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Sample records for intestinal peptide transporter

  1. In vitro studies on intestinal peptide transport in horses.

    PubMed

    Cehak, A; Schröder, B; Feige, K; Breves, G

    2013-11-01

    Published data on the physiology of nutrient transport across the equine intestine are limited, and the existence and relevance of peptide transporters are still unknown in the horse. In the present study, the equine intestinal peptide transport was investigated by Ussing chamber experiments using the radioisotope tracer technique and by uptake studies into brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Jejunal mucosae of 16 healthy adult horses were used. Tissue samples were mounted in Ussing chambers, and electrophysiological parameters as well as unidirectional flux rates of the radiolabelled dipeptide glycylglutamine (Gly-Gln) were determined. The short-circuit current (Isc) response to the luminal addition of Gly-Gln was significantly greater compared to the Isc response to glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) addition (P<0.01). Positive net flux rates were determined indicating absorption of the dipeptide. The addition of Gly-Sar reduced the flux rates significantly (P<0.01), suggesting that both peptides compete for the same transport system. The flux rates were not affected by changes in luminal pH value. Uptake studies into BBMV demonstrated an uphill transport in both the absence and the presence of an inwardly directed H+-gradient with the H+-mediated uphill transport being significantly greater than the transport under equilibrium conditions (P<0.001). A Na+-gradient did not cause an uphill transport. The Gly-Gln uptakes displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Km value for the H+-dependent Gly-Gln uptake being significantly different from the Km value for the Gly-Gln uptake under equilibrium conditions (P<0.05). In conclusion, the study demonstrated for the first time that dipeptides are transcellularly transported across the equine small intestine. The results indicate the presence of at least 2 transport systems for peptide absorption in the horse: 1 secondary active H+-mediated cotransport and 1 that is capable of an uphill transport energized by a mechanism other

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  3. Transport of IRW, an ovotransferrin-derived antihypertensive peptide, in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, Satyanarayana; Wu, Jianping

    2013-02-20

    IRW is an egg ovotransferrin-derived ACE inhibitory peptide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability and transcellular transport of IRW in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The stability of IRW was monitored on the apical (AP) surface while its transport was studied from AP to basal (BL) and from BL to AP surfaces. The results revealed that IRW is resistant against intestinal peptidase up to 60 min. Transport of IRW was not affected by addition of wortamanin, a transcytosis inhibitor. However, in the presence of cytochalasin D, a gap junction disruptor, transport of IRW was significantly increased, suggesting a possible passive transport from AP to BL surface. A higher transport of IRW from AP to BL surface than that from BL to AP surface suggests a passive-mediated transport. Moreover, in the presence of glycyl-sarcosine, a substrate for peptide transporter PepT 1, transport of IRW was reduced from AP to BL surface. The above observations showed atypical transport of IRW in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Thus, IRW may possibly be absorbed intact into the site of action for controlling hypertension.

  4. Expression of an antimicrobial peptide, digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine of E. praecox-infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis is a major intestinal disease of poultry, caused by several species of the protozoan Eimeria. The objective of this study was to examine changes in expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters and an antimicrobial peptide following an Eimeria praecox challenge of chickens at d...

  5. Guanylin peptides regulate electrolyte and fluid transport in the Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) posterior intestine.

    PubMed

    Ruhr, Ilan M; Bodinier, Charlotte; Mager, Edward M; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Williams, Cameron; Takei, Yoshio; Grosell, Martin

    2014-11-01

    The physiological effects of guanylin (GN) and uroguanylin (UGN) on fluid and electrolyte transport in the teleost fish intestine have yet to be thoroughly investigated. In the present study, the effects of GN, UGN, and renoguanylin (RGN; a GN and UGN homolog) on short-circuit current (Isc) and the transport of Cl-, Na+, bicarbonate (HCO3-), and fluid in the Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) intestine were determined using Ussing chambers, pH-stat titration, and intestinal sac experiments. GN, UGN, and RGN reversed the Isc of the posterior intestine (absorptive-to-secretory), but not of the anterior intestine. RGN decreased baseline HCO3- secretion, but increased Cl- and fluid secretion in the posterior intestine. The secretory response of the posterior intestine coincides with the presence of basolateral NKCC1 and apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the latter of which is lacking in the anterior intestine and is not permeable to HCO3- in the posterior intestine. However, the response to RGN by the posterior intestine is counterintuitive given the known role of the marine teleost intestine as a salt- and water-absorbing organ. These data demonstrate that marine teleosts possess a tissue-specific secretory response, apparently associated with seawater adaptation, the exact role of which remains to be determined.

  6. Oral peptide specific egg antibody to intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter-2b is effective at altering phosphate transport in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bobeck, Elizabeth A; Hellestad, Erica M; Sand, Jordan M; Piccione, Michelle L; Bishop, Jeff W; Helvig, Christian; Petkovich, Martin; Cook, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    Hyperimmunized hens are an effective means of generating large quantities of antigen specific egg antibodies that have use as oral supplements. In this study, we attempted to create a peptide specific antibody that produced outcomes similar to those of the human pharmaceutical, sevelamer HCl, used in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia (a sequela of chronic renal disease). Egg antibodies were generated against 8 different human intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter 2b (NaPi2b) peptides, and hNaPi2b peptide egg antibodies were screened for their ability to inhibit phosphate transport in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. Antibody produced against human peptide sequence TSPSLCWT (anti-h16) was specific for its peptide sequence, and significantly reduced phosphate transport in human Caco-2 cells to 25.3±11.5% of control nonspecific antibody, when compared to nicotinamide, a known inhibitor of phosphate transport (P≤0.05). Antibody was then produced against the mouse-specific peptide h16 counterpart (mouse sequence TSPSYCWT, anti-m16) for further analysis in a murine model. When anti-m16 was fed to mice (1% of diet as dried egg yolk powder), egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) was detected using immunohistochemical staining in mouse ileum, and egg anti-m16 IgY colocalized with a commercial goat anti-NaPi2b antibody. The effectiveness of anti-m16 egg antibody in reducing serum phosphate, when compared to sevelamer HCl, was determined in a mouse feeding study. Serum phosphate was reduced 18% (P<0.02) in mice fed anti-m16 (1% as dried egg yolk powder) and 30% (P<0.0001) in mice fed sevelamer HCl (1% of diet) when compared to mice fed nonspecific egg immunoglobulin. The methods described and the findings reported show that oral egg antibodies are useful and easy to prepare reagents for the study and possible treatment of select diseases.

  7. The mRNA expression of amino acid transporters, aminopeptidase, and the di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 in the intestine and liver of post-hatch broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acid transporter (AAT) proteins are responsible for the movement of amino acids (AA) in and out of cells. Aminopeptidase (APN) cleaves AAs from the N terminus of polypeptides making them available for transport, while PepT1 is a di- and tri- peptide transporter. In the intestine, these prote...

  8. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a chicken intestinal peptide transporter (cPepT1) in Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Pan, YuanXiang; Wong, Eric A; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Webb, Kenneth E

    2002-03-01

    To study peptide absorption in chickens, an intestinal peptide transporter cDNA (cPepT1) was isolated from a chicken duodenal cDNA library. The cDNA was 2914 bp long and encoded a protein of 714 amino acid residues with an estimated molecular size of 79.3 kDa and an isoelectric point of 7.48. cPepT1 protein is similar60% identical to PepT1 from rabbits, humans, mice, rats and sheep. Sixteen dipeptides, three tripeptides and four tetrapeptides that contained the essential amino acids Met, Lys and(or) Trp were used for functional analysis of cPepT1 in Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. For most di- and tripeptides tested, the substrate affinities were in the micromolar range, indicating that cPepT1 has high affinity for these peptides. Lys-Lys and Lys-Trp-Lys were exceptions, with substrate affinities in the millimolar range. Neither free amino acids nor tetrapeptides were transported by cPepT1. Northern blot analysis using a full-length cPepT1 cDNA as the probe demonstrated that cPepT1 is expressed strongly in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and at lower levels in kidney and ceca. The present study demonstrated for the first time the presence and functional characteristics of a peptide transport system from an avian species.

  9. Supplementation with branched-chain amino acids to a low-protein diet regulates intestinal expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Qiao, Shiyan; Ren, Man; Zeng, Xiangfang; Ma, Xi; Wu, Zhenlong; Thacker, Philip; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-11-01

    This study determined the effects of dietary branched-chain amino acids (AA) (BCAA) on growth performance, expression of jejunal AA and peptide transporters, and the colonic microflora of weanling piglets fed a low-protein (LP) diet. One hundred and eight Large White × Landrace × Duroc piglets (weaned at 28 days of age) were fed a normal protein diet (NP, 20.9 % crude protein), an LP diet (LP, 17.1 % crude protein), or an LP diet supplemented with BCAA (LP + BCAA, 17.9 % crude protein) for 14 days. Dietary protein restriction reduced piglet growth performance and small-intestinal villous height, which were restored by BCAA supplementation to the LP diet to values for the NP diet. Serum concentrations of BCAA were reduced in piglets fed the LP diet while those in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet were similar to values for the NP group. mRNA levels for Na(+)-neutral AA exchanger-2, cationic AA transporter-1, b(0,+) AA transporter, and 4F2 heavy chain were more abundant in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet than the LP diet. However, mRNA and protein levels for peptide transporter-1 were lower in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet as compared to the LP diet. The colonic microflora did not differ among the three groups of pigs. In conclusion, growth performance, intestinal development, and intestinal expression of AA transporters in weanling piglets are enhanced by BCAA supplementation to LP diets. Our findings provide a new molecular basis for further understanding of BCAA as functional AA in animal nutrition.

  10. Bile Acid-regulated Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-α (PPARα) Activity Underlies Circadian Expression of Intestinal Peptide Absorption Transporter PepT1/Slc15a1*

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:25016014

  11. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter.

  12. In vitro evaluation of N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics as substrates for the human intestinal di-/tri-peptide transporter hPEPT1.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rikke; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Begtrup, Mikael; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Brodin, Birger; Frokjaer, Sven; Steffansen, Bente

    2006-07-01

    Oral absorption of tripeptides is generally mediated by the human intestinal di-/tri-peptide transporter, hPEPT1. However, the bioavailability of tripeptides is often limited due to degradation in the GI-tract by various peptidases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the general application of N-methyl amide bioisosteres as peptide bond replacements in tripeptides in order to decrease degradation by peptidases and yet retain affinity for and transport via hPEPT1. Seven structurally diverse N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics were selected based on a principal component analysis of structural properties of 6859 N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics. In vitro extracellular degradation of the selected tripeptidomimetics as well as affinity for and transepithelial transport via hPEPT1 were investigated in Caco-2 cells. Decreased apparent degradation was observed for all tripeptidomimetics compared to the corresponding natural tripeptides. However, affinity for and transepithelial transport via hPEPT1 were only seen for Gly-Sar-Sar, AsnPsi[CONCH(3)]PhePsi[CONCH(3)]Trp, and Gly-Sar-Leu. This implies that tripeptidomimetics originating from tripeptides with neutral side chains are more likely to be substrates for hPEPT1 than tripeptidomimetics with charged side chains. The results of the present study indicate that the N-methyl amide peptide bond replacement approach for increasing bioavailability of tripeptidomimetic drug candidates is not generally applicable to all tripeptides. Nevertheless, retained affinity for and transport via hPEPT1 were shown for three of the evaluated N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics.

  13. In vitro evaluation of N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics as substrates for the human intestinal di-/tri-peptide transporter hPEPT1.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rikke; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Begtrup, Mikael; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Brodin, Birger; Frokjaer, Sven; Steffansen, Bente

    2006-07-01

    Oral absorption of tripeptides is generally mediated by the human intestinal di-/tri-peptide transporter, hPEPT1. However, the bioavailability of tripeptides is often limited due to degradation in the GI-tract by various peptidases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the general application of N-methyl amide bioisosteres as peptide bond replacements in tripeptides in order to decrease degradation by peptidases and yet retain affinity for and transport via hPEPT1. Seven structurally diverse N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics were selected based on a principal component analysis of structural properties of 6859 N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics. In vitro extracellular degradation of the selected tripeptidomimetics as well as affinity for and transepithelial transport via hPEPT1 were investigated in Caco-2 cells. Decreased apparent degradation was observed for all tripeptidomimetics compared to the corresponding natural tripeptides. However, affinity for and transepithelial transport via hPEPT1 were only seen for Gly-Sar-Sar, AsnPsi[CONCH(3)]PhePsi[CONCH(3)]Trp, and Gly-Sar-Leu. This implies that tripeptidomimetics originating from tripeptides with neutral side chains are more likely to be substrates for hPEPT1 than tripeptidomimetics with charged side chains. The results of the present study indicate that the N-methyl amide peptide bond replacement approach for increasing bioavailability of tripeptidomimetic drug candidates is not generally applicable to all tripeptides. Nevertheless, retained affinity for and transport via hPEPT1 were shown for three of the evaluated N-methyl amide tripeptidomimetics. PMID:16713701

  14. Peptide Transporter 1 is Responsible for Intestinal Uptake of the Dipeptide Glycylsarcosine: Studies in Everted Jejunal Rings from Wild-type and Pept1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Katherine; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of PEPT1 in the uptake of peptides/mimetics from mouse small intestine using glycylsarcosine (GlySar). After isolating jejunal tissue from wild-type and Pept1 null mice, 2-cm intestinal segments were everted and mounted on glass rods for tissue uptake studies. [14C]GlySar (4 μM) was studied as a function of time, temperature, sodium and pH, concentration, and potential inhibitors. Compared to wild-type animals, Pept1 null mice exhibited a 78% reduction of GlySar uptake at pH 6.0, 37°C. GlySar uptake showed pH dependence with peak values between pH 6.0-6.5 in wild-type animals, while no such tendency was observed in Pept1 null mice. GlySar exhibited Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics and a minor nonsaturable component in wild-type animals. In contrast, GlySar uptake occurred by only a nonsaturable process in Pept1 null mice. GlySar uptake was significantly inhibited by dipeptides, aminocephalosporins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the antiviral prodrug valacyclovir; these inhibitors had little, if any, effect on the uptake of GlySar in Pept1 null mice. The findings demonstrate that PEPT1 plays a critical role in the uptake of GlySar in jejunum, and suggest that PEPT1 is the major transporter responsible for the intestinal absorption of small peptides. PMID:20862774

  15. cis-Peptide Bonds: A Key for Intestinal Permeability of Peptides? .

    PubMed

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Ovadia, Oded; Frank, Andreas Oliver; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon; Kessler, Horst

    2015-10-19

    Recent structural studies on libraries of cyclic hexapeptides led to the identification of common backbone conformations that may be instrumental to the oral availability of peptides. Furthermore, the observation of differential Caco-2 permeabilities of enantiomeric pairs of some of these peptides strongly supports the concept of conformational specificity driven uptake and also suggests a pivotal role of carrier-mediated pathways for peptide transport, especially for scaffolds of polar nature. This work presents investigations on the Caco-2 and PAMPA permeability profiles of 13 selected N-methylated cyclic pentaalanine peptides derived from the basic cyclo(-D-Ala-Ala4 -) template. These molecules generally showed moderate to low transport in intestinal epithelia with a few of them exhibiting a Caco-2 permeability equal to or slightly higher than that of mannitol, a marker for paracellular permeability. We identified that the majority of the permeable cyclic penta- and hexapeptides possess an N-methylated cis-peptide bond, a structural feature that is also present in the orally available peptides cyclosporine A and the tri-N-methylated analogue of the Veber-Hirschmann peptide. Based on these observations it appears that the presence of N-methylated cis-peptide bonds at certain locations may promote the intestinal permeability of peptides through a suitable conformational preorganization.

  16. Polyamines alter intestinal glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Brockway, P D; Madsen, K; Hardin, J A; Gall, D G

    1995-03-01

    Polyamines are required for the growth of all eukaryotic cells. Enterocytes respond to luminal nutrients with large increases in polyamine synthesis, even though they are mature, nonproliferating cells. The role of polyamines in these cells is unknown. The current experiments examined whether polyamines affected intestinal transport of glucose, since absorption is the primary activity of enterocytes and since polyamines are known to affect membrane function and stability. Glucose transport was examined in rabbit brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). BBMV from rabbits given 5% alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) in their drinking water 24 h before they were killed transported significantly less glucose than control vesicles [38% decrease in maximal transport rate (Jmax)]. Orogastric administration of spermine, spermidine, or putrescine to DFMO-treated animals 24 h before they were killed prevented the decrease. In rabbits receiving only orogastric spermine, glucose transport was significantly increased (64% increase in Jmax), whereas in vivo spermidine and putrescine decreased Jmax. This increase in Jmax caused by in vivo administration of spermine was not dependent on protein synthesis. Addition of polyamines whether in vivo or in vitro decreased Michaelis constant in vesicles from control and DFMO-treated animals. The change in glucose transport induced by DFMO or polyamines was not related to altered membrane lipid composition or fluidity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. mRNA expression of amino acid transporters, aminopeptidase, and the di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 in the intestine and liver of posthatch broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Miska, Katarzyna B; Fetterer, Raymond H; Wong, Eric A

    2015-06-01

    Amino acid (AA) transporter proteins are responsible for the movement of amino acids in and out of cells. Aminopeptidase cleaves AAs from the N-terminus of polypeptides making them available for transport, while PepT1 is a di- and tripeptide transporter. In the intestine, these proteins are present on the brush border and basolateral membranes of enterocytes, and are essential for the uptake of AAs into enterocytes and their release into circulation. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of transcription of these genes after hatch in 3 regions of the small intestine, the ceca, and liver. Heritage broiler chicks (n=5) were sampled at day after hatch and days 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 17, and 21 posthatch, and mRNA expression level was measured using absolute quantitation. The small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) expressed the largest quantities of each gene tested. The expression in the ceca and liver was 1 to 3 orders of magnitude less than that of the small intestine. The expression of basolateral transporters in the small intestine was more constant over days posthatch than the expression of brush border transporters. In the ceca the expression of the brush border transporters decreased over the sampling period, while expression of basolateral genes was relatively constant. In the liver the expression of Na+ independent cationic and zwitterionic amino acid transporter (bo,+AT), Na+ independent cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2), excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), and the heavy chain corresponding to the bo,+) system (rBAT) significantly decreased at 12 days posthatch; however, the expression of Na+ independent cationic and Na+ dependent neutral amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), Na+ coupled neutral amino acid transporter 1; (SNAT1), and Na+ coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) significantly increased at day 5 posthatch compared to day 1 and these levels remained throughout the rest of the sampling period. The

  18. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  19. Watery diarrhoea with a vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Y; Nose, O; Kai, H; Okada, A; Mori, T; Lee, P K; Kakudo, K; Yanaihara, N

    1980-01-01

    An 8-month-old boy with persistent watery diarrhoea and failure to thrive developed abdominal distension, hypokalaemia, and flushing of the face and trunk. A high concentration of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity was found in the serum. Soon after resection of a suprarenal mass, the serum level of vasoactive intestinal peptide became normal and the diarrhoea stopped. Histologically the tumour was a ganglioneuroblastoma: the cells showed fluorescence by the indirect immunofluorescence technique with anti-vasoactive intestinal peptide serum. Electron microscopical examination showed abundant secretory granules in the tumour cells. Reports of chronic watery diarrhoea in children due to neural crest tumours are reviewed, with particular respect to the clinical features of the syndrome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4a Fig. 4b PMID:7006519

  20. Identification of an intestinal heme transporter.

    PubMed

    Shayeghi, Majid; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Oakhill, Jonathan S; Laftah, Abas H; Takeuchi, Ken; Halliday, Neil; Khan, Yasmin; Warley, Alice; McCann, Fiona E; Hider, Robert C; Frazer, David M; Anderson, Gregory J; Vulpe, Christopher D; Simpson, Robert J; McKie, Andrew T

    2005-09-01

    Dietary heme iron is an important nutritional source of iron in carnivores and omnivores that is more readily absorbed than non-heme iron derived from vegetables and grain. Most heme is absorbed in the proximal intestine, with absorptive capacity decreasing distally. We utilized a subtractive hybridization approach to isolate a heme transporter from duodenum by taking advantage of the intestinal gradient for heme absorption. Here we show a membrane protein named HCP 1 (heme carrier protein 1), with homology to bacterial metal-tetracycline transporters, mediates heme uptake by cells in a temperature-dependent and saturable manner. HCP 1 mRNA was highly expressed in duodenum and regulated by hypoxia. HCP 1 protein was iron regulated and localized to the brush-border membrane of duodenal enterocytes in iron deficiency. Our data indicate that HCP 1 is the long-sought intestinal heme transporter.

  1. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. PMID:25501338

  2. Modulation of intestinal L-glutamate transport by luminal leptin.

    PubMed

    Fanjul, Carmen; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Lostao, María Pilar; Ducroc, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Leptin is secreted into the digestive tract and contributes to the absorption of dietary molecules by regulating transporters activity. Here, we studied the effect of luminal leptin on the intestinal transport of L-glutamate, an important component of human diet. We examined the effect of leptin on L-glutamate uptake in rat intestine in vitro measuring glutamate-induced short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chambers and L-[(3)H (U)]-glutamate uptake in jejunal everted rings. Glutamate-induced Isc was only observed in Na(+)-free conditions. This Isc was concentration (1-60 mmol L(-1)) and pH dependent. Luminal leptin increased glutamate Isc (∼100 %). Dose-response curve showed a biphasic pattern, with maximal stimulations observed at 10(-13) and 10(-10) mmol L(-1), that were sensitive to leptin receptor antagonist. In everted rings, two glutamate transport mechanisms were distinguished: a Na(+)-dependent, H(+)-independent, that was inhibited by leptin (∼20 %), and a Na(+)-independent but H(+)-dependent, that was enhanced by leptin (∼20 %), in line with data obtained in Ussing chambers. Altogether, these data reveal original non-monotonic effect of luminal leptin in the intestine and demonstrate a new role for this hormone in the modulation of L-glutamate transport, showing that luminal active gut peptides can influence absorption of amino acids.

  3. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  4. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  5. Somatostatin-, vasoactive intestinal peptide-, and granulin-like peptides isolated from intestinal extracts of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, T; Yano, K; Yamasaki, M; Ando, M

    1995-09-01

    Three new peptides were originally isolated from intestinal extracts of goldfish. They were structurally related with somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and granulin (GRN) and thus termed goldfish somatostatin (gSS-28), gVIP, and gGRN, respectively. The primary structures of these peptides were determined as: SVESSNHLPA 10RERKAGCKNF20YWKGFTSC for the gSS-28; HSDAVFTDNY10SRYRKQMAAK20KYLNSVLA-NH2 for the gVIP, and VIHCDSSTIC10 PDGTTCCLSP20YGVWYCCPFS30MGQCCRDGIH40CCRHGYHCDS50TSTHCLR for the gGRN. The amino acid sequence of the gSS-28 was more similar (79-86% similarity) to somatostatins obtained in anglerfish, flounder, and sculpin, but far (21% similarity) from the catfish somatostatin, whereas goldfish and catfish belong to the same superorder. The structure of the gVIP was closely related to that of the cod VIP; only one residue (Tyr13) being substituted for Phe13 in the cod VIP. Comparing amino acid sequences of VIPs obtained in various vertebrates, the primary structure of this peptide was revealed to be relatively well conserved among vertebrates. In addition, the dose-response curve for the effect of gVIP on the short-circuit current (Isc) across the eel intestine was similar to that of human VIP, suggesting that VIPs in vertebrates have similar effect. The amino acid sequence of gGRN was 96% identical to that of carp GRN-1; only two residues (Ser6-Ser7) being substituted for Ala6-Ala7 in the carp GRN-1. The physiological significance of these peptides is discussed. PMID:8536941

  6. Do Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement Collaborate in the Intestinal Mucosa?

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Zoë A.; Jain, Umang; Van Limbergen, Johan; Stadnyk, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    It is well understood that multiple antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are constitutively deployed by the epithelium to bolster the innate defenses along the entire length of the intestines. In addition to this constitutive/homeostatic production, AMPs may be inducible and levels changed during disease. In contrast to this level of knowledge on AMP sources and roles in the intestines, our understanding of the complement cascade in the healthy and diseased intestines is rudimentary. Epithelial cells make many complement proteins and there is compelling evidence that complement becomes activated in the lumen. With the common goal of defending the host against microbes, the opportunities for cross-talk between these two processes is great, both in terms of actions on the target microbes but also on regulating the synthesis and secretion of the alternate family of molecules. This possibility is beginning to become apparent with the finding that colonic epithelial cells possess anaphylatoxin receptors. There still remains much to be learned about the possible points of collaboration between AMPs and complement, for example, whether there is reciprocal control over expression in the intestinal mucosa in homeostasis and restoring the balance following infection and inflammation. PMID:25688244

  7. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and SVI-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides, PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated.

  9. Vasoactive intestinal peptide signaling axis in human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorsam, Glenn Paul; Benton, Keith; Failing, Jarrett; Batra, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling axis constitutes a master “communication coordinator” between cells of the nervous and immune systems. To date, VIP and its two main receptors expressed in T lymphocytes, vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC)1 and VPAC2, mediate critical cellular functions regulating adaptive immunity, including arresting CD4 T cells in G1 of the cell cycle, protection from apoptosis and a potent chemotactic recruiter of T cells to the mucosa associated lymphoid compartment of the gastrointestinal tissues. Since the discovery of VIP in 1970, followed by the cloning of VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the early 1990s, this signaling axis has been associated with common human cancers, including leukemia. This review highlights the present day knowledge of the VIP ligand and its receptor expression profile in T cell leukemia and cell lines. Also, there will be a discussion describing how the anti-leukemic DNA binding transcription factor, Ikaros, regulates VIP receptor expression in primary human CD4 T lymphocytes and T cell lymphoblastic cell lines (e.g. Hut-78). Lastly, future goals will be mentioned that are expected to uncover the role of how the VIP signaling axis contributes to human leukemogenesis, and to establish whether the VIP receptor signature expressed by leukemic blasts can provide therapeutic and/or diagnostic information. PMID:21765981

  10. Electron Transport in Short Peptide Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Brisendine, Joseph; Ng, Fay; Nuckolls, Colin; Koder, Ronald; Venkarataman, Latha

    We present a study of the electron transport through a series of short peptides using scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction method. Our work is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of how various levels of protein structure contribute to the remarkable capacity of proteins to transport charge in biophysical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. We focus here on short mono, di and tri-peptides, and probe their conductance when bound to gold electrodes in a native buffer environment. We first show that these peptides can bind to gold through amine, carboxyl, thiol and methyl-sulfide termini. We then focus on two systems (glycine and alanine) and show that their conductance decays faster than alkanes terminated by the same linkers. Importantly, our results show that the peptide bond is less conductive than a sigma carbon-carbon bond. This work was supported in part by NSF-DMR 1507440.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following in...

  12. The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in scavenging singlet oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.R.; Misra, H.P. )

    1990-02-26

    The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a highly basic 28 amino acid peptide, has a widespread distribution in the body. The functional specificity of this peptide not only includes its potent vasodilatory activity, but also its role in protecting lungs against acute injury, in preventing T-lymphocyte proliferation and in modulating immune function. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible antioxidant properties of VIP. The authors found that VIP up to 50 {mu}g/ml had no inhibitory effect on its reduction of cytochrome C by xanthine and xanthine oxidase, indicating that the peptide does not have significant O{sub 2} scavenging ability. However, VIP was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the {sup 1}O{sub 2} dependent 2, 2, 6, 6 tetramethyl piperidine oxide (TEMPO) formation. {sup 1}O{sub 2} was produced by rose benzal photosensitizing system and was detected as TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct (TEMPO) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic technique. The formation of TEMPO signal was strongly inhibited by {beta}-carotene, histidine as well as azide, but not by superoxide dismutase (48 {mu}g/ml), catalase (20 {mu}g/ml) and mannitol (6mM), indicating that TEMPO signal was a TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct. These results indicate that VIP has potent antioxidant activity and may serve as a singlet O{sub 2} scavenger, thus it may modulate the oxidative tissue injury caused by this reactive oxygen species.

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) inhibits human renal cell carcinoma proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Bajo, Ana M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Schally, Andrew V; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-10-01

    Clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) is an aggressive and fatal neoplasm. The present work was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative potential of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exposure on non-tumoral (HK2) and tumoral (A498, cRCC) human proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. Reverse transcription and semiquantitative PCR was used at the VIP mRNA level whereas enzyme immunoanalysis was performed at the protein level. Both renal cell lines expressed VIP as well as VIP/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (VPAC) receptors whereas only HK2 cells expressed formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL-1). Receptors were functional, as shown by VIP stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Treatment with 0.1μM VIP (24h) inhibited proliferation of A498 but not HK2 cells as based on a reduction in the incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine and BrdU (5'-Br-2'-deoxyuridine), PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) expression and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) expression and activation. VPAC(1)-receptor participation was established using JV-1-53 antagonist and siRNA transfection. Growth-inhibitory response to VIP was related to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling systems as shown by studies on adenylate cyclase stimulation, and using the EPAC-specific compound 8CPT-2Me-cAMP and specific kinase inhibitors such as H89, wortmannin and PD98059. The efficacy of VIP on the prevention of tumor progression was confirmed in vivo using xenografted athymic mouse. These actions support a potential role of this peptide and its agonists in new therapies for cRCC.

  14. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  15. Induction of intestinal epithelial proliferation by glucagon-like peptide 2.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, D J; Erlich, P; Asa, S L; Brubaker, P L

    1996-01-01

    Injury, inflammation, or resection of the small intestine results in severe compromise of intestinal function. Nevertheless, therapeutic strategies for enhancing growth and repair of the intestinal mucosal epithelium are currently not available. We demonstrate that nude mice bearing subcutaneous proglucagon-producing tumors exhibit marked proliferation of the small intestinal epithelium. The factor responsible for inducing intestinal proliferation was identified as glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), a 33-aa peptide with no previously ascribed biological function. GLP-2 stimulated crypt cell proliferation and consistently induced a marked increase in bowel weight and villus growth of the jejunum and ileum that was evident within 4 days after initiation of GLP-2 administration. These observations define a novel biological role for GLP-2 as an intestinal-derived peptide stimulator of small bowel epithelial proliferation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8755576

  16. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  17. A rapid in vitro screening for delivery of peptide-derived peptidase inhibitors as potential drug candidates via epithelial peptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Martin; Meyer, Antje; Theis, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Daniel, Hannelore

    2004-08-01

    Targeting drugs or prodrugs to a specific enzyme by simultaneously targeting cell membrane carriers for efficient transport should provide the highest bioavailability along with specificity at the site of action. The peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, including the brush-border membranes of epithelial cells of the small intestine and kidney. The transporters accept a wide range of substrates and are therefore good targets for a transporter-mediated drug delivery. Here, we report a screening procedure for peptidomimetic drug candidates combining two independent expression systems: 1) a competition assay in transgenic Pichia pastoris yeast cells expressing either mammalian PEPT1 or PEPT2 for identifying substrate interaction with the transporter binding site; and 2) a Xenopus laevis-based oocyte expression of the peptide transporter for assessing electrogenic transport of drug candidates. Based on the known oral availability and in vivo efficacy of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPIV) inhibitor isoleucine-thiazolidide and its peptide-like structure, we first tested whether this compound is a substrate of epithelial peptide transporters. Additionally, a series of structurally related inhibitors were analyzed for transport. We identified various compounds that serve as substrates of the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1. In contrast, none of these DPIV inhibitors showed electrogenic transport by PEPT2, although a variety of the compounds displayed good affinities for competition in peptide uptake in PEPT2-expressing cells, suggesting that they may serve as efficient inhibitors. In conclusion, we have applied an in vitro screening system that predicts efficient intestinal absorption of peptide-derived peptidase inhibitors via PEPT1 in vivo. PMID:15051798

  18. Electrogenic, proton-coupled, intestinal dipeptide transport in herbivorous and carnivorous teleosts.

    PubMed

    Thamotharan, M; Gomme, J; Zonno, V; Maffia, M; Storelli, C; Ahearn, G A

    1996-05-01

    In both herbivorous tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and carnivorous rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) intestinal and pyloric cecal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV), [14C]glycylsarcosine ([14C]Gly-Sar) uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient. A transmembrane K(+)-diffusion potential (inside negative) stimulated [14C]Gly-Sar uptake above that observed with short-circuited vesicles, whereas an inwardly directed Na+ gradient in both fishes had no effect on peptide uptake. In tilapia, [14C]Gly-Sar influx occurred by the combination of 1) a high-affinity, saturable, proton gradient-dependent carrier system [Kt [concentration that equals one-half of maximum influx (Jmax)] = 0.56 +/- 0.08 mM; Jmax = 1,945.0 +/- 174.6 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1]; 2) a low-affinity, nonsaturable (within 1-10 mM), proton gradient-dependent carrier system (nonsaturable carrier-mediated transport component = 4,514.0 +/- 28.1 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1); and 3) a diffusional component accounting for < 10% of total influx within the concentration range tested. Influx (10 s) of 1-10 mM [14C]Gly-Sar in tilapia intestine was significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited by 10 mM diethylpyrocarbonate, a specific inhibitor of proton-coupled peptide transport systems. [14C]Gly-Sar influx into tilapia BBMV showed cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation by Gly-Pro, suggesting that [14C]Gly-Sar and Gly-Pro shared the same mucosal peptide transporter in fish. These observations strongly suggest that intestinal transport of peptides in herbivorous and carnivorous fishes is proton gradient dependent, electrogenic, sodium independent, and qualitatively resembles the peptide transport paradigm proposed for mammals. PMID:8928924

  19. Expression of heteromeric amino acid transporters along the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Zecevic, Marija; Wagner, Carsten A; Verrey, Francois

    2004-07-15

    Members of the new heterodimeric amino acid transporter family are composed of two subunits, a catalytic multitransmembrane spanning protein (light chain) and a type II glycoprotein (heavy chain). These transporters function as exchangers and thereby extend the transmembrane amino acid transport selectivity to specific amino acids. The heavy chain rBAT associates with the light chain b degrees (,+)AT to form a cystine and cationic amino acid transporter. The other heavy chain, 4F2hc, can interact with seven different light chains to form various transporters corresponding to systems L, y(+)L, asc or x(-)(c). The importance of some of these transporters in intestinal and renal (re)absorption of amino acids is highlighted by the fact that mutations in either the rBAT or b degrees (,+)AT subunit result in cystinuria whereas a defect in the y(+)-LAT1 light chain causes lysinuric protein intolerance. Here we investigated the localization of these transporters in intestine since both diseases are also characterized by altered intestinal amino acid absorption. Real time PCR showed organ-specific expression patterns for all transporter subunit mRNAs along the intestine and Western blotting confirmed these findings on the protein level. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated basolateral coexpression of 4F2hc, LAT2 and y(+)-LAT1 in stomach and small intestine, whereas rBAT and b degrees (,+)AT were found colocalizing on the apical side of small intestine epithelium. In stomach, 4F2hc and LAT2 were localized in H(+)/K(+)-ATPase-expressing parietal cells. The abundant expression of several members of the heterodimeric transporter family along the murine small intestine suggests their involvement in amino acids absorption. Furthermore, strong expression of rBAT, b degrees (,+)AT and y(+)-LAT1 in the small intestine explains the reduced intestinal absorption of some amino acid in patients with cystinuria or lysinuric protein intolerance.

  20. Trefoil peptide gene expression in small intestinal Crohn's disease and dietary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Poulsom, R; Chinery, R; Sarraf, C; Van Noorden, S; Stamp, G W; Lalani, E N; Elia, G; Wright, N A

    1993-01-01

    We examined the patterns of trefoil peptide gene expression in the ulcer-associated cell lineage (UACL) and mucosa adjacent to Crohn's disease in humans and during gastrointestinal adaptation to enteral feeding in rats. In the UACL, human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP) mRNA and peptide are present in the acinar and proximal duct cells, whereas pS2 mRNA and peptide are found in the distal duct cells and in the surface cells. In mucosa adjacent to UACL, pS2 mRNA and peptide are expressed ectopically by goblet cells and neuroendocrine cells. Intestinal crypts associated with the UACL showed marked neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia. Ultrastructural immunolocalization showed pS2 to be copackaged in the mucous cell and neuroendocrine granules. The copackaging of a secretory protein in both mucous and neuroendocrine granules, which have different functions, is unusual and indicates an important role for pS2 in the secretory process itself or as a ligand delivered to its receptor via multiple routes. We also cloned the newest trefoil peptide, intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), from human and rat intestinal mucosa. Using in situ hybridization we demonstrated its synthesis by normal rat intestinal goblet cells. RNAse protection analysis revealed that the level of mRNA for rat ITF in small and large intestine was affected by the process of enteral feeding. We conclude that trefoil peptides are widely distributed in the intestine in human inflammatory bowel disease and are of considerable potential functional importance.

  1. Pharmacodynamics and toxicity of vasoactive intestinal peptide for intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Cao, De-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Ai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the nasal route for the delivery of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the brain and to evaluate the toxicity of VIP nasal spray. Mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with the aggregated Abeta25-35 to mimic Alzheimer's disease. Following administration, different groups of mice were treated over one week, and their spatial learning and memory capacities were evaluated by the Morris water maze test. The toxicity of VIP nasal spray was evaluated by examining the morphology of individual rat nasal mucosa cilia and the pathology of rat nasal mucosa. Rats receiving intranasal VIP (40 microg/ml) showed good spatial memory relative to the Abeta25-35 model group, but the escape latency did not show any statistically significant difference. Intranasal administration of VIP nasal spray (200 microg/ml) improved deficits in spatial memory to the point that test animals receiving intranasal VIP showed no statistically significant differences from the normal control group in escape latency. This indicated that the nasal spray method could increase the quantity of VIP entering the brain and protect the central nervous systems of mice. Toxicity evaluation showed that the preparation could cause minor irritation, which resolved spontaneously within a week at the end of treatment. In conclusion, VIP can be delivered successfully to the brain using the intranasal route. PMID:23444784

  2. Interactions between angiotensin peptides and the sympathetic nervous system mediating intestinal sodium and water absorption in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Levens, N R; Peach, M J; Carey, R M

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the locus of interaction of angiotensin peptides with the sympathetic nervous system leading to alterations in jejunal sodium and water transport. At low physiological doses, angiotensin II (AII) stimulates jejunal sodium and water absorption, while at high doses peptide inhibits absorption and/or stimulates secretion. Both the stimulation of jejunal transport and the inhibition of absorption were expressed in adrenalectomized rats. However, the stimulation of jejunal water absorption was abolished and a potentiated inhibition of transport was expressed in peripherally sympathectomized rats (intact adrenal medulla) and in normal rats after administration of guanethadine, phentolamine, and prazosin. The angiotensin analog (Sar1 Leu8)-AII has low efficacy and is a potent competitive antagonist of the parent peptide in pressor and myotropic systems, but is a full agonist with even greater potency than AII in stimulating jejunal transport. The increased water transport in response to (Sar1 Leu8)-AII is not secondary to enhanced renal renin release, as the analog also stimulated jejunal transport in the presence of captopril and after bilateral nephrectomy. The stimulation of absorption in response to (Sar1 Leu8)-AII alone or together with AII was abolished by phentolamine. These data demonstrate that AII-increased intestinal absorption is secondary to the release of norepinephrine from nerve endings in the jejunum and that AII inhibition of absorption is not mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. The analog (Sar1 Leu8)-AII is a full agonist in the stimulation of jejunal transport (increased norepinephrine release), but antagonizes the inhibitory response to high doses of AII. Angiotensin peptides are potent modulators of intestinal sodium and water absorption. PMID:7204574

  3. Intracellular transport of nanocarriers across the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Xia, Dengning; Zhu, Quanlei; Hu, Lei; Gan, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the main barrier restricting the oral delivery of low-permeability drugs. Over recent years, numerous nanocarriers have been designed to improve the efficiency of oral drug delivery. However, the intracellular processes determining the transport of nanocarriers across the intestinal epithelium remain elusive, and only limited enhancement of the oral bioavailability of drugs has been achieved. Here, we review the processes involved in nanocarrier trafficking across the intestinal epithelium, including apical endocytosis, intracellular transport, and basolateral exocytosis. Understanding the complex intracellular processes of nanocarrier trafficking is particularly essential for the rational design of oral drug delivery systems. PMID:27094490

  4. Inhibition of goby posterior intestinal NaCl absorption by natriuretic peptides and by cardiac extracts.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A

    1996-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides abolish active Na+ and Cl- absorption across the posterior intestine of the euryhaline goby Gillichthys mirabilis. Inhibition by eel and human natriuretic peptides is dose-dependent with the following sequence of potencies based on experimentally determined ID50 values for inhibition of short-circuit current: eel ventricular natriuretic peptide (78 nmol.l-1), eel atrial natriuretic peptide (156 nmol.l-1), human brain natriuretic peptide (326 nmol.l-1), human alpha atrial natriuretic peptide (1.05 mumol.l-1), and eel C-type natriuretic peptide (75 mumol.l-1). Natriuretic peptides also significantly increase transcellular conductance. The observed sequence of natriuretic peptide potencies is suggestive of cellular mediation by GC-A-type NP-R1 receptors in this tissue; as expected for guanylyl-cyclase-coupled NP-R1 receptors, cyclic GMP mimics the action of natriuretic peptides on the goby intestine. Crude aqueous extracts of goby atrium and ventricle inhibited short circuit current and increased tissue conductance in a dose-dependent manner. Ventricular extract was more potent than atrial extract on both a per organ and per milligram basis.

  5. Intestinal organoids for assessing nutrient transport, sensing and incretin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva; Haller, Dirk; Daniel, Hannelore

    2015-11-19

    Intestinal nutrient transport and sensing are of emerging interest in research on obesity and diabetes and as drug targets. Appropriate in vitro models are lacking that allow both, studies on transport processes as well as sensing and subsequent incretin hormone secretion including intracellular signaling. We here demonstrate that murine small-intestinal organoids are the first in vitro model system enabling concurrent investigations of nutrient and drug transport, sensing and incretin hormone secretion as well as fluorescent live-cell imaging of intracellular signaling processes. By generating organoid cultures from wild type mice and animals lacking different nutrient transporters, we show that organoids preserve the main phenotypic features and functional characteristics of the intestine. This turns them into the best in vitro model currently available and opens new avenues for basic as well as medical research.

  6. Intestinal organoids for assessing nutrient transport, sensing and incretin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva; Haller, Dirk; Daniel, Hannelore

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal nutrient transport and sensing are of emerging interest in research on obesity and diabetes and as drug targets. Appropriate in vitro models are lacking that allow both, studies on transport processes as well as sensing and subsequent incretin hormone secretion including intracellular signaling. We here demonstrate that murine small-intestinal organoids are the first in vitro model system enabling concurrent investigations of nutrient and drug transport, sensing and incretin hormone secretion as well as fluorescent live-cell imaging of intracellular signaling processes. By generating organoid cultures from wild type mice and animals lacking different nutrient transporters, we show that organoids preserve the main phenotypic features and functional characteristics of the intestine. This turns them into the best in vitro model currently available and opens new avenues for basic as well as medical research. PMID:26582215

  7. The mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model: application to the assessment of intestinal lymphatic drug transport.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-03-06

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained.

  8. Protein Mediators of Sterol Transport Across Intestinal Brush Border Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Yu, Liqing

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cholesterol balance contributes significantly to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), the leading cause of death in the United States. The intestine has the unique capability to act as a gatekeeper for entry of cholesterol into the body, and inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption is now widely regarded as an attractive non-statin therapeutic strategy for ASCVD prevention. In this chapter we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding sterol transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. The purpose of this work is to summarize substantial progress made in the last decade in regards to protein-mediated sterol trafficking, and to discuss this in the context of human disease. PMID:20213550

  9. Transepithelial transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated intestinal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Dallin A.

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown potential to carry poorly absorbed drugs across the intestinal barrier and into systemic circulation, reducing the need for intravenous injections. Much of the in vitro transepithelial transport of PAMAM dendrimers to date has been investigated using Caco-2 monolayers which lack the microvilli morphology and enzymes present in isolated intestinal tissues. In addition, a challenge in predicting oral absorption is establishing a correlation between transport across rodent and human intestinal tissues. This dissertation focused on investigating the transepithelial transport of PAMAM dendrimers across rat and human isolated intestinal tissues. Permeability values in isolated tissues were compared with those across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Results indicate a difference in transport of PAMAM dendrimers, morphological changes and transepithelial electrical resistance between Caco-2 cell monolayers, rat and human intestinal tissue models. A relatively high transport rate across the tissues, given the macromolecular nature of PAMAM dendrimers, shows promise for use of these constructs for oral delivery in human.

  10. RGD-containing peptides inhibit intestinal regeneration in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Serrano, Arelys; García-Arrarás, José E

    2004-09-01

    The sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima is an echinoderm capable of regenerating its viscera. Previous studies from our group have shown a striking remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) during intestinal regeneration. To study the role of the ECM during regeneration, we have focused on the RGD sequences present in many ECM molecules. Regenerating animals were treated with an RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide that competes with the interaction between RGD sequence and cellular integrins. Saline and RGES (Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser) peptide injections were done as controls. The size of the regenerating intestine was determined, and the regenerating structures were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the presence of collagen and fibronectin, as well as for muscle and other cells. The results show a delay in intestinal regeneration in animals injected with the RGDS peptide, suggesting that the ECM-integrin interaction plays an important function in the regenerative process.

  11. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-14

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na⁺/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca(2+) in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca(2+) channels, K⁺ channels, Na⁺/Ca(2+) exchangers, and Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes.

  12. Substrate specificity of allelic variants of the TAP peptide transporter.

    PubMed

    Heemels, M T; Ploegh, H L

    1994-12-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptides from the cytosol into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An important determinant for the specificity of translocation is the identity of the C-terminal residue of the peptide substrate. In the rat, a suitable C terminus is necessary but not always sufficient for a peptide to be selected for translocation. Here we show that sequence constraints within a peptide of optimal length (9 residues) may interfere with transport; that the transporter selectively translocates shorter derivatives of a 16-mer peptide rather than the 16-mer itself; and that the transporter cimb allele, which is most selective in the C termini it will tolerate, is more relaxed in peptide length preference than is the clma variant. PMID:7895166

  13. Substrate specificity of allelic variants of the TAP peptide transporter.

    PubMed

    Heemels, M T; Ploegh, H L

    1994-12-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptides from the cytosol into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An important determinant for the specificity of translocation is the identity of the C-terminal residue of the peptide substrate. In the rat, a suitable C terminus is necessary but not always sufficient for a peptide to be selected for translocation. Here we show that sequence constraints within a peptide of optimal length (9 residues) may interfere with transport; that the transporter selectively translocates shorter derivatives of a 16-mer peptide rather than the 16-mer itself; and that the transporter cimb allele, which is most selective in the C termini it will tolerate, is more relaxed in peptide length preference than is the clma variant.

  14. Evaluation of superporous hydrogel (SPH) and SPH composite in porcine intestine ex-vivo: assessment of drug transport, morphology effect, and mechanical fixation to intestinal wall.

    PubMed

    Dorkoosh, Farid A; Borchard, Gerrit; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Verhoef, J Coos; Junginger, Hans E

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of superporous hydrogel (SPH) and SPH composite (SPHC) polymers to enhance the transport of N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethylester (BAEE) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4400 (FD4) across porcine intestinal epithelium ex-vivo, and to study any possible morphological damage to the epithelium by applying these polymers. In addition, the ability of these polymers to attach to the gut wall by mechanical pressure was examined by using a specifically designed centrifuge model. The transport of BAEE and FD4 across the intestinal mucosa was enhanced 2- to 3-fold by applying SPHC polymer in comparison to negative control. No significant morphological damage was observed by applying these polymers inside the intestinal lumen. Moreover, the SPH and SPHC polymers were able to attach mechanically to the intestinal wall by swelling and did not move in the intestinal lumen even when a horizontal force of 13 gms(-2) was applied. In conclusion, these polymers are appropriate vehicles for enhancing the intestinal absorption of peptide and protein drugs.

  15. Transmembrane transport of peptide type compounds: prospects for oral delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipka, E.; Crison, J.; Amidon, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis and delivery of potential therapeutic peptides and peptidomimetic compounds has been the focus of intense research over the last 10 years. While it is widely recognized that numerous limitations apply to oral delivery of peptides, some of the limiting factors have been addressed and their mechanisms elucidated, which has lead to promising strategies. This article will briefly summarize the challenges, results and current approaches of oral peptide delivery and give some insight on future strategies. The barriers determining peptide bioavailability after oral administration are intestinal membrane permability, size limitations, intestinal and hepatic metabolism and in some cases solubility limitations. Poor membrane permeabilities of hydrophilic peptides might be overcome by structurally modifying the compounds, thus increasing their membrane partition characteristics and/or their affinity to carrier proteins. Another approach is the site-specific delivery of the peptide to the most permeable parts of the intestine. The current view on size limitation for oral drug delivery has neglected partition considerations. Recent studies suggest that compounds with a molecular weight up to 4000 might be significantly absorbed, assuming appropriate partition behavior and stability. Metabolism, probably the most significant factor in the absorption fate of peptides, might be controlled by coadministration of competitive enzyme inhibitors, structural modifications and administration of the compound as a well absorbed prodrug that is converted into the therapeutically active agent after its absorption. For some peptides poor solubility might present a limitation to oral absorption, an issue that has been addressed by mechanistically defining and therefore improving formulation parameters. Effective oral peptide delivery requires further development in understanding these complex mechanisms in order to maximize the therapeutic potential of this class of compounds.

  16. Intestinal glucose transport and salinity adaptation in a euryhaline teleost

    SciTech Connect

    Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    Glucose transport by upper and lower intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles of the African tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) was characterized in fish acclimated to either freshwater of full-strength sea water. D-(/sup 3/H)-glucose uptake by vesicles was stimulated by a transmembrane Na gradient, was electrogenic, and was enhanced by countertransport of either D-glucose or D-galactose. Glucose transport was greater in the upper intestine than in the lower intestine and in sea water animals rather than in fish acclimated to freshwater. Glucose influx (10-s uptake) involved both saturable and nonsaturable transport components. Sea water adaptation increased apparent glucose influx K/sub t/, J/sub max/, apparent diffusional permeability (P), and the apparent Na affinity of the cotransport system in both intestinal segments, but the stoichiometry of Na-glucose transfer (1:1) was unaffected by differential saline conditions or gut region. It is suggested that increased sugar transport in sea water animals is due to the combination of enhanced Na-binding properties and an increase in number or transfer rate of the transport proteins. Freshwater animals compensate for reduced Na affinity of the coupled process by markedly increasing the protein affinity for glucose.

  17. Intestinal Permeability and Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Children with Autism: A Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marli A.; Sigalet, David L.; Holst, Jens J.; Meddings, Jon B.; Wood, Julie; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to feeding. Results were compared with sibling controls…

  18. Heat Stress Reduces Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Favors Intestinal Glucose Transport in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L.; Johnson, Jay S.; Weber, Thomas E.; Ross, Jason W.; Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35–50% humidity; n = 8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24–43% humidity; n = 8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (P<0.05). As expected, HS decreased feed intake by 53% (P<0.05) and body weight (P<0.05) compared to TN pigs. Ileum heat shock protein 70 expression increased (P<0.05), while intestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; P<0.05). Furthermore, HS increased serum endotoxin concentrations (P = 0.05). Intestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (P<0.05) and casein kinase II-α (P = 0.06). Protein expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the ileum revealed claudin 3 and occludin expression to be increased overall due to HS (P<0.05), while there were no differences in claudin 1 expression. Intestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (P<0.05). This was supported by increased ileum Na+/K+ ATPase activity in HS pigs. SGLT-1 protein expression was unaltered; however, HS increased ileal GLUT-2 protein expression (P = 0.06). Altogether, these data indicate that HS reduce intestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport. PMID:23936392

  19. Heat stress reduces intestinal barrier integrity and favors intestinal glucose transport in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Sarah C; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Johnson, Jay S; Weber, Thomas E; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Gabler, Nicholas K

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35-50% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24-43% humidity; n=8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (P<0.05). As expected, HS decreased feed intake by 53% (P<0.05) and body weight (P<0.05) compared to TN pigs. Ileum heat shock protein 70 expression increased (P<0.05), while intestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; P<0.05). Furthermore, HS increased serum endotoxin concentrations (P=0.05). Intestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (P<0.05) and casein kinase II-α (P=0.06). Protein expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the ileum revealed claudin 3 and occludin expression to be increased overall due to HS (P<0.05), while there were no differences in claudin 1 expression. Intestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (P<0.05). This was supported by increased ileum Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity in HS pigs. SGLT-1 protein expression was unaltered; however, HS increased ileal GLUT-2 protein expression (P=0.06). Altogether, these data indicate that HS reduce intestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport.

  20. Analysis of glycylsarcosine transport by lobster intestine using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Maria L; Lane, Amy L; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography was used to measure transepithelial transport of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) by perfused lobster (Homarus americanus) intestine. Unidirectional and net fluxes of dipeptide across the tissue and luminal factors affecting their magnitude and direction were characterized by perfusing the lumen with the dipeptide and measuring its appearance in saline on the serosal side of the organ. Transmural transport of 10 mM Gly-Sar resulted in serosal accumulation of only the dipeptide; no appearance of corresponding monomeric amino acids glycine or sarcosine was observed. Carrier-mediated and diffusional transmural intestinal transport of Gly-Sar was estimated at 1-15 mM luminal concentrations and followed a curvilinear equation providing a K m = 0.44 ± 0.17 mM, a J max = 1.27 ± 0.12 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), and a diffusional coefficient = 0.026 ± 0.008 nmol cm(-2) min(-1) mM(-1). Unidirectional mucosal to serosal and serosal to mucosal fluxes of 10 mM Gly-Sar provided a significant (p < 0.05) net absorptive flux toward the serosa of 3.54 ± 0.77 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), further supporting carrier-mediated dipeptide transport across the gut. Alkaline (pH 8.5) luminal pH more than doubled transmural Gly-Sar transport as compared to acidic (pH 5.5) luminal pH, while luminal amino acid-metal chelates (e.g., Leu-Zn-Leu), and high concentrations of amino acids alone significantly (p < 0.001) reduced intestinal Gly-Sar transfer by inhibiting carrier transport of the dipeptide. Proposed mechanisms accounting for intestinal dipeptide transport and luminal factors affecting this process are discussed.

  1. Analysis of glycylsarcosine transport by lobster intestine using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Maria L; Lane, Amy L; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography was used to measure transepithelial transport of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) by perfused lobster (Homarus americanus) intestine. Unidirectional and net fluxes of dipeptide across the tissue and luminal factors affecting their magnitude and direction were characterized by perfusing the lumen with the dipeptide and measuring its appearance in saline on the serosal side of the organ. Transmural transport of 10 mM Gly-Sar resulted in serosal accumulation of only the dipeptide; no appearance of corresponding monomeric amino acids glycine or sarcosine was observed. Carrier-mediated and diffusional transmural intestinal transport of Gly-Sar was estimated at 1-15 mM luminal concentrations and followed a curvilinear equation providing a K m = 0.44 ± 0.17 mM, a J max = 1.27 ± 0.12 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), and a diffusional coefficient = 0.026 ± 0.008 nmol cm(-2) min(-1) mM(-1). Unidirectional mucosal to serosal and serosal to mucosal fluxes of 10 mM Gly-Sar provided a significant (p < 0.05) net absorptive flux toward the serosa of 3.54 ± 0.77 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), further supporting carrier-mediated dipeptide transport across the gut. Alkaline (pH 8.5) luminal pH more than doubled transmural Gly-Sar transport as compared to acidic (pH 5.5) luminal pH, while luminal amino acid-metal chelates (e.g., Leu-Zn-Leu), and high concentrations of amino acids alone significantly (p < 0.001) reduced intestinal Gly-Sar transfer by inhibiting carrier transport of the dipeptide. Proposed mechanisms accounting for intestinal dipeptide transport and luminal factors affecting this process are discussed. PMID:25260349

  2. Dietary and developmental regulation of intestinal sugar transport.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, R P

    2001-01-01

    The Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter SGLT1 and the facilitated fructose transporter GLUT5 absorb sugars from the intestinal lumen across the brush-border membrane into the cells. The activity of these transport systems is known to be regulated primarily by diet and development. The cloning of these transporters has led to a surge of studies on cellular mechanisms regulating intestinal sugar transport. However, the small intestine can be a difficult organ to study, because its cells are continuously differentiating along the villus, and because the function of absorptive cells depends on both their state of maturity and their location along the villus axis. In this review, I describe the typical patterns of regulation of transport activity by dietary carbohydrate, Na(+) and fibre, how these patterns are influenced by circadian rhythms, and how they vary in different species and during development. I then describe the molecular mechanisms underlying these regulatory patterns. The expression of these transporters is tightly linked to the villus architecture; hence, I also review the regulatory processes occurring along the crypt-villus axis. Regulation of glucose transport by diet may involve increased transcription of SGLT1 mainly in crypt cells. As cells migrate to the villus, the mRNA is degraded, and transporter proteins are then inserted into the membrane, leading to increases in glucose transport about a day after an increase in carbohydrate levels. In the SGLT1 model, transport activity in villus cells cannot be modulated by diet. In contrast, GLUT5 regulation by the diet seems to involve de novo synthesis of GLUT5 mRNA synthesis and protein in cells lining the villus, leading to increases in fructose transport a few hours after consumption of diets containing fructose. In the GLUT5 model, transport activity can be reprogrammed in mature enterocytes lining the villus column. Innovative experimental approaches are needed to increase our understanding of sugar

  3. Thermodynamic evidence for a dual transport mechanism in a POT peptide transporter.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joanne L; Mindell, Joseph A; Newstead, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Peptide transport plays an important role in cellular homeostasis as a key route for nitrogen acquisition in mammalian cells. PepT1 and PepT2, the mammalian proton coupled peptide transporters (POTs), function to assimilate and retain diet-derived peptides and play important roles in drug pharmacokinetics. A key characteristic of the POT family is the mechanism of peptide selectivity, with members able to recognise and transport >8000 different peptides. In this study, we present thermodynamic evidence that in the bacterial POT family transporter PepTSt, from Streptococcus thermophilus, at least two alternative transport mechanisms operate to move peptides into the cell. Whilst tri-peptides are transported with a proton:peptide stoichiometry of 3:1, di-peptides are co-transported with either 4 or 5 protons. This is the first thermodynamic study of proton:peptide stoichiometry in the POT family and reveals that secondary active transporters can evolve different coupling mechanisms to accommodate and transport chemically and physically diverse ligands across the membrane.

