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Sample records for intestine small

  1. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  2. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  3. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  4. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  5. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  6. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  7. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  8. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  9. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to ...

  10. General Treatment Information for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer A-Z Small Intestine Cancer Treating Small Intestine Cancer General treatment information Depending on the type ... questions about your treatment options. More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  11. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  14. Small intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1989-06-01

    The small intestine, like the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, is an intelligent organ. It generates a wide variety of motor patterns to meet motility requirements in different situations. Its basic motor function after a meal is to mix the chyme with exocrine and intestinal secretions, agitate its contents to uniformly and evenly expose them to the mucosal surface, and to propel them distally at a rate that allows optimal absorption of food components, and reabsorption of bile. Most of these functions are performed by individual phasic contractions. In humans, the phasic contractions are largely disorganized in time and space. These contractions may cause mixing and agitation of luminal contents with slow distal propulsion. Occasionally, an individual contraction of large amplitude and long duration migrates over several centimeters and may rapidly propel the contents over this distance. In general, the spatial and temporal relationships of individual phasic contractions become less organized distally, resulting in a slower propulsion rate in the distal small intestine than in the proximal small intestine. The migrating clustered contractions generated after a meal may also be propulsive, but because of their unpredictable and irregular occurrence, their precise role in postprandial propulsion is incompletely understood. Rapidly migrating contractions may occur when the electrical control activity is obliterated by pharmacologic agents or during parasitic infections. Their effects on motility are not known yet. Between meals, when digestion is complete, the small intestine generates migrating motor complexes that help keep the small intestine clean by dislodging debris from the villi and dumping them into the colon. This may prevent decay of these materials in the small intestine and limit their contribution to bacterial overgrowth. Giant migrating contractions may perform a similar function in the distal small intestine as well as return any refluxed fecal

  15. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  16. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  19. Glycoprotein biosynthesis in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Perdomo, Jose

    1972-01-01

    Rat small intestinal mucosa was examined for ability to produce mucins with human blood group A, B, and H activity. Blood group activity of the mucins was compared to antigenic activity of red blood cells in individual rats and the enzymatic basis for differences was investigated. Red cells in all the rats examined contained human blood group A and B antigens. All rats synthesized intestinal mucins having B and H antigenic activity but 57% failed to produce mucins with blood group A activity (A-); the remaining 43% (A+) produced A substance. The activities of five glycosyltransferases including α(1→2) fucosyltransferase, the determinant of human secretor status, were measured in the intestine of A+ and A- rats. Four enzymes were the same in both groups, while the fifth, N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, was present only in A+ rats. The specificity of this latter enzyme, as found in the rat, appeared similar to that in humans, since it catalyzed addition of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine only to acceptors which had the H determinant structure. In the presence of the enzyme, A- mucin could be converted to A+ mucin; this was shown both by hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitin studies of the products of incubation of A- mucin with UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and the enzyme. These studies indicate that the difference between A+ and A- rats is due to the apparent absence of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase in the intestinal mucosa of A- rats. These rats may provide experimental models for studies on the effect of ABO and secretor status on susceptibility to ulceration and carcinogenesis. Images PMID:4112001

  20. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  1. Lymphangiectasia of small intestine presenting as intussusception.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Pervez; Bhardwaj, Subhash

    2008-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of a segment of gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. In small children, it is the commonest cause of intestinal obstruction. More than 90% of childhood intussusceptions are idiopathic. We report a rare case of localized small intestinal lymphangiectasia, presenting as intussusception in a 6-month-old male child. The child presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction for which he was later operated. The gross examination of excised ileocecal mass revealed intussusception. Histopathologic examination revealed lymphangiectasia of small intestine, which acted as a lead point for ileocecal intussusception. Postoperative period was uneventful.

  2. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  3. Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID).

    PubMed

    Pervez, Shahid; Mumtaz, Khalid; Ullah, Syed Siddiq; Akhtar, Nake; Ali, Naureen; Aaqil, Hina

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the frequency, demographics, clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, histopathological features, treatment and outcome of 'Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease' (IPSID). Archives contained a total of 27 cases of IPSID diagnosed and treated over an 18-year period. A M: F ratio of 2.4:1 was seen with a mean and median ages of 28.7 and 25 years. Most patients (68.8%) presented with abdominal pain and diarrhoea. In the majority (62.5%), duodenum was the primary site of involvement. Endoscopy showed polypoidal, raised or flat lesions. Biopsy findings included blunting or flattening of villi with dense plasma cell infiltrate and lymphoepithelial lesions. Twenty-four cases were categorized as stage A and B (benign and intermediate) and three were categorized as stage C (malignant, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytoid features). Stage A and B patients responded well to antibiotic treatment (tetracycline) with regression of the lesions while for stage C patients standard CHOP chemotherapy was administered.

  4. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  5. Small intestine biopotentials in rats after hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Stanciu, C.

    To study the effect of hypokinesia on rats small intestine (jejunum and ileum) biopotentials it was first necessary to characterize it. Biopotentials were recorded by intracellular placed microelectrodes from oral and caudal segments of the small intestine. The character of rats small intestine biopotentials differs from that of other species (man, cat, rabbit, dog, e.a.), the slow waves (SW) being smaller and the frequency of basal electrical rhythm higher (31.23 c/min orally and 24.50 caudally). Spike potentials are inscribed on the descending slope of SW but frequently delayed in each successive wave with a regular interval. Hypokinesia obtained by keeping rats in small cages for two weeks create only little changes in intestine biopotentials. The only clear difference was the increase of the slow waves amplitude. The other parameters were not specifically changed.

  6. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  7. Primary lymphoma of the upper small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Khosrow; Haghighi, Parviz; Bakhshandeh, Kiumars; Haghshenas, Mansour

    1970-01-01

    Seven patients with primary lymphoma involving the upper small intestine and presenting with diarrhoea, non-specific abdominal pain, and clubbing are reported. The disease appears to be more prevalent in young women, and clinical and radiological findings can provide an excellent preliminary diagnosis which is usually confirmed by peroral biopsy of the small intestine. This type of lymphoma is found to be clinically distinguishable both from the primary intestinal lymphomas reported from western countries and also from gastrointestinal involvement as part of a more systemic disease. It appears to be prevalent in the Middle East, and because of clear clinical, radiological, and histological features, it can be singled out from other primary intestinal lymphomas and considered as a distinct clinical entity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4919259

  8. Small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Yamamura, Eiichi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  9. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:24455340

  10. Small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paris, J K; McCandlish, I A P; Schwarz, T; Simpson, J W; Smith, S H

    2013-05-01

    A 9-year-old female neutered collie-cross dog was presented with a 2-month history of persistent diarrhoea, weight loss and intermittent vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed one loop of jejunum with a markedly thickened and multifocally hyperechoic wall, without loss of wall layering. Laparotomies were performed for biopsy and resection of affected intestine. Histopathological examination revealed small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis (GN). The dog recovered well from surgery and the diarrhoea resolved. Eleven months later the dog has gained weight and remains asymptomatic. This is the first report of small intestinal GN affecting a mature dog, in which pathology was localized to the mucosal lamina propria and surgical treatment resulted in a successful outcome.

  11. Flow and mixing by small intestine villi.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y F; de Loubens, C; Love, R J; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M

    2015-06-01

    Flow and mixing in the small intestine are multi-scale processes. Flows at the scale of the villi (finger-like structures of ≈500 μm length) are poorly understood. We developed a three-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model to gain insight into the effects of villous movements and the rheology of digesta on flow, mixing and absorption of nutrients at the periphery of the intestinal lumen. Our model simulated the hydrodynamic consequences of villi movements that resulted from folding of the mucosa during longitudinal contractions. We found that cyclic approximation and separation of groups of villi generated laminar eddies at the edges of the group and augmented mass transfers in the radial direction between the inter-villous space and the intestinal lumen which improved the absorption of nutrients and mixing at the periphery of the lumen. This augmentation was greater with highly diffusible nutrients and with high levels of shear-thinning (pseudoplasticity) of the fluid. We compared our results with bulk flows simulations done by previous workers and concluded that villous movements during longitudinal contractions is a major radial mixing mechanism in the small intestine and increases mixing and absorption around the mucosa despite adverse rheology.

  12. Iron absorption by small intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, M P; Martí, M T; Mitjavila, M T; Planas, J

    1993-01-01

    Iron (Fe) absorption by three segments (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) of the small intestine of chickens was studied by a perfusion technique in vivo in closed circuit using 59Fe Cl3 and was related to the histological characteristics of each segment. The serosal transfers of Fe for the duodenum and jejunum were the same (14%/cm), but significantly different (p < 0.05) from those of the ileum (9%/cm), which may be explained by the morphological and histological properties of the gut of chickens. However, the presence of Fe in blood and in liver was significantly lower after perfusion of the jejunum and ileum than after perfusion of the duodenum. It is concluded that chickens show an early adaptation of small intestine to Fe absorption in response to the considerable loss of Fe suffered during the laying process.

  13. Glucagon effects on the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, G K; Whalen, G E; Soergel, K H; Wu, W C; Meade, R C

    1979-07-01

    In healthy volunteers, the effects of intravenously administered glucagon on small intestinal function was investigated. Bolus doses resulting in plasma glucagon concentrations of greater than 800 pg/ml (5 min after injection) abolished jejunal contractions for 4.4 +/- 0.4 (SEM) min after a latency period of 49 +/- 4 sec. During continuous intravenous glucagon infusion, jejunal dilatation and increase in mean transit time (MTT) occurred at plasma levels greater than 720 pg/ml, while inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption was observed only with plasma glucagon concentrations of 1760 +/- 114 pg/ml. Under these conditions, the propulsion of fasting intestinal contents was slowed without change in flow rate. The observed effects cannot be attributed to the simultaneously occurring rise in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. Short-term increases in circulating glucagon concentration inhibit intestinal tone, contractions, and propulsion with only a minor effect on water and electrolyte absorption limited to a narrow concentration range of plasma glucagon. Neither effect occurs at glucagon levels likely to occur under physiologic concentrations. The latency period preceding the abolition of jejunal contractions suggests that glucagon does not act directly on intestinal smooth muscle cells.

  14. Irreversible electroporation on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M A; Narayan, R; Padath, T; Rubinsky, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) has recently been conceived as a new minimally invasive ablation method, using microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane bilayer and induce cell death while keeping all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix, intact. Here, we present the first in vivo study that examines the effects of NTIRE on the small intestine, an organ whose collateral damage is of particular concern in the anticipated use of NTIRE for treatment of abdominal cancers. Methods: A typical NTIRE electrical protocol was applied directly to the rat small intestine and histological analysis was used to examine the effect of NTIRE over time. Results: The application of NTIRE led to complete cell ablation in the targeted tissue, but the animal did not show any physiological effects of the procedure and the intestine showed signs of recovery, developing an epithelial layer 3 days post treatment and regenerating its distinct layers within a week. Conclusion: Our results indicate that this novel procedure can be used for abdominal cancer treatment while minimising collateral damage to adjacent tissues because of the unique ability of the NTIRE ablation method to target the cell membrane. PMID:22223084

  15. Streaming potentials in the rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, D. H.; Wright, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effect of adverse osmotic pressure gradients on fluid transfer and electrical potential across the wall of sacs of rat everted small intestine was investigated. 2. Addition of mannitol to the mucosal fluid produced a potential change of 0·062 mV/m-osM and a decrease in fluid transfer of 0·015 ml./m-osM/hr. This is consistent with the production of streaming potentials due to fluid movement through negatively charged pores in the intestine. 3. The solute-linked fluid movement does not pass through these negatively charged pores which are responsible for the streaming potentials. 4. From the magnitude and polarity of the streaming potential a value of —50 mV has been calculated for the zeta potential at the phase boundary in the pores. 5. Streaming potentials have been used to measure the equivalent pore radius, and a value of 4Å has been obtained. 6. It is concluded that electro-osmosis is not responsible for fluid transfer by the intestine, and the potential difference associated with hexose transfer is not electrokinetic in origin. PMID:5943002

  16. Biaxial mechanical modeling of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Chiara; Glass, Paul; Sitti, Metin; Di Martino, Elena S

    2011-11-01

    Capsule endoscopes are pill-size devices provided with a camera that capture images of the small intestine from inside the body after being ingested by a patient. The interaction between intestinal tissue and capsule endoscopes needs to be investigated to optimize capsule design while preventing tissue damage. To that purpose, a constitutive model that can reliably predict the mechanical response of the intestinal tissue under complex mechanical loading is required. This paper describes the development and numerical validation of a phenomenological constitutive model for the porcine duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Parameters characterizing the mechanical behavior of the material were estimated from planar biaxial test data, where intestinal tissue specimens were simultaneously loaded along the circumferential and longitudinal directions. Specimen-specific Fung constitutive models were able to accurately predict the planar stress-strain behavior of the tested samples under a wide range of loading conditions. To increase model generality, average anisotropic constitutive relationships were also generated for each tissue region by fitting average stress-strain curves to the Fung potential. Due to the observed variability in the direction of maximum stiffness, the average Fung models were less anisotropic than the specimen-specific models. Hence, average isotropic models in the Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin forms were attempted, but they could not adequately describe the degree of nonlinearity in the tissue. Values of the R2 for the nonlinear regressions were 0.17, 0.44 and 0.93 for the average Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Fung models, respectively. Average models were successfully implemented into FORTRAN routines and used to simulate capsule deployment with a finite element method analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  18. Inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase by valienamine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Guo; Shentu, Xu-Ping; Shen, Yin-Chu

    2005-02-01

    Valienamine, an aminocyclitol, has been isolated from the enzymolysis broth of validamycins. The absolute configuration of valienamine is similar to that of alpha-D-glucose. The inhibitory effect of this amino-sugar analog of alpha-D-glucose, valienamine, on porcine small intestinal sucrase was examined. Valienamine was found to be potent, competitive reversible inhibitor of porcine small intestinal sucrase in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.17 x 10(-3)M. Valienamine also exhibited dose-dependent, instantaneous inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase. The inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase by valienamine was pH-independent.

  19. STUDIES ON SMALL INTESTINAL CRYPT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Jerry S.

    1963-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt epithelium obtained from normal fasting humans by peroral biopsy of the mucosa was studied with the electron microscope. Paneth cells were identified at the base of the crypts by their elaborate highly organized endoplasmic reticulum, large secretory granules, and small lysosome-like dense bodies within the cytoplasm. Undifferentiated cells were characterized by smaller cytoplasmic membrane-bounded granules which were presumed to be secretory in nature, a less elaborate endoplasmic reticulum, many unattached ribosomes and, in some cells, the presence of glycogen. Some undifferentiated cells at the base of the crypts contained lobulated nuclei and striking paranuclear accumulations of mitochondria. Membrane-bounded cytoplasmic fragments, probably originating from undifferentiated and Paneth cells, were frequently apparent within crypt lumina. Of the goblet cells, some were seen actively secreting mucus. In these, apical mucus appeared to exude into the crypt lumen between gaps in the microvilli. The membrane formerly surrounding the apical mucus appeared to fuse with and become part of the plasma membrane of the cell, suggesting a merocrine secretory mechanism. Enterochromaffin cells were identified by their location between the basal regions of other crypt cells and by their unique intracytoplasmic granules. PMID:14064112

  20. Increased small intestinal apoptosis in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, S F; Attia, L; Scholes, J V; Walters, J R; Holt, P R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (CD) mucosa is flattened despite epithelial hyperproliferation. AIMS: To establish mechanisms of cell loss in CD. PATIENTS: 14 controls, 17 active CD patients, and 16 maintained with gluten free diet. METHODS: Programmed cell death was examined in small intestinal biopsy specimens by staining fragmented DNA using terminal uridine deoxynucleotidyl nick end labelling (TUNEL), in comparison with haematoxylin and eosin stained adjacent sections. Double staining with anti-CD45 antibodies determined the origin of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was graded from 1-3 (< 5, 5-20, > 20% respectively). Proliferating cells, immunostained by Ki-67 (MIB-1) antibody, were counted. RESULTS: Apoptotic cells were seen rarely by haematoxylin and eosin but more readily by TUNEL. In controls, 1.4 +/- 0.2% of epithelial cells were apoptotic (mean grade 1.1), mainly located in the upper villus. In active CD, frequent apoptotic cells were distributed throughout the crypt-villus unit (mean grade 2.4), decreasing after treatment to 1.1 (p < 0.001) even when still histologically abnormal. CD45 antibodies rarely stained apoptotic cells in active CD. The number of TUNEL positive cells correlated with proliferating cell number (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Enterocyte apoptosis is greatly increased in untreated CD, correlates with proliferation, and falls to normal with a gluten free diet, before histological improvement. Increased apoptosis may be responsible for villous atrophy in CD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9038662

  1. Three-Dimensional Coculture Of Human Small-Intestine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David; Spaulding, Glen; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Prewett, Tracy

    1994-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional masses of normal human epithelial and mesenchymal small-intestine cells cocultured in process involving specially designed bioreactors. Useful as tissued models for studies of growth, regulatory, and differentiation processes in normal intestinal tissues; diseases of small intestine; and interactions between cells of small intestine and viruses causing disease both in small intestine and elsewhere in body. Process used to produce other tissue models, leading to advances in understanding of growth and differentiation in developing organisms, of renewal of tissue, and of treatment of myriad of clinical conditions. Prior articles describing design and use of rotating-wall culture vessels include "Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues" (MSC-21559), "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), and "In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids" (MSC-21843).

  2. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  3. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  4. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  5. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G.; Patankar, Jay V.; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E.; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [3H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [3H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine. PMID:23220585

  7. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    PubMed

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  8. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  9. Retrospective Comparison of Gastrosplenic Entrapment of the Small Intestine to Other Strangulating Small Intestinal Lesions in Adult Horses.

    PubMed

    Bergren, Amanda L; Credille, Brent C; Epstein, Kira L; Giguère, Steeve

    2015-07-01

    To compare clinical data of horses with entrapment of the small intestine by the gastrosplenic ligament (ESIGL) to clinical data of horses with other strangulating small intestinal lesions. Retrospective case series. Medical records (January 2001-December 2011) of horses that had exploratory celiotomy for acute abdominal pain associated with strangulating small intestinal lesions were reviewed. Signalment, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic variables, surgical findings and surgical procedures performed, postoperative data and short-term survival were recorded. Clinical findings included excessive nasogastric reflux and abnormal abdominal fluid. Horses with ESIGL were significantly more likely to require intestinal resection and anastomosis and produced significantly less reflux postoperatively than horses with other strangulating small intestinal obstructions. Geldings were significantly more likely to develop ESIGL than mares or stallions. Quarter Horse or Quarter Horse type breeds were predisposed to ESIGL. Survival to hospital discharge in horses with ESIGL (16/22; 72.7%) was significantly higher than that of horses with other strangulating small intestinal obstructions (92/183; 50%). ESIGL was more prevalent in this population of horses evaluated for acute abdominal pain than in previous studies, accounting for 10.7% of all horses with strangulating small intestinal lesions. Geldings and Quarter Horse or Quarter Horse related breeds are predisposed to this condition. The prognosis for survival to hospital discharge was fair to good. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Collagenous colitis associated with small intestinal villous atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I; Sanders, S; Hopwood, D; Bouchier, I A

    1986-01-01

    Two patients diagnosed as having small intestinal hyperplastic villous atrophy and being treated with a gluten free diet were investigated because of persistent watery diarrhoea. Both were found to have collagenous colitis. Previous reports of this condition have emphasised the presence of normal small intestinal mucosal architecture and the association of collagenous colitis with intestinal villous atrophy has not previously been reported. Both cases responded to oral steroid therapy, but not to other previously recommended treatment regimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3792923

  11. Gastric and small intestine gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Do outcomes differ?

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Katherine; Nagarajan, Neeraja; Canner, Joseph; Najafian, Alireza; Wolfgang, Christopher; Schneider, Eric; Meyer, Christian; Lennon, Anne Marie; Johnston, Fabian M; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous literature has suggested that small intestine GISTs are more aggressive than gastric GISTs. Our primary objective was to compare the outcomes of gastric and small intestine GISTs in the decade after approval of imatinib for treatment. The SEER database was queried for cases of gastric and small intestine GIST between the years 2002 and 2012, using the ICD-O-3 histology code 8936. Survival analysis was performed using generalized gamma models for time to cause-specific mortality (CSM). CSM was 14.0% for the 3,759 gastric GIST patients and 14.3% for the 1,848 small intestine GIST patients. Five-year survival was 82.2% and 83.3% for gastric and small intestine patients, respectively. The number of diagnosed cases of GIST increased over the course of this study, especially for tumors <5 cm in size and in patients over age 50 years. In this large nation-wide study, we found that patients with gastric and small intestine GISTs had similar outcomes, in contrast to previous reports. The diagnosis of GIST has significantly increased in the last decade, which may reflect the increased recognition of this entity and frequent use of imaging. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:351-357. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  13. Colonization by lactobacilli of piglet small intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; Conway, P L

    1996-11-01

    The colonization potential of lactobacilli was investigated using small intestinal mucus extracts from 35-d-old pigs. Mucus-secreting tissue from the small intestine of piglets was gently rinsed to remove contents and then shaken in buffer to release mucus from the surface. Numbers of lactobacilli in different portions of the small intestine of 35-d-old pigs were enumerated. Also, mucus isolated from the small intestine of pigs was investigated for its capacity to support the growth of lactobacilli. Results indicated that Lactobacillus spp. inhabit the mucus layer of the small intestine and can grow and adhere to ileal mucus. From adhesion studies of Lactobacillus fermentum 104R to mucus analysed by Scatchard plot, it is suggested that an associating system showing positive cooperativity is involved. Proteinaceous compounds(s) involved in the adhesion to mucus were detected in the spent culture fluid from the growth of strain 104R. Studies are continuing in order to identify and characterize the adhesion-promoting protein(s). From the data, it is proposed that lactobacilli colonize the mucus layer of the small intestine of pigs.

  14. [Histophysiologic aspects of the remnant intestine of rats subjected to partial resection of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Delgado, M J; Moreno, J; Murillo, M L; Bolufer, J; López-Campos, J L

    1986-06-01

    The effect of small bowel resection on the morphology, mucous secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity of the remnant intestine was studied five months after surgical operation. Distal small bowel resection produced hyperplasia and infiltration of lymphocytes. The intestinal neutral and acid mucosubstances, and the alkaline phosphatase activity were increased in resected animals, whilst the sulphomucins content of goblet cells was unaltered. The serum alkaline phosphatase activity two and five months after resection was also increased.

  15. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine.

  16. [Capsule endoscopy for the diagnostics of small intestine tumours].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Márta; Pák, Péter; Pák, Gábor; Fehér, János

    2008-10-19

    Three to six percent of all gastrointestinal tumours and one to two percent of all malignant gastrointestinal tumours develop in the small intestine. These occur more frequently in men than in women and the peak of occurrence is at the age of 50 to 60 years. According to epidemiological investigations to date the most frequently developing primary tumours in the small intestine are adenocarcinomas, carcinoid tumours, lymphomas and small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumours. Clinical appearance of the tumours is the same, independent of their histological type. Fifty percent of the benign tumours is asymptomatic and is only discovered incidentally at autopsy. In comparison, 80% of malignant tumours is symptomatic. The prognosis of small intestine malignant tumours is very poor as at the time of diagnosis they have already formed metastases in 45-75% and at the time of surgery they are in 20-50% irresectable. The reason for the late diagnosis is on the one hand the non-specific nature of the symptoms, on the other hand, the limited visualisation of the entire small intestine via traditional radiological and endoscopic methods. Capsule endoscopy (CE) revolutionised the diagnostics of the small intestine by enabling non-invasive, pain-free investigation of the entire small intestine. The timely application of CE may replace a range of expensive assays with limited diagnostic value. Initial results indicate a higher prevalence of small intestine tumours than it had been estimated based on earlier epidemiological investigations. The new method provides an early diagnosis, enabling a definitive therapy, eventually significantly improving patient survival.

