intestinal obstruction after previous treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast. BT, determined as uptake of (99m)Tc-E. coli in blood, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen and lungs, was significantly higher in IO group than in CTL group. Treatments with both yeasts reduced BT in blood and all organs investigated. The treatment with both yeasts also reduced intestinal permeability as determined by blood uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA. Immunological data demonstrated that both treatments were able to significantly increase IL-10 levels, but only viable yeast had the same effect on sIgA levels. Intestinal lesions were more severe in IO group when compared to CTL and yeasts groups. Concluding, both viable and heat-killed cells of yeast prevent BT, probably by immunomodulation and by maintaining gut barrier integrity. Only the stimulation of IgA production seems to depend on the yeast viability.

  20. Intravital autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy of murine intestinal mucosa with ultra-broadband femtosecond laser pulse excitation: image quality, photodamage, and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Antje; Krapf, Lisa; Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Koop, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-broadband excitation with ultrashort pulses may enable simultaneous excitation of multiple endogenous fluorophores in vital tissue. Imaging living gut mucosa by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy with more than 150 nm broad excitation at an 800-nm central wavelength from a sub-10 fs titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser with a dielectric mirror based prechirp was compared to the excitation with 220 fs pulses of a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 730 and 800 nm wavelengths. Excitation efficiency, image quality, and photochemical damage were evaluated. At similar excitation fluxes, the same image brightness was achieved with both lasers. As expected, with ultra-broadband pulses, fluorescence from NAD(P)H, flavines, and lipoproteins was observed simultaneously. However, nonlinear photodamage apparent as hyperfluorescence with functional and structural alterations of the tissue occurred earlier when the laser power was adjusted to the same image brightness. After only a few minutes, the immigration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the epithelium and degranulation of these cells, a sign of inflammation, was observed. Photodamage is promoted by the higher peak irradiances and/or by nonoptimal excitation of autofluorescence at the longer wavelength. We conclude that excitation with a tunable narrow bandwidth laser is preferable to ultra-broadband excitation for autofluorescence-based 2-photon microscopy, unless the spectral phase can be controlled to optimize excitation conditions.

  1. Combined probiotic bacteria promotes intestinal epithelial barrier function in interleukin-10-gene-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chen-Zhang; Chen, Hong-Qi; Liang, Yong; Xia, Yang; Yang, Yong-Zhi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Dong; Wang, Shu-Hai; Liu, Jing; Qin, Huan-Long

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effects of combinations of probiotic (Bifico) on interleukin (IL)-10-gene-deficient (IL-10 KO) mice and Caco-2 cell monolayers. METHODS: IL-10 KO mice were used to assess the benefits of Bifico in vivo. IL-10 KO and control mice received approximately 1.5 × 108 cfu/d of Bifico for 4 wk. Colons were then removed and analyzed for epithelial barrier function by Ussing Chamber, while an ELISA was used to evaluate proinflammatory cytokines. The colon epithelial cell line, Caco-2, was used to test the benefit of Bifico in vitro. Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and the probiotic mixture Bifico, or single probiotic strains, were applied to cultured Caco-2 monolayers. Barrier function was determined by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction protein expression. RESULTS: Treatment of IL-10 KO mice with Bifico partially restored body weight, colon length, and epithelial barrier integrity to wild-type levels. In addition, IL-10 KO mice receiving Bifico treatment had reduced mucosal secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, and attenuated colonic disease. Moreover, treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with Bifico or single-strain probiotics in vitro inhibited EIEC invasion and reduced the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. CONCLUSION: Bifico reduced colon inflammation in IL-10 KO mice, and promoted and improved epithelial-barrier function, enhanced resistance to EIEC invasion, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine secretion. PMID:24782616

  2. Gut barrier function in malnourished patients

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, F; Farmery, S; MacLennan, K; Sheridan, M; Barclay, G; Guillou, P; Reynolds, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—The integrity of the gastrointestinal mucosa is a key element in preventing systemic absorption of enteric toxins and bacteria. In the critically ill, breakdown of gut barrier function may fuel sepsis. Malnourished patients have an increased risk of postoperative sepsis; however, the effects of malnutrition on intestinal barrier function in man are unknown. 
Aims—To quantify intestinal barrier function, endotoxin exposure, and the acute phase cytokine response in malnourished patients. 
Patients—Malnourished and well nourished hospitalised patients. 
Methods—Gastrointestinal permeability was measured in malnourished patients and well nourished controls using the lactulose:mannitol test. Endoscopic biopsy specimens were stained and morphological and immunohistochemical features graded. The polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mucosal cytokine expression. The immunoglobulin G antibody response to endotoxin and serum interleukin 6 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. 
Results—There was a significant increase in intestinal permeability in the malnourished patients in association with phenotypic and molecular evidence of activation of lamina propria mononuclear cells and enterocytes, and a heightened acute phase response. 
Conclusions—Intestinal barrier function is significantly compromised in malnourished patients, but the clinical significance is unclear. 

 Keywords: protein-energy malnutrition; intestinal permeability; endotoxin; cytokine PMID:9577348

  3. Intestinal barrier analysis by assessment of mucins, tight junctions, and α-defensins in healthy C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Volynets, Valentina; Rings, Andreas; Bárdos, Gyöngyi; Ostaff, Maureen J; Wehkamp, Jan; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier is gaining increasing attention because it is related to intestinal homeostasis and disease. Different parameters have been used in the past to assess intestinal barrier functions in experimental studies; however most of them are poorly defined in healthy mice. Here, we compared a number of barrier markers in healthy mice, established normal values and correlations. In 48 mice (24 C57BL/6J, 24 BALB/cJ background), we measured mucus thickness, and expression of mucin-2, α-defensin-1 and -4, zonula occludens-1, occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudin-1, 2 and -5. We also analyzed claudin-3 and fatty acid binding protein-2 in urine and plasma, respectively. A higher expression of mucin-2 protein was found in the colon compared to the ileum. In contrast, the α-defensins-1 and -4 were expressed almost exclusively in the ileum. The protein expression of the tight junction molecules claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens-1 did not differ between colon and ileum, although some differences occurred at the mRNA level. No age- or gender-related differences were found. Differences between C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice were found for α-defensin-1 and -4 mRNA expression, and for urine and plasma marker concentrations. The α-defensin-1 mRNA correlated with claudin-5 mRNA, whereas α-defensin-4 mRNA correlated with claudin-3 concentrations in urine. In conclusion, we identified a number of murine intestinal barrier markers requiring tissue analyses or measurable in urine or plasma. We provide normal values for these markers in mice of different genetic background. Such data might be helpful for future animal studies in which the intestinal barrier is of interest. PMID:27583194

  4. Protective effect of the traditional Chinese medicine xuesaitong on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Li, Dengxiao; Gao, Hong; Gao, Yuejin; Zhang, Long; Du, Yuling; Wu, Jian; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of xuesaitong on intestinal barrier dysfunction and related mechanisms in a rat model for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Rats were divided into sham-operated, disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated groups. In the disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated rats an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) model was introduced, which was created by a temporary obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The xuesaitong group was pre-treated with injections into the abdominal cavity prior to the generation of the IRI model. Tissue changes were evaluated using H&E staining and electron microscopy. Samples were analyzed at 0, 3 and 24 h post IRI. Ascites volumes as well as small intestinal mucosa bleeding, injury scores, wet to dry weight ratios, and propulsions were evaluated. Apoptotic rates were determined with TUNNEL assays. Blood serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured using ELISA, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression in small intestinal mucosa measured using immunohistochemistry. Results: We determined a significant increase of pathological damage to small intestinal tissues, intestinal wet to dry ratios, ascites volume, TNF-α levels, apoptosis rates of small intestinal mucosa, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 proteins in the disease-model group compared to the sham-operated group (P < 0.001), and intestinal motility was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). However, comparisons between disease-model and xuesaitong pre-treated animals revealed, that in the treatment group these changes occurred in significant less severities. Conclusions: Xuesaitong can effectively alleviate intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing TNF-α, up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating caspase-3 expression, in addition to increasing peristalsis. PMID:25932105

  5. [Correlation of the microbiota and intestinal mucosa in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel, irritable eye, and irritable mind syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Illés; Pacella, Elena; Radák, Zsolt

    2014-09-14

    Accumulating clinical evidence supports co-morbidity of irritable bowel, irritable eye and irritable mind symptoms. Furthermore, perturbation of the microbiota-host symbiosis (dysbiosis) is considered a common pathogenic mechanism connecting gastrointestinal, ocular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Consequently, maintaining or restoring microbiota-host symbiosis represents a new approach to treat these symptoms or to prevent their relapses. Current treatment approach assigned a primary role to live probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics to enhance colonization of beneficial bacteria and to strengthen the symbiosis. However, several papers showed major benefits of heat-killed probiotics as compared to their live counterparts on both intestinal and systemic symptoms. Recently, in addition to killing probiotics, in a proof of concept study lysates (fragments) of probiotics in combination with vitamins A, B, D and omega 3 fatty acids were successfully tested. These findings suggested a conceptual change in the approach addressed to both the microbiota and host as targets for intervention.

  6. Carrageenan Gum and Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli in a Piglet Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Impact on Intestinal Mucosa-associated Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Munyaka, Peris M.; Sepehri, Shadi; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) pathotype has been increasingly implicated in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. In a 21-day study, we investigated the effects of AIEC strain UM146 inoculation on microbiota profile of the ileal, cecal, ascending and descending colon in a pig model of experimental colitis. Carrageenan gum (CG) was used to induce colitis in weaner piglets whereas AIEC strain UM146 previously isolated from a CD patient was included to investigate a cause or consequence effect in IBD. Treatments were: (1) control; (2) CG; (3) AIEC strain UM146; and (4) CG+UM146. Pigs in groups 2 and 4 received 1% CG in drinking water from day 1 of the study while pigs in groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with UM146 on day 8. Following euthanization on day 21, tissue mucosal scrapings were collected and used for DNA extraction. The V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was then subjected to Illumina sequencing. Microbial diversity, composition, and the predicted functional metagenome were determined in addition to short chain fatty acids profiles in the digesta and inflammatory cytokines in the intestinal tissue. CG-induced colitis decreased bacterial species richness and shifted community composition. At the phylum level, an increase in Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres and a decrease in Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were observed in CG and CGUM146 compared to control and UM146. The metabolic capacity of the microbiome was also altered in CG and CGUM146 compared to UM146 and control in the colon. We demonstrated that CG resulted in bacterial dysbiosis and shifted community composition similar to what has been previously observed in IBD patients. However, AIEC strain UM146 alone did not cause any clear changes compared to CG or control in our experimental IBD pig model. PMID:27092122

  7. Transcriptional analysis of porcine intestinal mucosa infected with Salmonella Typhimurium revealed a massive inflammatory response and disruption of bile acid absorption in ileum.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juber Herrera; Collado-Romero, Melania; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Arce, Cristina; Bautista, Rocío; Carvajal, Ana; Cirera, Susanna; Claros, M Gonzalo; Garrido, Juan J

    2016-01-07

    Infected pork meat is an important source of non-typhoidal human salmonellosis. Understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is important for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies. Thus, hereby we study the transcriptional profiles along the porcine intestine during infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as post-transcriptional gene modulation by microRNAs (miRNA). Sixteen piglets were orally challenged with S. Typhimurium. Samples from jejunum, ileum and colon, collected 1, 2 and 6 days post infection (dpi) were hybridized to mRNA and miRNA expression microarrays and analyzed. Jejunum showed a reduced transcriptional response indicating mild inflammation only at 2 dpi. In ileum inflammatory genes were overexpressed (e.g., IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL1RAP, TNFα), indicating a strong immune response at all times of infection. Infection also down-regulated genes of the FXR pathway (e.g., NR1H4, FABP6, APOA1, SLC10A2), indicating disruption of the bile acid absorption in ileum. This result was confirmed by decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum of infected pigs. Ileal inflammatory gene expression changes peaked at 2 dpi and tended to resolve at 6 dpi. Furthermore, miRNA analysis of ileum at 2 dpi revealed 62 miRNAs potentially regulating target genes involved in this inflammatory process (e.g., miR-374 and miR-451). In colon, genes involved in epithelial adherence, proliferation and cellular reorganization were down-regulated at 2 and 6 dpi. In summary, here we show the transcriptional changes occurring at the intestine at different time points of the infection, which are mainly related to inflammation and disruption of the bile acid metabolism.

  8. Age-related differences in mucosal barrier function and morphology of the small intestine in low and normal birth weight piglets.

    PubMed

    Huygelen, V; De Vos, M; Willemen, S; Fransen, E; Casteleyn, C; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that the mucosal maturation of the small intestine is altered in low birth weight piglets, pairs of naturally suckled low birth weight (LBW, n = 20) and normal birth weight (NBW, n = 20) littermate piglets were selected and sampled after 0, 3, 10, and 28 d of suckling. In vivo intestinal permeability was evaluated via a lactulose-mannitol absorption test. Other indirect measurements for mucosal barrier functioning included sampling for histology and immunohistochemistry (intestinal trefoil factor [ITF]), measuring intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity, and immunoblotting for occludin, caspase-3, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The lactulose-mannitol ratio did not differ between NBW and LBW piglets, but a significant increase in this ratio was observed in 28-d-old piglets (P = 0.001). Small intestinal villus height did not differ with age (P = 0.02) or birth weight (P = 0.20). In contrast, villus width (P = 0.02) and crypt depth (P < 0.05) increased gradually with age, but no birth-weight-related differences were observed. LBW piglets had significantly (P = 0.03) more ITF immunoreactive positive cells per villus area compared to NBW piglets, whereas no age (P = 0.82) or region-related (P = 0.13) differences could be observed. The activity of IAP in the small intestine was higher in newborn piglets compared to the older piglets. No significant differences in cell proliferation in the small intestine was observed (P = 0.47) between NBW and LBW piglets; the highest proliferation was seen in piglets of 28 d of age (P = 0.01). Newborn piglets had significantly fewer apoptotic cells, whereas more apoptotic cells were seen in piglets of 10 d of age (P < 0.01). In conclusion, birth weight did not affect the parameters related to intestinal barrier function investigated in this study, suggesting that the mucosal barrier function is not altered in LBW piglets. Nevertheless, these results confirm that the mucosal barrier function

  9. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  10. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization.

    PubMed

    McCall, Ingrid C; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W; Parkos, Charles A

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  11. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  12. Bifidobacterium breve and Streptococcus thermophilus secretion products enhance T helper 1 immune response and intestinal barrier in mice.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Sandrine; Laharie, David; Asensio, Corinne; Vidal-Martinez, Teresita; Candalh, Céline; Rullier, Anne; Zerbib, Frank; Mégraud, Francis; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Heyman, Martine

    2005-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria or their secretion products can modulate immune responses differently in normal and inflammatory conditions. This comparative study analyzes the effect of oral administration of living lactic acid bacteria, or their conditioned media, on the epithelial and immune functions of colitis-prone C57BL/6 IL-10-deficient mice. Mice were untreated (control) or infected with Helicobacter hepaticus with or without oral treatment with living bacteria, Bifidobacterium breve C50 and Streptococcus thermophilus 065 (LB), or their culture-conditioned media (CM). Histology, cytokine mRNA, electrical resistance, and barrier capacity of colonic samples as well as cytokine secretion by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells were studied. Helicobacter hepaticus mice developed only mild colitis, which was not modified in LB or CM groups. In the CM (but not the LB) group, the colonic barrier was reinforced as compared to the other groups, as evidenced by decreased horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transcytosis and mannitol fluxes and increased electrical resistance. In MLN, the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IFNgamma was significantly higher in CM (2.06% and 1.98%, respectively) mice than in H. hepaticus (1.1% and 0.47%, P < 0.05) or control mice. In addition, the nonspecific stimulation of IFNgamma, TNFalpha, and IL-12 secretion by MLN cells was significantly higher in the CM group as compared to the other groups. In the absence of severe colitis, Bifidobacterium breve C50- and Streptococcus thermophilus 065-conditioned media can reinforce intestinal barrier capacity and stimulate Th1 immune response, highlighting the involvement of lactic acid bacteria-derived components in host defense.

  13. Possible roles of LI-Cadherin in the formation and maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Werner

    2013-01-01

    LI-cadherin belongs to the so called 7D-cadherins, exceptional members of the cadherin superfamily which are characterized by seven extracellular cadherin repeats and a small cytosolic domain. Under physiological conditions LI-cadherin is expressed in the intestine and colon in human and mouse and in the rat also in hepatocytes. LI-cadherin was shown to act as a functional Ca2+-dependent adhesion molecule, linking neighboring cells and a lot of biophysical and biochemical parameters were determined in the last time. It is also known that dysregulated LI-cadherin expression can be found in a variety of diseases. Although there are several hypothesis and theoretical models concerning the function of LI-cadherin, the physiological role of LI-cadherin is still enigmatic. PMID:24665380

  14. Protective effects of ψ taraxasterol 3-O-myristate and arnidiol 3-O-myristate isolated from Calendula officinalis on epithelial intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Catanzaro, Daniela; Cocetta, Veronica; Igl, Nadine; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Cecconello, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2016-03-01

    The triterpene esters ᴪ taraxasterol-3-O-myristate (1) and arnidiol-3-O-myristate (2) were tested for their ability to protect epithelial intestinal barrier in an in vitro model. Their effects on ROS production and on trans-epithelial resistance were investigated on CaCo-2 cell monolayers both in basal and stress-induced conditions. Both compounds were able to modulate the stress damage induced by H2O2 and INFγ+TNFα, showing a potential use as model compounds for the study of new therapeutic agents for intestinal inflammations. PMID:26791917

  15. Protective effects of ψ taraxasterol 3-O-myristate and arnidiol 3-O-myristate isolated from Calendula officinalis on epithelial intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Catanzaro, Daniela; Cocetta, Veronica; Igl, Nadine; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Cecconello, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2016-03-01

    The triterpene esters ᴪ taraxasterol-3-O-myristate (1) and arnidiol-3-O-myristate (2) were tested for their ability to protect epithelial intestinal barrier in an in vitro model. Their effects on ROS production and on trans-epithelial resistance were investigated on CaCo-2 cell monolayers both in basal and stress-induced conditions. Both compounds were able to modulate the stress damage induced by H2O2 and INFγ+TNFα, showing a potential use as model compounds for the study of new therapeutic agents for intestinal inflammations.

  16. Manganese deficiency or excess caused the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier, as regulated by NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling, in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Tang, Ren-Jun; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal mucosal immune components and mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) under dietary manganese (Mn) deficiency or excess were investigated. Fish were fed the diets containing graded levels of Mn [3.65-27.86 mg Mn kg(-1) diet] for 8 weeks. The results demonstrated that Mn deficiency significantly decreased the lysozyme and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, up-regulated tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 8 and the signalling factor nuclear factor-κB p65, and down-regulated interleukin 10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor β1, inhibitor of signalling factors κB-α and target of rapamycin mRNA levels in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI). However, Mn deficiency did not change the C3 content in the PI, whereas it decreased the C3 contents in the MI and DI. Additionally, Mn depletion also resulted in significantly low mRNA levels for tight junction proteins (claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-15, occludin and zonula occludens-1), antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, GPx and CAT) and NF-E2-related factor-2 in the intestines of fish. Excessive Mn exhibited toxic effects similar to Mn deficiency, where optimal Mn contents reversed those indicators. In conclusion, Mn deficiency or excess causes the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier relating to NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling in grass carp. Furthermore, quadratic regression analysis at 95% maximum response of lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities in the distal intestine of young grass carp revealed the optimum dietary Mn levels to be 8.90 and 8.99 mg kg(-1) diet, respectively.