  4. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  5. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Strauss, Holger M; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate its influence on intestinal cell translocation and membrane interaction. We find that acylation drastically increases in vitro intestinal peptide flux and confers a transient permeability enhancing effect on the cell layer. The analogues permeabilize model lipid membranes, indicating that the effect is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain provides 6- or 9-fold increase in peptide translocation at pH 7.4 and 5.5, respectively. Prolonging the chain length appears to hamper translocation, possibly due to self-association or aggregation, although the long chain acylated analogues remain superior to the unacylated peptide. For K(18)-acylation a short chain provides a moderate improvement, whereas medium and long chain analogues are highly efficient, with a 12-fold increase in permeability compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, on par with currently employed oral permeation enhancers. For K(18)-acylation the medium chain acylation appears to be optimal, as elongating the chain causes greater binding to the cell membrane but similar permeability, and we speculate that increasing the chain length further may

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    PubMed Central

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille; Stoll, Barbara; Bering, Stine B.; Hartmann, Bolette; Jelsing, Jacob; Qvist, Niels; Burrin, Douglas G.; Jeppesen, Palle B.; Holst, Jens J.

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following intestinal resection in preterm pigs. Preterm pigs were fed enterally for 48 h before undergoing resection of 50% of the small intestine and establishment of a jejunostomy. Following resection, pigs were maintained on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) without (SBS, n = 8) or with GLP-2 treatment (3.5 μg/kg body wt per h, SBS+GLP-2, n = 7) and compared with a group of unresected preterm pigs (control, n = 5). After 5 days of TPN, all piglets were fed enterally for 24 h, and a nutrient balance study was performed. Intestinal resection was associated with markedly reduced endogenous GLP-2 levels. GLP-2 increased the relative absorption of wet weight (46 vs. 22%), energy (79 vs. 64%), and all macronutrients (all parameters P < 0.05). These findings were supported by a 200% increase in sucrase and maltase activities, a 50% increase in small intestinal epithelial volume (P < 0.05), as well as increased DNA and protein contents and increased total protein synthesis rate in SBS+GLP-2 vs. SBS pigs (+100%, P < 0.05). Following intestinal resection in preterm pigs, GLP-2 induced structural and functional adaptation, resulting in a higher relative absorption of fluid and macronutrients. GLP-2 treatment may be a promising therapy to enhance intestinal adaptation and improve digestive function in preterm infants with jejunostomy following intestinal resection. PMID:23764891

  7. Intestinal dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) transport mediated by the facilitative sugar transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT8.

    PubMed

    Corpe, Christopher P; Eck, Peter; Wang, Jin; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Levine, Mark

    2013-03-29

    Intestinal vitamin C (Asc) absorption was believed to be mediated by the Na(+)-dependent ascorbic acid transporter SVCT1. However, Asc transport across the intestines of SVCT1 knock-out mice is normal indicating that alternative ascorbic acid transport mechanisms exist. To investigate these mechanisms, rodents were gavaged with Asc or its oxidized form dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), and plasma Asc concentrations were measured. Asc concentrations doubled following DHA but not Asc gavage. We hypothesized that the transporters responsible were facilitated glucose transporters (GLUTs). Using Xenopus oocyte expression, we investigated whether facilitative glucose transporters GLUT2 and GLUT5-12 transported DHA. Only GLUT2 and GLUT8, known to be expressed in intestines, transported DHA with apparent transport affinities (Km) of 2.33 and 3.23 mm and maximal transport rates (Vmax) of 25.9 and 10.1 pmol/min/oocyte, respectively. Maximal rates for DHA transport mediated by GLUT2 and GLUT8 in oocytes were lower than maximal rates for 2-deoxy-d-glucose (Vmax of 224 and 32 pmol/min/oocyte for GLUT2 and GLUT8, respectively) and fructose (Vmax of 406 and 116 pmol/min/oocyte for GLUT2 and GLUT8, respectively). These findings may be explained by differences in the exofacial binding of substrates, as shown by inhibition studies with ethylidine glucose. DHA transport activity in GLUT2- and GLUT8-expressing oocytes was inhibited by glucose, fructose, and by the flavonoids phloretin and quercetin. These studies indicate intestinal DHA transport may be mediated by the facilitative sugar transporters GLUT2 and GLUT8. Furthermore, dietary sugars and flavonoids in fruits and vegetables may modulate Asc bioavailability via inhibition of small intestinal GLUT2 and GLUT8.

  8. Oxygen in the regulation of intestinal epithelial transport.

    PubMed

    Ward, Joseph B J; Keely, Simon J; Keely, Stephen J

    2014-06-15

    The transport of fluid, nutrients and electrolytes to and from the intestinal lumen is a primary function of epithelial cells. Normally, the intestine absorbs approximately 9 l of fluid and 1 kg of nutrients daily, driven by epithelial transport processes that consume large amounts of cellular energy and O2. The epithelium exists at the interface of the richly vascularised mucosa, and the anoxic luminal environment and this steep O2 gradient play a key role in determining the expression pattern of proteins involved in fluid, nutrient and electrolyte transport. However, the dynamic nature of the splanchnic circulation necessitates that the epithelium can evoke co-ordinated responses to fluctuations in O2 availability, which occur either as a part of the normal digestive process or as a consequence of several pathophysiological conditions. While it is known that hypoxia-responsive signals, such as reactive oxygen species, AMP-activated kinase, hypoxia-inducible factors, and prolyl hydroxylases are all important in regulating epithelial responses to altered O2 supply, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved is still limited. Here, we aim to review the current literature regarding the role that O2 plays in regulating intestinal transport processes and to highlight areas of research that still need to be addressed.

  9. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25999427

  10. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  11. Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montoudis, Alain; Delvin, Edgard; Menard, Daniel

    2006-01-06

    Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

  12. Characterization of the rabbit intestinal fructose transporter (GLUT5).

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, K; Tatsumi, S; Morimoto, A; Minami, H; Yamamoto, H; Sone, K; Taketani, Y; Nakabou, Y; Oka, T; Takeda, E

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the jejunal/kidney-type facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT5) functions as a high-affinity D-fructose transporter. However, its precise role in the small intestine is not clear. In an attempt to identify the fructose transporter in the small intestine, we measured fructose uptake in Xenopus oocytes expressing jejunal mRNA from five species (rat, mouse, rabbit, hamster and guinea-pig). Only jejunal mRNA from the rabbit significantly increased fructose uptake. We also cloned a rabbit GLUT5 cDNA from a jejunal library The predicted amino acid sequence of the 487-residue rabbit GLUT5 showed 72.3 and 67.1% identity with human and rat GLUT5 respectively. Northern-blot analysis revealed GLUT5 transcripts in rabbit duodenum, jejunum and, to a lesser extent, kidney. After separation of rabbit jejunal mRNA on a sucrose density gradient, the fractions that conferred D-fructose transport activity in oocytes also hybridized with rabbit GLUT5 cDNA. Hybrid depletion of jejunal mRNA with a GLUT5 antisense oligonucleotide markedly inhibited the mRNA-induced fructose uptake in oocytes. Immunoblot analysis indicated that GLUT5 (49 kDa) is located in the brush-border membrane of rabbit intestinal epithelial cells. Xenopus oocytes injected with rabbit GLUT5 cRNA exhibited fructose uptake activity with a Km of 11 mM for D-fructose. D-Fructose transport by GLUT5 was significantly inhibited by D-glucose and D-galactose. D-Fructose uptake in brush-border membrane vesicles shows a Km similar to that of GLUT5, but was not inhibited by D-glucose or D-galactose. Finally, cytochalasin B photolabelled a 49 kDa protein in rabbit brush-border-membrane preparations that was immunoprecipitated by antibodies to GLUT5. Our results suggest that GLUT5 functions as a fructose transporter in rabbit small intestine. However, biochemical properties of fructose transport in Xenopus oocytes injected with GLUT5 cRNA differed from those in rabbit jejunal vesicles. Images Figure 2

  13. Interferon-gamma released by gluten-stimulated celiac disease-specific intestinal T cells enhances the transepithelial flux of gluten peptides.

    PubMed

    Bethune, Michael T; Siegel, Matthew; Howles-Banerji, Samuel; Khosla, Chaitan

    2009-05-01

    Celiac sprue is a T-cell-mediated enteropathy elicited in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary gluten proteins. To initiate and propagate inflammation, proteolytically resistant gluten peptides must be translocated across the small intestinal epithelium and presented to DQ2-restricted T cells, but the effectors enabling this translocation under normal and inflammatory conditions are not well understood. We demonstrate that a fluorescently labeled antigenic 33-mer gluten peptide is translocated intact across a T84 cultured epithelial cell monolayer and that preincubation of the monolayer with media from gluten-stimulated, celiac patient-derived intestinal T cells enhances the apical-to-basolateral flux of this peptide in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The permeability-enhancing activity of activated T-cell media is inhibited by blocking antibodies against either interferon-gamma or its receptor and is recapitulated using recombinant interferon-gamma. At saturating levels of interferon-gamma, activated T-cell media does not further increase transepithelial peptide flux, indicating the primacy of interferon-gamma as an effector of increased epithelial permeability during inflammation. Reducing the assay temperature to 4 degrees C reverses the effect of interferon-gamma but does not reduce basal peptide flux occurring in the absence of interferon-gamma, suggesting active transcellular transport of intact peptides is increased during inflammation. A panel of disease-relevant gluten peptides exhibited an inverse correlation between size and transepithelial flux but no apparent sequence constraints. Anti-interferon-gamma therapy may mitigate the vicious cycle of gluten-induced interferon-gamma secretion and interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of gluten peptide flux but is unlikely to prevent translocation of gluten peptides in the absence of inflammatory conditions.

  14. Calcium glycerophosphate preserves transepithelial integrity in the Caco-2 model of intestinal transport

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Palika; Weis, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the direct effects of ischemia on intestinal epithelial integrity. Furthermore, clinical efforts at mitigating the effect of hypoperfusion on gut permeability have focused on restoring gut vascular function. METHODS: We report that, in the Caco-2 cell model of transepithelial transport, calcium glycerophosphate (CGP), an inhibitor of intestinal alkaline phosphatase F3, has a significant effect to preserve transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and to attenuate increases in mannitol flux rates during hypoxia or cytokine stimulation. RESULTS: The effect was observable even at concentrations as low as 1 μmol/L. As celiac disease is also marked by a loss of gut epithelial integrity, the effect of CGP to attenuate the effect of the α-gliadin peptide 31-55 was also examined. In this instance, CGP exerted little effect of preservation of TEER, but significantly attenuated peptide induced increase in mannitol flux. CONCLUSION: It appears that CGP treatment might synergize with other therapies to preserve gut epithelial integrity. PMID:26290632

  15. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: not just trefoil peptides.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios-F; Scopa, Chrisoula-D; Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki-N; Vagianos, Constantine-E

    2008-06-14

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials. PMID:18567096

  16. Growth of embryo and gene expression of nutrient transporters in the small intestine of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-xia; Li, Xiang-guang; Yang, Jun-xian; Gao, Chun-qi; Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiu-qi; Yan, Hui-chao

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between gene expression of nutrient (amino acid, peptide, sodium and proton) transporters in the small intestine and embryonic growth in domestic pigeons (Columba livia). One hundred and twenty-five fertilized eggs were randomly assigned into five groups and were incubated under optimal conditions (temperature of 38.1 °C and relative humidity of 55%). Twenty embryos/birds from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation on embryonic day (E) 9, 11, 13, 15 and day of hatch (DOH). The eggs, embryos (without yolk sac), and organs (head, brain, heart, liver, lungs, kidney, gizzard, small intestine, legs, and thorax) were dissected, cleaned, and weighed. Small intestine samples were collected for RNA isolation. The mRNA abundance of intestinal nutrient transporters was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We classified these ten organs into four types according to the changes in relative weight during embryonic development. In addition, the gene expression of nutrient transporters was differentially regulated by embryonic day. The mRNA abundances of b(0,+)AT, EAAT3, y(+)LAT2, PepT1, LAT4, NHE2, and NHE3 increased linearly with age, whereas mRNA abundances of CAT1, CAT2, LAT1, EAAT2, SNAT1, and SNAT2 were increased to higher levels on E9 or E11 and then decreased to lower levels until DOH. The results of correlation analysis showed that the gene expressions of b(0,+)AT, EAAT3, PepT1, LAT4, NHE2, NHE3, and y(+)LAT2 had positive correlations with body weight (0.71intestinal weight (0.80intestinal weight (-0

  17. Why Does the Intestine Lack Basolateral Efflux Transporters for Cationic Compounds? A Provocative Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, William R; Ming, Xin; Bourdet, David; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-02-01

    Transport proteins in intestinal epithelial cells facilitate absorption of nutrients/compounds that are organic anions, cations, and zwitterions. For two decades, we have studied intestinal absorption and transport of hydrophilic ionic compounds, with specific focus on transport properties of organic cations and their interactions with intestinal transporters and tight junction proteins. Our data reveal how complex interactions between a compound and transporters in intestinal apical/basolateral (BL) membranes and tight junction proteins define oral absorption, and that the BL membrane lacks an efflux transporter that can transport positively charged compounds. Based on our investigations of transport mechanisms of zwitterionic, anionic, and cationic compounds, we postulate that physicochemical properties of these ionic species, in relation to the intestinal micro pH environment, have exerted evolutionary pressure for development of transporters that can handle apical uptake/efflux of all 3 ionic species and BL efflux of anions and zwitterions, but such evolutionary pressure is lacking for development of a BL efflux transporter for cationic compounds. This review provides an overview of intestinal uptake/efflux transporters and describes our studies on intestinal transport of cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic drugs that led to hypothesize that there are no cation-selective BL efflux transporters in the intestine. PMID:26869413

  18. Intestinal expression of metal transporters in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłkowski, Adam; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Wawer, Adriana; Grygorowicz, Tomasz; Cybulska, Anna; Członkowska, Anna

    2013-12-01

    In Wilson's disease (WND), biallelic ATP7B gene mutation is responsible for pathological copper accumulation in the liver, brain and other organs. It has been proposed that copper transporter 1 (CTR1) and the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) translocate copper across the human intestinal epithelium, while Cu-ATPases: ATP7A and ATP7B serve as copper efflux pumps. In this study, we investigated the expression of CTR1, DMT1 and ATP7A in the intestines of both WND patients and healthy controls to examine whether any adaptive mechanisms to systemic copper overload function in the enterocytes. Duodenal biopsy samples were taken from 108 patients with Wilson's disease and from 90 controls. CTR1, DMT1, ATP7A and ATP7B expression was assessed by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Duodenal CTR1 mRNA and protein expression was decreased in WND patients in comparison to control subjects, while ATP7A mRNA and protein production was increased. The variable expression of copper transporters may serve as a defense mechanism against systemic copper overload resulting from functional impairment of ATP7B.

  19. Identification of intestinal ion transport defects in microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, Dmitri V; Ahsan, Md Kaimul; Kumari, Vandana; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Kumar, Anoop; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Ameen, Nadia A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of function mutations in the actin motor myosin Vb (Myo5b) lead to microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and death in newborns and children. MVID results in secretory diarrhea, brush border (BB) defects, villus atrophy, and microvillus inclusions (MVIs) in enterocytes. How loss of Myo5b results in increased stool loss of chloride (Cl(-)) and sodium (Na(+)) is unknown. The present study used Myo5b loss-of-function human MVID intestine, polarized intestinal cell models of secretory crypt (T84) and villus resembling (CaCo2BBe, C2BBe) enterocytes lacking Myo5b in conjunction with immunofluorescence confocal stimulated emission depletion (gSTED) imaging, immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, shRNA silencing, immunoblots, and electrophysiological approaches to examine the distribution, expression, and function of the major BB ion transporters NHE3 (Na(+)), CFTR (Cl(-)), and SLC26A3 (DRA) (Cl(-)/HCO3 (-)) that control intestinal fluid transport. We hypothesized that enterocyte maturation defects lead villus atrophy with immature secretory cryptlike enterocytes in the MVID epithelium. We investigated the role of Myo5b in enterocyte maturation. NHE3 and DRA localization and function were markedly reduced on the BB membrane of human MVID enterocytes and Myo5bKD C2BBe cells, while CFTR localization was preserved. Forskolin-stimulated CFTR ion transport in Myo5bKD T84 cells resembled that of control. Loss of Myo5b led to YAP1 nuclear retention, retarded enterocyte maturation, and a cryptlike phenotype. We conclude that preservation of functional CFTR in immature enterocytes, reduced functional expression of NHE3, and DRA contribute to Cl(-) and Na(+) stool loss in MVID diarrhea. PMID:27229121

  20. Short-term regulation of glycolysis by vasoactive intestinal peptide in epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, I; Monge, L; Feliu, J E

    1989-01-01

    In epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine, we have studied the influence of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neurotransmitter which markedly increases enterocyte cyclic AMP, and of two cyclic AMP analogues (8-bromo cyclic AMP and N6,2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP) on the rate of glycolysis, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate concentration and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity, as well as on the rate of 3-O-methyl-D-[14C]glucose uptake. Our results show that, without affecting the rate of 3-O-methyl-D-[14C]glucose accumulation, VIP and cyclic AMP analogues were able to inhibit glucose consumption and L-lactate formation by isolated rat enterocytes. These effects occurred parallel to a significant decrease in the cellular concentration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and to a partial inactivation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase. These findings support the hypothesis that VIP inhibits glycolysis in rat enterocytes through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:2552995

  1. Intestinal transport of hexoses in the rat following chronic heat exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1979-01-01

    The study examines intestinal transport of sugars (D-glucose and D-galactose) in vitro and assesses organ maintenance in chronically heat-exposed rats. The results suggest that the response of intestinal absorption to heat exposure in the rat involves changes in intestinal weight and in glucose utilization. Despite the reduction in total intestinal weight, the ability of intestinal tissue to transport hexose per unit weight remains stable. Differences in intestinal weight and glucose utilization between pair-fed and heat-exposed animals suggest that the intestinal response to chronic heat exposure is not solely a function of the amount of food consumed. Alterations of hexose transport appear to be related to altered glucose metabolism and not altered transport capacity.

  2. Phosphate transport by rat intestinal basolateral-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, F K; Kikuchi, K; Arab, N

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of phosphate transport across intestinal basolateral membranes of the rat were determined by using enriched preparations in which uphill Na+-dependent D-glucose transport could not be demonstrated, but ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport was present. Phosphate transport was saturable, Na+-dependent and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax. was 51.1 +/- 4.2 pmol/10 s per mg of protein and Km was 14 +/- 3.9 microM. The transport process was electroneutral. Tracer-exchange experiments and counter-transport studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-Pi carrier at the basolateral membrane. The presence of inside-positive membrane potential did not enhance phosphate uptake, indicating that the Na+ effect is secondary to the presence of the Na+-Pi carrier rather than an induction of positive membrane potential. The stoichiometry of this carrier at pH 7.4 was 2 Na+:1 phosphate, as shown by direct studies utilizing the static-head method. These studies are the first to determine the presence of a phosphate carrier at the basolateral membrane. PMID:3663094

  3. β-Casein(94-123)-derived peptides differently modulate production of mucins in intestinal goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Plaisancié, Pascale; Boutrou, Rachel; Estienne, Monique; Henry, Gwénaële; Jardin, Julien; Paquet, Armelle; Léonil, Joëlle

    2015-02-01

    We recently reported the identification of a peptide from yoghurts with promising potential for intestinal health: the sequence (94-123) of bovine β-casein. This peptide, composed of 30 amino acid residues, maintains intestinal homoeostasis through production of the secreted mucin MUC2 and of the transmembrane-associated mucin MUC4. Our study aimed to search for the minimal sequence responsible for the biological activity of β-CN(94-123) by using several strategies based on (i) known bioactive peptides encrypted in β-CN(94-123), (ii) in silico prediction of peptides reactivity and (iii) digestion of β-CN(94-123) by enzymes of intestinal brush border membranes. The revealed sequences were tested in vitro on human intestinal mucus-producing HT29-MTX cells. We demonstrated that β-CN(108-113) (an ACE-inhibitory peptide) and β-CN(114-119) (an opioid peptide named neocasomorphin-6) up-regulated MUC4 expression whereas levels of the secreted mucins MUC2 and MUC5AC remained unchanged. The digestion of β-CN(94-123) by intestinal enzymes showed that the peptides β-CN(94-108) and β-CN(117-123) were present throughout 1·5 to 3 h of digestion, respectively. These two peptides raised MUC5AC expression while β-CN(117-123) also induced a decrease in the level of MUC2 mRNA and protein. In addition, this inhibitory effect was reproduced in airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, β-CN(94-123) is a multifunctional molecule but only the sequence of 30 amino acids has a stimulating effect on the production of MUC2, a crucial factor of intestinal protection.

  4. Transepithelial transport of flavanone in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shoko; Konishi, Yutaka

    2008-03-28

    Our recent study [S. Kobayashi, S. Tanabe, M. Sugiyama, Y. Konishi, Transepithelial transport of hesperetin and hesperidin in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1778 (2008) 33-41] shows that the mechanism of absorption of hesperetin involves both proton-coupled active transport and transcellular passive diffusion. Here, as well as analyzing the cell permeability of hesperetin, we also study the transport of other flavanones, naringenin and eriodictyol, using Caco-2 cell monolayers. Similar to hesperetin mentioned, naringenin and eriodictyol showed proton-coupled polarized transport in apical-to-basolateral direction in non-saturable manner, constant permeation in the apical-to-basolateral direction (J{sub ap{yields}}{sub bl}) irrespective of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and preferable distribution into the basolateral side after apical loading in the presence of a proton gradient. Furthermore, the proton-coupled J{sub ap{yields}}{sub bl} of hesperetin, naringenin and eriodictyol, were inhibited by substrates of the monocarboxylic acid transporter (MCT), such as benzoic acid, but not by ferulic acid. In contrast, both benzoic and ferulic acids have no stimulatory effect on J{sub ap{yields}}{sub bl} of each flavanone by trans-stimulation analysis. These results indicates that proton-driven active transport is commonly participated in the absorption of flavanone in general, and that its transport is presumed to be unique other than MCT-mediated transport for absorption of phenolic acids (PAs), sodium-dependent MCT (SMCT) nor anion exchanger-mediated transport.

  5. Effects of composite antimicrobial peptides in weanling piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol: II. Intestinal morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Tan, B E; Wu, M M; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Yuan, D X; Li, L

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) affects animal and human health and targets the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of composite antimicrobial peptides (CAP) to repair intestinal injury in piglets challenged with DON. A total of 28 piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (7 pigs/treatment): negative control, basal diet (NC), basal diet + 0.4% composite antimicrobial peptide (CAP), basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON (DON), and basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON + 0.4% CAP (DON + CAP). After an adaptation period of 7 d, blood samples were collected on d 15 and 30 after the initiation of treatment for determinations of the concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase. At the end of the study, all piglets were slaughtered to obtain small intestines for the determination of intestinal morphology, epithelial cell proliferation, and protein expression in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The results showed that DON increased serum concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and these values in the CAP and DON + CAP treatments were less than those in the NC and DON treatments, respectively (P < 0.05). The villous height/crypt depth in the jejunum and ileum and the goblet cell number in the ileum in the CAP and DON + CAP treatments were greater than those in the NC and DON treatments (P < 0.05). The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum in the DON + CAP treatment were greater than those in the DON treatment (P < 0.05). The DON decreased (P < 0.05) the relative protein expression of phosphorylated Akt (Protein Kinase B) and mTOR in the jejunal and ileal mucosa and of phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1 (p-4EBP1) in the jejunal mucosa, whereas CAP increased (P < 0.05) the protein expression of p-4EBP1 in the jejunum. These findings showed that DON could enhance intestinal permeability, damage villi

  6. Amino acid transport in the intestine of the caiman.

    PubMed

    Coulson, R A; Hernandez, T

    1983-01-01

    Seventeen amino acids were fed singly to small caimans and the rates of their disappearance from the gut lumen, and of their appearance in intestinal mucosa, whole intestine, whole stomach, and plasma were determined. The results were compared with those in which massive amounts of protein were fed. When single amino acids were fed, only traces of arginine, ornithine, lysine, aspartate and asparagine were absorbed intact. Glycine, alanine and serine were absorbed rapidly reaching mucosal concentrations as high as 40 mM. The others were not concentrated as highly and most were absorbed by the mucosa more slowly than the glycine group. Protein feeding did not result in high amino acid concentrations in the mucosa. Whether amino acids were ingested as protein or in the free state, glycine, alanine and glutamine increased in the mucosa, suggesting these three incorporate nitrogen released from the others. It appeared that several transport systems operate if amino acids are given singly, and that a different more efficient transport system operates during protein digestion.

  7. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  8. Intracellular delivery of functional proteins via decoration with transporter peptides.

    PubMed

    Siprashvili, Zurab; Reuter, Jason A; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-05-01

    Despite numerous attractive intracellular targets, protein therapeutics have been principally confined to the extracellular space due to the lack of a straightforward way to deliver functional polypeptides to the cell interior. Peptide sequences facilitating intracellular protein delivery have been identified; however, current strategies to apply them require problematic steps, such as generation of new in-frame fusion proteins, covalent chemical conjugation, and denaturation. We have developed a new approach to protein transfer into cells and tissues that relies on single-step decoration by cysteine-flanked, arginine-rich transporter peptides. This approach facilitated cell and tissue delivery of a variety of functional proteins, including antibodies and enzymes. Decoration with transporter peptides thus provides an attractive general means of intracellular delivery of functional proteins in vitro and in tissue.

  9. Deficient Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Innervation in the Sweat Glands of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz-Erian, Peter; Dey, Richard D.; Flux, Marinus; Said, Sami I.

    1985-09-01

    The innervation of acini and ducts of eccrine sweat glands by immunoreactive, vasoactive intestinal peptide--containing nerve fibers was sharply reduced in seven patients with cystic fibrosis compared to eight normal subjects. The decrease in innervation by this neuropeptide, which has been shown to promote blood flow and the movement of water and chloride across epithelial surfaces in other systems, may be a basic mechanism for the decreased water content and relative impermeability of the epithelium to chloride and other ions that characterize cystic fibrosis.

  10. Characterization of vasoactive intestinal peptide pituitary membrane receptors in turkey hens during different stages of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; el Halawani, M E

    1993-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a prolactin-releasing factor in turkey hens. Membranes from anterior pituitaries of turkey hens were used to characterize VIP receptors. Using HPLC-purified monoiodinated VIP, we found specific VIP receptors in the anterior pituitary glands. Binding was saturable and was time- and temperature-dependent. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated two binding sites, a high-affinity binding site (Kd1) of 6.6 +/- 1.8 pM and maximum binding (Bmax1) of 1.52 +/- 0.2 pM, and a low-affinity binding site (Kd2) of 542 +/- 200 pM and Bmax2 of 15.8 +/- 8.0 pM. Binding of VIp to pituitary membranes was specific, as compared to other peptides of the glucagon family. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was chicken VIP > porcine VIP > peptide histidine isoleucine > secretin > glucagon > growth hormone-releasing factor. Two binding sites were found in all the examined reproductive stages. The lowest binding site levels were found in nonphotostimulated and photorefractory birds, followed by photostimulated birds and layers; highest levels were found in incubating birds. Nest deprivation significantly reduced Bmax1 levels without changing hypothalamic VIP content. These results suggest the involvement of the anterior pituitary VIP receptors in the regulation of prolactin secretion from the pituitary gland.

  11. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY SUBSTANCES ON INTESTINAL DRUG METABOLISM AND TRANSPORT

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2011-01-01

    Successful delivery of promising new chemical entities via the oral route is rife with challenges, some of which cannot be explained or foreseen during drug development. Further complicating an already multifaceted problem is the obvious, yet often overlooked, effect of dietary substances on drug disposition and response. Some dietary substances, particularly fruit juices, have been shown to inhibit biochemical processes in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK), and potentially pharmacodynamic (PD), outcomes. Inhibition of intestinal CYP3A-mediated metabolism is the major mechanism by which fruit juices, including grapefruit juice, enhances systemic exposure to new and already marketed drugs. Inhibition of intestinal non-CYP3A enzymes and apically-located transport proteins represent recently identified mechanisms that can alter PK and PD. Several fruit juices have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, but some interactions have not translated to the clinic. The lack of in vitro-in vivo concordance is due largely to a lack of rigorous methods to elucidate causative ingredients prior to clinical testing. Identification of specific components and underlying mechanisms is challenging, as dietary substances frequently contain multiple, often unknown, bioactive ingredients that vary in composition and bioactivity. A translational research approach, combining expertise from clinical pharmacologists and natural products chemists, is needed to develop robust models describing PK/PD relationships between a given dietary substance and drug of interest. Validation of these models through well-designed clinical trials would facilitate development of common practice guidelines for managing drug-dietary substance interactions appropriately. PMID:21189136

  12. Intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid in rats immunized with protein-sulfanilic acid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Kawaratani, T; Kawashima, K; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

    1990-07-01

    Intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid was examined by means of an in vitro everted sac technique in rats immunized with a bovine gamma-globulin-sulfanilic acid conjugate. At a low concentration of sulfanilic acid, the intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid was decreased in rats immunized with bovine gamma-globulin-sulfanilic acid conjugate. This phenomenon was dose dependent and antigen specific, since there was no difference in the transport of sulfanilic acid at a high concentration and of an unrelated hapten. These results suggested that parenteral immunization impaired not only the intestinal transport of macromolecular antigens, as previously shown, but also the transport of the low molecular weight hapten, sulfanilic acid.

  13. Functions of Ion Transport Peptide and Ion Transport Peptide-Like in the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ion transport peptide (ITP) and ITP-like (ITPL) are highly conserved neuropeptides in insects and crustaceans. We investigated the alternatively spliced variants of ITP/ITPL in Tribolium castaneum to understand their functions. We identified three alternatively spliced transcripts named itp, itpl-...

  14. Transport of nattokinase across the rat intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Misawa, S; Takeuchi, N; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-09-01

    Intraduodenal administration of nattokinase (NK) at a dose of 80 mg/kg, resulted in the degradation of fibrinogen in plasma suggesting transport of NK across the intestinal tract in normal rats. The action of NK on the cleavage of fibrinogen in the plasma from blood samples drawn at intervals after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis with an anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody. The 270 kDa fragment carrying antigenic sites for the binding of the anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody appeared within 0.5 h and was then degraded gradually to a 105 kDa fragment via a 200 kDa fragment. This suggests that fibrinogen was degraded to a 105 kDa fragment via several intermediates (270 and 200 kDa). In parallel with the degradation process, plasma recalcification times were remarkably prolonged NK was also detected in the plasma from blood samples drawn 3 and 5 h after administration of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis with an anti-NK antibody. The results indicate that NK is absorbed from the rat intestinal tract and that NK cleaves fibrinogen in plasma after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme.

  15. Intestinal transport of monosaccharides and amino acids during postnatal development of mink.

    PubMed

    Buddington, R K; Malo, C; Sangild, P T; Elnif, J

    2000-12-01

    Intestinal development is typically studied using omnivores. For comparative purposes, we examined an altricial carnivore, the mink (Mustela vison). In mink, intestinal dimensions increase up to 8 wk after birth and then remain constant (length) or decrease (mass) into maturity despite continuing gains in body mass. Rates of glucose and fructose transport decline after birth for intact tissues but increase for brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Rates of absorption for five amino acids that are substrates for the acidic (aspartate), basic (lysine), neutral (leucine and methionine), and imino acid (proline) carriers increase between birth and 24 h for intact tissues before declining, but increase after 2 wk for BBMV. The proportion of BBMV amino acid uptake that is Na(+)-dependent increases during development but for aspartate is nearly 100% at all ages. Tracer uptake by BBMV can be inhibited by 100 mmol/l of unlabeled amino acid, except for lysine. BBMV uptake of the dipeptide glycyl-sarcosine does not differ between ages, is not Na(+) dependent, and is only partially inhibited by 100 mmol/l unlabeled dipeptide. Despite the ability to rapidly and efficiently digest high dietary loads of protein, rates of amino acid and peptide absorption are not markedly higher than those of other mammals.

  16. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-10-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid-binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1.

  17. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L.; Zhang, Youcai

    2015-01-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein–coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non–12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid–binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non–12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1. PMID:26199423

  18. Effect of Dietary Lead on Intestinal Nutrient Transporters mRNA Expression in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Roohollah; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Liang, Juan Boo; Soleimani Farjam, Abdoreza; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Idrus, Zulkifli

    2015-01-01

    Lead- (Pb-) induced oxidative stress is known to suppress growth performance and feed efficiency in broiler chickens. In an attempt to describe the specific underlying mechanisms of such phenomenon we carried out the current study. Ninety-six one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 2 dietary treatment groups of 6 pen replicates, namely, (i) basal diet containing no lead supplement (control) and (ii) basal diet containing 200 mg lead acetate/kg of diet. Following 3 weeks of experimental period, jejunum samples were collected to examine the changes in gene expression of several nutrient transporters, antioxidant enzymes, and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that addition of lead significantly decreased feed intake, body weight gain, and feed efficiency. Moreover, with the exception of GLUT5, the expression of all sugar, peptide, and amino acid transporters was significantly downregulated in the birds under Pb induced oxidative stress. Exposure to Pb also upregulated the antioxidant enzymes gene expression together with the downregulation of glutathione S-transferase and Hsp70. In conclusion, it appears that Pb-induced oxidative stress adversely suppresses feed efficiency and growth performance in chicken and the possible underlying mechanism for such phenomenon is downregulation of major nutrient transporter genes in small intestine. PMID:25695048

  19. Neonatal androgenization increases vasoactive intestinal peptide levels in rat anterior pituitary: possible involvement of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the neonatal androgenization-induced hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, H; Sasaki, S; Takebe, K

    1991-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be a physiological PRL-releasing factor. In the present study, we examined a possible involvement of VIP in the neonatal androgenization (NA)-induced hyperprolactinemia. Twenty-four hours after birth, newborn female rats were injected sc with 1,000 micrograms of testosterone (NA) or with oil vehicle only (control). Both groups were sacrificed at 8 weeks of age. Compared to controls, NA rats showed significantly higher plasma PRL levels (7.3 fold), anterior pituitary (AP) PRL content (2.1 fold) and plasma estradiol levels (2.1 fold). AP VIP content was extremely higher (61 fold) in NA rats than in controls. However, NA did not affect VIP content in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus or median eminence. These results suggest that the NA-induced hyperprolactinemia may be mediated, at least in part, by paracrine and/or autocrine effects of the increased AP VIP on PRL secretion. However, since the potentiation by NA of the AP VIP content was extremely marked compared to those of the other parameters, the possibility was also raised that the increased AP VIP may be involved in other endocrine and/or nonendocrine events occurring in the AP. PMID:1802925

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-2 and mouse intestinal adaptation to a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Amato, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Rappa, Francesca; Mulè, Flavia

    2013-04-01

    Endogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP2) is a key mediator of refeeding-induced and resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth. This study investigated the potential role of GLP2 in mediating the mucosal responses to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD). In this view, the murine small intestine adaptive response to a HFD was analyzed and a possible involvement of endogenous GLP2 was verified using GLP2 (3-33) as GLP2 receptor (GLP2R) antagonist. In comparison with animals fed a standard diet, mice fed a HFD for 14 weeks exhibited an increase in crypt-villus mean height (duodenum, 27.5±3.0%; jejunum, 36.5±2.9%; P<0.01), in the cell number per villus (duodenum, 28.4±2.2%; jejunum, 32.0±2.9%; P<0.01), and in Ki67-positive cell number per crypt. No change in the percent of caspase-3-positive cell in the villus-crypt was observed. The chronic exposure to a HFD also caused a significant increase in GLP2 plasma levels and in GLP2R intestinal expression. Daily administration of GLP2 (3-33) (30-60  ng) for 4 weeks did not modify the crypt-villus height in control mice. In HFD-fed mice, chronic treatment with GLP2 (3-33) reduced the increase in crypt-villus height and in the cell number per villus through reduction of cell proliferation and increase in apoptosis. This study provides the first experimental evidence for a role of endogenous GLP2 in the intestinal adaptation to HFD in obese mice and for a dysregulation of the GLP2/GLP2R system after a prolonged HFD.

  1. Regulatory signals for intestinal amino acid transporters and peptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, R.P.; Kwan, W.W.; Diamond, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Dietary protein ultimately regulates many processes involved in protein digestion, but it is often unclear whether proteins themselves, peptides, or amino acids (AAs) are the proximate regulatory signal. Hence the authors compared several processes involved in protein digestion in mice adapted to one of three rations, identical except for containing 54% of either casein, a partial hydrolysate of casein, or a free AA mixture simulating a complete hydrolysate of casein. The authors measured brush-border uptakes of seven AAs that variously serve as substrates for four AA transporters, and brush-border and cytosolic activities of four peptidases. The three rations yielded essentially the same AA uptake rates. Peptidase activities tended to be lower on the AA ration than on the protein ration. In other studies, all three rations yielded the same rates of brush-border peptide uptake; protein is only modestly more effective than AAs at inducing synthesis of pancreatic proteases; and, depending on the animal species, protein is either much less or much more effective than AAs at stimulating release of cholecystokinin and hence of pancreatic enzymes. Thus the regulators of each process involved in protein digestion are not necessarily that process's substrate.

  2. A unified nomenclature of NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER family members in plants.

    PubMed

    Léran, Sophie; Varala, Kranthi; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Crawford, Nigel; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise; David, Laure; Dickstein, Rebecca; Fernandez, Emilio; Forde, Brian; Gassmann, Walter; Geiger, Dietmar; Gojon, Alain; Gong, Ji-Ming; Halkier, Barbara A; Harris, Jeanne M; Hedrich, Rainer; Limami, Anis M; Rentsch, Doris; Seo, Mitsunori; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Mingyong; Coruzzi, Gloria; Lacombe, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Members of the plant NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER (NRT1/PTR) family display protein sequence homology with the SLC15/PepT/PTR/POT family of peptide transporters in animals. In comparison to their animal and bacterial counterparts, these plant proteins transport a wide variety of substrates: nitrate, peptides, amino acids, dicarboxylates, glucosinolates, IAA, and ABA. The phylogenetic relationship of the members of the NRT1/PTR family in 31 fully sequenced plant genomes allowed the identification of unambiguous clades, defining eight subfamilies. The phylogenetic tree was used to determine a unified nomenclature of this family named NPF, for NRT1/PTR FAMILY. We propose that the members should be named accordingly: NPFX.Y, where X denotes the subfamily and Y the individual member within the species.

  3. Intestinal transport of zinc and folic acid: a mutual inhibitory effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ghishan, F.K.; Said, H.M.; Wilson, P.C.; Murrell, J.E.; Greene, H.L.

    1986-02-01

    Recent observations suggest an inverse relationship between folic acid intake and zinc nutriture and indicate an interaction between folic acid and zinc at the intestinal level. To define that interaction, we designed in vivo and in vitro transport studies in which folic acid transport in the presence of zinc, as well as zinc transport in the presence of folic acid was examined. These studies show that zinc transport is significantly decreased when folate is present in the intestinal lumen. Similarly folic acid transport is significantly decreased with the presence of zinc. To determine whether this intestinal inhibition is secondary to zinc and folate-forming complexes, charcoal-binding studies were performed. These studies indicate that zinc and folate from complexes at pH 2.0, but that at pH 6.0, these complexes dissolve. Therefore, our studies suggest that under normal physiological conditions a mutual inhibition between folate and zinc exists at the site of intestinal transport.

  4. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  5. Molecular identification and functional characteristics of peptide transporters in the bonnethead shark (Sphyrna tiburo).

    PubMed

    Hart, Hannah R; Evans, Andrew N; Gelsleichter, James; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    Elasmobranchs are considered to be top marine predators, and in general play important roles in the transfer of energy within marine ecosystems. Despite this, little is known regarding the physiological processes of digestion and nutrient absorption in these fishes. One topic that is particularly understudied is the process of nutrient uptake across the elasmobranch gastrointestinal tract. Given their carnivorous diet, the present study sought to expand knowledge on dietary nutrient uptake in elasmobranchs by focusing on the uptake of products of protein digestion. To accomplish this, a full-length cDNA encoding peptide transporter 1 (PepT1), a protein previously identified within the brush border membrane of vertebrates that is responsible for the translocation of peptides released during digestion by luminal and membrane-bound proteases, was isolated from the bonnethead shark (Sphyrna tiburo). A cDNA encoding the related peptide transporter PepT2 was also isolated from S. tiburo using the same methodology. The presence of PepT1 was then localized in multiple components of the bonnethead digestive tract (esophagus, stomach, duodenum, intestine, rectum, and pancreas) using immunohistochemistry. Vesicle studies were used to identify the apparent affinity of PepT1 and to quantify the rate of dipeptide uptake by its H(+)-dependent cotransporter properties. The results of this study provide insight into the properties of peptide uptake within the bonnethead gut, and can facilitate future work on physiological regulation of protein metabolism and absorption including how these processes may vary in elasmobranchs that exhibit different feeding strategies. PMID:27188191

  6. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve intestina...

  7. Distinct regulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) expression at mRNA and peptide levels in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agoston, D V; Colburn, S; Krajniak, K G; Waschek, J A

    1992-05-25

    Neuronal differentiation was induced in cultures of the human neuroblastoma cell line subclone SH-SY5Y by 14-day treatment with dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP), retinoic acid, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). An approximate 4-fold increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with retinoic acid, whereas no change in VIP mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with dBcAMP or PMA. A short-term treatment of cells with PMA did however result in a 5-fold transient increase in VIP mRNA; prior differentiation with retinoic acid or dBcAMP diminished this effect. Observed increases in VIP mRNA were in all cases accompanied by increases in VIP immunoreactivity. Remarkably, however, long-term treatment of cells with dBcAMP, which caused no change in mRNA levels, resulted in a six-fold increase in VIP immunoreactivity. Acute (36-h) treatment with carbachol also caused an increase in VIP immunoreactivity (about 2-fold, and blocked by atropine) without an increase in VIP mRNA level. Thus, a quantitative change in gene transcription or mRNA stability appears not to be a prerequisite for increased VIP expression, indicating that regulation can occur at translational or post-translational steps.

  8. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  9. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  10. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacks of Intestine of Mice: A Model for the Study of Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyrup-Olsen, Ingrith; Linder, Alison R.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a laboratory procedure which uses the small intestines of mice as models for the transport of glucose and other solutes. Demonstrations are suitable for either introductory or advanced physiology courses. (RE)

  11. Medicinal Plants Qua Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretagogue via Intestinal Nutrient Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) participates in glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. Because GLP-1 is rapidly inactivated by the enzymatic cleavage of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) long-acting GLP-1 analogues, for example, exenatide and DPP4 inhibitors, for example, liraglutide, have been developed as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the inefficient clinical performance and the incidence of side effects reported on the existing therapeutics for T2DM have led to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells. Since the GLP-1 secretion of enteroendocrine L cells depends on the luminal nutrient constituents, the intestinal nutrient sensors involved in GLP-1 secretion have been investigated. In particular, nutrient sensors for tastants, cannabinoids, and bile acids are able to recognize the nonnutritional chemical compounds, which are abundant in medicinal plants. These GLP-1 secretagogues derived from medicinal plants are easy to find in our surroundings, and their effectiveness has been demonstrated through traditional remedies. The finding of GLP-1 secretagogues is directly linked to understanding of the role of intestinal nutrient sensors and their recognizable nutrients. Concurrently, this study demonstrates the possibility of developing novel therapeutics for metabolic disorders such as T2DM and obesity using nutrients that are readily accessible in our surroundings. PMID:26788106

  12. Nutrient availability, the microbiome, and intestinal transport during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Astbury, Stuart; Mostyn, Alison; Symonds, Michael E; Bell, Rhonda C

    2015-11-01

    Adequate adaptation of the gastrointestinal tract is important during pregnancy to ensure that the increased metabolic demands by the developing fetus are met. These include changes in surface area mediated by villus hypertrophy and enhanced functional capacity of individual nutrient receptors, including those transporting glucose, fructose, leucine, and calcium. These processes are regulated either by the enhanced nutrient demand or are facilitated by changes in the secretion of pregnancy hormones. Our review also covers recent research into the microbiome, and how pregnancy could lead to microbial adaptations, which are beneficial to the mother, yet are also similar to those seen in the metabolic syndrome. The potential role of diet in modulating the microbiome during pregnancy, as well as the potential for the intestinal microbiota to induce pregnancy complications, are examined. Gaps in the current literature are highlighted, including those where only historical evidence is available, and we suggest areas that should be a priority for further research. In summary, although a significant degree of adaptation has been described, there are both well-established processes and more recent discoveries, such as changes within the maternal microbiome, that pose new questions as to how the gastrointestinal tract effectively adapts to pregnancy, especially in conjunction with maternal obesity.

  13. Ontogenetic development of transporter regulation in bullfrog intestine.

    PubMed

    Toloza, E M; Diamond, J M

    1990-05-01

    Intestinal nutrient transporter activity is adapted to dietary substrate levels on three time scales: reversibly, within an adult individual, to rapid dietary changes; developmentally, to normal ontogenetic changes in diet; and evolutionarily, among carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores, to a species' natural diet. Does the capacity for rapid reversible adaptation itself vary adaptively during development? Substrate-dependent regulation would make functional sense in herbivorous/omnivorous tadpoles in which dietary substrate levels fluctuate unpredictably, but would serve no purpose in strictly carnivorous adult bullfrogs in which dietary protein is always high and carbohydrate is low. Hence, we fed premetamorphosis bullfrog tadpoles either boiled lettuce (high in carbohydrate, low in protein) or ground beef (high in protein, low in carbohydrate). Gut weight relative to body weight was higher in lettuce-fed tadpoles. Glucose uptake was greater and proline uptake slightly less in lettuce-fed than in beef-fed tadpoles. The resultant ratio of glucose uptake capacity to proline uptake capacity was nearly twice as high in lettuce-fed as in beef-fed tadpoles, corresponding to a much higher ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein. Adult frogs have been shown to lack such regulation. Therefore, the regulatory capacity seen in tadpoles must become lost during amphibian metamorphosis.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes Inhibits Serotonin Transporter in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Latorre, E; Pradilla, A; Chueca, B; Pagán, R; Layunta, E; Alcalde, A I; Mesonero, J E

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause a serious infection. Intestinal microorganisms have been demonstrated to contribute to intestinal physiology not only through immunological responses but also by modulating the intestinal serotonergic system. Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that is synthesized in the intestinal epithelium and regulates the whole intestinal physiology. The serotonin transporter (SERT), located in enterocytes, controls intestinal 5-HT availability and therefore serotonin's effects. Infections caused by L. monocytogenes are well described as being due to the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells; however, the effect of L. monocytogenes on the intestinal epithelium remains unknown. The main aim of this work, therefore, was to study the effect of L. monocytogenes on SERT. Caco2/TC7 cell line was used as an enterocyte-like in vitro model, and SERT functional and molecular expression assays were performed. Our results demonstrate that living L. monocytogenes inhibits serotonin uptake by reducing SERT expression at the brush border membrane. However, neither inactivated L. monocytogenes nor soluble metabolites were able to affect SERT. The results also demonstrate that L. monocytogenes yields TLR2 and TLR10 transcriptional changes in intestinal epithelial cells and suggest that TLR10 is potentially involved in the inhibitory effect observed on SERT. Therefore, L. monocytogenes, through TLR10-mediated SERT inhibition, may induce increased intestinal serotonin availability and potentially contributing to intestinal physiological changes and the initiation of the inflammatory response.

  15. Listeria monocytogenes Inhibits Serotonin Transporter in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Latorre, E; Pradilla, A; Chueca, B; Pagán, R; Layunta, E; Alcalde, A I; Mesonero, J E

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause a serious infection. Intestinal microorganisms have been demonstrated to contribute to intestinal physiology not only through immunological responses but also by modulating the intestinal serotonergic system. Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that is synthesized in the intestinal epithelium and regulates the whole intestinal physiology. The serotonin transporter (SERT), located in enterocytes, controls intestinal 5-HT availability and therefore serotonin's effects. Infections caused by L. monocytogenes are well described as being due to the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells; however, the effect of L. monocytogenes on the intestinal epithelium remains unknown. The main aim of this work, therefore, was to study the effect of L. monocytogenes on SERT. Caco2/TC7 cell line was used as an enterocyte-like in vitro model, and SERT functional and molecular expression assays were performed. Our results demonstrate that living L. monocytogenes inhibits serotonin uptake by reducing SERT expression at the brush border membrane. However, neither inactivated L. monocytogenes nor soluble metabolites were able to affect SERT. The results also demonstrate that L. monocytogenes yields TLR2 and TLR10 transcriptional changes in intestinal epithelial cells and suggest that TLR10 is potentially involved in the inhibitory effect observed on SERT. Therefore, L. monocytogenes, through TLR10-mediated SERT inhibition, may induce increased intestinal serotonin availability and potentially contributing to intestinal physiological changes and the initiation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27488594

  16. Expression cloning and functional characterization of the kidney cortex high-affinity proton-coupled peptide transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Boll, M; Herget, M; Wagener, M; Weber, W M; Markovich, D; Biber, J; Clauss, W; Murer, H; Daniel, H

    1996-01-01

    The presence of a proton-coupled electrogenic high-affinity peptide transporter in the apical membrane of tubular cells has been demonstrated by microperfusion studies and by use of brush border membrane vesicles. The transporter mediates tubular uptake of filtered di- and tripeptides and aminocephalosporin antibiotics. We have used expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes for identification and characterization of the renal high-affinity peptide transporter. Injection of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from rabbit kidney cortex into oocytes resulted in expression of a pH-dependent transport activity for the aminocephalosporin antibiotic cefadroxil. After size fractionation of poly(A)+ RNA the transport activity was identified in the 3.0- to 5.0-kb fractions, which were used for construction of a cDNA library. The library was screened for expression of cefadroxil transport after injection of complementary RNA synthesized in vitro from different pools of clones. A single clone (rPepT2) was isolated that stimulated cefadroxil uptake into oocytes approximately 70-fold at a pH of 6.0. Kinetic analysis of cefadroxil uptake expressed by the transporter's complementary RNA showed a single saturable high-affinity transport system shared by dipeptides, tripeptides, and selected amino-beta-lactam antibiotics. Electrophysiological studies established that the transport activity is electrogenic and affected by membrane potential. Sequencing of the cDNA predicts a protein of 729 amino acids with 12 membrane-spanning domains. Although there is a significant amino acid sequence identity (47%) to the recently cloned peptide transporters from rabbit and human small intestine, the renal transporter shows distinct structural and functional differences. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8552623

  17. Disrupted reproduction, estrous cycle, and circadian rhythms in female mice deficient in vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed

    Loh, D H; Kuljis, D A; Azuma, L; Wu, Y; Truong, D; Wang, H B; Colwell, C S

    2014-10-01

    The female reproductive cycle is gated by the circadian timing system and may be vulnerable to disruptions in the circadian system. Prior work suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are one pathway by which the circadian clock can influence the estrous cycle, but the impact of the loss of this peptide on reproduction has not been assessed. In the present study, we first examine the impact of the genetic loss of the neuropeptide VIP on the reproductive success of female mice. Significantly, mutant females produce about half the offspring of their wild-type sisters even when mated to the same males. We also find that VIP-deficient females exhibit a disrupted estrous cycle; that is, ovulation occurs less frequently and results in the release of fewer oocytes compared with controls. Circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity are disrupted in the female mutant mice, as is the spontaneous electrical activity of dorsal SCN neurons. On a molecular level, the VIP-deficient SCN tissue exhibits lower amplitude oscillations with altered phase relationships between the SCN and peripheral oscillators as measured by PER2-driven bioluminescence. The simplest explanation of our data is that the loss of VIP results in a weakened SCN oscillator, which reduces the synchronization of the female circadian system. These results clarify one of the mechanisms by which disruption of the circadian system reduces female reproductive success.

  18. Antioxidant activity of vasoactive intestinal peptide in HK2 human renal cells.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Bajo, Ana M; Schally, Andrew V; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of tissue and cell injuries. The injury in chronic nephrotic syndrome, acute renal failure, myeloma kidney injury and other kidney diseases is initiated by oxidative stress. We have previously demonstrated that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) acts as an antiproliferative agent in renal cancer cells. This study was designed to evaluate the renoprotective activity of VIP against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in a proximal tubule kidney cell line (human, non-tumor, HK2 cells) in order to investigate the potential usefulness of this peptide in the treatment of oxidative-stress related kidney diseases. HK2 cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Propidium iodide was used to identify cells undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting was performed with anti-Bcl-2, anti-Bax and anti-formyl peptide receptor (low-affinity variant FPRL-1) monoclonal antibodies whereas 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used for measurement of levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). HK2 cells were injured with H(2)O(2) in order to induce apoptosis: the effect was time- and dose-dependent. VIP increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased those of the proapoptotic protein Bax. VIP decreased the intracellular ROS levels reached by H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. VIP effect on ROS levels involved FPLR-1 but not VPAC(1,2) receptors as evidenced by the use of the respective antagonists WRW4 and JV-1-53. Thus, VIP protects HK2 cells from apoptosis by increasing Bcl-2 levels and this effect is initiated through FPLR1 receptor. In conclusion, VIP might exert a renoprotective effect by the suppression of oxidative stress.

  19. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1.

  20. Marked changes in endogenous antioxidant expression precede vitamin A-, C-, and E-protectable, radiation-induced reductions in small intestinal nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Roche, Marjolaine; Kemp, Francis W; Agrawal, Amit; Attanasio, Alicia; Neti, Prasad V S V; Howell, Roger W; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly proliferating epithelial crypt cells of the small intestine are susceptible to radiation-induced oxidative stress, yet there is a dearth of data linking this stress to expression of antioxidant enzymes and to alterations in intestinal nutrient absorption. We previously showed that 5-14 days after acute γ-irradiation, intestinal sugar absorption decreased without change in antioxidant enzyme expression. In the present study, we measured antioxidant mRNA and protein expression in mouse intestines taken at early times postirradiation. Observed changes in antioxidant expression are characterized by a rapid decrease within 1h postirradiation, followed by dramatic upregulation within 4h and then downregulation a few days later. The cell type and location expressing the greatest changes in levels of the oxidative stress marker 4HNE and of antioxidant enzymes are, respectively, epithelial cells responsible for nutrient absorption and the crypt region comprising mainly undifferentiated cells. Consumption of a cocktail of antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E, before irradiation, prevents reductions in transport of intestinal sugars, amino acids, bile acids, and peptides. Ingestion of antioxidants may blunt radiation-induced decreases in nutrient transport, perhaps by reducing acute oxidative stress in crypt cells, thereby allowing the small intestine to retain its absorptive function when those cells migrate to the villus days after the insult.

  1. The influence of restricted feeding on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing cells in the chicken small intestine.

    PubMed

    Monir, M M; Hiramatsu, K; Yamasaki, A; Nishimura, K; Watanabe, T

    2014-04-01

    The influence of restricted feeding on the distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing endocrine cells in the chicken small intestine was investigated using immunohistochemical and morphometrical techniques. This study demonstrated that the restricted feeding had an influence on the activity of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the chicken small intestine. There were differences in the localization and the frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the small intestine between control and restricted groups, especially 25% feed supply group provided with 25% of the intake during the adapting period. GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the control chickens were mainly located in epithelium from crypts to the lower part of intestinal villi. Those in restricted groups, however, tended to be located from crypts to the middle part of intestinal villi. The frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells was lowest in the control group, medium in 50% feed supply group and highest in 25% feed supply group at each intestinal region examined in this study, that is, increased with the advancement of restricting the amount of feed supply. These data show that the quantity of food intake is one of signals that have an influence on the secretion of GLP-1 from L cells in the chicken small intestine.

  2. Intestinal transport of gentamicin with a novel, glycosteroid drug transport agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrod, H. R.; Kim, J. S.; Longley, C. B.; Lipka, E.; Amidon, G. L.; Kakarla, R.; Hui, Y. W.; Weber, S. J.; Choe, S.; Sofia, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective was to investigate the ability of a glycosteroid (TC002) to increase the oral bioavailability of gentamicin. METHODS: Admixtures of gentamicin and TC002 were administered to the rat ileum by injection and to dogs by ileal or jejunal externalized ports, or PO. Bioavailability of gentamicin was determined by HPLC. 3H-TC002 was injected via externalized cannulas into rat ileum or jejunum, or PO and its distribution and elimination was determined. The metabolism of TC002 in rats was evaluated by solid phase extraction and HPLC analysis of plasma, urine and feces following oral or intestinal administration. RESULTS: The bioavailability of gentamicin was substantially increased in the presence of TC002 in both rats and dogs. The level of absorption was dependent on the concentration of TC002 and site of administration. Greatest absorption occurred following ileal orjejunal administration. TC002 was significantly more efficacious than sodium taurocholate, but similar in cytotoxicity. TC002 remained primarily in the GI tract following oral or intestinal administration and cleared rapidly from the body. It was only partly metabolized in the GI tract, but was rapidly and completely converted to its metabolite in plasma and urine. CONCLUSIONS: TC002 shows promise as a new drug transport agent for promoting intestinal absorption of polar molecules such as gentamicin.