  17. Avoidance of small intestine injury in gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.

    1983-09-01

    The evolution of systematized operative staging and radical surgical procedures in the management of gynecologic cancer has increased the complexities of integrating radiation therapy. High dose irradiation to large treatment volumes has been associated with an increased incidence of small intestine injury. This complication is morbid and often fatal. Although predisposing factors have been extensively studied, there has been a paucity of reports evaluating preventative measures. Between 1975 and 1980, 140 patients with gynecologic cancer were treated at the Valley Presbyterian Hospital in the Division of Radiation Therapy. Twenty-six patients with cervix cancer received definitive irradiation and seven received adjunct irradiation. Seventy-two with corpus cancer received adjunct irradiation, seven received definitive irradiation and three palliative irradiation. Eleven patients with ovarian cancer received adjunct irradiation and 15 palliative irradiation. Eight-five patients were at potential risk for small intestine injury and had treatment planning small intestine x rays. Fixation was observed in 7/39 (18%) without prior pelvic surgery and 30/46 (65%) with prior pelvic surgery. Information from the small intestine x rays were used in 41 patients to make 60 treatment modifications. Twenty-five of 140 (17%) had a reduction of total dose, 26/140 (18%) had exclusion of the small intestine by shrinking fields, or patient positioning and 13/140 (9%) had displacement of the small intestine by distension of the bladder. No patient developed small intestine injury. The disease free survival for cervix cancer 27/33 (82%), corpus cancer 68/79 (86%) and ovarian cancer 5/11 (45%).

  18. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  19. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  20. Small intestinal nematode infection of mice is associated with increased enterobacterial loads alongside the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Fischer, André; Heimesaat, Markus M; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are potent modulators of immune reactivity in mice and men. Intestinal nematodes live in close contact with commensal gut bacteria, provoke biased Th2 immune responses upon infection, and subsequently lead to changes in gut physiology. We hypothesized that murine nematode infection is associated with distinct changes of the intestinal bacterial microbiota composition. We here studied intestinal inflammatory and immune responses in mice following infection with the hookworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri and applied cultural and molecular techniques to quantitatively assess intestinal microbiota changes in the ileum, cecum and colon. At day 14 post nematode infection, mice harbored significantly higher numbers of γ-Proteobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae and members of the Bacteroides/Prevotella group in their cecum as compared to uninfected controls. Abundance of Gram-positive species such as Lactobacilli, Clostridia as well as the total bacterial load was not affected by worm infection. The altered microbiota composition was independent of the IL-4/-13 - STAT6 signaling axis, as infected IL-4Rα(-/-) mice showed a similar increase in enterobacterial loads. In conclusion, infection with an enteric nematode is accompanied by distinct intestinal microbiota changes towards higher abundance of gram-negative commensal species at the small intestinal site of infection (and inflammation), but also in the parasite-free large intestinal tract. Further studies should unravel the impact of nematode-induced microbiota changes in inflammatory bowel disease to allow for a better understanding of how theses parasites interfere with intestinal inflammation and bacterial communities in men.

  1. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish.

  2. The migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Gordon L.; Sarna, Sushil K.

    1991-10-01

    Gastric and small intestinal myoelectric and motor activity is divided into two main patterns, fed and fasted. During fasting, the predominant pattern of activity is the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC), a cyclically occurring pattern of electric and mechanical activity that is initiated in the stomach and duodenum almost simultaneously and, from there, propagates the length of the small intestine. Cyclic motor activity also occurs in the lower esophageal sphincter, the gallbladder, and the sphincter of Oddi with a duration that is related to the MMC in the small intestine. Of the possible mechanisms for initiation of the MMC in the small intestine (extrinsic neural control, intrinsic neural control, and hormonal control), intrinsic neural control via a series of coupled is the most likely. The keep this sentence in! hormone motilin also plays a role in the initiation of MMCs. After a meal, in man the MMC is disrupted and replaced by irregular contractions. The physiologic role of the MMC is to clear the stomach and small intestine of residual food, secretions, and desquamated cells and propel them to the colon. Disruption of the MMC cycle is associated with bacterial overgrowth in some patients, an observation that supports the proposed cleansing function of the MMC cycle.

  3. Characteristics of Small Intestinal Diseases on Single-Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhang; Liu, G.X.; Cai, L.; Yu, H.; Min, X.J.; Gan, H.T.; Yang, K.; SQ, Li; Yan, J.; Chen, L.; Tan, Q.H.; Wu, J.C.; Huang, X.L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small intestine has been considered inaccessible for a long term. The development of single-balloon endoscopy has greatly improved the diagnosis and treatment possibilities for small intestinal diseases. In this study, we aimed to explore the demographic characteristics and small intestinal diseases of patients who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy between 2009 and 2014 at our endoscopy center. We determined the enteroscopic findings for each small intestinal disease and the most susceptible age groups. In total, 186 patients were included in the study. Their mean age was 45.87 ± 15.77 years. Patients who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy were found to have neoplasms (most common age group: 14–45 years, most common lesion location: jejunum), lymphoma (46–59 and 60–74 years, ileum), protuberant lesions (45–59 years, jejunum), inflammation (14–45 and 46–59 years, ileum), benign ulcers (14–45 years, jejunum), diverticulum (14–45 years, ileum), vascular malformations (60–74 years, jejunum), polyps (14–45 years, jejunum), Crohn's disease (14–45 years, jejunum), hookworm infection (14–45 years, jejunum), lipid pigmentation (14–45 and 46–59 years, jejunum), undetermined bleeding (46–59 years, ileum), or undetermined stenosis (31 years, duodenum). Each small intestinal disease had distinct enteroscopic findings. PMID:26496270

  4. Cryptosporidium, chronic diarrhoea and the proximal small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A D; Thomas, A G; Walker-Smith, J A

    1992-01-01

    The association between Cryptosporidium, chronic diarrhoea and a proximal small intestinal mucosal enteropathy was reviewed over a six and a half year period. One hundred and twenty three children with cryptosporidiosis and no clinical evidence of immune deficiency were identified. 50% of children excreting only Cryptosporidium had chronic diarrhoea. Most cases (63%) of chronic diarrhoea occurred in the first two years of life. A mild to moderate enteropathy was present in all nine children undergoing a small intestinal biopsy and seven showed the presence of Cryptosporidium adhering to villous epithelium. All patients eventually recovered spontaneously. Cryptosporidium is a cause of chronic diarrhoea and a proximal small intestinal mucosal enteropathy in children without immune deficiency. Screening for the parasite should be part of the investigative procedures in children with chronic diarrhoea. Images Figure 4 PMID:1398230

  5. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed. PMID:25386070

  6. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-07

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed.

  7. Diagnosis and management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Matthew; Siwiec, Robert M; Wo, John M

    2013-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can result from failure of the gastric acid barrier, failure of small intestinal motility, anatomic alterations, or impairment of systemic and local immunity. The current accepted criteria for the diagnosis of SIBO is the presence of coliform bacteria isolated from the proximal jejunum with >10(5) colony-forming units/mL. A major concern with luminal aspiration is that it is only one random sampling of the small intestine and may not always be representative of the underlying microbiota. A new approach to examine the underlying microbiota uses rapid molecular sequencing, but its clinical utilization is still under active investigation. Clinical manifestations of SIBO are variable and include bloating, flatulence, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Severe cases may present with nutrition deficiencies due to malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The current management strategies for SIBO center on identifying and correcting underlying causes, addressing nutrition deficiencies, and judicious utilization of antibiotics to treat symptomatic SIBO.

  8. Developmental morphology of the small intestine of African ostrich chicks.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Peng, K M

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological development of the small intestine of African ostrich chicks and to examine the changes in the number of goblet cells therein by observing the gross anatomy and performing histochemistry and morphometry. The BW; length, height, and width of the villi; muscle thickness; depth of the crypts; and number of goblet cells in the intestinal villi and crypts were measured on neonatal d 1, 45, 90, and 334. Our results revealed that the weights of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum (relative to the BW) peaked on d 90, 45, and 45, respectively, and tended to decline thereafter. The villus height and width and muscle thickness in the small intestine were positively correlated with the age of the birds. The ratio of the villus height to the crypt depth differed among the segments of the small intestine and at the different time points. The number of goblet cells in the intestinal villi and crypts increased rapidly up to postnatal d 45 and then decreased rapidly between d 45 and 90. The number of goblet cells in the villi was greatest in the jejunum on d 1 and in the ileum on d 45, whereas that in the crypt was greatest in the ileum on d 1 and 90 and in the duodenum on d 45. These results suggest that the small intestine develops gradually from postnatal d 1 to 90 and that the period up to postnatal d 45 is marked by significant developmental changes in the parameters reflective of the digestive capacity, such as the weight, length, and surface area of the intestine and the number of goblet cells. Therefore, in reared African ostrich chicks, feed management should be enhanced between postnatal d 1 and 45.

  9. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P receptors in human colon and small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Korman, L.Y.; Sayadi, H.; Bass, B.; Moody, T.W.; Harmon, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and substance P are found in neurons in the lamina propria and submucosa and muscularis propria of human small intestine and colon. VIP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on epithelial, smooth muscle, and mononuclear cells. This study analyzes the distribution of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding and (/sup 125/I)substance P in human colon and small intestine using autoradiographic techniques. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was present in high density in the mucosal layer of colon and small intestine. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was not significantly greater than nonspecific binding in smooth muscle layers or the lymphoid follicles. In contrast, (/sup 125/I)substance P binding was present in high density over the colonic muscle but was not present over the mucosal layer. In human colon cancer, (/sup 125/I)VIP grain density over the malignant tissue was only slightly higher than background. These autoradiographic studies of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding indicate that the highest density of VIP receptors was found in the small intestine and superficial colonic mucosa, whereas the density of substance P receptors was highest over the smooth muscle layers. These findings suggest a mismatch between immunochemical content of the peptide and autoradiographic density of the receptor.

  10. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal bowel movement and is flushed away. Double-balloon enteroscopy (endoscopy) Regular upper endoscopy cannot look very ... goes forward a small distance, and then a balloon at its end is inflated to anchor it. ...

  11. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M; García-Verdugo, José M; Sayed, Ramy K A; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients.

  12. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E. Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M.; García-Verdugo, José M.; Sayed, Ramy K. A.; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D.; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients. PMID:28403142

  13. Absorption sites of orally administered drugs in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2017-09-17

    In pharmacotherapy, drugs are mostly taken orally to be absorbed systemically from the small intestine, and some drugs are known to have preferential absorption sites in the small intestine. It would therefore be valuable to know the absorption sites of orally administered drugs and the influencing factors. Areas covered:In this review, the author summarizes the reported absorption sites of orally administered drugs, as well as, influencing factors and experimental techniques. Information on the main absorption sites and influencing factors can help to develop ideal drug delivery systems and more effective pharmacotherapies. Expert opinion: Various factors including: the solubility, lipophilicity, luminal concentration, pKa value, transporter substrate specificity, transporter expression, luminal fluid pH, gastrointestinal transit time, and intestinal metabolism determine the site-dependent intestinal absorption. However, most of the dissolved fraction of orally administered drugs including substrates for ABC and SLC transporters, except for some weakly basic drugs with higher pKa values, are considered to be absorbed sequentially from the proximal small intestine. Securing the solubility and stability of drugs prior to reaching to the main absorption sites and appropriate delivery rates of drugs at absorption sites are important goals for achieving effective pharmacotherapy.

  14. Glucose metabolism in the mucosa of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, L. M.; Hübscher, G.

    1966-01-01

    1. The occurrence of five enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway in cell-free preparations of the mucosa of rat small intestine is described. These enzymes were found to be localized mainly in the supernatant fraction (6240000g-min.). 2. The properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were studied with respect to Km values for substrates and NADP+, pH optima and the effects of p-chloromercuribenzoate and palmitoyl-CoA. Higher total and specific activities of these two dehydrogenases were noted in the proximal half of the small intestine of the rat than in the distal half. 3. The specific activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the mucosa of the small intestine of the rat, cat, rabbit and guinea pig were compared. 4. In the rat the specific activities of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase, transketolase and transaldolase were higher in the supernatant fractions from the intestinal mucosa than in those from the liver. 5. The role of the pentose phosphate pathway is discussed in relation to the metabolism of hexose phosphates in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:4382012

  15. Role of intestinal cytochrome p450 enzymes in diclofenac-induced toxicity in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Yu

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of small intestinal (SI) cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in the metabolic activation of diclofenac (DCF), a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and DCF-induced intestinal toxicity. DCF induces intestinal ulcers in humans and mice, but the underlying mechanisms, including the necessity for drug bioactivation in the target tissues and the sources and identities of reactive intermediates, are not fully understood. We found that the number of DCF-induced (at 50 mg/kg p.o.) intestinal ulcers was significantly smaller in an intestinal epithelium (IE)-specific P450 reductase (CPR) knockout (IE-Cpr-null) mouse model, which has little P450 activity in the IE, than in wild-type (WT) mice, determined at 14 h after DCF administration. The involvement of intestinal P450 enzymes was confirmed by large reductions (>80-90%) in the rates of in vitro formation, in SI microsomal reactions, of hydroxylated DCF metabolites and reactive intermediates, trapped as DCF-glutathione (GSH) conjugates, in the IE-Cpr-null, compared with WT mice. The SI levels of DCF-GSH conjugates (at 4 h after dosing) and DCF-protein adducts (at 14 h after dosing) were significantly lower in IE-Cpr-null than in WT mice. In additional experiments, we found that pretreatment of mice with grapefruit juice, which is known to inhibit SI P450 activity, ameliorated DCF-induced intestinal toxicity in WT mice. Our results not only strongly support the notion that SI P450 enzymes play an important role in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, but also illustrate the possibility of preventing DCF-induced intestinal toxicity through dietary intervention.

  16. Peptide hydrolase activities of the mucosa of human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, William D.; Laster, Leonard

    1969-01-01

    Few studies have been published on peptide hydrolase activities of human small intestine mucosa. We developed methods to screen tissue extracts for such enzymes and to quantitate hydrolase activities for dipeptides containing the aromatic amino acid L-phenylalanine. The screening procedure indicated glycyl-L-proline hydrolase activity was reduced in biopsy specimens from patients with flattened intestinal mucosa. To explore this further, we established optimal assay conditions for hydrolase activities (a) glycyl-L-proline, (b) L-phenylalanyl-L-proline, (c) L-alanyl-L-phenylalanine, and (d) L-phenylalanylglycine. Biopsy specimens from patients with various intestinal disorders, but without flattened mucosa, and from three patients with flattened mucosa, showed a disproportionate reduction in activities (a) and (b), with the reduction being significantly more marked in the latter patients. We suggest that intestinal imidopeptide hydrolase activities, such as (a) and (b), are sensitive to changes in intestinal disease generally, particularly to the altered physiology associated with flattening of the mucosa, and are secondary to, rather than a cause of, the intestinal pathology. Our finding that intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity tended to parallel imidopeptide hydrolase activity, and that activity (a) was partially localized to the particulate fraction of mucosal homogenate, suggested that imidopeptide hydrolase activities may be located in the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium and that, like alkaline phosphatase activity, they may be reduced in flattened mucosae, in part at least because of the pathologic changes in the microvilli. In our studies of control subjects we did not detect peptide hydrolase activity deficiency analogous to asymptomatic disaccharidase deficiency. Images PMID:5765024

  17. Giant primary angiosarcoma of the small intestine showing severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mizuna; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Domen, Hiromitsu; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hirano, Satoshi; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-11-21

    Primary malignant tumors of the small intestine are rare, comprising less than 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. An 85-year-old woman was admitted with fever of 40 °C and marked abdominal distension. Her medical history was unremarkable, but blood examination showed elevated inflammatory markers. Abdominal computed tomography showed a giant tumor with central necrosis, extending from the epigastrium to the pelvic cavity. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine communicating with the gastrointestinal tract or with superimposed infection was suspected. Because no improvement occurred in response to antibiotics, surgery was performed. Laparotomy revealed giant hemorrhagic tumor adherent to the small intestine and occupying the peritoneal cavity. The giant tumor was a solid tumor weighing 3490 g, measuring 24 cm × 17.5 cm × 18 cm and showing marked necrosis. Histologically, the tumor comprised spindle-shaped cells with anaplastic large nuclei. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for vimentin, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen, but negative for c-kit and CD34. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed. Although no postoperative complications occurred, the patient experienced enlargement of multiple metastatic tumors in the abdominal cavity and died 42 d postoperatively. The prognosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma is very poor, even after volume-reducing palliative surgery.

  18. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD) velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule. PMID:22177218

  19. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon

    PubMed Central

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P.; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein–coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. PMID:26551552

  20. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

  1. Spontaneous free perforation of the small intestine in adults

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous free perforation of the small intestine is uncommon, especially if there is no prior history of visceral trauma. However, free, even recurrent, perforation may complicate a defined and established clinical disorder, such as Crohn’s disease. In addition, free perforation may be the initial clinical presentation of an occult intestinal disorder, such as a lymphoma complicating celiac disease, causing diffuse peritonitis and an acute abdomen. Initial diagnosis of the precise cause may be difficult, but now has been aided by computerized tomographic imaging. The site of perforation may be helpful in defining a cause (e.g., ileal perforation in Crohn’s disease, jejunal perforation in celiac disease, complicated by lymphoma or collagenous sprue). Urgent surgical intervention, however, is usually required for precise diagnosis and treatment. During evaluation, an expanding list of other possible causes should be considered, even after surgery, as subsequent management may be affected. Free perforation may not only complicate an established intestinal disorder, but also a new acute process (e.g., caused by different infectious agents) or a longstanding and unrecognized disorder (e.g., congenital, metabolic and vascular causes). Moreover, new endoscopic therapeutic and medical therapies, including use of emerging novel biological agents, have been complicated by intestinal perforation. Recent studies also support the hypothesis that perforation of the small intestine may be genetically-based with different mutations causing altered connective tissue structure, synthesis and repair. PMID:25110427

  2. Functional disorders of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kellow, J E; Bennett, E

    1996-10-01

    Sensorimotor disturbances of the small bowel are implicated increasingly in the pathogenesis of the functional gastrointestinal disorders. In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), alterations in both interdigestive and postprandial motility have been described, for example, the specific peristaltic contractions that are normally present in the ileum appear to occur more frequently and to be associated with abdominal pain in some patients. The latter finding is likely to be related to the selective mechanoreceptor hypersensitivity that has been demonstrated in the small bowel of IBS patients. The level of this afferent dysfunction has, however, not been established; some evidence suggests that personality traits, which predispose to a more severe and prolonged sympathetic response to stressors, may hasten the development of such sensorimotor disturbances.

  3. Developmental changes in distribution of the mucous gel layer and intestinal permeability in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Iiboshi, Y; Nezu, R; Khan, J; Chen, K; Cui, L; Yoshida, H; Wasa, M; Fukuzawa, M; Kamata, S; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    From the developmental aspects, the distribution of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 70,000 (FTTC-dextran) and mucous gel across the lumen of small intestine was observed as an investigation into the role of mucous gel on intestinal permeability. Furthermore, the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent, on intestinal permeability was examined. In suckling and weaned rats, FTTC-dextran (750 mg/kg body wt) was gavage-fed. After 3 hours, blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture to analyze plasma FTTC-dextran by fluorescence spectrometry. Samples of small intestine with luminal contents were frozen and sectioned in a cryostat for fluorescence microscopy; the same sections were placed in a 0.2% celloidin solution to preserve mucous gel and were stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction for light microscopy. In weaned rats, intestinal permeability was examined with different concentrations of intraluminally instilled NAC. The plasma level of FTTC-dextran showed a significant increase (p < .01) in suckling rats compared with the weaned rats. Morphologic findings were similar in both the jejunum and ileum: The spaces between villi were not entirely filled with mucus but filled with FTTC-dextran in suckling rats, whereas the spaces were filled with mucus and not filled with FTTC-dextran in weaned rats. Intestinal permeability in groups with NAC were significantly higher (p < .01) than that in group without NAC. These results suggest that an increase in the mucous gel layer that coats the epithelial lining according to the maturation of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most important factors for a restriction in intestinal permeability.

  4. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  5. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  6. Breath hydrogen concentration and small intestinal malabsorption in calves.

    PubMed

    Holland, R E; Herdt, T H; Refsal, K R

    1986-09-01

    Breath hydrogen concentrations were measured to assess intestinal carbohydrate malabsorption in preruminating calves. Oral administration of 1.25 g of lactulose (a nonabsorbable carbohydrate)/kg to calves produced breath hydrogen concentrations significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than values determined after calves were fed milk and before the treatment was given. This indicates that, in the calf, fermentation of nonabsorbed carbohydrates results in increased breath hydrogen values. To induce small intestinal malabsorption, chloramphenicol was administered orally at 50 mg/kg, 2 times a day, to 5 calves for 3 days. Before therapy was started, each calf was fitted with a duodenal cannula to facilitate collection of intestinal mucosal biopsy samples during treatment. Chloramphenicol therapy significantly (P less than 0.001) increased breath hydrogen concentrations from those values measured after calves were fed milk alone. Concurrently, chloramphenicol administration significantly decreased intestinal villous length (P less than 0.001) and D-xylose absorption (P less than 0.05), compared with those values before treatment was given. These results demonstrate that decreased intestinal absorptive capacity is associated with an increase in breath hydrogen concentrations and that breath hydrogen may be useful in evaluating malabsorption in calves with naturally occurring enteric disease.

  7. Digestion modeling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Taghipoor, M; Barles, G; Georgelin, C; Licois, J R; Lescoat, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the modeling of the digestion in the small intestine is developed by investigating specifically the effects of dietary fiber. As our previous model, this new version takes into account the three main phenomena of digestion: transit of the bolus, degradation of feedstuffs and absorption through the intestinal wall. However the two main physiochemical characteristics of dietary fiber, namely viscosity and water holding capacity, lead us to substantially modify our initial model by emphasizing the role of water and its intricated dynamics with dry matter in the bolus. Various numerical simulations given by this new model are qualitatively in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fiber on the velocity of bolus and on its degradation all along the small intestine. These simulations reproduce the negative effect of soluble dietary fiber on digestion as it has been experimentally observed. Although, this model is generic and contains a large number of parameters but, to the best of our knowledge, it is among the first qualitative dynamical models of fiber influence on intestinal digestion.

  8. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E Ross; Carmolli, Marya P; Ma, Jennie Z; Petri, William A

    2016-01-12

    Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO's pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO's association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90) of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation. A total of 165 million children worldwide are considered stunted, which is associated with increased risk of death prior to age 5 years and cognitive disability. Stunting has, in part, been attributed to

  9. Ultrasonographic examination of the small intestine, large intestine and greater omentum in 30 Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Steininger, K; Tschuor, A; Hässig, M

    2011-09-01

    The small and large intestine of 30 healthy Saanen goats were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0 MHz-linear transducer. The goats were examined on the right side, from the eighth rib to the caudal aspect of the flank. The small and large intestine could be easily differentiated. The descending duodenum could be imaged in 19 goats, and the jejunum and ileum seen in all goats. The jejunum and ileum were most often seen in cross-section and rarely in longitudinal section in the ventral region of the right flank. The intestinal contents were usually homogenously echoic, and active motility was observed in all the goats. The diameter of the small intestine was 0.8-2.7 cm (1.6 [0.33] cm). The spiral ansa of the colon was imaged in all the goats, and in 21 the caecum was also seen. Both these sections of large intestine were most commonly seen in the dorsal region of the right flank. The spiral ansa of the colon was easily identified by its spiral arrangement of centripetal and centrifugal gyri, which had a garland-like appearance. Because of intraluminal gas, only the wall of the colon closest to the transducer could be imaged. The diameter of the spiral colon ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 cm (1.1 [0.24] cm). Usually only the wall of the caecum closest to the transducer could be imaged and it appeared as a thick, echoic, slightly undulating line. The greater omentum could be seen in all the goats.