  17. Intestinal barrier function of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) post smolts is reduced by common sea cage environments and suggested as a possible physiological welfare indicator

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fish farmed under high intensity aquaculture conditions are subjected to unnatural environments that may cause stress. Therefore awareness of how to maintain good health and welfare of farmed fish is important. For Atlantic salmon held in sea cages, water flow, dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and temperature will fluctuate over time and the fish can at times be exposed to detrimentally low DO levels and high temperatures. This experimental study investigates primary and secondary stress responses of Atlantic salmon post smolts to long-term exposure to reduced and fluctuating DO levels and high water temperatures, mimicking situations in the sea cages. Plasma cortisol levels and cortisol release to the water were assessed as indicators of the primary stress response and intestinal barrier integrity and physiological functions as indicators of secondary responses to changes in environmental conditions. Results Plasma cortisol levels were elevated in fish exposed to low (50% and 60% saturation) DO levels and low temperature (9°C), at days 9, 29 and 48. The intestinal barrier function, measured as electrical resistance (TER) and permeability of mannitol at the end of the experiment, were reduced at 50% DO, in both proximal and distal intestine. When low DO levels were combined with high temperature (16°C), plasma cortisol levels were elevated in the cyclic 1:5 h at 85%:50% DO group and fixed 50% DO group compared to the control (85% DO) group at day 10 but not at later time points. The intestinal barrier function was clearly disturbed in the 50% DO group; TER was reduced in both intestinal regions concomitant with increased paracellular permeability in the distal region. Conclusions This study reveals that adverse environmental conditions (low water flow, low DO levels at low and high temperature), that can occur in sea cages, elicits primary and secondary stress responses in Atlantic salmon post smolts. The intestinal barrier function was significantly

  18. Physiological and pathophysiological factors affecting the expression and activity of the drug transporter MRP2 in intestine. Impact on its function as membrane barrier.

    PubMed

    Arana, Maite R; Tocchetti, Guillermo N; Rigalli, Juan P; Mottino, Aldo D; Villanueva, Silvina S M

    2016-07-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium functions as a selective barrier to absorb nutrients, electrolytes and water, but at the same time restricts the passage into the systemic circulation of intraluminal potentially toxic compounds. This epithelium maintains its selective barrier function through the presence of very selective and complex intercellular junctions and the ability of the absorptive cells to reject those compounds. Accordingly, the enterocytes metabolize orally incorporated xenobiotics and secrete the hydrophilic metabolites back into the intestinal lumen through specific transporters localized apically. In the recent decades, there has been increasing recognition of the existence of the intestinal cellular barrier. In the present review we focus on the role of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2) in the apical membrane of the enterocytes, as an important component of this intestinal barrier, as well as on its regulation. We provide a detailed compilation of significant contributions demonstrating that MRP2 expression and function vary under relevant physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Because MRP2 activity modulates the availability and pharmacokinetics of many therapeutic drugs administered orally, their therapeutic efficacy and safety may vary as well. PMID:27109321

  19. Curcumin protects against the intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury: involvement of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and TNF-α related mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuying; Guo, Ruixue; Kong, Yu; Wei, Xinliang; Wang, Weiwei; Shi, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Present study aimed to investigate the eff ect of curcumin-pretreatment on intestinal I/R injury and on intestinal mucosa barrier. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into: sham, I/R, and curcumin groups (n=10). Animals in curcumin group were pretreated with curcumin by gastric gavage (200 mg/kg) for 2 days before I/R. Small intestine tissues were prepared for Haematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining. Serum diamine oxidase (DAO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were measured. Expression of intestinal TNF-α and tight junction protein (ZO-1) proteins was detected by Western blot and/or immunohistochemistry. Serum DAO level and serum and intestinal TNF-α leves were signifi cantly increased after I/R, and the values were markedly reduced by curcumin pretreatment although still higher than that of sham group (p<0.05 or p<0.001). H&E staining showed the significant injury to intestinal mucosa following I/R, and curcumin pretreatment signifi cantly improved the histological structure of intestinal mucosa. I/R insult also induced significantly down-regulated expression of ZO-1, and the eff ect was dramatically attenuated by curcumin-pretreatment. Curcumin may protect the intestine from I/R injury through restoration of the epithelial structure, promotion of the recovery of intestinal permeability, as well as enhancement of ZO-1 protein expression, and this eff ect may be partly attributed to the TNF-α related pathway. PMID:26937210

  20. Anti-inflammatory and Intestinal Barrier-protective Activities of Commensal Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in Thoroughbreds: Role of Probiotics in Diarrhea Prevention in Neonatal Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi; Suzuki, Takuya; Wasano, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Fumihiko; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Tomonori; Nagamine, Natsuko; Tsurumachi, Takashi; Sugaya, Kiyoshi; Akita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Misako; Takagi, Kunihiko; Inoue, Yoshinobu; Asai, Yo; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    We previously isolated the commensal bacteria lactobacilli and bifidobacteria from the Thoroughbred intestine and prepared the horse probiotics LacFi(TM), consisting of Lactobacillus ruminis KK14, L. equi KK 15, L. reuteri KK18, L. johnsonii KK21, and Bifidobacterium boum HU. Here, we found that the five LacFi(TM) constituent strains remarkably suppressed pro-inflammatory interleukin-17 production in mouse splenocytes stimulated with interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β. The protective effects of the probiotic on impaired intestinal barrier function were evaluated in Caco-2 cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-α. Evaluation of transepithelial resistance showed that all the strains exhibited intestinal barrier protective activity, with significant suppression of barrier impairment by L. reuteri KK18. The LacFi(TM) constituent strains were detected in neonatal LacFi(TM)-administered Thoroughbred feces using polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and culture methods. These five strains were found to be the predominant lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the intestinal microbiota of LacFi(TM)-administered Thoroughbreds. Administration of LacFi(TM) to neonatal Thoroughbreds decreased diarrhea incidence from 75.9% in the control group (n=29 neonatal Thoroughbreds) to 30.7% in the LacFi(TM)-administered group (n=101 neonatal Thoroughbreds) immediately after birth to 20 weeks after birth. LacFi(TM) treatment also prevented diarrhea especially at and around 4 weeks and from 10 to 16 weeks. The duration of diarrhea was also shorter in the probiotics-administered group (7.4 ± 0.8 days) than in the control group (14.0 ± 3.2 days). These results indicate that the LacFi(TM) probiotics regulates intestinal function and contributes to diarrhea prevention.

  1. Ethanol Impairs Intestinal Barrier Function in Humans through Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Signaling: A Combined In Vivo and In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Elhaseen; Masclee, Ad; Troost, Freddy; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Aleksa, Katarina; Dekker, Jan; Jonkers, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol-induced gut barrier disruption is associated with several gastrointestinal and liver disorders. Aim Since human data on effects of moderate ethanol consumption on intestinal barrier integrity and involved mechanisms are limited, the objectives of this study were to investigate effects of a single moderate ethanol dose on small and large intestinal permeability and to explore the role of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a primary signaling mechanism. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 12 healthy volunteers after intraduodenal administration of either placebo or 20 g ethanol in a randomised cross-over trial. Localization of the tight junction (TJ) and gene expression, phosphorylation of the MAPK isoforms p38, ERK and JNK as indicative of activation were analyzed in duodenal biopsies. The role of MAPK was further examined in vitro using Caco-2 monolayers. Results Ethanol increased small and large intestinal permeability, paralleled by redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin, down-regulation of ZO-1 and up-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, and increased MAPK isoforms phosphorylation. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol increased permeability, induced redistribution of the junctional proteins and F-actin, and MAPK and MLCK activation, as indicated by phosphorylation of MAPK isoforms and myosin light chain (MLC), respectively, which could be reversed by pretreatment with either MAPK inhibitors or the anti-oxidant L-cysteine. Conclusions Administration of moderate ethanol dosage can increase both small and colon permeability. Furthermore, the data indicate a pivotal role for MAPK and its crosstalk with MLCK in ethanol-induced intestinal barrier disruption. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928733 PMID:25226407

  2. The Role of E-Cadherin in Maintaining the Barrier Function of Corneal Epithelium after Treatment with Cultured Autologous Oral Mucosa Epithelial Cell Sheet Grafts for Limbal Stem Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, Richard H.; Wood, Andrew; Oliva, Joan; Niihara, Hope; Makalinao, Andrew; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Pan, Derek; Tiger, Kumar; Garcia, Julio; Laporte, Amanda; French, Samuel W.; Niihara, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of E-cadherin in epithelial barrier function of cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) grafts was examined. CAOMECS were cultured on a temperature-responsive surface and grafted onto rabbit corneas with Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD). E-cadherin levels were significantly higher in CAOMECS compared to normal and LSCD epithelium. Beta-catenin colocalized with E-cadherin in CAOMECS cell membranes while phosphorylated beta-catenin was significantly increased. ZO-1, occludin, and Cnx43 were also strongly expressed in CAOMECS. E-cadherin and beta-catenin localization at the cell membrane was reduced in LSCD corneas, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a restoration of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression. LSCD corneas did not show continuous staining for ZO-1 or for Cnx43, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a positive expression of ZO-1 and Cnx43. Cascade Blue® hydrazide did not pass through CAOMECS. Because E-cadherin interactions are calcium-dependent, EGTA was used to chelate calcium and disrupt cell adhesion. EGTA-treated CAOMECS completely detached from cell culture surface, and E-cadherin levels were significantly decreased. In conclusion, E cadherin high expression contributed to CAOMECS tight and gap junction protein recruitment at the cell membrane, thus promoting cellular adhesion and a functional barrier to protect the ocular surface. PMID:27777792

  3. Indomethacin co-crystals and their parent mixtures: does the intestinal barrier recognize them differently?

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Valeria; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Bertolasi, Valerio; Ferraro, Luca; Beggiato, Sarah; Spizzo, Federico; Spisni, Enzo; Pavan, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Co-crystals are crystalline complexes of two or more molecules bound together in crystal lattices through noncovalent interactions. The solubility and dissolution properties of co-crystals can allow to increase the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). It is currently believed that the co-crystallization strategy should not induce changes on the pharmacological profile of the APIs, even if it is not yet clear whether a co-crystal would be defined as a physical mixture or as a new chemical entity. In order to clarify these aspects, we chose indomethacin as guest poorly aqueous soluble molecule and compared its properties with those of its co-crystals obtained with 2-hydroxy-4-methylpyridine (co-crystal 1), 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (co-crystal 2), and saccharine (co-crystal 3). In particular, we performed a systematic comparison among indomethacin, its co-crystals, and their parent physical mixtures by evaluating via HPLC analysis the API dissolution profile, its ability to permeate across intestinal cell monolayers (NCM460), and its oral bioavailability in rat. The indomethacin dissolution profile was not altered by the presence of co-crystallizing agents as physical mixtures, whereas significant changes were observed by the dissolution of the co-crystals. Furthermore, there was a qualitative concordance between the API dissolution patterns and the relative oral bioavailabilities in rats. Co-crystal 1 induced a drastic decrease of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value of NCM460 cell monolayers, whereas its parent mixture did not evidence any effect. The saccharin-indomethacin mixture induced a drastic decrease of the TEER value of monolayers, whereas its parent co-crystal 3 did not induce any effects on their integrity, being anyway able to increase the permeation of indomethacin. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time different effects induced by co-crystals and their parent physical

  4. Moderate Hypothermia Provides Better Protection of the Intestinal Barrier than Deep Hypothermia during Circulatory Arrest in a Piglet Model: A Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangxian; Tang, Zhixian; Lin, Weibin; Rong, Jian; Wu, Zhongkai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to assess the effects of different temperature settings of hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) on intestinal barrier function in a piglet model. Methods Twenty Wuzhishan piglets were randomly assigned to 40 min of HCA at 18°C (DHCA group, n = 5), 40 min of HCA at 24°C (MHCA group, n = 5), normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB group, n = 5) or sham operation (SO group, n = 5). Serum D-lactate (SDL) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels were determined. Microdialysis parameters (glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol) in the intestinal dialysate were measured. After 180 min of reperfusion, intestinal samples were harvested for real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting measurements for E-cadherin and Claudin-1. Results Higher levels of SDL and LPS were detected in the DHCA group than in the MHCA group (P < 0.001). Both MHCA and DHCA groups exhibited lower glucose levels, higher lactate and glycerol levels and a higher lactate to pyruvate (L/P) ratio compared with the CPB group (p<0.05); the DHCA group had higher lactate and glycerol levels and a higher L/P ratio (p<0.05) but similar glucose levels compared to the MHCA group. No significant differences in E-cadherin mRNA or protein levels were noted. Upregulation of claudin-1 mRNA levels was detected in both the DHCA and MHCA animals’ intestines (P < 0.01), but only the DHCA group exhibited a decrease in claudin-1 protein expression (P < 0.01). Conclusion HCA altered the energy metabolism and expression of epithelial junctions in the intestine. Moderate hypothermia (24°C) was less detrimental to the markers of normal functioning of the intestinal barrier than deep hypothermia (18°C). PMID:27685257

  5. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  6. Malaria-associated L-arginine deficiency induces mast cell-associated disruption to intestinal barrier defenses against nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jennifer Y; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Caughey, George H; Tsolis, Renee M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-10-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop L-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of L-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with L-arginine or L-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with L-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing L-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  7. Malaria-associated L-arginine deficiency induces mast cell-associated disruption to intestinal barrier defenses against nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jennifer Y; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Caughey, George H; Tsolis, Renee M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-10-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop L-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of L-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with L-arginine or L-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with L-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing L-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans.

  8. Malaria-Associated l-Arginine Deficiency Induces Mast Cell-Associated Disruption to Intestinal Barrier Defenses against Nontyphoidal Salmonella Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Jennifer Y.; Tiffany, Caitlin M.; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Caughey, George H.; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2013-01-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop l-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of l-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with l-arginine or l-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with l-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing l-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  9. Changes in intestinal barrier function and gut microbiota in high-fat diet-fed rats are dynamic and region dependent

    PubMed Central

    Boudry, Gaëlle; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2015-01-01

    A causal relationship between the pathophysiological changes in the gut epithelium and altered gut microbiota with the onset of obesity have been suggested but not defined. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal relationship between impaired intestinal barrier function and microbial dysbiosis in the small and large intestine in rodent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed HF diet (45% fat) or normal chow (C, 10% fat) for 1, 3, or 6 wk; food intake, body weight, and adiposity were measured. Barrier function ex vivo using FITC-labeled dextran (4,000 Da, FD-4) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) probes in Ussing chambers, gene expression, and gut microbial communities was assessed. After 1 wk, there was an immediate but reversible increase in paracellular permeability, decrease in IL-10 expression, and decrease in abundance of genera within the class Clostridia in the ileum. In the large intestine, HRP flux and abundance of genera within the order Bacteroidales increased with time on the HF diet and correlated with the onset of increased body weight and adiposity. The data show immediate insults in the ileum in response to ingestion of a HF diet, which were rapidly restored and preceded increased passage of large molecules across the large intestinal epithelium. This study provides an understanding of microbiota dysbiosis and gut pathophysiology in diet-induced obesity and has identified IL-10 and Oscillospira in the ileum and transcellular flux in the large intestine as potential early impairments in the gut that might lead to obesity and metabolic disorders. PMID:25747351

  10. Changes in intestinal barrier function and gut microbiota in high-fat diet-fed rats are dynamic and region dependent.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M Kristina; Boudry, Gaëlle; Lemay, Danielle G; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-05-15

    A causal relationship between the pathophysiological changes in the gut epithelium and altered gut microbiota with the onset of obesity have been suggested but not defined. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal relationship between impaired intestinal barrier function and microbial dysbiosis in the small and large intestine in rodent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed HF diet (45% fat) or normal chow (C, 10% fat) for 1, 3, or 6 wk; food intake, body weight, and adiposity were measured. Barrier function ex vivo using FITC-labeled dextran (4,000 Da, FD-4) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) probes in Ussing chambers, gene expression, and gut microbial communities was assessed. After 1 wk, there was an immediate but reversible increase in paracellular permeability, decrease in IL-10 expression, and decrease in abundance of genera within the class Clostridia in the ileum. In the large intestine, HRP flux and abundance of genera within the order Bacteroidales increased with time on the HF diet and correlated with the onset of increased body weight and adiposity. The data show immediate insults in the ileum in response to ingestion of a HF diet, which were rapidly restored and preceded increased passage of large molecules across the large intestinal epithelium. This study provides an understanding of microbiota dysbiosis and gut pathophysiology in diet-induced obesity and has identified IL-10 and Oscillospira in the ileum and transcellular flux in the large intestine as potential early impairments in the gut that might lead to obesity and metabolic disorders.

  11. The intestinal microbiome, barrier function, and immune system in inflammatory bowel disease: a tripartite pathophysiological circuit with implications for new therapeutic directions.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Stephen M; Zisman, Timothy L; Suskind, David L; Damman, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the tripartite pathophysiological circuit of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), involving the intestinal microbiota, barrier function, and immune system. Dysfunction in each of these physiological components (dysbiosis, leaky gut, and inflammation) contributes in a mutually interdependent manner to IBD onset and exacerbation. Genetic and environmental risk factors lead to disruption of gut homeostasis: genetic risks predominantly affect the immune system, environmental risks predominantly affect the microbiota, and both affect barrier function. Multiple genetic and environmental 'hits' are likely necessary to establish and exacerbate disease. Most conventional IBD therapies currently target only one component of the pathophysiological circuit, inflammation; however, many patients with IBD do not respond to immune-modulating therapies. Hope lies in new classes of therapies that target the microbiota and barrier function.

  12. The intestinal microbiome, barrier function, and immune system in inflammatory bowel disease: a tripartite pathophysiological circuit with implications for new therapeutic directions

    PubMed Central

    Vindigni, Stephen M.; Zisman, Timothy L.; Suskind, David L.; Damman, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the tripartite pathophysiological circuit of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), involving the intestinal microbiota, barrier function, and immune system. Dysfunction in each of these physiological components (dysbiosis, leaky gut, and inflammation) contributes in a mutually interdependent manner to IBD onset and exacerbation. Genetic and environmental risk factors lead to disruption of gut homeostasis: genetic risks predominantly affect the immune system, environmental risks predominantly affect the microbiota, and both affect barrier function. Multiple genetic and environmental ‘hits’ are likely necessary to establish and exacerbate disease. Most conventional IBD therapies currently target only one component of the pathophysiological circuit, inflammation; however, many patients with IBD do not respond to immune-modulating therapies. Hope lies in new classes of therapies that target the microbiota and barrier function. PMID:27366227

  13. Dietary glutamine prevents the loss of intestinal barrier function and attenuates the increase in core body temperature induced by acute heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Soares, Anne D N; Costa, Kátia A; Wanner, Samuel P; Santos, Rosana G C; Fernandes, Simone O A; Martins, Flaviano S; Nicoli, Jacques R; Coimbra, Cândido C; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2014-11-28

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) supplementation improves intestinal function in several stressful conditions. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of dietary Gln supplementation on the core body temperature (T core), bacterial translocation (BT) and intestinal permeability of mice subjected to acute heat stress were evaluated. Male Swiss mice (4 weeks old) were implanted with an abdominal temperature sensor and randomly assigned to one of the following groups fed isoenergetic and isoproteic diets for 7 d before the experimental trials: group fed the standard AIN-93G diet and exposed to a high ambient temperature (39°C) for 2 h (H-NS); group fed the AIN-93G diet supplemented with l-Gln and exposed to a high temperature (H-Gln); group fed the standard AIN-93G diet and not exposed to a high temperature (control, C-NS). Mice were orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid radiolabelled with technetium (99mTc) for the assessment of intestinal permeability or 99mTc-Escherichia coli for the assessment of BT. Heat exposure increased T core (approximately 41°C during the experimental trial), intestinal permeability and BT to the blood and liver (3 h after the experimental trial) in mice from the H-NS group relative to those from the C-NS group. Dietary Gln supplementation attenuated hyperthermia and prevented the increases in intestinal permeability and BT induced by heat exposure. No correlations were observed between the improvements in gastrointestinal function and the attenuation of hyperthermia by Gln. Our findings indicate that dietary Gln supplementation preserved the integrity of the intestinal barrier and reduced the severity of hyperthermia during heat exposure. The findings also indicate that these Gln-mediated effects occurred through independent mechanisms.