  3. Glucagon like peptide-2 induces intestinal restitution through VEGF release from subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Kerem; Pennartz, Christian; Felderbauer, Peter; Meier, Juris J; Banasch, Matthias; Bulut, Daniel; Schmitz, Frank; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Hoffmann, Peter

    2008-01-14

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) exerts intestinotrophic actions, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrated the expression of the GLP-2 receptor on fibroblasts located in the subepithelial tissue, where it might induce the release of growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, in the present studies we sought to elucidate the downstream mechanisms involved in improved intestinal adaptation by GLP-2. Human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co), human colonic cancer cells (Caco-2 cells) and rat ileum IEC-18 cells were used. GLP-2 receptor mRNA expression was determined using real time RT-PCR. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells were obtained following incubation with GLP-2 (50-250 nM) for 24 h. Cell viability was assessed by a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay, and wound healing was determined with an established migration-assay. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta), VEGF and KGF mRNA levels were determined by RT-PCR. Protein levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in CCD-18Co cells following GLP-2 stimulation were determined using ELISA. Neutralizing TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies were utilized to assess the role of TGF-beta and VEGF-A in the process of wound healing. GLP-2 receptor expression was detected in CCD-18Co cells. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells dose-dependently induced proliferation in Caco-2 cells, but not in IEC-18 cells. Conditioned media also enhanced cell migration in IEC-18 cells (P<0.01), while migration was even inhibited in Caco-2 cells (P<0.0012). GLP-2 significantly stimulated mRNA expression of VEGF and TGF-beta, but not of KGF in CCD-18Co. The migratory effects of GLP-2 were completely abolished in the presence of TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies. GLP-2 exerts differential effects on the epithelium of the small intestine and the colon. Thus, in small intestinal cells GLP-2 stimulates wound

  4. Modulation of epidermal growth factor effects on epithelial ion transport by intestinal trefoil factor.

    PubMed

    Chinery, R; Cox, H M

    1995-05-01

    1. The direct epithelial effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its modulation by intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) have been studied in a human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line called Colony-29 (Col-29). 2. When grown in culture as confluent monolayers and voltage-clamped in Ussing chambers, these epithelia responded with an increase in short circuit current (SCC) to basolateral as well as to apically applied EGF although the latter responses (at 10 nM) were only 25% of those observed following basolateral peptide. 3. Recombinant rat ITF (added to the basolateral surface) did not alter basal SCC levels, but it did enhance the electrogenic effects of basolateral EGF. The EC50 values for EGF-induced ion transport were 0.25 nM in control, and 0.26 nM in ITF pretreated Col-29 epithelia. A significant increase in the size of EGF responses (0.1 nM-10 nM) was observed in the presence of 10 nM ITF and the half-maximal concentration for this modulatory effect of ITF was 7.6 nM. 4. The EGF-induced increases in SCC were partially inhibited (50%) by piretanide pretreatment, indicating that Cl- secretion is involved. EGF responses either in the presence or absence of ITF were also significantly reduced (84% and 66% respectively) by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, piroxicam, therefore implicating prostaglandins as mediators of EGF-stimulated anion secretion. 5. We conclude that in confluent Col-29 epithelia, basolateral EGF stimulates a predominantly prostaglandin-dependent increase in Cl- secretion that is enhanced by basolateral ITF, and that these two peptides may interact in normal and damaged mucosa to alter the local apical solute and fluid environment.

  5. Clock genes, intestinal transport and plasma lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2009-05-01

    Light and food are two major environmental factors that impact daily life. Light entrainment is centrally controlled by suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Food entrainment might require cooperation between the intestine and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Clock genes that are essential for light entrainment also play a part in food entrainment. Understanding the role of clock genes in the entrainment of intestinal functions, as well as in gut-brain communication during food entrainment, will enhance our understanding of gastrointestinal and metabolic disorders. This review highlights recent studies examining light- and food-entrained regulation of plasma lipids and of various intestinal activities and offers insight into the role of the intestine in food entrainment. PMID:19349191

  6. Osmoregulation and epithelial water transport: lessons from the intestine of marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    For teleost fish living in seawater, drinking the surrounding medium is necessary to avoid dehydration. This is a key component of their osmoregulatory strategy presenting the challenge of excreting excess salts while achieving a net retention of water. The intestine has an established role in osmoregulation, and its ability to effectively absorb fluid is crucial to compensating for water losses to the hyperosmotic environment. Despite this, the potential for the teleost intestine to serve as a comparative model for detailed, integrative experimental studies on epithelial water transport has so far gone largely untapped. The following review aims to present an assessment of the teleost intestine as a fluid-transporting epithelium. Beginning with a brief overview of marine teleost osmoregulation, emphasis shifts to the processing of ingested seawater by the gastrointestinal tract and the characteristics of intestinal ion and fluid transport. Particular attention is given to acid-base transfers by the intestine, specifically bicarbonate secretion, which creates the distinctly alkaline gut fluids responsible for the formation of solid calcium carbonate precipitates. The respective contributions of these unique features to intestinal fluid absorption, alongside other recognised ion transport processes, are then subsequently considered within the wider context of the classic physiological problem of epithelial water transport. PMID:21735220

  7. Induction of aggregation of Raji human B-lymphoblastic cells by vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Robichon, A; Sreedharan, S P; Yang, J; Shames, R S; Gronroos, E C; Cheng, P P; Goetzl, E J

    1993-01-01

    Subsets of neurons in the thymic cortex, Peyer's patches and lymphoid tissues of the respiratory system deliver vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at nanomolar concentrations. The possible effects of VIP on B-cell adhesiveness in these tissues were examined in studies of the homotypic aggregation (HA) of human B-lymphoblastoid cells of the Raji line, which express a mean of 27,950 VIP receptors/cell with a mean Kd of 0.8 nM. Mean HA, assessed microscopically, attained a maximum of 54% after 8 hr with 0.1 microgram/ml of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (P < 0.01) and 31% after 24 hr with 10(-8) M VIP (P < 0.05), as contrasted with 13% and 20% at the respective times in medium alone, and both stimuli also increased the mean size of aggregates. The presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 permitted 10(-9) M VIP, which had no effect alone, to raise the mean cyclic AMP content of Raji cells by more than 10-fold and concurrently to elevate mean HA from 55% in medium alone at 48 hr to 70% and from 55% at 72 hr to 68% (P < 0.05 for both). Monoclonal antibodies to lymphocyte function-associated (LFA-1) adhesive protein and to intercellular adherence molecule-1 (ICAM-1) suppressed significantly the HA of Raji cells induced by VIP and PMA. The effects of VIP on compartmental immunity in the lungs and intestines thus may be mediated in part by increases in lymphocyte adhesiveness, which could contribute to the regional accumulation of specifically immunocompetent cells. Images Figure 2 PMID:8104888

  8. VIP and PHI coexist with an NPY-like peptide in intramural neurones of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, E; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1984-12-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are neuropeptides present in all layers of the small intestine. NPY-immunoreactive fibres in the gut seem to derive from two sources. One population is of extramural (sympathetic) origin and contains noradrenaline, another is of intramural origin and does not contain noradrenaline. In the present study of mouse, rat and pig, immunocytochemistry showed immunoreactive PHI to coexist completely with immunoreactive VIP. This was predictable, since VIP and PHI derive from the same precursor. In addition, however, VIP and PHI were found to coexist with immunoreactive NPY in non-adrenergic (but not in adrenergic) nerve fibres and nerve cell bodies. This coexistence was unexpected, since the VIP precursor does not contain NPY-like sequences.

  9. Application of an LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantification of human intestinal transporter proteins absolute abundance using a QconCAT technique.

    PubMed

    Harwood, M D; Achour, B; Russell, M R; Carlson, G L; Warhurst, G; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2015-06-10

    Transporter proteins expressed in the gastrointestinal tract play a major role in the oral absorption of some drugs, and their involvement may lead to drug-drug interaction (DDI) susceptibility when given in combination with drugs known to inhibit gut wall transporters. Anticipating such liabilities and predicting the magnitude of the impact of transporter proteins on oral drug absorption and DDIs requires quantification of their expression in human intestine, and linking these to data obtained through in vitro experiments. A quantitative targeted absolute proteomic method employing liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) together with a quantitative concatenation (QconCAT) strategy to provide proteotypic peptide standards has been applied to quantify ATP1A1 (sodium/potassium-ATPase; Na/K-ATPase), CDH17 (human peptide transporter 1; HPT1), ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein; P-gp), ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein; BCRP), ABCC2 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 2; MRP2) and SLC51A (Organic Solute Transporter subunit alpha; OST-α), in human distal jejunum (n=3) and distal ileum (n=1) enterocyte membranes. Previously developed selected reaction monitoring (SRM) schedules were optimised to enable quantification of the proteotypic peptides for each transporter. After harvesting enterocytes by calcium chelation elution and generating a total membrane fraction, the proteins were subjected to proteolytic digestion. To account for losses of peptides during the digestion procedure, a gravimetric method is also presented. The linearity of quantifying the QconCAT from an internal standard (correlation coefficient, R(2)=0.998) and quantification of all target peptides in a pooled intestinal quality control sample (R(2)≥ 0.980) was established. The assay was also assessed for within and between-day precision, demonstrating a <15% coefficient of variation for all peptides across 3 separate analytical runs, over 2 days. The methods were applied to

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-2 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baldassano, Sara; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Mei-Hu; Mulè, Flavia

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an important neuroendocrine peptide in intestinal physiology. It influences digestion, absorption, epithelial growth, motility, and blood flow. We studied involvement of GLP-2 in intestinal mucosal secretory behavior. Submucosal-mucosal preparations from guinea pig ileum were mounted in Ussing chambers for measurement of short-circuit current (Isc) as a surrogate for chloride secretion. GLP-2 action on neuronal release of acetylcholine was determined with ELISA. Enteric neuronal expression of the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) was studied with immunohistochemical methods. Application of GLP-2 (0.1–100 nM) to the serosal or mucosal side of the preparations evoked no change in baseline Isc and did not alter transepithelial ionic conductance. Transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS) evoked characteristic biphasic increases in Isc, with an initially rapid rising phase followed by a sustained phase. Application of GLP-2 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-2R antagonist GLP-2-(3-33) significantly reversed suppression of the EFS-evoked responses by GLP-2. Tetrodotoxin, scopolamine, and hexamethonium, but not vasoactive intestinal peptide type 1 receptor (VPAC1) antagonist abolished or reduced to near zero the EFS-evoked responses. GLP-2 suppressed EFS-evoked acetylcholine release as measured by ELISA. Pretreatment with GLP-2-(3-33) offset this action of GLP-2. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-2R immunoreactivity (-IR) was expressed in choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. We conclude that submucosal neurons in the guinea pig ileum express GLP-2R. Activation of GLP-2R decreases neuronally evoked epithelial chloride secretion by suppressing acetylcholine release from secretomotor neurons. PMID:19628655

  11. Effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 on Hepatic, Renal, and Intestinal Disposition of 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Silvina S. M.; Perdomo, Virginia G.; Ruiz, María L.; Rigalli, Juan P.; Arias, Agostina; Luquita, Marcelo G.; Vore, Mary; Catania, Viviana A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of the liver, small intestine, and kidney to synthesize and subsequently eliminate dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a substrate for multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), was assessed in rats treated with glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2, 12 μg/100 g b.wt. s.c. every 12 h for 5 consecutive days). An in vivo perfused jejunum model with simultaneous bile and urine collection was used. A single intravenous dose of 30 μmol/kg b.wt. 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was administered, and its conjugate, DNP-SG, and dinitrophenyl cysteinyl glycine (DNP-CG), resulting from the action of γ-glutamyltransferase on DNP-SG, were determined in bile, intestinal perfusate, and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography. Tissue content of DNP-SG was also assessed in liver, intestine, and kidneys. Biliary excretion of DNP-SG+DNP-CG was decreased in GLP-2 rats with respect to controls. In contrast, their intestinal excretion was substantially increased, whereas urinary elimination was not affected. Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies revealed preserved levels of Mrp2 protein and mRNA in liver and renal cortex and a significant increase in intestine in response to GLP-2 treatment. Tissue content of DNP-SG detected 5 min after CDNB administration was decreased in liver, increased in intestine, and unchanged in kidney in GLP-2 versus control group, consistent with GLP-2-induced down-regulation of expression of glutathione transferase (GST) Mu in liver and up-regulation of GST-Alpha in intestine at both protein and mRNA levels. In conclusion, GLP-2 induced selective changes in hepatic and intestinal disposition of a common GST and Mrp2 substrate administered systemically that could be of pharmacological or toxicological relevance under therapeutic treatment conditions. PMID:22453052

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2) and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets. PMID:25049952

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide administration after stroke in rats enhances neurogenesis and improves neurological function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shi, Qing-Dong; Yang, Yuan-Bo; Qian, Yi-Hua; Feng, Gai-Feng; Chang, Ling; Zong, Chang-Hong

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on neurogenesis and neurological function after cerebral ischemia. Rats were intracerebroventricular administered with VIP after a 2h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and sacrificed at 7, 14 and 28 days after MCAO. Functional outcome was studied with the modified neurological severity score. The infarct volume was evaluated via histology. Neurogenesis, angiogenesis and the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis, respectively. The treatment with VIP significantly reduced the neurological severity score and the infarc volume, and increased the numbers of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunoreactive cells and doublecortin immunoreactive area in the subventricular zone (SVZ) at 7, 14 and 28 days after ischemia. The cerebral protein levels of VEGF and VEGF expression in the SVZ were also enhanced in VIP-treated rats at 7 days after stroke. VIP treatment obviously increased the number of BrdU positive endothelial cells in the SVZ and density of cerebral microvessels in the ischemic boundary at 28 days after ischemia. Our study suggests that in the ischemic rat brain VIP reduces brain damage and promotes neurogenesis by increasing VEGF. VIP-enhanced neurogenesis is associated with angiogenesis. These changes may contribute to improvement in functional outcome.

  14. New formulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide using liposomes in hyaluronic acid gel for uveitis.

    PubMed

    Lajavardi, Laure; Camelo, Serge; Agnely, Florence; Luo, Wei; Goldenberg, Brigitte; Naud, Marie-Christine; Behar-Cohen, Francine; de Kozak, Yvonne; Bochot, Amélie

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the benefits of a novel formulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) based on the incorporation of VIP-loaded rhodamine-conjugated liposomes (VIP-Rh-Lip) within hyaluronic acid (HA) gel (Gel-VIP-Rh-Lip) for the treatment of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in comparison with VIP-Rh-Lip alone. In vitro release study and rheological analysis showed that interactions between HA chains and liposomes resulted in increased viscosity and reinforced elasticity of the gel. In vivo a single intravitreal injection of Gel-VIP-Rh-Lip was performed in rats 7 days prior to uveitis induction by subcutaneous lipopolysaccharide injection. The maximal ocular inflammation occurs within 16-24 h in controls (VIP-Rh-Lip, unloaded-Rh-Lip). Whereas intraocular injection of VIP-Rh-Lip had no effect on EIU severity compared with controls, Gel-VIP-Rh-Lip reduced significantly the clinical score and number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the eye. The fate of liposomes, VIP and HA in the eyes, regional and inguinal lymph nodes and spleen was analyzed by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy. Retention of liposomes by HA gel was observed in vitro and in vivo. Inflammation severity seemed to impact on system stability resulting in the delayed release of VIP. Thus, HA gel containing VIP-Rh-Lip is an efficient strategy to obtain a sustained delivery of VIP in ocular and lymph node tissues.

  15. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on vascular conductance are unaffected by anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bouder, T.G.; Huffman, L.J.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-12-01

    In rats anesthetized with ketamine and pentobarbital (KET/PB), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) increases vascular conductance (VC) in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, whereas no changes in VC are observed in a number of other organs. Because anesthesia may alter the responsiveness of physiological systems, we compared the effects of VIP on organ VC in conscious or anesthetized rats. Chronically catheterized rats were studied in the conscious state or 30 min after induction of anesthesia with KET/PB, isoflurane, or Inactin. Blood flows were measured by the reference sample version of the radioactive microsphere (MS) technique using two MS injections ({sup 141}Ce-MS/{sup 85}Sr-MS). Mean arterial blood pressure was monitored and used in the calculation of VC. Organ VCs were similar under basal conditions in conscious and anesthetized rats. VIP infusion caused systemic hypotension and increased VCs in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, and these responses were largely unaffected by anesthesia. These results indicate that the anesthetics used do not alter basal VC or the responsiveness of the vasculature to exogenous VIP.

  16. Extra-renal elimination of uric acid via intestinal efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Fujita, Takuya; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion accounts for two-thirds of total elimination of uric acid and the remainder is excreted in feces. However, the mechanism of extra-renal elimination is poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism and the extent of elimination of uric acid through liver and intestine using oxonate-treated rats and Caco-2 cells as a model of human intestinal epithelium. In oxonate-treated rats, significant amounts of externally administered and endogenous uric acid were recovered in the intestinal lumen, while biliary excretion was minimal. Accordingly, direct intestinal secretion was thought to be a substantial contributor to extra-renal elimination of uric acid. Since human efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2 accepts uric acid as a substrate and genetic polymorphism causing a decrease of BCRP activity is known to be associated with hyperuricemia and gout, the contribution of rBcrp to intestinal secretion was examined. rBcrp was confirmed to transport uric acid in a membrane vesicle study, and intestinal regional differences of expression of rBcrp mRNA were well correlated with uric acid secretory activity into the intestinal lumen. Bcrp1 knockout mice exhibited significantly decreased intestinal secretion and an increased plasma concentration of uric acid. Furthermore, a Bcrp inhibitor, elacridar, caused a decrease of intestinal secretion of uric acid. In Caco-2 cells, uric acid showed a polarized flux from the basolateral to apical side, and this flux was almost abolished in the presence of elacridar. These results demonstrate that BCRP contributes at least in part to the intestinal excretion of uric acid as extra-renal elimination pathway in humans and rats.

  17. Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) an intestinal sterol transporter.

    PubMed

    Davis, Harry R; Altmann, Scott W

    2009-07-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) has been identified and characterized as an essential protein in the intestinal cholesterol absorption process. NPC1L1 localizes to the brush border membrane of absorptive enterocytes in the small intestine. Intestinal expression of NPC1L1 is down regulated by diets containing high levels of cholesterol. While otherwise phenotypically normal, Npc1l1 null mice exhibit a significant reduction in the intestinal uptake and absorption of cholesterol and phytosterols. Characterization of the NPC1L1 pathway revealed that cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe specifically binds to an extracellular loop of NPC1L1 and inhibits its sterol transport function. Npc1l1 null mice are resistant to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, and when crossed with apo E null mice, are completely resistant to the development of atherosclerosis. Intestinal gene expression studies in Npc1l1 null mice indicated that no exogenous cholesterol was entering enterocytes lacking NPC1L1, which resulted in an upregulation of intestinal and hepatic LDL receptor and cholesterol biosynthetic gene expression. Polymorphisms in the human NPC1L1 gene have been found to influence cholesterol absorption and plasma low density lipoprotein levels. Therefore, NPC1L1 is a critical intestinal sterol uptake transporter which influences whole body cholesterol homeostasis.

  18. Role of the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporters in Bile Acid and Drug Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters expressed by the hepatocyte and enterocyte play critical roles in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, an effective recycling and conservation mechanism that largely restricts these potentially cytotoxic detergents to the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. In doing so, the hepatic and enterocyte transport systems ensure a continuous supply of bile acids to be used repeatedly during the digestion of multiple meals throughout the day. Absorption of bile acids from the intestinal lumen and export into the portal circulation is mediated by a series of transporters expressed on the enterocyte apical and basolateral membranes. The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter (abbreviated ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) is responsible for the initial uptake of bile acids across the enterocyte brush border membrane. The bile acids are then efficiently shuttled across the cell and exported across the basolateral membrane by the heteromeric Organic Solute Transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. This chapter briefly reviews the tissue expression, physiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and transport properties of the ASBT and OSTα-OSTα. In addition, the chapter discusses the relationship between the intestinal bile acid transporters and drug metabolism, including development of ASBT inhibitors as novel hypocholesterolemic or hepatoprotective agents, prodrug targeting of the ASBT to increase oral bioavailability, and involvement of the intestinal bile acid transporters in drug absorption and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21103970

  19. Green tea formulations with vitamin C and xylitol on enhanced intestinal transport of green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Sol; Lee, Sang-Jun; Chung, Jin-Oh; Oh, Yu-Jin; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2013-05-01

    The effect of green tea formulated with vitamin C and xylitol on intestinal cell transport of gallated and nongallated catechin was studied. The transport of catechins from both apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical directions was measured. The effect of vitamin C (4, 10, 20 ppm), xylitol (11, 27.5, 55 ppm), and combinations of both on the intestinal transport rate of catechins was examined. The efflux value (Pb→a/Pa→b) of (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-)-epicatechin (EC), and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) was 0.26, 0.22, 1.22, and 0.17, respectively, indicating that EC appeared to be less absorbed compared with other catechins. The addition of xylitol (11, 27.5, 55 ppm) and vitamin C (4, 10, 20 ppm) and in combination enhanced transport rate of nongallated catechins such as EC and EGC. For EC, vitamin C was revealed to be the most effective on intestinal transport, implying the inhibition of the efflux transport mechanism of EC. Intestinal transport of gallated catechins significantly increased from catechins formulated with vitamin C and xylitol in a dose-dependent manner compared to the catechin-only formulation. Results provide a potential strategy to enhance the delivery and bioavailability of catechins in humans by modulating green tea formulation with vitamin C and xylitol.

  20. Functional characterization of a putative disaccharide membrane transporter in crustacean intestine.

    PubMed

    Likely, Rasheda; Johnson, Eric; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    Transepithelial absorption of dietary sucrose in the American lobster, Homarus americanus, was investigated by mounting an intestine in a perfusion chamber to characterize mucosal to serosal (MS) (14)C-sucrose transport. These fluxes were measured by adding varying concentrations of (14)C-sucrose to the perfusate and monitoring their appearance in the bathing solution. Transepithelial (14)C-sucrose transport was the combination of a hyperbolic function of luminal concentration, following Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and apparent diffusion. The kinetic constants of the putative sucrose transporter were KM = 20.50 ± 6.00 µM and J max = 1.81 ± 0.50 pmol/cm(2) × min. Phloridzin, an inhibitor of Na(+)-dependent mucosal glucose transport, decreased MS (14)C-sucrose transport. Decreased MS (14)C-sucrose transport also occurred in the presence of luminal trehalose, a disaccharide containing D-glucose moieties. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) identified the chemical nature of radioactively labeled sugars in the bath following transepithelial transport. TLC revealed (14)C-sucrose was transported across the intestine largely intact with no (14)C-glucose or (14)C-fructose appearing in the serosal bath or luminal perfusate. Only 13% of bath radioactivity was volatile metabolites. Results suggest that disaccharide sugars can be transported intact across crustacean intestine and support the occurrence of a functional disaccharide membrane transporter. PMID:25416426

  1. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Meddings, Jon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The relationship between the enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and intestinal inflammation is unclear. GLP-2 promotes mucosal growth, decreases permeability and reduces inflammation in the intestine; physiological stimulation of GLP-2 release is triggered by nutrient contact. The authors hypothesized that ileal Crohn disease (CD) affects GLP-2 release. METHODS: With ethics board approval, pediatric patients hospitalized with CD were studied; controls were recruited from local schools. Inclusion criteria were endoscopy-confirmed CD (primarily of the small intestine) with a disease activity index >150. Fasting and post-prandial GLP-2 levels and quantitative urinary recovery of orally administered 3-O-methyl-glucose (active transport) and lactulose/mannitol (passive) were quantified during the acute and remission phases. RESULTS: Seven patients (mean [± SD] age 15.3±1.3 years) and 10 controls (10.3±1.6 years) were studied. In patients with active disease, fasting levels of GLP-2 remained stable but postprandial levels were reduced. Patients with active disease exhibited reduced glucose absorption and increased lactulose/mannitol recovery; all normalized with disease remission. The change in the lactulose/mannitol ratio was due to both reduced lactulose and increased mannitol absorption. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that pediatric patients with acute ileal CD have decreased postprandial GLP-2 release, reduced glucose absorption and increased intestinal permeability. Healing of CD resulted in normalization of postprandial GLP-2 release and mucosal functioning (nutrient absorption and permeability), the latter due to an increase in mucosal surface area. These findings have implications for the use of GLP-2 and feeding strategies as a therapy in CD patients; further studies of the effects of inflammation and the GLP-2 axis are recommended. PMID:24106731

  2. Modulation of chicken intestinal immune gene expression by small cationic peptides as feed additives during the first week posthatch.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Swaggerty, Christina L; Jiang, Yiwei

    2013-09-01

    We have been investigating modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host's immune system as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens by antibiotics. One such approach is the use of a group of small cationic peptides (BT) produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus. These peptides have immune modulatory properties that enhance both leukocyte functional efficiency and leukocyte proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA transcription activities in vitro. In addition, when provided as a feed additive for just 4 days posthatch, BT peptides significantly induce a concentration-dependent protection against cecal and extraintestinal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. In the present studies, we assessed the effects of feeding BT peptides on transcriptional changes on proinflammatory cytokines, inflammatory chemokines, and Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the ceca of broiler chickens with and without S. Enteritidis infection. After feeding a BT peptide-supplemented diet for the first 4 days posthatch, chickens were then challenged with S. Enteritidis, and intestinal gene expression was measured at 1 or 7 days postinfection (p.i.) (5 or 11 days of age). Intestinal expression of innate immune mRNA transcripts was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Analysis of relative mRNA expression showed that a BT peptide-supplemented diet did not directly induce the transcription of proinflammatory cytokine, inflammatory chemokine, type I/II interferon (IFN), or TLR mRNA in chicken cecum. However, feeding the BT peptide-supplemented diet primed cecal tissue for increased (P ≤ 0.05) transcription of TLR4, TLR15, and TLR21 upon infection with S. Enteritidis on days 1 and 7 p.i. Likewise, feeding the BT peptides primed the cecal tissue for increased transcription of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-18, type I and II IFNs) and inflammatory chemokine (CxCLi2

  3. Circadian regulation of cardiovascular function: a role for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Analyne; Loh, Dawn H.; Jordan, Maria C.; Roos, Kenneth P.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian system, driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), regulates properties of cardiovascular function. The dysfunction of this timing system can result in cardiac pathology. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is crucial for circadian rhythms in a number of biological processes including SCN electrical activity and wheel running behavior. Anatomic evidence indicates that SCN neurons expressing VIP are well positioned to drive circadian regulation of cardiac function through interactions with the autonomic centers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that loss of VIP would result in circadian deficits in heart rate (HR) and clock gene expression in cardiac tissue. We implanted radiotelemetry devices into VIP-deficient mice and wild-type (WT) controls and continuously recorded HR, body temperature, and cage activity in freely moving mice. Under light-dark conditions, VIP-deficient mice displayed weak rhythms in HR, body temperature, and cage activity, with onsets that were advanced in phase compared with WT mice. Similarly, clock gene expression in cardiac tissue was rhythmic but phase advanced in mutant mice. In constant darkness, the normal circadian rhythms in HR were lost in VIP-deficient mice; however, most mutant mice continued to exhibit circadian rhythms of body temperature with shortened free-running period. The loss of VIP altered, but did not abolish, autonomic regulation of HR. Analysis of the echocardiograms did not find any evidence for a loss of cardiac function in VIP-deficient mice, and the size of the hearts did not differ between genotypes. These results demonstrate that VIP is an important regulator of physiological circadian rhythmicity in the heart. PMID:20952671

  4. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on the wound healing of alkali-burned corneas

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Nese; Yildirim, Nilgun; Gurer, Firdevs; Basmak, Hikmet; Uzuner, Kubilay; Sahinturk, Varol; Gursoy, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on wound healing in experimental alkali burns of the cornea. METHODS Twenty-seven albino rabbits, weighing 3.2±0.75 kg were used. Alkali burns were induced on corneas by applying 10 mm Whatman paper No:50 soaked in 1 mol/L NaOH. They have further classified into 5 groups as follows: 1) control group given no treatment (n=5); 2) VIP given subconjunctivally (n=6); 3) VIP injected into anterior chamber (n=6); 4) NaCl 0.9% given subconjunctivally (n=5); 5) NaCl 0.9% given into the anterior chamber (n=5). All treatment protocols except control group were followed by topical eye drops composed of VIP at two hourly intervals for one week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. RESULTS VIP treated groups of rabbits with alkali burns were found to have better wound healing findings histo-pathologically when compared to those of control group who have received no treatment on day 30. No differences were observed between groups in respect to degree of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) infiltration and degree of loss of amorphous substrate on day 15. However, PMNL infiltration and degree of loss of amorphous substrate were lower in Groups 2 and 3 when compared to that of control group on day 30 (P<0.05). CONCLUSION We have shown that VIP has positive effects on alkali induced corneal burns. VIP may inhibit PMNL migration to cornea through an immunomodulatory effect. Inhibition of PMNL migration might reduce the release of collagenases and this might prevent the extracellular amorphous substance loss. PMID:26949636

  5. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Excites GnRH Neurons in Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Piet, Richard; Dunckley, Henry; Lee, Kiho; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-09-01

    A variety of external and internal factors modulate the activity of GnRH neurons to control fertility in mammals. A direct, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated input to GnRH neurons originating from the suprachiasmatic nucleus is thought to relay circadian information within this network. In the present study, we examined the effects of VIP on GnRH neuron activity in male and female mice at different stages of the estrous cycle. We carried out cell-attached recordings in slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice and calcium imaging in slices from a mouse line expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 selectively in GnRH neurons. We show that 50%-80% of GnRH neurons increase their firing rate in response to bath-applied VIP (1nM-1000nM) in both male and female mice and that this is accompanied by a robust increase in intracellular calcium concentrations. This effect is mediated directly at the GnRH neuron likely through activation of high-affinity VIP receptors. Because suprachiasmatic nucleus-derived timing cues trigger the preovulatory surge only on the afternoon of proestrus in female mice, we examined the effects of VIP during the estrous cycle at different times of day. VIP responsiveness in GnRH neurons did not vary significantly in diestrous and proestrous mice before or around the time of the expected preovulatory surge. These results indicate that the majority of GnRH neurons in male and female mice express functional VIP receptors and that the effects of VIP on GnRH neurons do not alter across the estrous cycle. PMID:27501185

  6. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  7. Gender-dependent association of type 2 diabetes with the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Paladini, Fabiana; Adinolfi, Valerio; Cocco, Elisa; Ciociola, Ester; Tamburrano, Giulia; Cascino, Isabella; Lucantoni, Federica; Morano, Susanna; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2012-02-10

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by an inadequate pancreatic beta-cell response to the progressive insulin resistance. Its pathogenesis is complex and has been connected with a state of preclinical chronic inflammation. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and its receptors play a relevant role in the homeostasis of insulin secretion as well as in the control of inflammation. In particular, VIP receptor 1 (VPAC1) has been found to be down-modulated during inflammation, and to be associated with several diseases. The objective of this study was to compare the distribution of SNPs mapping in the VIP receptor 1 gene in cases with type 2 diabetes and matched controls. Seven hundred cases with type 2 diabetes (423 males and 277 females) and 830 random controls (419 males and 411 females) were analyzed for the distribution of three common SNPs mapping in the VPAC1 gene. The results show a significantly different genotype distribution of the SNP rs9677 in the 3'-UTR of VPAC1 in female cases with type 2 diabetes compared to gender-matched controls (ptrend=6×10(-4)). The rs9677 CC genotype confers the highest risk (OR: 2.1) and correlates with worse clinical parameters such as higher level of total cholesterol, higher LDL/HDL ratio and a higher HbA1c concentration. The genetic association reported here indicates that VIP/VPAC1 signaling can be a relevant pathway in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in females suggesting that at least some aspects of the genetic predisposition to this disease can be gender-specific.

  8. Generation of highly selective VPAC2 receptor agonists by high throughput mutagenesis of vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Yung, Stephanie L; Dela Cruz, Fernando; Hamren, Sarah; Zhu, Jian; Tsutsumi, Manami; Bloom, James W; Caudle, Margaret; Roczniak, Steve; Todd, Tracey; Lemoine, Lynn; MacDougall, Margit; Shanafelt, Armen B; Pan, Clark Q

    2003-03-21

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) has a specific receptor PAC1 and shares two receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VPAC2 activation enhances glucose-induced insulin release while VPAC1 activation elevates glucose output. To generate a large pool of VPAC2 selective agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, structure-activity relationship studies were performed on PACAP, VIP, and a VPAC2 selective VIP analog. Chemical modifications on this analog that prevent recombinant expression were sequentially removed to show that a recombinant peptide would retain VPAC2 selectivity. An efficient recombinant expression system was then developed to produce and screen hundreds of mutant peptides. The 11 mutations found on the VIP analog were systematically replaced with VIP or PACAP sequences. Three of these mutations, V19A, L27K, and N28K, were sufficient to provide most of the VPAC2 selectivity. C-terminal extension with the KRY sequence from PACAP38 led to potent VPAC2 agonists with improved selectivity (100-1000-fold). Saturation mutagenesis at positions 19, 27, 29, and 30 of VIP and charge-scanning mutagenesis of PACAP27 generated additional VPAC2 selective agonists. We have generated the first set of recombinant VPAC2 selective agonists described, which exhibit activity profiles that suggest therapeutic utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  9. Cargo Delivery into the Brain by in vivo identified Transport Peptides.

    PubMed

    Urich, Eduard; Schmucki, Roland; Ruderisch, Nadine; Kitas, Eric; Certa, Ulrich; Jacobsen, Helmut; Schweitzer, Christophe; Bergadano, Alessandra; Ebeling, Martin; Loetscher, Hansruedi; Freskgård, Per-Ola

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier prevent access of biotherapeutics to their targets in the central nervous system and therefore prohibit the effective treatment of neurological disorders. In an attempt to discover novel brain transport vectors in vivo, we injected a T7 phage peptide library and continuously collected blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using a cisterna magna cannulated conscious rat model. Specific phage clones were highly enriched in the CSF after four rounds of selection. Validation of individual peptide candidates showed CSF enrichments of greater than 1000-fold. The biological activity of peptide-mediated delivery to the brain was confirmed using a BACE1 peptide inhibitor linked to an identified novel transport peptide which led to a 40% reduction of Amyloid-β in CSF. These results indicate that the peptides identified by the in vivo phage selection approach could be useful transporters for systemically administrated large molecules into the brain with therapeutic benefits.

  10. Review. The mammalian proton-coupled peptide cotransporter PepT1: sitting on the transporter-channel fence?

    PubMed

    Meredith, David

    2009-01-27

    The proton-coupled di- and tripeptide transporter PepT1 (SLC15a1) is the major route by which dietary nitrogen is taken up from the small intestine, as well as being the route of entry for important therapeutic (pro)drugs such as the beta-lactam antibiotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and antiviral and anti-cancer agents. PepT1 is a member of the major facilitator superfamily of 12 transmembrane domain transporter proteins. Expression studies in Xenopus laevis on rabbit PepT1 that had undergone site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved arginine residue (arginine282 in transmembrane domain 7) to a glutamate revealed that this residue played a role in the coupling of proton and peptide transport and prevented the movement of non-coupled ions during the transporter cycle. Mutations of arginine282 to other non-positive residues did not uncouple proton-peptide cotransport, but did allow additional ion movements when substrate was added. By contrast, mutations to positive residues appeared to function the same as wild-type. These findings are discussed in relation to the functional role that arginine282 may play in the way PepT1 operates, together with structural information from the homology model of PepT1 based on the Escherichia coli lactose permease crystal structure.

  11. In vitro study of transporters involved in intestinal absorption of inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Marta; Barrios, Julio A; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta

    2012-02-20

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) [As(III)+As(V)] is a drinking water contaminant, and human exposure to these arsenic species has been linked with a wide range of health effects. The main path of exposure is the oral route, and the intestinal epithelium is the first physiological barrier that iAs must cross in order to be absorbed. However, there is a lack of information about intestinal iAs absorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of certain transporters [glucose transporters (GLUT and SGLT), organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), aquaporins (AQPs), and phosphate transporters (NaPi and PiT)] in intestinal absorption of As(V) and As(III), using the Caco-2 cell line as a model of the intestinal epithelium. For this purpose, the effects of chemical inhibition and gene silencing of the transporters of interest on iAs uptake were evaluated, and also the differential expression of these transporters after treatment with iAs. The results show that chemical inhibition using rifamycin SV (OATP inhibitor), phloridzin (SGLT inhibitor), phloretin (GLUT and AQP inhibitor), and copper sulfate (AQP inhibitor) leads to a significant reduction in the apparent permeability and cellular retention of As(III). RT-qPCR indicates up-regulation of GLUT2, GLUT5, OATPB, AQP3, and AQP10 after exposure to As(III), while exposure to As(V) increases the expression of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, especially NaPiIIb. Gene silencing of OATPB, AQP10, and GLUT5 for As(III) and NaPiIIb for As(V) significantly reduces uptake of the inorganic forms. These results indicate that these transporters may be involved in intestinal absorption of iAs.

  12. Comparative cation dependency of sugar transport by crustacean hepatopancreas and intestine.

    PubMed

    Duka, Ada; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is transported in crustacean hepatopancreas and intestine by Na(+)-dependent co-transport, while Na(+)-dependent D-fructose influx has only been described for the hepatopancreas. It is still unclear if the two sugars are independently transported by two distinct cation-dependent co-transporter carrier systems. In this study, lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used to characterize, in detail, the cation-dependency of both D-[(3)H]-glucose and D-[(3)H]-fructose influxes, while in vitro perfused intestines were employed to determine the nature of cation-dependent sugar transport across this organ. Over the sodium concentration range of 0-100 mM, both [(3)H]-glucose and [(3)H]-fructose influxes (0.1 mM; 1 min uptakes) by hepatopancreatic BBMV were hyperbolic functions of [Na(+)]. [(3)H]-glucose and [(3)H]-fructose influxes by hepatopancreatic BBMV over a potassium concentration range of 15-100 mM were hyperbolic functions of [K(+)]. Both sugars displayed significant (p<0.01) Na(+)/K(+)-dependent and cation-independent uptake processes. Transepithelial 25 µM [(3)H]-glucose and [(3)H]-fructose fluxes across lobster intestine over luminal sodium and potassium concentration ranges of 0-50 mM and 5-100 mM, respectively, were hyperbolic functions of luminal [Na(+)] and [K(+)]. As with hepatopancreatic sugar transport, transepithelial intestinal sugar transport exhibited both significant (p<0.01) Na(+)/K(+)-dependent and cation-independent processes. Results suggest that both D-glucose and D-fructose are transported by a single SGLT-type carrier in each organ with sodium being the "preferred", high affinity, cation for both sugars in the hepatopancreas, and potassium being the "preferred", high affinity, cation for both sugars in the intestine. PMID:24950971

  13. Inhibition of sodium intestinal transport and mucosal (Na+-K+)-ATPase in experimental Fanconi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wapnir, R A; Exeni, R A; McVicar, M; De Rosas, R J; Lifshitz, F

    1975-11-01

    The administration of 1.5 or 9.0 mmoles/kg ip of maleate to rats induced, in addition to renal alterations similar to those occurring in the Fanconi syndrome, a decline in the intestinal mucosa (Na+-K+)-ATPase with a simultaneous decrease in sodium intestinal transport and an increase in potassium absorption. Further differences in the behavior of the two electrolytes were observed when the concentration of sodium in the perfusates was altered. No changes occurred in amino acid or glucose transport in experimental animals.

  14. Effects of phorbol esters on fluid transport and blood flow in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoeqvist, A.; Henderson, L.S.; Fondacaro, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of phorbol esters on intestinal fluid transport and blood flow in the anesthetized cat and enteropooling in the conscious rat. Intraluminal administration of phorbol ester into a segment of isolated small bowel produced a copious intestinal secretion and a concomitant mesenteric hyperemia in the cat. Net fluid movement in the intestine was converted from absorption in the control state to secretion following phorbol ester administration. Intravenous atropine reduced the phorbol ester-induced secretion by 56%; clonidine abolished the remaining secretory response. In the rat, intragastric administration of phorbol ester produced enteropooling comparable to that of other potent intestinal secretagogues. Since phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, these suggest that activation of protein kinase C in the small intestine may lead to a full secretory response. The evidence suggests that this secretion is accompanied by a metabolic hyperemia. These results suggest that protein kinase C plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport.

  15. Sustained glucagon-like peptide-2 infusion is required for intestinal adaptation, and cessation reverses increased cellularity in rats with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Chen, Xueyan; Holst, Jens J.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived hormone that is a proposed treatment for human short bowel syndrome (SBS). The objective was to determine how the timing, duration, and cessation of GLP-2 administration affect intestinal adaptation and enterocyte kinetics in a rat model of human SBS that results in intestinal failure requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Rats underwent 60% jejunoileal resection plus cecectomy and jugular vein cannulation and were maintained exclusively with TPN for 18 days in these treatments: TPN control (no GLP-2); sustained GLP-2 (1–18 days); early GLP-2 (1–7 days, killed at 7 or 18 days); and delayed GLP-2 (12–18 days). Body weight gain was similar across groups, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was significantly increased with coinfusion of GLP-2 (100 μg·kg−1·day−1) with TPN. GLP-2-treated rats showed significant increases in duodenum and jejunum mucosal dry mass, protein, DNA, and sucrase activity compared with TPN control. The increased jejunum cellularity reflected significantly decreased apoptosis and increased crypt mitosis and crypt fission due to GLP-2. When GLP-2 infusion stopped at 7 days, these effects were reversed at 18 days. Sustained GLP-2 infusion significantly increased duodenum length and decreased 18-day mortality to 0% from 37.5% deaths in TPN control (P = 0.08). Colon proglucagon expression quantified by real-time RT-qPCR was increased in TPN controls and attenuated by GLP-2 infusion; jejunal expression of the GLP-2 receptor did not differ among groups. In summary, early, sustained GLP-2 infusion reduces mortality, induces crypt fission, and is required for intestinal adaptation, whereas cessation of GLP-2 reverses gains in mucosal cellularity in a rat model of intestinal failure. PMID:20864657

  16. Dietary regulation of intestinal brush-border sugar and amino acid transport in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Buddington, R K; Chen, J W; Diamond, J M

    1991-10-01

    The ability of omnivores and herbivores to regulate reversibly their intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters is functionally related to the unpredictably variable composition of their natural diets. To determine whether carnivores are able similarly to regulate the activities of their intestinal nutrient transporters, we fed to three species of vertebrates that are carnivorous as adults (cats, mink, and leopard frogs) diets with either at least 50% digestible carbohydrate or with negligible carbohydrate levels. Rates of transport for the sugars glucose and fructose and the amino acids (AAs) aspartate, leucine, lysine, and proline were measured throughout the intestine (only proline and glucose in the frogs) by an in vitro everted-sleeve method. Although all three species consume much carbohydrate during early development, only the mink was able to regulate sugar transporter activity in response to changes in levels of dietary carbohydrate. In contrast, the sugar transporters of the cat were unresponsive to varying carbohydrate levels, and long-term feeding of a high-carbohydrate diet caused down-regulation of sugar transport in frogs. Of the three species, only the mink is a member of a family that includes omnivorous species, whereas all members of the families to which the cat and frog belong are carnivorous as adults. All three species were able to regulate rates of AA transport, though the patterns and magnitude of the responses differed between species as well as between AAs, suggesting independent regulation of some AA transporters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  18. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  19. The glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor is expressed in enteric neurons and not in the epithelium of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jens; Pedersen, Nis B; Brix, Sophie W; Grunddal, Kaare Villum; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hartmann, Bolette; Ørskov, Cathrine; Poulsen, Steen S; Holst, Jens J

    2015-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential in the treatment of intestinal deficiencies. It has recently been approved for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. The effects of GLP-2 are mediated by specific binding of the hormone to the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) which was cloned in 1999. However, consensus about the exact receptor localization in the intestine has never been established. By physical, chemical and enzymatic tissue fragmentation, we were able to divide rat jejunum into different compartments consisting of: (1) epithelium alone, (2) mucosa with lamina propria and epithelium, (3) the external muscle coat including myenteric plexus, (4) a compartment enriched for the myenteric plexus and (5) intestine without epithelium. Expression of Glp2r; chromogranin A; tubulin, beta 3; actin, gamma 2, smooth muscle, enteric and glial fibrillary acidic protein in these isolated tissue fractions was quantified with qRT-PCR. Expression of the Glp2r was confined to compartments containing enteric neurons and receptor expression was absent in the epithelium. Our findings provide evidence for the expression of the GLP-2R in intestinal compartments rich in enteric neurons and, importantly they exclude significant expression in the epithelium of rat jejunal mucosa.

  20. Effects of waterborne Cu exposure on intestinal copper transport and lipid metabolism of Synechogobius hasta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Luo, Zhi; Chen, Guang-Hui; Shi, Xi; Liu, Xu; Song, Yu-Feng; Pan, Ya-Xiong

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the effects of waterborne Cu exposure on intestinal Cu transport and lipid metabolism of Synechogobius hasta. S. hasta were exposed to 0, 0.4721 and 0.9442μM Cu, respectively. Sampling occurred on days 0, 21 and 42, respectively. Growth performance, intestinal lipid deposition, Cu content, and activities and mRNA expression of enzymes and genes involved in Cu transport and lipid metabolism were analyzed. Cu exposure decreased WG and SGR on days 21 and 42. Cu exposure increased intestinal Cu and lipid contents. Increased Cu accumulation was attributable to increased enzymatic activities (Cu-ATPase and Cu, Zn-SOD) and genes' (CTR1, CTR2, DMT1, ATP7a, ATP7b, MT1 and MT2) expression involved in Cu transport. Waterborne Cu exposure also increased activities of lipogenic enzymes (6PGD and ICDH on both days 21 and 42, ME on day 42), up-regulated mRNA levels of lipogenic genes (G6PD, 6PGD, ME, ICDH, FAS and ACCa), lipolytic genes (ACCb, CPT I and HSLa) and genes involved in intestinal fatty acid uptake (IFABP and FATP4) on both days 21 and 42. The up-regulation of lipolysis may result from the increased metabolic expenditure for detoxification and maintenance of the normal body functions in a response to Cu exposure. Meantime, Cu exposure increased lipogenesis and fatty acid uptake, leading to net lipid accumulation in the intestine despite increased lipolysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report involved in intestinal lipid metabolism in combination with intestinal Cu absorption following waterborne Cu exposure, which provides new insights and evidence into Cu toxicity in fish. PMID:27509383

  1. Characterization of a transport activity for long-chain peptides in barley mesophyll vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Magali Schnell; Abele, Rupert; Nagy, Réka; Grotemeyer, Marianne Suter; Tampé, Robert; Rentsch, Doris; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-04-01

    The plant vacuole is the largest compartment in a fully expanded plant cell. While only very limited metabolic activity can be observed within the vacuole, the majority of the hydrolytic activities, including proteolytic activities reside in this organelle. Since it is assumed that protein degradation by the proteasome results in the production of peptides with a size of 3-30 amino acids, we were interested to show whether the tonoplast exhibits a transport activity, which could deliver these peptides into the vacuole for final degradation. It is shown here that isolated barley mesophyll vacuoles take up peptides of 9-27 amino acids in a strictly ATP-dependent manner. Uptake is inhibited by vanadate, but not by NH(+)(4), while GTP could partially substitute for ATP. The apparent affinity for the 9 amino acid peptide was 15 μM, suggesting that peptides are efficiently transferred to the vacuole in vivo. Inhibition experiments showed that peptides with a chain length below 10 amino acids did not compete as efficiently as longer peptides for the uptake of the 9 amino acid peptide. Our results suggest that vacuoles contain at least one peptide transporter that belongs to the ABC-type transporters, which efficiently exports long-chain peptides from the cytosol into the vacuole for final degradation.

  2. Aboral changes in D-glucose transport by human intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Bluett, M K; Abumrad, N N; Arab, N; Ghishan, F K

    1986-01-01

    D-Glucose transport was investigated in isolated brush-border membrane vesicles from human small intestine. Characteristics of D-glucose transport from the jejunum were compared with that in the mid and terminal ileum. Jejunal and mid-ileal D-glucose transport was Na+-dependent and electrogenic. The transient overshoot of jejunal D-glucose transport was significantly greater than corresponding values in mid-ileum. The terminal ileum did not exhibit Na+-dependent D-glucose transport, but did exhibit Na+-dependent taurocholate transport. Na+-glucose co-transport activity as measured by tracer-exchange experiments was greatest in the jejunum, and diminished aborally. We conclude that D-glucose transport in man is Na+-dependent and electrogenic in the proximal intestine and directly related to the activity of D-glucose-Na+ transporters present in the brush-border membranes. D-Glucose transport in the terminal ileum resembles colonic transport of D-glucose. PMID:3800877

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Wang, Guo-Du; Mulè, Flavia; Wood, Jackie D

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts at the G protein-coupled receptor, GLP-1R, to stimulate secretion of insulin and to inhibit secretion of glucagon and gastric acid. Involvement in mucosal secretory physiology has received negligible attention. We aimed to study involvement of GLP-1 in mucosal chloride secretion in the small intestine. Ussing chamber methods, in concert with transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS), were used to study actions on neurogenic chloride secretion. ELISA was used to study GLP-1R effects on neural release of acetylcholine (ACh). Intramural localization of GLP-1R was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Application of GLP-1 to serosal or mucosal sides of flat-sheet preparations in Ussing chambers did not change baseline short-circuit current (I(sc)), which served as a marker for chloride secretion. Transmural EFS evoked neurally mediated biphasic increases in I(sc) that had an initial spike-like rising phase followed by a sustained plateau-like phase. Blockade of the EFS-evoked responses by tetrodotoxin indicated that the responses were neurally mediated. Application of GLP-1 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) suppressed this action of GLP-1. The GLP-1 inhibitory action on EFS-evoked responses persisted in the presence of nicotinic or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor antagonists but not in the presence of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. GLP-1 significantly reduced EFS-evoked ACh release. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-1R immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. Our results suggest that GLP-1R is expressed in guinea pig submucosal neurons and that its activation leads to a decrease in neurally evoked chloride secretion by suppressing release of ACh at neuroepithelial junctions in the enteric neural networks

  4. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Beale, John H; Parker, Joanne L; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W; Newstead, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26320580

  5. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport

    PubMed Central

    Beale, John H.; Parker, Joanne L.; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L.; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E.; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26320580

  6. Mass balance approaches for estimating the intestinal absorption and metabolism of peptides and analogues: theoretical development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinko, P. J.; Leesman, G. D.; Amidon, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for estimating the extent of intestinal peptide and peptide analogue absorption was developed on the basis of a mass balance approach that incorporates convection, permeability, and reaction. The macroscopic mass balance analysis (MMBA) was extended to include chemical and enzymatic degradation. A microscopic mass balance analysis, a numerical approach, was also developed and the results compared to the MMBA. The mass balance equations for the fraction of a drug absorbed and reacted in the tube were derived from the general steady state mass balance in a tube: [formula: see text] where M is mass, z is the length of the tube, R is the tube radius, Pw is the intestinal wall permeability, kr is the reaction rate constant, C is the concentration of drug in the volume element over which the mass balance is taken, VL is the volume of the tube, and vz is the axial velocity of drug. The theory was first applied to the oral absorption of two tripeptide analogues, cefaclor (CCL) and cefatrizine (CZN), which degrade and dimerize in the intestine. Simulations using the mass balance equations, the experimental absorption parameters, and the literature stability rate constants yielded a mean estimated extent of CCL (250-mg dose) and CZN (1000-mg dose) absorption of 89 and 51%, respectively, which was similar to the mean extent of absorption reported in humans (90 and 50%). It was proposed previously that 15% of the CCL dose spontaneously degraded systematically; however, our simulations suggest that significant CCL degradation occurs (8 to 17%) presystemically in the intestinal lumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  7. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weaning and transport stress can have a negative impact on the piglet's immune system and intestinal microbiota. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of a yeast product on innate immunity and microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract following stress of weaning and trans...

  8. Intestinal microbial affects of yeast products on weaned and transport stressed pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to determine effects of a commercially available yeast product (XPC, Diamond-V Mills) and stress of transportation on total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Lactobacilli populations in the intestine of weaning pigs. In a RCB design with a 2 x 2 factorial ar...

  9. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacs of the Small Intestine of Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kirk L.; Butt, A. Grant

    2013-01-01

    The Na[superscript +]-glucose cotransporter is a key transport protein that is responsible for absorbing Na[superscript +] and glucose from the luminal contents of the small intestine and reabsorption by the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. Robert K. Crane originally described the cellular model of absorption of Na[superscript +] and…

  10. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  11. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption.

  12. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  13. Roles of the Peptide Transport Systems and Aminopeptidase PepA in Peptide Assimilation by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ki, Mi Ran; Lee, Ji Hyun; Yun, Soon Kyu; Choi, Kyung Min; Hwang, Se Young

    2015-10-01

    Peptide assimilation in Helicobacter pylori necessitates a coordinated working of the peptide transport systems (PepTs) and aminopeptidase (PepA). We found that H. pylori hydrolyzes two detector peptides, L-phenylalanyl-L-3-thiaphenylalanine (PSP) and L-phenylalanyl-L-2- sulfanilylglycine (PSG), primarily before intake and excludes their antibacterial effects, whereas Escherichia coli readily transports them with resultant growth inhibition. PSP assimilation by H. pylori was inhibited by aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin, but not by dialanine or cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, contrary to that of E. coli. RT- and qRT-PCR analyses showed that H. pylori may express first the PepTs (e.g., DppA and DppB) and then PepA. In addition, western blot analysis of PepA suggested that the bacterium secretes PepA in response to specific inducers.

  14. Effects of the mucoadhesive polymer polycarbophil on the intestinal absorption of a peptide drug in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lehr, C M; Bouwstra, J A; Kok, W; De Boer, A G; Tukker, J J; Verhoef, J C; Breimer, D D; Junginger, H E

    1992-05-01

    The absorption across rat intestinal tissue of the model peptide drug 9-desglycinamide, 8-arginine vasopressin from bioadhesive formulations was studied in-vitro, in a chronically isolated internal loop in-situ and after intraduodenal administration in-vivo. A controlled-release bioadhesive drug delivery system was tested, consisting of microspheres of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with a mucoadhesive Polycarbophil-coating, as well as fast-release formulation consisting of an aqueous solution of the peptide in a suspension of Polycarbophil particles. Using the controlled-release system, a slight improvement of peptide absorption was found in-vitro in comparison with a non-adhesive control system, but not in-situ or in-vivo. In contrast, bioavailability was significantly increased in all three models from the Polycarbophil suspension in comparison with a solution of the drug in saline. The effect appeared to be dose-dependent, indicative of intrinsic penetration-enhancing properties of the mucoadhesive polymer. A prolongation of the absorption phase in-vitro and in the chronically isolated loop in-situ suggested that the polymer was able to protect the peptide from proteolytic degradation. This could be confirmed by degradation studies in-vitro. The duration of the penetration enhancing/enzyme inhibiting effect was diminished with increasing complexity of the test model, in the same way as was previously found for the bioadhesive effect. This interrelationship suggests that the observed improvement in peptide absorption and the mucoadhesive properties of this polymer are associated. The development of a fast-release oral dosage form for peptide drugs on the basis of Polycarbophil appears to be possible.

  15. Functional Characterization of Water Transport and Cellular Localization of Three Aquaporin Paralogs in the Salmonid Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Steffen S.; Olesen, Jesper H.; Bedal, Konstanze; Engelund, Morten Buch; Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M.; Tipsmark, Christian K.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal water absorption is greatly enhanced in salmonids upon acclimation from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW); however, the molecular mechanism for water transport is unknown. We conducted a pharmacological characterization of water absorption in the rainbow trout intestine along with an investigation of the distribution and cellular localization of three aquaporins (Aqp1aa, -1ab, and -8ab) in pyloric caeca, middle (M), and posterior (P) intestine of the Atlantic salmon. In vitro iso-osmotic water absorption (Jv) was higher in SW than FW-trout and was inhibited by (mmol L−1): 0.1 KCN (41%), 0.1 ouabain (72%), and 0.1 bumetanide (82%) suggesting that active transport, Na+, K+-ATPase and Na+, K+, 2Cl−-co-transport are involved in establishing the driving gradient for water transport. Jv was also inhibited by 1 mmol L−1 HgCl2, serosally (23% in M and 44% in P), mucosally (27% in M), or both (61% in M and 58% in P), suggesting involvement of both apical and basolateral aquaporins in water transport. The inhibition was antagonized by 5 mmol L−1 mercaptoethanol. By comparison, 10 mmol L−1 mucosal tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of certain aquaporins, inhibited Jv by 20%. In the presence of glucose, mucosal addition of phloridzin inhibited water transport by 20%, suggesting that water transport is partially linked to the Na+-glucose co-transporter. Using polyclonal antibodies against salmon Aqp1aa, -1ab, and -8ab, we detected Aqp1aa, and -1ab immunoreactivity in the brush border and sub-apical region of enterocytes in all intestinal segments. The Aqp8ab antibody showed a particularly strong immunoreaction in the brush border and sub-apical region of enterocytes throughout the intestine and also stained lateral membranes and peri-nuclear regions though at lower intensity. The present localization of three aquaporins in both apical and lateral membranes of salmonid enterocytes facilitates a model for transcellular water transport in the

  16. Meat proteins had different effects on oligopeptide transporter PEPT1 in the small intestine of young rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjie; Li, Chunbao; Song, Shangxin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-12-01

    The peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) in the apical membrane of enterocytes is the central mechanism for regulating the absorption of di- and tripeptides. Dietary proteins may affect PEPT1 abundance and peptide absorption. The present study aimed to characterize changes in PEPT1 mRNA and PEPT1 protein levels in the duodenum and jejunum of young rats after 7-day diet intervention with casein (reference), soy, beef, pork, chicken and fish proteins and further evaluate the impact on the epithelial absorption capacity. RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that: (1) PEPT1 protein level in duodenum was higher (p < 0.05) for soy protein group than that for casein group. However, no difference was observed in jejunal PEPT1 protein level between any two diet groups (p > 0.05). The soy protein group had lower crypt depth and higher V/C ratio in the jejunum (p < 0.05). (2) PEPT1 mRNA levels were lower (p < 0.05) in rat duodenum and jejunum in pork, chicken and fish protein groups, whose trend was contrary to the results of jejunual histological observation with lower crypt depth, greater villus height and higher V/C ratio. In conclusion, different meat proteins alter distinct PEPT1 expression level and absorption capacity as reflected by gut morphology in small intestine.

  17. Role of glial cell-line derived neurotropic factor family receptor alpha2 in the actions of the glucagon-like peptides on the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Sean C; Lee, Jenny; Izzo, Angelo; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2007-08-01

    The intestinal glucagon-like peptides GLP-1 and GLP-2 inhibit intestinal motility, whereas GLP-2 also stimulates growth of the intestinal mucosa. However, the mechanisms of action of these peptides in the intestine remain poorly characterized. To determine the role of the enteric nervous system in the actions of GLP-1 and GLP-2 on the intestine, the glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor family receptor alpha(2) (GFRalpha2) knockout (KO) mouse was employed. The mice exhibited decreased cholinergic staining, as well as reduced mRNA transcripts for substance P-ergic excitatory motoneurons in the enteric nervous system (ENS) (P < 0.05). Examination of parameters of intestinal growth (including small and large intestinal weight and small intestinal villus height, crypt depth, and crypt cell proliferation) demonstrated no differences between wild-type and KO mice in either basal or GLP-2-stimulated mucosal growth. Nonetheless, KO mice exhibited reduced numbers of synaptophysin-positive enteroendocrine cells (P < 0.05), as well as a markedly impaired basal gastrointestinal (GI) transit rate (P < 0.05). Furthermore, acute administration of GLP-1 and GLP-2 significantly inhibited transit rates in wild-type mice (P < 0.05-0.01) but had no effect in GFRalpha2 KO mice. Despite these changes, expression of mRNA transcripts for the GLP receptors was not reduced in the ENS of KO animals, suggesting that GLP-1 and -2 modulate intestinal transit through enhancement of inhibitory input to cholinergic/substance P-ergic excitatory motoneurons. Together, these findings demonstrate a role for GFRalpha2-expressing enteric neurons in the downstream signaling of the glucagon-like peptides to inhibit GI motility, but not in intestinal growth.