  10. [Segmental ischemic lesions of the mesenteric small intestine].

    PubMed

    Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; de Lutio di Castelguidone, E; Fondacaro, R

    1987-01-01

    Segmental ischemic disease consists of segmental infarctions and ischemic stenoses. Vasculitis (LES, polyarteritis nodosa, Schönlein-Henoch syndrome), thrombosis, arteriosclerotic changes, mechanical obstructions (adhesions, hernia, volvulus, traumas), hemorrhagic disorders are the most common causes of these intestinal lesions. The authors report their experience achieved during three years on 428 small bowel examinations; among these, 197 were double contrast enemas. Ten patients showed roentgenographic features referred to vascular diseases: 1 LES, 1 Schönlein-Henoch syndrome, 3 polyarteritis nodosa, 5 spontaneous hemorrhagic disorders or due to treatment with anticoagulants. The authors, after a review of the radiological findings, emphasize the high sensitivity and low specificity of double contrast small bowel enema. Furthermore they underline the usefulness of this method in demonstrating and monitoring intestinal pathologic changes.

  11. Transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S S; Hardy, J G; Fara, J W

    1986-01-01

    The gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms has been measured in 201 studies in normal subjects using gamma scintigraphy. Solutions, small pellets, and single units (matrix tablets and osmotic pumps) were administered with different amounts of food in the stomach, ranging from fasted state to heavy breakfast. Gastric emptying was affected by the nature of the dosage form and the presence of food in the stomach. Solutions and pellets were emptied even when the stomach was in the digestive mode, while single units were retained for long periods of time, depending on the size of the meal. In contrast, measured intestinal transit times were independent of the dosage form and fed state. The small intestinal transit time of about three hours (mean +/- 1 h SEM) has implications for the design of dosage forms for the sustained release of drugs in specific positions in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3732895

  12. Goblet cells and intestinal Alkaline phosphatase expression (IAP) during the development of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José Rosa; Ayub, Laís Costa; Dos Reis, Camila Audrey; Machado, Miriam Joice; da Silva, Jéssica; Omar, Nádia Fayez; de Miranda Soares, Maria Albertina

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the temporal and spacial distribution of the mucins produced by goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) expression during the development of the small intestine of the rat. Intestines were removed from rats on the 15th, 17th and 18th days of intratuterine life (i.u.) and on the 3rd, 10th, 17th and 25th days after birth (a.b.). Intestines were processed for routine histological procedures and sections were submitted to histochemistry using PAS to stain neutral glycoproteins and Alcian blue for acidic glycoproteins, as well as immunohistochemistry to detect IAP. In rats, glycoprotein production was seen to begin in the intestinal epithelium cell at around the 17th day of i.u. life; however, this production was not accompanied by morphological indications of the presence of goblet cells. By the 18th i.u. day, the villus epithelium was undergoing differentiation and the first goblet cells could be identified from this time. At around the 10th day a.b., both compartments of the small intestine were detected; i.e. the villi and the crypts. At this timepoint, goblet cells were present in the villi, and also in the upper regions of the crypts. On the 3rd, 10th 17th and 25th days a.b., the presence of the goblet cells increased and presented regional differences in the sections evaluated. IAP was not detected during i.u. life, but was weakly detected in the cells of the villi from the 3rd day a.b., along the entire extension of the villi. On the 10th day, IAP was detected at the tip of the villi, while on the 25th day, it was detected along the extension of the villi, but with a weaker intensity. In conclusion, a temporal and spacial distribution of goblet cells and IAP activity occurs during the development of the small intestine, suggesting a possible regulatory control in accordance with the suckling and weaning phases of food intake in the rat's life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  14. Small intestinal mucosal abnormalities in post-perinatal deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Variend, S; Sunderland, R

    1984-01-01

    Examination of small intestinal mucosa from cases of post-perinatal death in Sheffield between September 1980 and September 1981 showed mucosal changes before death in 18 of 78 cases (20%). There was no significant difference in prevalence between explained and unexplained deaths, nor was there any positive association with viral isolation from the small intestine. The lesion was much more common in males than females and showed a strong association with bottle feeding--no infant wholly breast fed showed an enteropathy. There was a low incidence of symptoms referrable to the gastrointestinal tract among affected infants, and no appreciable evidence of failure to thrive, as reflected by the postmortem body weight, was present. Mucosal changes of the small intestine in cases of sudden infant death syndrome have previously been reported and attributed to heatstroke. Although the finding of similar lesions in infants who died explicably does not appear to support this view, overheating is difficult to exclude as most of the explained deaths with a mucosal lesion occurred at home. Images PMID:6699191

  15. Adherence targets of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in human small intestines.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Yokota, T

    1989-01-01

    Formalin-fixed human small intestinal mucosa with mucus coating, villi, and lymphoid follicle epithelium at the mucosal surface was used to test the adherence sites of clinically isolated (Kanagawa phenomenon-positive) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 3 h at 37 degrees C possessed various levels of cell-associated hemagglutinins (HAs) which were detected with human or guinea pig erythrocytes. The observed adherence abilities of V. parahaemolyticus strains to human small intestinal mucosa correlated roughly with the HA levels of the strains. Under the test conditions, ileal lymphoid follicle epithelium (especially M cells) provided the best adherence target for V. parahaemolyticus. Adherence to villus absorptive cells or to mucus coating was observed at lower levels. In addition, all 3-h-grown V. parahaemolyticus strains tested produced high levels of HAs as detected with rabbit erythrocytes. The strains were all strikingly motile. In contrast, V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 20 h at 37 degrees C had much lower levels of HAs, adherence abilities, and motility. In contrast to the above observations, piliation of V. parahaemolyticus was more extensive at ca. 20 h of incubation at 37 degrees C than at ca. 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. The remarkable ability of V. parahaemolyticus to adhere to lymphoid follicle epithelium was also confirmed by using rabbit small intestinal mucosa. Images PMID:2568344

  16. Isoenzymes of glutathione transferase in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, M K; Ozer, N; Mannervik, B

    1988-01-01

    The major glutathione transferases in the rat small-intestine cytosol were isolated and characterized. The enzymes active with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as second substrate were almost quantitatively recovered after affinity chromatography on immobilized S-hexylglutathione. The different basic forms of glutathione transferase, which account for 90% of the activity, were resolved by chromatofocusing. Fractions containing enzymes with lower isoelectric points were not further resolved. The isolated fractions were characterized by their elution position in chromatofocusing, apparent subunit Mr, reactions with specific antibodies, substrate specificities and inhibition characteristics. The major basic forms identified were glutathione transferases 1-1, 4-4 and 7-7. In addition, evidence for the presence of a variant form of subunit 1, as well as trace amounts of subunits 2 and 3, was obtained. A significant amount of transferase 8-8 in the fraction of acidic enzyme forms was demonstrated by immunoblot and Ouchterlony double-diffusion analysis. In the comparison of the occurrence of the different forms of glutathione transferase in liver, lung, kidney and small intestine, it was found that the small intestine is the richest source of glutathione transferase 7-7. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3140787

  17. Histomorphometric changes of small intestine in pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Tamadon, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Food intake of rats increases during pregnancy. This requires changes in the structure of the small intestine to absorb additional food. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological changes in the layers of small intestine in rats during pregnancy. Duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 18 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (day 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy) were collected. Villous height and width and thickness of lamina propria, tunica muscularis entirely and separately (circular and longitudinal layers) were measured on transverse sections. During pregnancy increasing villi length and muscular layer thickness was observed in duodenum. Furthermore, along with the progress of gestation greatest histomorphometric change in small intestine was observed in the jejunum. The reduction in the ileum histomorphologic indices was observed during pregnancy. In conclusion, increase in histomorphologic indices of duodenum and jejunum supplies more capacity of duodenum to digest food intake during pregnancy and decrease in these indices in ileum controls the absorption of excess produced amino acids and glucose by hyperphagia.

  18. Histochemical features of the Muscovy duck small intestine during development.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao An; Pirone, Andrea; Lenzi, Carla; Xiaoming, Nie; Baglini, Alessandro; Romboli, Isabella

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrated for the first time the distribution and morphology of argyrophil and of goblet cells in the mucosa of the small intestine of the Muscovy duck during development using the Grimelius silver staining and alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff (AB/PAS) staining technique. The argyrophil cells distribution was variable over the length of the small intestine from embryonic day 24 (24E) to post-hatching day 13 (13d). In the villi most argyrophil cells belonged to the open-type, while in the crypts they belonged to the closed-type. In the duodenum the density of argyrophil cells was highest at hatching, while in the jejunum and in the ileum the highest density value was at hatching and 13d. AB/PAS-positive goblet cells appeared on the villi and crypts of the duodenum and jejunum at 30E, and in the ileum at hatching. The density of AB/PAS-positive cells was the highest in the three segments at hatching. The AB-positive cells, compared with the PAS-positive cells, predominated in villi and crypts of the three segments, moreover the rate of AB-positive cells to PAS-positive cells significantly decreased from 30E to 9d. An increase in argyrophil and goblet cells number during the later incubation and at hatching, could indicate the small intestine in that period is being prepared to face a new diet.

  19. Iodide transport in rat small intestine: dependence on calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Ilundain, A; Larralde, J; Toval, M

    1987-01-01

    1. The involvement of calcium in the regulation of iodide secretion was investigated in stripped sheets of rat small intestine. 2. In the absence of exogenous modifiers a net iodide absorption was observed in the rat proximal intestine, whereas the mid-intestine secreted iodide. 3. Removal of Ca2+ from the bathing solutions abolished net I- secretion in the mid-intestine. The calcium channel blocker verapamil produced similar effects on net I- secretion. 4. Theophylline increased net I- secretion both in the absence and in the presence of verapamil, but the effects of theophylline were less in the presence of verapamil or in Ca2+-free media. 5. Trifluoperazine inhibited basal iodide secretion and attenuated theophylline-induced I- secretion. 6. All the modifiers which prevented net I- secretion reduced iodide fluxes across the mucosal border and increased serosal iodide exit. The opposite was observed with theophylline. 7. It is suggested that I- secretion might result from changes in both mucosal and serosal I- permeabilities, and that both processes appear to be regulated by calmodulin. PMID:3446797

  20. Intestinal mast cells and eosinophils in relation to Strongyloides ratti adult expulsion from the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Kadosaka, T; Kimura, E; Takagi, H; Kondo, S; Itoh, M

    2013-04-01

    Mucosal mast cells (MMC) play a crucial role in the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti adults from the small intestine of mice. We reported the large intestinal parasitism of S. ratti in rats, and there has been no report on MMC in the large intestine of the natural host. We studied kinetics of MMC, together with eosinophils, in the upper and lower small intestines, caecum and colon of infected rats. Two distinct phases of mastocytosis were revealed: one in the upper small intestine triggered by stimulation of 'ordinary' adults, and the other in the colon stimulated by 'immune-resistant' adults that started parasitizing the colon around 19 days post-infection. In all 4 intestinal sites, the MMC peaks were observed 5-7 days after the number of adult worms became the maximum and the height of MMC peaks appeared to be dependent on the number of parasitic adults, suggesting an important role played by worms themselves in the MMC buildup.

  1. Volvulus of small intestine: rare complication of mesenteric pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Fan, H-L; Chen, T-W; Hong, Z-J; Hsieh, C-B; Chan, D-C; Chen, C-J; Liu, Y-C; Yu, J-C

    2009-12-01

    Mesenteric cyst is a rare intra-abdominal lesion. Most patients with mesenteric cysts are asymptomatic. Symptomatic mesenteric cysts are associated with cyst size, cyst location, and complications, including infection, rupture, hemorrhage, and intestinal obstruction. Volvulus is a rare complication of mesenteric cyst. We report a 50-year-old woman with colicky epigastric pain for three days. The symptoms exacerbated in the supine position and were relieved in the sitting position. Computed tomography of her abdomen revealed a huge cystic lesion with a whirl sign of mesentery vessels. She had the history of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Segmental resection of the small intestine with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Histology indicated a hemorrhagic pseudocyst. The patient recovered well after surgery. Mesenteric pseudocyst rarely results in volvulus of small intestine. Our case is the eleventh case reported in the English literature. Atypical presentation of epigastric pain while lying down may lead to mis-diagnosis. This case reminds the clinicians this rare complication.

  2. The Effect of DA-6034 on Intestinal Permeability in an Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Shin; Lee, Oh Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-6034 has anti-inflammatory activities and exhibits cytoprotective effects in acute gastric injury models. However, explanations for the protective effects of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability are limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury model and its protective effect against small intestinal injury. Methods Rats in the treatment group received DA-6034 from days 0 to 2 and indomethacin from days 1 to 2. Rats in the control group received indomethacin from days 1 to 2. On the fourth day, the small intestines were examined to compare the severity of inflammation. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Western blotting was performed to confirm the association between DA-6034 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Results The inflammation scores in the treatment group were lower than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Hemorrhagic lesions in the treatment group were broader than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Intestinal permeability was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. DA-6034 enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression, and intestinal permeability was negatively correlated with ERK expression. Conclusions DA-6034 may decrease intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced intestinal injury model via the ERK pathway. PMID:27114435

  3. Small intestinal transit of spherical particles in the active rat

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, P.T.; Sutton, S.C.; LeRoy-Wayne, S.

    1986-03-05

    Reproducible measurements of small intestine transit for spherical particles of 0.5 ..mu.. to 1 mm diameter, have been accomplished in the conscious rat. A short cannula of polyethylene is surgically implanted into the duodenum and exists through the abdominal wall. After recovery, a bolus of saline containing colored or isotopically labeled particulate material and an internal standard of NaCr/sup 51/O/sub 4/ is introduced with a modified pipette tip that snugly fills the cannula to prevent back flow. The rats eat and drink during the transit period and are maintained on a reversed light cycle so that transit is measured during their physically active period. Glass microspheres of 1mm, 500 ..mu.., and 50 ..mu.. were followed at 30 min, 1 hr, and 2 hr intervals by opening the intestine and photographing 1 cm segments along its length. Polymer beads of 500 ..mu.., 125 ..mu.., and 70 ..mu.. were labeled with /sup 125/I and located by freezing the exteriorized intestine and counting 1 cm segments in a gamma counter. Movement of the fluid bolus as detected by NaCr/sup 51/O/sub 4/ was reproducible with the fluid front moving through 59%, 73%, and 81% of the length at 30 min, 1 hr, and 2 hr. One millimeter to 125 ..mu.. glass and polymer beads moved with the fluid bolus. Evidence for separation of the fluid phase and particles under approx. 100 ..mu.. is accumulating. It is hypothesized that small particles under a critical size may become lodged in the mucus lining of the intestinal wall.

  4. Expression and Function of Intestinal Hexose Transporters after Small Intestinal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Corey W.; Fatima, Javairiah; Duenes, Judith; Houghton, Scott G.; Kasparek, Michael S.; Sarr, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of neural regulation in expression and function of intestinal hexose transporters is unknown. Aim To determine the role of intestinal innervation in gene expression and function of the membrane hexose transporters, SGLT1, GLUT2, and GLUT5 in the enterocyte. Hypothesis Denervation of the small intestine decreases expression of hexose transporters leading to decreased glucose absorption. Methods Six groups of Lewis rats were studied (n=6 each): control, 1 wk after sham laparotomy, 1 and 8 wk after syngeneic (no immune rejection) orthotopic small bowel transplantation (SBT) (SBT1, SBT8) to induce complete extrinsic denervation, and 1 and 8 wk after selective disruption of intrinsic neural continuity to jejunoileum by gut transection and reanastomosis (T/A1, T/A8). All tissue was harvested between 8AM and 10AM. In duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, mucosal mRNA levels were quantitated by real time PCR, protein by Western blotting, and transporter-mediated glucose absorption using the everted sleeve technique. Results Across the six groups, relative gene expression of hexose transporter mRNA and protein levels were unchanged and no difference in transporter-mediated glucose uptake was evident in any region. Glucose transporter affinity (Km) and functional transporter levels (Vmax) calculated for duodenum and jejunum showed no difference between the six groups. Conclusion Baseline regulation of hexose transporter function is not mediated tonically by intrinsic or extrinsic neural continuity to the jejunoileum. PMID:19541015

  5. Mucosal projections of enteric neurons in the porcine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hens, J; Schrödl, F; Brehmer, A; Adriaensen, D; Neuhuber, W; Scheuermann, D W; Schemann, M; Timmermans, J P

    2000-06-05

    In the present study, a combination of immunohistochemistry and retrograde 1,1;-didodecyl-3,3,3;,3;-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing was used to unravel the morphology, distribution, and neurochemical coding of submucous and myenteric neurons with axonal projections to the mucosa of the porcine small intestine. The majority of traced neurons was located in the inner submucous plexus (ISP; 78%), whereas the remaining part was distributed between the outer submucous plexus (OSP; 10%) and myenteric plexus (MP; 12%). Among these traced neurons, some distinct neuronal populations could be distinguished according to their morphologic and neurochemical properties. In the ISP, several types of traced neurons were detected: 1) morphologic type II neurons expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity, and substance P (SP) immunoreactivity; 2) ChAT/SP-immunoreactive (-IR) small neurons; 3) vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) -IR small neurons; and 4) multidendritic ChAT/somatostatin (SOM) -IR neurons. The traced neuronal populations of the OSP and MP were similar to each other. In both plexuses, the following DiI-labelled neurons were found: 1) ChAT/CGRP/(SP)-IR type II neurons; 2) multidendritic ChAT/SP-IR neurons; and 3) multidendritic ChAT/SOM-IR neurons. Comparison of the present findings with previously obtained data concerning the mucosal innervation pattern of the intestine of small mammals, revealed significant species differences with respect to the morphologic and neurochemical features of the involved enteric neuronal classes. Although not identical, a closer resemblance between pig and human enteric nervous system seems to be at hand, as far as the anatomic organization and the presence of neurochemically identified neuronal subtypes within the enteric nervous system are concerned.

  6. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra.

  7. Lubiprostone Accelerates Intestinal Transit and Alleviates Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients With Chronic Constipation.

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, Irene; Bashashati, Mohammad; Alvarez, Alicia; Hall, Mark; Shankar, Nagasri; Gomez, Yvette; McCallum, Richard W; Sarosiek, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Lubiprostone is an effective treatment for chronic constipation (CC). The mechanism of action of lubiprostone is through increasing fluid secretion and lubrication of the intestinal lumen. The effects of lubiprostone on gastrointestinal transit and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) have not been adequately explored. The current study was designed to investigate whether lubiprostone (1) alters gastrointestinal transit and (2) affects SIBO in patients with constipation. A total of 29 female patients (mean age = 39 years; range: 19-64) with CC received 2 weeks of lubiprostone (24mcg b.i.d., P.O.). Stool consistency based on Bristol stool scale and the frequency of bowel movements (BMs) were recorded. Gastric emptying time, small bowel transit time, colon transit time (CTT), combined small and large bowel transit time (SLBTT) and whole gut transit time were measured using wireless motility capsule. The SIBO status was assessed by the lactulose breath test. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank, Mann-Whitney U, Spearman׳s rank correlation and Chi-square tests. Lubiprostone significantly softened the stool and increased the frequency of BM from median of 2 to 4times per week. The CTT and SLBTT were significantly shorter in responders to lubiprostone (i.e., those with ≥ 2 times increase in the number of their weekly BM) compared with nonresponders. The higher frequency of BM after treatment was significantly correlated with the acceleration of CTT, SLBTT and whole gut transit time. In all, 17 out of 25 (68%) patients, who were tested for SIBO at baseline, were positive. In addition, 7 out of 17 (41%) SIBO-positive patients became SIBO-negative after lubiprostone treatment (P < 0.05). In CC, lubiprostone improves the frequency of BMs, softens the stool, accelerates intestinal transit and decreases accompanying SIBO. The improvement of SIBO could be explained by the cleansing effect of increased intestinal fluid and mucus combined with enhanced intestinal

  8. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E. Ross; Carmolli, Marya P.; Ma, Jennie Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90) of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation. PMID:26758185

  9. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dengqun; Wang, Fengchao; Zou, Zhongmin; Dong, Shiwu; Wang, Junping; Ran, Xinze; Li, Chunxue; Shi, Chunmeng; Su, Yongping

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of 95.65% ± 3.72% at different times in chimerism. Donor-derived cells distributed widely in all the layers of the gastrointestinal tract. There were GFP positive BMDCs in the myenteric plexus, which resembled characteristics of ICCs, including myenteric location, c-Kit positive staining, and ramified morphology. Donor-derived ICCs in the myenteric plexus contributed to a percentage ranging 9.25% ± 4.9% of all the ICCs in the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, here we described that donor-derived BMDCs might differentiate into gastrointestinal ICCs after radiation injury, which provided an alternative source for the origin of the ICCs in the muscular plexus of adult intestine. These results further identified the plasticity of BMDCs and indicated therapeutic implications of BMDCs for the gastrointestinal dysmotility caused by ICCs disorders. PMID:20396598

  10. Laparoscopic Herniorrhaphy with Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Using mesh or a synthetic prosthesis during the laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. A new material, porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS mesh), has been successfully used in canine and rodent animal models with excellent results. This mesh is degradable and resorbable with a marked decrease in the possibility of becoming infected. However, the amount of fibroblast ingrowth is equal to that with polypropylene mesh. Methods: A comparison was made between this new SIS mesh to repair 15 inguinal hernias in 12 patients and polypropylene mesh used in 12 similar patients. A preperitoneal approach with balloon dissection was used in all patients. Results: Demographics were similar in both groups. The results were excellent and compared equally. Complications (seroma, discomfort) were minimal in both groups and were similar. Conclusions: Porcine small intestinal submucosa, SIS mesh, can be used for laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:12166756

  11. [Coordination of the myoelectrical activity of the large and small intestine].

    PubMed

    Lychkova, A E

    2012-01-01

    Coordination of the myoelectrical activity of the large and small intestine was studied. Pacemaker cells of intestine are predominantly located at the proximal divisions of large and small intestine and have an increased spontaneous slow-wave activity, which ensures the distribution of excitation in smooth muscle underlying intestines. Due to the ileocecal coordination by sequential motor activity of small and large intestine is provided. The distal direction gradient of slow waves frequency reduction was established. Pacemaker cells possess certain structural specificity and is specialized in the spontaneous bioelectric activity.

  12. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. D-tagatose has low small intestinal digestibility but high large intestinal fermentability in pigs.