  14. Supplementing formula-fed piglets with a low molecular weight fraction of bovine colostrum whey results in an improved intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    De Vos, M; Huygelen, V; Van Raemdonck, G; Willemen, S; Fransen, E; Van Ostade, X; Casteleyn, C; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that a low molecular weight fraction of colostral whey could affect the morphology and barrier function of the small intestine, 30 3-d-old piglets (normal or low birth weight) were suckled (n = 5), artificially fed with milk formula (n = 5), or artificially fed with milk formula with a low molecular weight fraction of colostral whey (n = 5) until 10 d of age. The small intestine was sampled for histology (haematoxylin and eosin stain; anti-KI67 immunohistochemistry) and enzyme activities (aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, lactase, maltase, and sucrase). In addition, intestinal permeability was evaluated via a dual sugar absorption test and via the measurement of occludin abundance. Artificially feeding of piglets reduced final BW (P < 0.001), villus height (P < 0.001), lactase (P < 0.001), and dipeptidylpeptidase IV activities (P < 0.07), whereas crypt depth (P < 0.001) was increased. No difference was observed with regard to the permeability measurements when comparing artificially fed with naturally suckling piglets. Supplementing piglets with the colostral whey fraction did not affect BW, enzyme activities, or the outcome of the dual sugar absorption test. On the contrary, the small intestines of supplemented piglets had even shorter villi (P = 0.001) than unsupplemented piglets and contained more occludin (P = 0.002). In conclusion, at 10 d of age, no differences regarding intestinal morphology and permeability measurements were observed between the 2 BW categories. In both weight categories, the colostral whey fraction affected the morphology of the small intestine but did not improve the growth performances or the in vivo permeability. These findings should be acknowledged when developing formulated milk for neonatal animals with the aim of improving the performance of low birth weight piglets. PMID:25012977

  15. Supplementing formula-fed piglets with a low molecular weight fraction of bovine colostrum whey results in an improved intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    De Vos, M; Huygelen, V; Van Raemdonck, G; Willemen, S; Fransen, E; Van Ostade, X; Casteleyn, C; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that a low molecular weight fraction of colostral whey could affect the morphology and barrier function of the small intestine, 30 3-d-old piglets (normal or low birth weight) were suckled (n = 5), artificially fed with milk formula (n = 5), or artificially fed with milk formula with a low molecular weight fraction of colostral whey (n = 5) until 10 d of age. The small intestine was sampled for histology (haematoxylin and eosin stain; anti-KI67 immunohistochemistry) and enzyme activities (aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, lactase, maltase, and sucrase). In addition, intestinal permeability was evaluated via a dual sugar absorption test and via the measurement of occludin abundance. Artificially feeding of piglets reduced final BW (P < 0.001), villus height (P < 0.001), lactase (P < 0.001), and dipeptidylpeptidase IV activities (P < 0.07), whereas crypt depth (P < 0.001) was increased. No difference was observed with regard to the permeability measurements when comparing artificially fed with naturally suckling piglets. Supplementing piglets with the colostral whey fraction did not affect BW, enzyme activities, or the outcome of the dual sugar absorption test. On the contrary, the small intestines of supplemented piglets had even shorter villi (P = 0.001) than unsupplemented piglets and contained more occludin (P = 0.002). In conclusion, at 10 d of age, no differences regarding intestinal morphology and permeability measurements were observed between the 2 BW categories. In both weight categories, the colostral whey fraction affected the morphology of the small intestine but did not improve the growth performances or the in vivo permeability. These findings should be acknowledged when developing formulated milk for neonatal animals with the aim of improving the performance of low birth weight piglets.

  16. Fermented Pueraria Lobata extract ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis by reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and recovering intestinal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seungho; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Jang, Yeong-Su; Kang, Ju-Hee; Jang, Jung-Eun; Yi, Tae-Hoo; Park, Sang-Yong; Kim, Sun-Yeou; Yoon, Yeo-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder occurring in the gastrointestinal track. However, the efficacy of current therapeutic strategies has been limited and accompanied by side effects. In order to eliminate the limitations, herbal medicines have recently been developed for treatment of IBD. Peuraria Lobata (Peuraria L.) is one of the traditional herbal medicines that have anti-inflammatory effects. Bioavailability of Peuraria L., which is rich in isoflavones, is lower than that of their fermented forms. In this study, we generated fermented Peuraria L. extracts (fPue) and investigated the role of fPue in inflammation and intestinal barrier function in vitro and in vivo. As the mice or intestinal epithelial cells were treated with DSS/fPue, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was reduced and the architecture and expression of tight junction proteins were recovered, compared to the DSS-treated group. In summary, fPue treatment resulted in amelioration of DSS-induced inflammation in the colon, and the disrupted intestinal barrier was recovered as the expression and architecture of tight junction proteins were retrieved. These results suggest that use of fPue could be a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of IBD. PMID:27729931

  17. TNFα/IFNγ Mediated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Is Attenuated by MicroRNA-93 Downregulation of PTK6 in Mouse Colonic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard S.; Eitner, Rebecca A.; Chen, Liwei; Wu, Mack H.

    2016-01-01

    transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), as well as excluded FoxO1 from the nucleus. Our results indicate that PTK6 may act as a novel mediator of intestinal epithelial permeability during inflammatory injury, and miR-93 may protect intestinal epithelial barrier function, at least in part, by targeting PTK6. PMID:27119373

  18. Maturation of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in Neonatal Rats Coincides with Decreased FcRn Expression, Replacement of Vacuolated Enterocytes and Changed Blimp-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo Sureda, Ester; Weström, Björn; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.; Prykhodko, Olena

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal barrier is immature in newborn mammals allowing for transfer of bioactive macromolecules, e.g. protecting antibodies, from mother’s milk to the blood circulation and in neonatal rodents lasts until weaning. This passage involves the neonatal-Fc-receptor (FcRn) binding IgG in the proximal and highly endocytic vacuolated enterocytes in the distal immature small intestine (SI). Recent studies have suggested an involvement of the transcription factor B-lymphocyte-induced maturation-protein-1 (Blimp-1) in the regulation of SI maturation in mice. Hence, the objective of the present study was to monitor the development of the intestinal barrier function, in relation to Blimp-1 expression during both natural and precociously induced intestinal maturation in rats. Results During the suckling period IgG plasma levels increased, while after gut closure it temporarily decreased. This corresponded to a high expression of FcRn in the proximal SI epithelium and the presence of vacuolated enterocytes in the distal SI. The immature foetal-type epithelium was replaced after weaning or induced precocious maturation, by an adult-type epithelium with FcRnneg cells in the proximal and by non-vacuolated enterocytes in the distal SI. In parallel to this epithelial shift, Blimp-1 expression decreased in the distal SI. Conclusion The switch from foetal- to adult-type epithelium, with decreased proximal expression of FcRn and distal replacement of vacuolated enterocytes, was concurrent in the two SI regions and could be used for monitoring SI maturation in the rat. The changes in expression of Blimp-1 in the distal SI epithelium followed the maturation pattern. PMID:27736989

  19. Glutamine decreases intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by downregulating HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Qingxiu; Xu, Zengguang; Yu, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is a common clinical pathophysiological process that is common in severe trauma, major surgery, and in post-resuscitation. Glutamine (Gln) reduces intestinal IR injury, however, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) are mediators involved in the pathophysiology of intestinal IR injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Gln on the intestinal mucosa of HMGB1 expression following IR to determine whether Gln relieved intestinal IR injury in the intestinal mucosal barrier. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were included in the present study. A model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury was established by clamping the superior mesenteric artery of the rats to cause ischemia, followed by restoring blood flow. The animals were randomly divided into the control (n=24) and the Gln (n=24) groups for the experiments. The two groups of rats were given enteral nutrition with equal heat, nitrogen (heat 125.4 kJ/kg/day, nitrogen 0.2 g/kg/day). The Gln group of rats was fed with enteral nutrition plus 3% Gln, while the control rats were fed with enteral nutrition plus 3% soybean protein. After 7 days, the HMGB1 and plasma levels of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1, Gln, D-lactic acid and diamine oxidase (DAO) were observed. The changes in the morphology of intestinal mucosa were observed using electron microscopy. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1, D-lactic acid and DAO, and the level of HMGB1, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1 in intestinal mucosa were significantly higher after IR (p<0.05), while the plasma level of Gln was lower in the two groups. In the control group, the plasma level of IL-1, TNF-α, DAO and D-lactic acid, and that of HMGB1, NF-κB, TNF-α, and IL-1 in intestinal mucosa were significantly higher, while the plasma level of Gln was lower than that prior to modeling on the 3

  20. Effects of glutamine alone or in combination with zinc and vitamin A on growth, intestinal barrier function, stress and satiety-related hormones in Brazilian shantytown children

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Aldo A. M.; Anstead, Gregory M.; Zhang, Qiong; Figueiredo, Ítalo L.; Soares, Alberto M.; Mota, Rosa M. S.; Lima, Noélia L.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Oriá, Reinaldo B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of supplemental zinc, vitamin A, and glutamine alone or in combination on growth, intestinal barrier function, stress and satiety-related hormones among Brazilian shantytown children with low median height-for-age z-scores. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in children aged two months to nine years from the urban shanty compound community of Fortaleza, Brazil. Demographic and anthropometric information was assessed. The random treatment groups available for testing (a total of 120 children) were as follows: (1) glutamine alone, n = 38; (2) glutamine plus vitamin A plus zinc, n = 37; and a placebo (zinc plus vitamin A vehicle) plus glycine (isonitrogenous to glutamine) control treatment, n = 38. Leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), and plasma levels of cortisol were measured with immune-enzymatic assays; urinary lactulose/mannitol and serum amino acids were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00133406. RESULTS: Glutamine treatment significantly improved weight-for-height z-scores compared to the placebo-glycine control treatment. Either glutamine alone or all nutrients combined prevented disruption of the intestinal barrier function, as measured by the percentage of lactulose urinary excretion and the lactulose:mannitol absorption ratio. Plasma leptin was negatively correlated with plasma glutamine (p = 0.002) and arginine (p = 0.001) levels at baseline. After glutamine treatment, leptin was correlated with weight-for-age (WAZ) and weight-for-height z-scores (WHZ) (p≤0.002) at a 4-month follow-up. In addition, glutamine and all combined nutrients (glutamine, vitamin A, and zinc) improved the intestinal barrier function in these children. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings reveal the benefits of glutamine alone or in combination with other gut-trophic nutrients in growing children via interactions with

  1. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application. PMID:26617183

  3. Impact of exogenous lipase supplementation on growth, intestinal function, mucosal immune and physical barrier, and related signaling molecules mRNA expression of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zeng, Yun-Yun; Xu, Shu-De; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of exogenous lipase supplementation on the growth performance, intestinal growth and function, immune response and physical barrier function, and related signaling molecules mRNA expression of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 450 grass carp (255.02 ± 0.34 g) were fed five diets for 60 days. There were 5 dietary treatments that included a normal protein and lipid diet containing 30% crude protein (CP) with 5% ether extract (EE), and the low-protein and high-lipid diets (28% CP, 6% EE) supplemented with graded levels of exogenous lipase supplementation activity at 0, 1193, 2560 and 3730 U/kg diet. The results indicated that compared with a normal protein and lipid diet (30% CP, 5% EE), a low-protein and high-lipid diet (28% CP, 6% EE) (un-supplemented lipase) improved lysozyme activities and complement component 3 contents in the distal intestine (DI), interleukin 10 mRNA expression in the proximal intestine (PI), and glutathione S-transferases activity and glutathione content in the intestine of young grass carp. In addition, in low-protein and high-lipid diets, optimal exogenous lipase supplementation significantly increased acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and complement component 3 (C3) contents (P < 0.05), up-regulated the relative mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides (liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and hepcidin) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1) and signaling molecules inhibitor protein-κBα (IκBα) and target of rapamycin (TOR) (P < 0.05), down-regulated the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ2, and interleukin 1β), and signaling molecules (nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ) (P < 0.05) in the intestine of young grass carp. Moreover, optimal exogenous lipase supplementation significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde

  4. Effect of thyme essential oil and selenium on intestine integrity and antioxidant status of broilers.

    PubMed

    Placha, I; Takacova, J; Ryzner, M; Cobanova, K; Laukova, A; Strompfova, V; Venglovska, K; Faix, S

    2014-02-01

    1. This study evaluated the duodenal wall integrity, antioxidant status as well as some immunological parameters of broiler chickens supplemented with 0.5 g Thymus vulgaris essential oil (EO)/kg diet and 0.4 mg Se/kg DM (dry matter) derived from sodium selenite. 2. A total of 192 one-d-old randomly divided chickens of both sexes (Ross 308 hybrid broilers) were divided into 4 treatment groups of 48 birds each. 3. The first group was fed on a nutritionally balanced basal diet (BD). The other three groups received BD supplemented with 0.5 g/kg thyme oil, or 0.4 mg Se/kg DM, or both feed additives together. 4. The results for the evaluated feed additives were (1) thyme oil - decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in duodenal mucosa and kidney, increased immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentration in duodenal mucosa, stimulated phagocytic activity in blood, improved intestinal barrier integrity (2) selenium - increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in blood and liver as well as thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity in duodenal mucosa, liver and in the kidney, (3) EO with selenium - increased thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity in duodenal mucosa. 5. These results demonstrated that thyme oil alone showed more effective potential to improve intestinal barrier integrity and antioxidant status as well as evoking an immune response in chickens, than if diets were supplemented with both thyme oil and selenium.

  5. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers.

  6. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers. PMID:27281582

  7. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines.

  8. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-01-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00±1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines. PMID:26416815

  9. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  10. The serine protease-mediated increase in intestinal epithelial barrier function is dependent on occludin and requires an intact tight junction.

    PubMed

    Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Iablokov, Vadim; Zaheer, Raza; Colarusso, Pina; Turner, Jerrold R; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2016-09-01

    Barrier dysfunction is a characteristic of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Understanding how the tight junction is modified to maintain barrier function may provide avenues for treatment of IBD. We have previously shown that the apical addition of serine proteases to intestinal epithelial cell lines causes a rapid and sustained increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), but the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that serine proteases increase barrier function through trafficking and insertion of tight junction proteins into the membrane, and this could enhance recovery of a disrupted monolayer after calcium switch or cytokine treatment. In the canine epithelial cell line, SCBN, we showed that matriptase, an endogenous serine protease, could potently increase TER. Using detergent solubility-based cell fractionation, we found that neither trypsin nor matriptase treatment changed levels of tight junction proteins at the membrane. In a fast calcium switch assay, serine proteases did not enhance the rate of recovery of the junction. In addition, serine proteases could not reverse barrier disruption induced by IFNγ and TNFα. We knocked down occludin in our cells using siRNA and found this prevented the serine protease-induced increase in TER. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we found serine proteases induce a greater mobile fraction of occludin in the membrane. These data suggest that a functional tight junction is needed for serine proteases to have an effect on TER, and that occludin is a crucial tight junction protein in this mechanism. PMID:27492333

  11. Low Doses of Celecoxib Attenuate Gut Barrier Failure During Experimental Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Short, Scott S.; Wang, Jin; Castle, Shannon L.; Fernandez, G. Esteban; Smiley, Nancy; Zobel, Michael; Pontarelli, Elizabeth M.; Papillon, Stephanie C.; Grishin, Anatoly V.; Ford, Henri R.

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal barrier becomes compromised during systemic inflammation, leading to entry of luminal bacteria into the host and gut origin sepsis. Pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory gut barrier failure is an important problem in critical care. In this study we examined the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key enzyme in the production of inflammatory prostanoids, in gut barrier failure during experimental peritonitis in mice. I.p. injection of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) increased the levels of COX-2 and its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the ileal mucosa, caused pathologic sloughing of the intestinal epithelium, increased passage of FITC-dextran and bacterial translocation across the barrier, and increased internalization of the tight junction-associated proteins JAM-A and ZO-1. Luminal instillation of PGE2 in an isolated ileal loop increased transepithelial passage of FITC-dextran. Low doses (0.5–1 mg/kg), but not a higher dose (5 mg/kg) of the specific COX-2 inhibitor Celecoxib partially ameliorated the inflammatory gut barrier failure. These results demonstrate that high levels of COX-2-derived PGE2 seen in the mucosa during peritonitis contribute to gut barrier failure, presumably by compromising tight junctions. Low doses of specific COX-2 inhibitors may blunt this effect while preserving the homeostatic function of COX-2-derived prostanoids. Low doses of COX-2 inhibitors may find use as an adjunct barrier-protecting therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:24126890

  12. β-1,3/1,6-Glucan alleviated intestinal mucosal barrier impairment of broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yujing; Guo, Yuming; Wang, Zhong

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan on gut morphology, intestinal epithelial tight junctions, and bacterial translocation of broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Ninety Salmonella-free Arbor Acre male broiler chickens were randomly divided into 3 groups: negative control group (NC), Salmonella Typhimurium-infected positive group (PC), and the Salmonella Typhimurium-infected group with dietary 100 mg/kg of β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation (T) to determine the effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan on intestinal barrier function. Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone significantly decreased villus height (P < 0.001), villus height/crypt depth ratio (P < 0.05), and the number of goblet cells (P < 0.001) in the jejunum at 14 d postinfection (dpi), but significantly increased the number of intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA)-expressing cells at 14 dpi (P < 0.01) and total sIgA levels in the jejunum at 7 (P < 0.05) and 14 dpi (P < 0.01) compared with the unchallenged birds (NC). Dietary β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation not only significantly increased villus height, villus height/crypt depth ratio, and the number of goblet cells (P < 0.01), but also increased the number of sIgA-expressing cells (P < 0.05) and sIgA content in the jejunum at 14 dpi (P < 0.01) in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium in comparison with Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone. β-1,3/1,6-Glucan addition had significant inhibitory effects (P < 0.05) on cecal Salmonella colonization levels and liver Salmonella invasion of the Salmonella Typhimurium-infected birds compared with the PC group. Intestinal tight junction proteins claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin mRNA expression in the jejunum at 14 dpi was significantly decreased by Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone (P < 0.01) compared with that of the NC group, whereas β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation significantly increased claudin-1 and occludin mRNA expression (P < 0.01) at

  13. Tumour necrosis factor-α-induced loss of intestinal barrier function requires TNFR1 and TNFR2 signalling in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongjia; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2013-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been reported to play a central role in intestinal barrier dysfunction in many diseases; however, the precise role of the TNF-α receptors (TNFRs) has not been well defined using in vivo models. Our previous data showed that enteral nutrient deprivation or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) led to a loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function (EBF), with an associated upregulation of TNF-α and TNFR1. In this study, we hypothesized that TNF-α plays an important role in TPN-associated EBF dysfunction. Using a mouse TPN model, we explored the relative roles of TNFR1 vs. TNFR2 in mediating this barrier loss. C57/BL6 mice underwent intravenous cannulation and were given enteral nutrition or TPN for 7 days. Tumour necrosis factor-α receptor knockout (KO) mice, including TNFR1KO, TNFR2KO or TNFR1R2 double KO (DKO), were used. Outcomes included small intestine transepithelial resistance (TER) and tracer permeability, junctional protein zonula occludens-1, occludin, claudins and E-cadherin expression. In order to address the dependence of EBF on TNF-α further, exogenous TNF-α and pharmacological blockade of TNF-α (Etanercept) were also performed. Total parenteral nutrition led to a loss of EBF, and this was almost completely prevented in TNFR1R2DKO mice and partly prevented in TNFR1KO mice but not in TNFR2KO mice. The TPN-associated downregulation of junctional protein expression and junctional assembly was almost completely prevented in the TNFR1R2DKO group. Blockade of TNF-α also prevented dysfunction of the EBF and junctional protein losses in mice undergoing TPN. Administration of TPN upregulated the downstream nuclear factor-κB and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) signalling, and these changes were almost completely prevented in TNFR1R2DKO mice, as well as with TNF-α blockade, but not in TNFR1KO or TNFR2KO TPN groups. Tumour necrosis factor-α is a critical factor for TPN-associated epithelial barrier dysfunction, and

  14. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Goyer, Marianne; Loiselet, Alicia; Bon, Fabienne; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ.