  18. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport.

    PubMed Central

    Hempe, J M; Cousins, R J

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of zinc absorption has not been delineated, but kinetic studies show that both passive and carrier-mediated processes are involved. We have identified a low molecular mass zinc-binding protein in the soluble fraction of rat intestinal mucosa that could function as an intracellular zinc carrier. The protein was not detected in liver or pancreas, suggesting a role specific to the intestine. The protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport and shows signs of saturation at higher luminal zinc concentrations, characteristics consistent with a role in carrier-mediated zinc absorption. Microsequence analysis of the protein purified by gel-filtration HPLC and SDS/PAGE showed complete identity within the first 41 N-terminal amino acids with the deduced protein sequence of cysteine-rich intestinal protein [Birkenmeier, E. H. & Gordon, J. I. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2516-2520]. These investigators showed that the gene for this protein is developmentally regulated in neonates during the suckling period, conserved in many vertebrate species, and predominantly expressed in the small intestine. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein contains a recently identified conserved sequence of histidine and cysteine residues, the LIM motif, which our results suggest confers metal-binding properties that are important for zinc transport and/or functions of this micronutrient. Images PMID:1946385

  19. Genetic and phenotypic adaptation of intestinal nutrient transport to diet in fish.

    PubMed

    Buddington, R K; Chen, J W; Diamond, J

    1987-12-01

    1. Herbivores have higher rates of intestinal sugar transport and lower rates of amino acid transport than carnivores, if each are studied while eating their respective natural diets. It was unclear whether these species differences involve a genetic contribution, since when omnivores are switched from a high-protein to a high-carbohydrate diet they reversibly increase sugar transport and suppress amino acid transport. Hence we studied eight fish species of differing natural diets while all were eating the same manufactured diet. 2. Na+-dependent L-proline uptake and active D-glucose uptake, measured in vitro by the everted intestinal sleeve technique, followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Values of the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant increased with values of the maximal transport rate, probably as a result of unstirred layer effects. 3. The ratio of proline to glucose uptake decreased in the sequence: carnivores greater than omnivores greater than herbivores. The intestine's uptake capacity for the non-essential nutrient glucose was much higher in herbivores than in carnivores, correlated with species differences in carbohydrate content of the natural diet. Proline uptake varied much less among species, since species with different natural diets still have similar protein requirements. 4. Since all species were studied while eating the same diet, these species differences in uptake are not phenotypic but genetic adaptations to the different natural diets. 5. In two fish species which normally switch from carnivory towards herbivory or omnivory as they mature, we observe a 'hard-wired' developmental change in intestinal uptake. Larger animals had lower proline uptake relative to glucose uptake than did smaller animals, even though both were being maintained on the same diet in the laboratory. 6. Carnivorous fish tend to allocate absorptive tissue to pyloric caeca or a thick mucosa, while herbivorous fish tend towards a long thin intestine.

  20. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na(+)/[Formula: see text] cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H(+)-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl(-) channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal [Formula: see text] secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood [Formula: see text] levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  1. Human, rat and chicken small intestinal Na+-Cl−-creatine transporter: functional, molecular characterization and localization

    PubMed Central

    Peral, M J; García-Delgado, M; Calonge, M L; Durán, J M; De La Horra, M C; Wallimann, T; Speer, O; Ilundáin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In spite of all the fascinating properties of oral creatine supplementation, the mechanism(s) mediating its intestinal absorption has(have) not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize intestinal creatine transport. [14C]Creatine uptake was measured in chicken enterocytes and rat ileum, and expression of the creatine transporter CRT was examined in human, rat and chicken small intestine by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results show that enterocytes accumulate creatine against its concentration gradient. This accumulation was electrogenic, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, with a probable stoichiometry of 2 Na+: 1 Cl−: 1 creatine, and inhibited by ouabain and iodoacetic acid. The kinetic study revealed a Km for creatine of 29 μm. [14C]Creatine uptake was efficiently antagonized by non-labelled creatine, guanidinopropionic acid and cyclocreatine. More distant structural analogues of creatine, such as GABA, choline, glycine, β-alanine, taurine and betaine, had no effect on intestinal creatine uptake, indicating a high substrate specificity of the creatine transporter. Consistent with these functional data, messenger RNA for CRT was detected only in the cells lining the intestinal villus. The sequences of partial clones, and of the full-length cDNA clone, isolated from human and rat small intestine were identical to previously cloned CRT cDNAs. Immunological analysis revealed that CRT protein was mainly associated with the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This study reports for the first time that mammalian and avian enterocytes express CRT along the villus, where it mediates high-affinity, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, apical creatine uptake. PMID:12433955

  2. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na(+)/[Formula: see text] cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H(+)-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl(-) channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal [Formula: see text] secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood [Formula: see text] levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans.

  3. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y.; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M.; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid–base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na+/HCO3− cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl−/HCO3− exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H+-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl− channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal HCO3− secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood HCO3− levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  4. Effects of chronic ethanol ingestion on the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor-effector system from rat seminal vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Juarranz, M G; Marinero, M J; Bodega, G; Prieto, J C; Guijarro, L G

    1999-02-01

    We studied the modifications of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor/effector system from the rat seminal vesicle after chronic ethanol ingestion. Ethanol treatment resulted in a decreased height of the secretory epithelium of seminal vesicle as well as in a weight loss of this gland. These morphological changes were accompanied by an increase of immunoreactive vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) levels and a decrease of the stimulatory effect of VIP adenylate cyclase activity in the seminal vesicle. The loss of sensitivity of the enzyme to VIP was conceivably related to a decrease in the affinity of VIP receptors rather than to a decrease in their number. The changes in the affinity of the VIP receptors were accompanied with a lower sensitivity of VIP binding to GTP, which suggest an uncoupling between the receptor and the transductor molecules. However, chronic exposure to ethanol did not modify either the levels of G-protein subunits (alpha(s) and alpha(i1/2)) or the GTPase activity from seminal vesicle membranes. Moreover, ethanol feeding did not affect adenylate cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin or by Gpp(NH)p. Thus, ethanol-induced changes in the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to VIP appear to be attributed to an alteration in the VIP-receptor/G-protein interphase rather than in the G-protein/adenylate cyclase connection. PMID:10069562

  5. A tissue engineered model of the intestinal lacteal for evaluating lipid transport by lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Raghunathan, Sandeep; Swartz, Melody A.

    2010-01-01

    Lacteals are the entry point of all dietary lipids into the circulation, yet little is known about the active regulation of lipid uptake by these lymphatic vessels, and there lacks in vitro models to study the lacteal – enterocyte interface. We describe an in vitro model of the human intestinal microenvironment containing differentiated Caco-2 cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). We characterize the model for fatty acid, lipoprotein, albumin, and dextran transport, and compare to qualitative uptake of fatty acids into lacteals in vivo. We demonstrate relevant morphological features of both cell types and strongly polarized transport of fatty acid in the intestinal-to-lymphatic direction. We found much higher transport rates of lipid than of dextran or albumin across the lymphatic endothelial monolayer, suggesting most lipid transport is active and intracellular. This was confirmed with confocal imaging of Bodipy, a fluorescent fatty acid, along with transmission electron microscopy. Since our model recapitulates crucial aspects of the in vivo lymphatic-enterocyte interface, it is useful for studying the biology of lipid transport by lymphatics and as a tool for screening drugs and nanoparticles that target intestinal lymphatics. PMID:19396808

  6. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 expression in the intestine and skin--putative role in peptide hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Sundman, L; Saarialho-Kere, U; Vendelin, J; Lindfors, K; Assadi, G; Kaukinen, K; Westerholm-Ormio, M; Savilahti, E; Mäki, M; Alenius, H; D'Amato, M; Pulkkinen, V; Kere, J; Saavalainen, P

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) was recently found to be genetically associated with inflammatory bowel disease in addition to asthma and related traits. Epithelia of several organs express NPSR1 isoforms A and B, including the intestine and the skin, and NPSR1 appears to be upregulated in inflammation. In this study, we used cell lines and tissue samples to characterize the expression of NPSR1 and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) in inflammation. We used polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to investigate the expression of NPS and NPSR1 in intestinal diseases, such as celiac disease and food allergy, and in cutaneous inflammatory disorders. We found that NPSR1-A was expressed by the enteroendocrine cells of the gut. Overall, the expression pattern of NPS was similar to its receptor suggesting an autocrine mechanism. In an NPSR1-A overexpressing cell model, stimulation with NPS resulted in a dose-dependent upregulation of glycoprotein hormone, alpha polypeptide (CGA), tachykinin 1 (TAC1), neurotensin (NTS) and galanin (GAL) encoding peptide hormones secreted by enteroendocrine cells. Because NPSR1 was also expressed in macrophages, neutrophils, and intraepithelial lymphocytes, we demonstrated that stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma increased NPSR1 expression in the THP-1 monocytic cells. In conclusion, similar to other neuropeptides and their receptors, NPSR1 signalling might play a dual role along the gut-brain axis. The NPS/NPSR1 pathway may participate in the regulation of the peptide hormone production in enteroendocrine cells of the small intestine.

  7. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates. PMID:26852864

  8. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  9. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  10. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  11. Conditional (intestinal-specific) knockout of the riboflavin transporter-3 (RFVT-3) impairs riboflavin absorption.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Lambrecht, Nils; Lytle, Christian; Said, Hamid M

    2016-02-15

    Riboflavin (RF) is indispensable for normal cell metabolism, proliferation, and growth. The RFVT-3 protein (product of the Slc52a3 gene) is expressed in the gut with the expression being restricted to the apical membrane domain of the polarized intestinal epithelial cells. The relative contribution of RFVT-3 to total carrier-mediated RF uptake in the native intestine, however, is not clear. We addressed this issue in the current investigation using a conditional (intestinal-specific) RFVT-3 knockout (cKO) mouse model developed by the Cre/Lox approach. All RFVT-3 cKO mice were found to be RF deficient and showed a significant growth and development retardation; also, nearly two-thirds of them died prematurely between the age of 6 and 12 wk. In vivo (intestinal and colonic loops) and in vitro (native isolated intestinal epithelial cells) uptake studies showed a severe inhibition in carrier-mediated RF uptake in the cKO mice compared with control littermates. We also observed a significant increase in the level of expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes in the intestine of the cKO mice compared with control littermates. Supplementation of the RFVT-3 cKO mice with pharmacological doses of RF led to a complete correction of the growth retardation and to normalization in the level of expression of the oxidative stress-responsive genes in the gut. These results show, for the first time, that the RFVT-3 system is the main transporter involved in carrier-mediated RF uptake in the native mouse small and large intestine, and that its dysfunction impairs normal RF body homeostasis.

  12. Redistribution of calbindin-D28k in chick intestine in response to calcium transport.

    PubMed

    Nemere, I; Leathers, V L; Thompson, B S; Luben, R A; Norman, A W

    1991-12-01

    Vitamin D and its hormonally active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] are known to alter several parameters associated with stimulated intestinal Ca2+ transport: levels of calbindin-D28K, tubulin, and endosomal-lysosomal organelles containing Ca2+, and calbindin-D28K. In the present study the as yet unexamined relationship among Ca2+ transport, calbindin-D28K, and microtubules was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy. In vitamin D3-treated or 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated chicks, in the absence of Ca2+ transport, immunofluorescence microscopy of intestinal tissue fixed at 25 C indicated a colocalization of calbindin-D28K and tubulin along epithelial cell brush border and basal-lateral membranes. Initiation of in situ Ca2+ absorption for 10, 20, or 30 min before tissue fixation resulted first in increased punctate calbindin-D28K staining and then in a progressive decrease in intestinal cell- and microtubule-associated calbindin-D28K, with a concomitant increase in calbindin-D28K labeling in the villus core. When intestinal tissue from 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated chicks was chilled to 4 C before fixation (a procedure shown by others to cause microtubule depolymerization), evaluation by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed diffuse cytoplasmic staining of both the immunoreactive tubulin and its associated calbindin-D28K. These results indicate the possible involvement of calbindin-D28K with tubulin during the process of Ca2+ transport and the secretion of the calbindin-D28K as a consequence of the overall transport process. Electron microscopy with immunogold labeling revealed intestinal epithelial calbindin-D28K to be localized inside of small vesicles and lysosome-like structures, with sparse cytoplasmic labeling. Subsequent electron microscopic analysis of intestinal epithelial microtubules prepared by polymerization and depolymerization revealed immunogold labeling in coprecipitated vesicular remnants, with consistently light staining of filaments traversing

  13. Green tea polyphenols inhibit the sodium-dependent glucose transporter of intestinal epithelial cells by a competitive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Suzuki, M; Satsu, H; Arai, S; Hara, Y; Suzuki, K; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-11-01

    Intestinal glucose uptake is mainly performed by the sodium-dependent glucose transporter, SGLT1. The transport activity of SGLT1 was markedly inhibited by green tea polyphenols, this inhibitory activity being most pronounced in polyphenols having galloyl residues such as epicatechin gallate (ECg) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). Experiments using brush-border membrane vesicles obtained from the rabbit small intestine demonstrated that ECg inhibited SGLT1 in a competitive manner, although ECg itself was not transported via SGLT1. The present results suggest that tea polyphenols such as ECg interact with SGLT1 as antagonist-like molecules, possibly playing a role in controlling the dietary glucose uptake in the intestinal tract.

  14. A carrier-mediated transport for folate in basolateral membrane vesicles of rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Redha, R

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of exit of folate from the enterocyte, i.e. transport across the basolateral membrane, is not known. In this study we examined, using basolateral membrane vesicles, the transport of folic acid across the basolateral membrane of rat intestine. Uptake of folic acid by these vesicles represents transport of the substrate into the intravesicular compartment and not binding to the membrane surface. The rate of folic acid transport was linear for the first 1 min of incubation but decreased thereafter, reaching equilibrium after 5 min of incubation. The transport of folic acid was: (1) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 0.6 +/- 0.17 microM and Vmax. of 1.01 +/- 0.11 pmol/30 s per mg of protein; (2) inhibited in a competitive manner by the structural analogues 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and methotrexate (Ki = 2 and 1.4 microM, respectively); (4) electroneutral; (5) Na+-independent; (6) sensitive to the effect of the anion exchange inhibitor 4,4'-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data indicate the existence of a carrier-mediated transport system for folic acid in rat intestinal basolateral membrane and demonstrate that the transport process is electroneutral, Na+-independent and sensitive to the effect of anion exchange inhibition. PMID:3689340

  15. Glugacon-like peptide-2: broad receptor expression, limited therapeutic effect on intestinal inflammation and novel role in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    El-Jamal, Noura; Erdual, Edmone; Neunlist, Michel; Koriche, Dine; Dubuquoy, Caroline; Maggiotto, Francois; Chevalier, Julien; Berrebi, Dominique; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Boulanger, Eric; Cortot, Antoine; Desreumaux, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinotrophic hormone with growth promoting and anti-inflammatory actions. However, the full biological functions of GLP-2 and the localization of its receptor (GLP-2R) remain controversial. Among cell lines tested, the expression of GLP-2R transcript was detected in human colonic myofibroblasts (CCD-18Co) and in primary culture of rat enteric nervous system but not in intestinal epithelial cell lines, lymphocytes, monocytes, or endothelial cells. Surprisingly, GLP-2R was expressed in murine (GLUTag), but not human (NCI-H716) enteroendocrine cells. The screening of GLP-2R mRNA in mice organs revealed an increasing gradient of GLP-2R toward the distal gut. An unexpected expression was detected in the mesenteric fat, mesenteric lymph nodes, bladder, spleen, and liver, particularly in hepatocytes. In two mice models of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, the colonic expression of GLP-2R mRNA was decreased by 60% compared with control mice. Also, GLP-2R mRNA was significantly downregulated in intestinal tissues of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Therapeutically, GLP-2 showed a weak restorative effect on intestinal inflammation during TNBS-induced colitis as assessed by macroscopic score and inflammatory markers. Finally, GLP-2 treatment accelerated mouse liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy as assessed by histological and molecular analyses. In conclusion, the limited therapeutic effect of GLP-2 on colonic inflammation dampens its utility in the management of severe inflammatory intestinal disorders. However, the role of GLP-2 in liver regeneration is a novelty that might introduce GLP-2 into the management of liver diseases and emphasizes on the importance of elucidating other extraintestinal functions of GLP-2. PMID:24875097

  16. Experimental lead poisoning and intestinal transport of glucose, amino acids, and sodium.

    PubMed

    Wapnir, R A; Exeni, R A; McVicar, M; Lipshitz, F

    1977-03-01

    Juvenile rats fed a diet containing 1% lead acetate for 7 weeks, in addition to an impaired growth rate and renal function derangements, suffered malabsorption of glucose and certain amino acids, as assessed by an in vivo perfusion technique. The reduction in glucose absorption ranged between 10% and 31% when the carbohydrate was pumped in concentrations of 2-80 mM. This alteration was compatible with a noncompetitive type of transport inhibition. The intestinal absorption of glycine, lysine, and phenylalanine were, respectively, decreased 22, 18, and 15% when these amino acids were present at 1 mM levels. Sodium transport was severely reduced (57.6 +/- 17.9 (SEM) vs. 124.2 +/- 17.4 muEq/min-cm) and intestinal mucosa (Na+-K+)-ATPase was concomitantly lower in the lead-intoxicated rats (186.4 +/- 19.0 vs 268.4 +/- 29.8 nmol P/min-mg protein). However, this enzyme was not altered in liver and kidney. Furthermore, intestinal mucosa fructose-1,6-diphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and tryptophan hydroxylase were not different in experimental and control animals. These studies substantiate the presence of functional and biochemical abnormalities in the intestinal mucosa of young rats when fed substantial amounts of a soluble lead salt. It is, therefore, reasonable to accept the possibility that physiologic damage occurs in tissues directly subjected to high and persistent levels of a toxic agents, as it occurs in other organs, underscoring the parallelism between transport mechanisms at the renal and intestinal levels.

  17. A peptide zipcode sufficient for anterograde transport within amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Satpute-Krishnan, Prasanna; DeGiorgis, Joseph A.; Conley, Michael P.; Jang, Marcus; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2006-01-01

    Fast anterograde transport of membrane-bound organelles delivers molecules synthesized in the neuronal cell body outward to distant synapses. Identification of the molecular “zipcodes” on organelles that mediate attachment and activation of microtubule-based motors for this directed transport is a major area of inquiry. Here we identify a short peptide sequence (15 aa) from the cytoplasmic C terminus of amyloid precursor protein (APP-C) sufficient to mediate the anterograde transport of peptide-conjugated beads in the squid giant axon. APP-C beads travel at fast axonal transport rates (0.53 μm/s average velocity, 0.9 μm/s maximal velocity) whereas beads coupled to other peptides coinjected into the same axon remain stationary at the injection site. This transport appears physiologic, because it mimics behavior of endogenous squid organelles and of beads conjugated to C99, a polypeptide containing the full-length cytoplasmic domain of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Beads conjugated to APP lacking the APP-C domain are not transported. Coinjection of APP-C peptide reduces C99 bead motility by 75% and abolishes APP-C bead motility, suggesting that the soluble peptide competes with protein-conjugated beads for axoplasmic motor(s). The APP-C domain is conserved (13/15 aa) from squid to human, and peptides from either squid or human APP behave similarly. Thus, we have identified a conserved peptide zipcode sufficient to direct anterograde transport of exogenous cargo and suggest that one of APP's roles may be to recruit and activate axonal machinery for endogenous cargo transport. PMID:17062754

  18. Changes in vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and neuropeptide Y-ergic structures of the enteric nervous system in the carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Janusz; Łakomy, Ireneusz Mirosław

    2010-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at immunohistochemical analysis of potential changes in the enteric nervous system caused by cancer of the large intestine. In this purpose, neurons and nerve fibers of intestinal plexuses containing neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), in pathologically changed part of the large intestine were microscpically observed and compared. Samples were taken from patients operated due to cancer of the sigmoid colon and rectum. The number of neurons and density of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides found in sections with cancer tissues were compared to those observed in sections from the uninvolved intestinal wall. Changes relating to reductions in the number of NPY-ergic neurons and density of nerve fibres in submucous and myenteric plexuses in the sections with cancer tissues (pathological sections) were statistically significant. A statistically similar presence of VIP-ergic and PACAP-ergic neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses was observed in both the pathological and control sections. On the other hand, in the pathological sections, VIP-ergic nerve fibres in the myenteric plexuses and PACAP-ergic nerve fibres in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses were found to be less dense. Analysis revealed changes in pathologically affected part of the large intestine may caused disruption of proper intestinal function. Observed changes in the neural elements which are responsible for relaxation of the intestine may suggest dysfunction in the innervation of this part of the colon.

  19. Intestinal absorption mechanism of mirabegron, a potent and selective β₃-adrenoceptor agonist: involvement of human efflux and/or influx transport systems.

    PubMed

    Takusagawa, Shin; Ushigome, Fumihiko; Nemoto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Li, Qun; Kerbusch, Virginie; Miyashita, Aiji; Iwatsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Mirabegron, a weak-basic compound, is a potent and selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist for the treatment of overactive bladder. Mirabegron extended release formulation shows dose-dependent oral bioavailability in humans, which is likely attributable to saturation of intestinal efflux abilities leading to higher absorption with higher doses. This study evaluated the membrane permeability of mirabegron and investigated the involvement of human intestinal transport proteins in the membrane permeation of mirabegron. Transcellular transport and cellular/vesicular uptake assays were performed using Caco-2 cells and/or human intestinal efflux (P-glycoprotein [P-gp], breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP], and multidrug resistance associated protein 2 [MRP2]) and influx (peptide transporter 1 [PEPT1], OATP1A2, and OATP2B1) transporter-expressing cells, vesicles, or Xenopus laevis oocytes. The absorptive permeability coefficients of mirabegron in Caco-2 cells (1.68-1.83 × 10(-6) cm/s) at the apical and basal pH of 6.5 and 7.4, respectively, were slightly higher than those of nadolol (0.97-1.41 × 10(-6) cm/s), a low permeability reference standard, but lower than those of metoprolol and propranolol (both ranged from 8.49 to 11.6 × 10(-6) cm/s), low/high permeability boundary reference standards. Increasing buffer pH at the apical side from 5.5 to 8.0 gradually increased the absorptive permeation of mirabegron from 0.226 to 1.66 × 10(-6) cm/s, but was still less than the value in the opposite direction (11.0-14.2 × 10(-6) cm/s). The time- and concentration-dependent transport of mirabegron was observed in P-gp-expressing cells and OATP1A2-expressing oocytes with apparent Km values of 294 and 8.59 μM, respectively. In contrast, no clear BCRP-, MRP2-, PEPT1-, or OATP2B1-mediated uptake of mirabegron was observed in their expressing vesicles or cells. These findings suggest that mirabegron has low-to-moderate membrane permeability and P-gp is likely to be involved in its

  20. Effect of genetic SSTR4 ablation on inflammatory peptide and receptor expression in the non-inflamed and inflamed murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Van Op den Bosch, Joeri; Torfs, Pascal; De Winter, Benedicte Y; De Man, Joris G; Pelckmans, Paul A; Van Marck, Eric; Grundy, David; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The recently suggested pivotal role of somatostatin (SOM) receptor 4 (SSTR4) in inflammation and nociception in several non-intestinal organs and in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, necessitates exploration of the role of SSTR4 in GI pathophysiology. Therefore, the role of SSTR4 in GI activity was explored by investigating the effects of SSTR4 deficiency on intestinal motility, smooth muscle contractility and on the expression of SSTRs and neuropeptides in the healthy and Schistosoma mansoni-infected murine small intestine. Functional experiments revealed no differences in intestinal motility or smooth muscle cell contractility between wild-type and SSTR4 knockout (SSTR4(-/-)) mice in physiological conditions. As revealed by multiple immunofluorescent labellings, RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qPCR), genetic deficiency of SSTR4 considerably altered the expression of SOM and SSTRs in non-inflamed and inflamed conditions, affecting both extrinsic and intrinsic components of the intestinal innervation, along with SSTR expression in several non-neuronal cell types. Moreover, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression were significantly elevated in SSTR4(-/-) mice, confirming the modulatory role of SSTR4 on intestinal pro-inflammatory neuropeptide expression. These data suggest that SSTR4 plays a previously unexpected modulatory role in the regulation of intestinal SSTR expression. Moreover, in addition to the recently described inhibitory effects of SSTR4 on the neuronal release of pro-inflammatory peptides, SSTR4 appears also to be involved in the neuronal expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides in the murine small intestine.

  1. Characterization and regulation of adenosine transport in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mun, E C; Tally, K J; Matthews, J B

    1998-02-01

    Adenosine release from mucosal sources during inflammation and ischemia activates intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Previous data suggest that A2b receptor-mediated Cl- secretory responses may be dampened by epithelial cell nucleoside scavenging. The present study utilizes isotopic flux analysis and nucleoside analog binding assays to directly characterize the nucleoside transport system of cultured T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and to explore whether adenosine transport is regulated by secretory agonists, metabolic inhibition, or phorbol ester. Uptake of adenosine across the apical membrane displayed characteristics of simple diffusion. Kinetic analysis of basolateral uptake revealed a Na(+)-independent, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI)-sensitive facilitated-diffusion system with low affinity but high capacity for adenosine. NBTI binding studies indicated a single population of high-affinity binding sites basolaterally. Neither forskolin, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine, nor metabolic inhibition significantly altered adenosine transport. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly reduced both adenosine transport and the number of specific NBTI binding sites, suggesting that transporter number may be decreased through activation of protein kinase C. This basolateral facilitated adenosine transporter may serve a conventional function in nucleoside salvage and a novel function as a regulator of adenosine-dependent Cl- secretory responses and hence diarrheal disorders.

  2. Chronic restraint stress induces intestinal inflammation and alters the expression of hexose and lipid transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chooi Yeng

    2013-06-01

    Psychosocial stress is reported to be one of the main causes of obesity. Based on observations in studies that relate stress and gut inflammation to obesity, the present study hypothesized that chronic stress, via inflammation, alters the expression of nutrient transporters and contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. Rats were exposed to restraint stress for 4 h/day for 5 days/week for eight consecutive weeks. Different segments of rat intestine were then collected and analysed for signs of pathophysiological changes and the expression of Niemann-Pick C1-like-1 (NPC1L1), sodium-dependent glucose transporter-1 (SLC5A1, previously known as SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter-2 (SLC2A2, previously known as GLUT2). In a separate experiment, the total anti-oxidant activity (TAA)-time profile of control isolated intestinal segments was measured. Stress decreased the expression of NPC1L1 in the ileum and upregulated SLC5A1 in both the jejunum and ileum and SLC2A2 in the duodenum. Inflammation and morphological changes were observed in the proximal region of the intestine of stressed animals. Compared with jejunal and ileal segments, the rate of increase in TAA was higher in the duodenum, indicating that the segment contained less anti-oxidants; anti-oxidants may function to protect the tissues. In conclusion, stress alters the expression of hexose and lipid transporters in the gut. The site-specific increase in the expression of SLC5A1 and SLC2A2 may be correlated with pathological changes in the intestine. The ileum may be protected, in part, by gut anti-oxidants. Collectively, the data suggest that apart from causing inflammation, chronic stress may promote sugar uptake and contribute to hyperglycaemia.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  4. Regional Morphology and Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Rat Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Dallin; Bond, Tanner; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal permeability of PAMAM dendrimers has been observed, giving rationale for their use in oral drug delivery as potential carriers of associated molecules. This study assessed the apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) of dendrimers across isolated rat intestinal regional mucosae, along with estimation of the maximum non-toxic concentration. Caco-2 monolayers were also used to assess the comparative Papp values between isolated mucosae and cell culture models. Concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM of anionic and cationic dendrimers were tested in mucosae to assess their Papp, membrane TEER, [(14)C]-mannitol Papp, and histology. 0.1 mM concentrations of dendrimers were assessed over 120 min in Caco-2 cell monolayers as concentrations above that were cytotoxic. Jejunal transport of dendrimers was higher than transport in colonic epithelium. Monolayer Papp values of dendrimers were comparable to those of jejunal mucosae. Mucosae exposed to dendrimer concentrations of 10 mM for 120 min caused significant reduction in TEER and changes in tissue morphology; however, G3.5 was the only analogue that caused significant TEER reduction and morphological changes at 1 mM concentrations. Transport in jejunal mucosae appears to be the greatest indicating that the small intestinal will be the most likely region to target for oral drug delivery using PAMAM dendrimers.

  5. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function.

  6. Role of the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in the maintenance of intestinal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Sabui, Subrata; Bohl, Jennifer Ann; Kapadia, Rubina; Cogburn, Kyle; Ghosal, Abhisek; Lambrecht, Nils W; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing a conditional (intestinal-specific) knockout (cKO) mouse model, we have recently shown that the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) (SLC5A6) is the only biotin uptake system that operates in the gut and that its deletion leads to biotin deficiency. Unexpectedly, we also observed that all SMVT-cKO mice develop chronic active inflammation, especially in the cecum. Our aim here was to examine the role of SMVT in the maintenance of intestinal mucosal integrity [permeability and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins]. Our results showed that knocking out the mouse intestinal SMVT is associated with a significant increase in gut permeability and with changes in the level of expression of TJ proteins. To determine whether these changes are related to the state of biotin deficiency that develops in SMVT-cKO mice, we induced (by dietary means) biotin deficiency in wild-type mice and examined its effect on the above-mentioned parameters. The results showed that dietary-induced biotin deficiency leads to a similar development of chronic active inflammation in the cecum with an increase in the level of expression of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as an increase in intestinal permeability and changes in the level of expression of TJ proteins. We also examined the effect of chronic biotin deficiency on permeability and expression of TJ proteins in confluent intestinal epithelial Caco-2 monolayers but observed no changes in these parameters. These results show that the intestinal SMVT plays an important role in the maintenance of normal mucosal integrity, most likely via its role in providing biotin to different cells of the gut mucosa. PMID:27492331

  7. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  8. Inhibitory effect of oatmeal extract oligomer on vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced inflammation in surviving human skin.

    PubMed

    Boisnic, S; Branchet-Gumila, M C; Coutanceau, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiinflammatory effect of oatmeal extract oligomer on skin fragments stimulated by a neuromediator, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Skin fragments (from plastic surgery) were maintained in survival conditions for 6 h. To induce inflammation, VIP was placed in contact with dermis by culture medium. Histological analysis was then performed on hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Edema was evaluated with semiquantitative scores. Vasodilation was studied by quantifying the percentage of dilated vessels according to scores and by measuring their surface by morphometrical image analysis. TNF-alpha dosage was made on culture supernatants. Vasodilation was significantly increased after application of VIP. After treatment with oatmeal extract oligomer, the mean surface of dilated vessels and edema were significantly decreased compared with VIP-treated skin. Moreover, treatment with this extract decreased TNF-alpha.

  9. Effects of colchicine on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid. Ultrastructural, biochemical, and radiochemical studies in fasting rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-03-01

    The involvement of microtubules in the transepithelial transport of exogenous lipid in intestinal absorptive cells has been suggested. Using electronmicroscopic, biochemical, and radiochemical methods, researchers have studied the effects of the antimicrotubular agent colchicine on the intestinal mucosa and on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid of rats in the fasting state. After colchicine treatment, the concentration of triglycerides in intestinal mucosa of rats fasted for 24 h doubled, and electron microscopic studies showed a striking accumulation of lipid particles in absorptive epithelial cells of the tips of jejunal villi. These findings suggest that colchicine interferes with the intestinal transepithelial transport of endogenous lipoproteins. Additional studies, using an intraduodenal pulse injection of (/sup 14/C)linoleic acid, showed that colchicine does not affect the uptake of fatty acids by intestinal mucosa. However, it had divergent effects on fatty acid esterification, enhancing their incorporation into triglycerides relative to phospholipids, and caused a significant accumulation of endogenous diglycerides, triglycerides, and cholesterol esters within the absorptive intestinal epithelium. Detailed ultrastructural and morphometric studies revealed a decrease of visible microtubules, and a displacement of the smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, it is shown that after colchicine treatment, microvilli appear at the lateral plasma membrane of intestinal absorptive cells, a change not previously reported to our knowledge. Thus, our study shows that colchicine causes significant changes in enterocyte ultrastructure and colchicine perturbs the reesterification of absorbed endogenous fatty acids and their secretion in the form of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the enterocyte.

  10. Transepithelial transport of ambroxol hydrochloride across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Stetinová, Vera; Smetanová, Libuse; Kholová, Dagmar; Svoboda, Zbynek; Kvetina, Jaroslav

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed i) to characterize the transepithelial transport of the mucolytic agent ambroxol hydrochloride across the intestinal barrier, ii) to classify the ambroxol according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and iii) to predict ambroxol absorption in humans. Transport of ambroxol (100, 300 and 1000 micromol/l) was studied in a human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2 in apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical direction, under iso-pH 7.4 and pH-gradient (6 vs. 7.4) conditions. The relative contribution of the paracellular route was estimated using Ca2+-free transport medium. Ambroxol samples from receiver compartments were analysed by HPLC with UV detection (242 nm). Results showed that ambroxol transport is linear with time, pH-dependent and direction-independent, displays non-saturable (first-order) kinetics. Thus, the transport seems to be transcellular mediated by passive diffusion. Estimated high solubility and high permeability (P(app) = 45 x 10(-6) cm/s) of ambroxol rank it among well absorbed compounds and class I of BCS. It can be expected that the oral dose fraction of ambroxol absorbed in human intestine is high.

  11. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26241918

  12. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Stereospecific transport of Tyr-MIF-1 across the blood-brain barrier by peptide transport system-1

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Michals, E.A.; Barrera, C.M. )

    1990-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that peptide transport system-1 (PTS-1), the saturable system that transports Tyr-MIF-1, the enkephalins, and related peptides out of the central nervous system (CNS), exhibits stereospecificity. In the present studies, we showed that {sup 125}I-L-Tyr-MIF-1, but not {sup 131}I-D-Tyr-MIF-1, was cleared from the CNS more rapidly than could be accounted for by nonspecific mechanisms. Such clearance was inhibited by a 1.0 nmol dose of L-Tyr-MIF-1, but not by D-Tyr-MIF-1. Neither L- nor D-Tyr-MIF-1 altered the much lower clearance of I-D-Tyr-MIF-1 from the brain. Radioactivity recovered from the vascular space after the injection of {sup 125}I-Tyr-MIF-1 into the lateral ventricle of the brain eluted by HPLC primarily as intact peptide, demonstrating that most of the Tyr-MIF-1 was not degraded during transport. By contrast, the nonsaturable unidirectional influx of Tyr-MIF-1 into the CNS did not distinguish between the isomers. These studies confirm and extend the observations that Tyr-MIF-1 is transported out of the CNS by a saturable, stereospecific transport system as an intact peptide while the influx into the CNS is by a nonsaturable mechanism that does not distinguish between the isomers.

  14. Role of sodium ion in transport of folic acid in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of sodium on folate transport across the intestinal luminal membrane was analyzed using two techniques: the influx chamber and isoalted brush-border membrane vesicles. Preincubation of tissue in Na -free medium did not have a consistent effect on folic acid influx provided that Na was present in the test solution. Replacement of Na in the test solution by choline resulted in a significant reduction of folic acid influx. However, when intestinal sheets that had been equilibrated in Na -free solution were exposed to test solutions containing either Na , Li , K , Rb , Cs , Tris , or guanidinium as main cations, folic acid influx was not significantly decreased. Concentration-dependence studies showed that replacement of Na by Rb did not affect the saturable mechanism of folate transport. Rather, a decrease in nonsaturable folic acid uptake accounted for the slightly reduced influx observed in the presence of Rb . Experiments with brush-border membrane vesicles revealed that methotrexate uptake was significantly higher in the presence of external Na than in the presence of K , but was not different from uptake in the presence of K plus valinomycin. These data suggest that 1) the saturable component of folate transport is not Na dependent, and 2) nonsaturable transport of folic acid across the luminal membrane occurs in part through a conductive pathway that involves a negatively charged species of folate and a cation whose membrane permeability affects the rate of folate transport. The importance of Na in this process in vivo derives from the fact that Na is the most permeant cation available at the absorptive site in the small intestine.

  15. Functional Implications and Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation of the Peptide Transporter Ptr2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Ken; Moriya, Atsuto; Uemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The peptide transporter Ptr2 plays a central role in di- or tripeptide import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although PTR2 transcription has been extensively analyzed in terms of upregulation by the Ubr1-Cup9 circuit, the structural and functional information for this transporter is limited. Here we identified 14 amino acid residues required for peptide import through Ptr2 based on the crystallographic information of Streptococcus thermophilus peptide transporter PepTst and based on the conservation of primary sequences among the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs). Expression of Ptr2 carrying one of the 14 mutations of which the corresponding residues of PepTst are involved in peptide recognition, salt bridge interaction, or peptide translocation failed to enable ptr2Δtrp1 cell growth in alanyl-tryptophan (Ala-Trp) medium. We observed that Ptr2 underwent rapid degradation after cycloheximide treatment (half-life, approximately 1 h), and this degradation depended on Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. The ubiquitination of Ptr2 most likely occurs at the N-terminal lysines 16, 27, and 34. Simultaneous substitution of arginine for the three lysines fully prevented Ptr2 degradation. Ptr2 mutants of the presumed peptide-binding site (E92Q, R93K, K205R, W362L, and E480D) exhibited severe defects in peptide import and were subjected to Rsp5-dependent degradation when cells were moved to Ala-Trp medium, whereas, similar to what occurs in the wild-type Ptr2, mutant proteins of the intracellular gate were upregulated. These results suggest that Ptr2 undergoes quality control and the defects in peptide binding and the concomitant conformational change render Ptr2 subject to efficient ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. PMID:25172766

  16. Transporters for ammonium, amino acids and peptides are expressed in pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, W; Frommer, W B; Ward, J M

    1999-03-01

    Insect capture and digestion contribute substantially to the nitrogen budget of carnivorous plants. In Nepenthes, insect-derived nitrogenous compounds are imported from the pitcher fluid and transported throughout the plant via the vascular tissue to support growth. Import and distribution of nutrients may require transmembrane nitrogen transporters. Representatives of three classes of genes encoding transporters for the nitrogenous compounds ammonium, amino acids and peptides were identified in Nepenthes pitchers. The expression at the cellular level of an ammonium transporter gene, three amino acid transporter genes, and one peptide transporter gene were investigated in the insect trapping organs of Nepenthes. Expression of the ammonium transporter gene NaAMT1 was detected in the head cells of digestive glands in the lower part of the pitcher where NaAMT1 may function in ammonium uptake from the pitcher fluid. One amino acid transporter gene, NaAAP1, was expressed in bundle sheath cells surrounding the vascular tissue. To understand the locations where transmembrane transport could be required within the pitcher, symplasmic and apoplasmic continuity was probed using fluorescent dyes. Symplasmic connections were not found between cortical cells and vascular bundles. Therefore, the amino acid transporter encoded by NaAAP1 may be involved in transport of amino acids into the vascular tissue. In contrast, expression of the peptide transporter gene NaNTR1 was detected in phloem cells of the vascular tissue within pitchers. NaNTR1 may function in the export of nitrogen from the pitcher by loading peptides into the phloem. PMID:10230062

  17. Influence of renovascular hypertension on the distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach and heart of rats

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Żaneta; Janiuk, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with serious dysfunction of the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Given the relevant role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the regulation of digestion process, control of blood pressure and heart rate as well as cardio- and gastro-protective character of the peptide, it appeared worthwhile to undertake the research aimed at immunohistochemical identification and evaluation of VIP-positive structures in the pylorus and heart of hypertensive rats. Up to now, this issue has not been investigated. The experimental model of hypertension in rats according to Goldblatt (two-kidney one clip model of hypertension) was used in the study. The experimental material (pylorus and heart) was collected in the sixth week of the study. VIP-containing structures were evaluated using immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. The analysis of the results showed a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive VIP structures and in the intensity of immunohistochemical staining in the stomach and in the heart of hypertensive rats. Our findings indicate that VIP is an important regulator of cardiovascular and digestive system in physiological and pathological conditions. However, to better understand the exact role of VIP in hypertension further studies need to be carried out. PMID:25990439

  18. Characterization of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor in rat submandibular gland: radioligand binding assay in membrane preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-09-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor in membranes from rat submandibular gland was studied using radioligand binding assays with /sup 125/I-VIP and various unlabeled competing ligands. In addition to the necessity of working within the parameters under which all radioligand binding assays should be performed, binding studies with /sup 125/I-VIP, as with other peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, are subject to additional technical difficulties. Specific problems that were addressed included radioligand proteolysis, the identification of an effective protease inhibitor (leupeptin) and the deleterious effects of a commonly used inhibitor (bacitracin); avid radioligand absorption to incubation tubes that was eliminated by precoating of the tubes with a combination of polyethylenimine and an organosilane; and a disproportionate effect of increasing membrane protein concentration on affinity estimates. Under optimized conditions, the affinity (Kd) and density Bmax values for /sup 125/I-VIP obtained from saturation assays (76 pM, 2.0 pmol/mg) were in excellent agreement. Membrane protein (or receptor) levels beyond the linear portion of the receptor concentration curve are often used in radioligand binding assays. Results from /sup 125/I-VIP binding studies at elevated receptor concentrations revealed the predicted marked decrease in receptor affinity. In addition, the rank order potency of unlabeled ligands in inhibition binding assays was changed. The optimization of the assay for measuring VIP receptors in submandibular gland membrane provides a reliable method for studying the role of receptor regulation in stimulus-secretion coupling for this neuropeptide.

  19. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  20. Influence of renovascular hypertension on the distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach and heart of rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Janiuk, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with serious dysfunction of the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Given the relevant role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the regulation of digestion process, control of blood pressure and heart rate as well as cardio- and gastro-protective character of the peptide, it appeared worthwhile to undertake the research aimed at immunohistochemical identification and evaluation of VIP-positive structures in the pylorus and heart of hypertensive rats. Up to now, this issue has not been investigated. The experimental model of hypertension in rats according to Goldblatt (two-kidney one clip model of hypertension) was used in the study. The experimental material (pylorus and heart) was collected in the sixth week of the study. VIP-containing structures were evaluated using immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. The analysis of the results showed a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive VIP structures and in the intensity of immunohistochemical staining in the stomach and in the heart of hypertensive rats. Our findings indicate that VIP is an important regulator of cardiovascular and digestive system in physiological and pathological conditions. However, to better understand the exact role of VIP in hypertension further studies need to be carried out.

  1. Acetate transport across the intestinal epithelium of an herbivorous teleost. [Oreochromis mossambicus

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, E.; Ahearn, G.A. )

    1990-02-26

    {sup 3}H-acetate transport across the upper intestine of the tilapia, Oreochromis mossabicus, using brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles, and intestinal sheets mounted in modified Ussing chambers was investigated. Brush border and basolateral vesicles demonstrated qualitatively similar anion antiport activity where, in the presence of a full profile of organic and inorganic anions, volatile fatty acids (VFA; acetate, propionate, butyrate) and bicarbonate showed reciprocal trans-stimulation and cis-inhibition of {sup 3}H-acetate influx, suggesting both membranes had the same VFA/bicarbonate exchange mechanism. Kinetic analysis of {sup 3}H-acetate influx into brush border and basolateral vesicles revealed different half-saturation constants (Km) as a function of external acetate concentrations (6.43 mM and 11.91 mM, respectively) and as a function of internal bicarbonate (5.89 mM and 0.41 mM, respectively). Intestinal sheets supported net absorptive fluxes when serosal acetate concentrations were held steady at 1.0 mM and mucosal acetate was varied from 1.60 to 10.0 mM. Unidirectional fluxes were significantly diminished by the addition of acetazolamide. This study postulates a transcellular transport pathway for VFA whereby qualitatively similar antiporters in series lead to a downhill flow of luminal acetate to the blood, which is driven by intracellular carbonic anhydrase and a transmural VFA concentration gradient.

  2. Evaluation of a thiodipeptide, L-phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-L-alanine, as a novel probe for peptide transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Saito, Sachi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    L-Phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-l-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala), a thiourea dipeptide, was evaluated as a probe for peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Uptake of Phe-Ψ-Ala in PEPT1-overexpressing HeLa cells was significantly higher than that in vector-transfected HeLa cells and the Km value was 275 ± 32 µM. The uptake was pH-dependent, being highest at pH 6.0, and was significantly decreased in the presence of PEPT1 inhibitors [glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), cephalexin, valaciclovir, glycylglycine, and glycylproline]. In metabolism assay using rat intestinal mucosa, rat hepatic microsomes, and human hepatocytes, the amount of Phe-Ψ-Ala was unchanged, whereas phenylalanylalanine was extensively decomposed. The clearance, distribution volume, and half-life of intravenously administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in rats were 0.151 ± 0.008 L/h/kg, 0.235 ± 0.012 L/kg, and 1.14 ± 0.07 h, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala (2.31 ± 0.60 µg/mL) in the presence of Gly-Sar was significantly decreased compared with that in the absence of glycylsarcosine (3.74 ± 0.44 µg/mL), suggesting that the intestinal absorption of Phe-Ψ-Ala is mediated by intestinal PEPT1. In conclusion, our results indicate that Phe-Ψ-Ala is a high-affinity, metabolically stable, non-radioactive probe for PEPT1, and it should prove useful in studies of PEPT1, e.g., for predicting drug-drug interactions mediated by PEPT1 in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Intestinal ammonia transport in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): evidence for a Na+ coupled uptake mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Julian G; Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2015-05-01

    In vitro gut sac experiments were performed on freshwater and 60% seawater acclimated trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under treatments designed to discern possible mechanisms of intestinal ammonia transport. Seawater acclimation increased ammonia flux rate into the serosal saline (Jsamm) in the anterior intestine, however it did not alter Jsamm in the mid- or posterior intestine suggesting similar mechanisms of ammonia handling in freshwater and seawater fish. Both fluid transport rate (FTR) and Jsamm were inhibited in response to basolateral ouabain treatment, suggesting a linkage of ammonia uptake to active transport, possibly coupled to fluid transport processes via solvent drag. Furthermore, decreases in FTR and Jsamm caused by low Na(+) treatment indicated a Na(+) linked transport mechanism. Mucosal bumetanide (10(-4) M) had no impact on FTR, yet decreased Jsamm in the anterior and mid-intestine, suggesting NH4(+) substitution for K(+) on an apical NKCC, and at least a partial uncoupling of ammonia transport from fluid transport. Additional treatments (amiloride, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA), phenamil, bafilomycin, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), high sodium) intended to disrupt alternative routes of Na(+) uptake yielded no change in FTR or Jsamm, suggesting the absence of direct competition between Na(+) and ammonia for transport. Finally, [(14)C]methylamine permeability (PMA) measurements indicated the likely presence of an intestinal Rh-mediated ammonia transport system, as increasing NH4Cl (0, 1, 5 mmol l(-1)) concentrations reduced PMA, suggesting competition for transport through Rh proteins. Overall, the data presented in this paper provide some of the first insights into mechanisms of teleost intestinal ammonia transport.

  4. Utilization of peptide carrier system to improve intestinal absorption: targeting prolidase as a prodrug-converting enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. P.; Hu, M.; Subramanian, P.; Mosberg, H. I.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of targeting prolidase as a peptide prodrug-converting enzyme has been examined. The enzymatic hydrolysis by prolidase of substrates for the peptide transporter L-alpha-methyldopa-pro and several dipeptide analogues without an N-terminal alpha-amino group (phenylpropionylproline, phenylacetylproline, N-benzoylproline, and N-acetylproline) was investigated. The Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and Vmax for L-alpha-methyldopa-pro are 0.09 +/- 0.02 mM and 3.98 +/- 0.25 mumol/min/mg protein, respectively. However, no hydrolysis of the dipeptide analogues without an N-terminal alpha-amino group is observed, suggesting that an N-terminal alpha-amino group is required for prolidase activity. These results demonstrate that prolidase may serve as a prodrug-converting enzyme for the dipeptide-type prodrugs, utilizing the peptide carrier for transport of prodrugs into the mucosal cells and prolidase, a cytosolic enzyme, to release the drug. However, a free alpha-amino group appears to be necessary for prolidase hydrolysis.

  5. Mixing and Transport in the Small Intestine: A Lattice-Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banco, Gino; Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing; Aliani, Amit; Webb, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    The two primary functions of the small intestine are absorption of nutrients into the blood stream and transport of material along the gut for eventual evacuation. The primary transport mechanism is peristalsis. The time scales for absorption, however, rely on mixing and transport of molecules between the bulk flow and epithelial surface. Two basic motions contribute to mixing: peristalsis and repetitive segmental contraction of short segments of the gut. In this study we evaluate the relative roles of peristalsis vs. segmental contraction on the degree of mixing and time scales of nutrient transport to the epithelium using a two-dimensional model of flow and mixing in the small intestine. The model uses the lattice-Boltzmann framework with second-order moving boundary conditions and passive scalar (Sc = 10). Segmental and peristaltic contractions were parameterized using magnetic resonance imaging data from rat models. The Reynolds numbers (1.9), segment lengths (33 mm), max radii (2.75 mm) and occlusion ratios (0.33) were matched for direct comparison. Mixing is quantified by the rate of dispersion of scalar from an initial concentration in the center of the segment. We find that radial mixing is more rapid with segmental than peristaltic motion, that radial dispersion is much more rapid than axial, and that axial is comparable between the motions.

  6. Estriol blunts postprandial blood glucose rise in male rats through regulating intestinal glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Lee, Woojung; Kim, Su-Nam; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2015-03-01

    Despite increased total food intake in healthy, late-stage pregnant women, their peak postprandial blood sugar levels are normally much lower than the levels seen in healthy nonpregnant women. In this study, we sought to determine whether estriol (E3), an endogenous estrogen predominantly produced during human pregnancy, contributes to the regulation of the postprandial blood glucose level in healthy normal rats. In vivo studies using rats showed that E3 blunted the speed and magnitude of the blood glucose rise following oral glucose administration, but it did not appear to affect the total amount of glucose absorbed. E3 also did not affect insulin secretion, but it significantly reduced the rate of intestinal glucose transport compared with vehicle-treated animals. Consistent with this finding, expression of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 and 2 was significantly downregulated by E3 treatment in the brush-border membrane and basolateral membrane, respectively, of enterocytes. Most of the observed in vivo effects were noticeably stronger with E3 than with 17β-estradiol. Using differentiated human Caco-2 enterocyte monolayer culture as an in vitro model, we confirmed that E3 at physiologically relevant concentrations could directly inhibit glucose uptake via suppression of glucose transporter 2 expression, whereas 17β-estradiol did not have a similar effect. Collectively, these data showed that E3 can blunt the postprandial glycemic surge in rats through modulating the level of intestinal glucose transporters.

  7. Evidence of lactoferrin transportation into blood circulation from intestine via lymphatic pathway in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Etsumori

    2004-05-01

    Using adult rats, the characteristic transporting system for lactoferrin (LF) from intestinal lumen into the blood circulation was investigated. The rats were randomly divided into two groups, a non-collected thoracic lymph (NC) group and a collected thoracic lymph (LC) group. Peripheral blood and thoracic lymph were collected from a jugular vein and a thoracic lymph duct, respectively, under anaesthesia. Bovine LF (bLF) was infused into the duodenal lumen by needle over a 1-min period at a dose of 1 g kg(-1). The transported bLF in the plasma and lymph was assayed quantitatively by double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Morphological investigation was also carried out in the intestine, lymph node, and liver. Following intraduodenal administration of bLF, the transported bLF in the NC group was detected in the plasma, and reached a peak value at 2 h. Furthermore, the bLF concentration in the thoracic duct lymph fluid in the LC group increased significantly, and peaked 2 h after the administration. In addition, bLF was not detected in the plasma of the LC group. Immunohistochemical analysis clearly showed anti-bLF positive particles in the epithelial cells of the apical villi. The striated border and baso-lateral membrane were also bLF positive. These results suggest that intraduodenally infused bLF is transported into the blood circulation via the lymphatic pathway, not via portal circulation in adult rats.

  8. Diet-induced epigenetic regulation in vivo of the intestinal fructose transporter Glut5 during development of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuji; Douard, Veronique; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2011-04-01

    Metabolic complications arising from excessive fructose consumption are increasing dramatically even in young children, but little is known about ontogenetic mechanisms regulating Glut5 [glucose transporter 5; encoded by the Slc2a5 (solute carrier family 2 member 5) gene]. Glut5 expression is low postnatally and does not increase, unless luminal fructose and systemic glucocorticoids are present, until ≥ 14 days of age, suggesting substrate-inducible age- and hormone-sensitive regulation. In the present study, we perfused intestines of 10- and 20-day-old rats with either fructose or glucose then analysed the binding of Pol II (RNA polymerase II) and GR (glucocorticoid receptor), as well as acetylation of histones H3 and H4 by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Abundance of Glut5 mRNA increased only with fructose perfusion and age, a pattern that matched that of Pol II binding and histone H3 acetylation to the Glut5 promoter. Although many regions of the Glut5 promoter respond to developmental signals, fewer regions perceive dietary signals. Age- but not fructose-dependent expression of Sglt1 [sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 1 encoded by the Slc5a1(solute carrier family 5 member 1) gene] also correlated with Pol II binding and histone H3 acetylation. In contrast, G6Pase (glucose-6-phosphatase; encoded by the G6pc gene) expression, which decreases with age and increases with fructose, is associated only with age-dependent changes in histone H4 acetylation. Induction of Glut5 during ontogenetic development appears to be specifically mediated by GR translocation to the nucleus and subsequent binding to the Glut5 promoter, whereas the glucocorticoid-independent regulation of Sglt1 by age was not associated with any GR binding to the Sglt1 promoter.

  9. cap alpha. -Methylglucoside satisfies only Na/sup +/-dependent transport system of intestinal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmich, G.A.; Randles, J.

    1981-01-01

    The unidirectional influx of ..cap alpha..-methylglucoside (..cap alpha..-MG) by isolated chicken intestinal epithelial cells is 98% inhibited by phlorizin. The remaining 2% of the total influx occurs in the absence of Na/sup +/, is not sensitive to phloretin, and is equal to the diffusional entry rate for 2-deoxyglucose. The glucoside is much more strongly accumulated (75-fold) than 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG) (10-fold). Inhibitors of the serosal sugar carrier (phloretin, cytochalasin B, theophylline, and flavanoids) do not enhance ..cap alpha..-MG accumulation. It is concluded that the glycoside is not a substrate for the intestinal serosal transport system. Steady-state gradients of the sugar can be represented accurately by a concentrative, phlorizin-sensitive system that is opposed by a diffusional efflux process.

  10. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.—Patel, C., Douard, V., Yu, S., Gao, N., Ferraris, R. P. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption. PMID:26071406

  11. Differential cellular expression of organic anion transporting peptides OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 in the human retina and brain: implications for carrier-mediated transport of neuropeptides and neurosteriods in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Vavricka, Stephan R; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are polyspecific organic anion transporters, which are expressed in the blood-brain barrier, the choroid plexus, and other organs. The physiologic function of OATPs in extrahepatic tissues remains ambiguous. In rat retina, members of the OATP family are expressed. We therefore investigated the human retina for the expression of OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 and extended the study to human brain. Furthermore, we searched for peptide neurotransmitters as novel OATP substrates. OATP1A2 displayed a broad expression pattern in human retina as assessed by immunofluorescence localization. It is expressed in photoreceptor bodies and somas of amacrine cells. OATP1B2 expression is restricted to the inner nuclear layer and to the inner plexiform layer. Using paraffin sections from human cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus, OATP1A2 was localized to neurons and neuronal processes, while OATP2B1 is expressed in endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide were identified as substrates for OATP1A2 and OATP2B1. Double-labeling immunofluorescence of human retina demonstrated the presence of substance P and of vasoactive intestinal peptides in neurons expressing OATP1A2 and OATP2B1, respectively. The expression of OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 in retinal neurons implies a role of these transporters in the reuptake of peptide neurotransmitters released from retinal neurons. The abundant expression of OATP1A2 in brain neurons points to the possibility that OATP1A2 could be involved in the homeostasis of neurosteroids. The high expression of OATP2B1 in brain capillaries supports an important function of OATPs in substance penetration across the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Down regulation of small intestinal ion transport in PDZK1- (CAP70/NHERF3) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, Jutta; Riederer, Brigitte; Tuo, Biguang; Chen, Mingmin; Manns, Michael; Biber, Jürg; Yun, Chris; Kocher, Olivier; Seidler, Ursula

    2007-07-01

    The PDZ-binding protein PDZK1 (CAP70/PDZ-dc-1/NHERF3) in vitro binds to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the anion exchangers SLC26A3 and SLC26A6 and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3, all of which are major transport proteins for intestinal anion secretion and salt absorption. This study was undertaken to search for a role of PDZK1 in regulating electrolyte transport in native murine small intestine. Short circuit current (I (SC)) and HCO-(3) secretory rate (J(HCO-)(3)) were measured to assess electrogenic anion secretion; (22)Na(+) fluxes to assess sodium absorption in isolated small intestine. NHE3, CFTR, as well as NHERF1, NHERF2, and PDZK1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels, and NHE3 total enterocyte and brush border membrane (BBM) protein abundance were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western analysis. NHE3 localization was performed by immunohistochemistry. In pdzk1 -/- jejunal mucosa, basal net Na(+) absorption as well as the inhibition of Na(+) absorption by forskolin was significantly reduced. In pdzk1 -/- duodenal mucosa, identical basal I (SC) and (J(HCO-)(3)) but a significant, yet mild, reduction of forskolin-stimulated Delta(J(HCO-)(3)) and DeltaI (SC) was observed compared to +/+ tissue. Tissue conductance, morphological features, and the DeltaI (SC) and increase in (22)Na(+) absorption in response to luminal glucose was identical in pdzk1 +/+ and -/- small intestine, ruling out a general absorptive defect. While CFTR mRNA expression levels were unchanged, NHE3 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in small intestinal mucosa of pdzk1 -/- mice. Total enterocyte and BBM abundance was not significantly different, suggesting an increased NHE3 turnover, possibly due to reduced NHE3 membrane retention time. Lack of the PDZ-adapter protein PDZK1 in murine small intestine causes a mild reduction in maximal CFTR activation, but a severe defect in electroneutral Na(+) absorption.