    PubMed

    Laerke, H N; Jensen, B B

    1999-05-01

    The digestibility of D-tagatose, its effect on the digestibility of macronutrients and the metabolic response of the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract to the ingestion of this carbohydrate were studied in pigs. Eight pigs were fed a low fiber diet comprising 15% sucrose (control group). Another eight pigs were fed a similar diet except that 100 g sucrose per kg diet was replaced by D-tagatose (test group). After 18 d, the pigs were killed and the gastrointestinal contents removed for analysis. The digestibility of D-tagatose was 25.8 +/- 5.6% in the distal third of the small intestine. The small intestinal digestibilities of dry matter (86.9 +/- 1.3 vs. 92.9 +/- 0.9%), gross energy (74.4 +/- 1.6 vs. 80.7 +/- 1.8%) and sucrose (90.4 +/- 2.5 vs. 98.0 +/- 0.5%) were lower (P < 0. 05) in the pigs fed D-tagatose. Digestibilities of starch, protein and fat did not differ between groups. D-Tagatose, sucrose and starch were fully digested in the large intestine. The fecal digestibilities of energy, dry matter and fat did not differ between the two groups, whereas D-tagatose reduced the fecal digestibility of protein (91.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 93.5 +/- 0.7%, P < 0.05). D-Tagatose served as a substrate for the microbiota in the cecum and proximal colon as indicated by a reduced pH, and a greater ATP concentration, adenylate energy charge (AEC) ratio and concentration of short-chain fatty acids. In particular, the increase in the concentrations of propionate, butyrate and valerate suggests possible health benefits of this monosaccharide.

  14. Familial risk of small intestinal carcinoid and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, Elham; Pukkala, Eero; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2013-08-01

    Small intestinal cancer (SIC) is rare, and its etiology is poorly understood. We compared clusters of families with SICs of different histologic subtypes. By using the nationwide family cancer data sets of Sweden and Finland, we identified a cohort of 9964 first-degree relatives of 1799 patients with SIC, diagnosed from 1961 through 2009. Data were collected from time periods as long as 47 years (mean, 35.4 y), and cancer incidence was determined. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated and stratified by sex, age, time period, and cancer type, using the incidence rates for the entire national population as the reference. Among the 1799 SIC cases, 1.1% had a sibling with SIC, so the SIR was 11.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2-18.2); 1.1% had a parent or child with SIC (SIR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.0-5.6). The SIR of concordant carcinoid histology of SIC among siblings was 28.4 (95% CI, 14.7-49.6; n = 12) and in parent-child pairs was 9.9 (95% CI, 5.4-16.6; n = 14). The familial risk of concordant histologic subtypes increased for siblings diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, but only 2 familial cases were identified. In family members of patients with SIC of the adenocarcinoma subtype, risks of colorectal and bladder cancer were modestly but significantly increased compared with the general population. Family members of patients with SIC of the carcinoid subtype had an increased risk for kidney cancer and polycythemia vera. Based on data from our population-based study, first-degree relatives of patients with small intestinal carcinoid tumors have developed these tumors with high incidence. Because of the rareness of this tumor, the absolute risk remains moderate even within families. Gastroenterologists could inform patients with small intestinal carcinoids about the familial risk and encourage counseling for their first-degree relatives. Studies are needed to identify genetic factors that affect susceptibility to SIC. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published

  15. [An improved single-layer suture in the surgery of small and large intestines].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, B B; Sysoev, S V

    2010-01-01

    The methods and results of using single-layer interrupted intestinal suture in operations on the small and large intestines are presented. Using the suture decreases the number of complications associated with this technique, improves the direct results of operations and reduces postoperative lethality both in urgent and planned surgery. The proposed intestinal suture is thought to be justified in connecting similar and dissimilar parts of the intestinal tube in the variants of longitudinal, transversal, terminal, lateral and termino-lateral interintestinal anastomoses.

  16. [Characterization of the microflora of the small intestine (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, H; Knoke, M

    1980-03-01

    Normal and abnormal microflora of the upper small intestine was studied in 356 patients. Low counts are characteristic of normal microbial colonization (eubiosis), changes in quality and/or quantity are pathological (dysbiosis). The latter status is described as overgrowth syndrome. We found some types of dysbiosis. Prevalent was type Dys1 with the highest counts and the greatest variety of bacteria and yeasts. In contrast to this, type Dys2 showed higher germ counts of only one genus like coliforms (Dys2 Coli), streptococci (Dys2 Str.), lactobacilli (Dys2 L.) or yeasts (Dys2 Y.). In dysbiosis, we frequently saw bifidobacterium and bacteroides. Simultaneous sampling from stomach, duodenum, and jejunum indicated different modes of colonization of these parts (oral or fecal type).

  17. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    PubMed Central

    Torfs, Sara C.; Maes, An A.; Delesalle, Catherine J.; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M.; Deprez, Piet

    2015-01-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in pre- and post-operative samples from surgical SI colic horses compared to controls. However, no association with postoperative ileus or non-survival could be demonstrated at any time point. In this clinical study, plasma serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic. PMID:25694668

  18. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia.

  19. Genetics and epigenetics in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Stålberg, P; Westin, G; Thirlwell, C

    2016-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumour of the small intestine (SI-NET), formerly known as midgut carcinoid tumour, is the most common small intestinal malignancy. The incidence is rising, with recent reports of 0.67 per 100 000 in the USA and 1.12 per 100 000 in Sweden. SI-NETs often present a challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment, as patients often have widespread disease and are beyond cure by surgery. Somatostatin analogues provide the mainstay of medical treatment to control hormonal excess and increase the time to progression. Despite overall favourable prognosis (5-year overall survival of 65%), there is a need to find markers to identify both patients with worse outcome and new targets for therapy. Loss on chromosome 18 has been reported in 60-90% of SI-NETs, but mutated genes on this chromosome have failed detection. Recently, a putative tumour suppressor role has been suggested for TCEB3C occurring at 18q21 (encoding elongin A3), which may undergo epigenetic repression. CDKN1B has recently been revealed as the only recurrently mutated gene in SI-NETs but, with a frequency as low as 8%, its role as a driver in SI-NET development may be questioned. Integrated genomewide analysis including exome and whole-genome sequencing, gene expression, DNA methylation and copy number analysis has identified three novel molecular subtypes of SI-NET with differing clinical outcome. DNA methylation analysis has demonstrated that SI-NETs have significant epigenetic dysregulation in 70-80% of tumours. In this review, we focus on understanding of the genetic, epigenetic and molecular events that lead to development and progression of SI-NETs.

  20. Gamma/delta intraepithelial lymphocytes in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masaki; Itoh, Tsunetoshi

    2016-09-01

    Although many studies of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have been reported, most of them have focused on αβ-IELs; little attention has been paid to γδ-IELs. The function of γδ-IELs remains largely unclear. In this article, we briefly review a number of reports on γδ-IELs, especially those in the small intestine, along with our recent studies. We found that γδ-IELs are the most abundant (comprising >70 % of the) IELs in the duodenum and the jejunum, implying that it is absolutely necessary to investigate the function(s) of γδ-IELs when attempting to delineate the in vivo defense system of the small intestine. Intraperitoneal injection of anti-CD3 mAb stimulated the γδ-IELs and caused rapid degranulation of them. Granzyme B released from their granules induced DNA fragmentation of duodenal and jejunal epithelial cells (paracrine) and of the IELs themselves (autocrine). However, perforin (Pfn) was not detected, and DNA fragmentation was induced even in Pfn-knockout mice; our system was therefore found to present a novel type of in vivo Pfn-independent DNA fragmentation. We can therefore consider γδ-IELs to be a novel type of large granular lymphocyte without Pfn. Fragmented DNA was repaired in the cells, indicating that DNA fragmentation alone cannot be regarded as an unambiguous marker of cell death or apoptosis. Finally, since the response was so rapid and achieved without the need for accessory cells, it seems that γδ-IELs respond readily to various stimuli, are activated only once, and die 2-3 days after activation in situ without leaving their site. Taken together, these results suggest that γδ-IELs are not involved in the recognition of specific antigen(s) and are not involved in the resulting specific killing or exclusion of the relevant antigen(s).

  1. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine.

  2. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine. PMID:25834302

  3. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells.

  4. Extrinsic intestinal denervation modulates tumor development in the small intestine of Apc(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Verena; Dietrich, Alexandra; Kasparek, Michael S; Benhaqi, Petra; Schneider, Marlon R; Schemann, Michael; Seeliger, Hendrik; Kreis, Martin E

    2015-04-29

    Innervation interacts with enteric immune responses. Chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. We aimed to study potential extrinsic neuronal modulation of intestinal tumor development in a mouse model. Experiments were performed with male Apc(Min/+) or wild type mice (4 weeks old, body weight approximately 20 g). Subgroups with subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (apcV/wtV), sympathetic denervation of the small intestine (apcS/wtS) or sham operated controls (apcC/wtC) were investigated (n = 6-14 per group). Three months after surgical manipulation, 10 cm of terminal ileum were excised, fixed for 48 h in 4% paraformaldehyde and all tumors were counted and their area determined in mm(2) (mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM)). Whole mounts of the muscularis of terminal ileum and duodenum (internal positive control) were also stained for tyrosine hydroxylase to confirm successful sympathetic denervation. Tumor count in Apc(Min/+) mice was 62 ± 8 (apcC), 46 ± 11 (apcV) and 54 ± 8 (apcS) which was increased compared to wildtype controls with 4 ± 0.5 (wtC), 5 ± 0.5 (wtV) and 5 ± 0.6 (wtS; all p < 0.05). For Apc(Min/+) groups, vagotomized animals showed a trend towards decreased tumor counts compared to sham operated Apc(Min/+) controls while sympathetic denervation was similar to sham Apc(Min/+). Area covered by tumors in Apc(Min/+) mice was 55 ± 10 (apcC), 31 ± 8 (apcV) and 42 ± 8 (apcS) mm(2), which was generally increased compared to wildtype controls with 7 ± 0.6 (wtC), 7 ± 0.4 (wtV) and 7 ± 0.6 (wtS) mm(2) (all p < 0.05). In Apc(Min/+) groups, tumor area was decreased in vagotomized animals compared to sham operated controls (p < 0.05) while sympathetically denervated mice showed a minor trend to decreased tumor area compared to controls. Extrinsic innervation of the small bowel is likely to modulate tumor development in Apc(Min/+) mice

  5. Establishment of a primary culture method for mouse intestinal epithelial cells by organ culture of fetal small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kiyoshi; Sato, Kanako; Morishita, Satoru; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2009-08-01

    Studies of the physiological functions of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) have been limited by the difficulty of primary culture of IEC. We established a method for primary culture of mouse IEC by culturing fragments of fetal small intestines pretreated with EDTA. This method reproducibly resulted in the expansion of cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells, and vigorous expansion of the epithelial cells was observed only from intestinal fragments of embryonic days 15-16. These cells expressed alkaline phosphatase activity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, indicating the mature phenotype of IEC in a small intestine. The cells also presented antigens to CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the cells expressed various cytokines and chemokines, and the expression was enhanced by bacterial stimulation. These results indicate that the primary-cultured mouse IEC prepared by the method established here can be a beneficial tool in study of the functions of IECs, especially in mucosal immunity.

  6. Radioprotective potential of histamine on rat small intestine and uterus.

    PubMed

    Carabajal, E; Massari, N; Croci, M; Martinel Lamas, D J; Prestifilippo, J P; Bergoc, R M; Rivera, E S; Medina, V A

    2012-12-18

    The aim of this study was to improve knowledge about histamine radioprotective potential investigating its effect on reducing ionising radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage on the rat small intestine and uterus. Forty 10-week-old male and 40 female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Histamine and histamine-5Gy groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Histamine-5Gy and untreated-5Gy groups were irradiated with a dose of whole-body Cesium-137 irradiation. Three days after irradiation animals were sacrificed and tissues were removed, fixed, and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferation, apoptosis and oxidative DNA markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate chromosomal damage. Histamine treatment reduced radiation-induced mucosal atrophy, oedema and vascular damage produced by ionising radiation, increasing the number of crypts per circumference (239 ± 12 vs 160 ± 10; P<0.01). This effect was associated with a reduction of radiation-induced intestinal crypts apoptosis. Additionally, histamine decreased the frequency of micronuclei formation and also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG immunoreactivity, a marker of DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, radiation induced flattening of the endometrial surface, depletion of deep glands and reduced mitosis, effects that were completely blocked by histamine treatment. The expression of a proliferation marker in uterine luminal and glandular cells was markedly stimulated in histamine treated and irradiated rats. The obtained evidences indicate that histamine is a potential candidate as a safe radioprotective agent that might increase the therapeutic index of radiotherapy for intra-abdominal and pelvic cancers. However, its efficacy needs to be carefully investigated in prospective clinical trials.

  7. A model for calcium permeation into small intestine.

    PubMed

    Dolinska, Barbara; Mikulska, Agnieszka; Caban, Artur; Ostrozka-Cieslik, Aneta; Ryszka, Florian

    2011-09-01

    An in vitro model was used to simulate the intestinal permeation of calcium ions depending on the type of salt (carbonate, fumarate, citrate, or gluconate), its concentration (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10 mM/l), and pH (1.3, 4.2, 6.2, or 7.5). To simulate the conditions for calcium permeation in a patient in a fasting state, the solutions were placed in contact with segments of small intestine of pig: stomach, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The percent permeation, its rate, and half-time were measured in each case. In all cases, the maximum permeation was seen at 1 mM concentration, depending on pH: 100% for carbonate at pH 1.3; 82% for fumarate, pH 6.2; 79.5% for citrate at pH 4.2, and 81% for gluconate at pH 7.4. The maximum rate of permeation (% h(-1)) was also observed at 1 mM: 2.16 for carbonate at pH 1.3, 0.29 for fumarate at pH 6.2, 0.26 for citrate at pH 4.2, and 0.28 for gluconate at pH 7.4. The shortest half-time permeation (t (1/2), h) for 1 mM solutions depended also on pH (in parentheses): carbonate 0.3 (1.3), fumarate 2.4 (6.2), citrate 2.6 (4.2), and gluconate 2.5 (7.4). The results suggest that calcium carbonate and citrate can be recommended to patients with normal gastric acidity and hyperacidity while fumarate and gluconate to patients with hypoacidity.

  8. [Experience with capsule endoscopy diagnostic tool for the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Sanhueza Bravo, Edgar; Ibáñez, Patricio; Araya, Raúl; Delgado, Iris; Quezada, Soledad; Jadue, Liliana; Navarrete, Claudio

    2010-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a relatively new method to evaluate the small intestine. To evaluate the indications of CE in our center and assess whether specific indications are associated with best results during CE studies. Retrospective analysis of 69 patients aged 9 to 85 years (36 males) subjected to a CE at our institution between April 2004 and October 2007. The most common indications for CE were overt gastrointestinal bleeding in 43.5% of patients, iron deficiency anemia in 39.1 %, suspicion of a small bowel tumor in 4.3%, chronic diarrhea in 4.3% and abdominal pain in 2.9%. CE was normal in 23.2% and was able to find lesions in 76.8% of the studies. Gastrointestinal bleeding, followed by iron deficiency anemia were the indications associated with the higher rates of positive findings during CE. Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anemia were the indications that obtained the best diagnostic yield for CE.

  9. Intestinal absorption of berberine and 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine and their effects on sugar absorption in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-chao; Dong, Su; Xu, Li-jun; Zhang, Chen-yu

    2014-04-01

    The intestinal absorption of berberine (Ber) and its structural modified compound 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine (Hdber) was compared, and their effects on the intestinal absorption of sugar by perfusion experiment were investigated in order to reveal the mechanism of low dose and high activity of Hdber in the treatment of hyperglycemia. The absorption of Hdber and Ber in rat small intestine was measured by in situ perfusion. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the concentrations of Hdber and Ber. In situ perfusion method was also used to study the effects of Hdber and Ber on sugar intestinal absorption. Glucose oxidase method and UV spectrophotometry were applied to examine the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in the perfusion fluid. The results showed that the absorption rate of Ber in the small intestine was lower than 10%, but that of Hdber was larger than 70%. Both Hdber and Ber inhibited the absorption of glucose and sucrose at the doses of 10 and 20 μg/mL. However, Hdber presented stronger activity than Ber (P<0.01). It is suggested that Hdber is absorbed easily in rat small intestine and that its inhibitory effect on the absorption of sugar is better than Ber.

  10. Survival after total body irradiation: Effects of irradiation of exteriorized small intestine. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Kitto, G.; Pelky, T.; Taylor, P.

    1993-12-31

    Rats receiving lethal irradiation to their exteriorized small intestine with pulsed 18 MVp bremsstrahlung radiation live about 4 days longer than rats receiving a dose of total-body irradiation (TBI) causing intestinal death. The LD50 for intestinal irradiation is approximately 6 Gy higher than the LD50 for intestinal death after TBI. Survival time after exteriorized intestinal irradiation can be decreased, by adding abdominal irradiation. Adding thoracic or pelvic irradiation does not alter survival time. Shielding of large intestine improves survival after irradiation of the rest of the abdomen while the small intestine is also shielded. The kinetics of histological changes in small intestinal tissues implicate the release of humoral factors after irradiation of the abdomen. Radiation injury develops faster in the first (proximal) 40 cm of the small intestine and is expressed predominantly as shortening in villus height. In the last (distal) 40 cm of the small intestine, the most pronounced radiation effect is a decrease in the number of crypts per millimeter. Irradiation (20 Gy) of the proximal small intestine causes 92 % mortality (median survival 10 days). Irradiation (20 Gy) of the distal small intestine causes 27% mortality (median survival > 30 days). In addition to depletion of crypt stem cells in the small intestine, other issues (humoral factors, irradiated subsection of the small intestine and shielding of the large intestine) appear to influence radiation-induced intestinal mortality.

  11. Cat eye syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Ward, J; Sierra, I A; D'Croz, E

    1989-10-01

    A newborn male infant is presented with the characteristic phenotype of the cat eye syndrome and a small supernumerary chromosome shorter than a 22. He also had complete absence of parasympathetic ganglion cells throughout the small and large intestine.

  12. A Novel Model of P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor Screening Using Human Small Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfang; Zeng, Zhiyang; Sun, Jialiang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Dali; Zhang, Xueli; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an important efflux transporter in intestine, regulates the bioavailability of orally taken drugs. To develop an in vitro model that preferably mimics the physiological microenvironment of human intestine, we employed the three-dimensionally (3D) cultured organoids from human normal small intestinal epithelium. It was observed that the intestinal crypts could efficiently form cystic organoid structure with the extension of culture time. Furthermore, the physiological expression of ABCB1 was detected at both mRNA and protein levels in cultured organoids. Rhodamine 123 (Rh123), a typical substrate of P-gp, was actively transported across 3D organoids and accumulated in the luminal space. This transport process was also inhibited by verapamil and mitotane. In summary, the above-mentioned model based on human small intestinal 3D organoids is suitable to imitate the small intestinal epithelium and could be used as a novel in vitro model especially for P-gp inhibitor screening.

  13. [Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth as a cause of lactase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, N A; Ruchkina, I N; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L

    2015-01-01

    To establish the rate of lactase deficiency (LD) in patients with post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), to define a role of enteric bacteria in the pathogenesis of hypolactasia, and to evaluate the efficiency of probiotic therapy. Examinations were made in 386 patients with PI-IBS, including 112 (79.4%) women; mean age 33.9 ± 9.1 years; disease duration 2.6 ± 1.4 years. Rapid tests of small intestinal mucosa (SIM) biopsy specimens obtained from the duodenal retrobulbar segment were used to diagnose LD. Bacterial growth was estimated by a hydrogen breath test using a H2 MICRO gas analyzer. The patients with PI-IBS were revealed to have moderate and severe LD in 25.6 and 10.9%, respectively. All the patients with LD were detected to have small intestinal (SI) bacterial overgrowth (BOG). An inverse correlation was found between LD and the degree of SI BOG (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). 73.7% of the patients with moderate LD showed a positive effect of probiotic therapy as regression of clinical symptoms of LD, a decrease of hydrogen levels in expired air from 72.4 ± 25.1 to 16.41 ± 3.2 ppm (p < 0.05), an increase of lactate activity in the SIM biopsy specimens and an improvement of quality of life from 2.69 ± 0.53 to 5.53 ± 0.64 scores according to the GCI scale. No improvement occurred in 73.8% of the patients with severe LD. LD was identified in 36.5% of the patients with PI-IBS. There was an inverse correlation between the degree of LD and SI BOG. The good therapeutic effect of probiotics in LD suggests that the symbiotic gut microflora positively affects the activity of lactase in the human SIM. No therapeutic effect of probiotics in patients with severe LN serves as the basis for a search for more active probiotic therapy.

  14. Ectopic pancreatic tissue in the wall of the small intestine: Two rare case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiannan; Huang, Haibin; Huo, Sibo; Liu, Ying; Xu, Guangmeng; Gao, Hongwen; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Tongjun

    2017-09-01

    Ectopic pancreas, which is a kind of rare congenital disease, forms during embryonic development. It can occur throughout the whole gastrointestinal tract, but has a low tendency to develop in the wall of the small intestine. It is easy for patients with ectopic pancreases to be misdiagnosed because the symptoms are untypical and can vary. In the present study, we reported two rare cases of ectopic pancreatic tissue in the wall of the small intestine, which presented with obvious abdominal pain and distention. The laboratory tests and computed tomography (CT) scans didn't reveal any evidence of ectopic pancreas. The two patients received small intestine masses resection and intestinal anastomosis. During surgery, an intestinal mass with a diameter of 4.0 cm was found in the first patient. An intestinal mass with a diameter of 0.8 cm, jejunum perforation, and diffuse peritonitis were found in the second patient. Histological analyses of the dissected intestinal masses confirmed them as ectopic pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, for the second patient, the intestinal perforation and diffuse peritonitis were not induced by the ectopic pancreas, but by a jujube pit that was found in the perforated site of the intestine. Our study demonstrated that an ectopic pancreas should be considered in cases of untypical abdominal symptoms with intestinal masses.

  15. Digestion of starch in a dynamic small intestinal model.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Fonseca, M R; Gouseti, O; Fryer, P J; Wickham, M S J; Bakalis, S

    2016-12-01

    The rate and extent of starch digestion have been linked with important health aspects, such as control of obesity and type-2 diabetes. In vitro techniques are often used to study digestion and simulated nutrient absorption; however, the effect of gut motility is often disregarded. The present work aims at studying fundamentals of starch digestion, e.g. the effect of viscosity on digestibility, taking into account both biochemical and engineering (gut motility) parameters. New small intestinal model (SIM) that realistically mimics gut motility (segmentation) was used to study digestibility and simulated oligosaccharide bio accessibility of (a) model starch solutions; (b) bread formulations. First, the model was compared with the rigorously mixed stirred tank reactor (STR). Then the effects of enzyme concentration/flow rate, starch concentration, and digesta viscosity (addition of guar gum) were evaluated. Compared to the STR, the SIM showed presence of lag phase when no digestive processes could be detected. The effects of enzyme concentration and flow rate appeared to be marginal in the region of mass transfer limited reactions. Addition of guar gum reduced simulated glucose absorption by up to 45 % in model starch solutions and by 35 % in bread formulations, indicating the importance of chyme rheology on nutrient bioaccessibility. Overall, the work highlights the significance of gut motility in digestive processes and offers a powerful tool in nutritional studies that, additionally to biochemical, considers engineering aspects of digestion. The potential to modulate food digestibility and nutrient bioaccessibility by altering food formulation is indicated.

  16. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  17. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75–5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. PMID:25311799

  19. Hemangiopericytoma in the Small Intestine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Coha, B.; Krizanovic, D.; Perusinovic, Z.; Marinic, S.; Jakovina, K.