  15. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Goyer, Marianne; Loiselet, Alicia; Bon, Fabienne; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. PMID:26933885

  16. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Fabienne; L’Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. PMID:26933885

  17. Pregnane X Receptor Activation Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Expression and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1/2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aditya; Zhao, Angela; Erickson, Sarah L; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Lau, Aik Jiang; Alston, Laurie; Chang, Thomas K H; Mani, Sridhar; Hirota, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders with a complex etiology. IBD is thought to arise in genetically susceptible individuals in the context of aberrant interactions with the intestinal microbiota and other environmental risk factors. Recently, the pregnane X receptor (PXR) was identified as a sensor for microbial metabolites, whose activation can regulate the intestinal epithelial barrier. Mutations in NR1I2, the gene that encodes the PXR, have been linked to IBD, and in animal models, PXR deletion leads to barrier dysfunction. In the current study, we sought to assess the mechanism(s) through which the PXR regulates barrier function during inflammation. In Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell monolayers, tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ exposure disrupted the barrier and triggered zonula occludens-1 relocalization, increased expression of myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Activation of the PXR [rifaximin and [[3,5-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]ethenylidene]bis-phosphonic acid tetraethyl ester (SR12813); 10 μM] protected the barrier, an effect that was associated with attenuated MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. In vivo, activation of the PXR [pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN)] attenuated barrier disruption induced by toll-like receptor 4 activation in wild-type, but not Pxr-/-, mice. Furthermore, PCN treatment protected the barrier in the dextran-sulfate sodium model of experimental colitis, an effect that was associated with reduced expression of mucosal MLCK and phosphorylated JNK1/2. Together, our data suggest that the PXR regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier during inflammation by modulating cytokine-induced MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. Thus, targeting the PXR may prove beneficial for the treatment of inflammation-associated barrier disruption in the context of IBD. PMID:27440420

  18. Pregnane X Receptor Activation Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Expression and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1/2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aditya; Zhao, Angela; Erickson, Sarah L; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Lau, Aik Jiang; Alston, Laurie; Chang, Thomas K H; Mani, Sridhar; Hirota, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders with a complex etiology. IBD is thought to arise in genetically susceptible individuals in the context of aberrant interactions with the intestinal microbiota and other environmental risk factors. Recently, the pregnane X receptor (PXR) was identified as a sensor for microbial metabolites, whose activation can regulate the intestinal epithelial barrier. Mutations in NR1I2, the gene that encodes the PXR, have been linked to IBD, and in animal models, PXR deletion leads to barrier dysfunction. In the current study, we sought to assess the mechanism(s) through which the PXR regulates barrier function during inflammation. In Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell monolayers, tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ exposure disrupted the barrier and triggered zonula occludens-1 relocalization, increased expression of myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Activation of the PXR [rifaximin and [[3,5-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]ethenylidene]bis-phosphonic acid tetraethyl ester (SR12813); 10 μM] protected the barrier, an effect that was associated with attenuated MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. In vivo, activation of the PXR [pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN)] attenuated barrier disruption induced by toll-like receptor 4 activation in wild-type, but not Pxr-/-, mice. Furthermore, PCN treatment protected the barrier in the dextran-sulfate sodium model of experimental colitis, an effect that was associated with reduced expression of mucosal MLCK and phosphorylated JNK1/2. Together, our data suggest that the PXR regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier during inflammation by modulating cytokine-induced MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. Thus, targeting the PXR may prove beneficial for the treatment of inflammation-associated barrier disruption in the context of IBD.

  19. Other causes of GI mucosal injury: upper intestinal content.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, W P

    1987-05-01

    Factors in upper intestinal content that can produce acute injury to the gastric mucosa include lysolecithin and the bile acids. Both damage the gastric mucosal barrier by increasing mucosal permeability. The secondary and deconjugated bile acids are more toxic in this regard than are the primary or conjugated ones. The extent of injury is highly pH-dependent. Although the bile acids do not affect the gel properties of gastric mucus, they do produce significant inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity and gastric bicarbonate secretion. In concert with other topical damaging agents, bile acids increase mucosal blood flow. However, gross mucosal lesions are rarely observed under these circumstances. Chronic exposure of acid-peptic-secreting mucosa to upper intestinal content results in the development of a severe atrophic gastritis within 6 months. The ability of atrophic mucosa to maintain an intraluminal pH gradient is impaired, and it ulcerates with great regularity when exposed to a highly acid environment. Clinically, excessive enterogastric reflux has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both benign gastric ulcer and the post-gastrectomy syndrome of alkaline reflux gastritis. The evidence to support this view for both disease entities is reviewed. PMID:3113802

  20. Bacterial translocation and in vivo assessment of intestinal barrier permeability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with and without soyabean meal-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mosberian-Tanha, Peyman; Øverland, Margareth; Landsverk, Thor; Reveco, Felipe E; Schrama, Johan W; Roem, Andries J; Agger, Jane W; Mydland, Liv T

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this experiment was to evaluate the intestinal barrier permeability in vivo in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed increasing levels of soyabean meal (SBM). The relationship between SBM-induced enteritis (SBMIE) and the permeability markers was also investigated. Our results showed that the mean score of morphological parameters was significantly higher as a result of 37·5 % SBM inclusion in the diet, while the scores of fish fed 25 % SBM or lower were not different from those of the fish meal-fed controls (P < 0·05). SBMIE was found in the distal intestine (DI) in 18 % of the fish (eleven of sixty): ten in the 37·5 % SBM-fed group and one in the 25 % SBM-fed group. Sugar markers in plasma showed large variation among individuals probably due to variation in feed intake. We found, however, a significant linear increase in the level of plasma d-lactate with increasing SBM inclusion level (P < 0·0001). Plasma concentration of endotoxin was not significantly different in groups with or without SBMIE. Some individual fish showed high values of endotoxin in blood, but the same individuals did not show any bacterial translocation. Plasma bacterial DNA was detected in 28 % of the fish with SBMIE, and 8 % of non-SBMIE fish (P = 0·07). Plasma concentration of d-lactate was significantly higher in fish with SBMIE (P < 0·0001). To conclude, SBMIE in the DI of rainbow trout was associated with an increase in bacterial translocation and plasma d-lactate concentration, suggesting that these permeability markers can be used to evaluate intestinal permeability in vivo.

  1. Intestinal Cell Barrier Function In Vitro Is Severely Compromised by Keratin 8 and 18 Mutations Identified in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zupancic, Tina; Stojan, Jure; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Komel, Radovan; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Liovic, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18) mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N) are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T) discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity) each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo. PMID:24915158

  2. Bacterial translocation and in vivo assessment of intestinal barrier permeability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with and without soyabean meal-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mosberian-Tanha, Peyman; Øverland, Margareth; Landsverk, Thor; Reveco, Felipe E; Schrama, Johan W; Roem, Andries J; Agger, Jane W; Mydland, Liv T

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this experiment was to evaluate the intestinal barrier permeability in vivo in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed increasing levels of soyabean meal (SBM). The relationship between SBM-induced enteritis (SBMIE) and the permeability markers was also investigated. Our results showed that the mean score of morphological parameters was significantly higher as a result of 37·5 % SBM inclusion in the diet, while the scores of fish fed 25 % SBM or lower were not different from those of the fish meal-fed controls (P < 0·05). SBMIE was found in the distal intestine (DI) in 18 % of the fish (eleven of sixty): ten in the 37·5 % SBM-fed group and one in the 25 % SBM-fed group. Sugar markers in plasma showed large variation among individuals probably due to variation in feed intake. We found, however, a significant linear increase in the level of plasma d-lactate with increasing SBM inclusion level (P < 0·0001). Plasma concentration of endotoxin was not significantly different in groups with or without SBMIE. Some individual fish showed high values of endotoxin in blood, but the same individuals did not show any bacterial translocation. Plasma bacterial DNA was detected in 28 % of the fish with SBMIE, and 8 % of non-SBMIE fish (P = 0·07). Plasma concentration of d-lactate was significantly higher in fish with SBMIE (P < 0·0001). To conclude, SBMIE in the DI of rainbow trout was associated with an increase in bacterial translocation and plasma d-lactate concentration, suggesting that these permeability markers can be used to evaluate intestinal permeability in vivo. PMID:27547389

  3. A Gut Microbial Metabolite of Linoleic Acid, 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic Acid, Ameliorates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Impairment Partially via GPR40-MEK-ERK Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Mizukure, Taichi; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Kimura, Ikuo; Hirano, Kanako; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro; Suzuki, Takuya; Arita, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Tanabe, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids have attracted much attention because of their various physiological properties. Dysfunction of tight junction (TJ) in the intestine contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. We evaluated the effects of five novel gut microbial metabolites on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced barrier impairment in Caco-2 cells and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, suppressed TNF-α and dextran sulfate sodium-induced changes in the expression of TJ-related molecules, occludin, zonula occludens-1, and myosin light chain kinase. HYA also suppressed the expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA and protein expression in Caco-2 cells and colonic tissue. In addition, HYA suppressed the protein expression of TNFR2 in murine intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HYA significantly up-regulated G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 expression in Caco-2 cells. It also induced [Ca2+]i responses in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 with higher sensitivity than linoleic acid, its metabolic precursor. The barrier-recovering effects of HYA were abrogated by a GPR40 antagonist and MEK inhibitor in Caco-2 cells. Conversely, 10-hydroxyoctadacanoic acid, which is a gut microbial metabolite of oleic acid and lacks a carbon-carbon double bond at Δ12 position, did not show these TJ-restoring activities and down-regulated GPR40 expression. Therefore, HYA modulates TNFR2 expression, at least partially, via the GPR40-MEK-ERK pathway and may be useful in the treatment of TJ-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25505251

  4. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  5. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network

    PubMed Central

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  6. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network.

    PubMed

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  7. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  8. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients

    PubMed Central

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A.; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed. PMID:26226276

  9. From Intestinal Permeability to Dysmotility: The Biobreeding Rat as a Model for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vanheel, Hanne; Masaoka, Tatsuhiro; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Houben, Els; Verbeke, Kristin; De Hertogh, Gert; Berghe, Pieter Vanden; Tack, Jan; Farré, Ricard

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired intestinal barrier function, low-grade inflammation and altered neuronal control are reported in functional gastrointestinal disorders. However, the sequence of and causal relation between these events is unclear, necessitating a spontaneous animal model. The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of intestinal permeability, mucosal and neuromuscular inflammation and nitrergic motor neuron function during the lifetime of the BioBreeding (BB) rat. Methods Normoglycemic BB-diabetes prone (DP) and control rats were sacrificed at different ages and jejunum was harvested to characterize intestinal permeability, inflammation and neuromuscular function. Results Both structural and functional evidence of increased intestinal permeability was found in young BB-DP rats from the age of 50 days. In older animals, starting in the mucosa from 70 days and in half of the animals also in the muscularis propria from 110 days, an inflammatory reaction, characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear cells and higher myeloperoxidase activity, was observed. Finally, in animals older than 110 days, coinciding with a myenteric ganglionitis, a loss of nitrergic neurons and motor function was demonstrated. Conclusion In the BB-rat, mucosal inflammatory cell infiltration is preceded by intestinal barrier dysfunction and followed by myenteric ganglionitis and loss of nitrergic function. This sequence supports a primary role for impaired barrier function and provides an insightful model for the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25354336

  10. The Role of Mucosal Defense in Intestinal Injury of Infants With Fetal Growth Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Panakhova, Nushaba F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infants with fetal growth retardation (FGR) are prone to intestinal disorders. Objectives: Aim of the study was to determine the role of mucosal defense ability in formation of gut injury in infants with FGR. Materials and Methods: 44 premature infants who were admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit were divided into two groups: 20 infants with FGR (FGR group) and 24 appropriate-for-gestational age newborns (AGA group). Control group consisted of 22 premature infants who were delivered after uncomplicated pregnancy. Gut barrier function was evaluated by detecting serum intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) and intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP). The level of serum IFABP and ITF was measured by using ELISA method. Results: FGR group showed significantly higher ITF concentration than AGA group on the first days of life (P ˂ 0.01). High level of ITF in the FGR group significantly declines up to 7th - 10th day of life (P ˂ 0.01). This reduction was accompanied by increase of IFABP which is a marker of ischemic intestinal mucosal injury. Correlation analyses showed that ITF had a negative correlation with IFABP. Conclusions: Infants with fetal growth retardation are characterized by a high level of ITF on the first days of life. This protects intestinal mucosa under hypoxic conditions. Its subsequent decline accompanied by an increase of IFABP reflects the depletion of Goblet cells to secret ITF causing damage to the integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:26848381

  11. Butyrate promotes the recovering of intestinal wound healing through its positive effect on the tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Fan, P X; Li, L S; Qiao, S Y; Zhang, G L; Li, D F

    2012-12-01

    Postweaning diarrhea is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in weanling piglets. Feeding sodium butyrate to weanling piglets decreased the incidence of diarrhea, but the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium butyrate on diarrhea in relation to wound healing of intestinal barrier using IPEC-J2 cell model. Cultured cells were scratched to induce wound and then were treated with 4 mM sodium butyrate. The results showed that supplementation of the cells with sodium butyrate significantly promoted the process of wound healing, indicating the protective effects of butyrate on the intestinal mucosa. Butyrate treatment enhanced mRNA expression of the intestinal mucosal tight junction proteins occludin and zonula occluden protein-1 (P < 0.05), which suggested that the promotion of wound healing by butyrate is related to the maintenance of the function of the intestinal barrier. In addition, in the butyrate-treated group, intestinal total superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (P < 0.05), two of the main antioxidant enzymes, as well as glutathione (P < 0.05), one of the nonenzymatic antioxidant components, were enhanced whereas the malondialdehyde level, a marker of free radical mediated lipid peroxidation injury, was decreased (P < 0.05) compared with the control group. Collectively, these results indicate that dietary sodium butyrate might, at least partly, play an important role in recovering the intestinal tight junctions having a positive effect on maintaining the gut integrity.

  12. Prions efficiently cross the intestinal barrier after oral administration: Study of the bioavailability, and cellular and tissue distribution in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Akihiko; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Khan, Uffaf; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Kharat, Vineetkumar; Soto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Natural forms of prion diseases frequently originate by oral (p.o.) infection. However, quantitative information on the gastro-intestinal (GI) absorption of prions (i.e. the bioavailability and subsequent biodistribution) is mostly unknown. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the fate of prions after oral administration, using highly purified radiolabeled PrPSc. The results showed a bi-phasic reduction of PrPSc with time in the GI, except for the ileum and colon which showed sustained increases peaking at 3–6 hr, respectively. Plasma and whole blood 125I-PrPSc reached maximal levels by 30 min and 3 hr, respectively, and blood levels were constantly higher than plasma. Upon crossing the GI-tract 125I-PrPSc became associated to blood cells, suggesting that binding to cells decreased the biological clearance of the agent. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed that oligomeric 125I-PrPSc were transported from the intestinal tract, and protein misfolding cyclic amplification showed that PrPSc in organs and blood retained the typical prion self-replicating ability. Pharmacokinetic analysis found the oral bioavailability of 125I-PrPSc to be 33.6%. Interestingly, 125I-PrPSc reached the brain in a quantity equivalent to the minimum amount needed to initiate prion disease. Our findings provide a comprehensive and quantitative study of the fate of prions upon oral infection. PMID:27573341

  13. [The correlation study between the changes of intestinal mucosa predominant bacteria and Toll-like receptor 2, Toll-like receptor 4 gene expressions in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Guo, W T; Liu, P; Dong, L N; Wang, J P

    2016-07-01

    Based on high throughput sequencing and PCR detection technology, this study has found out that intestinal microbial diversity was impaired and the quantities of two main bacteria flora (Bacteroidetes and Clostridium) were significantly reduced in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS). Meanwhile mucosal expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 were significantly enhanced, which was inversely correlated with the reduction of Bacteroidetes and Clostridium. Thus, it suggests that D-IBS may be associated with TLR signal transduction triggered by the intestinal dysbacteriosis. PMID:27373290

  14. Toxic Effects of Maternal Zearalenone Exposure on Intestinal Oxidative Stress, Barrier Function, Immunological and Morphological Changes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Gao, Rui; Meng, Qingwei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Bi, Chongpeng; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of maternal zearalenone (ZEN) exposure on the intestine of pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and its offspring. Ninety-six pregnant SD rats were randomly divided into four groups and were fed with diets containing ZEN at concentrations of 0.3 mg/kg, 48.5 mg/kg, 97.6 mg/kg or 146.0 mg/kg from gestation days (GD) 1 to 7. All rats were fed with mycotoxin-free diet until their offspring were weaned at three weeks of age. The small intestinal fragments from pregnant rats at GD8, weaned dams and pups were collected and studied for toxic effects of ZEN on antioxidant status, immune response, expression of junction proteins, and morphology. The results showed that ZEN induced oxidative stress, affected the villous structure and reduced the expression of junction proteins claudin-4, occludin and connexin43 (Cx43) in a dose-dependent manner in pregnant rats. Different effects on the expression of cytokines were also observed both in mRNA and protein levels in these pregnant groups. Ingestion of high levels of ZEN caused irreversible damage in weaned dams, such as oxidative stress, decreased villi hight and low expression of junction proteins and cytokines. Decreased expression of jejunal interleukin-8 (IL-8) and increased expression of gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GPx2) mRNA were detected in weaned offspring, indicating long-term damage caused by maternal ZEN. We also found that the Nrf2 expression both in mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the ZEN-treated groups of pregnant dams and the high-dose of ZEN group of weaned dams. The data indicate that modulation of Nrf2-mediated pathway is one of mechanism via which ZEN affects gut wall antioxidant and inflammatory responses. PMID:25180673

  15. Prions efficiently cross the intestinal barrier after oral administration: Study of the bioavailability, and cellular and tissue distribution in vivo.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Khan, Uffaf; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Kharat, Vineetkumar; Soto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Natural forms of prion diseases frequently originate by oral (p.o.) infection. However, quantitative information on the gastro-intestinal (GI) absorption of prions (i.e. the bioavailability and subsequent biodistribution) is mostly unknown. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the fate of prions after oral administration, using highly purified radiolabeled PrP(Sc). The results showed a bi-phasic reduction of PrP(Sc) with time in the GI, except for the ileum and colon which showed sustained increases peaking at 3-6 hr, respectively. Plasma and whole blood (125)I-PrP(Sc) reached maximal levels by 30 min and 3 hr, respectively, and blood levels were constantly higher than plasma. Upon crossing the GI-tract (125)I-PrP(Sc) became associated to blood cells, suggesting that binding to cells decreased the biological clearance of the agent. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed that oligomeric (125)I-PrP(Sc) were transported from the intestinal tract, and protein misfolding cyclic amplification showed that PrP(Sc) in organs and blood retained the typical prion self-replicating ability. Pharmacokinetic analysis found the oral bioavailability of (125)I-PrP(Sc) to be 33.6%. Interestingly, (125)I-PrP(Sc) reached the brain in a quantity equivalent to the minimum amount needed to initiate prion disease. Our findings provide a comprehensive and quantitative study of the fate of prions upon oral infection. PMID:27573341

  16. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  17. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  18. Nutritional factors influencing intestinal health of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Odle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Dietary nutrients are essential for gastrointestinal (GI) growth and function, and nutritional support of GI growth and development is a significant component of infant care. For healthy full-term neonates, nutritional provisions of the mother's milk and/or formula will support normal maturation of structure and function of the GI tract in most infants. The composition of breast milk affects GI barrier function and development of a competent mucosal immune system. The functional nutrients and other bioactive components of milk support a microenvironment for gut protection and maturation. However, premature infants struggle with feeding tolerance impairing normal GI function, leading to intestinal dysfunction and even death. The high prevalence worldwide of enteric diseases and dysfunction in neonates has led to much interest in understanding the role of nutrients and food components in the establishment and maintenance of a functioning GI tract. Neonates who do not receive enteral feeding as either mother's milk or formula are supported by total parental nutrition (TPN). The lack of enteral nutrition can compound intestinal dysfunction, leading to high morbidity and mortality in intestinally compromised infants. Reciprocally, enteral stimulation of an immature GI tract can also compound intestinal dysfunction. Therefore, further understanding of nutrient interactions with the mucosa is necessary to define nutritional requirements of the developing GI tract to minimize intestinal complications and infant morbidity. Piglet models of intestinal development and function are similar to humans, and this review summarizes recent findings regarding nutrient requirements for growth and maintenance of intestinal health. In particular, this article reviews the role of specific amino acids (arginine, glutamine, glutamate, and threonine), fatty acids (long chain polyunsaturated, medium chain, and short chain), various prebiotic carbohydrates (short-chain fructo

  19. The Intestinal Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christoph; Neurath, Markus F; Wirtz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has important metabolic and host-protective functions. Conversely to these beneficial functions, the intestinal microbiota is thought to play a central role in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), a chronic inflammation of the gut mucosa. Genetic screens and studies in experimental mouse models have clearly demonstrated that IBD can develop due to excessive translocation of bacteria into the bowel wall or dysregulated handling of bacteria in genetically susceptible hosts. In healthy individuals, the microbiota is efficiently separated from the mucosal immune system of the gut by the gut barrier, a single layer of highly specialized epithelial cells, some of which are equipped with innate immune functions to prevent or control access of bacterial antigens to the mucosal immune cells. It is currently unclear whether the composition of the microbial flora or individual bacterial strains or pathogens induces or supports the pathogenesis of IBD. Further research will be necessary to carefully dissect the contribution of individual bacterial species to this disease and to ascertain whether specific modulation of the intestinal microbiome may represent a valuable further option for future therapeutic strategies.