  13. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangran; Li, Jianjun; Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05). Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  14. P-glycoprotein in sheep liver and small intestine: gene expression and transport efflux activity.

    PubMed

    Ballent, M; Wilkens, M R; Maté, L; Muscher, A S; Virkel, G; Sallovitz, J; Schröder, B; Lanusse, C; Lifschitz, A

    2013-12-01

    The role of the transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the disposition kinetics of different drugs therapeutically used in veterinary medicine has been demonstrated. Considering the anatomo-physiological features of the ruminant species, the constitutive expression of P-gp (ABCB1) along the sheep gastrointestinal tract was studied. Additionally, the effect of repeated dexamethasone (DEX) administrations on the ABCB1 gene expression in the liver and small intestine was also assessed. The ABCB1 mRNA expression was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. P-gp activity was evaluated in diffusion chambers to determine the efflux of rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in the ileum from experimental sheep. The constitutive ABCB1 expression was 65-fold higher in the liver than in the intestine (ileum). The highest ABCB1 mRNA expression along the small intestine was observed in the ileum (between 6- and 120-fold higher). The treatment with DEX did not elicit a significant effect on the P-gp gene expression levels in any of the investigated gastrointestinal tissues. Consistently, no significant differences were observed in the intestinal secretion of Rho 123, between untreated control (Peff S-M = 3.99 × 10(-6)  ± 2.07 × 10(-6) ) and DEX-treated animals (Peff S-M = 6.00 × 10(-6)  ± 2.5 × 10(-6) ). The understanding of the efflux transporters expression and activity along the digestive tract may help to elucidate clinical implications emerging from drug interactions in livestock.

  15. A Mouse Model of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: Loss of Intestine Zinc Transporter ZIP4 (Slc39a4) Disrupts the Stem Cell Niche and Intestine Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Jim; Venken, Koen J. T.; De Lisle, Robert C.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the human Zip4 gene cause acrodermatitis enteropathica, a rare, pseudo-dominant, lethal genetic disorder. We created a tamoxifen-inducible, enterocyte-specific knockout of this gene in mice which mimics this human disorder. We found that the enterocyte Zip4 gene in mice is essential throughout life, and loss-of-function of this gene rapidly leads to wasting and death unless mice are nursed or provided excess dietary zinc. An initial effect of the knockout was the reprogramming of Paneth cells, which contribute to the intestinal stem cell niche in the crypts. Labile zinc in Paneth cells was lost, followed by diminished Sox9 (sex determining region Y-box 9) and lysozyme expression, and accumulation of mucin, which is normally found in goblet cells. This was accompanied by dysplasia of the intestinal crypts and significantly diminished small intestine cell division, and attenuated mTOR1 activity in villus enterocytes, indicative of increased catabolic metabolism, and diminished protein synthesis. This was followed by disorganization of the absorptive epithelium. Elemental analyses of small intestine, liver, and pancreas from Zip4-intestine knockout mice revealed that total zinc was dramatically and rapidly decreased in these organs whereas iron, manganese, and copper slowly accumulated to high levels in the liver as the disease progressed. These studies strongly suggest that wasting and lethality in acrodermatitis enteropathica patients reflects the loss-of-function of the intestine zinc transporter ZIP4, which leads to abnormal Paneth cell gene expression, disruption of the intestinal stem cell niche, and diminished function of the intestinal mucosa. These changes, in turn, cause a switch from anabolic to catabolic metabolism and altered homeostasis of several essential metals, which, if untreated by excess dietary zinc, leads to dramatic weight loss and death. PMID:22737083

  16. Protective effect of quercetin on pig intestinal integrity after transport stress is associated with regulation oxidative status and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, Yi; WEI, Hong Kui; XIANG, Quan-Hang; WANG, Jun; ZHOU, Yuan-Fei; PENG, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of quercetin supplementation on intestinal integrity, intestinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and intestinal inflammation in pigs under transport stress. A total of 170 finishing pigs were randomly assigned into two groups. Animals in the control group consumed a basal diet, while those in the treatment group consumed the same diet supplemented with 25 mg quercetin per kg feed. After a 4-week period, pigs were transported for 5 hr. The quercetin-supplemented pigs showed decreased serum levels of endotoxin (P<0.05), increased height of jejunum villi (P<0.05), and increased occludin and zonula occudens-1 (ZO-1) mRNA expression in the jejunum (P<0.05). These parameters are associated with intestinal health and were markedly improved by quercetin supplementation. Pigs consuming the quercetin-supplemented diet had lower intestinal levels of ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) compared with the control group (P<0.05). This finding coincided with greater inhibition of the innate immune system (P<0.05), including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase B (Akt) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways, as well as decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines in the jejunum. These results indicate that quercetin alleviates intestinal injury in pigs during transport, probably through modulation of intestinal oxidative status and inflammation. PMID:27301842

  17. Single liposome analysis of peptide translocation by the ABC transporter TAPL

    PubMed Central

    Zollmann, Tina; Moiset, Gemma; Tumulka, Franz; Tampé, Robert; Poolman, Bert; Abele, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters use ATP to drive solute transport across biological membranes. Members of this superfamily have crucial roles in cell physiology, and some of the transporters are linked to severe diseases. However, understanding of the transport mechanism, especially of human ABC exporters, is scarce. We reconstituted the human lysosomal polypeptide ABC transporter TAPL, expressed in Pichia pastoris, into lipid vesicles (liposomes) and performed explicit transport measurements. We analyzed solute transport at the single liposome level by monitoring the coincident fluorescence of solutes and proteoliposomes in the focal volume of a confocal microscope. We determined a turnover number of eight peptides per minute, which is two orders of magnitude higher than previously estimated from macroscopic measurements. Moreover, we show that TAPL translocates peptides against a large concentration gradient. Maximal filling is not limited by an electrochemical gradient but by trans-inhibition. Countertransport and reversibility studies demonstrate that peptide translocation is a strictly unidirectional process. Altogether, these data are included in a refined model of solute transport by ABC exporters. PMID:25646430

  18. Computational modelling of H+-coupled peptide transport via human PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Irie, Megumi; Terada, Tomohiro; Katsura, Toshiya; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Inui, Ken-ichi

    2005-06-01

    H+-coupled peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) mediates the transport of small peptides and peptide-like drugs in a pH- and voltage-dependent manner. Here, we investigated the transport mechanisms of PEPT1 for neutral and charged substrates by experimental studies and computational simulation. Uptake studies revealed that the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), a neutral substrate, decreased with a fall in pH from 7.4 to 5.5, but at pH 5.0, the Km increased again. In contrast, the Km value of an anionic substrate, ceftibuten, declined steadily with decreasing pH. Based on these findings and information from the literature, we hypothesized the transport mechanisms in which (1) H+ binds to not only the H+-binding site, but also the substrate-binding site; and (2) H+ at the substrate-binding site inhibits the interaction of neutral and cationic substrates, but is necessary for that of anionic substrates. To validate these hypotheses, a computational model was constructed and various properties of substrate transport by PEPT1 were simulated. Our model reproduced the voltage dependence, hyperbolic saturation and bell-shaped pH-profile of Gly-Sar transport. Moreover, the various transport properties of negatively and positively charged substrates were also reconstructed. These findings indicated that the inferred mechanisms are able to sufficiently interpret the transport of both neutral and charged substrates by PEPT1. PMID:15802293

  19. Expression of the rabbit intestinal N2 Na+/nucleoside transporter in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, S M; Griffith, D A

    1991-01-01

    Polyadenylated [poly(A)+] mRNA isolated from rabbit small-intestinal mucosa was injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, and expression of the N2 Na+/nucleoside co-transporter was assayed by measuring Na(+)-dependent thymidine uptake. Expression of Na(+)-dependent thymidine uptake steadily increased after mRNA injection and was on average increased 11-fold by day 6 over background. Na(+)-dependent thymidine uptake was saturable (apparent Km approximately 30 microM at 22 degrees C) and inhibited by uridine and cytidine, but not by guanosine and inosine. These properties of the expressed thymidine transport strongly suggest that the epithelial N2 Na+/nucleoside co-transporter can be expressed in X. laevis oocytes. PMID:1898349

  20. Tests of the adaptive modulation hypothesis for dietary control of intestinal nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Karasov, W H

    1992-09-01

    According to the adaptive modulation hypothesis, an intestinal transporter should be repressed when its biosynthetic and other costs (of maintenance) exceed the benefits it provides. This leads to two contrasting predictions: transport of a sugar or amino acid worth calories should tend to be increased by its substrate, and transport of a vitamin should be modulated downwards by its substrate and upmodulated in deficiency. In a test of the first prediction, omnivorous desert iguanas eating alfalfa pellets (a high-carbohydrate diet) were compared with desert iguanas eating mealworms (a low-carbohydrate, higher-protein diet). In accord with the prediction, intact intestinal sleeves from the former group had higher rates of carrier-mediated D-glucose uptake/centimeter across the brush border than sleeves from the latter group. But in contrast to the first prediction, mealworm eaters had lower (not higher) proline uptake rates, and the ratio of glucose/proline uptake in the two groups did not differ. I review similar tests in 12 other species and show that overall the hypothesis has been quite robust with regard to the first prediction. Cases in which the hypothesis is rejected may reflect complications associated with changes in other dietary factors or phylogenetic constraints. In a test of the second prediction, uptake of the water-soluble vitamin choline was not increased in choline-deficient chicks, nor was it decreased in adults that have no dietary requirement for choline. I review similar tests for four other vitamins and five essential minerals. Dietary control of transport of the minerals and two of the vitamins seems to be in accord with the hypothesis. But transport rate for three vitamins (choline, pantothenic acid, ascorbic acid) seems not to be increased in deficiency. The best explanation seems to be that vitamin transport is modulated only if it is primarily by a carrier-mediated pathway.

  1. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models. PMID

  2. Amphipathic polyproline peptides stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Sviridov, D O; Drake, S K; Freeman, L A; Remaley, A T

    2016-03-18

    ApoA-I mimetics are short synthetic peptides that contain an amphipathic α-helix and stimulate cholesterol efflux by the ABCA1 transporter in a detergent-like extraction mechanism. We investigated the use of amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix for stimulating cholesterol efflux by ABCA1. Polypro peptides were synthesized with modified prolines, containing either a hydrophobic phenyl group (Prop) or a polar N-acetylgalactosamine (Prog) attached to the pyrrolidine ring and were designated as either PP-2, 3, 4, or 5, depending on the number of 3 amino acid repeat units (Prop-Prog-Prop). Based on molecular modeling, these peptides were predicted to be relatively rigid and to bind to a phospholipid bilayer. By CD spectroscopy, PP peptides formed a Type-II polypro helix in an aqueous solution. PP-2 was inactive in promoting cholesterol efflux, but peptides with more than 2 repeat units were active. PP-4 showed a similar Vmax as a much longer amphipathic α-helical peptide, containing 37 amino acids, but had a Km that was approximately 20-fold lower. PP peptides were specific in that they did not stimulate cholesterol efflux from cells not expressing ABCA1 and were also non-cytotoxic. Addition of PP-3, 4 and 5 to serum promoted the formation of smaller size HDL species (7 nM) and increased its capacity for ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by approximately 20-35% (p < 0.05). Because of their relatively small size and increased potency, amphipathic peptides with a polypro helix may represent an alternative structural motif for the development of apoA-I mimetic peptides.

  3. Transport of an export-defective protein by a highly hydrophobic signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Rusch, S L; Kendall, D A

    1994-01-14

    We have examined the sequence constraints on the amino-terminal region of the mature portion of alkaline phosphatase that are important for its efficient transport in Escherichia coli. Using a homopolymeric sequence of serines to replace 6 residues in this region, a transport-incompetent mutant was produced. Reintroduction of residues from the native sequence which restore charge and beta-turn potential resulted in little improvement. However, by replacing the hydrophobic core of the signal peptide with a homopolymeric series of leucines, not only was transport restored but precursor processing was more efficient than for the wild type and was insensitive to disruption of the protonmotive force. Moreover, we have titrated the signal peptide with leucine to alanine substitutions (Doud, S. K., Chou, M. M., and Kendall, D. A. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 1251-1256) and determined the minimum level of hydrophobicity necessary to achieve transport of the mutant protein. The results indicate that signal peptide hydrophobicity can completely override possible requirements for negatively charged residues and strong beta-turn forming potential in the mature protein and that the polyleucine-containing signal peptide may act as a generic signal sequence for the transport of non-native proteins in E. coli.

  4. Diet effects on glucose absorption in the small intestine of neonatal calves: importance of intestinal mucosal growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Zitnan, Rudolf; Schönhusen, Ulrike; Pfannkuche, Helga; Hudakova, Monika; Metges, Cornelia C; Hammon, Harald M

    2014-10-01

    Colostrum (C) feeding in neonatal calves improves glucose status and stimulates intestinal absorptive capacity, leading to greater glucose absorption when compared with milk-based formula feeding. In this study, diet effects on gut growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters were investigated in several gut segments of the small intestine. Fourteen male German Holstein calves received either C of milkings 1, 3, and 5 (d 1, 2, and 3 in milk) or respective formulas (F) twice daily from d 1 to d 3 after birth. Nutrient content, and especially lactose content, of C and respective F were the same. On d 4, calves were fed C of milking 5 or respective F and calves were slaughtered 2h after feeding. Tissue samples from duodenum and proximal, mid-, and distal jejunum were taken to measure villus size and crypt depth, mucosa and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were taken to determine protein content, and mRNA expression and activity of lactase and mRNA expression of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) were determined from mucosal tissue. Additionally, protein expression of SGLT1 in BBMV and GLUT2 in crude mucosal membranes and BBMV were determined, as well as immunochemically localized GLUT2 in the intestinal mucosa. Villus circumference, area, and height were greater, whereas crypt depth was smaller in C than in F. Lactase activity tended to be greater in C than in F. Protein expression of SGLT1 was greater in F than in C. Parameters of villus size, lactase activity, SGLT1 protein expression, as well as apical and basolateral GLUT2 localization in the enterocytes differed among gut segments. In conclusion, C feeding, when compared with F feeding, enhances glucose absorption in neonatal calves primarily by stimulating mucosal growth and increasing absorptive capacity in the small intestine, but not by stimulating abundance of intestinal glucose transporters.

  5. Calcium transport from the intestine and into bone in a rat model simulating weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Globus, R. K.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a defect in transport of calcium in the duodenum was related to decreased bone formation in the suspended rat. Rats were suspended by the tail at a 40 deg angle for up to 15 days. Ca-45 was injected into the ligated duodenum in situ 15 minutes prior to sacrific. Blood, tibia, vertebra and humerus were obtained for total calcium and Ca-45 analyses. Intestinal calcium transport did not appear to be significantly altered by suspension. However, by 5 days of suspension a significant decrease in accumulation of Ca-45 into tibia and vertebra was observed. A trend of decreasing bone mineral and mass was established in tibia and vertebra by the fifth day of suspension. The humerus failed to demonstrate a significant weight decrease or change in Ca-45 accumulation after 15 days of suspension. Results from this simulated weightlessness model suggest that transport of calcium from intestine into bone is decreased within 5 days of suspension. This deficiency appears to be associated with a progressive decrease in total mass of non-weightbearing bones.

  6. Immunoprecipitation and characterization of a binding protein specific for the peptide, intestinal trefoil factor.

    PubMed

    Chinery, R; Cox, H M

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant rat intestinal trefoil factor (rITF) and human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP) were irreversibly cross-linked to specific binding sites in solubilized rat intestinal epithelial membranes and human adenocarcinoma cells. Analysis of the immunoprecipitates by immunoblotting identified a cross-linked protein complex of approximately 45 kDa, which under reducing conditions appeared as a approximately 28-kDa band and the latter displayed ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of a tyrosine, but not a threonine or serine, residue in the binding complex. [125I]rITF was used to localize binding sites by autoradiography of frozen sections from rat gastrointestinal tissues. A high density of specific [125I]rITF binding sites was present within gastric, colonic, and jejunal mucosal glands. Unlabeled hSP partially inhibited [125I]rITF binding at a concentration of 1 microM when compared with the same concentration of unlabeled rITF. These studies support earlier observations for the existence of trefoil binding sites in the gastrointestinal tract and further suggest that hSP has affinity for the mucosal rITF binding site.

  7. Toxicity of leucine-containing peptides in Escherichia coli caused by circumvention of leucine transport regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tavori, H; Kimmel, Y; Barak, Z

    1981-01-01

    A variety of leucine-containing peptides (LCP), Phe-Leu, Gly-Leu, Pro-Leu, Ala-Leu, Ala-Leu-Lys, Leu-Phe-Ala, Leu-Leu-Leu, and Leu-Gly-Gly, inhibited the growth of a prototrophic strain of Escherichia coli K-12 at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.28 mM. Toxicity requires normal uptake of peptides. When peptide transport was impaired by mutations, strains became resistant to the respective LCP. Inhibition of growth occurred immediately after the addition of LCP, and was relieved when 0.4 mM isoleucine was added. The presence of Gly-Leu in the medium correlated with the inhibition of growth, and the bacteria began to grow at the normal rate 70 min after Gly-Leu became undetectable. Disappearance of the peptide corresponded with the appearance of free leucine and glycine in the medium. The concentration of leucine inside the LCP-treated bacteria was higher than that in the leucine-treated and the control cultures. We suggest that entry of LCP into the cells via peptide transport systems circumvents the regulation of leucine transport, thereby causing abnormality high concentrations of leucine inside the cells. This accumulation of leucine interferes with the biosynthesis of isoleucine and inhibits the growth of the bacteria. Images PMID:7012134

  8. Electrophoretic Transport of Na(+) and K(+) Ions Within Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Diaz, Jennifer A; Cagin, Tahir

    2016-08-18

    One of the most important applications of cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) is their potential to be used as artificial ion channels. Natural ion channels are large and complex membrane proteins, which are very expensive, difficult to isolate, and sensible to denaturation; for this reason, artificial ion channels are an important alternative, as they can be produced by simple and inexpensive synthetic chemistry paths, allowing manipulation of properties and enhancement of ion selectivity properties. Artificial ion channels can be used as component in molecular sensors and novel therapeutic agents. Here, the electrophoretic transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions within cyclic peptide nanotubes is investigated by using molecular dynamic simulations. The effect of electric field in the stability of peptide nanotubes was studied by calculating the root mean square deviation curves. Results show that the stability for CPNTs decreases for higher electric fields. Selective transport of cations within the hydrophilic tubes was observed and the negative Cl(-) ions did not enter the peptide nanotubes during the simulation. Radial distribution functions were calculated to describe structural properties and coordination numbers and changes in the first and second hydration shell were observed for the transport of Na(+) and K(+) inside of cyclic peptide nanotubes. However, no effect on coordination number was observed. Diffusion coefficients were calculated from the mean square deviation curves and the Na(+) ion showed higher mobility than the K(+) ion as observed in equivalent experimental studies. The values for diffusion coefficients are comparable with previous calculations in protein channels of equivalent sizes. PMID:27448165

  9. Familial hypophosphatemic rickets: defective transport of inorganic phosphate by intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Short, E M; Binder, H J; Rosenberg, L E

    1973-02-16

    Uptake of inorganic phosphate is impared in intestinal mucosa from hemizygous males and heterozygous females with X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets. Considerable intrafamilial and interfamilial variation in uptake of inorganic phosphate is observed in affected patients. Uptake by normal mucosa is concentrative and energy-dependent, and is mediated by at least two systems with widely different affinities. These results lend direct support to the thesis that the primary metabolic disturbance in this disease results from impaired transport of inorganic phosphate in kidney and gut.

  10. Kinetics of D-glucose and L-leucine transport into sheep and pig intestinal brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wolffram, S; Eggenberger, E; Scharrer, E

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic parameters (Vmax, Kt) of Na+-dependent D-glucose transport into brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from sheep and pig jejunum were determined. Due to the fermentation of ingested carbohydrates in the rumen the small intestine of ruminants (sheep) has to absorb much less glucose than the small intestine of monogastric omnivores (pigs) or herbivores. Kinetic analysis of the concentration dependence of D-glucose transport revealed a ten-fold smaller Vmax value combined with a five times lower Kt value in sheep BBMV compared with pig BBMV. The Vmax value for L-leucine transport did not differ between the two species investigated, whereas the Kt value in the sheep exceeded that in the pig. It is concluded from these results that the mechanism for Na+-dependent D-glucose transport in ruminants is adapted to the small amounts of carbohydrates reaching the small intestine.

  11. FXR regulates organic solute transporters alpha and beta in the adrenal gland, kidney, and intestine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hans; Zhang, Yanqiao; Lee, Florence Y; Nelson, Stanley F; Gonzalez, Frank J; Edwards, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Expression of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is limited to the liver, intestine, kidney, and adrenal gland. However, the role of FXR in the latter two organs is unknown. In the current study, we performed microarray analysis using RNA from H295R cells infected with constitutively active FXR. Several putative FXR target genes were identified, including the organic solute transporters alpha and beta (OSTalpha and OSTbeta). Electromobility shift assays and promoter-reporter studies identified functional farnesoid X receptor response elements (FXREs) in the promoters of both human genes. These FXREs are conserved in both mouse genes. Treatment of wild-type mice with 3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3'-carboxy-2-chloro-stilben-4-yl)-oxymethyl-5-isopropyl-isoxazole (GW4064), a synthetic FXR agonist, induced OSTalpha and OSTbeta mRNAs in the intestine and kidney. Both mRNAs were also induced when wild-type, but not FXR-deficient (FXR-/-), adrenals were cultured in the presence of GW4064. OSTalpha and OSTbeta mRNA levels were also induced in the adrenals and kidneys of wild-type, but not FXR-/-, mice after the increase of plasma bile acids in response to the hepatotoxin alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate. Finally, overexpression of human OSTalpha and OSTbeta facilitated the uptake of conjugated chenodeoxycholate and the activation of FXR target genes. These results demonstrate that OSTalpha and OSTbeta are novel FXR target genes that are expressed in the adrenal gland, kidney, and intestine.

  12. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2015-09-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.

  13. Transepithelial transports of rare sugar D-psicose in human intestine.

    PubMed

    Hishiike, Takashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Shigeru; Nakajima, Daichi; O'Charoen, Siwaporn; Ooshima, Hisaka; Sun, Yuanxia

    2013-07-31

    D-Psicose (Psi), the C3-epimer of D-fructose (Fru), is a noncalorie sugar with a lower glycemic response. The trans-cellular pathway of Psi in human enterocytes was investigated using a Caco-2 cell monolayer. The permeation rate of Psi across the monolayer was not affected by the addition of phlorizin, an inhibitor of sugar transporter SGLT1, whereas it was accelerated by treatment with forskolin, a GLUT5-gene inducer, clearly showing that GLUT5 is involved in the transport of Psi. The permeability of Psi was suppressed in the presence of D-glucose (Glc) and Fru, suggesting that the three monosaccharides are transported via the same transporter. Since GLUT2, the predominant sugar transporter on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes, mediates the transport of Glc and Fru, Psi might be mediated by GLUT2. The present study shows that Psi is incorporated from the intestinal lumen into enterocytes via GLUT5 and is released to the lamina propria via GLUT2.

  14. Human intestinal transporter database: QSAR modeling and virtual profiling of drug uptake, efflux and interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedykh, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Duan, Jianmin; Hucke, Oliver; Garneau, Michel; Zhu, Hao; Bonneau, Pierre; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Membrane transporters mediate many biological effects of chemicals and play a major role in pharmacokinetics and drug resistance. The selection of viable drug candidates among biologically active compounds requires the assessment of their transporter interaction profiles. Methods Using public sources, we have assembled and curated the largest, to our knowledge, human intestinal transporter database (>5,000 interaction entries for >3,700 molecules). This data was used to develop thoroughly validated classification Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models of transport and/or inhibition of several major transporters including MDR1, BCRP, MRP1-4, PEPT1, ASBT, OATP2B1, OCT1, and MCT1. Results & Conclusions QSAR models have been developed with advanced machine learning techniques such as Support Vector Machines, Random Forest, and k Nearest Neighbors using Dragon and MOE chemical descriptors. These models afforded high external prediction accuracies of 71–100% estimated by 5-fold external validation, and showed hit retrieval rates with up to 20-fold enrichment in the virtual screening of DrugBank compounds. The compendium of predictive QSAR models developed in this study can be used for virtual profiling of drug candidates and/or environmental agents with the optimal transporter profiles. PMID:23269503

  15. Towards a structural understanding of drug and peptide transport within the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon

    2011-10-01

    One of the principal aims of modern drug design is the targeted delivery of drugs within the body, such as to the central nervous system, combined with their exclusion from the liver and kidneys, which break down foreign molecules and subsequently eliminate them. Many of the commonly prescribed drugs are transported into cells and across the plasma membrane via endogenous membrane transporters, whose principal roles are the uptake of essential nutrients for metabolism. In many cases, such drug transport is serendipitous as they are simply mistaken as 'natural' compounds. Many of these transporters could, however, be targeted more efficiently, improving drug absorption, distribution and retention. The molecular details of these drug-transporter interactions, however, are at best poorly understood, in large part through the absence of any high-resolution structural information. To address this issue, we recently determined the structure of a prokaryotic peptide transporter, PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis, which shares a high degree of sequence similarity and functional characteristics with the human PepT1 and PepT2 proteins. PepT1 and PepT2 contribute significantly to the oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of a number of important drug families, including antibiotics, antivirals and anticancer agents. The crystal structure of PepTSo provides the first high-resolution model of a drug importer and provides the starting point for understanding drug and peptide transport within the human body.

  16. Release of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor peptides during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO cheese and their absorption through an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, L; Catalani, E; Morera, P; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Bernabucci, U; De Noni, I; Nardone, A

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of 8 bovine casein-derived peptides (VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP, and HLPLP) reported as angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACE-I) was investigated in the 3-kDa ultrafiltered water-soluble extract (WSE) of Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) cheese samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionization source. Only VPP, IPP, LHLPLP, and HLPLP were revealed in the WSE, and their total amount was in the range of 8.46 to 21.55 mg/kg of cheese. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion, the same ACE-I peptides along with the newly formed AYFYPEL and AYFYPE were found in the 3 kDa WSE of PR digestates. Digestates presented high amounts (1,880-3,053 mg/kg) of LHLPLP, whereas the remaining peptides accounted for 69.24 to 82.82 mg/kg. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values decreased from 7.92 ± 2.08 in undigested cheese to 3.20 ± 1.69 after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The 3-kDa WSE of digested cheeses were used to study the transport of the 8 ACE-I peptides across the monolayers of the Caco-2 cell culture grown on a semipermeable membrane of the transwells. After 1h of incubation, 649.20 ± 148.85 mg/kg of LHLPLP remained in the apical compartment, whereas VPP, IPP, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, and HLPLP accounted in total for less than 36.78 mg/kg. On average, 0.6% of LHLPLP initially present in the digestates added to the apical compartment were transported intact to the basolateral chamber after the same incubation time. Higher transport rate (2.9%) was ascertained for the peptide HLPLP. No other intact ACE-I peptides were revealed in the basolateral compartment. For the first time, these results demonstrated that the ACE-I peptides HLPLP and LHLPLP present in the in vitro digestates of PR cheese are partially absorbed through an in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium.

  17. Intestinal transport of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose, a major active component of Polygala tenuifolia, using Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Steinmetz, André; Liao, Yonghong; Wang, Ning; Peng, Bo; Chang, Qi

    2013-10-01

    3,6'-Disinapoylsucrose is a major active component of the herb Polygala tenuifolia which has long been used for relieving tranquilization, uneasiness of the mind, and improving learning and memory. Our previous study found that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had a very low oral bioavailability. Its mechanisms of absorption in the small intestine have so far been unclear. In the present study, the absorption mechanisms of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose were investigated by using the Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models. The 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose concentration was determined by an LC/MS/MS method. In a Caco-2 cell transport study, the results showed that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had very limited intestinal permeability with average apparent permeability coefficient values around (1.11-1.34) × 10(-7) cm/s from the apical (A) to the basolateral (B) side and (1.37-1.42) × 10(-7) cm/s from B to A, at concentrations of 5, 20, and 33 µM. No concentration dependence in the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport was observed. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose (5 µM) from A to B greatly increased to 4.49 × 10(-7) and 1.81 × 10(-7) cm/s, respectively, when the cells were preincubated with EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM). No significant effect on the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport by the inhibitors including verapamil, cyclosporine A, and sodium azide was observed. Similar results were found in the small intestinal perfusion study. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose greatly increased from 3.97 × 10(-6) to 23.4 × 10(-6) and 20.0 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM), respectively, in perfusion buffer. An in vitro stability evaluation of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose in the gastrointestinal tract showed that it was relatively stable both in the stomach and small intestine contents, while it was found to be more instable in the colon contents. All of the

  18. Intestinal transport of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose, a major active component of Polygala tenuifolia, using Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Steinmetz, André; Liao, Yonghong; Wang, Ning; Peng, Bo; Chang, Qi

    2013-10-01

    3,6'-Disinapoylsucrose is a major active component of the herb Polygala tenuifolia which has long been used for relieving tranquilization, uneasiness of the mind, and improving learning and memory. Our previous study found that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had a very low oral bioavailability. Its mechanisms of absorption in the small intestine have so far been unclear. In the present study, the absorption mechanisms of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose were investigated by using the Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models. The 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose concentration was determined by an LC/MS/MS method. In a Caco-2 cell transport study, the results showed that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had very limited intestinal permeability with average apparent permeability coefficient values around (1.11-1.34) × 10(-7) cm/s from the apical (A) to the basolateral (B) side and (1.37-1.42) × 10(-7) cm/s from B to A, at concentrations of 5, 20, and 33 µM. No concentration dependence in the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport was observed. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose (5 µM) from A to B greatly increased to 4.49 × 10(-7) and 1.81 × 10(-7) cm/s, respectively, when the cells were preincubated with EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM). No significant effect on the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport by the inhibitors including verapamil, cyclosporine A, and sodium azide was observed. Similar results were found in the small intestinal perfusion study. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose greatly increased from 3.97 × 10(-6) to 23.4 × 10(-6) and 20.0 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM), respectively, in perfusion buffer. An in vitro stability evaluation of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose in the gastrointestinal tract showed that it was relatively stable both in the stomach and small intestine contents, while it was found to be more instable in the colon contents. All of the

  19. Acquisition of dietary copper: a role for anion transporters in intestinal apical copper uptake.

    PubMed

    Zimnicka, Adriana M; Ivy, Kristin; Kaplan, Jack H

    2011-03-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient in humans and is required for a wide range of physiological processes, including neurotransmitter biosynthesis, oxidative metabolism, protection against reactive oxygen species, and angiogenesis. The first step in the acquisition of dietary copper is absorption from the intestinal lumen. The major human high-affinity copper uptake protein, human copper transporter hCTR1, was recently shown to be at the basolateral or blood side of both intestinal and renal epithelial cell lines and thus does not play a direct role in this initial step. We sought to functionally identify the major transport pathways available for the absorption of dietary copper across the apical intestinal membrane using Caco2 cells, a well-established model for human enterocytes. The initial rate of apical copper uptake into confluent monolayers of Caco2 cells is greatly elevated if amino acids and serum proteins are removed from the growth media. Uptake from buffered saline solutions at neutral pH (but not at lower pH) is inhibited by either d- or l-histidine, unaltered by the removal of sodium ions, and inhibited by ∼90% when chloride ions are replaced by gluconate or sulfate. Chloride-dependent copper uptake occurs with Cu(II) or Cu(I), although Cu(I) uptake is not inhibited by histidine, nor by silver ions. A well-characterized inhibitor of anion exchange systems, DIDS, inhibited apical copper uptake by 60-70%, while the addition of Mn(II) or Fe(II), competitive substrates for the divalent metal transporter DMT1, had no effect on copper uptake. We propose that anion exchangers play an unexpected role in copper absorption, utilizing copper-chloride complexes as pseudo-substrates. This pathway is also observed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, human embryonic kidney cells, and Cos-7 cells. The special environment of low pH, low concentration of protein, and protonation of amino acids in the early intestinal lumen make this pathway especially important in

  20. Development of intestinal ion-transporting mechanisms during smoltification and seawater acclimation in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundh, Henrik; Nilsen, Tom O.; Lindström, Jenny; Hasselberg-Frank, Linda; Stefansson, Sigurd O.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Sundell, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of ion transporters involved in intestinal fluid absorption and presents evidence for developmental changes in abundance and tissue distribution of these transporters during smoltification and seawater (SW) acclimation of Atlantic salmonSalmo salar. Emphasis was placed on Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+, K+, Cl− co-transporter (NKCC) isoforms, at both transcriptional and protein levels, together with transcription of chloride channel genes. The nka α1c was the dominant isoform at the transcript level in both proximal and distal intestines; also, it was the most abundant isoform expressed in the basolateral membrane of enterocytes in the proximal intestine. This isoform was also abundantly expressed in the distal intestine in the lower part of the mucosal folds. The protein expression of intestinal Nkaα1c increased during smoltification. Immunostaining was localized to the basal membrane of the enterocytes in freshwater (FW) fish, and re-distributed to a lateral position after SW entry. Two other Nka isoforms, α1a and α1b, were expressed in the intestine but were not regulated to the same extent during smoltification and subsequent SW transfer. Their localization in the intestinal wall indicates a house-keeping function in excitatory tissues. The absorptive form of the NKCC-like isoform (sub-apically located NKCC2 and/or Na+, Cl−co-transporter) increased during smoltification and further after SW transfer. The cellular distribution changed from a diffuse expression in the sub-apical regions during smoltification to clustering of the transporters closer to the apical membrane after entry to SW. Furthermore, transcript abundance indicates that the mechanisms necessary for exit of chloride ions across the basolateral membrane and into the lateral intercellular space are present in the form of one or more of three different chloride channels: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator I and II and chloride channel

  1. Membrane transport mechanisms of choline in human intestinal epithelial LS180 cells.

    PubMed

    Horie, Asuka; Ishida, Kazuya; Watanabe, Yuri; Shibata, Kaito; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the membrane transport mechanisms of choline using human intestinal epithelial LS180 cells. The mRNA of choline transporter-like proteins (CTLs) was expressed significantly in LS180 cells, and the rank order was CTL1 > CTL4 > CTL3 > CTL2 > CTL5. In contrast, the mRNA expression of other choline transporters, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, OCT2 and high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1), was considerably lower in LS180 cells. Five mm unlabelled choline, hemicolinium-3 and guanidine, but not tetraethylammonium, inhibited the cellular uptake of 100 µm choline in LS180 cells. The uptake of choline into LS180 cells was virtually Na(+)-independent. The uptake of choline was significantly decreased by acidification of the extracellular pH; however, it was not increased by alkalization of the extracellular pH. In addition, both acidification and alkalization of intracellular pH decreased the uptake of choline, indicating that the choline uptake in LS180 cells is not stimulated by the outward H(+) gradient. On the other hand, the uptake of choline was decreased by membrane depolarization along with increasing extracellular K(+) concentration. In addition, the Na(+)-independent uptake of choline was saturable, and the Km value was estimated to be 108 µm. These findings suggest that the uptake of choline into LS180 cells is membrane potential-dependent, but not outward H(+) gradient-dependent.

  2. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1.

  3. Familial renal glycosuria: a genetic reappraisal of hexose transport by kidney and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Elsas, Louis J.; Rosenberg, Leon E.

    1969-01-01

    Renal glucose titration studies were carried out in 10 members of two pedigrees with familial renal glycosuria to test the accepted hypothesis of autosomal dominant inheritance and to investigate the genetic significance of “type A” and “type B” renal glycosuria. In one family, a brother and sister each had a moderately reduced threshold and tubular maximum for glucose (type A), but both of their parents reabsorbed glucose normally. In the second family, two brothers had severe type A renal glycosuria, their mother and one brother had a mild type A defect, and another brother demonstrated a reduced threshold, an exaggerated splay, and a normal tubular maximum, indicative of type B glycosuria. Hexose transport by intestinal mucosa was also investigated in controls and in the three brothers with the most severe renal glycosuria. D-glucose-14C and 3-O-methylglucose-14C were accumulated by jejunal mucosa from controls by processes which were saturable and concentrative. No differences in hexose transport were observed in the patients with renal glycosuria. We conclude that familial renal glycosuria can be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; that mild and severe type A renal glycosuria and type B renal glycosuria can occur in the same pedigree; and that defective reabsorption of glucose by the kidney need not be accompanied by abnormalities in intestinal glucose transport. These findings indicate that glucose transport in the gut and kidney are not mediated by identical mechanisms, and that several different mutations are responsible for the phenotypic variability in familial renal glycosuria. PMID:5822589

  4. Lairage during transport of eighteen-kilogram pigs has an impact on innate immunity and commensal bacteria diversity in the intestines.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; Minton, J E; Patterson, J A; Marchant Forde, J; Eicher, S D

    2008-05-01

    Long distance transportation may affect the health of pigs; thus, adding a rest stop (lairage) during long journeys may improve their well-being. The objective of this study was to determine whether a mid-journey lairage influenced swine innate immunity and intestinal microbial populations after a 16-h transport. Four replications were conducted, 1 in each of 4 seasons. Eighteen-kilogram pigs were housed in 16 pens (13 to 16 pigs/pen) with 8 pens/treatment. Lairage pigs were transported for 8 h, given a rest with food and water for 8 h, then transported for an additional 8 h. Continuous pigs were continuously transported for 16 h. Jugular blood samples and intestinal tissue and contents were collected from 16 pigs (8/treatment) on d 1, 3, 7, and 14 posttransport. Hematocrit and white blood cell counts were determined and neutrophil cell functions, including phagocytosis/oxidative burst and phagocytosis of latex beads and leukocyte phenotypic cell markers (CD14 and CD18), were analyzed using flow cytometry. Expression of toll-like receptors 2, 4, and 5; IL-8 (a cytokine that is a chemoattractant for neutrophils); CCL20 (a chemokine that is a chemoattractant for dendritic cells); and the antimicrobial peptide PR39 were determined from ileal and jejunal total RNA. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to determine shifts in intestinal microbial populations. Total white blood cell and granulocyte counts in continuous pigs were greater (P < 0.01) on d 1 than in lairage pigs. Phagocytosis of microbeads was greater in continuous (P < 0.05) than in lairage pigs on d 7. Expression of IL-8 in jejunum was greater (P < 0.05) for continuous than for lairage pigs on d 1. Expression of CCL20 in the ileum was greater (P < 0.05) on d 14 for the continuous pigs. Expression of PR39 was greatest (P < 0.05) in the jejunum of lairage pigs on d 3. Lairage pigs had a greater (P < 0.05) variation in microbial populations (lower similarity coefficient) in the jejunum contents on

  5. Evidence for long-distance xylem transport of signal peptide activity from tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    Several types of small, endogenous signal peptides are now known to induce a wide range of local and systemic responses in plants, but how such signal peptide activity is transported over long distances remains unclear. In particular, the possible occurrence and root-to-shoot transport of signal peptide activity in the xylem does not appear to have been previously investigated. Suspension-cultured cells of wild tomato Lycopersicon peruvanium L. were used in an established bioassay for detecting nanomolar concentrations of signal peptides via the induction of alkalinizing activity. Xylem sap naturally exuded from the cut and washed stem-surfaces of de-topped tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum L. cv. Castlemart) was collected, partially purified, concentrated, and shown by the bioassay consistently to contain significant alkalinizing activity. Plant salinity treatment induced further small increases in activity. Subsidiary experiments indicated that the alkalinizing activity found in the xylem-sap had properties similar to those of known plant signal peptides and was root derived. Thus, it was (i) detectable within minutes, (ii) eluted similarly during HPLC chromatography, (iii) destroyed by incubation with proteases and stable in the presence of protease inhibitor cocktail, and (iv) not found in bioassays of simulated xylem sap placed on the cut stem-surfaces of non-exuding roots in order to detect any significant release of wound peptides from the stem. Further investigations of the signal peptide activity in root xylem sap could provide new insights into its identity, genes, receptors, origins, and possible hormonal roles in regulating shoot growth and development.

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells via CREB/MITF/tyrosinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-Hua; Yao, Cheng; Oh, Jang-Hee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Tian, Yu-Dan; Han, Mira; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho; Jin, Zhe-Hu; Lee, Dong Hun

    2016-08-26

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), one of the major skin neuropeptides, has been suggested to have active roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which can commonly cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. However, the effect of VIP on melanogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we showed that the melanin contents, tyrosinase activity, and gene expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were significantly increased by treatment with VIP in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells and the stimulatory melanogenic effect was further examined in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMns). In addition, phosphorylated levels of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and protein kinase A (PKA) were markedly increased after VIP treatment, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), or Akt, indicating the possible PKA-CREB signaling pathway involved in VIP-induced melanogenesis. This result was further verified by the fact that VIP induced increased melanin synthesis, and protein levels of phosphorylated CREB, MITF, tyrosinase were significantly attenuated by H89 (a specific PKA inhibitor). These data suggest that VIP-induced upregulation of tyrosinase through the CREB-MITF signaling pathway plays an important role in finding new treatment strategy for skin inflammatory diseases related pigmentation disorders. PMID:27343558

  7. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  8. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  9. Distribution of vasotocin- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity in the brain of blue tit (Cyanistes coeruleus)

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Catherine M.; Székely, Tamás; Csillag, András; Zachar, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus) are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT) and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping. The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species. PMID:26236200

  10. Vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonist treatment during mouse embryogenesis impairs social behavior and cognitive function of adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Cuasay, Katrina; Abebe, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a regulator of rodent embryogenesis during the period of neural tube closure. VIP enhanced growth in whole cultured mouse embryos; treatment with a VIP antagonist during embryogenesis inhibited growth and development. VIP antagonist treatment during embryogenesis also had permanent effects on adult brain chemistry and impaired social recognition behavior in adult male mice. The neurological deficits of autism appear to be initiated during neural tube closure and social behavior deficits are among the key characteristics of this disorder that is more common in males and is frequently accompanied by mental retardation. The current study examined the blockage of VIP during embryogenesis as a model for the behavioral deficits of autism. Treatment of pregnant mice with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10 had no apparent effect on the general health or sensory or motor capabilities of adult offspring. However, male offspring exhibited reduced sociability in the social approach task and deficits in cognitive function, as assessed through cued and contextual fear conditioning. Female offspring did not show these deficiencies. These results suggest that this paradigm has usefulness as a mouse model for aspects of autism as it selectively impairs male offspring who exhibit the reduced social behavior and cognitive dysfunction seen in autism. Furthermore, the study indicates that the foundations of some aspects of social behavior are laid down early in mouse embryogenesis, are regulated in a sex specific manner and that interference with embryonic regulators such as VIP can have permanent effects on adult social behavior.

  11. Linking Gene Expression in the Intestine to Production of Gametes Through the Phosphate Transporter PITR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Balklava, Zita; Rathnakumar, Navin D.; Vashist, Shilpa; Schweinsberg, Peter J.; Grant, Barth D.

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential mineral for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell metabolism and structure. Its uptake into the cell is mediated by membrane-bound transporters and coupled to Na+ transport. Mammalian sodium-dependent Pi cotransporters have been grouped into three families NaPi-I, NaPi-II, and NaPi-III. Despite being discovered more than two decades ago, very little is known about requirements for NaPi-III transporters in vivo, in the context of intact animal models. Here we find that impaired function of the Caenorhabditis elegans NaPi-III transporter, pitr-1, results in decreased brood size and dramatically increased expression of vitellogenin by the worm intestine. Unexpectedly, we found that the effects of pitr-1 mutation on vitellogenin expression in the intestine could only be rescued by expression of pitr-1 in the germline, and not by expression of pitr-1 in the intestine itself. Our results indicate the existence of a signal from the germline that regulates gene expression in the intestine, perhaps linking nutrient export from the intestine to production of gametes by the germline. PMID:27449055

  12. Linking Gene Expression in the Intestine to Production of Gametes Through the Phosphate Transporter PITR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Balklava, Zita; Rathnakumar, Navin D; Vashist, Shilpa; Schweinsberg, Peter J; Grant, Barth D

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential mineral for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell metabolism and structure. Its uptake into the cell is mediated by membrane-bound transporters and coupled to Na(+) transport. Mammalian sodium-dependent Pi cotransporters have been grouped into three families NaPi-I, NaPi-II, and NaPi-III. Despite being discovered more than two decades ago, very little is known about requirements for NaPi-III transporters in vivo, in the context of intact animal models. Here we find that impaired function of the Caenorhabditis elegans NaPi-III transporter, pitr-1, results in decreased brood size and dramatically increased expression of vitellogenin by the worm intestine. Unexpectedly, we found that the effects of pitr-1 mutation on vitellogenin expression in the intestine could only be rescued by expression of pitr-1 in the germline, and not by expression of pitr-1 in the intestine itself. Our results indicate the existence of a signal from the germline that regulates gene expression in the intestine, perhaps linking nutrient export from the intestine to production of gametes by the germline. PMID:27449055

  13. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, suppresses food intake and gastric emptying with the elevation of plasma peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 in a dietary fat-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hata, Takahiro; Mera, Yasuko; Ishii, Yukihito; Tadaki, Hironobu; Tomimoto, Daisuke; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Kawai, Takashi; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakutani, Makoto

    2011-03-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) takes part in the mobilization and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from enterocytes and hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of diethyl-2-({3-dimethylcarbamoyl-4-[(4'-trifluoromethylbiphenyl-2-carbonyl) amino] phenyl}acetyloxymethyl)-2-phenylmalonate (JTT-130), a novel intestine-specific MTP inhibitor, on food intake, gastric emptying, and gut peptides using Sprague-Dawley rats fed 3.1% fat, 13% fat, or 35% fat diets. JTT-130 treatment suppressed cumulative food intake and gastric emptying in rats fed a 35% fat diet, but not a 3.1% fat diet. In rats fed a 13% fat diet, JTT-130 treatment decreased cumulative food intake but not gastric emptying. In addition, treatment with orlistat, a lipase inhibitor, completely abolished the reduction of food intake and gastric emptying by JTT-130 in rats fed a 35% fat diet. On the other hand, JTT-130 treatment increased the plasma concentrations of gut peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) but not cholecystokinin, in the portal vein in rats fed a 35% fat diet. These elevations in PYY and GLP-1 were also abolished by treatment with orlistat. Furthermore, JTT-130 treatment in rats fed a 35% fat diet increased the contents of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the intestinal lumen, which might contribute to the elevation of PYY and GLP-1 levels. The present findings indicate that JTT-130 causes satiety responses, decreased food intake, and gastric emptying in a dietary fat-dependent manner, with enhanced production of gut peptides such as PYY and GLP-1 from the intestine.

  14. Modulation of intestinal calcium and phosphate transport in young goats fed a nitrogen- and/or calcium-reduced diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2015-12-28

    Feeding ruminants a reduced N diet is a common approach to reduce N output based on rumino-hepatic circulation. However, a reduction in N intake caused massive changes in Ca and inorganic phosphate (Pi) homoeostasis in goats. Although a single dietary Ca reduction stimulated intestinal Ca absorption in a calcitriol-dependent manner, a concomitant reduction of Ca and N supply led to a decrease in calcitriol, and therefore a modulation of intestinal Ca and Pi absorption. The aim of this study was to examine the potential effects of dietary N or Ca reduction separately on intestinal Ca and Pi transport in young goats. Animals were allocated to a control, N-reduced, Ca-reduced or combined N- and Ca-reduced diet for about 6-8 weeks, whereby N content was reduced by 25 % compared with recommendations. In Ussing chamber experiments, intestinal Ca flux rates significantly decreased in goats fed a reduced N diet, whereas Pi flux rates were unaffected. In contrast, a dietary Ca reduction stimulated Ca flux rates and decreased Pi flux rates. The combined dietary N and Ca reduction withdrew the stimulating effect of dietary Ca reduction on Ca flux rates. The expression of Ca-transporting proteins decreased with a reduced N diet too, whereas Pi-transporting proteins were unaffected. In conclusion, a dietary N reduction decreased intestinal Ca transport by diminishing Ca-transporting proteins, which became clear during simultaneous N and Ca reduction. Therefore, N supply in young ruminant nutrition is of special concern for intestinal Ca transport. PMID:26443238

  15. H(+)/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H(+) gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. PMID:27216463

  16. Quantitative Targeted Absolute Proteomics of Transporters and Pharmacoproteomics-Based Reconstruction of P-Glycoprotein Function in Mouse Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Takanori; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a pharmacokinetic model integrating in vitro mdr1a efflux activity (which we previously reported) with in vitro/in vivo differences in protein expression level can reconstruct intestinal mdr1a function. In situ intestinal permeability-surface area product ratio between wild-type and mdr1a/1b (-/-) mice is one of the parameters used to describe intestinal mdr1a function. The reconstructed ratios of six mdr1a substrates (dexamethasone, digoxin, loperamide, quinidine, verapamil, vinblastine) and one nonsubstrate (diazepam) were consistent with the observed values reported by Adachi et al. within 2.1-fold difference. Thus, intestinal mdr1a function can be reconstructed by our pharmacoproteomic modeling approach. Furthermore, we evaluated regional differences in protein expression levels of mouse intestinal transporters. Sixteen (mdr1a, mrp4, bcrp, abcg5, abcg8, glut1, 4f2hc, sglt1, lat2, pept1, mct1, slc22a18, ostβ, villin1, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, γ-gtp) out of 46 target molecules were detected by employing our established quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. The protein expression amounts of mdr1a and bcrp increased progressively from duodenum to ileum. Sglt1, lat2, and 4f2hc were highly expressed in jejunum and ileum. Mct1 and ostβ were highly expressed in ileum. The quantitative expression profiles established here should be helpful to understand and predict intestinal transporter functions. PMID:27276518

  17. Mechanisms Underlying Food-Drug Interactions: Inhibition of Intestinal Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively. PMID:22884524

  18. The emerging role of PDZ adapter proteins for regulation of intestinal ion transport.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, G; Seidler, U

    2006-11-01

    In the gastrointestinal tract, CFTR, in conjunction with one or several members of the SLC26 anion exchanger family, mediates electrogenic Cl- and HCO3- secretion. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform NHE3, on the other hand, coupled to one or several of the SLC26 isoforms, mediates electroneutral NaCl absorption. The agonist-induced activation of anion secretion and inhibition of salt absorption causes secretory diarrhea. Current dogma sees the formation of a multiprotein complex of transport proteins, postsynaptic density-95/discs large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) adapter proteins, anchoring proteins, the cytoskeleton, and the involved protein kinases as one crucial step in the regulation of these transport processes. Data obtained in heterologous expression studies suggest an important role of these PDZ adapter proteins in trafficking, endocytic recycling, and membrane retention of the respective transmembrane proteins. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the role of the PDZ adapter proteins NHERF, E3KARP, PDZK1, IKEPP (NHERF-1 to NHERF-4), CAL, and Shank-2 that bind to CFTR, NHE3, and the intestinal SLC26 members in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport. Current concepts are mostly derived from heterologous expression studies and studies on their role in organ physiology are still in infancy. Recently, however, PDZ adapter protein-deficient mice and organ-specific cell lines have become available, and the first results suggest a more cell-type and possibly signal-specific role of these adapter proteins. This opens the potential for drug development targeted to PDZ domain interactions, which is, in theory, one of the most efficient antidiarrheal strategies. PMID:16798722

  19. Ethanol alters vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced steroid release from immature rat ovaries in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, W.L.; Hiney, J.K.; Fuentes, F.; Forrest, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the acute effects of ethanol (ETOH) on basal and VIP-induced release of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E{sub 2}) from immature ovaries in vitro. Ovaries were collected from anestrus (A) and both naturally occurring and pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG)-induced early proestrus (EP) animals. The ovaries were incubated in wither media alone, media plus 1 {mu}M VIP, media plus ETOH in doses ranging from 25 to 100 mM, or media plus each dose of ETOH containing VIP. The present results demonstrate that ETOH did not affect either basal or VIP-induced steroid release from ovaries collected from A animals. Likewise, the ETOH did not alter basal steroid secretion from EP animals; however, the drug significantly reduced the VIP-stimulated release of both T and E, from EP ovaries. Thus, these data demonstrate for the first time that ETOH is capable of altering prepubertal ovarian responsiveness to VIP, a peptide known to be involved in the developmental regulation of ovarian function.

  20. Modulation of small intestinal phosphate transporter by dietary supplements of mineral phosphorus and phytase in broilers.

    PubMed

    Huber, Korinna; Zeller, Ellen; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Dietary phosphorus (P) is known as a main modulator of phosphate (Pi) transporter expression. The effect of supplemented mineral P with or without phytase on protein expression of two sodium-dependent Pi (NaPi) transporters and a calcium channel was studied in the small intestine of broilers. Thirty-six broilers were randomly assigned to six different diets at 15 days of age. Two levels of total P (tP, adjusted by monocalcium phosphate (MCP) supplementation), 0.39% (BD-) and 0.47% (BD+) were fed until day 25; and at each tP level, three levels of phytase were used with 0, 500, and 12,500 FTU/kg of an E. coli phytase. Mucosa samples from jejunum and ileum were taken and apical membranes were isolated by MgCl2 precipitation. Protein expression of NaPi IIb, NaPi type III (PiT1) and the calcium channel TRPV6 were semiquantitatively measured by Western blotting and jejunal mucosal phytase activity by measurement of Pi release. The jejunal NaPi IIb transporter was expressed with two distinct bands, which were modulated differently by diet. NaPi IIb Band1 increased (P < 0.05) and Band2 decreased (P < 0.05) with phytase supplementation but was not affected by MCP supplementation. This inverse modulation of Band1 and Band2 was significantly related to the amount of net absorbed P with higher expression of Band1 at higher amounts of net absorbed P. In addition, a second Pi transporter, PiT1, was detected in which ileal expression decreased (P < 0.05) in response to higher phytase supplementation. The expression of the calcium channel TRPV6 was increased in BD+ groups. A trend for an interaction between MCP and phytase supplementation on mucosal phytase activity was observed (P = 0.079) with a decrease in activity when BD+ with 12,500 FTU/kg phytase was fed. Chicken intestinal epithelial cells responded to dietary supplemented phytase and MCP by changing the Pi transporter expression in apical membranes. In conclusion, availability of Pi is most likely the key modulator of

  1. A comparison of the release of a vasoactive-intestinal-peptide-like peptide and acetylcholine in the giant axon-Schwann cell preparation of the tropical squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea.

    PubMed

    Evans; Reale; Merzon; Villegas

    1999-01-21

    A vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-like peptide is released by axonal stimulation in the giant axon-Schwann cell preparation from the tropical squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea. It is also released by direct application of l-glutamate, the giant axon-Schwann cell signalling molecule in this preparation. The release of the peptide parallels the release of acetylcholine from the Schwann cells themselves in this preparation in a number of different ways. The release of both acetylcholine and the VIP-like peptide have the same threshold (between 2x10(-10) and 5x10(-10 )mol l-1) for l-glutamate application and the same recovery time after inhibition of release by exposure of the preparation to a prolonged pulse of l-glutamate. A prolonged l-glutamate pulse of 10(-8 )mol l-1 releases both substances for as long as the pulse is applied to the preparation, whereas a prolonged pulse of 10(-9 )mol l-1 l-glutamate releases acetylcholine in the same way but releases the VIP-like peptide only transiently. The VIP-like peptide is likely to be co-released with acetylcholine from the Schwann cells.

  2. Nutrient transport in the small intestine: Na+,K+-ATPase expression and activity in the small intestine of the chicken as influenced by dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Gal-Garber, O; Mabjeesh, S J; Sklan, D; Uni, Z

    2003-07-01

    The Na+-K+-ATPase, localized in the basolateral membrane of enterocytes plays a major role in nutrient transport in the small intestine by transferring K+ ions into and Na+ out of the cell. Within the enterocyte, homeostasis is maintained by active exclusion of Na from the cell by the Na+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) or sodium pump. Because much of the intestinal nutrient transport is by Na cotransporters, Na+,K+-ATPase may be used to evaluate nutrient uptake. In this study, nutrient transport was evaluated by determining expression and activity of Na+-K+-ATPase in the jejunum of chicks fed diets with different concentrations of Na. Expression of the chicken Na+-K+-ATPase gene was examined following isolation of an 1,140 bp cDNA fragment of the alpha-subunit using a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR reaction with specific primers. This fragment was sequenced and showed 95 to 98% homology with the mammalian alpha-subunit of the Na+-K+-ATPase genes. This cDNA fragment was used as a specific probe in Northern blot hybridization for determination of expression in the chicken jejunum. Expression of mRNA of Na+-K+-ATPase was enhanced at low dietary Na but was unchanged at high dietary Na concentrations. In contrast, activity of the enzyme was low with low dietary Na and unchanged at high dietary Na. The Vmax of the Na+-K+-ATPase was unchanged, but affinity was altered by dietary Na concentrations. Thus, determination of expression and activity of intestinal Na+-K+-ATPase allows clearer understanding of changes in intestinal uptake due to dietary Na.

  3. Peptide modules for overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport to cells.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna A; Kiselev, Anton V

    2016-01-01

    Absence of safe and efficient methods of nucleic acids delivery is one of the major issues which limits the development of human gene therapy. Highly efficient viral vectors raise questions due to safety reasons. Among non-viral vectors peptide-based carriers can be considered as good candidates for the development of "artificial viruses"--multifunctional polyplexes that mimic viruses. Suggested strategy to obtain multifunctionality is to combine several peptide modules into one modular carrier. Different kinds of peptide modules are needed for successful overcoming barriers of nucleic acids transport into the cells. Design of such modules and establishment of structure-function relationships are issues of importance to researchers working in the field of nucleic acids delivery.