    2008-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor, mostly composed of pericytes of ramified appearance that are normally found all along the venules and capillaries. An 18-year-old female was admitted on March 17, 1997 to the Department of Infectious Diseases for fever, chills and failure to thrive. Physical examination revealed a palpable tumorous mass in the iliac region on the right. The patient was transferred to the Department of Surgery. Vaginal examination and echotomography of the abdomen and pelvis minor were performed and revealed the presence of an irregular, inhomogeneous tumorous formation of 8 cm in diameter in the pelvis minor, differentially diagnostic right ovary, i.e. acute adnexitis or perityphlitic tumor. After that, small intestine resection, tumor excision in toto, and appendectomy were performed on April 16, 1997. Pathohistological diagnosis was hemangiopericytoma and chronic appendicitis. The biological behavior of this tumor is difficult to predict on the basis of clinical and morphological parameters. In our patient, local tumor excision was not followed by adjuvant therapy. After ten years, the patient is well, healthy and a mother of two healthy children. PMID:21897805

  20. Hemangiopericytoma in the small intestine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coha, B; Krizanovic, D; Perusinovic, Z; Marinic, S; Jakovina, K

    2008-09-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor, mostly composed of pericytes of ramified appearance that are normally found all along the venules and capillaries. An 18-year-old female was admitted on March 17, 1997 to the Department of Infectious Diseases for fever, chills and failure to thrive. Physical examination revealed a palpable tumorous mass in the iliac region on the right. The patient was transferred to the Department of Surgery. Vaginal examination and echotomography of the abdomen and pelvis minor were performed and revealed the presence of an irregular, inhomogeneous tumorous formation of 8 cm in diameter in the pelvis minor, differentially diagnostic right ovary, i.e. acute adnexitis or perityphlitic tumor. After that, small intestine resection, tumor excision in toto, and appendectomy were performed on April 16, 1997. Pathohistological diagnosis was hemangiopericytoma and chronic appendicitis. The biological behavior of this tumor is difficult to predict on the basis of clinical and morphological parameters. In our patient, local tumor excision was not followed by adjuvant therapy. After ten years, the patient is well, healthy and a mother of two healthy children.

  1. Heavy ion induced changes in small intestinal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, K. E.; McCullough, J. S.; Brennan, P.; Hayes, T. L.; Ainsworth, E. J.; Nelson, A. C.

    1994-10-01

    The effects on 17 different structural parameters of mouse small intestine three days after treatment with three types of heavy ion (neon, iron and niobium) are compared, the first two being of particular relevance to space flight. The data for niobium are given in full, showing that changes after niobium ion treatment are not standard and are concentrated in the epithelial compartment, with few of the parameters having a response which is dose dependent. When comparisons are made for the three types of heavy ion, the damage is greatest after neon ion irradiation, implying that the additional non-epithelial damage produced as LET rises from X rays through neutrons to neon ions is not necessarily maintained as LET continues to rise. Further understanding is therefore needed of the balance between changes affecting the vascular and absorptive components of the organ. Variation from group to group is also important, as is variation of strain or gastrointestinal status. All such factors are important in the understanding of changes in multicellular organs after exposure to heavy ion radiation.

  2. Morphometric characteristics of the small and large intestines of Mus musculus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Wołczuk, K; Wilczyńska, B; Jaroszewska, M; Kobak, J

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the size of the small and large intestine in postnatal development of Mus musculus mice. The gut was obtained from 2-, 4-, 6-, and 12-week-old animals. The morphometric analysis was performed at microscopic level. Measurements and calculations included dimensions of villi (height, diameter) and their number per 1 mm(2) surface area in the proximal, middle, and distal section of the small intestine, as well as the length and surface area (external and internal) of the small and large intestines. To find the allometric relationship between the size of the small and large intestines and body mass, reduced major axis regression was applied. The length and surface area of both intestinal segments gradually increased with age. The increase in the internal surface area of the small intestine was the result of lengthening of the intestine and increasing diameter of the villi in its proximal and middle sections. No increase in villus height during the studied period was detected. A marked increase in the size of the intestinal segments was observed between the 2(nd) and 4(th) weeks of life, when the length doubled and the surface area tripled in size. Allometric analysis revealed that the increase in length and internal surface area of the small and large intestines was more rapid than the body mass increase during the weaning period, while it was not different from isometry after the weaning. In conclusion, the greatest changes in the structure and size of the small and large intestines of mice occurred in the weaning period. During this period these two segments of intestine grew faster than the rest of the body and reached adult proportions.

  3. Small intestinal submucosa as a graft to increase rectum diameter.

    PubMed

    Greca, Fernando Hintz; de Noronha, Lucia; Marcolini, Fayrus Rodrigo Nastally; Verona, Alessandro; Pereira, Ian Arantes; Bier, Rodrigo Shueda

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the biocompatibility of the porcine small bowel submucosa and its ability to increase the rectal diameter compared with a formal transverse coloplasty. We assigned 36 New Zealand male rabbits to four experimental groups: groups C1 and C2 were treated with transverse coloplasty and groups S1 and S2 were treated with a patch of a porcine small intestine submucosa. We killed the animals in the C1 and S1 groups on the 7th postoperative day, and the animals in the C2 and S2 groups on the 30th postoperative day. We evaluated outcomes on the basis of animal survival, clinical course, anastomosis bursting pressures, morphometric examination, and histologic and immunohistochemical assessment. Morphometric examination showed a significant increase in colonic diameter in animals in the S2 group. We found no statistical difference regarding anastomosis bursting pressure between the C1 and S1 groups, and the C2 and S2 groups. On the 30th postoperative day, histologic examination showed total epithelium coverage of the grafts, and the immunohistochemical study showed an organized smooth muscular layer covering the graft. The higher concentration of collagen ticker fiber, type I, was seen in the S2 and C2 groups, but there was no statistical difference between them. The implanted graft proved superior to transverse coloplasty regarding the increase in distal colon diameter. Remarkable regeneration, marked fibroplasia, and epithelium coverage occurred throughout the graft on the 30th postoperative day. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Virtual Intestine: in-silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R.; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly-coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is co-regulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in-silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multi-scale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences. PMID:26562482

  6. Survival After Total Body Irradiation: Effects of Irradiation of Exteriorized Small Intestine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    exteriorized small intestine H . M. Vriesendorp 1, R. M. Vigneulle’, G. Kitto ’, T. Pelky t, P. Taylor ’-* and J . Smith ’Armed Forces Radiobiologv...P., Fiedner, T. M. and Archambeau, J . 0. Mare- Schultheiss, T. E. and Jardine, J . H . Acute and late radiation malian Radiation Lethality, a...acute intestinal 4 Dowling, R. H . Update on intestinal adaptation. Triangle radiation syndrome through shielding. Am. J . Physiol. 185, Sandoz J . Med

  7. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Booijink, Carien CGM; Troost, Freddy J; Bork, Peer; Wels, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) harbors a complex community of microbes. The microbiota composition varies between different locations in the GI tract, but most studies focus on the fecal microbiota, and that inhabiting the colonic mucosa. Consequently, little is known about the microbiota at other parts of the GI tract, which is especially true for the small intestine because of its limited accessibility. Here we deduce an ecological model of the microbiota composition and function in the small intestine, using complementing culture-independent approaches. Phylogenetic microarray analyses demonstrated that microbiota compositions that are typically found in effluent samples from ileostomists (subjects without a colon) can also be encountered in the small intestine of healthy individuals. Phylogenetic mapping of small intestinal metagenome of three different ileostomy effluent samples from a single individual indicated that Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli, Clostridium sp. and high G+C organisms are most abundant in the small intestine. The compositions of these populations fluctuated in time and correlated to the short-chain fatty acids profiles that were determined in parallel. Comparative functional analysis with fecal metagenomes identified functions that are overrepresented in the small intestine, including simple carbohydrate transport phosphotransferase systems (PTS), central metabolism and biotin production. Moreover, metatranscriptome analysis supported high level in-situ expression of PTS and carbohydrate metabolic genes, especially those belonging to Streptococcus sp. Overall, our findings suggest that rapid uptake and fermentation of available carbohydrates contribute to maintaining the microbiota in the human small intestine. PMID:22258098

  8. Effect of chenodiol on the small intestine. Unimpaired structure and function during therapy for gallstone dissolution.

    PubMed

    Casanova, S; Roda, A; Festi, D; Mazzella, G; Aldini, R; Bazzoli, F; Sama, C; Morselli, A M; Barbara, L; Roda, E

    1981-12-04

    To test whether long-term oral dosage with chenodiol (chenodeoxycholic acid) used for dissolution of cholesterol gallstones would cause impairment of small-intestinal structuree or function, ten patients were studied before and after three months of oral chenodiol administration, 15 mg/kg of body weight per day. Small-intestinal structure was assessed by roentgenogram and intestinal biopsy, using both light and electron microscopy. Small-intestinal function was assessed by xylose, fat and vitamin B12, lactose, and bile-acid absorption. Bile acid metabolism was also characterized by the breath test for deconjugation using carbon dioxide labeled with radioactive carbon 14. No significant abnormalities were found. The results suggest that oral chenodiol administration does not impair intestinal structur or function in doses used for gallstone dissolution.

  9. Parameterization of small intestinal water volume using PBPK modeling.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Anil; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Edginton, Andrea

    2015-01-25

    To facilitate accurate predictions of oral drug disposition, mechanistic absorption models require optimal parameterization. Furthermore, parameters should maintain a biological basis to establish confidence in model predictions. This study will serve to calculate an optimal parameter value for small intestinal water volume (SIWV) using a model-based approach. To evaluate physiologic fidelity, derived volume estimates will be compared to experimentally-based SIWV determinations. A compartmental absorption and transit (CAT) model, created in Matlab-Simulink®, was integrated with a whole-body PBPK model, developed in PK-SIM 5.2®, to provide predictions of systemic drug disposition. SIWV within the CAT model was varied between 52.5mL and 420mL. Simulations incorporating specific SIWV values were compared to pharmacokinetic data from compounds exhibiting solubility induced non-proportional changes in absorption using absolute average fold-error. Correspondingly, data pertaining to oral administration of acyclovir and chlorothiazide were utilized to derive estimates of SIWV. At 400mg, a SIWV of 116mL provided the best estimates of acyclovir plasma concentrations. A similar SIWV was found to best depict the urinary excretion pattern of chlorothiazide at a dose of 100mg. In comparison, experimentally-based estimates of SIWV within adults denote a central tendency between 86 and 167mL. The derived SIWV (116mL) represents the optimal parameter value within the context of the developed CAT model. This result demonstrates the biological basis of the widely utilized CAT model as in vivo SIWV determinations correspond with model-based estimates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of small intestine submucosa as ureteral allograft in pigs.

    PubMed

    Greca, Fernando H; Noronha, Lucia; Bendhack, Marcelo; Feres, André; Soccol, Andréa; Duda, João R

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of small intestine submucosa (SIS) in the reconstruction of the ureter in swine. An experimental study was performed in 10 half-breed pigs weighing between 20 and 30 K, in which a previously prepared segment of SIS measuring approximately 2.0 cm was implanted in the upper third part of the right ureter. Of the 10 operated animals, one died 14 days after the surgery due to a dehiscence on the suture line of the implanted graft. The remaining 9 animals were submitted to ultrasound examination of the urinary tract and were sacrificed on the 40th postoperative day. The macroscopic evaluation showed no calculus, incrustation, fistula, abscesses or adhesions in the ureters with the graft. Microscopic evaluation with hematoxylin-eosin and Sirius red showed in the experimental area (graft) the presence of urothelium in 100% of the cases, collagen in 100% of the cases, and smooth muscle layer in 87.5% of the animals. In the area adjacent to the graft (proximal and distal), we observed 92.86% of urothelium, 42.86% of collagen and 71.43% of smooth muscle. In the contralateral ureter, it was found 100% of urothelium and smooth muscle and just 11.11% of collagen. The microscopic analysis of the kidneys whose ureters received the graft of SIS evidenced congestion in 55.55%, pelvic edema in 66.66% and interstitial nephritis in 77.78%. Hydronephrosis was present in 33.33% and chronic pyelonephritis in 44%. Only 1 animal presented total absence of glomerulus in the renal parenchyma. The SIS graft behaved as a biological tissue support, allowing the regeneration of the urothelium and smooth muscle grow, despite of chronic inflammatory process.

  11. Melatonin Immunoreactivity in Malignant Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Rasmusson, Annica J.; Ali, Abir; Stridsberg, Mats; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are derived from enterochromaffin cells. After demonstrating melatonin in enterochromaffin cells, we hypothesized that SI-NETs may express and secrete melatonin, which may have an impact on clinical factors and treatment response. Methods Tumour tissue from 26 patients with SI-NETs, representing paired sections of primary tumour and metastasis, were immunohistochemically stained for melatonin and its receptors, MT1 and MT2. Plasma melatonin and immunoreactivity (IR) for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 in tumour cells were compared to other tumour markers and clinical parameters. Melatonin was measured at two time points in fasting morning plasma from 43 patients with SI-NETs. Results Melatonin IR was found in all SI-NETS. Melatonin IR intensity in primary tumours correlated inversely to proliferation index (p = 0.022) and patients reported less diarrhoea when melatonin IR was high (p = 0.012). MT1 IR was low or absent in tumours. MT2 expression was medium to high in primary tumours and generally reduced in metastases (p = 0.007). Plasma-melatonin ranged from 4.5 to 220.0 pg/L. Higher levels were associated with nausea at both time points (p = 0.027 and p = 0.006) and flush at the second sampling. In cases with disease stabilization or remission (n = 34), circulating melatonin levels were reduced in the second sample (p = 0.038). Conclusion Immunoreactive melatonin is present in SI-NETs. Circulating levels of melatonin in patients with SI-NETs are reduced after treatment. Our results are congruent with recent understanding of melatonin’s endocrine and paracrine functions and SI-NETs may provide a model for further studies of melatonin function. PMID:27736994

  12. Laser acupuncture causes thermal changes in small intestine meridian pathway.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Regina Célia; Pansini, Mario; Arruda, Gisele; Valente, Caroline; Brioschi, Marcos Leal

    2016-11-01

    The acupuncture meridians represent the flow of corporal energy which contains the acupuncture points. Laser acupuncture is a form of acupuncture stimulation by the use of laser. Thermographic images represent the propagation of heat in micro-environmental systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of thermographic images to document the changes on the small intestine meridian (S.I.M.) when submitted to laser acupuncture. Another important issue regards to the analysis of the flow direction if it is upward when stimulated by acupuncture points. For the execution of this work, a laser acupuncture pen was used in points of the meridian in the S.I.M. Two healthy male volunteers were selected (18 and 60 years old, respectively), and doses of 576,92 J/cm(2) with low-power infrared laser equipment with a wavelength of 780 nm in the SI.3 and SI.19 points were applied. An infrared thermal camera was used to measure the temperature of the S.I.M. during the 6 min laser acupuncture pen stimulus. When the laser acupuncture of both volunteers was conducted in the SI.3 point, it presented hyper-radiation of the hemi face in the same side, far from the application site. When this was applied in the SI.19 point, hyper-radiation in the same point and temperature lowering at the end of the meridian were observed. The laser energy caused thermal changes along the path of the S.I.M., distal, and proximal at the same time, proving the existence of the S.I.M.

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Bioavailability Regulates Angiogenesis and Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation during Postnatal Small Intestinal Development.

    PubMed

    Schlieve, Christopher R; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Holoyda, Kathleen A; Hou, Xiaogang; Fowler, Kathryn L; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly conserved, master regulatory molecule required for endothelial cell proliferation, organization, migration and branching morphogenesis. Podocoryne carnea and drosophila, which lack endothelial cells and a vascular system, express VEGF homologs, indicating potential roles beyond angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The role of VEGF in the development and homeostasis of the postnatal small intestine is unknown. We hypothesized regulating VEGF bioavailability in the postnatal small intestine would exhibit effects beyond the vasculature and influence epithelial cell stem/progenitor populations. VEGF mutant mice were created that overexpressed VEGF in the brush border of epithelium via the villin promotor following doxycycline treatment. To decrease VEGF bioavailability, sFlt-1 mutant mice were generated that overexpressed the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 upon doxycycline administration in the intestinal epithelium. Mice were analyzed after 21 days of doxycycline administration. Increased VEGF expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR and ELISA in the intestine of the VEGF mutants compared to littermates. The VEGF mutant duodenum demonstrated increased angiogenesis and vascular leak as compared to littermate controls. The VEGF mutant duodenum revealed taller villi and increased Ki-67-positive cells in the transit-amplifying zone with reduced Lgr5 expression. The duodenum of sFlt-1 mutants revealed shorter villi and longer crypts with reduced proliferation in the transit-amplifying zone, reduced expression of Dll1, Bmp4 and VE-cadherin, and increased expression of Sox9 and EphB2. Manipulating VEGF bioavailability leads to profound effects on not only the intestinal vasculature, but epithelial stem and progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Elucidation of the crosstalk between VEGF signaling in the vasculature, mesenchyme and epithelial stem/progenitor cell populations may direct future cell therapies for intestinal

  14. Diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the small intestine with damage to nerve plexus. A cause of intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Arista-Nasr, J; González-Romo, M; Keirns, C; Larriva-Sahd, J

    1993-08-01

    We describe the clinicopathologic characteristics of three patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and malabsorption. The patients were young women (average age, 25 years) who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss that led to extreme inanition and death in two patients despite multiple treatment schemes. The evolution of the process averaged 8 years. No case manifested evidence of malignant lymphoproliferative progression. Histologically, a diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate that affected all the layers of the intestinal wall was observed in full-thickness biopsy specimens. The proliferating lymphocytes were small and mixed with mature plasma cells that proved to be polyclonal on immunohistochemical analysis. An outstanding finding in all three cases was extensive damage to submucosal and myenteric nerve plexus associated with a lymphoid infiltrate. Quantification of the myenteric plexus by using immunohistochemical and morphometric techniques also revealed a marked reduction in their number. We concluded that diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the small intestine associated with damage to the intestinal nerve plexus constitutes a specific disorder that is different from other diseases that produce intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  15. Intrapelvic prosthesis to prevent injury of the small intestine with high dosage pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    The major complication to delivering tumoricidal dosages of radiation to the pelvis is radiation damage to the loops of the small intestine located within the radiation field. To exclude the small intestine from the pelvis after extensive pelvic surgical treatment, prosthetic materials are used. A transabdominal baffle made of prosthetic mesh separates pelvic and abdominal cavities. A Silastic implant, usually used in the reconstruction of the breast, is used in the pelvis to occupy space. In so doing, all of the small intestine can be excluded from the pelvic cavity and dosages of radiation to 6,500 rads can be administered.

  16. Occurrence of small intestinal volvulus in a terrier puppy-a case report

    PubMed Central

    Golshahi, Hannaneh; Tavasoly, Abbas; Namjoo, Abdolrasol; Bahmani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Volvulus is the torsion of an organ around its root. In dogs, volvulus of the stomach is well known, but volvulus of the small intestine is rare. A dead 3-month-old female terrier puppy was presented for postmortem examination. According to owner statements, the puppy was depressed, lethargic and had abdominal pain, abdominal distension, severe diarrhea and vomiting a few hours before death. With gross and histopathologic studies, the death of this puppy was indorsed to small intestinal volvulus, subsequent infarction, peritonitis and likely acute toxaemia and/or septicaemia. The present case is going to be the first recorded case of small intestinal volvulus in dog in Iran.

  17. Scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time: Comparison with the hydrogen breath technique

    SciTech Connect

    Caride, V.J.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; Buddoura, W.; Winchenbach, K.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The hydrogen breath test was used as a standard against which a scintigraphic method for determination of small intestinal transit time was evaluated and compared. A total of 19 male volunteers ranging in age from 23 to 28 yr participated in the study. The subjects ingested an isosmotic lactulose solution containing /sup 99m/technetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Sn) and then remained supine under a large field of view gamma-camera that interfaced with a computer system. Data were visually analyzed and then quantified to determine gastric emptying and small intestinal transit time. The small intestinal transit time ranged from 31 to 139 min with the scintigraphic method and 30 to 190 min with the hydrogen breath test (r . 0.77). The mean small intestinal transit time for 20 individual determinations with the scintigraphic method, 73.0 +/- 6.5 min (mean +/- SEM), was similar to the results from the hydrogen breath test technique, 75.1 +/- 8.3 min. Thirteen volunteers underwent two studies with the scintigraphic method separated by intervals ranging from 2 days to 8 wk. Individual variations in small intestinal transit time were significantly correlated with individual variations in gastric emptying (p less than 0.05). We conclude that the scintigraphic method allows accurate determination of gastrocecal time and is a noninvasive technique which may be a useful clinical test for small intestinal transit time as well as for providing information on the pathophysiology and pharmacology of intestinal motility.

  18. Cattle Bile Aggravates Diclofenac Sodium-Induced Small Intestinal Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hironori; Watanabe, Shiro

    2011-01-01

    Cattle bile (CB) has long been used in Japan as an ingredient of digestive medicines. Bile acids are major chemical constituents of CB, and CB ingestion is assumed to affect small intestinal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Mice were fed a diet supplemented with or without CB for 7 days and treated with diclofenac sodium (DIF) to induce small intestinal injury. Lesion formation was enhanced, and PGE2 content and COX expression levels were elevated in the small intestine of DIF-treated mice fed the CB diet compared with those fed the control diet. The administration of a reconstituted mixture of bile acids found in CB enhanced lesion formation in DIF-treated mice. CB administration elevated the contents of CB-derived bile acids in the small intestine, some of which exhibited a high cytotoxicity to cultured intestinal epithelial cells. These results suggest that the elevated levels of CB-derived cytotoxic bile acids in the small intestine contribute to the aggravation of DIF-induced small intestinal injury. The use of CB may be limited during the therapy of inflammatory diseases with NSAIDs. PMID:21584236

  19. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  20. Comparison of radiography and ultrasonography for diagnosing small-intestinal mechanical obstruction in vomiting dogs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; Thompson, Margret S; Scrivani, Peter V; Dykes, Nathan L; Yeager, Amy E; Freer, Sean R; Erb, Hollis N

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed on acutely vomiting dogs to compare the accuracy of radiography and ultrasonography for the diagnosis of small-intestinal mechanical obstruction and to describe several radiographic and ultrasonographic signs to identify their contribution to the final diagnosis. The sample population consisted of 82 adult dogs and small-intestinal obstruction by foreign body was confirmed in 27/82 (33%) dogs by surgery or necropsy. Radiography produced a definitive result (obstructed or not obstructed) in 58/82 (70%) of dogs; ultrasonography produced a definitive result in 80/82 (97%) of dogs. On radiographs, a diagnosis of obstruction was based on detection of segmental small-intestinal dilatation, plication, or detection of a foreign body. Approximately 30% (8/27) of obstructed dogs did not have radiographic signs of segmental small-intestinal dilatation, of which 50% (4/8) were due to linear foreign bodies. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of small-intestinal obstruction was based on detection of an obstructive lesion, sonographic signs of plication or segmental, small-intestinal dilatation. The ultrasonographic presence or absence of moderate-to-severe intestinal diameter enlargement (due to lumen dilatation) of the jejunum (>1.5 cm) was a useful discriminatory finding and, when present, should prompt a thorough search for a cause of small-intestinal obstruction. In conclusion, both abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography are accurate for diagnosing small-intestinal obstruction in vomiting dogs and either may be used depending on availability and examiner choice. Abdominal ultrasonography had greater accuracy, fewer equivocal results and provided greater diagnostic confidence compared with radiography. © 2010 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Effect of hypocholesterolemia on cholesterol synthesis in small intestine of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Feingold, K R; Moser, A H

    1987-11-01

    Studies by our and other laboratories have demonstrated that cholesterol synthesis is increased in the small intestine of insulinopenic diabetic animals. In normal animals, many factors have been shown to regulate cholesterol synthesis in the small intestine, including changes in plasma cholesterol levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lowering plasma cholesterol levels on small intestine cholesterol synthesis in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (4-APP)-induced hypocholesterolemia (plasma cholesterol levels less than 20 mg/dl) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in small intestine cholesterol synthesis, which was most marked in the distal small intestine, decreasing proximally. In the distal small intestine the incorporation of 3H2O into cholesterol was 0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol.h-1.g-1 in diabetic rats versus 1.60 +/- 0.38 in diabetic rats administered 4-APP (P less than .01). This stimulation of cholesterol synthesis occurred in the upper villus, middle villus, and crypt cells isolated from the middle intestine of the 4-APP-treated diabetic animals. In agreement with these observations, "functional hypocholesterolemia" due to Triton WR-1339 administration also stimulated cholesterol synthesis 2.5-fold in the small intestine of normal and diabetic animals. In the distal small intestine, cholesterol synthesis was 0.43 +/- 0.10 mumol.h-1.g-1 in the diabetic rats versus 1.08 +/- 0.21 in diabetic rats treated with Triton WR-1339 (P less than .05). In both the 4-APP and Triton WR-1339 experiments, the response of the diabetic rats was similar to that observed in normal rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of hypocholesterolemia on cholesterol synthesis in small intestine of diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Moser, A.H.