  20. Quantitative In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Intestinal and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Kinetics of the Plant N-Alkylamide Pellitorine

    PubMed Central

    Veryser, Lieselotte; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Joshi, Tanmayee; Tatke, Pratima; Taevernier, Lien

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the gut mucosa and blood-brain barrier (BBB) pharmacokinetic permeability properties of the plant N-alkylamide pellitorine. Methods. Pure pellitorine and an Anacyclus pyrethrum extract were used to investigate the permeation of pellitorine through (1) a Caco-2 cell monolayer, (2) the rat gut after oral administration, and (3) the BBB in mice after intravenous and intracerebroventricular administration. A validated bioanalytical UPLC-MS2 method was used to quantify pellitorine. Results. Pellitorine was able to cross the Caco-2 cell monolayer from the apical-to-basolateral and from the basolateral-to-apical side with apparent permeability coefficients between 0.6 · 10−5 and 4.8 · 10−5 cm/h and between 0.3 · 10−5 and 5.8 · 10−5 cm/h, respectively. In rats, a serum elimination rate constant of 0.3 h−1 was obtained. Intravenous injection of pellitorine in mice resulted in a rapid and high permeation of pellitorine through the BBB with a unidirectional influx rate constant of 153 μL/(g·min). In particular, 97% of pellitorine reached the brain tissue, while only 3% remained in the brain capillaries. An efflux transfer constant of 0.05 min−1 was obtained. Conclusion. Pellitorine shows a good gut permeation and rapidly permeates the BBB once in the blood, indicating a possible role in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. PMID:27493960

  1. Effect of Candida albicans on Intestinal Ischemia-reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Wu, Chun-Rong; Wang, Chen; Yang, Chun-Hui; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is supposed to play a key role in the pathophysiological processes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IIRI), and Candida albicans in human gut commonly elevates inflammatory cytokines in intestinal mucosa. This study aimed to explore the effect of C. albicans on IIRI. Methods: Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into five groups according to the status of C. albicans infection and IIRI operation: group blank and sham; group blank and IIRI; group cefoperazone plus IIRI; group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and IIRI (CCI); and group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and sham. The levels of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and diamine oxidase (DAO) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to evaluate the inflammation reactivity as well as the integrity of small intestine. Histological scores were used to assess the mucosal damage, and the C. albicans blood translocation was detected to judge the permeability of intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: The levels of inflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in serum and intestine were higher in rats undergone both C. albicans infection and IIRI operation compared with rats in other groups. The levels of DAO (serum: 44.13 ± 4.30 pg/ml, intestine: 346.21 ± 37.03 pg/g) and Chiu scores (3.41 ± 1.09) which reflected intestinal mucosal disruption were highest in group CCI after the operation. The number of C. albicans translocated into blood was most in group CCI ([33.80 ± 6.60] ×102 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml). Conclusion: Intestinal C. albicans infection worsened the IIRI-induced disruption of intestinal mucosal barrier and facilitated the subsequent C. albicans translocation and dissemination. PMID:27411459

  2. Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-12-01

    Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was replaced by either cocoa butter (CB, rich in long-chain saturated fatty acids) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, exclusively medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Ethanol feeding increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration and perturbed hepatic and serum metabolite profiles. Ethanol feeding with CB or MCT alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and attenuated ethanol-induced metabolic perturbation. Both CB and MCT also normalized ethanol-induced hepatic macrophage activation, cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration. Ethanol feeding elevated serum endotoxin level, which was normalized by MCT but not CB. In accordance, ethanol-induced downregulations of intestinal occludin and zonula occludens-1 were normalized by MCT but not CB. However, CB normalized ethanol-increased hepatic endotoxin level in association with upregulation of an endotoxin detoxifying enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1). Knockdown ASS1 in H4IIEC3 cells resulted in impaired endotoxin clearance and upregulated cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the protection of saturated fats against alcohol-induced liver injury occur via different actions at the gut-liver axis and are chain length dependent.

  3. Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was replaced by either cocoa butter (CB, rich in long-chain saturated fatty acids) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, exclusively medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Ethanol feeding increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration and perturbed hepatic and serum metabolite profiles. Ethanol feeding with CB or MCT alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and attenuated ethanol-induced metabolic perturbation. Both CB and MCT also normalized ethanol-induced hepatic macrophage activation, cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration. Ethanol feeding elevated serum endotoxin level, which was normalized by MCT but not CB. In accordance, ethanol-induced downregulations of intestinal occludin and zonula occludens-1 were normalized by MCT but not CB. However, CB normalized ethanol-increased hepatic endotoxin level in association with upregulation of an endotoxin detoxifying enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1). Knockdown ASS1 in H4IIEC3 cells resulted in impaired endotoxin clearance and upregulated cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the protection of saturated fats against alcohol-induced liver injury occur via different actions at the gut-liver axis and are chain length dependent. PMID:24113767

  4. Intestinal Folate Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Olinger, Edward J.; Bertino, Joseph R.; Binder, Henry J.

    1973-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine whether pteroylmonoglutamic acid (PGA) at physiologic concentrations is transported across the small intestine unaltered or is reduced and methylated to the circulating folate form (5-methyltetrahydrofolate [5-MeFH4]) during absorption. [3H]PGA was incubated in vitro on the mucosal side of rat jejunum. Of the folate transferred to the serosal side, the percent identified as 5-MeFH4 by DEAE-Sephadex chromtography was inversely related to the initial mucosa PGA concentration: at 7, 20, and 2,000 nM, 44%, 34%, and 2%, respectively, was converted to 5-MeFH4. In contrast, less than 4% of the folate transferred across ileal mucosa was 5-MeFH4 when the initial mucosa concentration was 20 nM. Specific activity of dihydrofolate (DHF) reductase, the enzyme responsible for converting PGA to tetrahydrofolic acid, was measured in villus homogenates and was significantly greater in the jejunum than in the ileum. 1,000 nM methotrexate (MTX), a DHF reductase inhibitor, markedly inhibited PGA conversion to 5-MeFH4 by the jejunum. Studies of transmural flux, initial rate of mucosal entry (influx) and mucosal accumulation (uptake) of folate were also performed. Although MTX did not alter the influx of PGA, MTX decreased jejunal mucosal uptake but increased transmural movement. Transmural folate movement across ileal mucosa was greater than across jejunal mucosa although mucosal uptake was greater in the jejunum than in the ileum. These results could explain previous studies which have failed to identify conversion of PGA to 5-MeFH4 when intestinal preparations have been exposed to higher and less physiologic concentrations of PGA. Further, these studies suggest that 5-MeFH4 may be retained by the jejunal mucosa. PMID:4727453

  5. Influence of thermally oxidized vegetable oils and animal fats on intestinal barrier function and immune variables in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, P; Kerr, B J; Weber, T E; Chen, C; Johnston, L J; Shurson, G C

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of feeding thermally oxidized lipids on metabolic oxidative status, gut barrier function, and immune response of young pigs, 108 barrows (6.67 ± 0.03 kg BW) were assigned to 12 dietary treatments in a 4 × 3 factorial arrangement in addition to a corn-soybean meal control diet. Main effects were 4 lipid sources (corn oil [CN], canola oil [CA], poultry fat [PF], and tallow [TL]) and 3 oxidation levels (original lipids [OL], slow oxidation [SO] of lipids heated for 72 h at 95°C, or rapid oxidation [RO] of lipids heated for 7 h at 185°C). Pigs were provided ad libitum access to diets for 28 d followed by controlled feed intake for 10 d. After a 24-h fast on d 38, serum was collected and analyzed for α-tocopherol (α-T), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), endotoxin, haptoglobin, IgA, and IgG. On the same day following serum collection, lactulose and mannitol were fed and subsequently measured in the urine to evaluate gut permeability. There was a source × peroxidation interaction for serum α-T concentration where pigs fed SO or RO had decreased (P < 0.05) serum α-T concentration compared with pigs fed OL in CA and CN diets but not in pigs fed PF and TL diets. There was no source × peroxidation interaction for serum TBARS, but among all lipid sources, pigs fed SO or RO lipids had increased (P < 0.05) serum TBARS compared with pigs fed OL. In addition, pigs fed CN or CA had greater (P < 0.05) serum TBARS compared with pigs fed PF or TL diets. There were no lipid source × peroxidation level interaction or lipid source or peroxidation level effects on serum endotoxin, haptoglobin, IgA, or IgG. Pigs fed lipid supplemented diets tended to have increased serum endotoxin (P = 0.06), IgA (P = 0.10), and IgG (P = 0.09) compared with pigs fed the control diet. There were no lipid source × peroxidation level interaction or lipid source or peroxidation level effects on urinary TBARS and lactulose to mannitol ratio. Compared with pigs

  6. Bacteria-Derived Compatible Solutes Ectoine and 5α-Hydroxyectoine Act as Intestinal Barrier Stabilizers to Ameliorate Experimental Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Wadie, Walaa; Scherner, Olaf; Efferth, Thomas; Khayyal, Mohamed T

    2015-06-26

    Earlier studies showed that the compatible solute ectoine (1) given prophylactically before induction of colitis by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats prevented histological changes induced in the colon and the associated rise in inflammatory mediators. This study was therefore conducted to investigate whether ectoine (1) and its 5α-hydroxy derivative (2) would also be effective in treating an already established condition. Two days after inducing colitis in rats by instilling TNBS/alcohol in the colon, animals were treated orally once daily for 1 week with either 1 or 2 (50, 100, 300 mg/kg). Twenty-four hours after the last drug administration rats were sacrificed. Ulcerative lesions and colon mass indices were reduced by 1 and 2 in a bell-shaped manner. Best results were obtained with 100 mg/kg ectoine (1) and 50 mg/kg 5α-hydroxyectoine (2). The solutes normalized the rise in myeloperoxidase, TNFα, and IL-1β induced by TNBS but did not affect levels of reduced glutathione or ICAM-1, while reducing the level of fecal calprotectin, an established marker for inflammatory bowel disease. The findings indicate that the naturally occurring compatible solutes ectoine (1) and 5α-hydroxyectoine (2) possess an optimum concentration that affords maximal intestinal barrier stabilization and could therefore prove useful for better management of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Muscularis mucosae - the forgotten sibling.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kohsuke; Kamikawa, Yuichiro

    2007-10-01

    Lamina muscularis mucosae sitting beneath mucosal surface of the digestive tract has received little attention to date compared with external smooth muscle layers. Motor activity of the muscularis mucosae shows a great regional and species difference. Autonomic innervation profile is also different from esophagus to colon or between animal species. Intracellular transduction mechanisms for motor activity of the muscularis mucosae are also different from those of external longitudinal and circular muscles or from vascular and airway smooth muscles. Since the submucosal area is a major source for eicosanoid production, abnormality of muscularis mucosae motor activity may link with abnormality of mucosal absorption and secretion functions. Inflammatory bowel diseases such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease accompanied with altered motor activity of the muscularis mucosae. Much attention should be attracted to the human muscularis mucosae as a new therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  8. Vitamin A supplementation effects on intestinal barrier function, growth, total parasitic and specific Giardia spp. infections in Brazilian children: a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Aldo A. M.; Soares, Alberto M.; Lima, Noélia L.; Mota, Rosa M. S.; Maciel, Bruna L. L.; Kvalsund, Michelle P.; Barrett, Leah J.; Fitzgerald, Relana P.; Blaner, William S.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the effects of retinol on intestinal barrier function, growth, total parasites and Giardia spp. infections in children in the Northeast of Brazil. Methods The study was a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial (http://clinicaltrials.gov;Register#NCT00133406) involving 79children reiceved vitamin A 100,000 - 200,000 IU (n = 39) or placebo (n = 40) at enrollment, 4 and 8 months, followed for 36 months. Intestinal barrier function was evaluated using the lactulose:mannitol test. Stool lactoferrin was used as a marker for intestinal inflammation. Results The groups were similar with regard to age, sex, nutritional parameters (z-scores), serum retinol concentrations, proportion of lactoferrin positive stool samples, and intestinal barrier function. The lactulose:mannitol ratio did not change during the same time of follow-up (p>0.05). The proportion of lactoferrin positive samples evaluated at one month did not change between groups (p>0.05). Total intestinal parasitic specifically new infections were significantly lower in the vitamin A treatment compared to control group; these were accounted for entirely by significantly fewer new Giardia infections in the vitamin A treatment group. The cumulative z-scores for weight-for-length or height (WHZ), length or height-for-age z-scores (HAZ), and weight-for-age (WAZ) did not change significantly with vitamin A intervention for 36 months of follow-up. Conclusions These data showed that total parasitic infection and Giardia spp. infections were significantly lower in the vitamin A treatment group when compared to the placebo group, suggesting that vitamin A improves host defenses against Giardia infections. PMID:20038852

  9. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development.

  10. Canalicular adenoma of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Maamouri, F; Bellil, K; Bellil, S; Chelly, I; Mekni, A; Kchir, N; Haouet, S; Zitouna, M

    2007-06-01

    Canalicular adenoma is a benign tumor which comprises 1% of salivary gland neoplasms and 4% of minor salivary gland tumors. It occurs in the upper lip mucosa in about 90% of cases. The next most common location is the buccal mucosa (9.5% of tumors). We present herein a new case of canalicular adenoma of buccal mucosa involving a 74-year-old man. He was suffering of a slowly growing and painless nodule of the right buccal mucosa. The treatment was surgery and histological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of canalicular adenoma. No recurrence was noted one year later.

  11. Loss of intestinal O-glycans promotes spontaneous duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Bergstrom, Kirk; Fu, Jianxin; Xie, Biao; Chen, Weichang; Xia, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Mucin-type O-glycans, primarily core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans, are the major mucus barrier components throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Previous reports identified the biological role of O-glycans in the stomach and colon. However, the biological function of O-glycans in the small intestine remains unknown. Using mice lacking intestinal core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans [intestinal epithelial cell C1galt1(-/-);C3GnT(-/-) or double knockout (DKO)], we found that loss of O-glycans predisposes DKO mice to spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis by ∼1 yr of age. Tumor incidence did not increase with age; however, tumors advanced in aggressiveness by 20 mo. O-glycan deficiency was associated with reduced luminal mucus in DKO mice before tumor development. Altered intestinal epithelial homeostasis with enhanced baseline crypt proliferation characterizes these phenotypes as assayed by Ki67 staining. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis reveals a significantly lower bacterial burden in the duodenum compared with the large intestine. This phenotype is not reduced with antibiotic treatment, implying O-glycosylation defects, rather than bacterial-induced inflammation, which causes spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis. Moreover, inflammatory responses in DKO duodenal mucosa are mild as assayed with histology, quantitative PCR for inflammation-associated cytokines, and immunostaining for immune cells. Importantly, inducible deletion of intestinal O-glycans in adult mice leads to analogous spontaneous duodenal tumors, although with higher incidence and heightened severity compared with mice with O-glycans constitutive deletion. In conclusion, these studies reveal O-glycans within the small intestine are critical determinants of duodenal cancer risk. Future studies will provide insights into the pathogenesis in the general population and those at risk for this rare but deadly cancer.

  12. Exogenous phospholipids supplementation improves growth and modulates immune response and physical barrier referring to NF-κB, TOR, MLCK and Nrf2 signaling factors in the intestine of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Po; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary phospholipids (PL) on the growth performance, intestinal enzyme activity and immune response and intestinal physical barrier of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 1080 juvenile grass carp with an average initial weight of 9.34 ± 0.03 g were fed six semi-purified diets containing 0.40% (unsupplemented control group), 1.43%, 2.38%, 3.29%, 4.37% and 5.42% PL for 2 months. Results indicated that 3.29% PL increased lysozyme (LZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and complement component 3 (C3) content (P < 0.05), up-regulated the mRNA relative expression levels of interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), inhibitor protein κBα (IκBα), target of rapamycin (TOR) and casein kinase 2 (CK2) (P < 0.05), and down-regulated tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β, nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κB p65), IκB kinase β (IKKβ) and IκB kinase γ (IKKγ) mRNA relative expression levels (P < 0.05) in the intestine, suggesting that optimum PL could improve fish intestinal immunity. In addition, 3.29% PL increased the activities of anti-superoxide anion (ASA), anti-hydroxyl radical, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR), the content of glutathione (P < 0.05), and the mRNA relative expression levels of occludin, zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), claudin 3, claudin 12, claudin b, claudin c, SOD1, GPx, GR and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and ROS content (P < 0.05), the mRNA relative expression levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in the intestine, indicating that the optimum PL could improve fish intestinal physical barrier. Finally, based on the PWG, C3 content in the DI, ACP activity in the DI, intestinal PC content and intestinal ASA activity, the

  13. Ulcerative colitis as a polymicrobial infection characterized by sustained broken mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shui-Jiao; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Jian-Ping; Yang, Xi-Yan; Lu, Fang-Gen

    2014-07-28

    To reduce medication for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), we need to establish the etiology of UC. The intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been shown to differ from that of healthy controls and abundant data indicate that it changes in both composition and localization. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is significantly higher in IBD patients compared with controls. Probiotics have been investigated for their capacity to reduce the severity of UC. The luminal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract are covered by a mucus layer. This normally acts as a barrier that does not allow bacteria to reach the epithelial cells and thus limits the direct contact between the host and the bacteria. The mucus layer in the colon comprises an inner layer that is firmly adherent to the intestinal mucosa, and an outer layer that can be washed off with minimal rinsing. Some bacteria can dissolve the protective inner mucus layer. Defects in renewal and formation of the inner mucus layer allow bacteria to reach the epithelium and have implications for the causes of colitis. In this review, important elements of UC pathology are thought to be the intestinal bacteria, gut mucus, and the mucosa-associated immune system. PMID:25071341

  14. Ulcerative colitis as a polymicrobial infection characterized by sustained broken mucus barrier

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shui-Jiao; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Jian-Ping; Yang, Xi-Yan; Lu, Fang-Gen

    2014-01-01

    To reduce medication for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), we need to establish the etiology of UC. The intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been shown to differ from that of healthy controls and abundant data indicate that it changes in both composition and localization. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is significantly higher in IBD patients compared with controls. Probiotics have been investigated for their capacity to reduce the severity of UC. The luminal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract are covered by a mucus layer. This normally acts as a barrier that does not allow bacteria to reach the epithelial cells and thus limits the direct contact between the host and the bacteria. The mucus layer in the colon comprises an inner layer that is firmly adherent to the intestinal mucosa, and an outer layer that can be washed off with minimal rinsing. Some bacteria can dissolve the protective inner mucus layer. Defects in renewal and formation of the inner mucus layer allow bacteria to reach the epithelium and have implications for the causes of colitis. In this review, important elements of UC pathology are thought to be the intestinal bacteria, gut mucus, and the mucosa-associated immune system. PMID:25071341

  15. Partial amino acid sequence and mRNA analysis of cytosolic pyridoxine-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase from porcine intestinal mucosa: proposed derivation from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Tseung, Chi-Wah; McMahon, Laura G; Vázquez, Jorge; Pohl, Jan; Gregory, Jesse F

    2004-05-15

    We have previously identified and purified a novel beta-glucosidase, designated PNGH (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase), from the cytosolic fraction of pig intestinal mucosal. PNGH catalyses the hydrolysis of PNG (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside), a plant derivative of vitamin B6 that exhibits partial nutritional bioavailability in humans and animals. Preliminary amino acid sequence analysis indicated regions of close similarity of PNGH to the precursor form of LPH (lactase-phlorizin hydrolase), the beta-glucosidase localized to the brush-border membrane. We report in the present study amino acid sequence data for PNGH and results of Northern blot analyses, upon which we propose a common genomic origin of PNGH and LPH. Internal Edman sequencing of the PNGH band isolated by SDS/PAGE yielded data for 16 peptides, averaging 10.8 amino acids in length. These peptides from PNGH (approx. 140 kDa) were highly similar to sequences existing over most of the length of the >200 kDa precursor of rabbit LPH; however, we found no PNGH sequences that corresponded to approx. 350 amino acids between positions 463 and 812 of the LPH precursor, a region encoded by exon 7 of the LPH precursor gene (amino acids 568-784), and no sequences that corresponded to regions near the N-terminus. MS analysis of tryptic peptides yielded 25 peptides, averaging 15 amino acids, with masses that matched segments of the rabbit LPH precursor. Northern blot analysis of pig and human small intestinal polyadenylated mRNA using a non-specific LPH cDNA probe showed an expected approx. 6 kb transcript of the LPH precursor, but also an approx. 4 kb transcript that was consistent with the size predicted from the PNGH protein mass. Using a probe specific to the region encoded by exon 7, hybridization occurred only with the 6 kb transcript. Based on these observations, we propose that both PNGH and LPH enzymes have the same genomic origin, but differ in transcriptional and, possibly, post

  16. Partial amino acid sequence and mRNA analysis of cytosolic pyridoxine-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase from porcine intestinal mucosa: proposed derivation from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Tseung, Chi-Wah; McMahon, Laura G; Vázquez, Jorge; Pohl, Jan; Gregory, Jesse F

    2004-05-15

    We have previously identified and purified a novel beta-glucosidase, designated PNGH (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase), from the cytosolic fraction of pig intestinal mucosal. PNGH catalyses the hydrolysis of PNG (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside), a plant derivative of vitamin B6 that exhibits partial nutritional bioavailability in humans and animals. Preliminary amino acid sequence analysis indicated regions of close similarity of PNGH to the precursor form of LPH (lactase-phlorizin hydrolase), the beta-glucosidase localized to the brush-border membrane. We report in the present study amino acid sequence data for PNGH and results of Northern blot analyses, upon which we propose a common genomic origin of PNGH and LPH. Internal Edman sequencing of the PNGH band isolated by SDS/PAGE yielded data for 16 peptides, averaging 10.8 amino acids in length. These peptides from PNGH (approx. 140 kDa) were highly similar to sequences existing over most of the length of the >200 kDa precursor of rabbit LPH; however, we found no PNGH sequences that corresponded to approx. 350 amino acids between positions 463 and 812 of the LPH precursor, a region encoded by exon 7 of the LPH precursor gene (amino acids 568-784), and no sequences that corresponded to regions near the N-terminus. MS analysis of tryptic peptides yielded 25 peptides, averaging 15 amino acids, with masses that matched segments of the rabbit LPH precursor. Northern blot analysis of pig and human small intestinal polyadenylated mRNA using a non-specific LPH cDNA probe showed an expected approx. 6 kb transcript of the LPH precursor, but also an approx. 4 kb transcript that was consistent with the size predicted from the PNGH protein mass. Using a probe specific to the region encoded by exon 7, hybridization occurred only with the 6 kb transcript. Based on these observations, we propose that both PNGH and LPH enzymes have the same genomic origin, but differ in transcriptional and, possibly, post

  17. [The colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence: the limits between polypectomy and intestinal resection].