  4. The lymph lipid precursor pool is a key determinant of intestinal lymphatic drug transport.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Porter, Christopher J H; Charman, William N

    2006-02-01

    The influence of the size and turnover kinetics of the enterocyte-based lymph lipid precursor pool (LLPP) on intestinal lymphatic drug transport has been examined. Mesenteric lymph duct-cannulated rats were infused intraduodenally with low (2-5 mg/h) or high (20 mg/h) lipid-dose formulations containing 100 microg/h halofantrine (Hf, a model drug) and 1 microCi/h (14)C-oleic acid (OA) (as a marker for lipid transport) until steady-state rates of lipid(dX(L)/dt)(ss) and drug (dD(L)/dt)(ss) transport in lymph were obtained. After 5 h, the infusion was changed to formulations of the same composition but excluding (14)C-OA and Hf, allowing calculation of the first order rate constants describing turnover of lipid (K(X)) and drug (K(D)) from the LLPP into the lymph from the washout kinetics. The mass of lipid (X(LP)) and drug (D(LP)) in the LLPP was also determined. Biliary-lipid output was determined in a separate group of rats that had been infused with the same formulations. The results indicate that after administration of high lipid doses, lymphatic drug transport is dependent on the mass of exogenous lipid available in the LLPP and the rate of lipid pool turnover into the lymph. In contrast, after administration of low lipid doses, biliary-derived endogenous lipids are most likely to be the primary drivers of drug incorporation into the LLPP and lymph. Therefore, the LLPP size and composition seem to be major determinants of lymphatic drug transport, and formulation components, which increase lipid pool size, may therefore enhance lymphatic drug transport. PMID:16249368

  5. Surface Decorated Gold Nanoparticles by Linear and Cyclic Peptides as Molecular Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Oh, Donghoon; Sullivan, Brian; McCaffrey, Kellen; Mandal, Dindyal; Parang, Keykavous

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized in situ in a green and rapid method from the reaction of reducing linear and cyclic peptides containing tryptophan and lysine residues, (KW)5 and cyclic [KW]5, with an aqueous solution of HAuCl4 and were evaluated as cellular nanodrug delivery systems. The cyclic or linear nature of the peptide was found to determine the morphology and size of the formed peptide-AuNPs and their in vitro molecular transporting efficiency. While cyclic [KW]5-AuNPs formed sponge-like agglomerates, linear (KW)5-AuNPs demonstrated ball-shaped structures. A comparative flow cytometry study showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence-labeled anti-HIV drugs (emtricitabine (FTC) and lamivudine (3TC)) in human Leukemia (CCRF-CEM) cells, and a negatively charged cell-impermeable phosphopeptide (GpYEEI) in human ovarian adecarcinoma (SK-OV-3) cells was significantly higher in the presence of cyclic [KW]5-AuNPs than that of linear (KW)5-AuNPs, parent cyclic [KW]5, and linear (KW)5 peptides. For example, the cellular uptake of F′-GpYEEI was enhanced 12.8-fold by c[KW]5-AuNPs. Confocal microscopy revealed the localization of fluorescence-labeled-3TC in the presence of c[KW]5-AuNPs mostly in nucleus in SK-OV-3 cells after 1 h. On the other hand, l(KW)5-AuNPs delivered fluorescence-labeled-3TC in cytoplasm. These data suggest that non-cell penetrating peptides can be converted to efficient molecular transporters through peptide-capped AuNPs formation. PMID:23834324

  6. D-(Ala1)-peptide T-amide is transported from blood to brain by a saturable system

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, C.M.; Kastin, A.J.; Banks, W.A.

    1987-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier. The entry into the central nervous system of a commercially available analog of Peptide T, an octapeptide derived from the human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein 120, was studied in several experiments. It was found that /sup 125/I-Peptide T analog given intravenously in the periphery entered the brain in an intact form, as confirmed by HPLC, to a greater extent than did the labeled albumin control. This entry occurred despite the very low lipid solubility, measured by the octanol/buffer partition coefficient, for the iodinated analog. The rate of entry was decreased by unlabeled Peptide T analog, but not by iodo-tyrosine. Saturable transport out of the brain was not observed after intraventricular administration. Thus, results with /sup 125/I-Peptide T analog indicate that saturable systems can transport peptides from the blood into the central nervous system.

  7. Immunoreactivity to peptides belonging to the pancreatic polypeptide family (NPY, aPY, PP, PYY) and to glucagon-like peptide in the endocrine pancreas and anterior intestine of adult lampreys, Petromyzon marinus: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Cheung, R; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M; Youson, J H

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactivity of antisera directed against human neuropeptide Y (NPY), anglerfish polypeptide YG (aPY), bovine pancreatic polypeptide (bPP), salmon pancreatic polypeptide (sPP), porcine peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), and salmon glucagon-like peptide (GLP) was investigated in the endocrine pancreas and anterior intestine of adult lampreys, Petromyzon marinus, by immunohistochemical analysis. There was no immunoreactivity to anti-sPP and anti-bPP in any tissue and anti-GLP immunostaining was only present in the anterior intestine. The immunoreactivity to antisera raised against NPY, aPY, and PYY was colocalized within the same small number of cells in the caudal and cranial pancreas of juveniles and the caudal pancreas of upstream migrant adults. These antibodies did not immunostain B- or D-cells and thus, NPY, aPY, and PYY were likely localized in a third cell type (3a) in the lamprey pancreas. Immunostaining of a few cells with only anti-aPY suggested the possibility of a fourth cell type (3b). Immunoreactivity was similar in the cranial and caudal pancreas of male upstream migrants; however, in the female cranial pancreas, a few cells demonstrated intense immunoreaction to anti-aPY, while weaker immunostaining with this antiserum was observed in B-cells. In the intestine of juvenile and upstream migrant lampreys, positive immunostaining to GLP, NPY, aPY, and PYY antibodies was colocalized within the same cell. We believe that this cell may contain PYY/glucagon family peptides. Other intestinal cells immunostained with either GLP or somatostatin-34 antiserum. PMID:2026316

  8. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. PMID:8568273

  9. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism.

  10. Regulation of iron uptake and transport by transferrin in Caco-2 cells, an intestinal cell line.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Hernandez, X; Smith, M; Glass, J

    1994-06-22

    Caco-2 cells grown in bicameral chambers, a model of intestinal epithelial iron transport (Biochim. Biophys. Acta (1991) 1070, 205-208), were used to study the effect of apo-transferrin (apo-Tf) in the basal chamber on 59Fe uptake from the apical surface, intracellular 59Fe distribution, and 59Fe transport into the basal chamber. Caco-2 cells were grown with varying amounts of iron to achieve cells that were either iron-deficient (FeD), or normal iron status (FeN), or iron-loaded (FeH). The effect of apo-Tf was most marked in FeD cells with the transport of 59Fe from 1 microM 59Fe-ascorbate on the apical side to the basal chamber measured as (22.2 +/- 3.0) x 10(4), (8.2 +/- 0.6) x 10(4), and (2.7 +/- 0.4) x 10(4) atoms 59Fe/cell/min in the presence of apo-Tf, BSA, and no added protein, respectively. Unexpectedly in FeD cells total 59Fe uptake (i.e., both 59Fe in the cells and that transported into the basal chamber) was decreased by basolateral apo-Tf with total uptake of (2.6 +/- 0.3) x 10(5), (4.8 +/- 0.6) x 10(5), and (4.8 +/- 0.7) x 10(5) atoms/cell/min with apo-Tf, BSA, and no additions, respectively. Analysis of intracellular 59Fe by isoelectrofocusing in polyacrylamide gels demonstrated 59Fe migrating both with a basic pI and with the pI values of ferritin (Ft) at a ratio of 200:1 (basic pI moiety: ferritin) in FeD cells. The presence of Tf further decreased the small amount of 59Fe in Ft. These studies demonstrate that basolateral Tf affects the apical uptake of 59Fe, the intracellular distribution of 59Fe, and the transport of 59Fe across intestinal epithelium, the latter effect occurring even when cellular content of ferritin is high.

  11. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides.

  12. Characterization of the Opp Peptide Transporter of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and Its Role in Virulence and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Pablo M. R. O.; Seyffert, Nubia; Silva, Wanderson M.; Castro, Thiago L. P.; Silva, Renata F.; Lima, Danielle D.; Hirata, Raphael; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Despite the economic importance of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), a chronic disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, few genes related to the virulence of its etiologic agent have been characterized. The oligopeptide permease (Opp) transporters are located in the plasma membrane and have functions generally related to the uptake of peptides from the extracellular environment. These peptide transporters, in addition to having an important role in cell nutrition, also participate in the regulation of various processes involving intercellular signaling, including the control of the expression of virulence genes in pathogenic bacteria. To study the role of Opp in C. pseudotuberculosis, an OppD deficient strain was constructed via simple crossover with a nonreplicative plasmid carrying part of the oppD gene sequence. As occurred to the wild-type, the ΔoppD strain showed impaired growth when exposed to the toxic glutathione peptide (GSH), indicating two possible scenarios: (i) that this component can be internalized by the bacterium through an Opp-independent pathway or (ii) that there is toxicity while the peptide is extracellular. Additionally, the ΔoppD mutant presented a reduced ability to adhere to and infect macrophages compared to the wild-type, although both strains exhibit the same potential to colonize spleens and cause injury and death to infected mice. PMID:24895581

  13. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides. PMID:27621456

  14. The Small Intestinal Epithelia of Beef Steers Differentially Express Sugar Transporter Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in Response to Abomasal Versus Ruminal Infusion of Starch Hydrolysate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mammals, the absorption of mono¬saccharides from small intestinal lumen involves at least 3 sugar transporters (SugT): sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1; gene SLC5A1) transports glucose and galactose, whereas glucose transporter (GLUT) 5 (GLUT5; gene SLC2A5) transports fructose, acros...

  15. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Segal, Michal; Soifer, Ilya; Petzold, Heike; Howard, Jonathon; Elbaum, Michael; Reiner, Orly

    2012-03-15

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  16. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Michal; Soifer, Ilya; Petzold, Heike; Howard, Jonathon; Elbaum, Michael; Reiner, Orly

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport. PMID:23213412

  17. Altered vasoactive intestinal peptides expression in irritable bowel syndrome patients and rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Anderson, Ethan M; Caudle, Robert M; Henderson, Wendy A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the vasoactive intestinal peptides (VIP) expression in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis. METHODS: The VIP gene expression and protein plasma levels were measured in adult participants (45.8% male) who met Rome III criteria for IBS for longer than 6 mo and in a rat model of colitis as induced by TNBS. Plasma and colons were collected from naïve and inflamed rats. Markers assessing inflammation (i.e., weight changes and myeloperoxidase levels) were assessed on days 2, 7, 14 and 28 and compared to controls. Visceral hypersensitivity of the rats was assessed with colo-rectal distension and mechanical threshold testing on hind paws. IBS patients (n = 12) were age, gender, race, and BMI-matched with healthy controls (n = 12). Peripheral whole blood and plasma from fasting participants was collected and VIP plasma levels were assayed using a VIP peptide-enzyme immunoassay. Human gene expression of VIP was analyzed using a custom PCR array. RESULTS: TNBS induced colitis in the rats was confirmed with weight loss (13.7 ± 3.2 g) and increased myeloperoxidase activity. Visceral hypersensitivity to colo-rectal distension was increased in TNBS treated rats up to 21 d and resolved by day 28. Somatic hypersensitivity was also increased up to 14 d post TNBS induction of colitis. The expression of an inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase was significantly elevated in the intracellular granules of neutrophils in rat models following TNBS treatment compared to naïve rats. This confirmed the induction of inflammation in rats following TNBS treatment. VIP plasma concentration was significantly increased in rats following TNBS treatment as compared to naïve animals (P < 0.05). Likewise, the VIP gene expression from peripheral whole blood was significantly upregulated by 2.91-fold in IBS patients when compared to controls (P < 0.00001; 95%CI). VIP plasma protein was not significantly different when compared with

  18. Transport of aspalathin, a Rooibos tea flavonoid, across the skin and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao; du Plessis, Jeanetta; du Preez, Jan; Hamman, Josias; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2008-05-01

    Since Rooibos tea contains high levels of flavonoid antioxidants with potential health benefits when taken orally or applied topically, the quantity of the antioxidants crossing the physiological barriers is of scientific, clinical and commercial importance. This study investigated the in vitro transport of aspalathin, a unique flavonoid constituent of Rooibos tea, across intestinal epithelial cells and the human skin. The transport studies were conducted for both pure aspalathin solutions and extracts from unfermented (or green) Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) aerial plant material across human abdominal skin in vertical Franz diffusion cells and Caco-2 cell monolayers in Transwell 6-well plates. The results obtained from the percutaneous permeation studies demonstrated that only 0.01% of the initial aspalathin dose from both the test solution and extract permeated through the skin, which was in accordance with the prediction from its log P value of -0.347. A portion of 0.07% of the initial aspalathin dose penetrated the different layers of the skin for the green Rooibos extract solution and 0.08% for the pure aspalathin solution. The transport of aspalathin across Caco-2 cell monolayers was concentration dependent and reached almost 100% (P(app) = 20.93 x 10(-6) cm/s) of the initial dose in the highest concentration tested for the extract, while it was only 79.03% (P(app) = 15.34 x 10(-6) cm/s) of the initial dose for the highest concentration of the aspalathin solution.

  19. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca2+ uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  20. Quercetin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and ferroportin transporter expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lesjak, Marija; Hoque, Rukshana; Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K S; Sharp, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin--the most abundant dietary polyphenol--are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3'UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  1. Quercetin Inhibits Intestinal Iron Absorption and Ferroportin Transporter Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S.; Srai, Surjit K. S.; Sharp, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin – the most abundant dietary polyphenol – are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3′UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  2. New advances in the pathophysiology of intestinal ion transport and barrier function in diarrhea and the impact on therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakraborty, Subhra; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Woodward, Owen M

    2012-06-01

    Diarrhea remains a continuous threat to human health worldwide. Scaling up the best practices for diarrhea prevention requires improved therapies. Diarrhea results from dysregulation of normal intestinal ion transport functions. Host-microbe contact is a key determinant of this response. Underlying mechanisms in the disease state are regulated by intracellular signals that modulate the activity of individual transport proteins responsible for ion transport and barrier function. Similarly, virulence factors of pathogens and their complex interaction with the host has shed light on the mechanism of enteric infection. Great advances in our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of epithelial transport, and host-microbe interaction have been made in recent years. Application of these new advances may represent strategies to decrease pathogen attachment, enhance intestinal cation absorption, decrease anion secretion and repair barrier function. This review highlights the new advances and better understanding in the pathophysiology of diarrheal diseases and their impact on therapy.

  3. Regulation of rat adrenal vasoactive intestinal peptide content: effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment and changes in dietary sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Hinson, J P; Renshaw, D; Carroll, M; Kapas, S

    2001-09-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is well established as a paracrine regulator of adrenal function. It is present in nerves supplying the adrenal cortex, although previous studies have found that the amount of VIP in the outer zones of the rat adrenal is not affected by ligating the splanchnic nerve supplying the adrenal gland. The present studies were designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in regulating the VIP content of the rat adrenal gland. This study examined the effects of changes in electrolyte balance and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration on the adrenal content of VIP as measured by radioimmunoassay. Rats on a low sodium diet had a significantly increased capsular/zona glomerulosa immunoreactive VIP (irVIP) level, while rats on a high sodium diet had suppressed levels relative to controls. Changes in dietary sodium did not affect inner zone/medullary VIP content. Administration of ACTH caused a decrease in irVIP levels in the capsular/zona glomerulosa portion of the adrenal gland but had no effect on the inner zone/medulla. Analysis of mRNA encoding VIP revealed a large increase in expression of VIP in the sodium-deplete group compared with the control, with no change in VIP expression in the sodium-loaded group. ACTH treatment was found to significantly decrease VIP mRNA levels in the capsular portion. Neither ACTH treatment nor changes in sodium intake affected inner zones/medullary VIP message. These data suggest that VIP in the capsule and zona glomerulosa region of the adrenal cortex is regulated in response to the physiological status of the animal, with changes in capsular/zona glomerulosa VIP correlating with changes in zona glomerulosa function.

  4. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the small intestine of Eimeria acervulina-infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis is a major disease of poultry caused by the intestinal protozoa Eimeria. Eimeria acervulina mainly infects the duodenum, causing lesions in epithelial tissue. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of E. acervulina infection on the expression of 18 nutrient transport...

  5. Impaired carbohydrate digestion and transport and mucosal dysbiosis in the intestines of children with autism and gastrointestinal disturbances.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent L; Hornig, Mady; Buie, Timothy; Bauman, Margaret L; Cho Paik, Myunghee; Wick, Ivan; Bennett, Ashlee; Jabado, Omar; Hirschberg, David L; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances are commonly reported in children with autism, complicate clinical management, and may contribute to behavioral impairment. Reports of deficiencies in disaccharidase enzymatic activity and of beneficial responses to probiotic and dietary therapies led us to survey gene expression and the mucoepithelial microbiota in intestinal biopsies from children with autism and gastrointestinal disease and children with gastrointestinal disease alone. Ileal transcripts encoding disaccharidases and hexose transporters were deficient in children with autism, indicating impairment of the primary pathway for carbohydrate digestion and transport in enterocytes. Deficient expression of these enzymes and transporters was associated with expression of the intestinal transcription factor, CDX2. Metagenomic analysis of intestinal bacteria revealed compositional dysbiosis manifest as decreases in Bacteroidetes, increases in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, and increases in Betaproteobacteria. Expression levels of disaccharidases and transporters were associated with the abundance of affected bacterial phylotypes. These results indicate a relationship between human intestinal gene expression and bacterial community structure and may provide insights into the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disturbances in children with autism.

  6. Neurons containing gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide are involved in the reception of the photic signal in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the Syrian hamster: an immunocytochemical ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Aïoun, J; Chambille, I; Peytevin, J; Martinet, L

    1998-02-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nuclei are involved in the generation of biological rhythms and are synchronized by light input coming from the retina. The targets of retinal afferents and the involvement of neurons containing gastrin-releasing and vasoactive intestinal peptides in photic reception were investigated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the Syrian hamster by using light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. Cholera toxin was used to trace retinal fibers and Fos immunoreactivity to visualize cellular response to light stimulation. Ultrastructural observations were made in the intermediate third of the nuclei, the area of highest overlap for the immunoreactivities investigated. Gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide cell bodies were localized in the ventral part of the nuclei; their dense immunoreactive fiber network often displayed synaptic contacts. Both neuropeptides were colocalized in elongated cells observed near the optic chiasm. Following a light pulse in the middle of the subjective night, Fos protein was expressed in most gastrin-releasing peptide perikarya and in some vasoactive intestinal peptide cells. Retinal terminals mostly occurred in the midline zone between the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Symmetrical or asymmetrical retinal synapses were observed on gastrin-releasing peptide-immunoreactive dendrites and somata, but never on vasoactive intestinal peptide neurons. These results are discussed in relation to the photic entrainment of the circadian clock.

  7. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  8. MicroRNAs as regulators of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions: implication for intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kenji; Iwamoto, Takuya; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions in the small intestine function as an absorption barrier and sometimes as a facilitator of orally administered drugs. The expression of these proteins often fluctuates and thereby causes individual pharmacokinetic variability. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small non-coding RNAs, have recently emerged as a new class of gene regulator. MiRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to target mRNA to suppress its translation or regulate its degradation. They have been shown to be key regulators of proteins associated with pharmacokinetics. Moreover, the role of miRNAs on the expression of some proteins expressed in the small intestine has recently been clarified. In this review, we summarize current knowledge regarding the role of miRNAs in the regulation of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions as well as its implication for intestinal barrier function. MiRNAs play vital roles in the differentiation, architecture, and barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells, and directly and/or indirectly regulate the expression and function of proteins associated with drug absorption in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the variation of miRNA expression caused by pathological and physiological conditions as well as genetic factors should affect the expression of these proteins. Therefore, miRNAs could be significant factors affecting inter- and intra-individual variations in the pharmacokinetics and intestinal absorption of drugs. Overall, miRNAs could be promising targets for personalized pharmacotherapy or other attractive therapies through intestinal absorption of drugs.

  9. Luminal leptin inhibits L-glutamine transport in rat small intestine: involvement of ASCT2 and B0AT1.

    PubMed

    Ducroc, Robert; Sakar, Yassine; Fanjul, Carmen; Barber, Ana; Bado, André; Lostao, Maria Pilar

    2010-07-01

    L-glutamine is the primary metabolic fuel for enterocytes. Glutamine from the diet is transported into the absorptive cells by two sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporters present at the apical membrane: ASCT2/SLC1A5 and B(0)AT1/SLC6A19. We have demonstrated that leptin is secreted into the stomach lumen after a meal and modulates the transport of sugars after binding to its receptors located at the brush border of the enterocytes. The present study was designed to address the effect of luminal leptin on Na(+)-dependent glutamine (Gln) transport in rat intestine and identify the transporters involved. We found that 0.2 nM leptin inhibited uptake of Gln and phenylalanine (Phe) (substrate of B(0)AT1) using everted intestinal rings. In Ussing chambers, 10 mM Gln absorption followed as Na(+)-induced short-circuit current was inhibited by leptin in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition at 10 nM; I(C50) = approximately 0.1 nM). Phe absorption was also decreased by leptin. Western blot analysis after 3-min incubation of the intestinal loops with 10 mM Gln, showed marked increase of ASCT2 and B(0)AT1 protein in the brush-border membrane that was reduced by rapid preincubation of the intestinal lumen with 1 nM leptin. Similarly, the increase in ASCT2 and B(0)AT1 gene expression induced by 60-min incubation of the intestine with 10 mM Gln was strongly reduced after a short preincubation period with leptin. Altogether these data demonstrate that, in rat, leptin controls the active Gln entry through reduction of both B(0)AT1 and ASCT2 proteins traffic to the apical plasma membrane and modulation of their gene expression.

  10. Impaired intestinal sodium and chloride transport in the blind loop syndrome of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, J D; Fromm, M; Menge, H; Riecken, E O

    1987-03-01

    Self-filling blind loops of rat jejunum were used as a model for the blind loop syndrome in humans. Electrical resistance, short circuit current, and unidirectional sodium and chloride fluxes were measured using the Ussing technique. Whereas net fluxes for sodium and chloride did not differ significantly from zero in the blind loop or in the control, unidirectional fluxes of either direction were decreased and electrical resistance was increased, indicating an increase in the tightness of the intestinal wall. Measurements of alternating current impedance and micropuncture experiments revealed that this was due to an increase in epithelial resistance from 9 +/- 1 omega X cm2 (n = 15, results of both methods) to 27 +/- 4 omega X cm2 (n = 15) and in subepithelial resistance from 40 +/- 2 omega X cm2 (n = 15) to 76 +/- 7 omega X cm2 (n = 15). As the ratio of epithelial to subepithelial resistance was similar in the blind loop and in the control, lower transport rates in the blind loop are indicative of impaired epithelial transport function. Subsequently, two different transport systems were characterized. First, the 3-o-methyl-glucose-induced, phlorizin-reversible increase in short circuit current, representing glucose-coupled sodium absorption, showed a 77% decrease in maximum velocity in the blind loop and no change in Km. Second, the chloride-induced, bumetanide-reversible increase in short circuit current in tissues stimulated simultaneously by prostaglandin E1 and theophylline, representing rheogenic chloride secretion, also showed a decrease in maximum velocity (of 83%) and no change in Km. A morphometric analysis revealed that the crypt surface area increased by 100% in the blind loop, whereas the villous surface area was not significantly different between blind loops and controls. We conclude that the jejunal self-filling blind loop is characterized by impaired active ion transport processes and an increase in epithelial and subepithelial resistance.

  11. Identification of intestinal bicarbonate transporters involved in formation of carbonate precipitates to stimulate water absorption in marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Yukihiro; Nakada, Tsutomu; Kato, Akira; Doi, Hiroyuki; Mistry, Abinash C; Chang, Min-Hwang; Romero, Michael F; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2008-04-01

    Marine teleost fish precipitate divalent cations as carbonate deposits in the intestine to minimize the potential for excessive Ca2+ entry and to stimulate water absorption by reducing luminal osmotic pressure. This carbonate deposit formation, therefore, helps maintain osmoregulation in the seawater (SW) environment and requires controlled secretion of HCO3(-) to match the amount of Ca2+ entering the intestinal lumen. Despite its physiological importance, the process of HCO3(-) secretion has not been characterized at the molecular level. We analyzed the expression of two families of HCO3(-) transporters, Slc4 and Slc26, in fresh-water- and SW-acclimated euryhaline pufferfish, mefugu (Takifugu obscurus), and obtained the following candidate clones: NBCe1 (an Na+-HCO3(-) cotransporter) and Slc26a6A and Slc26a6B (putative Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchangers). Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes showed that Slc26a6A and Slc26a6B have potent HCO3(-)-transporting activity as electrogenic Cl(-)/nHCO3(-) exchangers, whereas mefugu NBCe1 functions as an electrogenic Na+-nHCO3(-) cotransporter. Expression of NBCe1 and Slc26a6A was highly induced in the intestine in SW and expression of Slc26a6B was high in the intestine in SW and fresh water, suggesting their involvement in HCO3(-) secretion and carbonate precipitate formation. Immunohistochemistry showed staining on the apical (Slc26a6A and Slc26a6B) and basolateral (NBCe1) membranes of the intestinal epithelial cells in SW. We therefore propose a mechanism for HCO3(-) transport across the intestinal epithelial cells of marine fish that includes basolateral HCO3(-) uptake (NBCe1) and apical HCO3(-) secretion (Slc26a6A and Slc26a6B). PMID:18216137

  12. Effect of renal insufficiency on the active transport of calcium by the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Baerg, Richard D.; Kimberg, Daniel V.; Gershon, Elaine

    1970-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium is often depressed in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Furthermore, the malabsorption of calcium and the osteodystrophy which occur in association with chronic renal disease are often “resistant” to vitamin D; the basis for this resistance remains uncertain however. Recent studies by others have emphasized the role of an abnormality in the metabolism of vitamin D in accounting for the alterations in the calcium absorption and the apparent vitamin D-resistance which accompany the uremic syndrome. The present studies with an experimentally uremic animal model demonstrate a defect in the active transport of calcium by duodenal gut sacs in vitro. This abnormality is not due to the semistarvation associated with renal insufficiency and cannot be corrected by the administration of physiologic amounts of vitamin D3: it is reversed by massive doses of the vitamin. Neither the metabolism of vitamin D3 nor the levels of calcium binding protein activity in the duodenal mucosa are affected by renal insufficiency under the conditions employed in the present studies. The results of the present studies strongly suggest that in addition to the recently proposed mechanism involving an interference with the metabolism of vitamin D renal insufficiency also affects the cellular mechanisms for calcium transport in a manner which, while opposite in direction to that of vitamin D, is independent of a direct interaction with the vitamin or its metabolites. PMID:5422027

  13. Transporter associated with antigen processing preselection of peptides binding to the MHC: a bioinformatic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini; Hemsley, Shelley; Flower, Darren R

    2004-12-01

    TAP is responsible for the transit of peptides from the cytosol to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In an immunological context, this event is followed by the binding of peptides to MHC molecules before export to the cell surface and recognition by T cells. Because TAP transport precedes MHC binding, TAP preferences may make a significant contribution to epitope selection. To assess the impact of this preselection, we have developed a scoring function for TAP affinity prediction using the additive method, have used it to analyze and extend the TAP binding motif, and have evaluated how well this model acts as a preselection step in predicting MHC binding peptides. To distinguish between MHC alleles that are exclusively dependent on TAP and those exhibiting only a partial dependence on TAP, two sets of MHC binding peptides were examined: HLA-A*0201 was selected as a representative of partially TAP-dependent HLA alleles, and HLA-A*0301 represented fully TAP-dependent HLA alleles. TAP preselection has a greater impact on TAP-dependent alleles than on TAP-independent alleles. The reduction in the number of nonbinders varied from 10% (TAP-independent) to 33% (TAP-dependent), suggesting that TAP preselection is an important component in the successful in silico prediction of T cell epitopes. PMID:15557175

  14. Measuring intestinal fluid transport in vitro: Gravimetric method versus non-absorbable marker.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Genz, Janet; Grosell, Martin; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-04-01

    The gut sac is a long-standing, widely used in vitro preparation for studying solute and water transport, and calculation of these fluxes requires an accurate assessment of volume. This is commonly determined gravimetrically by measuring the change in mass over time. While convenient this likely under-estimates actual net water flux (Jv) due to tissue edema. We evaluated whether the popular in vivo volume marker [(14)C]-PEG 4000, offers a more representative measure of Jvin vitro. We directly compared these two methods in five teleost species (toadfish, flounder, rainbow trout, killifish and tilapia). Net fluid absorption by the toadfish intestine based on PEG was significantly higher, by almost 4-fold, compared to gravimetric measurements, compatible with the latter under-estimating Jv. Despite this, PEG proved inconsistent for all of the other species frequently resulting in calculation of net secretion, in contrast to absorption seen gravimetrically. Such poor parallelism could not be explained by the absorption of [(14)C]-PEG (typically <1%). We identified a number of factors impacting the effectiveness of PEG. One was adsorption to the surface of sample tubes. While it was possible to circumvent this using unlabelled PEG 4000, this had a deleterious effect on PEG-based Jv. We also found sequestration of PEG within the intestinal mucus. In conclusion, the short-comings associated with the accurate representation of Jv by gut sac preparations are not overcome by [(14)C]-PEG. The gravimetric method therefore remains the most reliable measure of Jv and we urge caution in the use of PEG as a volume marker. PMID:26794612

  15. Peptide transport through the blood-brain barrier. Final report 1 Jul 87-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, W.M.

    1991-01-15

    Most neuropeptides are incapable of entering the brain from blood owing to the presence of unique anatomical structures in the brain capillary wall, which makes up the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Such neuropeptides could be introduced into the bloodstream by intranasal insufflation and, thus, could have powerful medicinal properties (e.g., Beta-endorphin for the treatment of pain, vasopressin analogues for treatment of memory, ACTH analogues for treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy), should these peptides be capable of traversing the BBB. One such strategy for peptide delivery through the BBB is the development of chimeric peptides, which is the basis of the present contract. The production of chimeric peptides involves the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide (e.g., Beta-endorphin, vasopressin) to a transportable vector peptide (e.g., insulin, transferrin, cationized albumin, histone). The transportable peptide is capable of penetrating the BBB via receptor-mediated or absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Therefore, the introduction of chimeric peptides allows the nontransportable peptide to traverse the BBB via a physiologic piggy back mechanism.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse 3T3 cells: Role of cAMP, Ca sup 2+ , and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Zurier, B.B.; Kozma, M.; Sinnett-Smith, J.; Rozengurt, E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulated initiation of DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. The peptide stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin and either forskolin or an inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effect was obtained at 1 nM. At mitogenic concentrations, VIP stimulated a marked accumulation (eightfold) of cAMP. In contrast to other growth-promoting neuropeptides, VIP did not induce an increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} or the activation of protein kinase C. The authors conclude that neuropeptides can modulate long-term cell proliferation through multiple signaling pathways.

  17. A synthetic peptide shows retro- and anterograde neuronal transport before disrupting the chemosensation of plant-pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Jones, Laura M; Urwin, Peter E; Atkinson, Howard J

    2011-01-01

    Cyst nematodes are a group of plant pathogens each with a defined host range that cause major losses to crops including potato, soybean and sugar beet. The infective mobile stage hatches from dormant eggs and moves a short distance through the soil to plant roots, which it then invades. A novel strategy for control has recently been proposed in which the plant is able to secrete a peptide which disorientates the infective stage and prevents invasion of the pathogen. This study provides indirect evidence to support the mechanism by which one such peptide disrupts chemosensory function in nematodes. The peptide is a disulphide-constrained 7-mer with the amino acid sequence CTTMHPRLC that binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A fluorescently tagged version of this peptide with both epifluorescent and confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that retrograde transport occurs from an aqueous environment along bare-ending primary cilia of chemoreceptive sensilla. The peptide is transported to the cell bodies of these neurons and on to a limited number of other neurons to which they connect. It appears to be localised in both neuronal processes and organelles adjacent to nuclei of some neurons suggesting it could be transported through the Golgi apparatus. The peptide takes 2.5 h to reach the neuronal cell bodies. Comparative studies established that similar but less abundant uptake occurs for Caenorhabditis elegans along its well studied dye-filling chemoreceptive neurons. Incubation in peptide solution or root-exudate from transgenic plants that secrete the peptide disrupted normal orientation of infective cyst nematodes to host root diffusate. The peptide probably undergoes transport along the dye-filling non-cholinergic chemoreceptive neurons to their synapses where it is taken up by the interneurons to which they connect. Coordinated responses to chemoreception are disrupted when the sub-set of cholinergic interneurons secrete the peptide at synapses that

  18. Regulating Ion Transport in Peptide Nanotubes by Tailoring the Nanotube Lumen Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Luis; Benjamin, Ari; Sullivan, Matthew; Keten, Sinan

    2015-05-01

    We use atomistic nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate how specific ionic flux in peptide nanotubes can be regulated by tailoring the lumen chemistry through single amino acid substitutions. By varying the size and polarity of the functional group inserted into the nanotube interior, we are able to adjust the Na(+) flux by over an order of magnitude. Cl(-) is consistently denied passage. Bulky, nonpolar groups encourage interactions between the Na(+) and the peptide backbone carbonyl groups, disrupting the Na(+) solvation shell and slowing the transport of Na(+). Small groups have the opposite effect and accelerate flow. These results suggest that relative ion flux and selectivity can be precisely regulated in subnanometer pores by molecularly defining the lumen according to biological principles.

  19. Transport of Particles in Intestinal Mucus under Simulated Infant and Adult Physiological Conditions: Impact of Mucus Structure and Extracellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R.; Bajka, Balazs H.; Rigby, Neil M.; Nau, Françoise; Dupont, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The final boundary between digested food and the cells that take up nutrients in the small intestine is a protective layer of mucus. In this work, the microstructural organization and permeability of the intestinal mucus have been determined under conditions simulating those of infant and adult human small intestines. As a model, we used the mucus from the proximal (jejunal) small intestines of piglets and adult pigs. Confocal microscopy of both unfixed and fixed mucosal tissue showed mucus lining the entire jejunal epithelium. The mucus contained DNA from shed epithelial cells at different stages of degradation, with higher amounts of DNA found in the adult pig. The pig mucus comprised a coherent network of mucin and DNA with higher viscosity than the more heterogeneous piglet mucus, which resulted in increased permeability of the latter to 500-nm and 1-µm latex beads. Multiple-particle tracking experiments revealed that diffusion of the probe particles was considerably enhanced after treating mucus with DNase. The fraction of diffusive 500-nm probe particles increased in the pig mucus from 0.6% to 64% and in the piglet mucus from ca. 30% to 77% after the treatment. This suggests that extracellular DNA can significantly contribute to the microrheology and barrier properties of the intestinal mucus layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the structure and permeability of the small intestinal mucus have been compared between different age groups and the contribution of extracellular DNA highlighted. The results help to define rules governing colloidal transport in the developing small intestine. These are required for engineering orally administered pharmaceutical preparations with improved delivery, as well as for fabricating novel foods with enhanced nutritional quality or for controlled calorie uptake. PMID:24755941

  20. Structure of an antibacterial peptide ATP-binding cassette transporter in a novel outward occluded state

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Hassanul G.; Tong, Zhen; Mathavan, Indran; Li, Yanyan; Iwata, So; Zirah, Séverine; Rebuffat, Sylvie; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Beis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae produce antimicrobial peptides for survival under nutrient starvation. Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is an antimicrobial peptide with a unique lasso topology. It is secreted by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporter McjD, which ensures self-immunity of the producing strain through efficient export of the toxic mature peptide from the cell. Here we have determined the crystal structure of McjD from Escherichia coli at 2.7-Å resolution, which is to the authors’ knowledge the first structure of an antibacterial peptide ABC transporter. Our functional and biochemical analyses demonstrate McjD-dependent immunity to MccJ25 through efflux of the peptide. McjD can directly bind MccJ25 and displays a basal ATPase activity that is stimulated by MccJ25 in both detergent solution and proteoliposomes. McjD adopts a new conformation, termed nucleotide-bound outward occluded. The new conformation defines a clear cavity; mutagenesis and ligand binding studies of the cavity have identified Phe86, Asn134, and Asn302 as important for recognition of MccJ25. Comparisons with the inward-open MsbA and outward-open Sav1866 structures show that McjD has structural similarities with both states without the intertwining of transmembrane (TM) helices. The occluded state is formed by rotation of TMs 1 and 2 toward the equivalent TMs of the opposite monomer, unlike Sav1866 where they intertwine with TMs 3–6 of the opposite monomer. Cysteine cross-linking studies on the McjD dimer in inside-out membrane vesicles of E. coli confirmed the presence of the occluded state. We therefore propose that the outward-occluded state represents a transition intermediate between the outward-open and inward-open conformation of ABC exporters. PMID:24920594

  1. Region-dependent absorption of faropenem shared with foscarnet, a phosphate transporter substrate, in the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Hiroshi; Sawazaki, Rinako; Oda, Masako; Kobayashi, Michiya

    2008-09-01

    Faropenem, a penem antibiotic, is orally active despite its hydrophilic nature. However, its intestinal absorption has not yet been characterised in detail. This study was undertaken to determine the factors regulating faropenem absorption using intestinal loops prepared in the rat duodenum, jejunum and terminal ileum. Faropenem disappearance was much greater than that of cefotaxime and meropenem, and faropenem disappeared more extensively from the terminal ileum than from the jejunum or duodenum. In contrast to faropenem, the disappearance of ceftibuten was much greater from the duodenum and jejunum than from the terminal ileum. As the accumulation and enzymatic degradation of faropenem was minimal in the intestinal mucosa, faropenem was considered to enter the portal vein smoothly after its disappearance from the intestinal loops. Faropenem disappearance was not significantly influenced by the presence of monocarboxylic acids, amino acids or bile acid. Dipeptides such as L-carnosine and glycylglycine slightly but significantly lowered faropenem disappearance from the terminal ileum. On the other hand, foscarnet exerted a marked inhibitory effect on faropenem disappearance, but the antiviral agent did not modulate ceftibuten absorption. The present results suggest that faropenem is in part absorbed via a phosphate transporter present in the rat small intestine. PMID:18614339

  2. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes.

  3. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes. PMID:26106901

  4. Characteristics of the protein carrier of the peptide-transport system in the scutellum of germinating barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Walker-Smith, D J; Payne, J W

    1984-09-01

    Through the use of the protein reagents N-ethylmaleimide, p-chloromercuribenzenesulphonic acid and phenylarsine oxide, it is shown that in the scutellum of the germinating barley embryo, the transport of peptides, but not the transport of amino acids or glucose is specifically thiol-dependent. Furthermore, these essential thiol groups are shown to exist as redox-sensitive, vicinal-dithiols that lie at the substrate-binding sites of the peptide-transport proteins. The binding of N-ethylmaleimide to these dithiols is shown to be very fast, matching the kinetics of inhibition of peptide transport by this reagent. A technique for the specific labelling of the dithiols with N-ethyl[2,3-(14)C]maleimide is described, which allows the carrier proteins to be visualized at the scutellar epithelium using radioautography and permits calculation of the approximate amount of peptide-transport protein present per scutellum. In related studies, the importance of arginyl and histidyl residues to both amino-acid and peptide transport is shown, although other residues, e.g. carboxyl ligands do not seem to be critically involved.

  5. Inhibitory effect of unconjugated bile acids on the intestinal transport of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in rat jejunum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Hollander, D; Strum, W B

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the unconjugated bile acids, cholic, deoxycholic, chenodeoxycholic, and ursodeoxycholic acids, and of the conjugated bile acid taurocholic acid on the mucosal-to-serosal transport and tissue uptake of the naturally occurring folate derivative, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-CH3H4PteGlu) was examined in everted sacs of rat jejunum. Each of the unconjugated bile acids examined inhibited the transport and tissue uptake of 5-CH3H4PteGlu in a concentration dependent manner. At low concentrations (0.01-0.1 mM) of cholic and deoxycholic acids, no structural or functional damage to the intestinal mucosa occurred and the transport of 5-CH3H4PteGlu was inhibited competitively with Ki values of 0.114 mM and 0.055 mM for cholic and deoxycholic acids, respectively. The greater inhibition of 5-CH3H4PteGlu transport by unconjugated bile acids at 1 mM can be attributed to observed structural and functional damage to the intestinal mucosa. The addition of 2 mM lecithin to the mucosal medium failed to prevent the inhibitory effect of 0.1 mM deoxycholic acid on the transport of 0.5 microM 5-CH3H4PteGlu. Compared with the effect of unconjugated bile acids, the conjugated bile acid taurocholic acid (0.01-5 mM) showed no effect on the transport and tissue uptake of 5-CH3H4PteGlu. The results of this study show that intestinal transport and tissue uptake of 5-CH3H4PteGlu are inhibited by unconjugated bile acids in a dose-dependent fashion. The clinical and physiological implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:6510770

  6. Peristaltic transport of a generalized Burgers’ fluid: Application to the movement of chyme in small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Pandey, S. K.; Das, S.

    2011-07-01

    The present investigation deals with the peristaltic transport of generalized Burgers' fluid with fractional element model in a channel. The analysis is carried out under long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. An efficient mathematical tool, namely, Adomian decomposition method, is used to obtain the analytical approximate solutions of the fractional differential equation. The channel is governed by the propagation of sinusoidal waves that help the walls contract and relax but not expand beyond the natural boundary. The expressions of axial velocity, volume flow rate and pressure gradient are obtained. The effects of the fractional parameters and the material constants are discussed on pressure difference and the friction force across one wavelength. The comparative studies for various models of viscoelastic fluids such as fractional generalized Burgers' model, generalized Burgers' model, fractional Burgers' model and Burgers' model are performed. It is inferred that the movement of viscoelastic chyme with generalized Burgers' model through the small intestine is favorable in comparison to the movement of viscoelastic chyme with fractional generalized Burgers' model.

  7. Structural hierarchy of regulatory elements in the folding and transport of an intestinal multidomain protein.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Marc; Polaina, Julio; Naim, Hassan Y

    2010-02-01

    Human intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, LPH, encompasses four homologous domains, which presumably have evolved from two subsequent duplications of one ancestral gene. The profragment, LPHalpha, comprises homologous domains I and II and functions as an intramolecular chaperone in the context of the brush-border LPHbeta region of LPH. Here, we analyze the inter-relationship between homologous domains III and IV of LPHbeta and their implication in the overall structure, function, and trafficking of LPH. In silico analyses revealed potential domain boundaries for these domains as a basis for loop-out mutagenesis and construction of deletion or individual domain forms of LPH. Removal of domain IV, which contains lactase, results in a diminished phlorizin hydrolase activity, lack of dimerization in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but accelerated transport kinetics from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. By contrast, deletion of domain III, which harbors phlorizin hydrolase, generates a malfolded protein that is blocked in the ER. Interestingly, homologous domain III is transport-competent per se and sorted to the apical membrane in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Nevertheless, it neither dimerizes nor acquires complete phlorizin hydrolase activity. Our data present a hierarchical model of LPH in which the homologous domain III constitutes (i) a fully autonomous core domain within LPH and (ii) another intramolecular chaperone besides the profragment LPHalpha. Nevertheless, the regulation of the trafficking kinetics and activity of domain III and entire LPH including elevation of the enzymatic activities require the correct dimerization of LPH in the ER, an event that is accomplished by the non-autonomous domain IV.

  8. The impact of nanoparticles on the mucosal translocation and transport of GLP-1 across the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Francisca; Shrestha, Neha; Shahbazi, Mohammed-Ali; Fonte, Pedro; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Granja, Pedro L; Santos, Hélder A; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is in the pipeline for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) therapy. However, oral administration of GLP-1 is hindered by the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and poor bioavailability. In this study, three nanosystems composed by three different biomaterials (poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA), Witepsol E85 lipid (solid lipid nanoparticles, SLN) and porous silicon (PSi) were developed and loaded with GLP-1 to study their permeability in vitro. All the nanoparticles presented a size of approximately 200 nm. The nanoparticles' interaction with the mucus and the intestinal cells were enhanced after coating with chitosan (CS). PSi nanosystems presented the best association efficiency (AE) and loading degree (LD), even though a high AE was also observed for PLGA nanoparticles and SLN. Among all the nanosystems, PLGA and PSi were the only nanoparticles able to sustain the release of GLP-1 in biological fluids when coated with CS. This characteristic was also maintained when the nanosystems were in contact with the intestinal Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cell monolayers. The CS-coated PSi nanoparticles showed the highest GLP-1 permeation across the intestinal in vitro models. In conclusion, PLGA + CS and PSi + CS are promising nanocarriers for the oral delivery of GLP-1.

  9. Iron content of ferritin modulates its uptake by intestinal epithelium: implications for co-transport of prions.

    PubMed

    Bhupanapadu Sunkesula, Solomon Raju; Luo, Xiu; Das, Dola; Singh, Ajay; Singh, Neena

    2010-01-01

    The spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the deer and elk population has caused serious public health concerns due to its potential to infect farm animals and humans. Like other prion disorders such a sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob-disease of humans and Mad Cow Disease of cattle, CWD is caused by PrP-scrapie (PrPSc), a beta-sheet rich isoform of a normal cell surface glycoprotein, the prion protein (PrPC). Since PrPSc is sufficient to cause infection and neurotoxicity if ingested by a susceptible host, it is important to understand the mechanism by which it crosses the stringent epithelial cell barrier of the small intestine. Possible mechanisms include co-transport with ferritin in ingested food and uptake by dendritic cells. Since ferritin is ubiquitously expressed and shares considerable homology among species, co-transport of PrPSc with ferritin can result in cross-species spread with deleterious consequences. We have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models of intestinal epithelial cell barrier to understand the role of ferritin in mediating PrPSc uptake and transport. In this report, we demonstrate that PrPSc and ferritin from CWD affected deer and elk brains and scrapie from sheep resist degradation by digestive enzymes, and are transcytosed across a tight monolayer of human epithelial cells with significant efficiency. Likewise, ferritin from hamster brains is taken up by mouse intestinal epithelial cells in vivo, indicating that uptake of ferritin is not limited by species differences as described for prions. More importantly, the iron content of ferritin determines its efficiency of uptake and transport by Caco-2 cells and mouse models, providing insight into the mechanism(s) of ferritin and PrPSc uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:20429907

  10. THE BIOSYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND PACKAGING OF MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING PEPTIDES IN THE AMPHIBIAN PARS INTERMEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments in which glycine-3H has been introduced into excised neurointermediate lobes of Xenopus laevis incubated in a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium have shown that ∼ 50% of the incorporated radioactivity is present in small peptides which have an electrophoretic mobility characteristic of the melanocyte-stimulating (MSH) peptides shown to be elaborated within the tissue. Based on these results and the demonstration that a discrete ∼ 7 min pulse of the label can be introduced into the tissue, electron microscope radioautography has been employed to follow the subcellular events concerned with the synthesis, intracellular transport, and packaging of the labeled secretory product. Together, these studies indicate that the newly synthesized material arises in peptide form, rather than as part of a larger prohormone molecule, on the ribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within the parenchymal cells of the intermediate portion of the lobe. A proportion is then incorporated into and remains for an extended period within the intracisternal granules which are a feature of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within these cells in vitro Most (∼ 60%) of the labeled secretory product, however, is transferred to the Golgi complex within 30 min and, within a further 10 min, becomes packaged into small (∼ 200 mµ) electron-opaque secretory granules. It is probable that under the conditions employed these granules represent the final intracellular location of secretory product before it is released PMID:5028257

  11. Large-scale multiplex absolute protein quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in human intestine, liver, and kidney microsomes by SWATH-MS: Comparison with MRM/SRM and HR-MRM/PRM.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Kuno, Takuya; Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Obuchi, Wataru; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine simultaneously the absolute protein amounts of 152 membrane and membrane-associated proteins, including 30 metabolizing enzymes and 107 transporters, in pooled microsomal fractions of human liver, kidney, and intestine by means of SWATH-MS with stable isotope-labeled internal standard peptides, and to compare the results with those obtained by MRM/SRM and high resolution (HR)-MRM/PRM. The protein expression levels of 27 metabolizing enzymes, 54 transporters, and six other membrane proteins were quantitated by SWATH-MS; other targets were below the lower limits of quantitation. Most of the values determined by SWATH-MS differed by less than 50% from those obtained by MRM/SRM or HR-MRM/PRM. Various metabolizing enzymes were expressed in liver microsomes more abundantly than in other microsomes. Ten, 13, and eight transporters listed as important for drugs by International Transporter Consortium were quantified in liver, kidney, and intestinal microsomes, respectively. Our results indicate that SWATH-MS enables large-scale multiplex absolute protein quantification while retaining similar quantitative capability to MRM/SRM or HR-MRM/PRM. SWATH-MS is expected to be useful methodology in the context of drug development for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion in the human body based on protein profile information.

  12. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  13. Myosin Ia is required for CFTR brush border membrane trafficking and ion transport in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, Dmitri V; Caputo, Christina; Collaco, Anne; Hoekstra, Nadia; Egan, Marie E; Mooseker, Mark S; Ameen, Nadia A

    2012-08-01

    In enterocytes of the small intestine, endocytic trafficking of CFTR channels from the brush border membrane (BBM) to the subapical endosomes requires the minus-end motor, myosin VI (Myo6). The subapical localization of Myo6 is dependent on myosin Ia (Myo1a) the major plus-end motor associated with the BBM, suggestive of functional synergy between these two motors. In villus enterocytes of the Myo1a KO mouse small intestine, CFTR accumulated in syntaxin-3 positive subapical endosomes, redistributed to the basolateral domain and was absent from the BBM. In colon, where villi are absent and Myo1a expression is low, CFTR exhibited normal localization to the BBM in the Myo1a KO similar to WT. cAMP-stimulated CFTR anion transport in the small intestine was reduced by 58% in the KO, while anion transport in the colon was comparable to WT. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the association of CFTR with Myo1a. These data indicate that Myo1a is an important regulator of CFTR traffic and anion transport in the BBM of villus enterocytes and suggest that Myo1a may power apical CFTR movement into the BBM from subapical endosomes. Alternatively, it may anchor CFTR channels in the BBM of villus enterocytes as was proposed for Myo1a's role in BBM localization of sucrase-isomaltase. PMID:22510086

  14. Seasonal plasticity in the peptide neuronal systems: potential roles of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the regulation of the reproductive axis in subtropical Indian weaver birds.

    PubMed

    Surbhi; Rastogi, A; Rani, S; Kumar, V

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the expression of gonadotrophin-releasing and inhibiting hormones (GnRH-I, GnRH-II and GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in subtropical Indian weaver birds, which demonstrate relative photorefractoriness. Experiment 1 measured peptide expression levels in the form of immunoreactive (-IR) cells, percentage cell area and cell optical density in the preoptic area (GnRH-I), midbrain (GnRH-II), paraventricular nucleus (GnIH), mediobasal hypothalamus [dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), infundibular complex (INc), NPY and VIP] and lateral septal organ (VIP) during the progressive, breeding, regressive and nonbreeding phases of the annual reproductive cycle. GnRH-I was decreased in the nonbreeding and VIP was increased in INc in the breeding and regressive states. GnRH-II and NPY levels did not differ between the testicular phases. Double-labelled immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed a close association between the GnRH/GnIH, GnRH/NPY, GnRH/VIP and GnIH/NPY peptide systems, implicating them interacting and playing roles in the reproductive regulation in weaver birds. Experiment 2 further measured these peptide levels in the middle of day and night in weaver birds that were maintained under short days (8 : 16 h light /dark cycle; photosensitive), exposed to ten long days (16 : 8 h light /dark cycle; photostimulated) or maintained for approximately 2 years on a 16 : 8 h light /dark cycle (photorefractory). Reproductively immature testes in these groups precluded the possible effect of an enhanced gonadal feedback on the hypothalamic peptide expression. There were group differences in the GnRH-I (not GnRH-II), GnIH, NPY and VIP immunoreactivity, albeit with variations in immunoreactivity measures in the present study. These results, which are consistent with those reported in birds with relative photorefractoriness, show the distribution and possibly a complex interaction of key neuropeptides in the regulation of the

  15. Differential effect of aluminum on the blood-brain barrier transport of peptides, technetium and albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Fasold, M.B.

    1988-02-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxin capable of altering membrane structure and function. We investigated whether aluminum also can affect saturable transport across membranes using the blood-brain barrier as our model. Mice were given i.p. or i.v. aluminum (up to 100 mg/kg) as the chloride salt and the disappearance from the brain of several centrally administered substances was measured. We found that aluminum rapidly and profoundly inhibited the saturable system that transports the small, N-tyrosinated peptides Tyr-MIF-1 and the enkephalins from the brain to the blood by acting as a noncompetitive inhibitor. In contrast, the disappearance from the brain of technetium pertechnetate (a substance also transported out of the brain by a different saturable system), albumin or D-Tyr-MIF-1 (a stereoisomer of Tyr-MIF-1 that was confirmed not to be transported by the carrier system) was not affected by aluminum. Aluminum also did not alter either the saturable or nonsaturable component of the uptake of Tyr-MIF-1 by erythrocytes. These findings suggest that one mechanism by which aluminum may induce neurotoxicity is by selective alteration of the transport systems of the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Characterization of calcium transport by basolateral membrane vesicles of human small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Toshiko; Ghishan, F.K. )

    1988-10-01

    The present studies investigated the mechanism of Ca{sup 2+} transport across basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) prepared from human small intestine. Ca{sup 2+} uptake represented transport into the intravesicular space as evident by osmolality study and by the demonstration of Ca{sup 2+} efflux from the intravesicular space by Ca{sup 2+} ionophore A23187. Ca{sup 2+} uptake was stimulated by Mg{sup 2+}-ATP. Kinetic parameters for ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} uptake revealed a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 0.02{plus minus}0.01 {mu}M and a maximum rate of uptake (V{sub max}) of 1.00{plus minus}0.03 nmol{center dot}mg protein{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}. Ca{sup 2+} uptake in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} was inhibited by 75%. The K{sub m} of ATP concentration required for half-maximal Ca{sup 2+} uptake was 0.50{plus minus}0.1 mM. Basolateral membranes depleted of calmodulin by EDTA osmotic shock decreased ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} uptake by 65%. Trifluoperazine, an anticalmodulin drug, inhibited ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} uptake by 50%, while no inhibition was noted in calmodulin-depleted membranes. Efflux of Ca{sup 2+} in the BLMVs was stimulated by trans-Na{sup +}. Na{sup +}-dependent Ca{sup 2+} uptake was saturable with respect to Ca{sup 2+} concentration and exhibited a K{sub m} of 0.09{plus minus}0.03 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 1.08{plus minus}0.01 nmol{center dot}mg protein{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}. These results are consistent with the existence of a Na{sup +}-Ca{sup 2+} exchange system and ATP and Mg{sup 2+}-dependent, calmodulin-regulated Ca{sup 2+}, transport mechanism in BLMVs of human enterocytes.

  17. Electrophysiological characterization of electrolyte and nutrient transport across the small intestine in horses.

    PubMed

    Cehak, A; Burmester, M; Geburek, F; Feige, K; Breves, G

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the transport mechanisms of electrolytes and nutrients across the jejunum of nine healthy horses electrophysiologically. The stripped mucosa was mounted in Ussing chambers and tissue conductances (G(t)) and short circuit currents (I(sc)) were continuously monitored. After blocking the sodium and potassium channels with amiloride, tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) and barium, chloride secretion was stimulated by carbachol and forskolin. Subsequently, chloride channels were inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid, CFTR(inh)-172, N-(2-naphtalenyl)-(3.5-dibromo-2.4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101) and glibenclamide and their dose-response effect was investigated. The response to glucose, l-alanine and glycyl-l-glutamine was determined at two different mucosal pH values (pH 7.4 and 5.4 respectively). Mean basal I(sc) was -0.47 +/- 0.31 microEq/cm(2)h and mean G(t) was 22.17 +/- 1.78 mS/cm(2). Amiloride and TEA did not alter the baseline I(sc). Barium, carbachol and forskolin significantly increased I(sc). Irrespective of the dose, none of the chloride inhibitors changed I(sc). All nutrients induced a significant increase in I(sc) with the increase being significantly higher at pH 7.4 than at pH 5.4. In conclusion, there is evidence that chloride secretion in horses may be different from respective transport mechanisms in other species. The glucose absorption is suggestive of a sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1. However, a decrease in luminal pH did not stimulate current response to peptides as shown for other mammals. PMID:19646103

  18. Hydrophobic Interactions Are Key To Drive the Association of Tapasin with Peptide Transporter Subunit TAP2.

    PubMed

    Rufer, Elke; Kägebein, Danny; Leonhardt, Ralf M; Knittler, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    The transporter associated with Ag processing (TAP) translocates proteasomally derived cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum. TAP is a central component of the peptide-loading complex (PLC), to which tapasin (TPN) recruits MHC class I (MHC I) and accessory chaperones. The PLC functions to facilitate and optimize MHC I-mediated Ag presentation. The heterodimeric peptide transporter consists of two homologous subunits, TAP1 and TAP2, each of which contains an N-terminal domain (N-domain) in addition to a conserved transmembrane (TM) core segment. Each N-domain binds to the TM region of a single TPN molecule, which recruits one MHC I molecule to TAP1 and/or TAP2. Although both N-domains act as TPN-docking sites, various studies suggest a functional asymmetry within the PLC resulting in greater significance of the TAP2/TPN interaction for MHC loading. In this study, we demonstrate that the leucine-rich hydrophobic sequence stretches (with the central leucine residues L20 and L66) in the first and second TM helix of TAP2 form a functional unit acting as a docking site for optimal TPN/MHC I recruitment, whereas three distinct highly conserved arginine and/or aspartate residues inside or flanking these TM helices are dispensable. Moreover, we show that the physical interaction between TAP2 and TPN is disrupted by benzene, a compound known to interfere with hydrophobic interactions, such as those between pairing leucine zippers. No such effects were observed for the TAP1/TAP2 interaction or the complex formation between TPN and MHC I. We propose that TAP/TPN complex formation is driven by hydrophobic interactions via leucine zipper-like motifs.

  19. Peptide and amino acid transporters are differentially regulated during seed development and germination in faba bean.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Manoela; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Tewes, Annegret; Dietrich, Daniela; Rentsch, Doris; Weber, Hans; Wobus, Ulrich

    2003-08-01

    Two peptide transporter (PTR) homologs have been isolated from developing seeds of faba bean (Vicia faba). VfPTR1 was shown to be a functional peptide transporter through complementation of a yeast mutant. Expression patterns of VfPTR1 and VfPTR2 as well as of the amino acid permease VfAAP1 (Miranda et al., 2001) were compared throughout seed development and germination. In developing seeds, the highest levels of VfPTR1 transcripts were reached during midcotyledon development, whereas VfAAP1 transcripts were most abundant during early cotyledon development, before the appearance of storage protein gene transcripts, and were detectable until late cotyledon development. During early germination, VfPTR1 mRNA appeared first in cotyledons and later, during seedling growth, also in axes and roots. Expression of VfPTR2 and VfAAP1 was delayed compared with VfPTR1, and was restricted to the nascent organs of the seedlings. Localization of VfPTR1 transcripts showed that this PTR is temporally and spatially regulated during cotyledon development. In germinating seeds, VfPTR1 mRNA was localized in root hairs and root epidermal cells, suggesting a role in nutrient uptake from the soil. In seedling roots, VfPTR1 was repressed by a dipeptide and by an amino acid, whereas nitrate was without influence.