    1987-11-01

    Studies by our and other laboratories have demonstrated that cholesterol synthesis is increased in the small intestine of insulinopenic diabetic animals. In normal animals, many factors have been shown to regulate cholesterol synthesis in the small intestine, including changes in plasma cholesterol levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lowering plasma cholesterol levels on small intestine cholesterol synthesis in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, 4-aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)pyrimidine (4-APP)-induced hypocholesterolemia (plasma cholesterol levels less than 20 mg/dl) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in small intestine cholesterol synthesis, which was most marked in the distal small intestine, decreasing proximally. In the distal small intestine the incorporation of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O into cholesterol was 0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol.h-1.g-1 in diabetic rats versus 1.60 +/- 0.38 in diabetic rats administered 4-APP (P less than .01). This stimulation of cholesterol synthesis occurred in the upper villus, middle villus, and crypt cells isolated from the middle intestine of the 4-APP-treated diabetic animals. In agreement with these observations, functional hypocholesterolemia due to Triton WR-1339 administration also stimulated cholesterol synthesis 2.5-fold in the small intestine of normal and diabetic animals. In the distal small intestine, cholesterol synthesis was 0.43 +/- 0.10 mumol.h-1.g-1 in the diabetic rats versus 1.08 +/- 0.21 in diabetic rats treated with Triton WR-1339 (P less than .05). In both the 4-APP and Triton WR-1339 experiments, the response of the diabetic rats was similar to that observed in normal rats.

  3. Sodium recirculation and isotonic transport in toad small intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, S; Larsen, E H; Ussing, H H

    1999-04-01

    Isolated small intestine of toad (Bufo bufo) was mounted on glass tubes for perfusion studies with oxygenated amphibian Ringer's solution containing glucose and acetate. Under open-circuit conditions (Vt = -3.9 +/- 1.8 mV, N = 14) the preparation generated a net influx of 134Cs+. The time course of unidirectional 134Cs+-fluxes was mono-exponential with similar rate constants for influx and outflux when measured in the same preparation. The flux-ratio was time invariant from the beginning of appearance of the tracers to steady state was achieved. Thus, just a single pathway, the paracellular pathway, is available for transepithelial transport of Cs+. From the ratio of unidirectional Cs+-fluxes the paracellular force was calculated to be, 18.2 +/- 1.5 mV (N = 6), which is directed against the small transepithelial potential difference. The paracellular netflux of cesium ions, therefore, is caused by solvent drag. The flux of 134Cs+ entering and trapped by the cells was of a magnitude similar to that passing the paracellular route. Therefore, independent of the convective flux of 134Cs+, every second 134Cs+ ion flowing into the lateral space was pumped into the cells rather than proceeding, via the low resistance pathway, to the serosal bath. It is thus indicated that the paracellular convective flow of 134Cs+ is driven by lateral Na+/K+-pumps. Transepithelial unidirectional 42K+ fluxes did not reach steady state within an observation period of 70 min, indicating that components of the fluxes in both directions pass the large cellular pool of potassium ions. The ratio of unidirectional 24Na+ fluxes was time-variant and declined from an initial value of 3.66 +/- 0.34 to a significantly smaller steady-state value of 2.57 +/- 0.26 (P < 0.001, N = 5 paired observations), indicating that sodium ions pass the epithelium both via the paracellular and the cellular pathway. Quantitatively, the larger ratio of paracellular Na+ fluxes, as compared to that of paracellular Cs

  4. Reentrant cannulation of the small intestine in sheep: cannula and surgical method.

    PubMed

    Ivan, M; Johnston, D W

    1981-04-01

    The function, design and production of a reentrant cannula for the small intestine of sheep and the corresponding surgical procedure are described. The cannula is molded in one piece from polyvinylchloride plastisol. It consists of a curved intestinal tube joined to a stem with an external elliptical ring on the distal end and a perforated flange that encircles the stem above the intestinal tube. A circular perspex valve with two curved channels was made to fit into the interior of the cannula, making it capable of either a "maintenance" or a "collection" function. The cannula was inserted into the proximal duodenum and(or) terminal ileum of sheep via a 5-cm incision on the antimesenteric side of the intestine. The intestine was attached to the cannula by a Dacron straight arterial graft. This reentrant cannulation method does not require an intestinal transection and a mesenteric incision under the transection. Therefore, little damage was done to the blood and nervous system.

  5. Species differences in in vitro and in vivo small intestinal metabolism of CYP3A substrates.

    PubMed

    Komura, Hiroshi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2008-05-01

    Intestinal first-pass metabolism has a great impact on the bioavailability of CYP3A substrates in humans, and the in vivo impact has quantitatively been evaluated using CYP3A inhibitors or inducers. In vitro and in vivo preclinical investigations for intestinal metabolism are essential in clarifying pharmacokinetic behavior in animal species and predicting the effect of intestinal metabolism in the human. In this review, we will discuss species differences in intestinal CYP3A enzymes, and CYP3A-mdediated intestinal elimination. Identical CYP3A4 enzyme is expressed in human intestine and liver, but different CYP3A enzymes in both tissues of the mouse and rat are found, that is, respective intestinal enzyme is considered as cyp3a13 and CYP3A62. There is little information on CYP3A enzymes in the monkey and dog intestine, unlike the liver. In vitro metabolic activities of midazolam and nisoldipine are higher in the human and monkey than in the rat. In vivo assessment of cyclosporine, midazolam, nifedipine, tacrolimus, and verapamil has been reported in various species (monkey, rat, mouse, and/or dog) including the human. For midazolam, the monkey shows significant in vivo intestinal metabolism, as evidenced in the human. The monkey might be an appropriate animal model for evaluating small intestinal first-pass metabolism of CYP3A substrates.

  6. Adult stem cells in the small intestine are intrinsically programmed with their location-specific function.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Sabine; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; Mokry, Michal; Akkerman, Ronald D L; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Clevers, Hans; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-05-01

    Differentiation and specialization of epithelial cells in the small intestine are regulated in two ways. First, there is differentiation along the crypt-villus axis of the intestinal stem cells into absorptive enterocytes, Paneth, goblet, tuft, enteroendocrine, or M cells, which is mainly regulated by WNT. Second, there is specialization along the cephalocaudal axis with different absorptive and digestive functions in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum that is controlled by several transcription factors such as GATA4. However, so far it is unknown whether location-specific functional properties are intrinsically programmed within stem cells or if continuous signaling from mesenchymal cells is necessary to maintain the location-specific identity of the small intestine. Using the pure epithelial organoid technique, we show that region-specific gene expression profiles are conserved throughout long-term cultures of both mouse and human intestinal stem cells and correlated with differential Gata4 expression. Furthermore, the human organoid culture system demonstrates that Gata4-regulated gene expression is only allowed in absence of WNT signaling. These data show that location-specific function is intrinsically programmed in the adult stem cells of the small intestine and that their differentiation fate is independent of location-specific extracellular signals. In light of the potential future clinical application of small intestine-derived organoids, our data imply that it is important to generate GATA4-positive and GATA4-negative cultures to regenerate all essential functions of the small intestine.

  7. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. E-NPP3 controls plasmacytoid dendritic cell numbers in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimoto, Kosuke; Okumura, Ryu; Umemoto, Eiji; Kurashima, Yosuke; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP) performs multiple functions including activation and induction of apoptosis of many cell types. The ATP-hydrolyzing ectoenzyme ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 3 (E-NPP3) regulates ATP-dependent chronic allergic responses by mast cells and basophils. However, E-NPP3 is also highly expressed on epithelial cells of the small intestine. In this study, we showed that E-NPP3 controls plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) numbers in the intestine through regulation of intestinal extracellular ATP. In Enpp3-/- mice, ATP concentrations were increased in the intestinal lumen. pDC numbers were remarkably decreased in the small intestinal lamina propria and Peyer’s patches. Intestinal pDCs of Enpp3-/- mice showed enhanced cell death as characterized by increases in annexin V binding and expression of cleaved caspase-3. pDCs were highly sensitive to ATP-induced cell death compared with conventional DCs. ATP-induced cell death was abrogated in P2rx7-/- pDCs. Accordingly, the number of intestinal pDCs was restored in Enpp3-/- P2rx7-/- mice. These findings demonstrate that E-NPP3 regulates ATP concentration and thereby prevents the decrease of pDCs in the small intestine. PMID:28225814

  9. [Gastro-intestinal neuroectodermal tumor (GNET): A case report of a small intestine tumor with hepatic metastases].

    PubMed

    Kervarrec, Thibault; Lecointre, Claire; Kerdraon, Rémy; Bens, Guido; Piquard, Arnaud; Michenet, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The gastro-intestinal neuroectodermal tumor (GNET) is a rare sarcoma of the digestive tract, which was recently recognised. The knowledge of the morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular diagnostic criteria is necessary to not mistake it for the metastasis of a melanoma or for another sarcoma of the digestive tract as the gastro-intestinal clear cells sarcoma or the malignant peripheral nervous system tumor (MPNST). We report the case of a 41-year-old patient with a GNET of the small intestine with hepatic metastasis. The histological examination showed a diffuse proliferation of epithelioid cells, which only express PS100. The presence EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusions with any melanocytic differentiation leads to the diagnosis of GNET.

  10. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.J.; Pitman, K.; Starr, G.; Wood, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease. These mice exhibited aganglionosis of the terminal segment of the large intestine. This condition was accompanied by fecal stasis and megacolon. Gastric emptying of saline or milk meals was slower in the mice with aganglionic or induced megacolon than in the normal mice, but the rate of emptying was faster than after administration of morphine (10 mg/kg). In the small intestine, the distribution of the radiolabeled marker and the advancing edge of the marker profile were abnormal in the mice with megacolon. There were small differences between the megacolonic and normal mice in the distance traversed by the advancing edge of the intraluminal profile of the marker. These results are evidence for disturbances of gastric and small intestinal motor function that occur in mice secondary to development of megacolon.

  11. Clinical outcome in patients with small-intestinal non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kako, Shinichi; Oshima, Kumi; Sato, Miki; Terasako, Kiriko; Okuda, Shinya; Nakasone, Hideki; Yamazaki, Rie; Tanaka, Yukie; Tanihara, Aki; Kawamura, Yutaka; Kiyosaki, Hirokazu; Higuchi, Takakazu; Nishida, Junji; Konishi, Fumio; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2009-10-01

    The clinical features and outcome of small intestinal lymphoma remain unclear. We retrospectively analyzed 23 patients who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a small intestinal lesion. With a median follow-up of 37 months, the 5-year overall survival and failure-free survival (FFS) were 64% and 60%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, a worse performance status at the start of treatment and the occurrence of abdominal symptoms or perforation during treatment were associated with poor survival. Perforation often resulted in a dismal prognosis in patients with uncontrollable lymphoma, but not in patients with lymphoma in remission. The role of surgery in small intestinal lymphoma remains equivocal. In the current study, surgery before other therapies favorably influenced FFS, and all patients who underwent complete resection of the small intestinal lesion had extremely favorable results. Further studies are warranted to establish optimal therapeutic strategies.

  12. Effect of wood creosote and loperamide on propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Ataka, K; Morino, H; Shibata, T

    1999-10-01

    To elucidate a mechanism of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote, its effect on the propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine was studied using a charcoal meal test and a colonic bead expulsion test. The effect was compared with that of loperamide. At an ordinary therapeutic dose, wood creosote inhibited the propulsive motility of colon, but not of small intestine. On the other hand, loperamide inhibited the propulsive motility of small intestine, but not of colon. The results indicate that at least a part of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote and loperamide is attributable to their antikinetic effect predominantly on colon of the former and predominantly on small intestine of the latter.

  13. Yoghurts containing probiotics reduce disruption of the small intestinal barrier in methotrexate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Southcott, E; Tooley, K L; Howarth, G S; Davidson, G P; Butler, R N

    2008-07-01

    Small intestinal permeability was employed to assess the efficacy of commercially available yoghurts containing probiotics in a rat model of methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to four groups (n = 8): MTX + water, MTX + cow's milk yoghurt (CY; fermented with Lactobacillus johnsonii), MTX + sheep's milk yoghurt (SY; containing Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus), and saline. Treatment gavage occurred twice daily for 7 days pre-MTX and 5 days post-MTX. Intestinal permeability was assessed on days -7, -1, 2, and 5 of the trial. Intestinal sections were collected at sacrifice for histological and biochemical analyses. Histology revealed that rats receiving CY and SY did not have a significantly damaged duodenum compared to controls. However, an improved small intestinal barrier function was evident, determined by a decreased lactulose/mannitol ratio. Probiotics containing SY and CY may be useful in preventing disruption to intestinal barrier function in MTX-induced mucositis.

  14. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Xuan; Wu, Wan-Chun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress. METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10), bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10(CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related to the

  15. Small Intestine Inflammation in Roquin-Mutant and Roquin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jeremy S.; Montufar-Solis, Dina; Nakra, Niyati; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Klein, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Roquin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that localizes to cytosolic RNA granules, is involved in regulating mRNA stability and translation. Mice that have a M199R mutation in the Roquin protein (referred to as sanroque or Roquinsan/san mice) develop autoimmune pathologies, although the extent to which these occur in the intestinal mucosa has not been determined. Here, we demonstrate that Roquinsan/san mice reproducibly develop intestinal inflammation in the small intestine but not the colon. Similarly, mice generated in our laboratory in which the Roquin gene was disrupted by insertion of a gene trap cassette (Roquingt/gt mice) had small intestinal inflammation that mimicked that of Roquinsan/san mice. MLN cells in Roquinsan/san mice consisted of activated proliferating T cells, and had increased numbers of CD44hi CD62Llo KLRG1+ short-lived effector cells. Proportionally more small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes in Roquinsan/san mice expressed the ICOS T cell activation marker. Of particular interest, small intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes in Roquinsan/san mice consisted of a high proportion of Gr-1+ T cells that included IL-17A+ cells and CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells. Extensive cytokine dysregulation resulting in both over-expression and under-expression of chemotactic cytokines occurred in the ileum of Roquinsan/san mice, the region most prone to the development of inflammation. These findings demonstrate that chronic inflammation ensues in the intestine following Roquin alteration either as a consequence of protein mutation or gene disruption, and they have implications for understanding how small intestinal inflammation is perpetuated in Crohn's disease (CD). Due to the paucity of animal models of CD-like pathophysiology in the small intestine, and because the primary gene/protein defects of the Roquin animal systems used here are well-defined, it will be possible to further elucidate the underlying genetic and molecular mechanisms that drive the disease process

  16. Association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, Andre; Fialho, Andrea; Schenone, Aldo; Thota, Prashanthi; McCullough, Arthur; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been associated with several diseases. The association between SIBO and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has not been investigated. This study was aimed to investigate the frequency and risk factors for the development of DVT in patients tested for SIBO. Methods: All 321 eligible patients were included from the Cleveland Clinic Gastrointestinal Motility Lab databank from January 2008 to January 2014. Patients who were evaluated with glucose hydrogen/methane breath test as well as Doppler ultrasonography for suspected DVT were included. Patients with catheter-related DVT were excluded. The primary outcomes were the frequency and risk factors (including SIBO) for DVT in this patient population. Results: Of the 321-case cohort, 144 patients (44.9%) tested positive for SIBO, and 53 (16.5%) had ultrasonographic findings of DVT. SIBO evaluation before the evaluation of DVT occurred in 201 patients (median time from the breath test to ultrasonography: 27 months; interquartile range [IQR]: 11.0–45.0 months), and SIBO evaluation after evaluation for DVT occurred in 120 patients (median time from ultrasonography to the breath test: 30 months; IQR: 11.8–54.3 months). In the univariate analysis, DVT was associated with family history of thromboembolic events (35.8% vs 16.0%, P=0.001), chronic kidney diseases (CKD; 26.4% vs 13.4%, P=0.019) and the presence of SIBO (69.8% vs 39.9%, P<0.001). In the multivariate analysis, family history of thromboembolic events (odds ratio [OR]: 3.39; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67–6.87; P<0.001), CKD (OR: 2.23; 95%CI: 1.04–4.74; P = 0.037), and the presence of SIBO (OR: 3.27; 95% CI: 1.70–6.32; P < 0.001) remained independently associated with DVT. Conclusion: SIBO was found to be associated with DVT. The nature of this association warrants further investigation. PMID:27044499

  17. Preoperative diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma presenting with melena using wireless capsule endoscopy of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Yu; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Kazuto; Naito, Tatsushi; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Masahiro; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akio; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Primary neoplasms of the small intestine are relatively rare in all age groups, accounting for about 5 % of all gastrointestinal tumors 1. Cavernous hemangiomas of the small intestine are also rare, can cause gastrointestinal bleeding, and are extremely difficult to diagnose preoperatively 2. We present a patient who presented with melena and iron deficiency anemia, for whom wireless capsule endoscopy and single-balloon enteroscopy facilitated the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:27004239

  18. Differential stimulation of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase by difluoromethylornithine in the rat colon and small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Halline, A G; Dudeja, P K; Brasitus, T A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of chronic inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by the specific inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) in the rat colon and small intestine on mucosal contents of polyamines, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (decarboxylated AdoMet) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMet decarboxylase) activity were studied. Administration of 1% DFMO in the drinking water for 10 or 15 weeks resulted in inhibition of ODC and decreases in intracellular putrescine and spermidine contents in both proximal and distal segments of small intestine and colon. At both time points DFMO administration resulted in a dramatic stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase activity and a rise in decarboxylated AdoMet content in the proximal and distal small-intestinal segments compared with controls, which was not seen in either colonic segment of DFMO-treated animals. This differential stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase by DFMO in the small intestine and colon could not be entirely explained on the basis of differences in polyamine contents, which are known to regulate this enzyme activity. Kinetic and inhibition studies of AdoMet decarboxylase in control small and large intestine revealed that: (1) there was no difference in Vmax. values between the tissues; (2) the Km for AdoMet was higher in the small intestine than in the colon; and (3) the Ki for product inhibition by decarboxylated AdoMet was higher in the small intestine than in the colon. These results suggest that the differential stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase by DFMO in the small intestine and colon may be due to different isoenzymes and could play a significant role in the regulation of polyamine contents throughout the gut. PMID:2497738

  19. Imaging diagnosis--muscular hypertrophy of the small intestine and pseudodiverticula in a horse.

    PubMed

    Navas De Solís, Cristobal; Biscoe, Elisabeth W; Lund, Caleb M; Labbe, Karyn; Muñoz, Juan; Farnsworth, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    A 14-year-old Thoroughbred gelding was presented for chronic colic and weight loss. Transcutaneous and transrectal abdominal ultrasonography revealed distended, thickened small intestine with primary thickening of the muscularis and a focally more thickened loop with an echoic structure crossing the wall from the mucosa to the serosa. Visualization of diffuse thickening of the muscularis (muscular hypertrophy of the small intestine) and a focal lesion (pseudodiverticulum) helped clinicians make informed decisions. This case illustrates the importance of transabdominal and transrectal ultrasonography in horses with chronic colic and the relevance of considering the abnormalities in layering pattern of the intestinal wall.

  20. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  1. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Greydanus, M.P.; Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  2. Comparison between small bowel manometric patterns and full-thickness biopsy histopathology in severe intestinal dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Malagelada, C; Karunaratne, T B; Accarino, A; Cogliandro, R F; Landolfi, S; Gori, A; Boschetti, E; Malagelada, J R; Stanghellini, V; Azpiroz, F; De Giorgio, R

    2017-09-22

    Intestinal manometry is the current standard for direct evaluation of small bowel dysmotility. Patients with abnormal motility can either be diagnosed of pseudo-obstruction when there are radiological findings mimicking mechanical intestinal obstruction or of enteric dysmotility when these findings are absent. The aim of the present study was to prospectively compare small bowel manometric abnormalities with histopathological findings in intestinal full-thickness biopsies in patients with severe dysmotility disorders. We investigated 38 patients with intestinal manometry and a subsequent full-thickness intestinal biopsy. Manometric recordings were read by 4 investigators and a diagnostic consensus was obtained in 35 patients. Histopathological analysis, including specific immunohistochemical techniques of small bowel biopsies was performed and compared to manometric readings. Patients with abnormal intestinal manometry had abnormal histopathological findings in 73% of cases. However, manometric patterns did not match with the specific neuromuscular abnormalities. Among patients with a neuropathic manometry pattern and abnormal histopathology, only 23% had an enteric neuropathy, whereas 62% had neuromuscular inflammation, and 15% an enteric myopathy. On the other hand, patients with a myopathic manometry pattern all had abnormal histopathology, however, none of them with signs of enteric myopathy. Small bowel dysmotility detected by intestinal manometry is often associated with abnormal neuromuscular findings in full-thickness biopsies. However, there is no correlation between the specific manometric patterns and the histopathological findings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage by modulating NAD(+) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Arpana; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-11-27

    Although cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug for the treatment of a variety of tumors, its use is critically limited because of adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal damage. Cisplatin treatment increases oxidative stress biomarkers in the small intestine, which may induce apoptosis of epithelial cells and thereby elicit damage to the small intestine. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a cofactor for various enzymes associated with cellular homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the hyper-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is closely associated with the depletion of NAD(+) in the small intestine after cisplatin treatment, which results in downregulation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity. Furthermore, a decrease in SIRT1 activity was found to play an important role in cisplatin-mediated small intestinal damage through nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, facilitated by its acetylation increase. However, use of dunnione as a strong substrate for the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme led to an increase in intracellular NAD(+) levels and prevented the cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage correlating with the modulation of PARP-1, SIRT1, and NF-κB. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD(+) levels by pharmacological NQO1 substrates could be a promising therapeutic approach for protecting against cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage.