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, L; Brescia, A; Pulcini, A; Finizio, R; Fabrizio, G; Granai, A V; Messinetti, S

    1993-01-01

    According to a clinic case, the authors pointed out the role of histological diagnosis in the therapeutic approach of large intestinal adenomas. In order to identify those lesions which can metastasize, having exceeded the muscularis mucosae and having invaded the submucosa, rigorous histological standards must be performed. Intestinal resection versus polypectomy is determined only according to the involvement or not of the muscularis mucosae.

  18. The ANXA1 released from intestinal epithelial cells alleviate DSS-induced colitis by improving NKG2A expression of Natural Killer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Z; Zuo, D; Yang, J; Fan, H

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises when intestinal immune homeostasis is broken, the maintenance of such homeostasis is principally controlled by cross talk between commensal bacteria, mucosal immune cells and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs can prevent the contact between luminal bacteria with immune cells through the formation of a physical barrier and the expression of antimicrobial peptides to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. During Colitis the IECs can express increased ANXA1, which is important for regeneration of intestinal mucosa and function as a potent anti-inflammatory protein. Natural Killer (NK) cells can also suppress the progression of colitis. It is uncertain about the effect of the cross-talk between injured IECs and recruited NK cells during colitis. In this study, the expression of ANXA1 in IECS from DSS treated mice was increased, and more NK cells were recruited to intestinal mucosa. In addition, the expression of NKG2A was upregulated when co-cultured with NK cells. The results further proved that overexpression of NKG2A in NK cells was important for inhibiting the recruitment and activity of neutrophils to alleviate DSS-induced colitis. Here, we provide a new anti-inflammation mechanism about ANXA1 secreted from injured IECs, where ANXA1 can stimulate the expression of NKG2A in NK cells that affect the recruitment and activity of neutrophils necessary for pathology of colitis.

  19. The ANXA1 released from intestinal epithelial cells alleviate DSS-induced colitis by improving NKG2A expression of Natural Killer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Z; Zuo, D; Yang, J; Fan, H

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises when intestinal immune homeostasis is broken, the maintenance of such homeostasis is principally controlled by cross talk between commensal bacteria, mucosal immune cells and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs can prevent the contact between luminal bacteria with immune cells through the formation of a physical barrier and the expression of antimicrobial peptides to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. During Colitis the IECs can express increased ANXA1, which is important for regeneration of intestinal mucosa and function as a potent anti-inflammatory protein. Natural Killer (NK) cells can also suppress the progression of colitis. It is uncertain about the effect of the cross-talk between injured IECs and recruited NK cells during colitis. In this study, the expression of ANXA1 in IECS from DSS treated mice was increased, and more NK cells were recruited to intestinal mucosa. In addition, the expression of NKG2A was upregulated when co-cultured with NK cells. The results further proved that overexpression of NKG2A in NK cells was important for inhibiting the recruitment and activity of neutrophils to alleviate DSS-induced colitis. Here, we provide a new anti-inflammation mechanism about ANXA1 secreted from injured IECs, where ANXA1 can stimulate the expression of NKG2A in NK cells that affect the recruitment and activity of neutrophils necessary for pathology of colitis. PMID:27435504

  20. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorders would harm the intestinal protective mechanism, or intestinal barrier function, and bacterial/endotoxin translocation, of intestinal failure (IF) would ensue. This review disscussed the theory of the intestinal failure, aiming at attracting recognition and valuable comments by clinicians. PMID:15052668

  1. Interleukin-10 Enhances the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in the Presence of Corticosteroids through p38 MAPK Activity in Caco-2 Monolayers: A Possible Mechanism for Steroid Responsiveness in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lorén, Violeta; Cabré, Eduard; Ojanguren, Isabel; Domènech, Eugeni; Pedrosa, Elisabet; García-Jaraquemada, Arce; Mañosa, Miriam; Manyé, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are the first line therapy for moderate-severe flare-ups of ulcerative colitis. Despite that, up to 60% of patients do not respond adequately to steroid treatment. Previously, we reported that low IL-10 mRNA levels in intestine are associated with a poor response to glucocorticoids in active Crohn’s disease. Here, we test whether IL-10 can favour the response to glucocorticoids by improving the TNFα-induced intestinal barrier damage (assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance) in Caco-2 monolayers, and their possible implications on glucocorticoid responsiveness in active ulcerative colitis. We show that the association of IL-10 and glucocorticoids improves the integrity of TNFα-treated Caco-2 cells and that p38 MAPK plays a key role. In vitro, IL-10 facilitates the nuclear translocation of p38 MAPK-phosphorylated thereby modulating glucocorticoids-receptor-α, IL-10-receptor-α and desmoglein-2 expression. In glucocorticoids-refractory patients, p38 MAPK phosphorylation and membrane desmoglein-2 expression are reduced in colonic epithelial cells. These results suggest that p38 MAPK-mediated synergism between IL-10 and glucocorticoids improves desmosome straightness contributing to the recovery of intestinal epithelium and reducing luminal antigens contact with lamina propria in ulcerative colitis. This study highlights the link between the intestinal epithelium in glucocorticoids-response in ulcerative colitis. PMID:26090671

  2. Absorption of thiamine and nicotinic acid in the rat intestine during fasting and immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirilyuk, O. G.; Khmelevskiy, Y. V.

    1980-01-01

    By perfusion of isolated sections of intestine with a solution containing thiamine at a concentration of 3.1 micromole, it was established that thiamine absorption in animals fasted for 72 hours decreased by 28 percent, whereas absorption increased by 12 percent in rats after 24 hour immobilization. After immobilization, absorption of label in the intestinal mucosa increased. Na K ATPase activity in the intestinal mucosa decreased by 10 percent during fasting, and it increased with immobilization of the animals. Activity of Na K ATPase in the intestinal mucosa cells determined the absorption rate of thiamine and nicotinic acid at the level of vitamin transport through the plasma membranes of the enterocytes.

  3. Studies with inulin-type fructans on intestinal infections, permeability, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Symbiosis between host and gut bacteria can be optimized by prebiotics. Inulin-type fructans have been shown to improve the microbial balance of the intestinal ecosystem by stimulating the growth of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. These changes have been associated with several health benefits, including the prevention of gastrointestinal and systemic infections in animal models and human studies. Inulin-type fructans induce changes of the intestinal mucosa characterized by higher villi, deeper crypts, increased number of goblet cells, and a thicker mucus layer on the colonic epithelium. Bacterial antagonism and competition of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli with pathogens, as well as the trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium, may explain the protective role of inulin against enteric infections. In contrast, studies with rats fed a low-calcium diet suggested a negative effect of prebiotics on intestinal barrier function. However, the adverse effect was clearly ascribed to the strong reduction of dietary calcium, as it could be reversed by oral administration of calcium. The adverse effect of a low-calcium diet on intestinal permeability has not been observed in humans. Inulin and oligofructose are now being tested in human studies aimed at prevention of bacterial translocation in critical health conditions. Mixtures of probiotics and prebiotics including inulin or oligofructose significantly reduced the rate of postoperative infections in liver transplant patients. Finally, inulin and oligofructose have proven useful to prevent mucosal inflammatory disorders in animal models and in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. NOD-Like Receptors in Intestinal Homeostasis and Epithelial Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Marianna; Yeretssian, Garabet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a dynamic physical barrier segregating the luminal content from the underlying mucosal tissue. Following injury, the epithelial integrity is restored by rapid migration of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) across the denuded area in a process known as wound healing. Hence, through a sequence of events involving restitution, proliferation and differentiation of IECs the gap is resealed and homeostasis reestablished. Relapsing damage followed by healing of the inflamed mucosa is a hallmark of several intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While several regulatory peptides, growth factors and cytokines stimulate restitution of the epithelial layer after injury, recent evidence in the field underscores the contribution of innate immunity in controlling this process. In particular, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play critical roles in sensing the commensal microbiota, maintaining homeostasis, and regulating intestinal inflammation. Here, we review the process of intestinal epithelial tissue repair and we specifically focus on the impact of NLR-mediated signaling mechanisms involved in governing epithelial wound healing during disease. PMID:24886810

  5. "Green" synthesized and coated nanaosilver alters the membrance permeability of barrier (intestinal, brain, endothelial) cells and stimulates oxidative stress pathways in neurons.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanosilver's (nanoAg) use in medical applications and consumer products is increasing. Because of this, its "green" synthesis and surface modification with beneficial coatings are desirable. Given nanoAg's potential exposure routes (e.g., dermal, intestin...

  6. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  7. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  8. Adrenomedullin regulates intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Herrero, S; Martínez, A

    2016-07-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) are 2 biologically active peptides produced by the same gene, ADM, with ubiquitous distribution and many physiological functions. Adrenomedullin is composed of 52 amino acids, has an internal molecular ring composed by 6 amino acids and a disulfide bond, and shares structural similarities with calcitonin gene-related peptide, amylin, and intermedin. The AM receptor consists of a 7-transmembrane domain protein called calcitonin receptor-like receptor in combination with a single transmembrane domain protein known as receptor activity-modifying protein. Using morphologic techniques, it has been shown that AM and PAMP are expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract, being specially abundant in the neuroendocrine cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa; in the enterochromaffin-like and chief cells of the gastric fundus; and in the submucosa of the duodenum, ileum, and colon. This wide distribution in the gastrointestinal tract suggests that AM and PAMP may act as gut hormones regulating many physiological and pathologic conditions. To date, it has been proven that AM and PAMP act as autocrine/paracrine growth factors in the gastrointestinal epithelium, play key roles in the protection of gastric mucosa from various kinds of injury, and accelerate healing in diseases such as gastric ulcer and inflammatory bowel diseases. In addition, both peptides are potent inhibitors of gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying; they regulate the active transport of sugars in the intestine, regulate water and ion transport in the colon, modulate colonic bowel movements and small-intestine motility, improve endothelial barrier function, and stabilize circulatory function during gastrointestinal inflammation. Furthermore, AM and PAMP are antimicrobial peptides, and they contribute to the mucosal host defense system by regulating gut microbiota. To get a formal demonstration of the effects that endogenous AM and

  9. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Weyandt, Gerhard H.; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  10. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  11. Tissue-engineered oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Moharamzadeh, K; Colley, H; Murdoch, C; Hearnden, V; Chai, W L; Brook, I M; Thornhill, M H; Macneil, S

    2012-07-01

    Advances in tissue engineering have permitted the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of human oral mucosa for various in vivo and in vitro applications. Tissue-engineered oral mucosa have been further optimized in recent years for clinical applications as a suitable graft material for intra-oral and extra-oral repair and treatment of soft-tissue defects. Novel 3D in vitro models of oral diseases such as cancer, Candida, and bacterial invasion have been developed as alternatives to animal models for investigation of disease phenomena, their progression, and treatment, including evaluation of drug delivery systems. The introduction of 3D oral mucosal reconstructs has had a significant impact on the approaches to biocompatibility evaluation of dental materials and oral healthcare products as well as the study of implant-soft tissue interfaces. This review article discusses the recent advances in tissue engineering and applications of tissue-engineered human oral mucosa.

  12. Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Probiotics are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals claiming positive effects on athlete’s gut health, redox biology and immunity but there is lack of evidence to support these statements. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial to observe effects of probiotic supplementation on markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation and inflammation, at rest and after intense exercise. 23 trained men received multi-species probiotics (1010 CFU/day, Ecologic®Performance or OMNi-BiOTiC®POWER, n = 11) or placebo (n = 12) for 14 weeks and performed an intense cycle ergometry over 90 minutes at baseline and after 14 weeks. Zonulin and α1-antitrypsin were measured from feces to estimate gut leakage at baseline and at the end of treatment. Venous blood was collected at baseline and after 14 weeks, before and immediately post exercise, to determine carbonyl proteins (CP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidation status of lipids (TOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Statistical analysis used multifactorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). Level of significance was set at p < 0.05, a trend at p < 0.1. Results Zonulin decreased with supplementation from values slightly above normal into normal ranges (<30 ng/ml) and was significantly lower after 14 weeks with probiotics compared to placebo (p = 0.019). We observed no influence on α1-antitrypsin (p > 0.1). CP increased significantly from pre to post exercise in both groups at baseline and in the placebo group after 14 weeks of treatment (p = 0.006). After 14 weeks, CP concentrations were tendentially lower with probiotics (p = 0.061). TOS was slightly increased above normal in both groups, at baseline and after 14 weeks of treatment. There was no effect of supplementation or exercise on TOS. At baseline, both groups showed considerably higher TNF-α concentrations than normal. After 14 weeks TNF-α was

  13. The common prophylactic therapy for bowel surgery is ineffective for clearing Bacteroidetes, the primary inducers of systemic inflammation, and causes faster death in response to intestinal barrier damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sinsimer, Daniel; Esseghir, Amira; Tang, May; Laouar, Amale

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective The role of secreted gut microbial components in the initiation of systemic inflammation and consequences of antibiotic therapies on this inflammatory process are poorly elucidated. We investigate whether peripheral innate cells mount an inflammatory response to gut microbial components, the immune cells that are the primary drivers of systemic inflammation, the bacterial populations that are predominantly responsible, and whether perioperative antibiotics affect these processes. Method and experimental design Conditioned supernatants from gut microbes were used to stimulate murine innate cell types in vitro and in vivo, and proinflammatory responses were characterised. Effects of antibiotic therapies on these responses were investigated using a model of experimental intestinal barrier damage induced by dextran sodium sulfate. Results Proinflammatory responses in the periphery are generated by components of anaerobes from the Bacteroidetes phylotype and these responses are primarily produced by myeloid dendritic cells. We found that the common prophylactic therapy for sepsis (oral neomycin and metronidazole administered to patients the day prior to surgery) is ineffective for clearing Bacteroidetes from the murine intestine. A point of critical consequence of this result is the increased systemic inflammation and premature death observed in treated mice, and these outcomes appear to be independent of gut bacterial spread in the initial phase of intestinal barrier damage. Importantly, spillage of gut microbial products, rather than dissemination of gut microbes, may underlay the initiation of systemic inflammation leading to death. Conclusions Our data further affirm the importance of a balanced gut microflora biodiversity in host immune homeostasis and reinforce the notion that inadequate antibiotic therapy can have detrimental effects on overall immune system. PMID:26462264

  14. Denatured globular protein and bile salt-coated nanoparticles for poorly water-soluble drugs: Penetration across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the circulation system and enhanced oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Yang, Ke; Fan, Lifang; Lv, Yaqi; Jin, Zhu; Zhu, Shumin; Qin, Chao; Wang, Yiao; Yin, Lifang

    2015-11-10

    Oral drug delivery is the most preferred route for patients; however, the low solubility of drugs and the resultant poor absorption compromise the benefits of oral administration. On the other hand, for years, the overwhelmingly accepted mechanism for enhanced oral absorption using lipid nanocarriers was based on the process of lipid digestion and drug solubilization in the small intestine. Few reports indicated that other bypass pathways are involved in drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) for oral delivery of nanocarriers. Herein, we report a new nanoemulsion system with a denatured globular protein with a diameter of 30 nm, soybean protein isolates (SPI), and bile salt as emulsifiers, aiming to enhance the absorption of insoluble drugs and explore other pathways for absorption. A BCS class II drug, fenofibrate (FB), was used as the model drug. The SPI and bile salt-coated Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were prepared via a high-pressure homogenizing procedure. Interestingly, the present Ns could be converted to solid dosage form using fluid-bed coating technology, maintaining a nanoscale size. Most importantly, in a model of in situ rat intestinal perfusion, Ns could penetrate across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the systemic circulation and then obtain biodistribution into other tissues. In addition, Ns significantly improved FB oral absorption, exhibited as a greater than 2- and 2.5-fold increase in Cmax and AUC0-t, respectively, compared to the suspension formulation. Overall, the present Ns are promising nanocarriers for the oral delivery of insoluble drugs, and the penetration of intact Ns across the GIT barrier into systemic circulation may be a new strategy for improved drug absorption with the use of nanocarriers.

  15. MicroRNA profiling of the intestine during hypothermic circulatory arrest in swine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Bin; Liang, Meng-Ya; Chen, Guang-Xian; Yang, Xiao; Qin, Han; Yao, Jian-Ping; Feng, Kang-Ni; Wu, Zhong-Kai

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To perform a profiling analysis of changes in intestinal microRNA (miRNA) expression during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA). METHODS: A total of eight piglets were randomly divided into HCA and sham operation (SO) groups. Under general anesthesia, swine in the HCA group were subjected to hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass at 24 °C followed by 80 min of circulatory arrest, and the reperfusion lasted for 180 min after cross-clamp removal. The counterparts in the SO group were only subjected to median sternotomy. Histopathological analysis was used to detect mucosal injury, and Pick-and-Mix custom miRNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panels containing 306 unique primer sets were utilized to assay unpooled intestinal samples harvested from the two groups. RESULTS: The intestinal mucosa of the animals that were subjected to 24 °C HCA exhibited representative ischemic reperfusion injury of grade 2 or 3 according to the Chiu score. Such intestinal mucosal injuries, with the subepithelial space and epithelial layer lifting away from the lamina propria, were accompanied by shortened and irregular villi. On the contrary, the intestinal mucosa remained normal in the sham-operated animals. In total, twenty-five miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two groups (15 upregulated and 10 downregulated in the HCA group). Among these, eight miRNAs (miR-122, miR-221-5p, miR-31, miR-421-5p, miR-4333, miR-499-3p, miR-542 and let-7d-3p) were significantly dysregulated (four higher and four lower). The expression of miR-122 was significantly (5.37-fold) increased in the HCA group vs the SO group, indicating that it may play a key role in HCA-induced mucosal injury. CONCLUSION: Exposure to HCA caused intestinal miRNA dysregulation and barrier dysfunction in swine. These altered miRNAs might be related to the protection or destruction of the intestinal barrier. PMID:25717255

  16. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M.; Lang, Jessica K.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  17. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Vezza, Teresa; Garrido-Mesa, José; Utrilla, M Pilar; Montilla, Antonia; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Olano, Agustín; Corzo, Nieves; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2014-05-14

    Intestinal microbiota modulation is becoming an interesting approach to manage inflammatory bowel disease and can be achieved by the administration of prebiotics. Previous studies showed the intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of the prebiotic lactulose. The aim of the present study was to test the preventative effects of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose with prebiotic properties (OsLu) in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis and compare them with those of lactulose. Both treatments modified bacterial profile in intestinal contents, increasing the bifidobacteria and lactobacilli counts and up-regulating the production of short-chain fatty acids, although OsLu generated a larger amount. OsLu also inhibited to a greater extent different pro-inflammatory markers such as interleukins (IL) 1, 6, 12, and 23 and chemokines (MCP-1 and CINC-1). However, both prebiotics equally restored colonic epithelial integrity, evaluated both with a histological score (OsLu, 9.8 ± 2.2; and lactulose, 12.1 ± 2.1, vs colitic control, 27.3 ± 3.3) and by measuring several key proteins of the mucosal barrier (MUC-2, MUC-3, and TTF-3). OsLu effect was also associated with an inhibition of iNOS expression and a reduction of Th17 cell activity in the inflamed tissue that facilitated the intestinal mucosa barrier recovery. In conclusion, OsLu showed a better anti-inflammatory profile than lactulose in this model of experimental colitis.