  20. Somatostatin, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive intramural nerve structures of the human large intestine affected by carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Janusz; Kaleczyc, Jerzy

    2010-09-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the arrangement and chemical coding of enteric nerve structures in the human large intestine affected by cancer. Tissue samples comprising all layers of the intestinal wall were collected during surgery form both morphologically unchanged and pathologically altered segments of the intestine (n=15), and fixed by immersion in buffered paraformaldehyde solution. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5) and their chemical coding using antibodies against somatostatin (SOM), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The microscopic observations revealed distinct morphological differences in the enteric nerve system structure between the region adjacent to the cancer invaded area and the intact part of the intestine. In general, infiltration of the cancer tissue resulted in the gradual (depending on the grade of invasion) first decomposition and reduction to final partial or complete destruction and absence of the neuronal elements. A comparative analysis of immunohistochemically labeled sections (from the unchanged and pathologically altered areas) revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of CGRP-positive neurons and nerve fibres in both submucous and myenteric plexuses in the transitional zone between morphologically unchanged and cancer-invaded areas. In this zone, a decrease was also observed in the density of SP-positive nerve fibres in all intramural plexuses. Conversely, the investigations demonstrated statistically insignificant differences in number of SP- and SOM-positive neurons and a similar density of SOM-positive nerve fibres in the plexuses of the intact and pathologically changed areas. The differentiation between the potential adaptive changes in ENS or destruction of its elements by cancer invasion should be a subject of

  1. Stimulation of Synthesis and Release of Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) from Intestinal Smooth Muscle Cells by Substance P and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide (PACAP)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qudah, M.; Alkahtani, R.; Akbarali, H.I.; Murthy, K.S.; Grider, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin present in the intestine where it participates in survival and growth of enteric neurons, augmentation of enteric circuits, and stimulation of intestinal peristalsis and propulsion. Previous studies largely focused on the role of neural and mucosal BDNF. The expression and release of BDNF from intestinal smooth muscle and the interaction with enteric neuropeptides has not been studied in gut. Methods The expression and secretion of BDNF from smooth muscle cultured from rabbit longitudinal intestinal muscle in response to substance P and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) was measured by western blot and ELISA. BDNF mRNA was measured by rt-PCR. Key Results The expression of BNDF protein and mRNA was greater in smooth muscle cells from the longitudinal muscle than from circular muscle layer. PACAP and substance P increased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in cultured longitudinal smooth muscle cells. PACAP and substance P also stimulated the secretion of BDNF from cultured longitudinal smooth muscle cells. Chelation of intracellular calcium with BAPTA prevented substance P-induced increase in BDNF mRNA and protein expression as well as substance P-induced secretion of BDNF. Conclusions & Inferences Neuropeptides known to be present in enteric neurons innervating the longitudinal layer increase the expression of BDNF mRNA and protein in smooth muscle cells and stimulate the release of BDNF. Considering the ability of BDNF to enhance smooth muscle contraction, this autocrine loop may partially explain the characteristic hypercontractility of longitudinal muscle in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26088546

  2. Lipid absorption defects in intestine-specific microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Parks, John S; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2013-10-18

    We have previously described apolipoprotein B (apoB)-dependent and -independent cholesterol absorption pathways and the role of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in these pathways. To assess the contribution of these pathways to cholesterol absorption and to determine whether there are other pathways, we generated mice that lack MTP and ABCA1, individually and in combination, in the intestine. Intestinal deletions of Mttp and Abca1 decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations by 45 and 24%, respectively, whereas their combined deletion reduced it by 59%. Acute cholesterol absorption was reduced by 28% in the absence of ABCA1, and it was reduced by 92-95% when MTP was deleted in the intestine alone or together with ABCA1. MTP deficiency significantly reduced triglyceride absorption, although ABCA1 deficiency had no effect. ABCA1 deficiency did not affect cellular lipids, but Mttp deficiency significantly increased intestinal levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Accumulation of intestinal free fatty acids, but not triglycerides, in Mttp-deficient intestines was prevented when mice were also deficient in intestinal ABCA1. Combined deficiency of these genes increased intestinal fatty acid oxidation as a consequence of increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1α (CPT1α). These studies show that intestinal MTP and ABCA1 are critical for lipid absorption and are the main determinants of plasma and intestinal lipid levels. Reducing their activities might lower plasma lipid concentrations.

  3. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption. PMID:26577021

  4. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption.

  5. Clinical significance of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) in drug disposition: their roles in hepatic clearance and intestinal absorption.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Yoshihisa; Maeda, Kazuya; Ikejiri, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Kenta; Horie, Toshiharu; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) family transporters accept a number of drugs and are increasingly being recognized as important factors in governing drug and metabolite pharmacokinetics. OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 play an important role in hepatic drug uptake while OATP2B1 and OATP1A2 might be key players in intestinal absorption and transport across blood-brain barrier of drugs, respectively. To understand the importance of OATPs in the hepatic clearance of drugs, the rate-determining process for elimination should be considered; for some drugs, hepatic uptake clearance rather than metabolic intrinsic clearance is the more important determinant of hepatic clearances. The importance of the unbound concentration ratio (liver/blood), K(p,uu) , of drugs, which is partly governed by OATPs, is exemplified in interpreting the difference in the IC(50) of statins between the hepatocyte and microsome systems for the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity. The intrinsic activity and/or expression level of OATPs are affected by genetic polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions. Their effects on the elimination rate or intestinal absorption rate of drugs may sometimes depend on the substrate drug. This is partly because of the different contribution of OATP isoforms to clearance or intestinal absorption. When the contribution of the OATP-mediated pathway is substantial, the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs should be greatly affected. This review describes the estimation of the contribution of OATP1B1 to the total hepatic uptake of drugs from the data of fold-increases in the plasma concentration of substrate drugs by the genetic polymorphism of this transporter. To understand the importance of the OATP family transporters, modeling and simulation with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model are helpful.

  6. Effects of salinity and prolactin on gene transcript levels of ion transporters, ion pumps and prolactin receptors in Mozambique tilapia intestine.

    PubMed

    Seale, Andre P; Stagg, Jacob J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Breves, Jason P; Soma, Satoshi; Watanabe, Soichi; Kaneko, Toyoji; Cnaani, Avner; Harpaz, Sheenan; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2014-09-15

    Euryhaline teleosts are faced with significant challenges during changes in salinity. Osmoregulatory responses to salinity changes are mediated through the neuroendocrine system which directs osmoregulatory tissues to modulate ion transport. Prolactin (PRL) plays a major role in freshwater (FW) osmoregulation by promoting ion uptake in osmoregulatory tissues, including intestine. We measured mRNA expression of ion pumps, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α3-subunit (NKAα3) and vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase A-subunit (V-ATPase A-subunit); ion transporters/channels, Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC2) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); and the two PRL receptors, PRLR1 and PRLR2 in eleven intestinal segments of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) acclimated to FW or seawater (SW). Gene expression levels of NKAα3, V-ATPase A-subunit, and NKCC2 were generally lower in middle segments of the intestine, whereas CFTR mRNA was most highly expressed in anterior intestine of FW-fish. In both FW- and SW-acclimated fish, PRLR1 was most highly expressed in the terminal segment of the intestine, whereas PRLR2 was generally most highly expressed in anterior intestinal segments. While NKCC2, NKAα3 and PRLR2 mRNA expression was higher in the intestinal segments of SW-acclimated fish, CFTR mRNA expression was higher in FW-fish; PRLR1 and V-ATPase A-subunit mRNA expression was similar between FW- and SW-acclimated fish. Next, we characterized the effects of hypophysectomy (Hx) and PRL replacement on the expression of intestinal transcripts. Hypophysectomy reduced both NKCC2 and CFTR expression in particular intestinal segments; however, only NKCC2 expression was restored by PRL replacement. Together, these findings describe how both acclimation salinity and PRL impact transcript levels of effectors of ion transport in tilapia intestine.

  7. Regulation of intestinal serotonin transporter expression via epigenetic mechanisms: role of HDAC2.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ravinder K; Kumar, Anoop; Malhotra, Pooja; Maher, Daniel; Singh, Varsha; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Alrefai, Waddah; Saksena, Seema

    2013-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) facilitates clearance of extracellular 5-HT by its uptake and internalization. Decreased expression of SERT and consequent high 5-HT levels have been implicated in various diarrheal disorders. Thus, appropriate regulation of SERT is critical for maintenance of 5-HT homeostasis in health and disease. Previous studies demonstrated that SERT is regulated via posttranslational and transcriptional mechanisms. However, the role of epigenetic mechanisms in SERT regulation is not known. Current studies investigated the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition on SERT expression and delineated the mechanisms. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with the pan-HDAC inhibitors butyrate (5 mM) and trichostatin (TSA, 1 μM) decreased SERT mRNA and protein levels. Butyrate- or TSA-induced decrease in SERT was associated with decreased activity of human SERT (hSERT) promoter 1 (upstream of exon 1a), but not hSERT promoter 2 (upstream of exon 2). Butyrate + TSA did not show an additive effect on SERT expression, indicating that mechanisms involving histone hyperacetylation may be involved. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated enrichment of the hSERT promoter 1 (flanking nt -250/+2) with tetra-acetylated histone H3 or H4, which was increased (~3-fold) by butyrate. Interestingly, specific inhibition of HDAC2 (but not HDAC1) utilizing small interfering RNA decreased SERT mRNA and protein levels. The decrease in SERT expression by HDAC inhibition was recapitulated in an in vivo model. SERT mRNA levels were decreased in the ileum and colon of mice fed pectin (increased availability of butyrate) compared with controls fed a fiber-free diet (~50-60%). Our results identify a novel role of HDAC2 as a regulator of SERT gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

  8. Oat β-glucan depresses SGLT1- and GLUT2-mediated glucose transport in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6).

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Nazanin N; Purslow, Peter P; Tosh, Susan M; Bakovic, Marica

    2016-06-01

    Oat β-glucan consumption is linked to reduced risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity by lowering glycemic response and serum level of low-density lipoproteins. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of action of oat β-glucan at the interface between the gut wall and the lumen responsible for attenuating glucose levels. We proposed that viscous oat β-glucan acts as a physical barrier to glucose uptake in normally absorptive gut epithelial cells IEC-6 by affecting the expression of intestinal glucose transporters. Concentration and time-dependent changes in glucose uptake were established by using a nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. The effectiveness of nutrient transport in IEC-6 cells was shown by significant differences in glucose uptake and corresponding transporter expression. The expressions of glucose transporters sodium-glucose-linked transport protein 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) increased with time (0-60 minutes) and glucose levels (5-25 mmol/L). The suppression of glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression by increasing concentrations (4-8 mg/mL) of oat β-glucan demonstrated a direct effect of the physical properties of oat β-glucan on glucose transport. These results affirmed oat β-glucan as a dietary agent for minimizing postprandial glucose and showed that modulating the activity of the key intestinal glucose transporters with oat β-glucan could be an effective way of lowering blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. PMID:27188900

  9. Concord and Niagara Grape Juice and Their Phenolics Modify Intestinal Glucose Transport in a Coupled in Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Human Intestinal Model

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Sydney; Lim, Jongbin; Chegeni, Mohammad; Wightman, JoLynne D.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Ferruzzi, Mario G.

    2016-01-01

    While the potential of dietary phenolics to mitigate glycemic response has been proposed, the translation of these effects to phenolic rich foods such as 100% grape juice (GJ) remains unclear. Initial in vitro screening of GJ phenolic extracts from American grape varieties (V. labrusca; Niagara and Concord) suggested limited inhibitory capacity for amylase and α-glucosidase (6.2%–11.5% inhibition; p < 0.05). Separately, all GJ extracts (10–100 µM total phenolics) did reduce intestinal trans-epithelial transport of deuterated glucose (d7-glu) and fructose (d7-fru) by Caco-2 monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, with 60 min d7-glu/d7-fru transport reduced 10%–38% by GJ extracts compared to control. To expand on these findings by assessing the ability of 100% GJ to modify starch digestion and glucose transport from a model starch-rich meal, 100% Niagara and Concord GJ samples were combined with a starch rich model meal (1:1 and 1:2 wt:wt) and glucose release and transport were assessed in a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Digestive release of glucose from the starch model meal was decreased when digested in the presence of GJs (5.9%–15% relative to sugar matched control). Furthermore, transport of d7-glu was reduced 10%–38% by digesta containing bioaccessible phenolics from Concord and Niagara GJ compared to control. These data suggest that phenolics present in 100% GJ may alter absorption of monosaccharides naturally present in 100% GJ and may potentially alter glycemic response if consumed with a starch rich meal. PMID:27399765

  10. Early Endosomes Are Required for Major Histocompatiblity Complex Class II Transport to Peptide-loading Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Valérie; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Desaymard, Catherine; Raposo, Graça; Amigorena, Sebastian

    1999-01-01

    Antigen presentation to CD4+ T lymphocytes requires transport of newly synthesized major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to the endocytic pathway, where peptide loading occurs. This step is mediated by a signal located in the cytoplasmic tail of the MHC class II-associated Ii chain, which directs the MHC class II-Ii complexes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to endosomes. The subcellular machinery responsible for the specific targeting of MHC class II molecules to the endocytic pathway, as well as the first compartments these molecules enter after exit from the TGN, remain unclear. We have designed an original experimental approach to selectively analyze this step of MHC class II transport. Newly synthesized MHC class II molecules were caused to accumulate in the Golgi apparatus and TGN by incubating the cells at 19°C, and early endosomes were functionally inactivated by in vivo cross-linking of transferrin (Tf) receptor–containing endosomes using Tf-HRP complexes and the HRP-insoluble substrate diaminobenzidine. Inactivation of Tf-containing endosomes caused a marked delay in Ii chain degradation, peptide loading, and MHC class II transport to the cell surface. Thus, early endosomes appear to be required for delivery of MHC class II molecules to the endocytic pathway. Under cross-linking conditions, most αβIi complexes accumulated in tubules and vesicles devoid of γ-adaptin and/or mannose-6-phosphate receptor, suggesting an AP1-independent pathway for the delivery of newly synthesized MHC class II molecules from the TGN to endosomes. PMID:10473634

  11. Ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of centrally and peripherally administered trout pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the unanaesthetized trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, J-C; Lancien, F; Mimassi, N; Conlon, J M

    2009-12-01

    In mammals, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are involved in cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of PACAP, VIP and their receptors in various tissues of teleost fish, including the brain, but little is known about their respiratory and cardiovascular effects. The present study was undertaken to compare the central and peripheral actions of graded doses (25-100 pmol) of trout PACAP and trout VIP on ventilatory and cardiovascular variables in the unanaesthetized rainbow trout. Compared with vehicle, only intracerebroventricular injection of PACAP significantly (P<0.05) elevated the ventilation frequency and the ventilation amplitude, but both peptides significantly increased the total ventilation (total ventilation). However, the maximum hyperventilatory effect of PACAP was approximately 2.5-fold higher than the effect of VIP at the 100 pmol dose (PACAP, (total ventilation)=+5407+/-921 arbitrary units, a.u.; VIP, (total ventilation)=+2056+/-874 a.u.; means +/- s.e.m.). When injected centrally, only PACAP produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) (100 pmol: +21%) but neither peptide affected heart rate (f(H)). Intra-arterial injections of either PACAP or VIP were without effect on the ventilatory variables. PACAP was without significant action on P(DA) and f(H) while VIP significantly elevated P(DA) (100 pmol: +36%) without changing f(H). In conclusion, the selective central hyperventilatory actions of exogenously administered trout PACAP, and to a lesser extent VIP, suggest that the endogenous peptides may be implicated in important neuroregulatory functions related to the central control of ventilation in trout.

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide enhanced aromatase activity in the neonatal rat ovary before development of primary follicles or responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    George, F.W.; Ojeda, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the factors that regulate aromatase activity in fetal-neonatal rat ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity (assessed by measuring the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed from (1..beta..-/sup 3/H)testosterone) is low prior to birth and increases to values greater than 30 pmol/hr per mg of protein between days 8 and 12 after birth. The appearance of ovarian aromatase coincides with the development of primordial follicles. Fetal-neonatal ovaries maintained in serum-free organ culture do not develop aromatase activity at the expected time. Ovine follicle-stimulating hormone, ovine luteinizing hormone, or their combination failed to induce the enzyme activity in cultured fetal ovaries, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone is effective in preventing the decline in aromatase activity when postnatal day 8 ovaries are placed in culture. In contrast to follicle-stimulating hormone, dibutyryl-cAMP markedly enhances ovarian aromatase in cultured fetal ovaries. Likewise, enhancement of endogenouse cAMP formation with forskolin or cholera toxin caused an increase in enzyme activity within 24 hr. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a peptide known to occur in ovarian nerves, caused a dose-dependent increase in aromatase activity in fetal ovaries prior to folliculogenesis. Of related peptides tested, only the peptide having N-terminal histidine and C-terminal isoleucine amide was capable of inducing aromatase activity in fetal ovaries. The fact that VIP can induce aromatase activity in fetal rat ovaries prior to follicle formation and prior to responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone suggests that this neuropeptide may play a critical role in ovarian differentiation.

  13. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP) and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) Regulate Murine Neural Progenitor Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Eugene; May, Victor; Braas, Karen M.; Shutz, Kristin C.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NPC) have gained wide interest over the last decade from their therapeutic potential, either through transplantation or endogenous replacement, after central nervous system (CNS) disease and damage. Whereas several growth factors and cytokines have been shown to promote NPC survival, proliferation, or differentiation, the identification of other regulators will provide much needed options for NPC self-renewal or lineage development. Although previous studies have shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate stem/progenitor cells, the responses appeared variable. To examine the direct roles of these peptides in NPCs, postnatal mouse NPC cultures were withdrawn from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) and maintained under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of PACAP27, PACAP38, or VIP. The NPCs expressed the PAC1(short)null receptor isoform, and the activation of these receptors decreased progenitor cell apoptosis more than 80% from TUNEL assays and facilitated proliferation more than fivefold from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) analyses. To evaluate cellular differentiation, replicate control and peptide-treated cultures were examined for cell fate marker protein and transcript expression. In contrast with previous work, PACAP peptides downregulated NPC differentiation, which appeared consistent with the proliferation status of the treated cells. Accordingly, these results demonstrate that PACAP signaling is trophic and can maintain NPCs in a multipotent state. With these attributes, PACAP may be able to promote endogenous NPC self-renewal in the adult CNS, which may be important for endogenous self-repair in disease and ageing processes. PMID:18629655

  14. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulate murine neural progenitor cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Eugene; May, Victor; Braas, Karen M; Shutz, Kristin C; Mao-Draayer, Yang

    2008-11-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NPC) have gained wide interest over the last decade from their therapeutic potential, either through transplantation or endogenous replacement, after central nervous system (CNS) disease and damage. Whereas several growth factors and cytokines have been shown to promote NPC survival, proliferation, or differentiation, the identification of other regulators will provide much needed options for NPC self-renewal or lineage development. Although previous studies have shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate stem/progenitor cells, the responses appeared variable. To examine the direct roles of these peptides in NPCs, postnatal mouse NPC cultures were withdrawn from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) and maintained under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of PACAP27, PACAP38, or VIP. The NPCs expressed the PAC1(short)null receptor isoform, and the activation of these receptors decreased progenitor cell apoptosis more than 80% from TUNEL assays and facilitated proliferation more than fivefold from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) analyses. To evaluate cellular differentiation, replicate control and peptide-treated cultures were examined for cell fate marker protein and transcript expression. In contrast with previous work, PACAP peptides downregulated NPC differentiation, which appeared consistent with the proliferation status of the treated cells. Accordingly, these results demonstrate that PACAP signaling is trophic and can maintain NPCs in a multipotent state. With these attributes, PACAP may be able to promote endogenous NPC self-renewal in the adult CNS, which may be important for endogenous self-repair in disease and ageing processes.

  15. Effect of Dietary Nutrient Density on Small Intestinal Phosphate Transport and Bone Mineralization of Broilers during the Growing Period.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhui; Yuan, Jianmin; Miao, Zhiqiang; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Yu; Tian, Wenxia; Guo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    A 2 × 4 factorial experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary nutrient density on growth performance, small intestinal epithelial phosphate transporter expression, and bone mineralization of broiler chicks fed with diets with different nutrient densities and nonphytate phosphorus (NPP) levels. The broilers were fed with the same starter diets from 0 to 21 days of age. In the grower phase (day 22 to 42), the broilers were randomly divided into eight groups according to body weight. Relatively high dietary nutrient density (HDND) and low dietary nutrient density (LDND) diets were assigned metabolic energy (ME) values of 3,150 and 2,950 kcal/kg, respectively. Crude protein and essential amino acid levels were maintained in the same proportion as ME to prepare the two diet types. NPP levels were 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, and 0.40% of the diets. Results showed that a HDND diet significantly increased the body weight gain (BWG) of broilers and significantly decreased the feed conversion ratio and NPP consumed per BWG. HDND significantly decreased tibial P content of the broilers. Conversely, mRNA expression of NaPi-IIb and protein expression of calbindin were significantly increased in the intestine of broilers fed a HDND diet. HDND also increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, especially at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%). The mRNA expression of NaPi-IIa in the kidneys was significantly increased at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%) to maintain P balance. Tibial P, calcium, and ash content were significantly decreased, as were calbindin and VDR expression levels in the intestine at a low NPP level. Therefore, HDND improved the growth rate of broilers and increased the expression of phosphate and calcium transporter in the small intestine, but adversely affected bone mineralization. PMID:27100791

  16. Effect of Dietary Nutrient Density on Small Intestinal Phosphate Transport and Bone Mineralization of Broilers during the Growing Period

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhiqiang; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Yu; Tian, Wenxia; Guo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    A 2 × 4 factorial experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary nutrient density on growth performance, small intestinal epithelial phosphate transporter expression, and bone mineralization of broiler chicks fed with diets with different nutrient densities and nonphytate phosphorus (NPP) levels. The broilers were fed with the same starter diets from 0 to 21 days of age. In the grower phase (day 22 to 42), the broilers were randomly divided into eight groups according to body weight. Relatively high dietary nutrient density (HDND) and low dietary nutrient density (LDND) diets were assigned metabolic energy (ME) values of 3,150 and 2,950 kcal/kg, respectively. Crude protein and essential amino acid levels were maintained in the same proportion as ME to prepare the two diet types. NPP levels were 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, and 0.40% of the diets. Results showed that a HDND diet significantly increased the body weight gain (BWG) of broilers and significantly decreased the feed conversion ratio and NPP consumed per BWG. HDND significantly decreased tibial P content of the broilers. Conversely, mRNA expression of NaPi-IIb and protein expression of calbindin were significantly increased in the intestine of broilers fed a HDND diet. HDND also increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, especially at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%). The mRNA expression of NaPi-IIa in the kidneys was significantly increased at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%) to maintain P balance. Tibial P, calcium, and ash content were significantly decreased, as were calbindin and VDR expression levels in the intestine at a low NPP level. Therefore, HDND improved the growth rate of broilers and increased the expression of phosphate and calcium transporter in the small intestine, but adversely affected bone mineralization. PMID:27100791

  17. Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion.

    PubMed

    Kiela, Pawel R; Ghishan, Fayez K

    2016-04-01

    Virtually all nutrients from the diet are absorbed into blood across the highly polarized epithelial cell layer forming the small and large intestinal mucosa. Anatomical, histological, and functional specializations along the gastrointestinal tract are responsible for the effective and regulated nutrient transport via both passive and active mechanisms. In this chapter, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism of intestinal absorption of key nutrients such as sodium, anions (chloride, sulfate, oxalate), carbohydrates, amino acids and peptides, lipids, lipid- and water-soluble vitamins, as well as the major minerals and micronutrients. This outline, including the molecular identity, specificity, and coordinated activities of key transport proteins and genes involved, serves as the background for the following chapters focused on the pathophysiology of acquired and congenital intestinal malabsorption, as well as clinical tools to test and treat malabsorptive symptoms. PMID:27086882

  18. Daily variations in concentration of vasoactive intestinal peptide immunoreactivity in hypothalamic nuclei of rats rendered diurnal by restricted-schedule feeding.

    PubMed

    Morin, A J; Denoroy, L; Jouvet, M

    1993-04-01

    We previously described that in the suprachiasmatic (SCN), peri-(PeVN) and paraventricular (PaVN) nuclei of normal rats, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity (VIP-LI) accumulates during the night period and decreases during the day. In order to determine whether these variations are linked to the light-dark cycle or are a consequence of sleep-wake rhythm expression, we dissociated these two parameters by restricting feeding to diurnal hours. In these conditions which inverse the paradoxical sleep rhythm, the VIP-LI pattern is perturbed and its minimum advanced by 4 h in the SCN. In the PeVN, the daily pattern is maintained but the minimum is also advanced by 4 h. Finally, the rhythm is abolished in the PaVN. These circadian fluctuations indicate that the hypothalamic VIP-LI rhythm is not linked to the paradoxical sleep rhythm but could be sensitive to photic and non-photic Zeitgeber.

  19. Hydrokinetic activity of secretion and secretin analogues, modified in the N-terminal sequence, and of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, P; Forell, M M; Jaeger, E; Moroder, L; Wünsch, E

    1981-01-01

    In the dog pancreas in vivo, the biological activity of secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was compared to that of secretin analogues modified in their N-terminal hexapeptide and to X-secretion (alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin) and Y-secretin (a conversion product of X-secretin consisting of about 15% secretin and 85% beta-Asp3-secretin). Replacement of Asp3 by glutamic acid reduced secretin activity markedly. Replacement by neutral amino acids abolished the activity nearly completely. alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin and beta-Asp3-secretin appeared to be ineffective. The results indicate that the free beta-carboxy group of the side chain of the Asp3 residue of the secretin molecule is of decisive importance for hydrokinetic action.

  20. Hydrokinetic activity of secretion and secretin analogues, modified in the N-terminal sequence, and of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, P; Forell, M M; Jaeger, E; Moroder, L; Wünsch, E

    1981-01-01

    In the dog pancreas in vivo, the biological activity of secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was compared to that of secretin analogues modified in their N-terminal hexapeptide and to X-secretion (alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin) and Y-secretin (a conversion product of X-secretin consisting of about 15% secretin and 85% beta-Asp3-secretin). Replacement of Asp3 by glutamic acid reduced secretin activity markedly. Replacement by neutral amino acids abolished the activity nearly completely. alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin and beta-Asp3-secretin appeared to be ineffective. The results indicate that the free beta-carboxy group of the side chain of the Asp3 residue of the secretin molecule is of decisive importance for hydrokinetic action. PMID:7274610

  1. Characterisation of the single copy trefoil peptides intestinal trefoil factor and pS2 and their ability to form covalent dimers.

    PubMed

    Chinery, R; Bates, P A; De, A; Freemont, P S

    1995-01-01

    A bacterial recombinant expression system was established to produce biologically active rat Intestinal Trefoil Factor (rITF). Characterisation of purified rITF shows that both monomers and dimers can be observed under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis studies show that Cys57 is necessary for rITF dimer formation. Samples of human gastrointestinal tissue following biopsy also demonstrated the presence of reducible human pS2 and ITF covalent dimers. Three-dimensional models for pS2 and ITF support the hypothesis that both pS2 and ITF can exist as disulphide-linked dimers in vivo and that any proposed function for these peptides must take dimer formation into account.

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide: A potent stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in gut carcinoma cell lines in culture*

    PubMed Central

    Laburthe, M.; Rousset, M.; Boissard, C.; Chevalier, G.; Zweibaum, A.; Rosselin, G.

    1978-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent and efficient stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in a human colon carcinoma cell line, HT 29. cAMP accumulation is sensitive to a concentration of VIP as low as 3×10-12 M. Maximum VIP-induced cAMP levels were observed with 10-9 M VIP and are about 200 times above the basal levels. Half-maximum cAMP production was obtained at 3×10-10 M VIP. 125I-Labeled VIP was found to bind to HT 29 cells; this binding was competitively inhibited by concentrations of unlabeled VIP between 10-10 and 10-7 M. Half-maximum inhibition of binding was observed with 2×10-9 M VIP. Secretin also stimulated cAMP accumulation in HT 29 cells, but its effectiveness was 1/1000 that of VIP. The other peptides tested at 10-7 M, such as insulin, glucagon, bovine pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, octapeptide of cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and substance P, did not stimulate cAMP accumulation. Prostaglandin E1 and catecholamines stimulated cAMP production but were 1/2.3 and 1/5.5 as efficient as VIP, respectively. Another malignant cell line from the gut, the human rectal tumor cell line HRT 18, is also sensitive to VIP. In HRT 18 cells, VIP stimulated cAMP accumulation with a maximal effect at 10-8 M; half-maximum stimulation was observed at about 10-9 M. These results demonstrate the presence of VIP receptors in two malignant human intestinal cell lines (HT 29 and HRT 18) in culture and provide a model for studying the action of VIP on cell proliferation. PMID:208077

  3. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8 × ( W L ¯ ) n = 3 , 4 , 5 / POPE . The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT.

  4. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8×(WL¯)n=3,4,5/POPE. The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT. PMID:26156492

  5. The difference in sensitivity to cardiac steriods of (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and amino acid transport in the intestinal mucosa of the rat and other species

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. W. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of various cardioactive steroids on the activity of a microsomal (Na+ + K+)-activated ATPase from rat intestinal mucosa has been studied and compared with their effects on L-phenylalanine and D-galactose transport by rings of rat intestine in vitro. A similar comparison between the sensitivities to ouabain of microsomal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and of phenylalanine transport in the intestines of the mouse, guinea-pig and toad has been made. 2. The rat intestinal enzyme is 50% inhibited by a concentration of 1 × 10-4M ouabain, 1 × 10-5M scillaren A and 4 × 10-6M scilliroside. At concentrations which almost completely inhibit the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity, these steroids have no effect on the transport of phenylalanine or galactose by the rat intestine. Only at concentrations of 1 × 10-3M are scillaren A and scilliroside able to reduce phenylalanine accumulation significantly, the same concentration of ouabain being effective only in the absence of external potassium ions. Digitoxin, 1 × 10-4M, a comparatively apolar glycoside, had no action on phenylalanine transport in the rat intestine. 3. The effect of ouabain on the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and phenylalanine transport system in the mouse intestine is completely analogous to its effect on these parameters in the rat. 4. A half-maximal inhibition of guinea-pig intestinal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase by ouabain occurs at an inhibitor concentration of 2 × 10-6M, but phenylalanine transport by this tissue is only half-maximally reduced at a concentration of 3 × 10-5M. Similarly, in the rabbit intestine, there appears to be a difference of an order of magnitude between the sensitivities of the two parameters. 5. In the toad, 50% inhibition of the enzymic activity is observed at a concentration of 3 × 10-5M ouabain, whereas a concentration of 8 × 10-4M is required to reduce phenylalanine accumulation by one half. 6. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that an (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase is not the only

  6. Gastro-intestinal transport of calcium and cadmium in fresh water and seawater acclimated trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Klinck, Joel S; Wood, Chris M

    2013-03-01

    Transport of calcium (Ca) and cadmium (Cd) was examined along the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) of freshwater and seawater Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus (FWT and SWTies respectively) using in vitro and in vivo experiments. Based on known physiological differences between FWT and SWT which aid in regulating ion levels and osmolarity, we hypothesized that SWT would have lower rates of Ca uptake. Also, we predicted that Cd rates would also be lower because Cd is known to share a common transport mechanism with Ca. Kinetics of Ca and Cd transport were determined using mucosal salines of varying concentrations [1, 10, 30, 60, and 100 (mmolL(-1) for Ca, μmolL(-1) for Cd)]. Linear and saturating relationships were found for Ca for FWT and SWT, but overall SWT had lower rates. Linear and/or saturating relationships were also found for Cd uptake, but rates varied little between fish types. Elevated Ca had no inhibitory effect on Cd transport, and Ca channel blockers nifedipine and verapamil had little effect on Ca or Cd uptake. However, lanthanum reduced Ca transport into some compartments. A 21 day in vivo feeding experiment was also performed where FWT and SWT were exposed to control diets or Cd-spiked diets (552 μg Cd g(-1) food). Whole body Cd uptake between fish types was similar, but the majority of Cd in SWT remained in the posterior intestine tissue, while FWT transported more Cd through their gut wall. Overall it appears that large differences in Ca and Cd uptake between FWT and SWT exist, with SWT generally having lower rates.

  7. Expression of trefoil peptides (TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3) in gastric carcinomas, intestinal metaplasia, and non-neoplastic gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai K; Yu, Jun; Chan, Francis K L; To, Ka F; Chan, Michael W Y; Ebert, M P A; Ng, Enders K W; Chung, S C Sydney; Malfertheiner, Peter; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2002-08-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) domain peptides consist of three members that play a role in intestinal mucosal defence and repair, and in tumourigenesis. The role of the three TFF members in the gastric carcinogenesis cascade remains poorly defined. This study examined seven gastric cell lines, 50 gastric cancers and their adjacent non-cancer tissues, and tissues from 40 non-cancer patients, in order to elucidate the chronology of TFF expression in various stages of gastric carcinogenesis. TFF expression was determined by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot. Aberrant expression of TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3 was frequently detected in gastric cell lines. Specifically, TFF1 was detected in all non-cancer patients, but was detected in only 50% of gastric cancer and 66% of adjacent normal tissues. TFF2 expression was demonstrated in 87.5% of non-cancer patients, 34% of gastric carcinomas, and 58% of adjacent non-cancer tissues. There was a significant correlation between TFF1 and TFF2 expression in gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancer tissues (p<0.001). By contrast, TFF3 was detected in 25% of non-cancer patients and showed a predilection for areas with intestinal metaplasia (p=0.005). Sixty-two per cent of gastric cancers and 24% of neighbouring non-cancer tissues showed TFF3 expression. Immunoreactivity against TFF3 was demonstrated in goblet cells of intestinal metaplasia and within the cytoplasm and nuclei of tumour cells. Progressive loss of TFF1 and TFF2, together with the induction of TFF3, is likely to be involved in the early stage of the multi-step gastric carcinogenesis pathway.

  8. Intractable and dramatic diarrhea in liver transplantation recipient with vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing tumor after split liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haiqing, W; Jiayin, Y; Jian, Y; Lunan, Y

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea after liver transplantation is a common complication. Vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing tumor (VIPoma) is a rare cause of watery diarrhea; 80% of such tumors occur in the pancreas, but it is rare in liver. Hypersecretion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide can stimulate intestinal water and electrolyte secretion, and patients with VIPoma present with watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, and dehydration. Here we report on a 50-year-old man who presented with a 7-month history of watery diarrhea. He had undergone an orthotopic split-liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in November 2011. Two months after the liver transplantation, he presented with watery diarrhea, dehydration, and hypokalemia. Antibiotics, immunosuppressive drugs modification, antidiarrheal agents, antispasmodics, adsorbents, and fasting were alternately used to control the diarrhea, but his symptoms remained unchanged. A chromogranin examination, a marker of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm, was positive in the third month of the diarrhea history and VIPoma was considered. Treatment with somatostatin immediately controlled the diarrhea, but the primary lesion could not be identified even after corresponding examinations were completed. In the ninth month of diarrhea, a 1 × 1-cm lesion was detected in the right liver by ultrasonography. Radiofrequency ablation was performed, and the diarrhea stopped. Seventeen months later, the chromogranin level decreased to normal and the patient was asymptomatic. Neither the recipient sharing the other liver portion nor the donor presented with any symptoms, so we wondered how the tumor occurred. It is possible that a small VIPoma lesion existed in the liver donor before the transplantation, and that the immunosuppressive drugs induced tumor development. PMID:25596962

  9. Intestinal mucosal changes and upregulated calcium transporter and FGF-23 expression during lactation: Contribution of lactogenic hormone prolactin.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Sripong, Chanakarn; Longkunan, Asma; Chankamngoen, Wasutorn; Keadsai, Chutiya; Kraidith, Kamonshanok; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2016-01-15

    As the principal lactogenic hormone, prolactin (PRL) not only induces lactogenesis but also enhances intestinal calcium absorption to supply calcium for milk production. How the intestinal epithelium res-ponses to PRL is poorly understood, but it is hypothesized to increase mucosal absorptive surface area and calcium transporter expression. Herein, lactating rats were found to have greater duodenal, jejunal and ileal villous heights as well as cecal crypt depths than age-matched nulliparous rats. Morphometric analyses in the duodenum and cecum showed that their mucosal adaptations were diminished by bromocriptine, an inhibitor of pituitary PRL release. PRL also upregulated calcium transporter expression (e.g., TRPV6 and PMCA1b) in the duodenum of lactating rats. Since excessive calcium absorption could be detrimental to lactating rats, local negative regulator of calcium absorption, e.g., fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, should be increased. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the upregulation of FGF-23 protein expression in the duodenal and cecal mucosae of lactating rats, consistent with the enhanced FGF-23 mRNA expression in Caco-2 cells. Bromocriptine abolished this lactation-induced FGF-23 expression. Additionally, FGF-23 could negate PRL-stimulated calcium transport across Caco-2 monolayer. In conclusion, PRL was responsible for the lactation-induced mucosal adaptations, which were associated with compensatory increase in FGF-23 expression probably to prevent calcium hyperabsorption.

  10. Volume regulation of intestinal cells of echinoderms: Putative role of ion transporters (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC).

    PubMed

    Castellano, Giovanna C; Souza, Marta M; Freire, Carolina A

    2016-11-01

    Echinoderms are exclusively marine osmoconformer invertebrates. Some species occupy the challenging intertidal region. Upon salinity changes, the extracellular osmotic concentration of these animals also varies, exposing tissues and cells to osmotic challenges. Cells and tissues may then respond with volume regulation mechanisms, which involve transport of ions and water into and/or out of the cells, through ion transporters, such as the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC. The goal of this study was to relate the cell volume regulation capacity of echinoderm intestinal cells Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NKCC activities, in three echinoderm species: Holothuria grisea, Arbacia lixula, and Echinometra lucunter. Isolated cells of these species displayed some control of their cell volume upon exposure to anisosmotic media (isolated intestinal cells, calcein fluorescence as indicator of volume change), with a distinct higher capacity shown by H. grisea, which did not swell even upon 50% hyposmotic shock. The holothuroid cells showed indirect evidence (effect of furosemide) of the participation of NKCC in this process, with a secretory function, and of a secondary role by the NKA (effect of ouabain). Other mechanisms are probably responsible for this function in the urchins. Variable expression of these transporters, and others not examined here, may to some extent account for the variability in cell volume regulation capacity in echinoderm cells.

  11. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Geraldo E; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R G; Martins, Heber A; Guarnier, Flávia A; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  12. VPAC2 (vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor type 2) receptor deficient mice develop exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with increased Th1/Th17 and reduced Th2/Treg responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqi; Lopez, Robert; Waschek, James

    2014-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are two structurally-related neuropeptides with widespread expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although these peptides have been repeatedly shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory actions when administered in animal models of inflammatory disease, mice deficient in VIP and PACAP were recently shown to exhibit different phenotypes (ameliorated and exacerbated, respectively) in response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, elucidating what are the specific immunoregulatory roles played by each of their receptor subtypes (VPAC1, VPAC2, and PAC1) is critical. In this study, we found that mice with a genetic deletion of VIPR2, encoding the VPAC2 receptor, exhibited exacerbated (MOG35-55)-induced EAE compared to wild type mice, characterized by enhanced clinical and histopathological features, increased proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ (Th1), and IL-17 (Th17)) and reduced anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGFβ, and IL-4 (Th2)) in the CNS and lymph nodes. Moreover, the abundance and proliferative index of lymph node, thymus and CNS CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs were strikingly reduced in VPAC2-deficient mice with EAE. Finally, the in vitro suppressive activity of lymph node and splenic Tregs from VPAC2-deficient mice was impaired. Overall, our results demonstrate critical protective roles for PACAP and the VPAC2 receptor against autoimmunity, promoting the expansion and maintenance of the Treg pool. PMID:25305591

  13. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  14. The gene encoding human intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) is located on chromosome 21q22.3 clustered with other members of the trefoil peptide family

    SciTech Connect

    Chinery, R.; Williamson, J.; Poulsom, R.

    1996-03-01

    The gene coding for human intestinal trefoil factor (hITF), a recently described cellular motogen produced by gastrointestinal goblet cells and epithelia elsewhere, is a member of the rapidly growing trefoil peptide family. In a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel, the hITF (HGMW-approved symbol TFF3) genomic locus segregated with human chromosome 21q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 2.1-kb genomic probe of the hITF gene mapped this locus more precisely to the q22.3 region. Triple fluorescence in situ hybridization, together with physical mapping of human genomic DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, revealed that the hITF gene is tightly linked to those encoding the other known human trefoil peptides, namely the breast cancer estrogen-inducable gene pS2 (BCEI) and human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP/SML1). This gene family could become a useful marker for the genetic and physical mapping of chromosome 21 and for a better definition of the region involved in the clinical phenotype of several genetic diseases. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Geraldo E; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R G; Martins, Heber A; Guarnier, Flávia A; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress.

  16. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our object...

  17. Modulation of chicken intestinal immune gene expression by small cationic peptides as feed additives during the first week posthatch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been investigating modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host’s immune system as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens by antibiotics. One such approach is the use of a group of small cationic peptides (BT) produced by a Gram-positive soi...

  18. The application of Ussing chambers for determining the impact of microbes and probiotics on intestinal ion transport.

    PubMed

    Lomasney, Kevin W; Hyland, Niall P

    2013-09-01

    Host-microbe interactions have gained considerable attention in recent years with regards to their role in various organic disorders and diseases. In particular, research efforts have focused on the intestinal microbiota, where the largest and most diverse populations not only co-exist with the host, but also directly influence the state and function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Moreover, both human and animal studies alike are now beginning to show a positive influence of probiotic bacteria on GI disorders associated with diarrhoea or constipation. Diarrheagenic GI diseases, such as those caused by Vibreo cholera or enterpathogenic Eschericia coli, have well-characterised interactions with the host that explain much of the observed symptoms, in particular severe diarrhoea. However, the mechanisms of action of nonpathogenic bacteria or probiotics on host physiology are less clearly understood. In the context of defining the mechanisms of action of probiotics in vitro, the Ussing chamber has proven to be a particularly useful tool. Here, we will present data from several studies that have defined molecular targets for microbes and putative probiotics in the regulation of intestinal secretory and absorptive function, and we will discuss these in the context of their application in pathogen- or inflammation-induced alterations in intestinal ion transport.

  19. Anion transport properties of amine and amide-sidechained peptides are affected by charge and phospholipid composition†

    PubMed Central

    You, Lei; Li, Ruiqiong; Gokel, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Four synthetic anion transporters (SATs) having the general formula (n-C18H37)2N-COCH2OCH2CO-(Gly)3Pro-Lys(ε-N-R)-(Gly)2-O-n-C7H15 were prepared and studied. The group R was Cbz, H (TFA salt), t-Boc, and dansyl in peptides 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. The glutamine analog (GGGPQAG sequence) was also included. A dansyl-substituted fluorescent SAT was used to probe peptide insertion; the dansyl sidechain resides in an environment near the bilayer’s midpolar regime. When the lysine sidechain was free or protected amine, little effect was noted on final Cl− transport rate in DOPC : DOPA (7 : 3) liposomes. This stands in contrast to the significant retardation of transport previously observed when a negative glutamate residue was present in the peptide sequence. It was also found that Cl− release from liposomes depended on the phospholipid composition of the vesicles. Chloride transport diminished significantly for the free lysine containing SAT, 2, when the lipid was altered from DOPC : DOPA to pure DOPC. Amide-sidechained SATs 1 and 5 showed a relatively small decrease in Cl− transport. The effect of lipid composition on Cl− transport was explained by differences in electrostatic interaction between amino acid sidechain and lipid headgroup, which was modeled by computation. PMID:18688484

  20. Molecular insights on the cyclic peptide nanotube-mediated transportation of antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huifang; Chen, Jian; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Wu, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNs) show a potential use in drug delivery. In this study, the CPN composed of (Trp-D-Leu)(4)-Gln-D-Leu was synthesized and tested for the transport of the antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). CPN-mediated release of 5-FU from liposomes experimentally tested the transportation function of the synthetic CPNs. To explore the transportation mechanism of CPNs, computational studies have been performed on the CPN models stacked by 8 subunits, including conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations, and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations in the environment of hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer. Our CMD simulations demonstrated that the ortho-CPN is the most stable nanotube, in which the Gln residue is in the ortho-position relative to other residues. The calculated diffusion coefficient value for inner water molecules was 1.068 × 10(-5) cm(2)·s(-1), almost half that of the bulky water and 24 times faster than that of the typical gramicidin A channel. The CPN conserved its hollow structure along the 10 ns CMD simulations, with a tile angle of 50° relative to the normal of DMPC membrane. Results from SMD simulations showed that the 5-FU molecule was transported by hopping through different potential energy minima distributed along subunits, and finally exited the nanotube by escaping from the kink region at the last two subunits. The hopping of 5-FU was driven by switching from hydrophobic interactions between 5-FU and the interior wall of the nanotube to hydrogen bonding interactions of 5-FU with the backbone carbonyl group and amide group of ortho-CPN. The calculated binding free energy profile of 5-FU interacting with the CPN indicated that there was an energy well near the outer end of the nanotube.

  1. Mechanisms of Intestinal Serotonin Transporter (SERT) Upregulation by TGF-β1 Induced Non-Smad Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N.; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Priyamvada, Shubha; Saksena, Seema; Alrefai, Waddah A.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β1 is an important multifunctional cytokine with numerous protective effects on intestinal mucosa. The influence of TGF-β1 on serotonin transporter (SERT) activity, the critical mechanism regulating the extracellular availability of serotonin (5-HT), is not known. Current studies were designed to examine acute effects of TGF-β1 on SERT. Model human intestinal Caco-2 cells grown as monolayer’s or as cysts in 3D culture and ex vivo mouse model were utilized. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml, 60 min) stimulated SERT activity (~2 fold, P<0.005). This stimulation of SERT function was dependent upon activation of TGF-β1 receptor (TGFRI) as SB-431542, a specific TGF-βRI inhibitor blocked the SERT stimulation. SERT activation in response to TGF-β1 was attenuated by inhibition of PI3K and occurred via enhanced recruitment of SERT-GFP to apical surface in a PI3K dependent manner. The exocytosis inhibitor brefeldin A (2.5 μM) attenuated the TGF-β1-mediated increase in SERT function. TGF-β1 increased the association of SERT with the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) syntaxin 3 (STX3) and promoted exocytosis of SERT. Caco-2 cells grown as cysts in 3D culture recapitulated the effects of TGF-β1 showing increased luminal staining of SERT. Ussing chamber studies revealed increase in 3H-5-HT uptake in mouse ileum treated ex vivo with TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml, 1h). These data demonstrate a novel mechanism rapidly regulating intestinal SERT via PI3K and STX3. Since decreased SERT is implicated in various gastro-intestinal disorders e.g IBD, IBS and diarrhea, understanding mechanisms stimulating SERT function by TGF-β1 offers a novel therapeutic strategy to treat GI disorders. PMID:25954931

  2. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  3. Anti-allergic effects of a nonameric peptide isolated from the intestine gastrointestinal digests of abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Won Sun; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Chang-Min; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the intestine gastrointestinal (GI) digests of abalone [Haliotis discus hannai (H. discus hannai)] modulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The GI digests of the abalone intestines were fractionated into fractions I (>10 kDa), II (5-10 kDa) and Ⅲ (<5 kDa). Of the abalone intestine GI digests (AIGIDs), fraction Ⅲ inhibited the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in mice. Subsequently, a bioactive peptide [abalone intestine GI digest peptide (AIGIDP)] isolated from fraction Ⅲ was determined to be 1175.2 Da, and the amino acid sequence was found to be PFNQGTFAS. We noted that the purified nonameric peptide (AIGIDP) attenuated the phorbol‑12‑myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced histamine release and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in human mast cells (HMC-1 cells). In addition, we also noted that AIGIDP inhibited the PMACI‑induced activation of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and that it suppressed the production of cytokines by decreasing the phosphorylation of JNK. The findings of our study indicate that AIGIDP exerts a modulatory, anti-allergic effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26718326

  4. Anti-allergic effects of a nonameric peptide isolated from the intestine gastrointestinal digests of abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Won Sun; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Chang-Min; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the intestine gastrointestinal (GI) digests of abalone [Haliotis discus hannai (H. discus hannai)] modulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The GI digests of the abalone intestines were fractionated into fractions I (>10 kDa), II (5-10 kDa) and Ⅲ (<5 kDa). Of the abalone intestine GI digests (AIGIDs), fraction Ⅲ inhibited the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in mice. Subsequently, a bioactive peptide [abalone intestine GI digest peptide (AIGIDP)] isolated from fraction Ⅲ was determined to be 1175.2 Da, and the amino acid sequence was found to be PFNQGTFAS. We noted that the purified nonameric peptide (AIGIDP) attenuated the phorbol‑12‑myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced histamine release and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in human mast cells (HMC-1 cells). In addition, we also noted that AIGIDP inhibited the PMACI‑induced activation of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and that it suppressed the production of cytokines by decreasing the phosphorylation of JNK. The findings of our study indicate that AIGIDP exerts a modulatory, anti-allergic effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  5. Mechanisms of nanoparticle internalization and transport across an intestinal epithelial cell model: effect of size and surface charge.

    PubMed

    Bannunah, Azzah M; Vllasaliu, Driton; Lord, Jennie; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of nanoparticle size (50 and 100 nm) and surface charge on their interaction with Caco-2 monolayers as a model of the intestinal epithelium, including cell internalization pathways and the level of transepithelial transport. Initially, toxicity assays showed that cell viability and cell membrane integrity were dependent on the surface charge and applied mass, number, and total surface area of nanoparticles, as tested in two epithelial cell lines, colon carcinoma Caco-2 and airway Calu-3. This also identified suitable nanoparticle concentrations for subsequent cell uptake experiments. Nanoparticle application at doses below half maximal effective concentration (EC₅₀) revealed that the transport efficiency (ratio of transport to cell uptake) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is significantly higher for negatively charged nanoparticles compared to their positively charged counterparts (of similar size), despite the higher level of internalization of positively charged systems. Cell internalization pathways were hence probed using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors aiming to establish whether the discrepancy in transport efficiency is due to different uptake and transport pathways. Vesicular trans-monolayer transport for both positively and negatively charged nanoparticles was confirmed via inhibition of dynamin (by dynasore) and microtubule network (via nocodazole), which significantly reduced the transport of both nanoparticle systems. For positively charged nanoparticles a significant decrease in internalization and transport (46% and 37%, respectively) occurred in the presence of a clathrin pathway inhibitor (chlorpromazine), macropinocytosis inhibition (42%; achieved by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyi)-amiloride), and under cholesterol depletion (38%; via methyl-β-cyclodextrin), but remained unaffected by the inhibition of lipid raft associated uptake (caveolae) by genistein. On the contrary, the most prominent reduction in

  6. DLL4 promotes continuous adult intestinal lacteal regeneration and dietary fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Cisarovsky, Christophe; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Bruand, Marine; Jaquet, Muriel; Davanture, Suzel; Ragusa, Simone; Siegert, Stefanie; Dormond, Olivier; Benedito, Rui; Radtke, Freddy; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    The small intestine is a dynamic and complex organ that is characterized by constant epithelium turnover and crosstalk among various cell types and the microbiota. Lymphatic capillaries of the small intestine, called lacteals, play key roles in dietary fat absorption and the gut immune response; however, little is known about the molecular regulation of lacteal function. Here, we performed a high-resolution analysis of the small intestinal stroma and determined that lacteals reside in a permanent regenerative, proliferative state that is distinct from embryonic lymphangiogenesis or quiescent lymphatic vessels observed in other tissues. We further demonstrated that this continuous regeneration process is mediated by Notch signaling and that the expression of the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) in lacteals requires activation of VEGFR3 and VEGFR2. Moreover, genetic inactivation of Dll4 in lymphatic endothelial cells led to lacteal regression and impaired dietary fat uptake. We propose that such a slow lymphatic regeneration mode is necessary to match a unique need of intestinal lymphatic vessels for both continuous maintenance, due to the constant exposure to dietary fat and mechanical strain, and efficient uptake of fat and immune cells. Our work reveals how lymphatic vessel responses are shaped by tissue specialization and uncover a role for continuous DLL4 signaling in the function of adult lymphatic vasculature. PMID:26529256

  7. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  8. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C W; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions.

  9. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C W; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  10. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions.

  11. In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Scaling Factors for Intestinal P-Glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: Part I: A Cross-Laboratory Comparison of Transporter-Protein Abundances and Relative Expression Factors in Human Intestine and Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Matthew D; Achour, Brahim; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Russell, Matthew R; Carlson, Gordon; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2016-03-01

    Over the last 5 years the quantification of transporter-protein absolute abundances has dramatically increased in parallel to the expanded use of in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK)-linked models, for decision-making in pharmaceutical company drug development pipelines and regulatory submissions. Although several research groups have developed laboratory-specific proteomic workflows, it is unclear if the large range of reported variability is founded on true interindividual variability or experimental variability resulting from sample preparation or the proteomic methodology used. To assess the potential for methodological bias on end-point abundance quantification, two independent laboratories, the University of Manchester (UoM) and Bertin Pharma (BPh), employing different proteomic workflows, quantified the absolute abundances of Na/K-ATPase, P-gp, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the same set of biologic samples from human intestinal and Caco-2 cell membranes. Across all samples, P-gp abundances were significantly correlated (P = 0.04, Rs = 0.72) with a 2.4-fold higher abundance (P = 0.001) generated at UoM compared with BPh. There was a systematically higher BCRP abundance in Caco-2 cell samples quantified by BPh compared with UoM, but not in human intestinal samples. Consequently, a similar intestinal relative expression factor (REF), derived from distal jejunum and Caco-2 monolayer samples, between laboratories was found for P-gp. However, a 2-fold higher intestinal REF was generated by UoM (2.22) versus BPh (1.11). We demonstrate that differences in absolute protein abundance are evident between laboratories and they probably result from laboratory-specific methodologies relating to peptide choice.

  12. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio(propionate)) (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free (125I) tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using (125I) (D-Ala2)beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free (125I) DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free (125I) tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the (125I) DABE into (125I) tyrosine.

  13. Changes in mRNA expression of ABC and SLC transporters in liver and intestines of the adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Uno, Satoshi; Uraki, Misato; Ito, Ayami; Shinozaki, Yuki; Yamada, Ayano; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effects of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) on the amounts of mRNA of 12 types of rat ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporters in the liver and small intestine, 7 (D7) and 21 days (D21) after the injection of adjuvant. There were no significant differences in mRNA levels of ABC and SLC transporters between the livers of AA and control rats on D7, except in the case of Mdr1a. However, levels of Mdr1a, Mrp2 and Oatp SLC transporters were significantly lower in AA than in the control livers on D21. In contrast, the mRNA levels of several ABC and SLC transporters, especially Mrp2, Bcrp, LAT2 and Oatp1a5, were significantly lower in the small intestines of AA rats compared with the controls on D7, though there were no significant differences by D21. The time-dependent alterations in mRNA levels of the pregnane X receptor, but not the constitutive androstane receptor, in the liver and intestine were similar to the changes in mRNA levels of most transporters examined. The present study showed that AA was associated with reduced mRNA expression of several ABC and SLC transporters in the liver and small intestine, but that the time courses of the effects of AA on mRNA expression differed between the liver and small intestine. These results raise the possibility of a functional change of the transporters of liver and intestine in AA rats.

  14. Regulation of Glucose Transporter Expression in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells following Exposure to an Anthocyanin-Rich Berry Extract

    PubMed Central

    Alzaid, Fawaz; Cheung, Hoi-Man; Preedy, Victor R.; Sharp, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Polyphenols contained within plant tissues are consumed in significant amounts in the human diet and are known to influence a number of biological processes. This study investigated the effects of an anthocyanin-rich berry-extract on glucose uptake by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Acute exposure (15 min) to berry extract (0.125%, w/v) significantly decreased both sodium-dependent (Total uptake) and sodium-independent (facilitated uptake) 3H-D-glucose uptake. In longer-term studies, SGLT1 mRNA and GLUT2 mRNA expression were reduced significantly. Polyphenols are known to interact directly with glucose transporters to regulate the rate of glucose absorption. Our in vitro data support this mechanism and also suggest that berry flavonoids may modulate post-prandial glycaemia by decreasing glucose transporter expression. Further studies are warranted to investigate the longer term effects of berry flavonoids on the management of glycaemia in human volunteers. PMID:24236070

  15. Characterization of the transport of. cap alpha. -methylaminoisobutyric acid by a human intestinal cell line (HT-29)

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, L.; Dantzig, A.H.

    1986-03-01

    Under certain growth conditions, the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 exhibits intestinal enterocyte-like properties. The differentiated cells possess a brush border with the enzyme markers (aminopeptidase and sucrase) normally associated with the intestine. To aid in the characterization of the transport properties of these cells, the uptake of a non-metabolizable amino acid analog, /sup 14/C-..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) as examined in the HT-29-Al subclone which possesses a brush border. The cells exhibited a time-dependent uptake of MeAIB which was concentrative and sodium-dependent. The pH optimum for uptake was about 7.8. Uptake was inhibited by low temperature, 1 mM ouabain, or 0.5 mM dinitrophenol. A 1 hr-preincubation of the cells in an isotonic KCl solution resulted in a decreased uptake rate, suggesting that a negative membrane potential is important for MeAIB uptake. The rate of 0.5 mM MeABIB uptake was inhibited by 40 to 90% by 5 mM of certain small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Pro, Gly, met but not by acidic or basic amino acids such as Asp, Glu, Arg or Lys. The uptake of MeAIB appears to be mediated by an amino acid transport carrier similar to the A-system described previously for Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  16. Arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides noncovalently transport protein into living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Hui; Chen, Chung-Pin; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chang, Microsugar; Hou, Yu-Wun; Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ru; Liu, Kevin; Lee, Han-Jung

    2006-08-01

    Plasma membranes of plant or animal cells are generally impermeable to peptides or proteins. Many basic peptides have previously been investigated and covalently cross-linked with cargoes for cellular internalization. In the current study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery (AID) peptides are able to deliver fluorescent proteins or beta-galactosidase enzyme into animal and plant cells, as well as animal tissue. Cellular internalization and transdermal delivery of protein could be mediated by effective and nontoxic AID peptides in a neither fusion protein nor conjugation fashion. Therefore, noncovalent AID peptides may provide a useful strategy to have active proteins function in living cells and tissues in vivo.