  4. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland) is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. Methods A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4) giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, ϕ). Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1) with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam); (2) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Results Experiment (1) showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min) and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min). Comparing experiments (1) and (2) there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2) and (3), short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1) (p = 0.03). Conclusion MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state. PMID:22206545

  5. Titanium dioxide induced inflammation in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Carolina Maciel; de Azevedo, Walter Mendes; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan; Toma, Sérgio Hiroshi; Leite, André Zonetti de Arruda; Lordello, Maria Laura; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lúcia; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Ferreira, Marcelo Alves; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPTiO2) and microparticles (MPTiO2) on the inflammatory response in the small intestine of mice. METHODS: Bl 57/6 male mice received distilled water suspensions containing TiO2 (100 mg/kg body weight) as NPTiO2 (66 nm), or MPTiO2 (260 nm) by gavage for 10 d, once a day; the control group received only distilled water. At the end of the treatment the duodenum, jejunum and ileum were extracted for assessment of cytokines, inflammatory cells and titanium content. The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in segments of jejunum and ileum (mucosa and underlying muscular tissue). CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells were evaluated in duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples fixed in 10% formalin by immunohistochemistry. The titanium content was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. RESULTS: We found increased levels of T CD4+ cells (cells/mm2) in duodenum: NP 1240 ± 139.4, MP 1070 ± 154.7 vs 458 ± 50.39 (P < 0.01); jejunum: NP 908.4 ± 130.3, MP 813.8 ± 103.8 vs 526.6 ± 61.43 (P < 0.05); and ileum: NP 818.60 ± 123.0, MP 640.1 ± 32.75 vs 466.9 ± 22.4 (P < 0.05). In comparison to the control group, the groups receiving TiO2 showed a statistically significant increase in the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-12, IL-4, IL-23, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β. The cytokine production was more pronounced in the ileum (mean ± SE): IL-12: NP 33.98 ± 11.76, MP 74.11 ± 25.65 vs 19.06 ± 3.92 (P < 0.05); IL-4: NP 17.36 ± 9.96, MP 22.94 ± 7.47 vs 2.19 ± 0.65 (P < 0.05); IL-23: NP 157.20 ± 75.80, MP 134.50 ± 38.31 vs 22.34 ± 5.81 (P < 0.05); TNFα: NP 3.71 ± 1.33, MP 5.44 ± 1.67 vs 0.99 ± 019 (P < 0.05); IFNγ: NP 15.85 ± 9

  6. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the crypt-villus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies.

  7. Plasma catecholamines and postoperative gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A; Henry, D P; Kopin, I J

    1975-03-01

    The role of adrenal medullary discharge of catecholamines on inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion after laparotomy was examined in rats. The rate of movement of a 51Cr-labeled liquid test meal, which had been introduced by gastric intubation, out of the stomach and through the small intestine, was retarded 12 hr after laparotomy. Adrenal demedullation produced a striking decrease in plasma catecholamines and abolished surgically induced elevation of the catecholamines, but had no significant effect on gastric emptying or intestinal propulsion in rats subjected to laparotomy or in the unoperated control animals. Thus circulating catecholamines play little if any role in controlling normal gastroinestinal motility or in the postoperative decrease in rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal motility.

  8. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in murine small intestine during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryo; Yajima, Takaji; Tsukahara, Takamitsu

    2017-02-01

    The important role played by the gut microbiota in host immunity is mediated, in part, through toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated the postnatal changes in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine and assessed how expression is influenced by gut microbiota. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine was highly dynamic during development. The changes were especially profound during the suckling period, with the maximal mRNA levels detected in the mid-suckling period. Immunohistochemical and flow-cytometric analyses indicated that the changes in TLR2 and TLR4 expression involve primarily epithelial cells. The germ-free mice showed minor changes in TLR2/TLR4 mRNA and TLR2 protein during the suckling period. This study demonstrated that the postnatal expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in small intestinal epithelial cells is dynamic and depends on the presence of commensal intestinal microbiota.

  9. Role of GATA factors in development, differentiation, and homeostasis of the small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Boaz E; Stapleton, Kelly A; Krasinski, Stephen D

    2014-03-01

    The small intestinal epithelium develops from embryonic endoderm into a highly specialized layer of cells perfectly suited for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The development, differentiation, and regeneration of the small intestinal epithelium require complex gene regulatory networks involving multiple context-specific transcription factors. The evolutionarily conserved GATA family of transcription factors, well known for its role in hematopoiesis, is essential for the development of endoderm during embryogenesis and the renewal of the differentiated epithelium in the mature gut. We review the role of GATA factors in the evolution and development of endoderm and summarize our current understanding of the function of GATA factors in the mature small intestine. We offer perspective on the application of epigenetics approaches to define the mechanisms underlying context-specific GATA gene regulation during intestinal development.

  10. Role of GATA factors in development, differentiation, and homeostasis of the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Boaz E.; Stapleton, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium develops from embryonic endoderm into a highly specialized layer of cells perfectly suited for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The development, differentiation, and regeneration of the small intestinal epithelium require complex gene regulatory networks involving multiple context-specific transcription factors. The evolutionarily conserved GATA family of transcription factors, well known for its role in hematopoiesis, is essential for the development of endoderm during embryogenesis and the renewal of the differentiated epithelium in the mature gut. We review the role of GATA factors in the evolution and development of endoderm and summarize our current understanding of the function of GATA factors in the mature small intestine. We offer perspective on the application of epigenetics approaches to define the mechanisms underlying context-specific GATA gene regulation during intestinal development. PMID:24436352

  11. Polydatin Alleviates Small Intestine Injury during Hemorrhagic Shock as a SIRT1 Activator

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Chen, Zhongqing; Xu, Siqi; Song, Rui; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Ke-seng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of SIRT1 in small intestine damage following severe hemorrhagic shock and to investigate whether polydatin (PD) can activate SIRT1 in shock treatment. Research Design and Methods. The severe hemorrhagic shock model was reproduced in Sprague Dawley rats. Main Outcome Measures. Two hours after drug administration, half of the rats were assessed for survival time evaluation and the remainder were used for small intestinal tissue sample collection. Results. Bleeding and swelling appeared in the small intestine with epithelial apoptosis and gut barrier disturbance during hemorrhagic shock. SIRT1 activity and PGC-1α protein expression of the small intestine were decreased, which led to an increase in acetylated SOD2 and decreases in the expression and activity of SOD2, resulting in severe oxidative stress. The decreased SIRT1 activity and expression were partially restored in the PD administration group, which showed reduced intestine injury and longer survival time. Notably, the effect of PD was abolished after the addition of Ex527, a selective inhibitor of SIRT1. Conclusions. The results collectively suggest a role for the SIRT1-PGC-1α-SOD2 axis in small intestine injury following severe hemorrhagic shock and that PD is an effective SIRT1 activator for the shock treatment. PMID:26301045

  12. Lack of small intestinal ulcerogenecity of nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin, NCX-530, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Hase, S; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the intestinal ulcerogenic property of nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin (NCX-530) in the rat, in comparison with indomethacin. Animals were given indomethacin or NCX-530 subcutaneously and killed 24 h later for macroscopic examination of the small intestine. A single administration of indomethacin (10 mg/kg) provoked damage, mainly in the jejunum and ileum, accompanied by an increase in myeloperoxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities as well as bacterial translocation. NCX-530 at an equimolar dose (14.2 mg/kg) caused no gross damage in the small intestine, nor any significant change in inducible nitric oxide synthase and myeloperoxidase activities or bacterial translocation. NOR-3, the nitric oxide donor (6.0 mg/kg), when administered subcutaneously together with indomethacin, significantly prevented the occurrence of intestinal lesions and other mucosal changes. Indomethacin reduced mucus and fluid secretions in the small intestine, while both NCX-530 and NOR-3 enhanced these secretions. NCX-530 reduced the mucosal prostaglandin E2 contents and exhibited an anti-inflammatory action against carrageenan-induced paw oedema, with equal effectiveness to indomethacin. NCX-530 does not cause intestinal damage, despite inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. The reduced intestinal toxicity of NCX-530 may be attributable to inhibition of enterobacterial translocation, partly by increasing the mucus and fluid secretions mediated by nitric oxide released from this compound.

  13. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  14. Eosinophilic venulitis in the small intestines in a mouse model of late asthma.

    PubMed

    Bui, Linh Kan; Hayashi, Toshiharu; Nakashima, Tomomi; Horii, Yoichiro

    2011-10-01

    The allergen-unchallenged enteric lesions in late allergic asthma are largely unknown. To clarify this point, BALB/c mice were sensitized by ovalbumin (OVA)/aluminum adjuvant intraperitoneally two times (on days 0 and 10) and then challenged with OVA intranasally on day 14 (asthma group). Four days after the challenge, small intestinal lesions were examined. By this treatment, diarrhea was not observed in the asthma group. Compared to the controls with or without OVA sensitization and/or OVA challenge, the asthma group developed eosinophilic venulitis without an increase in mucosal mast cells in small intestines, whereas intestinal epithelial cells were relatively intact. A few numbers of interleukin (IL)-4(+) and IL-5(+) lymphoid cells were recognized in intestines in the asthma group, but not in the controls. Expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 on venular endothelium and eotaxin-2(+) eosinophils, but not epithelial cells, in intestines were detected in the asthma group, but not in the controls. Total IgE, OVA-specific IgE and eotaxin, and IL-5, but not interferon-γ, were produced systemically in the asthma group compared to the controls. The present study suggests that eosinophilic venulitis without mast cells in the intestine may be induced by the systemic, but not by local, helper T 2-type responses. In addition, eosinophilic venulitis in small intestines may be subclinical enteric lesions.

  15. Dietary phytic acid and wheat bran enhance mucosal phytase activity in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lopez, H W; Vallery, F; Levrat-Verny, M A; Coudray, C; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of dietary phytic acid (PA) on intestinal phytase activity in growing rats by in vitro determination of phytase activity in the three segments of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum), and by in vivo intestinal perfusion of a solution rich in PA (diluted soymilk). Using the in vitro method, duodenal and jejunal activities were enhanced significantly by adaptation to purified PA (+44 and +145% respectively, compared with control rats). For the rats adapted to the wheat bran (WB) diet, the induction of intestinal phytase by the substrate compared with the control values (P < 0.001) was observed only in ileum. Using soymilk in perfusions, rats consuming PA or WB diets hydrolyzed more phytate (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) than controls. Further, Mg absorption from diluted soymilk was not affected by food adaptation, whereas Ca absorption was greater in the PA and WB groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) than in the control group. Thus, intake of pure PA by rats enhances phytase in the upper parts of the small intestine (duodenum and jejunum), whereas the WB diet activates ileal phytase. Furthermore, the induction of phytase activity is greater in magnitude in rats fed synthetic PA than that observed in rats fed the WB diet. The enhancement of phytase improves intestinal Ca absorption, thus showing the capacity of the small intestine to adapt to diets rich in PA and poor in Ca.

  16. Morphometrics of the avian small intestine compared with that of nonflying mammals: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Shana R; Karasov, William H; Ives, Anthony R; Middleton, Kevin M; Garland, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    Flying animals may experience a selective constraint on gut volume because the energetic cost of flight increases and maneuverability decreases with greater digesta load. The small intestine is the primary site of absorption of most nutrients (e.g., carbohydrates, proteins, fat) in both birds and mammals. Therefore, we used a phylogenetically informed approach to compare small intestine morphometric measurements of birds with those of nonflying mammals and to test for effects of diet within each clade. We also compared the fit of nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic models to test for phylogenetic signal after accounting for effects of body mass, clade, and/or diet. We provide a new MATLAB program (Regressionv2.m) that facilitates a flexible model-fitting approach in comparative studies. As compared with nonflying mammals, birds had 51% less nominal small intestine surface area (area of a smooth bore tube) and 32% less volume. For animals <365 g in body mass, birds also had significantly shorter small intestines (20%-33% shorter, depending on body mass). Diet was also a significant factor explaining variation in small intestine nominal surface area of both birds and nonflying mammals, small intestine mass of mammals, and small intestine volume of both birds and nonflying mammals. On the basis of the phylogenetic trees used in our analyses, small intestine length and nominal surface area exhibited statistically significant phylogenetic signal in birds but not in mammals. Thus, for birds, related species tended to be similar in small intestine length and nominal surface area, even after accounting for relations with body mass and diet. A reduced small intestine in birds may decrease the capacity for breakdown and active absorption of nutrients. Birds do not seem to compensate for reduced digestive and absorptive capacity via a longer gut retention time of food, but we found some evidence that birds have an increased mucosal surface area via a greater villus area

  17. [Responses of peptide hydrolases of the small and large intestines in rats on the administration of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Borshchëv, Iu Iu; Gromova, L V; Ermolenko, E I; Grefner, N M; Borshchëva, I Iu; Gruzdkov, A A

    2012-06-01

    Effects of antibiotics on the structure and functional state of the intestine are not clear. We investigated some structural parameters of the small and large intestine, and activities of two intestinal peptide hydrolases in rats after administration of ampicillin and metronidazole during 3 and 5 days. After 3 days of antibiotic administration a decrease in the weight of mucosa in the small intestine, accompanied with a reduction in the villous height and width in this part of the intestine, and in the weight ofmucosa in the colon occured. At the same time the number of goblet cells in the small intestinal epithelium was increased. Specific activities of aminopeptidase M, and glycyl-L-leucine dipeptidase (micromol/min per g) in the mucosa of the small intestine were increased, and the total activities (micromol/min calculated per a part of the intestine) of the same enzymes did not change. The administration of antibiotics for 5 days resulted in increase of specific activity ofaminopeptidase M in the mucosa of the proximal part of the small intestine. In the chyme of the small intestine and colon, activities of the same enzymes (micromol/min calculated per a part of the intestine) were increased on the third and fifth days of the antibiotic administration. Thus, the application ofampicillin and metronidazole within 3-5 days causes a disturbance of the structural and functional parameters in the small and large intestines, which is most pronounced on the third day of the drug administration.

  18. Transgenic 6F tomatoes act on the small intestine to prevent systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia caused by Western diet and intestinally derived lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Buga, Georgette M; Su, Feng; Wagner, Alan C; Meriwether, David; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Gao, Feng; Grijalva, Victor; Danciger, Janet S; Van Lenten, Brian J; Org, Elin; Lusis, Aldons J; Pan, Calvin; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Smyth, Susan S; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Fogelman, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    We recently reported that levels of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the small intestine significantly correlated with the extent of aortic atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-null (LDLR⁻/⁻) mice fed a Western diet (WD). Here we demonstrate that WD increases unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA levels in the small intestine of LDLR⁻/⁻ mice and causes changes in small intestine gene expression. Confirmation of microarray analysis by quantitative RT-PCR showed that adding transgenic tomatoes expressing the apoA-I mimetic peptide 6F (Tg6F) to WD prevented many WD-mediated small intestine changes in gene expression. If instead of feeding WD, unsaturated LPA was added to chow and fed to the mice: i) levels of LPA in the small intestine were similar to those induced by feeding WD; ii) gene expression changes in the small intestine mimicked WD-mediated changes; and iii) changes in plasma serum amyloid A, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol levels, and the fast-performance liquid chromatography lipoprotein profile mimicked WD-mediated changes. Adding Tg6F (but not control tomatoes) to LPA-supplemented chow prevented the LPA-induced changes. We conclude that: i) WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia may be in part due to WD-induced increases in small intestine LPA levels; and ii) Tg6F reduces WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia by preventing WD-induced increases in LPA levels in the small intestine.

  19. Misoprostol in the intestinal lumen protects against radiation injury of the mucosa of the small bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.P.; Bonsack, M.E.; Felemovicius, I. )

    1994-03-01

    Systemically administered misoprostol, a PGE analog, has been shown to be an intestinal radioprotector. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of misoprostol into the intestinal lumen can also reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis. The rat small bowel was operatively exteriorized and segmented by means of suture ties. The remainder of the intestine and the rat were shielded in a lead box. Misoprostol was introduced into the lumen in various doses. After 30 min exposure to misoprostol, the isolated, exteriorized, segmented bowel was subjected to 11 Gy X irradiation. Five days later the animals were sacrificed and the intestines harvested for evaluation. Surviving crypt numbers per circumference and mucosal height were the criteria used for quantification of damage. Mucosa exposed to misoprostol at the time of radiation delivery showed significantly increased crypt numbers and mucosal height compared to adjacent saline-filled intestine. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Adaptation of electrolytes and fluid transport in rat small and large intestine after distal small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, C M; Molina, M T; Ilundain, A

    1988-06-01

    Na+, Cl- and water transport were studied in jejunum, caecum and colon after either 50% or 80% of small bowel resection (SBR). Four weeks after surgery, dry and wet weights, net absorption in vivo of sodium, chloride and water were determined. There was a significant intestinal growth after 50% or 80% SBR except for the colon which only showed increased tissue mass after 80% SBR. Net transport was stimulated both, per organ and per unit mass. In the small intestine and caecum both organ growth and changes in cell function appear to be involved in the adaptive response, regardless the extent of the small intestine resected. In the colon, compensatory growth appear to contribute to the adaptive response only after 80% SBR, whilst the transport function of the colonocytes seems to be stimulated after both types of SBR.

  1. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis.

  2. A Multicellular Approach Forms a Significant Amount of Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Frédéric G.; Matthews, Jamil A.; Speer, Allison L.; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Barthel, Erik R.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has successfully been used to rescue Lewis rats after massive small bowel resection. In this study, we transitioned the technique to a mouse model, allowing investigation of the processes involved during TESI formation through the transgenic tools available in this species. This is a necessary step toward applying the technique to human therapy. Multicellular organoid units were derived from small intestines of transgenic mice and transplanted within the abdomen on biodegradable polymers. Immunofluorescence staining was used to characterize the cellular processes during TESI formation. We demonstrate the preservation of Lgr5- and DcamKl1-positive cells, two putative intestinal stem cell populations, in proximity to their niche mesenchymal cells, the intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs), at the time of implantation. Maintenance of the relationship between ISEMF and crypt epithelium is observed during the growth of TESI. The engineered small intestine has an epithelium containing a differentiated epithelium next to an innervated muscularis. Lineage tracing demonstrates that all the essential components, including epithelium, muscularis, nerves, and some of the blood vessels, are of donor origin. This multicellular approach provides the necessary cell population to regenerate large amounts of intestinal tissue that could be used to treat short bowel syndrome. PMID:21395443

  3. Prostacyclin inhibits gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit in rats and dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwart, M.J.; Rush, B.D.

    1984-08-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) antagonizes 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2-induced diarrhea in rats, presumably by inhibiting the fluid accumulation of ''enteropooling'' in the small intestine. The effect of PGI2 on gastric emptying, small intestinal transit, and colonic transit was examined in rats and dogs to determine if interference with propulsion might also contribute to the antidiarrheal properties of this compound. Rats implanted with chronic duodenal cannulas were given subcutaneous PGI2 (0.1-1000 microgram/kg) followed 10 min later by intragastric /sup 2/Cr and a visually detectable duodenal transit marker. Forty-five minutes later, the animals were killed. Subcutaneous PGI2 inhibited gastric emptying maximally at 10 micrograms/kg. Small-intestinal transit was significantly decreased at 50 micrograms/kg and almost completely suppressed at 1.0 mg/kg. Subcutaneous naloxone (0.5 mg/kg) given 10 min before and 20 min after subcutaneous PGI2 administration did not block PGI2's effects. Intravenous or oral PGI2, had none of these effects. Small intestinal transit was only decreased by PGI2 infusion, suggesting that this parameter was more sensitive to a sustained blood level than gastric emptying. Hourly injections of subcutaneous PGI2 (0.5 mg/kg) had no effect on rat colonic transit measured over a 3-h period after deposition of the transit marker through a colonic cannula in a manner similar to that described for small-intestinal transit above. Small-intestinal transit was also measured in dogs given a barium suspension through a chronic duodenal cannula. In vehicle-treated dogs, barium reached the cecal area in an average of 2.8 h after instillation. In PGI2-treated dogs, barium never reached the cecum in the 5-h examination period. Thus, PGI2 inhibits gastric emptying in rat and small-intestinal transit in rat and dog but has no effect on rat colonic transit.

  4. Potato fiber protects the small intestinal wall against the toxic influence of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Huet, Pauline; Karlsson, Patrik; Eriksson, Sune; Tomaszewska, Ewa; Gawron, Antoni; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2012-04-01

    Acrylamide is a neurotoxic, genotoxic substance present in many commonly consumed food products and has been shown to have carcinogenic effects in rodents. The protective effects (if any) of potato fiber preparations, composed of cell wall material from potatoes, against the toxic influence of dietary acrylamide on the small intestinal wall were investigated. Male mice of the BALB/c strain were used in the study. Acrylamide was administered to the mice in their drinking water (0.5 mg/kg of body weight per day) and one of two types of potato fiber preparations (heated or raw potato fiber preparation) was added to their feed (2% addition to their feed). Histomorphometry of the small intestinal wall, hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide, animal weight, and feed and water consumption analyses were performed. Acrylamide altered the morphology and histology of the small intestinal wall, decreasing proliferation, myenteron and submucosal thicknesses, villus length, fractal dimension, crypt depth, crypt number, and the small intestinal absorptive surface. Conversely, apoptosis, hemoglobin adduct levels, intensity of epithelium staining, enterocyte number, villus epithelial thickness, and crypt width and parameters associated with nerve ganglia were increased. The two potato fiber preparations that were used abolished the negative influences of acrylamide on the small intestinal wall and had no influence on the hemoglobin adduct levels of acrylamide. The negative impact of acrylamide on the histologic structure, regeneration, and innervation of the small intestinal wall and the absorptive function of the small intestinal mucosa can be abolished by dietary potato fiber preparations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ghrelin in small intestine, its contribution to regulation of food intake and body weight in cross-intestinal parabiotic rats.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hitoshi; Masaki, Takayuki; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to be associated with feeding behavior in humans and rodents. It has been suggested that ghrelin may play a role behind the effect of bariatric surgery. Inbred rats were made into parabiotic pairs so that they shared a single abdominal cavity. A further operation is performed later in which the small intestines are transected and re-connected so that one rat continually lost nutrition to its partner. Changes in food intake and body weight were recorded. Seven weeks later, content of ghrelin in the plasma, stomach and upper intestines were measured in the paired rats. Rats which lost nutrients to its counterpart (Loss rats) ingested significantly more food than sham control rats (p<0.001). Rats which gained nutrient (Gain rats) ingested less than controls (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in body weight, blood glucose, insulin, free fatty acids and triglycerides between the paired rats. There was significantly higher levels of ghrelin in the plasma (p<0.008) and the intestine of the Loss rats (p<0.02). There were no difference in ghrelin in the stomach between parabiotic rats and sham operated controls. The ghrelin content of the plasma and intestines were significantly higher in the Loss rats, which ate more, and normal in the Gain rats, which ate less than controls. Because no remarkable changes in the ghrelin content were observed in the stomach, difference in the quality of the chime may affect the local synthesis and release of ghrelin.

  6. Differences in intraepithelial lymphocytes in the proximal, middle, distal parts of small intestine, cecum, and colon of mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hodaka

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported the regional differences in the intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) present in the small intestine of mice. In this study, we further investigated these differences on the basis of our previous findings and studied the entire intestine, including the cecum and colon. Most of the significant differences in phenotypic compositions were found between the small and large intestines, although some differences were found among the different parts of the small and large intestines. In particular, the composition of the subsets in alphabeta T cells and gammadelta T cells clearly differed between the small and large intestines. For example, in alphabeta T cells, the percentages of double negative (DN) and CD8alphaalpha(+) cells were higher in the large intestine, that of CD8alphabeta(+) cells was higher in the small intestine, and those of CD4(+) and CD4(+) CD8alphaalpha(+) double positive (DP) cells were higher in the distal part of the small intestine. In gammadelta T cells, the percentage of CD8alphaalpha(+) cells was higher in the small intestine and that of DN cells was higher in the large intestine. These results indicate that the differences between IELs in the small and large intestines are discontinuous.