  18. Morpho-elasticity of intestinal villi

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, V.; Ciarletta, P.

    2013-01-01

    Villi are ubiquitous structures in the intestine of all vertebrates, originating from the embryonic development of the epithelial mucosa. Their morphogenesis has similar stages in living organisms but different forming mechanisms. In this work, we model the emergence of the bi-dimensional undulated patterns in the intestinal mucosa from which villi start to elongate. The embryonic mucosa is modelled as a growing thick-walled cylinder, and its mechanical behaviour is described using an hyperelastic constitutive model, which also accounts for the anisotropic characteristics of the reinforcing fibres at the microstructural level. The occurrence of surface undulations is investigated using a linear stability analysis based on the theory of incremental deformations superimposed on a finite deformation. The Stroh formulation of the incremental boundary value problem is derived, and a numerical solution procedure is implemented for calculating the growth thresholds of instability. The numerical results are finally discussed with respect to different growth and materials properties. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the emergence of intestinal villi in embryos is triggered by a differential growth between the mucosa and the mesenchymal tissues. The proposed model quantifies how both the geometrical and the mechanical properties of the mucosa drive the formation of previllous structures in embryos. PMID:23486174

  19. Bovine colostrum increases pore-forming claudin-2 protein expression but paradoxically not ion permeability possibly by a change of the intestinal cytokine milieu.

    PubMed

    Bodammer, Peggy; Kerkhoff, Claus; Maletzki, Claudia; Lamprecht, Georg

    2013-01-01

    An impaired intestinal barrier function is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several nutritional factors are supposed to be effective in IBD treatment but scientific data about the effects on the intestinal integrity remain scarce. Bovine colostrum was shown to exert beneficial effects in DSS-induced murine colitis, and the present study was undertaken to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Western blot revealed increased claudin-2 expression in the distal ileum of healthy mice after feeding with colostrum for 14 days, whereas other tight junction proteins (claudin-3, 4, 10, 15) remained unchanged. The colostrum-induced claudin-2 induction was confirmed in differentiated Caco-2 cells after culture with colostrum for 48 h. Paradoxically, the elevation of claudin-2, which forms a cation-selective pore, was neither accompanied by increased ion permeability nor impaired barrier function. In an in situ perfusion model, 1 h exposure of the colonic mucosa to colostrum induced significantly increased mRNA levels of barrier-strengthening cytokine transforming growth factor-β, while interleukine-2, interleukine-6, interleukine-10, interleukine-13, and tumor-necrosis factor-α remained unchanged. Thus, modulation of the intestinal transforming growth factor-β expression might have compensated the claudin-2 increase and contributed to the observed barrier strengthening effects of colostrum in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23717570

  20. Bovine Colostrum Increases Pore-Forming Claudin-2 Protein Expression but Paradoxically Not Ion Permeability Possibly by a Change of the Intestinal Cytokine Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Maletzki, Claudia; Lamprecht, Georg

    2013-01-01

    An impaired intestinal barrier function is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several nutritional factors are supposed to be effective in IBD treatment but scientific data about the effects on the intestinal integrity remain scarce. Bovine colostrum was shown to exert beneficial effects in DSS-induced murine colitis, and the present study was undertaken to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Western blot revealed increased claudin-2 expression in the distal ileum of healthy mice after feeding with colostrum for 14 days, whereas other tight junction proteins (claudin-3, 4, 10, 15) remained unchanged. The colostrum-induced claudin-2 induction was confirmed in differentiated Caco-2 cells after culture with colostrum for 48 h. Paradoxically, the elevation of claudin-2, which forms a cation-selective pore, was neither accompanied by increased ion permeability nor impaired barrier function. In an in situ perfusion model, 1 h exposure of the colonic mucosa to colostrum induced significantly increased mRNA levels of barrier-strengthening cytokine transforming growth factor-β, while interleukine-2, interleukine-6, interleukine-10, interleukine-13, and tumor-necrosis factor-α remained unchanged. Thus, modulation of the intestinal transforming growth factor-β expression might have compensated the claudin-2 increase and contributed to the observed barrier strengthening effects of colostrum in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23717570

  1. Plasticity of the brush border - the yin and yang of intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Delphine; Salomon, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Louvard, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The brush border on the apical surface of enterocytes is a highly specialized structure well-adapted for efficient digestion and nutrient transport, whilst at the same time providing a protective barrier for the intestinal mucosa. The brush border is constituted of a densely ordered array of microvilli, protrusions of the plasma membrane, which are supported by actin-based microfilaments and interacting proteins and anchored in an apical network of actomyosin and intermediate filaments, the so-called terminal web. The highly dynamic, specialized apical domain is both an essential partner for the gut microbiota and an efficient signalling platform that enables adaptation to physiological stimuli from the external and internal milieu. Nevertheless, genetic alterations or various pathological stresses, such as infection, inflammation, and mechanical or nutritional alterations, can jeopardize this equilibrium and compromise intestinal functions. Long-time neglected, the intestinal brush-border shall be enlightening again as the central actor of the complex but essential intestinal homeostasis. Here, we review the processes and components involved in brush border organization and discuss pathological mechanisms that can induce brush border defects and their physiological consequences.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 treatment reduces intestinal damage in a murine model of irinotecan-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, R W; Pedroso, S H S P; Vieira, A T; Moreira, L M C; França, C S; Cartelle, C T; Arantes, R M E; Generoso, S V; Cardoso, V N; Neves, M J; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2016-09-01

    Indigenous microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of several intestinal diseases, including mucositis. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a major and serious side effect of cancer therapy, and there is no effective therapy for this clinical condition. However, some probiotics have been shown to attenuate such conditions. To evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 (Sc-905), a potential probiotic yeast, we investigated whether pre- or post-treatment with viable or inactivated Sc-905 could prevent weight loss and intestinal lesions, and maintain integrity of the mucosal barrier in a mucositis model induced by irinotecan in mice. Only post-treatment with viable Sc-905 was able to protect mice against the damage caused by chemotherapy, reducing the weight loss, increase of intestinal permeability and jejunal lesions (villous shortening). Besides, this treatment reduced oxidative stress, prevented the decrease of goblet cells and stimulated the replication of cells in the intestinal crypts of mice with experimental mucositis. In conclusion, Sc-905 protects animals against irinotecan-induced mucositis when administered as a post-treatment with viable cells, and this effect seems to be related with the reduction of oxidative stress and preservation of intestinal mucosa. PMID:27133563

  3. [Snow white small intestinal villi in hypobetalipoproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Goerg, K J; Borchard, F; Luley, C; Schubert, G E

    1996-09-01

    In contrast to the severe clinical picture of abetalipoproteinemia patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia are often asymptomatic. We demonstrate a 52-years-old female patient with a white mucosa of the small intestine casually observed by endoscopy. The white appearance of the mucosa was limited to the villi. As demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopy this was caused by fat loaded enterocytes similar to the picture of abetalipoproteinemia. Fasting serum lipids and apolipoproteins were only if the lower norm level for some parameters, but no increase of the serum lipids was observed after an oral fat load. Because of the missing symptoms, the typical histomorphology and laboratory findings the snow white mucosa of the small intestine is due by the hetocygote form of the autosomal dominant hypobetalipoproteinemia with fat loaded enterocytes.

  4. Pathogenic mechanisms of intestinal pneumatosis and portal venous gas: should patients with these conditions be operated immediately?

    PubMed

    Mitsuyoshi, Akira; Hamada, Shinshichi; Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Momono, Teppei; Aoyama, Hiroki; Kondo, Yuhei; Inoguchi, Kenta; Yokoyama, Daiju; Nakau, Masayuki; Suzaki, Sato; Okabe, Hiroshi; Yanagibashi, Ken

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to histologically observe portal venous gas (PVG)-causing intestinal pneumatosis (IP) and evaluate pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic strategies, including decisions on whether emergency surgery should be performed. Autopsy was performed in two cases of nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI). We directly histologically observed the pathogenic mechanisms of IP caused by gas-producing bacteria and IP considered to be caused by mechanical damage to the intestinal mucosa. IP can be classified hypothetically into the following types according to pathogenesis: (1) infection, (2) rupture (damage) of the intestinal mucosa + increased intestinal intraluminal pressure, and (3) mixed type. In cases of IP caused by gas-producing bacteria or IP associated with intestinal wall damage extending beyond the mucosa to the deep muscular layer, emergency surgery should be considered. However, it is highly possible that patients who test negative for infection with gas-producing bacteria whose intestinal wall damage remains only in the mucosa can be conservatively treated. PMID:26943428

  5. Oral administration of fermented wild ginseng ameliorates DSS-induced acute colitis by inhibiting NF-κB signaling and protects intestinal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Seong, Myeong A; Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Jang, Yeong Su; Choi, Seungho; Jang, Young Saeng; Lee, Taek Hwan; Jung, Kyung Hoon; Kang, Dong Kyu; Hurh, Byung Seok; Kim, Dae Eung; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Ginseng has been widely used for therapeutic and preventive purposes for thousands of years. However, orally administered ginseng has very low bioavailability and absorption in the intestine. Therefore, fermented ginseng was developed to enhance the beneficial effects of ginseng in the intestine. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of fermented wild ginseng (FWG). We found that FWG significantly alleviated the severity of colitis in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model, and decreased expression level of pro-inflammatory cytokines in colonic tissue. Moreover, we observed that FWG suppressed the infiltration of macrophages in DSS-induced colitis. FWG also attenuated the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by reducing the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus. Our data indicate that FWG contains anti-inflammatory activity via NF-κB inactivation and could be useful for treating colitis.

  6. Morphometric study of the layers of the canine small intestine at five sampling sites.

    PubMed

    Sarriá, R; Latorre, R; Henroteaux, M; Henroteaux, N; Soria, F; Pérez-Cuadrado, E; López Albors, O

    2012-06-01

    The histology of the canine intestine has not been accurately defined. To establish the precise thickness of its different layers, whole wall samples of the small intestine were removed from 41 cadavers at five standardised sampling sites (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, proximal ileum and distal ileum). The total thickness was estimated by morphometry, as was the thickness of the mucosa, muscularis mucosae, submucosa and muscularis externa. In addition, the size of the lymphoid aggregates in the submucosa and the thickness of the circular and longitudinal layers within both the muscularis mucosae and the muscularis externa were estimated. The total intestinal thickness depended very much upon the thickness of the mucosa and submucosa. The mucosa decreased progressively from proximal to distal parts of the small intestine (47% reduction). The thickness of the submucosa, however, changed little from the duodenum to the distal jejunum, but increased significantly in the ileum; this change was positively correlated with the amount of lymphoid tissue. Sex influenced the thickness of the intestinal wall, with males displaying higher thickness values along the small intestine. Conversely, no correlation between bodyweight and intestinal thickness was found for any of the five sampling sites. This study gives absolute and relative values for the thickness of the layers of the dog intestine which might help in the diagnosis of small intestinal pathology from postmortem samples and/or endoscopic biopsies.

  7. Bacteroides fragilis toxin 2 damages human colonic mucosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, M; Lotz, M; Sears, C; Pothoulakis, C; Castagliuolo, I; Wang, C; Sedivy, R; Sogukoglu, T; Cosentini, E; Bischof, G; Feil, W; Teleky, B; Hamilton, G; LaMont, J; Wenzl, E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Strains of Bacteroides fragilis producing a 20 kDa protein toxin (B fragilis toxin (BFT) or fragilysin) are associated with diarrhoea in animals and humans. Although in vitro results indicate that BFT damages intestinal epithelial cells in culture, the effects of BFT on native human colon are not known. 
AIMS—To examine the electrophysiological and morphological effects of purified BFT-2 on human colonic mucosa in vitro. 
METHODS—For resistance (R) measurements, colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers was exposed to luminal or serosal BFT-2 (1.25-10 nM) and after four hours morphological damage was measured on haematoxylin and eosin stained sections using morphometry. F actin distribution was assessed using confocal microscopy. 
RESULTS—Serosal BFT-2 for four hours was four-, two-, seven-, and threefold more potent than luminal BFT-2 in decreasing resistance, increasing epithelial 3H-mannitol permeability, and damaging crypt and surface colonocytes, respectively (p<0.05). Confocal microscopy showed reduced colonocyte F actin staining intensity after exposure to BFT-2. 
CONCLUSIONS—BFT-2 increases human colonic permeability and damages human colonic epithelial cells in vitro. These effects may be important in the development of diarrhoea and intestinal inflammation caused by B fragilis in vivo. 

 Keywords: B fragilis toxin; toxin mediated colonocyte damage; actin filaments; transepithelial resistance; morphometry PMID:10075957

  8. Muc2 Protects against Lethal Infectious Colitis by Disassociating Pathogenic and Commensal Bacteria from the Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Kirk S. B.; Kissoon-Singh, Vanessa; Gibson, Deanna L.; Ma, Caixia; Montero, Marinieve; Sham, Ho Pan; Ryz, Natasha; Huang, Tina; Velcich, Anna; Finlay, B. Brett; Chadee, Kris; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of attaching and effacing (A/E) Escherichia coli infections, the mechanisms by which the host defends against these microbes are unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the role of goblet cell-derived Muc2, the major intestinal secretory mucin and primary component of the mucus layer, in host protection against A/E pathogens. To assess the role of Muc2 during A/E bacterial infections, we inoculated Muc2 deficient (Muc2−/−) mice with Citrobacter rodentium, a murine A/E pathogen related to diarrheagenic A/E E. coli. Unlike wildtype (WT) mice, infected Muc2−/− mice exhibited rapid weight loss and suffered up to 90% mortality. Stool plating demonstrated 10–100 fold greater C. rodentium burdens in Muc2−/− vs. WT mice, most of which were found to be loosely adherent to the colonic mucosa. Histology of Muc2−/− mice revealed ulceration in the colon amid focal bacterial microcolonies. Metabolic labeling of secreted mucins in the large intestine demonstrated that mucin secretion was markedly increased in WT mice during infection compared to uninfected controls, suggesting that the host uses increased mucin release to flush pathogens from the mucosal surface. Muc2 also impacted host-commensal interactions during infection, as FISH analysis revealed C. rodentium microcolonies contained numerous commensal microbes, which was not observed in WT mice. Orally administered FITC-Dextran and FISH staining showed significantly worsened intestinal barrier disruption in Muc2−/− vs. WT mice, with overt pathogen and commensal translocation into the Muc2−/− colonic mucosa. Interestingly, commensal depletion enhanced C. rodentium colonization of Muc2−/− mice, although colonic pathology was not significantly altered. In conclusion, Muc2 production is critical for host protection during A/E bacterial infections, by limiting overall pathogen and commensal numbers associated with the colonic

  9. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  10. Characterization of the motor inhibitory role of colonic mucosa under chemical stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cano, Francisco E; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, María J

    2014-04-01

    The main roles of the colonic mucosa are the absorption of water and electrolytes and the barrier function that preserves the integrity of the colonic wall. The mediators and mechanisms to accomplish these functions are under continuous investigation, but little attention has been paid to a possible control of colonic motility by the mucosa that would fine tune the relationship between absorption and motility. The purpose of this study was to establish the role of the mucosa in the control of induced colonic contractility. Young ICR-CD1 mice (3-5 mo old) were studied. Isometric tension transducers were used to record contractility in full-thickness (FT) and mucosa-free (MF) strips from proximal colon. Proximal FT strips showed lower KCl- and bethanechol-induced responses than MF strips. The difference was not due to mechanical artefacts since the contractile response of FT strips to electrical field stimulation was around 50% lower than in MF. The inhibitory effects of the mucosa on FT strips were mimicked by immersion of separate strips of mucosa in the organ bath but not by addition of mucosal extract, suggesting gaseous molecules as mediators of this effect. Incubation of MF strips with synthase inhibitors of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide abolished the inhibition caused by addition of the mucosal strip, indicating that mucosal gasotransmitters are the mediators of these effects. This suggests that the control of colonic motility exerted by the mucosa could fine tune the balance between transit and absorption.

  11. l-Menthol sprayed on gastric mucosa causes edematous change

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Akihiro; Hachiya, Hiroki; Yumura, Takayuki; Ito, Shun; Hayashi, Shintaro; Nozaki, Masashi; Yoshida, Atsui; Ohashi, Noritsugu

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: l-Menthol (LM), sprayed on the distal gastric mucosa, is a safe antispasmodic agent used during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). However, it seems to affect gastric mucosal endoscopic findings. Therefore, we evaluated whether LM causes specific changes and impacts the endoscopic morphology of gastric lesions. Patients and methods: A total of 98 patients scheduled to undergo EGD were randomly assigned to receive LM solution (160 mg of 0.8 % LM added to 2.5 mL of indigo carmine [IC]; n = 49; LM group) or decuple-diluted IC solution without LM (n = 49; placebo group). We compared the incidence of specific mucosal changes and the difference in the endoscopic findings of several gastric lesions between these groups. Results: Annular-reticular – like mucosal changes appeared immediately after the administration of LM solution. This change was observed in 71.4 % of the LM group compared with 12.2 % of the placebo group (P < 0.01). In the placebo group, this change was observed in 14.7 % of subjects with atrophic gastritis compared with 6.7 % of those without atrophic gastritis (P = 0.39), whereas in the LM group, this change was observed in 84.8 % of subjects with atrophic gastritis compared with 43.8 % of those without atrophic gastritis (P < 0.01). Most early gastric cancers, erosions, and ulcers observed in this study became well demarcated after LM administration, although the incidence of gastric lesions did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion: LM changes the gastric mucosa into edematous mucosa, and this occurs more frequently in atrophic gastric mucosa than in pathologic lesions. LM may facilitate the demarcation of pathologic gastric lesions without intestinal metaplasia. PMID:26135260

  12. The phenotype of gastric mucosa coexisting with Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Rugge, M; Russo, V; Busatto, G; Genta, R; Di, M; Farinati, F; Graham, D

    2001-01-01

    Background/Aims—Barrett's oesophagus complicates the gastro-oesophageal acid reflux. Helicobacter pylori infection, particularly with cagA positive strains, induces inflammatory/atrophic lesions of the gastric mucosa, which may impair acid output. No systematic study has investigated the phenotype of the gastric mucosa coexisting with Barrett's oesophagus. This study was designed to identify the phenotype of gastric mucosa associated with Barrett's oesophagus. Methods—In this retrospective case control study, the phenotype of the gastric mucosa was histologically characterised in 53 consecutive patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 53 (sex and age matched) non-ulcer dyspeptic controls. Both patients and controls underwent extensive sampling of the gastric mucosa (two antral, one incisural, and two oxyntic biopsies). Intestinal metaplasia (IM) was categorised (type I, complete IM; types II and III, incomplete IM) by the high iron diamine stain; cagA status was ascertained by genotyping. Results—Helicobacter pylori was present in 19 of the 53 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 30 of the 53 controls (p < 0.02); eight of the 19 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and 28 of the 35 controls harboured cagA positive H pylori (p < 0.03). The histological severity of non-atrophic gastritis detected in the controls was significantly higher than that detected in the patients with Barrett's oesophagus (p < 0.0001). Multifocal atrophic gastritis was present in 4% of the patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 23% of controls (p < 0.01). The odds ratio for the association between multifocal atrophic gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus was 0.20 (95% confidence interval, 0.006 to 0.60). Gastric IM was detected in 13.2% of the patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 30.1% of the controls (p < 0.03). Type III IM at the gastric mucosa was only detected among controls. Conclusions—Barrett's oesophagus is associated with a low prevalence of H pylori cagA positive

  13. Oral administration of fermented wild ginseng ameliorates DSS-induced acute colitis by inhibiting NF-κB signaling and protects intestinal epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Myeong A; Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Jang, Yeong Su; Choi, Seungho; Jang, Young Saeng; Lee, Taek Hwan; Jung, Kyung Hoon; Kang, Dong Kyu; Hurh, Byung Seok; Kim, Dae Eung; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been widely used for therapeutic and preventive purposes for thousands of years. However, orally administered ginseng has very low bioavailability and absorption in the intestine. Therefore, fermented ginseng was developed to enhance the beneficial effects of ginseng in the intestine. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of fermented wild ginseng (FWG). We found that FWG significantly alleviated the severity of colitis in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model, and decreased expression level of pro-inflammatory cytokines in colonic tissue. Moreover, we observed that FWG suppressed the infiltration of macrophages in DSS-induced colitis. FWG also attenuated the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by reducing the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus. Our data indicate that FWG contains anti-inflammatory activity via NF-κB inactivation and could be useful for treating colitis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 419-425] PMID:25936779