  17. Arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides noncovalently transport protein into living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-H.; Chen, C.-P.; Chan, M.-H.; Chang, M.; Hou, Y.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Hsu, H.-R.; Liu, Kevin; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-08-04

    Plasma membranes of plant or animal cells are generally impermeable to peptides or proteins. Many basic peptides have previously been investigated and covalently cross-linked with cargoes for cellular internalization. In the current study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery (AID) peptides are able to deliver fluorescent proteins or {beta}-galactosidase enzyme into animal and plant cells, as well as animal tissue. Cellular internalization and transdermal delivery of protein could be mediated by effective and nontoxic AID peptides in a neither fusion protein nor conjugation fashion. Therefore, noncovalent AID peptides may provide a useful strategy to have active proteins function in living cells and tissues in vivo.

  18. High Levels of Dietary Supplement Vitamins A, C and E are Absorbed in the Small Intestine and Protect Nutrient Transport Against Chronic Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roche, Marjolaine; Neti, Prasad V S V; Kemp, Francis W; Azzam, Edouard I; Ferraris, Ronaldo P; Howell, Roger W

    2015-11-01

    We examined nutrient transport in the intestines of mice exposed to chronic low-LET 137Cs gamma rays. The mice were whole-body irradiated for 3 days at dose rates of 0, 0.13 and 0.20 Gy/h, for total dose delivery of 0, 9.6 or 14.4 Gy, respectively. The mice were fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with high levels of vitamins A, C and E. Our results showed that nutrient transport was perturbed by the chronic irradiation conditions. However, no apparent alteration of the macroscopic intestinal structures of the small intestine were observed up to day 10 after initiating irradiation. Jejunal fructose uptake measured in vitro was strongly affected by the chronic irradiation, whereas uptake of proline, carnosine and the bile acid taurocholate in the ileum was less affected. D-glucose transport did not appear to be inhibited significantly by either 9.6 or 14.4 Gy exposure. In the 14.4 Gy irradiated groups, the diet supplemented with high levels of vitamins A, C and E increased intestinal transport of fructose compared to the control diet (day 10; t test, P = 0.032), which correlated with elevated levels of vitamins A, C and E in the plasma and jejunal enterocytes. Our earlier studies with mice exposed acutely to 137Cs gamma rays demonstrated significant protection for transport of fructose, glucose, proline and carnosine. Taken together, these results suggest that high levels of vitamins A, C and E dietary supplements help preserve intestinal nutrient transport when intestines are irradiated chronically or acutely with low-LET gamma rays. PMID:26484399

  19. High Levels of Dietary Supplement Vitamins A, C and E are Absorbed in the Small Intestine and Protect Nutrient Transport Against Chronic Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roche, Marjolaine; Neti, Prasad V S V; Kemp, Francis W; Azzam, Edouard I; Ferraris, Ronaldo P; Howell, Roger W

    2015-11-01

    We examined nutrient transport in the intestines of mice exposed to chronic low-LET 137Cs gamma rays. The mice were whole-body irradiated for 3 days at dose rates of 0, 0.13 and 0.20 Gy/h, for total dose delivery of 0, 9.6 or 14.4 Gy, respectively. The mice were fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with high levels of vitamins A, C and E. Our results showed that nutrient transport was perturbed by the chronic irradiation conditions. However, no apparent alteration of the macroscopic intestinal structures of the small intestine were observed up to day 10 after initiating irradiation. Jejunal fructose uptake measured in vitro was strongly affected by the chronic irradiation, whereas uptake of proline, carnosine and the bile acid taurocholate in the ileum was less affected. D-glucose transport did not appear to be inhibited significantly by either 9.6 or 14.4 Gy exposure. In the 14.4 Gy irradiated groups, the diet supplemented with high levels of vitamins A, C and E increased intestinal transport of fructose compared to the control diet (day 10; t test, P = 0.032), which correlated with elevated levels of vitamins A, C and E in the plasma and jejunal enterocytes. Our earlier studies with mice exposed acutely to 137Cs gamma rays demonstrated significant protection for transport of fructose, glucose, proline and carnosine. Taken together, these results suggest that high levels of vitamins A, C and E dietary supplements help preserve intestinal nutrient transport when intestines are irradiated chronically or acutely with low-LET gamma rays.

  20. A microRNA program in the C. elegans hypodermis couples to intestinal mTORC2/PQM-1 signaling to modulate fat transport.

    PubMed

    Dowen, Robert H; Breen, Peter C; Tullius, Thomas; Conery, Annie L; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Animals integrate metabolic, developmental, and environmental information before committing key resources to reproduction. In Caenorhabditis elegans, adult animals transport fat from intestinal cells to the germline to promote reproduction. We identified a microRNA (miRNA)-regulated developmental timing pathway that functions in the hypodermis to nonautonomously coordinate the mobilization of intestinal fat stores to the germline upon initiation of adulthood. This developmental timing pathway, which is controlled by the lin-4 and let-7 miRNAs, engages mTOR signaling in the intestine. The intestinal signaling component is specific to mTORC2 and functions in parallel to the insulin pathway to modulate the activity of the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK-1). Surprisingly, SGK-1 functions independently of DAF-16/FoxO; instead, SGK-1 promotes the cytoplasmic localization of the PQM-1 transcription factor, which antagonizes intestinal fat mobilization at the transcriptional level when localized to the nucleus. These results revealed that a non-cell-autonomous developmental input regulates intestinal fat metabolism by engaging mTORC2 signaling to promote the intertissue transport of fat reserves from the soma to the germline. PMID:27401555

  1. Iron-induced reactive oxygen species mediate transporter DMT1 endocytosis and iron uptake in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Andrés; Gerdtzen, Ziomara P; Olivera-Nappa, Alvaro; Salgado, J Cristian; Núñez, Marco T

    2015-10-15

    Recent evidence shows that iron induces the endocytosis of the iron transporter dimetal transporter 1 (DMT1) during intestinal absorption. We, and others, have proposed that iron-induced DMT1 internalization underlies the mucosal block phenomena, a regulatory response that downregulates intestinal iron uptake after a large oral dose of iron. In this work, we investigated the participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the establishment of this response. By means of selective surface protein biotinylation of polarized Caco-2 cells, we determined the kinetics of DMT1 internalization from the apical membrane after an iron challenge. The initial decrease in DMT1 levels in the apical membrane induced by iron was followed at later times by increased levels of DMT1. Addition of Fe(2+), but not of Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), or Cu(1+), induced the production of intracellular ROS, as detected by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence. Preincubation with the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) resulted in increased DMT1 at the apical membrane before and after addition of iron. Similarly, preincubation with the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in the enhanced presence of DMT1 at the apical membrane. The decrease of DMT1 levels at the apical membrane induced by iron was associated with decreased iron uptake rates. A kinetic mathematical model based on operational rate constants of DMT1 endocytosis and exocytosis is proposed. The model qualitatively captures the experimental observations and accurately describes the effect of iron, NAC, and DMSO on the apical distribution of DMT1. Taken together, our data suggest that iron uptake induces the production of ROS, which modify DMT1 endocytic cycling, thus changing the iron transport activity at the apical membrane.

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide attenuates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase a pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yuanxing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Waschek, James A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2013-09-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), an exogenous, antigen-independent, local inflammation response, occurs in multiple clinical settings, including liver transplantation, hepatic resection, trauma, and shock. The nervous system maintains extensive crosstalk with the immune system through neuropeptide and peptide hormone networks. This study examined the function and therapeutic potential of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) neuropeptide in a murine model of liver warm ischemia (90 minutes) followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) triggered an induction of gene expression of intrinsic VIP; this peaked at 24 hours of reperfusion and coincided with a hepatic self-healing phase. Treatment with the VIP neuropeptide protected livers from IRI; this was evidenced by diminished serum alanine aminotransferase levels and well-preserved tissue architecture and was associated with elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The hepatocellular protection rendered by VIP was accompanied by diminished neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and activation, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and increased hepatic interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression. Strikingly, PKA inhibition restored liver damage in otherwise IR-resistant VIP-treated mice. In vitro, VIP not only diminished macrophage tumor necrosis factor α/IL-6/IL-12 expression in a PKA-dependent manner but also prevented necrosis/apoptosis in primary mouse hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our findings document the importance of VIP neuropeptide-mediated cAMP-PKA signaling in hepatic homeostasis and cytoprotection in vivo. Because the enhancement of neural modulation differentially regulates local inflammation and prevents hepatocyte death, these results provide the rationale for novel approaches to managing liver IRI in transplant patients. PMID:23744729

  3. Effects of dietary supplementation with an expressed fusion peptide bovine lactoferricin-lactoferrampin on performance, immune function and intestinal mucosal morphology in piglets weaned at age 21 d.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Youming; Huang, Ruilin; Sun, Zhihong; Li, Tiejun; Chu, Wuying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Lili; Geng, Meimei; Tu, Qiang

    2009-04-01

    Lactoferrin has antimicrobial activity associated with peptide fragments lactoferricin (LFC) and lactoferrampin (LFA) released on digestion. These two fragments have been expressed in Photorhabdus luminescens as a fusion peptide linked to protein cipB. The construct cipB-LFC-LFA was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth promoters in pig production. Sixty piglets with an average live body weight of 5.42 (sem 0.59) kg were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and randomly assigned to four treatment groups fed a maize-soyabean meal diet containing either no addition (C), cipB at 100 mg/kg (C+B), cipB-LFC-LFA at 100 mg/kg (C+L) or colistin sulfate at 100 mg/kg (C+CS) for 3 weeks. Compared with C, dietary supplementation with C+L for 3 weeks increased daily weight gain by 21 %, increased recovery from diarrhoea, enhanced serum glutathione peroxidase (GPx), peroxidase (POD) and total antioxidant content (T-AOC), liver GPx, POD, superoxide dismutase and T-AOC, Fe, total Fe-binding capacity, IgA, IgG and IgM levels (P < 0.05), decreased the concentration of E. coli in the ileum, caecum and colon (P < 0.05), increased the concentration of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the ileum, caecum and colon (P < 0.05), and promoted development of the villus-crypt architecture of the small intestine. Growth performance was similar between C+L- and C+CS-supplemented pigs. The present results indicate that LFC-LFA is an effective alternative to the feed antibiotic CS for enhancing growth performance in piglets weaned at age 21 d. PMID:18840311

  4. Solution structure of an analogue of vasoactive intestinal peptide as determined by two-dimensional NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopies and constrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.C.; Madison, V.S.; Bolin, D.R.; Greeley, D.N.; Toome, V.; Wegrzynski, B.B. )

    1989-03-21

    Structures have been determined for a potent analogue (VIP') of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in methanol/water solutions. In CD studies, both VIP and VIP' were helical in methanol/water, with the percentage of {alpha}-helix increasing with percentage methanol. The pH had little effect on the structure. Complete {sup 1}H NMR assignments were made for VIP' in 25% methanol at pH 4 and 6 and in 50% methanol at pH 6, using two-dimensional COSY, NOESY, and relay-COSY experiments. There were no widespread changes in chemical shifts between the samples at pH 4 and 6; however, widespread changes were observed between the samples in 25% and 50% methanol. Complete sets of NOEs were obtained for VIP' in 25% methanol, pH 4, and in 50% methanol, pH 6. These NOEs were converted into distance constraints and applied in molecular dynamics and energy minimization calculations using the program CHARMM. A set of low-energy structures was obtained for VIP' in each solvent system. In 25% methanol, VIP' has two helical segments at residues 9-17 and 23-28. The remainder of the structure is not well determined. In 50% methanol, residues 8-26 form a regular, well-defined {alpha}-helix and residues 5-8 form a type III {beta}-turn. The remaining residues are not ordered. These structural assessments agree with the CD data. In the lowest energy structure in 50% methanol, the side chains of Asp{sup 3}, Phe{sup 6}, Thr{sup 7}, and Tyr{sup 10} are clustered together--these residues are conserved throughout the family of peptide hormones homologous to VIP.

  5. Disequilibrium patterns of the peptide transporter loci within the HLA class II region

    SciTech Connect

    Klitz, W.; Stephens, C.J.; Carrington, M.

    1994-09-01

    Disequilibrium between genetic markers is expected to decline monotonically with recombinational map distance. We present evidence from the HLA class II region which seems to violate this principle. Pairwise disequilibrium values from a sample of northern Europeans were calculated for six loci ranging in physical separation from 7 kb to 550 kb. The histocompatibility loci DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 located on the distal end of the class II region behave as a single evolutionary unit within which extremely high linkage disequilibrium exists. Lower but significant levels of disequilibrium are present between these loci and DPB1 located at the proximal edge of the HLA complex. The peptide transporter loci TAP1 and TAP2, located in the intervening region, reveal no disequilibrium with each other and low or negligible disequilibrium with the flanking loci. This evidence suggests either a high rate of gene conversion in the TAP loci which mixes TAP alleles among haplotypes while maintaining the flanking markers, or recombinational hot spots near and between the TAP loci operating in combination with selection to preserve particular combinations of alleles at the flanking histocompatibility loci. Whatever explanation proves correct, this work demonstrates that the lack of association of TAP alleles with a DR-DQ associated disease cannot be used as evidence for a centromeric boundary of influence on that disease.

  6. Transport properties of simple organic molecules in a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Fan, Jian Fen; Zhang, Ming Ming; Weng, Pei Pei; Lin, Hui Fang

    2016-05-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the transport properties of single methane, methanol, and ethanol molecules through the water-filled transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube (CPNT) of 8 × (WL)₄-POPE, as well as the potential application of this CPNT in the separation of an alcohol/water mixture. Molecular size and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity were found to significantly influence molecular diffusion behavior in the channel. Methane and ethanol display more explicit distributions in midplane regions, while methanol mainly occurs in α-plane zones. Methane and ethanol drift faster near an α-plane zone, whereas methanol diffuses uniformly throughout the whole transmembrane region. The dipole orientation of channel methanol is significantly affected by the bare carbonyl groups at the tube mouths and flips mainly in gap 4, whereas the rotation of ethanol is blocked. Ball-shaped hydrophobic methane experiences more flips in gap 4. The PMF (potential of mean force) profiles of the three organic molecules disclose their different diffusion behaviors in the CPNT. Amphiphilic alcohols are able to form direct H-bonds with channel water and the tube. Both single and double water bridges with the tube were observed in the methanol and ethanol systems. The different adsorption behaviors of the alcohols and water in the dehydrated CPNT may lead to the potential application of the CPNT as a means of separating alcohols from water. PMID:27083567

  7. Different transport behaviors of NH4 (+) and NH3 in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Fan, Jianfen; Xu, Jian; Weng, Peipei; Lin, Huifang

    2016-10-01

    Two water-filled transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) of 8×cyclo-(WL)n=4,5/POPE were chosen to investigate the dependences of the transport properties of the positive NH4 (+) and neutral NH3 on the channel radius. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that molecular charge, size, ability to form H-bonds and channel radius all significantly influence the behaviors of NH4 (+) and NH3 in a CPNT. Higher electrostatic interactions, more H-bonds, and water-bridges were found in the NH4 (+) system, resulting in NH4 (+) meeting higher energy barriers, while NH3 can enter, exit and permeate the channels effortlessly. This work sheds a first light on the differences between the mechanisms of NH4 (+) and NH3 moving in a CPNT at an atomic level. Graphical Abstract Snapshot of the simulation system of NH4 (+)_octa-CPNT with an NH4 (+) initially positioned at one mouth of the tube, PMF profiles for single NH4 (+) ion and NH3 molecule moving through water-filled transmembrane CPNTs of 8×cyclo-(WL)n=4,5/POPE and sketch graphs of the possible H-bond forms of NH3 and NH4 (+) with the neighboring water. PMID:27600817

  8. PEGylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 improved the intestinal digestive function and prevented inflammation of weaning piglets challenged with LPS.

    PubMed

    Qi, K K; Wu, J; Deng, B; Li, Y M; Xu, Z W

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects on intestinal function, anti-inflammatory role and possible mechanism of polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 (pGLP-2), a long-acting form of pGLP-2, in weaning piglets challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We divided 18 weaned piglets on day 21 into three groups (control, LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2; n=6). The piglets from the LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 group were injected with PEG-pGLP-2 at 10 nmol/kg BW from 5 to 7 days of the trials daily. On 8th day, the piglets in the LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 groups were intraperitoneally administered with 100 µg LPS/kg. The control group was administered with the same volume of saline solution. The piglets were then sacrificed on day 28. Afterwards, serum, duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples were collected for analysis of structural and functional endpoints. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) lactase activities in the duodenum and the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment also significantly increased sucrase activity in the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. Furthermore, LPS treatment increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-10 in the ileum compared with the control treatment. By contrast, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment decreased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in the ileum compared with the LPS treatment. LPS treatment also increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression level of GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) and the percentage of GLP-2R-positive cells in the ileum; by comparison, these results were (P<0.05) reduced by LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment. Moreover, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) the content of serum keratinocyte growth factor compared with the control group and the LPS group. The protective effects of PEG-pGLP-2 on intestinal digestive function were associated with the release of GLP-2R mediator (keratinocyte

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-2 activates beta-catenin signaling in the mouse intestinal crypt: role of insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Philip E; Rowland, Katherine J; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Chronic administration of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) induces intestinal growth and crypt cell proliferation through an indirect mechanism requiring IGF-I. However, the intracellular pathways through which IGF-I mediates GLP-2-induced epithelial tropic signaling remain undefined. Because beta-catenin and Akt are important regulators of crypt cell proliferation, we hypothesized that GLP-2 activates these signaling pathways through an IGF-I-dependent mechanism. In this study, fasted mice were administered Gly(2)-GLP-2 or LR(3)-IGF-I (positive control) for 0.5-4 h. Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in non-Paneth crypt cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry and expression of its downstream proliferative markers, c-myc and Sox9, by quantitative RT-PCR. Akt phosphorylation and activation of its targets, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and caspase-3, were determined by Western blot. IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and IGF-I signaling were blocked by preadministration of NVP-AEW541 and through the use of IGF-I knockout mice, respectively. We found that GLP-2 increased beta-catenin nuclear translocation in non-Paneth crypt cells by 72 +/- 17% (P < 0.05) and increased mucosal c-myc and Sox9 mRNA expression by 90 +/- 20 and 376 +/- 170%, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01), with similar results observed with IGF-I. This effect of GLP-2 was prevented by blocking the IGF-IR as well as ablation of IGF-I signaling. GLP-2 also produced a time- and dose-dependent activation of Akt in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.01), most notably in the epithelium. This action was reduced by IGF-IR inhibition but not IGF-I knockout. We concluded that acute administration of GLP-2 activates beta-catenin and proliferative signaling in non-Paneth murine intestinal crypt cells as well as Akt signaling in the mucosa. However, IGF-I is required only for the GLP-2-induced alterations in beta-catenin.

  10. Presumed LRP1-targeting transport peptide delivers β-secretase inhibitor to neurons in vitro with limited efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ah; Casalini, Tommaso; Brambilla, Davide; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Interfering with the activity of β-secretase to reduce the production of Aβ peptides is a conceivable therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. However, the development of efficient yet safe inhibitors is hampered by secondary effects, usually linked to the indiscriminate inhibition of other substrates’ processing by the targeted enzyme. Based on the spatial compartmentalization of the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by β-secretase, we hypothesized that by exploiting the endocytosis receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein it would be possible to direct an otherwise cell-impermeable inhibitor to the endosomes of neurons, boosting the drug’s efficacy and importantly, sparing the off-target effects. We used the transport peptide Angiopep to build an endocytosis-competent conjugate and found that although the peptide facilitated the inhibitor’s internalization into neurons and delivered it to the endosomes, the delivery was not efficient enough to potently reduce β-secretase activity at the cellular level. This is likely connected to the finding that in the cell lines we used, Angiopep’s internalization was not mediated by its presumed receptor to a significant extent. Additionally, Angiopep exploited different internalization mechanisms when applied alone or when conjugated to the inhibitor, highlighting the impact that drug conjugation can have on transport peptides. PMID:27682851

  11. Impact of Efavirenz on Intestinal Metabolism and Transport: Insights From an Interaction Study With Ezetimibe in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, S; zu Schwabedissen, HE Meyer; Nassif, A; Modess, C; Desta, Z; Ogburn, ET; Mostertz, J; Keiser, M; Jia, J; Hubeny, A; Ulrich, A; Runge, D; Marinova, M; Lütjohann, D; Kroemer, HK; Siegmund, W

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia frequently occurs in patients treated with efavirenz who cannot be treated adequately with statins because of drug interactions. These patients may benefit from cholesterol-lowering therapy with ezetimibe. This study determined the influence of single-dose and multiple-dose efavirenz (400 mg/day for 9 days) on the pharmacokinetics and sterol-lowering of ezetimibe (10 mg) in 12 healthy subjects. In addition, the influence of efavirenz on genome-wide intestinal expression and in vitro function of ABCB1, ABCC2, UGT1A1, and OATP1B1 was studied. Efavirenz (multiple dose) had no influence on the pharmacokinetics and lipid-lowering functions of ezetimibe. Intestinal expression of enzymes and transporters (e.g., ABCB1, ABCC2, and UGT1A1) was not affected by chronic efavirenz. Efavirenz (single dose) slightly increased ezetimibe absorption and markedly decreased exposure to ezetimibe-glucuronide (single dose and multiple dose), which may be explained by inhibition of UGT1A1 and ABCB1 (in vitro data). Ezetimibe had no effect on the disposition of efavirenz. Consequently, ezetimibe may be a safe and efficient therapeutic option in patients with HIV infection. PMID:22297387

  12. Loss of Slc26a9 anion transporter alters intestinal electrolyte and HCO3(-) transport and reduces survival in CFTR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Li, Taolang; Riederer, Brigitte; Lenzen, Henrike; Ludolph, Lisa; Yeruva, Sunil; Tuo, Biguang; Soleimani, Manoocher; Seidler, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Slc26a9 is an anion transporter that is strongly expressed in the stomach and lung. Slc26a9 variants were recently found associated with a higher incidence of meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis (CF) infants, raising the question whether Slc26a9 is expressed in the intestine and what its functional role is. Slc26a9 messenger RNA (mRNA) was found highly expressed in the mucosae of the murine and human upper gastrointestinal tract, with an abrupt decrease in expression levels beyond the duodenum. Absence of SLC26a9 expression strongly increased the intestinally related mortality in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient mice. Proximal duodenal JHCO3(-) and fluid secretion were reduced in the absence of Slc26a9 expression. In the proximal duodenum of young Slc26a9 KO mice, the glands and villi/crypts were elongated and proliferation was enhanced. This difference was lost with ageing, as were the alterations in fluid movement, whereas the reduction in JHCO3(-) remained. Laser dissection followed by qPCR suggested Slc26a9 expression to be crypt-predominant in the duodenum. In summary, deletion of Slc26a9 caused bicarbonate secretory and fluid absorptive changes in the proximal duodenal mucosa and increased the postweaning death rates in CFTR-deficient mice. Functional alterations in the duodenum were most prominent at young ages. We assume that the association of meconium ileus and Slc26a9 variants may be related to maldigestion and impaired downstream signaling caused by loss of upper GI tract digestive functions, aggravating the situation of lack of secretion and sticky mucus at the site of obstruction in CF intestine.

  13. A role for phosphorylation in the regulation of the barley scutellar peptide transporter HvPTR1 by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Ashley, Merewyn K; West, Christopher E; Sunderland, Paul A; Bray, Clifford M

    2005-06-01

    Protein reserves in the cereal endosperm are sequentially degraded to small peptides and amino acids during germination and these are translocated across the scutellum to support growth of the embryo. Peptide transport in the germinating barley grain is mediated by specific carriers localized to the plasma membrane of the scutellar epithelium. In isolated barley embryos peptide transport is rapidly inhibited by amino acid concentrations comparable with those found in the post-germination barley grain. However, this inhibition of HvPTR1 activity is not effected at either the transcriptional or translational level. The protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid repressed transport of Ala-[14C]Phe, but not [14C]Ala, into the barley scutellar epithelium. In vivo [32P]orthophosphate labelling studies of barley scutellar tissue in combination with immunoprecipitation studies using antiserum raised to HvPTR1 showed that HvPTR1 (66 kDa) is phosphorylated in the presence of amino acids. Immunopurified HvPTR1 was further demonstrated to be phosphorylated on serine residues. Digestion with the N-glycosidase enzyme PNGase F results in a shift in the molecular mass of the protein by 10 kDa, indicating that HvPTR1 is an N-linked glycoprotein. These results provide strong circumstantial evidence that HvPTR1 peptide transport activity in the germinating barley grain is regulated at the post-translational level by phosphorylation in response to rising levels of amino acids emanating from the endosperm as a result of storage protein breakdown and mobilization. This is potentially an important element in balancing the flux of organic nitrogen and carbon from the endosperm to embryo during germination and seedling establishment.

  14. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  15. Augmentation of the effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide aerosol on pulmonary hypertension via coapplication of a neutral endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Leuchte, Hanno H; Prechtl, Christoph; Callegari, Jens; Meis, Tobias; Haziraj, Shani; Bevec, Dorian; Behr, Jürgen

    2015-03-15

    A deficiency of the pulmonary vasodilative vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Supplementation of VIP as an aerosol is hampered by the fact that it is rapidly inactivated by neutral endopeptidases (NEP) located on the lung surface. Coapplication of thiorphan, an NEP 24.11 inhibitor, could augment the biological effects of inhaled VIP alone. A stable pulmonary vasoconstriction with a threefold increase of pulmonary artery pressure was established by application the thromboxane mimetic U46619 in the isolated rabbit lung model. VIP and thiorphan were either applied intravascularly or as an aerosol. VIP caused a significant pulmonary vasodilation either during intravascular application or inhalation. These effects were of short duration. Thiorphan application had no effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction per se but significantly augmented the effects of VIP aerosol. Thiorphan, not only augmented the maximum hemodynamic effects of VIP aerosol, but also led to a significant prolongation of these effects. VIP causes pulmonary vasodilation in a model of acute experimental PH. The hemodynamic effects of VIP aerosol can be significantly augmented via coapplication of an NEP inhibitor.

  16. Combined ultrastructural and biochemical study of cellular processing of vasoactive intestinal peptide and its receptors in human colonic carcinoma cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Hejblum, G; Gali, P; Boissard, C; Astesano, A; Marie, J C; Anteunis, A; Hui Bon Hoa, D; Rosselin, G

    1988-11-01

    Desensitization of human carcinoma colonic cells in culture (HT-29) to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been reported previously (C. Boissard, J. C. Marie, G. Hejblum, C. Gespach, and G. Rosselin, Cancer Res., 46: 4406-4413, 1986). In the present study, we have determined the ultrastructural localization of VIP and its receptor after exposure of HT-29 cells to VIP monoiodinated on tyrosyl residue 10 together with the molecular forms and the activity of the internalized VIP receptor. Quantitative electron microscope autoradiography showed that after binding at the cell surface, VIP is internalized in heterogeneous endosomes. Cross-linking experiments followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis were performed in different experimental conditions allowing us to selectively obtain cell surface-associated, internalized, or recycled receptors. No detectable alteration of the labeled VIP-receptor complex occurred during the internalization and recycling processes. Furthermore, a loss of the forskolin potentiation of the VIP-induced stimulation of adenylate cyclase was observed after VIP exposure. This feature was time and temperature dependent as was the VIP-induced loss of cell surface receptors, indicating that the internalized VIP receptor is dissociated from the adenylate cyclase. PMID:2844402

  17. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide and naloxone combination on urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase level and kidney histology of rats exposed to severe hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Akin, M Z; Tunçel, N; Gürer, F; Kural, N; Uslu, S

    1993-09-01

    Renal hypoperfusion which occurs in hemorrhagic shock creates an environment in which cellular injury and organ dysfunction can occur during the episode of shock as well as reoxygenation and reperfusion. At the same time, mast cell degranulation which is observed during hemorrhage may have an additional deleterious effect on the kidney. Twenty-two (Mus norvegicus albinos) rats (200-250 g) of either sex were used. The animals were divided into three groups. Group 1, the control group, was exposed to a 40% hemorrhage. Group 2 was exposed to 40% hemorrhage and then shed blood reperfused. Group 3 was exposed to 40% hemorrhage, and in addition to shed blood reperfusion 25 ng kg-1 vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) + 5 mg kg-1 naloxone (NLX) were given. At the end of the experiment the kidneys were evaluated either histologically or by measurement of the urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity. Shed blood reperfusion caused continuation of ischemic tissue damage and elevation of urinary NAG activity. Addition of VIP and NLX to the blood reperfusion caused a decrease in urinary NAG excretion, and the histology of renal tissue was almost normal.

  18. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Receptor 2 Agonist Therapy in a Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Olson, Katherine E; Bade, Aditya N; Schutt, Charles R; Dong, Jingdong; Shandler, Scott J; Boska, Michael D; Mosley, R Lee; Gendelman, Howard E; Liu, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Neuroprotective immunity is defined by transformation of T-cell polarity for therapeutic gain. For neurodegenerative disorders and specifically for Parkinson's disease (PD), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2) agonists elicit robust anti-inflammatory microglial responses leading to neuronal sparing in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice. While neurotherapeutic potential was demonstrated for PD, there remain inherent limitations in translating these inventions from the laboratory to patients. One obstacle in translating such novel neurotherapeutics centers on the availability of suitable noninvasive methods to track disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. To this end, we developed manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) assays as a way to track a linkage between glial activation and VIPR2 agonist (LBT-3627)-induced neuroprotective immunity for MPTP-induced nigrostriatal degeneration. Notably, LBT-3627-treated, MPTP-intoxicated mice show reduced MEMRI brain signal intensities. These changes paralleled reduced astrogliosis and resulted in sparing of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase neurons. Most importantly, the data suggest that MEMRI can be developed as a biomarker tool to monitor neurotherapeutic responses that are relevant to common neurodegenerative disorders used to improve disease outcomes. PMID:27329163

  19. Action of 5-hydroxytryptamine on intestinal ion transport in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, J; Hardcastle, P T; Redfern, J S

    1981-01-01

    1. 5-HT increased the electrical activity of rat jejunum both in vivo and in vitro. The increased potential difference and short-circuit current resulted from a stimulation of electrogenic chloride secretion. NaCl absorption may also have been inhibited. 2. 5-HT did not alter cyclic AMP levels in isolated enterocytes. 3. The 5-HT response in vivo was unaffected by atropine, cyproheptadine, propranolol and hexamethonium. Phenoxybenzamine reduced the maximum response without affecting the dose required to produce a 50% maximum response. Methysergide, at a dose of 40 mg/kg, had a similar effect while a lower dose of 2 mg/kg produced no change. Mianserin competitively antagonized the response to 5-HT, a dose of 2 mg/kg producing a fourfold increase in the amount of 5-HT required to produce a 50% maximum response. 4. Acetylcholine and 5-HT seem to act independently in inducing intestinal secretion since atropine did not block the response to 5-HT and Mianserin did not alter the response to acetylcholine. 5. Experiments in which the intestinal villi or crypts were subjected to preferential damage suggested that 5-HT primarily produced its response at the crypt cell level. PMID:6275078

  20. Changes to Intestinal Transport Physiology and Carbonate Production at Various CO2 Levels in a Marine Teleost, the Gulf Toadfish (Opsanus beta).

    PubMed

    Heuer, Rachael M; Munley, Kathleen M; Narsinghani, Nafis; Wingar, Jessica A; Mackey, Theresa; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Most marine teleosts defend blood pH during high CO2 exposure by sustaining elevated levels of HCO3(-) in body fluids. In contrast to the gill, where measures are taken to achieve net base retention, elevated CO2 leads to base loss in the intestine of marine teleosts studied to date. This loss is thought to occur through transport pathways previously demonstrated to be involved with routine osmoregulation in marine teleosts. The main objective of this study was to characterize the intestinal transport physiology of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) when exposed to varied levels of CO2: control, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 μatm CO2 (0.04, 0.5, 1, and 2 kPa, respectively). Results of this study suggest that intestinal apical anion exchange is highly responsive to hypercarbia, evidenced by a dose-dependent increase in intestinal luminal HCO3(-) (mmol L(-1)) that was mirrored by a reduction in Cl(-) (mmol L(-1)). Despite activation of HCO3(-) transport pathways typically used during osmoregulation, fractional fluid absorption was only significantly lower at the highest level of CO2. Although increased HCO3(-) excretion could provide more substrate for intestinally produced carbonates, carbonate production was not significantly increased during hypercarbia at the levels tested. This study is among the first to thoroughly characterize how compensation for elevated CO2 affects transport physiology and carbonate production in the marine fish intestine. This deeper understanding may be particularly relevant when considering the impacts of future predicted ocean acidification, where prolonged base loss may alter the energetic cost of acid-base balance or osmoregulation in marine fish. PMID:27617361

  1. Investigating the transport dynamics of anthocyanins from unprocessed fruit and processed fruit juice from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) across intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toydemir, Gamze; Boyacioglu, Dilek; Capanoglu, Esra; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Tomassen, Monic M M; Hall, Robert D; Mes, Jurriaan J; Beekwilder, Jules

    2013-11-27

    Anthocyanins can contribute to human health through preventing a variety of diseases. The uptake of these compounds from food and the parameters determining uptake efficiency within the human body are still poorly understood. Here we have employed a Caco-2 cell based system to investigate the transport of key antioxidant food components from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) across the intestinal epithelial barrier. Anthocyanins and (-)-epicatechin were supplied in three contrasting matrices: fruit, processed fruit cherry juice, and polyphenolic fractions obtained by solid-phase extraction. Results show that both compound types behave differently. Fruit or juice matrices display comparable transport across the epithelial cell layer. The juice supplements sucrose and citric acid, which are regularly added to processed foods, have a positive effect on stability and transport. Polyphenolic fractions display a lower transport efficiency, relative to that of the fruit or juice, indicating the importance of food matrix components for intestinal absorption of polyphenols. PMID:24191680

  2. Investigating the transport dynamics of anthocyanins from unprocessed fruit and processed fruit juice from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) across intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toydemir, Gamze; Boyacioglu, Dilek; Capanoglu, Esra; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Tomassen, Monic M M; Hall, Robert D; Mes, Jurriaan J; Beekwilder, Jules

    2013-11-27

    Anthocyanins can contribute to human health through preventing a variety of diseases. The uptake of these compounds from food and the parameters determining uptake efficiency within the human body are still poorly understood. Here we have employed a Caco-2 cell based system to investigate the transport of key antioxidant food components from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) across the intestinal epithelial barrier. Anthocyanins and (-)-epicatechin were supplied in three contrasting matrices: fruit, processed fruit cherry juice, and polyphenolic fractions obtained by solid-phase extraction. Results show that both compound types behave differently. Fruit or juice matrices display comparable transport across the epithelial cell layer. The juice supplements sucrose and citric acid, which are regularly added to processed foods, have a positive effect on stability and transport. Polyphenolic fractions display a lower transport efficiency, relative to that of the fruit or juice, indicating the importance of food matrix components for intestinal absorption of polyphenols.

  3. Transporters from H-2b, H-2d, H-2s, H-2k, and H-2g7 (NOD/Lt) haplotype translocate similar sets of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, T N; Kantesaria, D V; Serreze, D V; Roopenian, D C; Ploegh, H L

    1994-01-01

    The TAP complex transports peptides from the cytosol into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum for presentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. A limited degree of sequence polymorphism has been observed for the mouse TAP1 and TAP2 genes by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis. However, functional polymorphism of the TAP transporter has thus far been observed for the rat only. Here we examine the effect of TAP polymorphism on ATP dependency and peptide specificity of TAP-mediated peptide transport and show that, in the mouse, polymorphism in TAP genes does not measurably alter the function of their gene products. We conclude that TAP polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases and that, in the mouse, the specificity of the TAP transporter is matched to that of the F pocket of the class I molecules for which it provides the peptide substrates. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7809164

  4. Ruminal and Abomasal Starch Hydrolysate Infusions Selectively Decrease the Expression of Cationic Amino Acid Transporter mRNA by Small Intestinal Epithelia of Forage-fed Beef Steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although cationic amino acids (CAA) are consid-ered essential to maximize optimal growth of cattle, transporters responsible for CAA absorption by bovine small intestinal epithelia have not been described. This study was conducted to test 2 hypotheses: 1) the duo¬denal, jejunal, and ileal epithelia ...

  5. [11C]-Labeled Metformin Distribution in the Liver and Small Intestine Using Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography in Mice Demonstrates Tissue-Specific Transporter Dependency.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jonas B; Sundelin, Elias I; Jakobsen, Steen; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole L; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jessen, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral antidiabetic drug, with well-documented beneficial preventive effects on diabetic complications. Despite being in clinical use for almost 60 years, the underlying mechanisms for metformin action remain elusive. Organic cation transporters (OCT), including multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATE), are essential for transport of metformin across membranes, but tissue-specific activity of these transporters in vivo is incompletely understood. Here, we use dynamic positron emission tomography with [(11)C]-labeled metformin ([(11)C]-metformin) in mice to investigate the role of OCT and MATE in a well-established target tissue, the liver, and a putative target of metformin, the small intestine. Ablation of OCT1 and OCT2 significantly reduced the distribution of metformin in the liver and small intestine. In contrast, inhibition of MATE1 with pyrimethamine caused accumulation of metformin in the liver but did not affect distribution in the small intestine. The demonstration of OCT-mediated transport into the small intestine provides evidence of direct effects of metformin in this tissue. OCT and MATE have important but separate roles in uptake and elimination of metformin in the liver, but this is not due to changes in biliary secretion. [(11)C]-Metformin holds great potential as a tool to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of metformin in clinical studies.

  6. Mutational analysis of the N-terminus in Schistocerca gregaria ion-transport peptide expressed in Drosophila Kc1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Meredith, J; Brock, H W; Phillips, J E

    2005-01-01

    The functions of the 6-7 amino acid N-terminal domain conserved in insect and crustacean members of the hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family were assayed by site-directed mutagenesis of Schistocerca gregaria ion-transport peptide (SchgrITP). Mutant peptides were expressed in Drosophila Kc1 cells and tested in a biological assay measuring stimulation of active Cl(-) transport across the locust ileum. We exchanged the N-terminal domain of SchgrITP with that of the shrimp Penaeus japonicus hyperglycemic hormone leaving the remainder of SchgrITP intact. The chimeric peptide was completely inactive in the ileal bioassay, showing that the N-terminus of SchgrITP is essential and that the 2 amino acids (phenylalanine-3 and aspartate-4) conserved in the shrimp and locust peptides are not sufficient for function. We made all possible alanine substitutions in the SchgrITP N-terminal domain. Only phenylalanines 2 and 3 were essential for function in the locust ileal bioassay. All N-terminal mutations were cleaved correctly from the prepropeptide, and expressed in similar concentrations as wild-type ITP suggesting the specific amino acids are not essential for these functions. Post-translational modification may explain a minor ITP isomorph observed in Drosophila Kc1 cell expression. Alanine substitution at position 2 produced a weak ITP antagonist. These structure-function studies, the first for any member of the CHH family, show that both conserved and unconserved amino acids contribute to SchgrITP ion-transport function and that the conserved aspartate in position 4 is required for a yet uncharacterized function.

  7. Phosphatidylcholine passes through lateral tight junctions for paracellular transport to the apical side of the polarized intestinal tumor cell-line CaCo2.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Wannhoff, Andreas; Bach, Margund; Gauss, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in intestinal mucus, indicative of a specific transport system across the mucosal epithelium to the intestinal lumen. To elucidate this transport mechanism, we employed a transwell tissue culture system with polarized CaCo2 cells. It was shown that PC could not substantially be internalized by the cells. However, after basal application of increasing PC concentrations, an apical transport of 47.1±6.3nmolh(-1)mMPC(-1) was observed. Equilibrium distribution studies with PC applied in equal concentrations to the basal and apical compartments showed a 1.5-fold accumulation on the expense of basal PC. Disruption of tight junctions (TJ) by acetaldehyde or PPARγ inhibitors or by treatment with siRNA to TJ proteins suppressed paracellular transport by at least 50%. Transport was specific for the choline containing the phospholipids PC, lysoPC and sphingomyelin. We showed that translocation is driven by an electrochemical gradient generated by apical accumulation of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) through CFTR. Pretreatment with siRNA to mucin 3 which anchors in the apical plasma membrane of mucosal cells inhibited the final step of luminal PC secretion. PC accumulates in intestinal mucus using a paracellular, apically directed transport route across TJs. PMID:27365309

  8. Adenosine protects Sprague Dawley rats from high-fat diet and repeated acute restraint stress-induced intestinal inflammation and altered expression of nutrient transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated acute restraint stress and high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal expression of nutrient transporters, concomitant to intestinal inflammation. The ability of adenosine to reverse any change was examined. Six-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: control or non-stressed (C), rats exposed to restraint stress for 6 h per day for 14 days (S), control rats fed with HFD (CHF) and restraint-stressed rats fed with HFD (SHF); four additional groups received the same treatments and were also given 50 mg/l adenosine dissolved in drinking water. Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, adiponectin and corticosterone were measured. Intestinal expression of SLC5A1, SLC2A2, NPC1L1 and TNF-α was analysed. Histological evaluation was conducted to observe for morphological and anatomical changes in the intestinal tissues. Results showed that HFD feeding increased glucose and insulin levels, and repeated acute restraint stress raised the corticosterone level by 22%. Exposure to both stress and HFD caused a further increase in corticosterone to 41%, while decreasing plasma adiponectin level. Restraint stress altered intestinal expression of SLC5A1, SLC2A2 and NPC1L1. These changes were enhanced in SHF rats. Adenosine was found to alleviate HFD-induced increase in glucose and insulin levels, suppress elevation of corticosterone in S rats and improve the altered nutrient transporters expression profiles. It also prevented upregulation of TNF-α in the intestine of SHF rats. In summary, a combination of stress and HFD exaggerated stress- and HFD-induced pathophysiological changes in the intestine, and biochemical parameters related to obesity. Adenosine attenuated the elevation of corticosterone and altered expression of SLC5A1, NPC1L1 and TNF-α.

  9. Vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor regulation of cAMP accumulation and glycogen hydrolysis in the human Ewing's sarcoma cell line WE-68.

    PubMed

    Van Valen, F; Jürgens, H; Winkelmann, W; Keck, E

    1989-01-01

    This study describes functional characteristics of receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on human Ewing's sarcoma WE-68 cells. These characteristics include 125I-VIP binding capacity, cellular cAMP generation, glycogen hydrolysis, and pharmacological specificity. Binding studies with 125I-VIP showed specific, saturable, binding sites for VIP in WE-68 cells. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites that exhibited a dissociation constant (Kd) of 90 pM and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 24 fmol/mg of protein. VIP and VIP-related peptides competed for 125I-VIP binding in the following order of potency: human (h) VIP greater than human peptide with N-terminal histidine and C-terminal methionine (PHM) greater than chicken secretin much greater than porcine secretin. Glucagon and the C-terminal fragments VIP[10-28] and VIP[16-28] and the VIP analogue (D-Phe2)VIP did not inhibit 125I-VIP binding. Addition of hVIP to WE-68 cells provoked marked stimulation of cAMP accumulation, hVIP stimulated increases in cAMP content were rapid, concentration-dependent, and potentiated by 3-isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX). Half-maximal stimulation (EC50) occurred at 150 nM hVIP. The ability of hVIP and analogues to stimulate cAMP generation paralleled their potencies in displacing 125I-VIP binding. (D-Phe2)VIP, VIP[10-28], VIP[16-28], and (p-Cl-D-Phe6, Leu17)VIP, a putative VIP receptor antagonist, affected neither basal cAMP levels nor hVIP-induced cAMP accumulation. WE-68 cell responses to hVIP were desensitized by prior exposure to hVIP. Desensitization to hVIP did not modify the cAMP response to beta-adrenergic stimulation, and beta-adrenergic agonist desensitization did not modify responses to hVIP. hVIP also induced a time- and concentration-dependent hydrolysis of 3H-glycogen newly formed from 3H-glucose in WE-68 cultures. hVIP maximally decreased 3H-glycogen content by 36% with an EC50 value of about 8 nM. The

  10. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs glucose transport in hippocampal and cortical neurons: involvement of membrane lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Pang, Z; Geddes, J W; Uchida, K; Mattson, M P

    1997-02-01

    A deficit in glucose uptake and a deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) each occur in vulnerable brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is not known whether mechanistic links exist between A beta deposition and impaired glucose transport. We now report that A beta impairs glucose transport in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons by a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation. A beta impaired 3H-deoxy-glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner and with a time course preceding neurodegeneration. The decrease in glucose transport was followed by a decrease in cellular ATP levels. Impairment of glucose transport, ATP depletion, and cell death were each prevented in cultures pretreated with antioxidants. Exposure to FeSO4, an established inducer of lipid peroxidation, also impaired glucose transport. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that exposure of cultures to A beta induced conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, to the neuronal glucose transport protein GLUT3. HNE induced a concentration-dependent impairment of glucose transport and subsequent ATP depletion. Impaired glucose transport was not caused by a decreased energy demand in the neurons, because ouabain, which inhibits Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity and thereby reduces neuronal ATP hydrolysis rate, had little or no effect on glucose transport. Collectively, the data demonstrate that lipid peroxidation mediates A beta-induced impairment of glucose transport in neurons and suggest that this action of A beta may contribute to decreased glucose uptake and neuronal degeneration in AD. PMID:8994059

  11. Dosage Effect of Zinc Glycine Chelate on Zinc Metabolism and Gene Expression of Zinc Transporter in Intestinal Segments on Rat.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danping; Hu, Qiaoling; Fang, Shenglin; Feng, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in various fundamental biological processes. The focus of this research was to investigate the dosage effect of zinc glycine chelate (Zn-Gly) on zinc metabolism and the gene expression of zinc transporters in intestinal segments. A total of 30 4-week-old SD rats were randomized into five treatment groups. The basal diets for each group were supplemented with gradient levels of Zn (0, 30, 60, 90, and 180 mg/kg) from Zn-Gly. After 1-week experiment, the results showed that serum and hepatic zinc concentration were elevated linearly with supplemental Zn levels from 0 to 180 mg Zn/kg. Serum Cu-Zn SOD activities resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) quadratic response and reached the peak when fed 60 mg Zn/kg. There were linear responses to the addition of Zn-Gly from 0 to 180 mg Zn/kg on Cu-Zn SOD and AKP activities in the liver. In the duodenum, MT1 mRNA was upregulated with the increasing dietary Zn-Gly levels and reached the peak of 180 mg Zn/kg (P < 0.05). Zip4 mRNA expression was downregulated with the increasing zinc levels (P < 0.05) in both duodenum and jejunum. In the jejunum, Zip5 mRNA expression in 60 mg Zn/kg was higher compared with other groups (P < 0.05). ZnT1 mRNA in duodenum was numerically increased with the rising levels of zinc content and was significantly higher (P < 0.05) with 180 mg Zn/kg. In the duodenum, adding 60 or 90 mg Zn/kg increased PepT1 expression, but in the jejunum, 60 mg Zn/kg did not differ from 0 added Zn. In summary, there is a dose-dependent effect of dietary Zn-Gly on serum and hepatic zinc levels and the activities of Cu-Zn SOD and AKP on rats. Dietary Zn-Gly has a certain effect on MT1, Zip4, Zip5, and ZnT1 expression, which expressed differently in intestinal segments with different levels of Zn-Gly load. Besides, Zn-Gly also could regulate PepT1 expression in intestinal segments.

  12. Na-dependent L-proline transport by eel intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Vilella, S.; Ahearn, G.A.; Cassano, G.; Storelli, C. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu )

    1988-10-01

    L-({sup 3}H)proline uptake by brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from intestinal mucosa of the European eel, Anguilla anguilla, was stimulated by a transmembrane Na gradient (out > in.) Kinetic analysis of L-proline influx, under short-circuited membrane potential conditions, indicated the presence of an apparent single Na-dependent carrier process and a nonsaturable transfer component with an apparent diffusional permeability (P) of 1.53 {plus minus} 0.35 {mu}l{center dot}mg protein{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}. An imposed transmembrane potential (inside negative) increased apparent L-proline binding affinity (lowered K{sub app}) without appreciably altering maximal amino acid influx (J{sub max}). Hill analysis of L-proline influx over a wide range of external Na concentrations indicated a 1:1 stoichiometry for Na-proline cotransport. Use of amino acid inhibitors of L-proline influx suggested that L-proline transfer may occur by either a classical Na-dependent A System with a wide substrate specificity or by the combination of Na-dependent PHE (phenylalanine preferring) and IMINO (proline, {alpha}-methylaminoisobutyric acid preferring) Systems.

  13. Rapid glucocorticoid inhibition of vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and prolactin release in rat pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rotsztejn, W H; Dussaillant, M; Nobou, F; Rosselin, G

    1981-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) stimulates both adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and prolactin release in normal rat pituitary cells in culture. cAMP accumulation is significant (P less than 0.01) at VIP concentrations as low as 1 nM and reaches a maximum with 0.1 microM. Addition of dexamethasone as early as 15 min before VIP inhibits VIP stimulation of both cAMP production and PRL secretion. The rapid inhibition is dose-dependent: it appears at doses as low as 0.01 pM and is complete at 1 pM dexamethasone. Increasing concentrations of dexamethasone induce a noncompetitive type of inhibition, as shown by the decrease in Vmax with no change in the apparent Km for VIP. Cycloheximide (1 mM) counteracts the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VIP-induced cAMP production, which suggests the involvement of a rapid protein synthesis mechanism. Ru-26988, a specific glucocorticoid devoid of any mineralocorticoid activity and which does not bind to intracellular transcortin-like component, also produces an inhibition of VIP-induced cAMP accumulation. Corticosterone also inhibits VIP-induced cAMP production but at concentrations higher than those of dexamethasone. In contrast, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, and testosterone have no effect. These results demonstrate that, in normal rat pituitary cells in culture, glucocorticoids at physiological concentrations rapidly inhibit the cAMP production and prolactin release induced by VIP by acting through specific glucocorticoid receptors. PMID:6278481

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced expression of cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage and 17 alpha-hydroxylase enzyme activity in hen granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L; Li, Z; Gibney, J A; Malamed, S

    1994-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate expression of cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) and P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (P450 17 alpha-OH) mRNA levels and enzyme activity in granulosa cells from nonhierarchal (6-8-mm) follicles. Initial studies demonstrated that immunoreactive VIP is localized within the theca (but not granulosa) layer of both resting (< 0.5-mm follicles) and 6-8-mm follicles, thus providing a potential paracrine mechanism of action for VIP. While short-term (3 h) incubation of granulosa cells with VIP (0.001-1.0 microM) failed to stimulate progesterone production from 6-8-mm follicle granulosa cells, a 4-h culture period in the presence of VIP resulted in increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation, and a 24-h culture period resulted in progesterone synthesis and increased P450scc mRNA levels; control levels of each endpoint measurement were not altered within the period observed. By contrast, culture with the growth factor transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) in the presence of VIP (1 microM) prevented increases in P450scc mRNA levels and progesterone production. Similar effects of VIP and TGF alpha in the presence of VIP were demonstrated for P450 17 alpha-OH mRNA levels and enzyme activity. Finally, there was an additive effect of VIP (0.1 microM) plus recombinant human (rh) FSH (100 mIU) on the initiation of progesterone production in cultured 6-8-mm follicle granulosa cells compared to the addition of VIP or rhFSH alone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Synergistic effect of vasoactive intestinal peptides on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in osteoblasts: amplification of p44/p42 MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Mizutani, Jun; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Minamitani, Chiho; Kato, Kenji; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2010-05-01

    We previously showed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in these cells. VIP, which by itself slightly stimulated IL-6 synthesis, synergistically enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. The synergistic effect of VIP on the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis was concentration-dependent in the range between 1 and 70 nM. We previously reported that VIP stimulated cAMP production in MC3T3-E1 cells. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, or 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8bromo-cAMP), a plasma membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, markedly enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis as well as VIP. VIP markedly up-regulated the TNF-alpha-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation. The Akt phosphorylation stimulated by TNF-alpha was only slightly affected by VIP. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, significantly suppressed the enhancement of TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis by VIP. The synergistic effect of a combination of VIP and TNF-alpha on the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase was diminished by H-89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These results strongly suggest that VIP synergistically enhances TNF-alpha-stimulated IL-6 synthesis via up-regulating p44/p42 MAP kinase through the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP system in osteoblasts.

  16. Malabsorption and intestinal adaptation after one anastomosis gastric bypass compared with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in rats.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Voitellier, Eglantine; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Kapel, Nathalie; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Chevallier, Jean-Marc; Msika, Simon; Bado, André; Le Gall, Maude

    2016-09-01

    The technically easier one-anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass (MGB) is associated with similar metabolic improvements and weight loss as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). However, MGB is controversial and suspected to result in greater malabsorption than RYGB. In this study, we compared macronutrient absorption and intestinal adaptation after MGB or RYGB in rats. Body weight and food intake were monitored and glucose tolerance tests were performed in rats subjected to MGB, RYGB, or sham surgery. Carbohydrate, protein, and lipid absorption was determined by fecal analyses. Intestinal remodeling was evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. Peptide and amino acid transporter mRNA levels were measured in the remodeled intestinal mucosa and those of anorexigenic and orexigenic peptides in the hypothalamus. The MGB and RYGB surgeries both resulted in a reduction of body weight and an improvement of glucose tolerance relative to sham rats. Hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide gene expression was higher in MGB rats than in RYGB or sham rats. Fecal losses of calories and proteins were greater after MGB than RYGB or sham surgery. Intestinal hyperplasia occurred after MGB and RYGB with increased jejunum diameter, higher villi, and deeper crypts than in sham rats. Peptidase and peptide or amino acid transporter genes were overexpressed in jejunal mucosa from MGB rats but not RYGB rats. In rats, MGB led to greater protein malabsorption and energy loss than RYGB. This malabsorption was not compensated by intestinal overgrowth and increased expression of peptide transporters in the jejunum.

  17. Malabsorption and intestinal adaptation after one anastomosis gastric bypass compared with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in rats.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Voitellier, Eglantine; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Kapel, Nathalie; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Chevallier, Jean-Marc; Msika, Simon; Bado, André; Le Gall, Maude

    2016-09-01

    The technically easier one-anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass (MGB) is associated with similar metabolic improvements and weight loss as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). However, MGB is controversial and suspected to result in greater malabsorption than RYGB. In this study, we compared macronutrient absorption and intestinal adaptation after MGB or RYGB in rats. Body weight and food intake were monitored and glucose tolerance tests were performed in rats subjected to MGB, RYGB, or sham surgery. Carbohydrate, protein, and lipid absorption was determined by fecal analyses. Intestinal remodeling was evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. Peptide and amino acid transporter mRNA levels were measured in the remodeled intestinal mucosa and those of anorexigenic and orexigenic peptides in the hypothalamus. The MGB and RYGB surgeries both resulted in a reduction of body weight and an improvement of glucose tolerance relative to sham rats. Hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide gene expression was higher in MGB rats than in RYGB or sham rats. Fecal losses of calories and proteins were greater after MGB than RYGB or sham surgery. Intestinal hyperplasia occurred after MGB and RYGB with increased jejunum diameter, higher villi, and deeper crypts than in sham rats. Peptidase and peptide or amino acid transporter genes were overexpressed in jejunal mucosa from MGB rats but not RYGB rats. In rats, MGB led to greater protein malabsorption and energy loss than RYGB. This malabsorption was not compensated by intestinal overgrowth and increased expression of peptide transporters in the jejunum. PMID:27418681

  18. Segmental dependent transport of low permeability compounds along the small intestine due to P-glycoprotein: the role of efflux transport in the oral absorption of BCS class III drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of P-gp efflux in the in vivo intestinal absorption process of BCS class III P-gp substrates, i.e. high-solubility low-permeability drugs. The in vivo permeability of two H (2)-antagonists, cimetidine and famotidine, was determined by the single-pass intestinal perfusion model in different regions of the rat small intestine, in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. The apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and the BL-AP transport of the compounds in the presence or absence of various efflux transporters inhibitors (verapamil, erythromycin, quinidine, MK-571 and fumitremorgin C) was investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers. P-gp expression levels in the different intestinal segments were confirmed by immunoblotting. Cimetidine and famotidine exhibited segmental dependent permeability through the gut wall, with decreased P(eff) in the distal ileum in comparison to the proximal regions of the intestine. Coperfusion of verapamil with the drugs significantly increased the permeability in the ileum, while no significant change in the jejunal permeability was observed. Both drugs exhibited significantly greater BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. Concentration dependent decrease of this secretion was obtained by the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, erythromycin and quinidine, while no effect was evident by the MRP2 inhibitor MK-571 and the BCRP inhibitor FTC, indicating that P-gp is the transporter mediates the intestinal efflux of cimetidine and famotidine. P-gp levels throughout the intestine were inversely related to the in vivo permeability of the drugs from the different segments. The data demonstrate that for these high-solubility low-permeability P-gp substrates, P-gp limits in vivo intestinal absorption in the distal segments of the small intestine; however P-gp plays a minimal role in the proximal intestinal segments due to significant lower P-gp expression levels

  19. Effect of gel-forming gums on the intestinal unstirred layer and sugar transport in vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnson, I T; Gee, J M

    1981-05-01

    The effect of two gel-forming polysaccharide gums, guar gum and Na-carboxymethyl-cellulose (CMC), on glucose transport in vitro was investigated using everted sacs of rat jejunum. The gums were added to the mucosal bathing media to give apparent viscosities in the range of 1-110 Pascal seconds X 10(-3), mPa.s(cP). Serosal glucose transport fell steeply by about 60% as the viscosities of the mucosal media rose to 20mPa.s, and levelled off thereafter. A similar effect was observed in sacs preincubated with guar gum (15 minutes) and exposed to glucose in a subsequent guar-free incubation. Glucose transport with and without the addition of guar gum was found to be sensitive to mucosal stirring, so that, when shaken at 130 oscillations per minute, sacs exposed to guar gum (0.25 %, viscosity c.a. 16 mPa.s (cP) transported glucose at a similar rate to sacs incubated without guar at 80 oscillations per minute. By measuring the time course for the establishment of osmotic induced potentials, it was shown that incubation with guar or CMC led to an increase in the apparent thickness of the unstirred fluid layer overlying the mucosa (guar-free thickness = 317 +/- 15 mu, guar treated thickness = 468 +/- 25 mu). It is suggested that the presence of