  14. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  15. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  16. Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule-2 Reduces Intestinal Epithelial Tight-Junction Damage and Mortality in Septic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Qiankun; Wang, Xiang; Yuan, Shoutao; Wang, Guozheng; Ji, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Objective Damage to intestinal epithelial tight junctions plays an important role in sepsis. Recently we found that Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule-2 (CORM-2) is able to protect LPS-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage and in this study we will investigate if CORM-2 could protect intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the rat cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. Materials and Methods The CLP model was generated using male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats according to standard procedure and treated with CORM-2 or inactive CORM-2 (iCORM-2), 8 mg/kg, i.v. immediately after CLP induction and euthanized after 24h or 72h (for mortality rate only). Morphological changes were investigated using both transmission electron and confocal microscopy. The levels of important TJ proteins and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) were examined using Western blotting. Cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α were measured using ELISA kits. The overall intestinal epithelial permeability was evaluated using FD-4 as a marker. Results CORM-2, but not iCORM-2, significantly reduced sepsis-induced damage of intestinal mucosa (including TJ disruption), TJ protein reduction (including zonula occludens-l (ZO-1), claudin-1 and occludin), MLC phosphorylation and proinflammatory cytokine release. The overall outcomes showed that CORM-2 suppressed sepsis-induced intestinal epithelial permeability changes and reduced mortality rate of those septic rats. Conclusions Our data strongly suggest that CORM-2 could be a potential therapeutic reagent for sepsis by suppressing inflammation, restoring intestinal epithelial barrier and reducing mortality. PMID:26720630

  17. Adaptations to the air breathing in the posterior intestine of the catfish (Corydoras aeneus, Callichthyidae). A histological and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Podkowa, Dagmara; Goniakowska-Witalińska, Lucyna

    2002-01-01

    A light and transmission electron microscopic study of the intestine of catfish C. aeneus shows that the anterior part of the intestine is a site of digestion and absorption and its structure is typical of that of other teleostean fishes. However, in this species the thin-walled posterior intestine is adapted to air breathing. In this region mucosa is smooth and lined with respiratory epithelium with capillary network. Several types of cells are observed in the epithelium: flattened respiratory epithelial cells with short microvili, goblet cells, scarce epithelial cells with numerous longer microvilli, and two types of endocrine cells (EC). The solitary brush cells with several long and thick microvilli described here are the first observation of such cells in the gastrointestinal tract of fishes. Bodies of respiratory epithelial cells lie between capillaries. Their cytoplasm, apart from typical organelles contains dense and lamellar bodies, which are a site of accumulation of surfactant. In regions where capillaries are covered by thin cytoplasmic sheets of respiratory epithelial cells, a thin (0.24-3.00 microm) air-blood barrier is formed, thus enabling gas exchange. Epithelial cells with longer microvilli do not participate in the formation of the air-blood barrier and are probably responsible for absorbtion. EC of the closed type are dispersed within the epithelium. Their cytoplasm contains characteristic round or oval dense core vesicles 69 to 230 nm in diameter. The role of EC and brush cells in the regulation of processes related to absorbtion, and to respiration, is disscused.

  18. Salmonella enterica Serovar-Host Specificity Does Not Correlate with the Magnitude of Intestinal Invasion in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Uzzau, Sergio; Leori, Guido S.; Petruzzi, Valentino; Watson, Patricia R.; Schianchi, Giuseppe; Bacciu, Donatella; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Wallis, Timothy S.; Rubino, Salvatore

    2001-01-01

    The colonization of intestinal and systemic tissues by Salmonella enterica serovars with different host specificities was determined 7 days after inoculation of 1 to 2-month-old lambs. Following oral inoculation, S. enterica serovars Abortusovis, Dublin, and Gallinarum were recovered in comparable numbers from the intestinal mucosa, but serovar Gallinarum was recovered in lower numbers than the other serovars from systemic sites. The pattern of bacterial recovery from systemic sites following intravenous inoculation was similar. The magnitude of intestinal invasion was evaluated in ovine ligated ileal loops in vivo. Serovars Dublin and Gallinarum and the broad-host-range Salmonella serovar Typhimurium were recovered in comparable numbers from ileal mucosa 3 h after loop inoculation, whereas the recovery of serovar Abortusovis was approximately 10-fold lower. Microscopic analysis of intestinal mucosae infected with serovars Typhimurium and Dublin showed dramatic morphological changes and infiltration of inflammatory cells, whereas mucosae infected with serovars Abortusovis and Gallinarum were indistinguishable from uninfected mucosae. Together these data suggest that Salmonella serovar specificity in sheep correlates with bacterial persistence at systemic sites. Intestinal invasion and avoidance of the host's intestinal inflammatory response may contribute to but do not determine the specificity of serovar Abortosovis for sheep. Intestinal invasion by serovar Abortusovis was significantly reduced after mutation of invH but was not reduced following curing of the virulence plasmid, suggesting that the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 influences but the virulence plasmid genes do not influence the ability of serovar Abortusovis to invade the intestinal mucosa in sheep. PMID:11292728

  19. Impaired barrier function by dietary fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) in rats is accompanied by increased colonic mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Vink, Carolien; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates stimulate the gut microflora and are therefore presumed to improve host resistance to intestinal infections. However, several strictly controlled rat infection studies showed that non-digestible fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) increase, rather than decrease, translocation of Salmonella towards extra-intestinal sites. In addition, it was shown that FOS increases intestinal permeability already before infection. The mechanism responsible for this adverse effect of FOS is unclear. Possible explanations are altered mucosal integrity due to changes in tight junctions or changes in expression of defense molecules such as antimicrobials and mucins. To examine the mechanisms underlying weakening of the intestinal barrier by FOS, a controlled dietary intervention study was performed. Two groups of 12 rats were adapted to a diet with or without FOS. mRNA was collected from colonic mucosa and changes in gene expression were assessed for each individual rat using Agilent rat whole genome microarrays. Results Among the 997 FOS induced genes we observed less mucosal integrity related genes than expected with the clear permeability changes. FOS did not induce changes in tight junction genes and only 8 genes related to mucosal defense were induced by FOS. These small effects are unlikely the cause for the clear increase in intestinal permeability that is observed. FOS significantly increased expression of 177 mitochondria-related genes. More specifically, induced expression of genes involved in all five OXPHOS complexes and the TCA cycle was observed. These results indicate that dietary FOS influences intestinal mucosal energy metabolism. Furthermore, increased expression of 113 genes related to protein turnover, including proteasome genes, ribosomal genes and protein maturation related genes, was seen. FOS upregulated expression of the peptide hormone proglucagon gene, in agreement with previous studies, as well as three other peptide

  20. Immunohistochemical study of tissue factor expression in normal intestine and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    More, L; Sim, R; Hudson, M; Dhillon, A P; Pounder, R; Wakefield, A J

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the localisation of tissue factor expression in normal and inflamed intestine. METHODS--Serial cryostat sections of tissue taken from patients with Crohn's disease (n = 8), ulcerative colitis (n = 5), and from controls (n = 5) were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and immunostained for tissue factor, collagen type IV, fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein IIIa. RESULTS--In control tissues tissue factor was present as a continuous layer along the epithelial basal lamina: sections from controls did not immunostain for fibrinogen or platelets. In non-ulcerated inflamed mucosa, tissue factor staining intensified in cases of Crohn's disease and was associated with fibrin deposition. Staining for tissue factor was either patchy or absent in cases of ulcerative colitis and there was no fibrin deposition. This change accompanied the early destruction of the epithelial basal lamina in ulcerative colitis that was not seen in Crohn's disease. In both diseases tissue factor expression in severely inflamed and ulcerated mucosa was present on lamina propria macrophages and vascular endothelium and was associated with fibrin or platelet thrombi. In three of eight cases of Crohn's disease tissue factor expression and thrombi were evident in areas of submucosal vasculitis. These were not seen in adjacent normal vessels. CONCLUSIONS--These observations are consistent with a tissue factor haemostatic barrier in the intestine: this barrier seems to be incomplete or defective in ulcerative colitis. Tissue factor expression by macrophages and endothelial cells may be important, particularly in the microvascular thrombosis and induration which are characteristic of Crohn's disease. Images PMID:8408693

  1. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected. PMID:25758122

  2. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected.

  3. The Distribution of SIgA and IgG Antibody-Secreting Cells in the Small Intestine of Bactrian Camels (Camelus bactrianus) of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wang-Dong; Wang, Wen-Hui; Jia, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are two important cell types in the mucosal immune system. This study aimed to explore the distribution of these ASC populations in the small intestine of Bactrian camels of different ages. Twenty-four Alashan Bactrian camels were divided into the following four age groups: young (1–2 years), pubertal (3–5 years), middle-aged (6–16 years) and old (17–20 years). SIgA and IgG ASCs in the intestinal mucosa lamina propria (LP) were observed and analyzed using immunohistochemcal techniques. The results from all age groups show that both SIgA and IgG ASCs were diffusely distributed in the intestinal LP, and some cells aggregated around the crypts. Moreover, the densities of the two ASC populations gradually increased from the duodenum to the jejunum and then decreased in the ileum. Meanwhile, there were more SIgA ASCs than IgG ASCs in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and these differences were significant in the young and pubertal groups (P<0.05). In addition, the SIgA and IgG ASC densities increased from the young to the pubertal period, peaked at puberty, and then gradually decreased with age. The results demonstrate that the SIgA and IgG ASC distributions help to form two immunoglobulin barriers in the intestinal mucosa to provide full protection, helping to maintain homeostasis. These findings also underscore the importance of researching the development and degeneration of intestinal mucosal immunity in Bactrian camels. PMID:27249417

  4. Zeta isoform of protein kinase C prevents oxidant-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and I-kappaBalpha degradation: a fundamental mechanism for epidermal growth factor protection of the microtubule cytoskeleton and intestinal barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Banan, A; Fields, J Z; Zhang, L J; Shaikh, M; Farhadi, A; Keshavarzian, A

    2003-10-01

    Oxidant damage and gut barrier disruption contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In our studies using a model of the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial barrier, monolayers of intestinal (Caco-2) cells, we investigated damage to and protection of the monolayer barrier. We reported that activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) via degradation of its endogenous inhibitor I-kappaBalpha is key to oxidant-induced disruption of barrier integrity and that growth factor (epidermal growth factor, EGF) protects against this injury by stabilizing the cytoskeletal filaments. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation seems to be required for monolayer maintenance, especially activation of the atypical zeta isoform of PKC. In an attempt to investigate, at the molecular level, the fundamental events underlying EGF protection against oxidant disruption, we tested the intriguing hypothesis that EGF-induced activation of PKC-zeta prevents oxidant-induced activation of NF-kappaB and the consequences of NF-kappaB activation, namely, cytoskeletal and barrier disruption. Monolayers of wild-type (WT) Caco-2 cells were incubated with oxidant (H2O2) with or without EGF or modulators. In other studies, we used the first gastrointestinal cell clones created by stable transfection of varying levels (1-5 microg) of cDNA to either overexpress PKC-zeta or to inhibit its expression. Transfected cell clones were then pretreated with EGF or a PKC activator (diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, OAG) before oxidant. We monitored the following endpoints: monolayer barrier integrity, stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton, subcellular distribution and activity of the PKC-zeta isoform, intracellular levels and phosphorylation of the NF-kappaB inhibitor I-kappaBalpha, and nuclear translocation and activity of NF-kappaB subunits p65 and p50. Monolayers were also fractionated and processed to assess

  5. An improved cryopreservation method for porcine buccal mucosa in ex vivo drug permeation studies using Franz diffusion cells.

    PubMed

    Amores, Sonia; Domenech, José; Colom, Helena; Calpena, Ana C; Clares, Beatriz; Gimeno, Álvaro; Lauroba, Jacinto

    2014-08-18

    The use of isolated animal models to assess percutaneous absorption of molecules is frequently reported. The porcine buccal mucosa has been proposed as a substitute for the buccal mucosa barrier on ex vivo permeability studies avoiding unnecessary sacrifice of animals. But it is not always easy to obtain fresh buccal mucosa. Consequently, human and porcine buccal mucosa is sometimes frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen, but this procedure is not always feasible. One cheaper and simpler alternative is to freeze the buccal mucosa of freshly slaughtered pigs in a mechanical freezer, using DMSO and albumin as cryoprotective agents. This study compared the ex vivo permeability parameters of propranolol hydrochloride through porcine buccal mucosa using a Franz diffusion cell system and HPLC as detection method. The freezing effects on drug permeability parameters were evaluated. Equally histological studies were performed. Furthermore, the use of the parameter transmucosal water loss (TMWL) as an indicator of the buccal mucosa integrity was evaluated just as transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is utilized for skin integrity. The results showed no difference between fresh and frozen mucosal flux, permeability coefficient or lag time of propranolol. However, statistical significant difference in TMWL between fresh and frozen mucosa was observed. PMID:24813111

  6. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  7. Optical reconstruction of murine colorectal mucosa at cellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cambrian Y.; Dubé, Philip E.; Girish, Nandini; Reddy, Ajay T.

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal layer of the colon is a unique and dynamic site where host cells interface with one another and the microbiome, with major implications for physiology and disease. However, the cellular mechanisms mediating colonic regeneration, inflammation, dysplasia, and dysbiosis remain undercharacterized, partly because the use of thin tissue sections in many studies removes important volumetric context. To address these challenges in visualization, we have developed the deep mucosal imaging (DMI) method to reconstruct continuous extended volumes of mouse colorectal mucosa at cellular resolution. Use of ScaleA2 and SeeDB clearing agents enabled full visualization of the colonic crypt, the fundamental unit of adult colon. Confocal imaging of large colorectal expanses revealed epithelial structures involved in repair, inflammation, tumorigenesis, and stem cell function, in fluorescent protein-labeled, immunostained, paraffin-embedded, or human biopsy samples. We provide freely available software to reconstruct and explore on computers with standard memory allocations the large DMI datasets containing in toto representations of distal colonic mucosal volume. Extended-volume imaging of colonic mucosa through the novel, extensible, and readily adopted DMI approach will expedite mechanistic investigations of intestinal physiology and pathophysiology at intracrypt to multicrypt length scales. PMID:25721303

  8. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches.

  9. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  10. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  11. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  12. Dendritic cells in intestinal homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rescigno, Maria; Di Sabatino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    DCs are specialized APCs that orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses. The intestinal mucosa contains numerous DCs, which induce either protective immunity to infectious agents or tolerance to innocuous antigens, including food and commensal bacteria. Several subsets of mucosal DCs have been described that display unique functions, dictated in part by the local microenvironment. In this review, we summarize the distinct subtypes of DCs and their distribution in the gut; examine how DC dysfunction contributes to intestinal disease development, including inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease; and discuss manipulation of DCs for therapy. PMID:19729841

  13. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  14. The gut wall provides an effective barrier against nanoparticle uptake

    PubMed Central

    Sinnecker, Heike; Krause, Thorsten; Koelling, Sabine; Lautenschläger, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: The omnipresence of nanoparticles (NPs) in numerous goods has led to a constant risk of exposure and inadvertent uptake for humans. This situation calls for thorough investigation of the consequences of NP intake. As the vast mucosa of the human gastrointestinal tract represents an attractive site of entry, we wanted to take a look on the fate that ingested NPs suffer in the gut. As a model to investigate NP uptake we used the isolated perfused rat small intestine. Differently sized fluorescent latex particles were used as exemplary anthropogenic NPs. Results: The particles were administered as bolus into the isolated intestine, and samples from the luminal, vascular and lymphatic compartments were collected over time. NP amounts in the different fluids were determined by fluorescence measurements. No particles could be detected in the vascular and lymphatic system. By contrast a major amount of NPs was found in luminal samples. Yet, a substantial share of particles could not be recovered in the fluid fractions, indicating a sink function of the intestinal tissue for NPs. A histological examination of the gut revealed that virtually no particles adhered to the epithelium or resided in the tissue, the bulk of particles seemed to be trapped in the mucus lining the gut tube. When this mucus was dissolved and removed from the gut almost the entire amount of particles missing could be recovered: over 95% of the given NPs were present in the two fractions, the luminal samples and the dissolved mucus. To foster NP uptake via an extended interaction time with the epithelium, the intestinal peristalsis was decelerated and the duration of the experiment was prolonged. Even under those conditions, no particle fluorescence was detected in the vascular and lymphatic samples. Conclusion: We could show that after intestinal exposure with a large dose of NPs the vast majority of NPs did obviously not come into contact with the epithelium but was either directly

  15. Normal keratinized mucosa transplants in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Dabelsteen, E; Reibel, J; Harder, F

    1981-01-01

    Two types of normal keratinized mucosa were transplanted to subcutaneous sites of nude mice of two different strains. 24 intact specimens of clinically normal human palatal mucosa were transplanted to nude mice of the strain nu/nu NC. The transplants were recovered after 42 d with a recovery rate of 96%. Moreover, 22 intact specimens of normal rat forestomach mucosa were transplanted to nude mice of the strain nu/nu BALB/c/BOM. These transplants were recovered after 21 d with a recovery rate of 63%. The histologic features of the transplants were essentially the same as those of the original tissues. However, epithelial outgrowths from the transplants differed with respect to the pattern of keratinization. The outgrowths of human palatal mucosa transplants were essentially unkeratinized, while the outgrowths of the rat forestomach transplants showed continued keratinization.

  16. Whey protein concentrate enhances intestinal integrity and influences transforming growth factor-β1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways in piglets after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kan; Jiao, Lefei; Cao, Shuting; Song, Zehe; Hu, Caihong; Han, Xinyan

    2016-03-28

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) has been reported to have protective effects on the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully elucidated. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is an important component in the WPC, but whether TGF-β1 plays a role in these processes is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of WPC on the intestinal epithelial barrier as well as whether TGF-β1 is involved in these protection processes in a piglet model after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. In total, eighteen weanling pigs were randomly allocated to one of the following three treatment groups: (1) non-challenged control and control diet; (2) LPS-challenged control and control diet; (3) LPS+5 %WPC diet. After 19 d of feeding with control or 5 %WPC diets, pigs were injected with LPS or saline. At 4 h after injection, pigs were killed to harvest jejunal samples. The results showed that WPC improved (P<0·05) intestinal morphology, as indicated by greater villus height and villus height:crypt depth ratio, and intestinal barrier function, which was reflected by increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased mucosal-to-serosal paracellular flux of dextran (4 kDa), compared with the LPS group. Moreover, WPC prevented the LPS-induced decrease (P<0·05) in claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens-1 expressions in the jejunal mucosae. WPC also attenuated intestinal inflammation, indicated by decreased (P<0·05) mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1β. Supplementation with WPC also increased (P<0·05) TGF-β1 protein, phosphorylated-Smad2 expression and Smad4 and Smad7 mRNA expressions and decreased (P<0·05) the ratios of the phosphorylated to total c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 (phospho-JNK:JNK and p-p38:p38), whereas it increased (P<0·05) the ratio of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) (phospho-ERK:ERK). Collectively, these results suggest that dietary inclusion of WPC

  17. Large intestine-targeted, nanoparticle-releasing oral vaccine to control genitorectal viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Talton, James; Zhang, Guofeng; Cunningham, Tshaka; Wang, Zijian; Waters, Robert C; Kirk, James; Eppler, Bärbel; Klinman, Dennis M; Sui, Yongjun; Gagnon, Susan; Belyakov, Igor M; Mumper, Russell J; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2012-08-01

    Both rectal and vaginal mucosal surfaces serve as transmission routes for pathogenic microorganisms. Vaccination through large intestinal mucosa, previously proven protective for both of these mucosal sites in animal studies, can be achieved successfully by direct intracolorectal (i.c.r.) administration, but this route is clinically impractical. Oral vaccine delivery seems preferable but runs the risk of the vaccine's destruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, we designed a large intestine-targeted oral delivery with pH-dependent microparticles containing vaccine nanoparticles, which induced colorectal immunity in mice comparably to colorectal vaccination and protected against rectal and vaginal viral challenge. Conversely, vaccine targeted to the small intestine induced only small intestinal immunity and provided no rectal or vaginal protection, demonstrating functional compartmentalization within the gut mucosal immune system. Therefore, using this oral vaccine delivery system to target the large intestine, but not the small intestine, may represent a feasible new strategy for immune protection of rectal and vaginal mucosa.

  18. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bowel may be due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...