  7. Blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 consumption along the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, N R; Weiss, H R

    1988-05-01

    Differences in O2 delivery and consumption along the fed and fasted small intestine are described. Total wall blood flow was determined in sequential segments of small intestine from 5 to 6-month-old male, anesthetized Fischer 344 rats either 75-80 min before or after feeding, using radioactive microspheres. Oxygen saturation in submucosal arterioles and venules (50-60 micron diam) was determined throughout the intestine, using a microspectrophotometric technique. Venous O2 saturations showed considerable heterogeneity in all regions, and ranged from 0 to 77%. Arterial-venous O2 content differences (CaO2-CvO2) did not change along the fasted rat intestine, and averaged 8.2 ml O2/100 ml blood. However, CaO2-CvO2 followed a small proximal to distal gradient (proximal greater than distal) in the fed rats. Larger proximal to distal gradients (proximal greater than distal) occurred in both blood flow and O2 consumption in both groups. Feeding did not change intestinal average CaO2-CvO2. However, feeding induced a 53% increase in average O2 consumption, with the greatest increase (130%) occurring in the middle third of the intestine. Feeding induced a 42% increase in average blood flow, with the greatest increase (70%) occurring in the distal third of the intestine. The increased O2 used by the fed intestine was primarily provided by the increased blood flow. The O2 consumption gradient is assumed to reflect differences in mucosal mass along the intestine and/or differences in metabolic activity.

  8. Expression of sweet receptor components in equine small intestine: relevance to intestinal glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kristian; Al-Rammahi, Miran; Arora, Daleep K; Moran, Andrew W; Proudman, Christopher J; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2012-07-15

    The heteromeric sweet taste receptor T1R2-T1R3 is expressed on the luminal membrane of certain populations of enteroendocrine cells. Sensing of sugars and other sweet compounds by this receptor activates a pathway in enteroendocrine cells, resulting in secretion of a number of gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2). This subsequently leads to upregulation in the expression of intestinal Na(+)/glucose cotransporter, SGLT1, and increased intestinal glucose absorption. On the basis of the current information available on the horse genome sequence, it has been proposed that the gene for T1R2 (Tas1R2) is absent in the horse. We show here, however, that horses express both the mRNA and protein for T1R2. Equine T1R2 is most closely homologous to that in the pig and the cow. T1R2 protein, along with T1R3, α-gustducin, and GLP-2 proteins are coexpressed in equine intestinal endocrine cells. Intravenous administration of GLP-2, in rats and pigs, leads to an increase in the expression of SGLT1 in absorptive enterocytes and enhancement in blood glucose concentrations. GLP-2 receptor is expressed in enteric neurons, excluding the direct effect of GLP-2 on enterocytes. However, electric stimulation of enteric neurons generates a neural response leading to SGLT1 upregulation, suggesting that sugar in the intestine activates a reflex increase in the functional expression of SGLT1. Horses possess the ability to upregulate SGLT1 expression in response to increased dietary carbohydrates, and to enhance the capacity of the gut to absorb glucose. The gut sweet receptor provides an accessible target for manipulating the equine gut to absorb glucose (and water), allowing greater energy uptake and hydration for hard-working horses.

  9. Effects of Clostridium perfringens iota toxin in the small intestine of mice.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Leandro M; Redondo, Enzo A; Dailoff, Gabriela C; Leiva, Carlos L; Díaz-Carrasco, Juan M; Bruzzone, Octavio A; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2017-07-29

    Iota toxin is a binary toxin solely produced by Clostridium perfringens type E strains, and is structurally related to CDT from C. difficile and CST from C. spiroforme. As type E causes hemorrhagic enteritis in cattle, it is usually assumed that associated diseases are mediated by iota toxin, although evidence in this regard has not been provided. In the present report, iota toxin intestinal effects were evaluated in vivo using a mouse model. Histological damage was observed in ileal loops treated with purified iota toxin after 4 h of incubation. Luminal iota toxin induced fluid accumulation in the small intestine in a dose dependent manner, as determined by the enteropooling and the intestinal loop assays. None of these changes were observed in the large intestine. These results suggest that C. perfringens iota toxin alters intestinal permeability, predominantly by inducing necrosis and degenerative changes in the mucosal epithelium of the small intestine, as well as changes in intestinal motility. The obtained results suggest a central role for iota toxin in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E hemorrhagic enteritis, and contribute to remark the importance of clostridial binary toxins in digestive diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes.

  11. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage by modulating NAD{sup +} metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Arpana; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-11-27

    Although cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug for the treatment of a variety of tumors, its use is critically limited because of adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal damage. Cisplatin treatment increases oxidative stress biomarkers in the small intestine, which may induce apoptosis of epithelial cells and thereby elicit damage to the small intestine. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is a cofactor for various enzymes associated with cellular homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the hyper-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is closely associated with the depletion of NAD{sup +} in the small intestine after cisplatin treatment, which results in downregulation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity. Furthermore, a decrease in SIRT1 activity was found to play an important role in cisplatin-mediated small intestinal damage through nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, facilitated by its acetylation increase. However, use of dunnione as a strong substrate for the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme led to an increase in intracellular NAD{sup +} levels and prevented the cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage correlating with the modulation of PARP-1, SIRT1, and NF-κB. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD{sup +} levels by pharmacological NQO1 substrates could be a promising therapeutic approach for protecting against cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage. - Highlights: • NAD{sup +} acts as a cofactor for numerous enzymes including Sirtuins and PARP. • Up-regulation of SIRT1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced intestinal damage. • Modulation of the cellular NAD{sup +} could be a promising therapeutic approach.

  12. Vascular anatomy of the small intestine-a comparative anatomic study on humans and pigs.

    PubMed

    von Trotha, Klaus-Thilo; Butz, Nick; Grommes, Jochen; Binnebösel, Marcel; Charalambakis, Natascha; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Schumpelick, Volker; Klinge, Uwe; Neumann, Ulf P; Prescher, Andreas; Krones, Carsten J

    2015-05-01

    Porcine models are well established for studying intestinal anastomotic healing. In this study, we aimed to clarify the anatomic differences between human and porcine small intestines. Additionally, we investigated the influences of longitudinal and circular sutures on human small intestine perfusion. Intestines were obtained from human cadavers (n = 8; small intestine, n = 51) and from pigs (n = 10; small intestine, n = 60). Vascularization was visualized with mennige gelatin perfusion and high-resolution mammography. Endothelial cell density was analyzed with immunohistochemistry and factor VIII antibodies. We also investigated the influence of suture techniques (circular anastomoses, n = 19; longitudinal sutures, n = 15) on vascular perfusion. Only human samples showed branching of mesenteric vessels. Compared to the pig, human vessels showed closer connections at the entrance to the bowel wall (p = 0.045) and higher numbers of intramural anastomoses (p < 0.001). Porcine main vessels formed in multifilament-like vessel bundles and displayed few intramural vessel anastomoses. Circular anastomoses induced a circular perfusion defect at the bowel wall; longitudinal anastomoses induced significantly smaller perfusion defects (p < 0.001). Both species showed higher vascular density in the jejunum than in the ileum (p < 0.001). Human samples showed similar vascular density within the jejunum (p = 0.583) and higher density in the ileum (p < 0.001) compared to pig samples. The results showed significant differences between human and porcine intestines. The porcine model remains the standard for studies on anastomotic healing because it is currently the only viable model for studying anastomosis and wound healing. Nevertheless, scientific interpretations must consider the anatomic differences between humans and porcine intestines.

  13. Effect of syngeneic thymocytes on proliferation of the small intestinal epithelium in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakov, A.N.; Aparovich, G.G.; Trufakin, V.A.

    1986-12-01

    This paper describes the study of the action of syngeneic thymocytes on proliferation of the epithelium of the mouse small intestine. The mice were injected with /sup 3/H-thymidine in the experiments. Under the experimental conditions presented here, syngeneic thymocytes can reduce the number of DNA-synthesizing cells in the intestinal epithelium, causing narrowing of the zone of proliferation and enlargement of the zone of differentiation of the enterocytes.

  14. Histopathological changes in small and large intestines during hymenolepidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Kolasa, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta is a chronic parasite living in the small intestine of rats, mice and humans. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological changes in the rat intestine during experimental hymenolepidosis. Our results showed that in rats infected with H. diminuta slight changes occurred in the length of the villus and crypts in different parts of the digestive tract. The changes were most distinct in the duodenum and jejunum on the 16 days post H. diminuta infection.

  15. Impact of endoscopic duodenal biopsy on the detection of small intestinal villous atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Saverymuttu, S. H.; Sabbat, J.; Burke, M.; Maxwell, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Coeliac disease is underdiagnosed partly because of insufficient recognition of more subtle presentations and partly because of the relative difficulty of jejunal biopsy. We have compared new case detection of small intestinal villous atrophy in the 5 years following changing to endoscopic multiple biopsy with our preceding 9 year experience utilizing jejunal capsule suction biopsy. The detection rate for small intestinal disease doubled while the number of patients investigated by small bowel biopsy increased threefold. We recommend that endoscopic duodenal biopsy replace jejunal biopsy for routine diagnostic purposes. PMID:2057427

  16. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  17. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  18. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Amy M; Callahan, Derrick J; Richner, Justin M; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F; Diamond, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation.

  19. Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 Negatively Regulates Growth and Promotes Enterocyte Differentiation in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Haegebarth, Andrea; Bie, Wenjun; Yang, Ruyan; Crawford, Susan E.; Vasioukhin, Valeri; Fuchs, Elaine; Tyner, Angela L.

    2006-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) (also called Brk or Sik) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase that is expressed in breast cancer and normal epithelial linings. In adult mice, PTK6 expression is high in villus epithelial cells of the small intestine. To explore functions of PTK6, we disrupted the mouse Ptk6 gene. We detected longer villi, an expanded zone of PCNA expression, and increased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in the PTK6-deficient small intestine. Although differentiation of major epithelial cell types occurred, there was a marked delay in expression of intestinal fatty acid binding protein, suggesting a role for PTK6 in enterocyte differentiation. However, fat absorption was comparable in wild-type and Ptk6−/− mice. It was previously shown that the serine threonine kinase Akt is a substrate of PTK6 and that PTK6-mediated phosphorylation of Akt on tyrosine resulted in inhibition of Akt activity. Consistent with these findings, we detected increased Akt activity and nuclear β-catenin in intestines of PTK6-deficient mice and decreased nuclear localization of the Akt substrate FoxO1 in villus epithelial cells. PTK6 contributes to maintenance of tissue homeostasis through negative regulation of Akt in the small intestine and is associated with cell cycle exit and differentiation in normal intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:16782882

  20. Role of dietary fiber in formation and prevention of small intestinal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic techniques such as capsule endoscopy have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause ulcers in the small intestine in humans, but there are few effective agents for treatment of small intestinal ulcers. Although the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcer has been widely studied, dietary factors have seldom been considered. In the present review, the role of dietary fiber (DF) in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcers is discussed. In previous studies, small intestinal lesions were not observed when NSAIDs were administered to fasted rats, dogs, and cats, but were observed in conventionally-fed animals, suggesting the importance of feeding in the formation of intestinal lesions induced by NSAIDs. However, in animals fed diets containing low or no DF, indomethacin (IND) did not produce lesions in the small intestine, but did produce lesions in animals fed diets supplemented with insoluble dietary fiber (IDF, cellulose). The results suggest that IDF in the diet plays an important role in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. On the other hand, addition of soluble dietary fibers (SDFs) such as pectin or mucin to regular diet markedly decreased NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. Thus, IDF and SDF have opposing effects on IND-induced intestinal lesions, i.e., IDF is harmful while SDF is protective. SDFs potentially represent a novel and safe means for protecting the small intestine against NSAID-induced intestinal lesions.

  1. Hyperenteroglucagonaemia and small intestinal mucosal growth after colonic perfusion of glucose in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Miazza, B M; Al-Mukhtar, M Y; Salmeron, M; Ghatei, M A; Felce-Dachez, M; Filali, A; Villet, R; Wright, N A; Bloom, S R; Crambaud, J C

    1985-01-01

    Beside intraluminal factors, humoral agents play an important role in intestinal adaptation. Enteroglucagon, the mucosal concentration of which is maximal in the terminal ileum and colon, is the strongest candidate for the role of small intestinal mucosal growth factor. The present experiment was designed to study the role of colonic enteroglucagon in stimulating mucosal growth in rats with a normal small intestine. After eight days of glucose large bowel perfusion, enteroglucagon plasma concentrations were 120.7 +/- SEM 9.2 pmol/l, versus 60.1 +/- 6.8 in mannitol perfused control rats (p less than 0.001). Gastrin, cholecystokinin, neurotensin, pancreatic glucagon, and insulin plasma concentrations were unchanged. Crypt cell proliferation, measured by the vincristine metaphase arrest technique, increased significantly in the small intestine of glucose perfused animals (p less than 0.005-0.001) in comparison with the controls. This resulted in a greater mucosal mass in both proximal and distal small bowel: mucosal wet weight, DNA, protein and alpha D-glucosidase per unit length intestine were all significantly higher (p less than 0.05-0.001) than in mannitol perfused rats. Our data, therefore, support the hypothesis that enteroglucagon is an enterotrophic factor and stress the possible role of the colon in the regulation of small bowel trophicity. PMID:3996942

  2. Pomegranate peel extract decreases small intestine lipid peroxidation by enhancing activities of major antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Blachier, François; Faure, Patrice; Garrel, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Pomegranate peel extract (PPE) contains several compounds with antioxidative properties. PPE added to foods may interact with endogenous antioxidants and promote health. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanisms by which PPE exerts their actions on tissues of biological systems in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of PPE on activities of antioxidant enzymes. Mice were used to investigate the effects of PPE on plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tissue MDA content and activities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), SOD2 and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the small intestine, liver and skeletal muscle - different tissues involved in the digestion, absorption and metabolism of dietary nutrients. Control mice were fed a standard diet, whereas treated mice were fed for 40 days with the standard diet containing 5% or 10% PPE. Mice fed the 10% PPE diet exhibited lower plasma MDA concentrations, reduced content of MDA in the small intestine and liver and higher levels of SOD1 and GPX activities in the small intestine compared to mice fed the control diet. These findings demonstrate that intake of PPE in diet attenuates small intestine lipid peroxidation and strengthens the first line of small intestine antioxidant defense by enhancing enzymatic antioxidative pathways. PPE is worthy of further study as a therapeutic approach to prevent peroxidative stress-induced gut pathogenesis. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  4. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  5. Protein transport across the small intestine in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Marit; Westerhout, Joost; Wichers, Harry J; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Verhoeckx, Kitty C M

    2014-01-01

    In view of the imminent deficiency of protein sources for human consumption in the near future, new protein sources need to be identified. However, safety issues such as the risk of allergenicity are often a bottleneck, due to the absence of predictive, validated and accepted methods for risk assessment. The current strategy to assess the allergenic potential of proteins focuses mainly on homology, stability and cross-reactivity, although other factors such as intestinal transport might be of added value too. In this review, we present an overview of the knowledge of protein transport across the intestinal wall and the methods currently being used to measure this. A literature study reveals that protein transport in sensitised persons occurs para-cellularly with the involvement of mast cells, and trans-cellularly via enterocytes, while in non-sensitised persons micro-fold cells and enterocytes are considered most important. However, there is a lack of comparable systematic studies on transport of allergenic proteins. Knowledge of the multiple protein transport pathways and which model system can be useful to study these processes may be of added value in the risk assessment of food allergenicity.

  6. De novo purine nucleotide synthesis in the rat small and large intestine: effect of dietary protein and purines.

    PubMed

    LeLeiko, N S; Bronstein, A D; Baliga, B S; Munro, H N

    1983-05-01

    This study assessed the pathway for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis in rat small intestinal and colonic mucosal cells, and determined the effects of dietary purines and protein on de novo purine nucleotide synthetic activity in the small intestine in vitro. Incubation of small intestinal mucosal scrapings with [14C]glycine failed to show an active pathway of de novo synthesis; in contrast, the colon showed incorporation of [14C]glycine into RNA. Rats fed a diet deficient in purines demonstrated increased incorporation of [14C]glycine into RNA-adrenine in small intestinal mucosal cells. Measurement of glutamine-amidophosphoribosyltransferase demonstrated that, regardless of the purine content of the diet, enzyme activity in the small intestine is significantly lower than in the colon or liver. The results indicate that, in the small intestine of the rat, there is an inactive de novo pathway of purine nucleotide biosynthesis that can be stimulated when purines are omitted from the diet.

  7. Rotavirus Infection Is Not Associated with Small Intestinal Fluid Secretion in the Adult Mouse▿

    PubMed Central

    Kordasti, Shirin; Istrate, Claudia; Banasaz, Mahanez; Rottenberg, Martin; Sjövall, Henrik; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to humans, adult but not infant small animals are resistant to rotavirus diarrhea. The pathophysiological mechanism behind this age-restricted diarrhea is currently unresolved, and this question was investigated by studying the secretory state of the small intestines of adult mice infected with rotavirus. Immunohistochemistry and histological examinations revealed that rotavirus (strain EDIM) infects all parts of the small intestines of adult mice, with significant numbers of infected cells in the ilea at 2 and 4 days postinfection. Furthermore, quantitative PCR revealed that 100-fold more viral RNA was produced in the ilea than in the jejuna or duodena of adult mice. In vitro perfusion experiments of the small intestine did not reveal any significant changes in net fluid secretion among mice infected for 3 days or 4 days or in those that were noninfected (37 ± 9 μl · h−1 · cm−1, 22 ± 13 μl · h−1 · cm−1, and 33 ± 6 μl · h−1 · cm−1, respectively) or in transmucosal potential difference (4.0 ± 0.3 mV versus 3.9 ± 0.4 mV), a marker for active chloride secretion, between control and rotavirus-infected mice. In vivo experiments also did not show any differences in potential difference between uninfected and infected small intestines. Furthermore, no significant differences in weight between infected and uninfected small intestines were found, nor were any differences in fecal output observed between infected and control mice. Altogether, these data suggest that rotavirus infection is not sufficient to stimulate chloride and water secretion from the small intestines of adult mice. PMID:16943290

  8. Transfer of propionate by rat small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R. J. C.; Jackson, M. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1966-01-01

    1. The transfer of propionate by sacs of rat everted intestine has been investigated in relation to a number of physico-chemical factors which affect movement of weak electrolytes. 2. Neither the observed movement nor the distribution of propionate can be accounted for by the theory of non-ionic diffusion or by modifications of it, such as the microclimate hypothesis or partial permeability to ions. 3. It is not possible to account for the observed propionate movement by the electrical potential across the gut or by solvent drag. 4. The most satisfactory explanation for the observations is a transfer process in the gut for volatile fatty acids, and some features of this are discussed. PMID:5937409

  9. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status

    PubMed Central

    Willing, Benjamin P.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:27096607

  10. Seasonal plasticity of gut morphology and small intestinal enzymes in free-living Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan-Sheng; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Wang, De-Hua

    2013-05-01

    The phenotypic plasticity of the digestive system may determine the diversity of animal diets and, thus, their niche width. This study examines the effects of seasonal fluctuations in food quality and temperature on the gut morphology and the activity of sucrase, maltase, and aminopeptidase-N in the small intestinal brush-border membrane of male Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Based on the adaptive modulation hypothesis and the principle of optimal gut function design, we hypothesize that the gut size, tissue-specific activity, and total hydrolytic capacity of intestinal digestive enzyme are upregulated in winter and downregulated in summer in response to diet shifts and energy demand in free-living Mongolian gerbils. Various seasonal modulation patterns in digestive enzyme activity in different regions of the small intestines were observed. The results show that male gerbils have the longest and heaviest small intestines in winter. This mechanism may be adapted to increase their food intake during winter. Male gerbils also exhibit the highest tissue-specific and total sucrase, maltase, and aminopeptidase-N activity in winter and in spring. Seasonal modulations are more distinct in the jejunum than in the duodenum and the ileum of the small intestines. The digestive phenotypic flexibility of male gerbils effectively corresponded with seasonal diet shifts and temperature fluctuations.

  11. GATA factors regulate proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression in small intestine of mature mice

    PubMed Central

    Beuling, Eva; Baffour-Awuah, Nana Yaa A.; Stapleton, Kelly A.; Aronson, Boaz E.; Noah, Taeko K.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Fleet, James C.; Krasinski, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims GATA transcription factors regulate genes in multiple organs to control proliferation and differentiation. GATA4 is expressed in the proximal 85% of the small intestine, where it regulates the expression of genes that are specifically expressed by absorptive enterocytes. GATA6 is co-expressed with GATA4 but is also expressed in the ileum; its function in the mature small intestine is unknown. Methods We investigated the function of GATA6 in small intestine using adult mice with inducible disruption of Gata6, or Gata6 and Gata4, specifically in the intestine. Results In ileum, deletion of Gata6 reduced in proliferation and numbers of enteroendocrine cells, increased numbers of goblet-like cells in crypts, caused loss of Paneth cells, and altered expression of genes specific to absorptive enterocytes. In contrast, in jejunum and duodenum, deletion of Gata6 increased numbers of Paneth cells. Deletion of Gata6 and Gata4 resulted jejunal and duodenal phenotype that was nearly identical to that in the ileum after deletion of Gata6 alone, demonstrating that most GATA4 functions are redundant with those of GATA6. Conclusion GATA transcription factors are required for proliferation, secretory cell differentiation, and expression of genes by absorptive enterocytes in the small intestinal epithelium. PMID:21262227

  12. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII.

  13. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  14. Incarceration of the small intestine by the epiploic foramen in fifteen horses.

    PubMed

    Vasey, J R

    1988-04-01

    In 15 horses with acute abdominal disease, a diagnosis of incarceration of small intestine through the epiploic foramen was made, either at the time of exploratory celiotomy or at necropsy.The horses exhibited signs of moderate to severe abdominal pain and were suffering from hypovolaemic and/or endotoxic shock. Nasogastric intubation produced either gas or fluid, the pH of which was in the range of 5 to 7.2, indicating reflux of small intestinal content into the stomach. Consistent physical findings included absence of gut sounds on auscultation, dilated small intestine palpable on rectal examination, and serosanguineous or xanthochromic fluid from abdominal paracentesis.A ventral midline laparotomy was performed on 11 horses. The incarcerated bowel, which involved the distal jejunum and ileum in 14 horses and jejunum in one horse, varied in length from 26 cm to 13 meters. Reduction of the incarceration was accomplished by gentle traction of the efferent and/or afferent intestine. Infarcted segments of the small intestine were exteriorized, resected, and an end-to-end jejunal anastomosis or an end-to-side jejunocecal anastomosis was performed. A successful postoperative recovery was achieved in three horses.

  15. Protective effect of geranylgeranylacetone against loxoprofen sodium-induced small intestinal lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Tomohisa; Ichikawa, Takafumi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Goso, Yukinobu; Kurihara, Makoto; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2011-02-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induce small intestinal ulcers but the preventive measures against it remain unknown. So we evaluated the effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), a mucosal protectant, on both the mucus content and loxoprofen sodium-induced lesions in the rat small intestine. Normal male Wistar rats were given GGA (200 or 400mg/kg p.o.) and euthanized 3h later for measurement of mucin content and immunoreactivity. Other Wistar rats were given loxoprofen sodium (30mg/kg s.c.) and euthanized 24h later. GGA (30-400mg/kg p.o.) was administered twice: 30min before and 6h after loxoprofen sodium. The total mucin content of the small intestinal mucosa increased, especially the ratio of sialomucin, which increased approximately 20% more than the control level after a single dose of GGA. Loxoprofen sodium provoked linear ulcers along the mesenteric margin of the distal jejunum, accompanied by an increase in enterobacterial translocation. Treatment of the animals with GGA dose-dependently prevented the development of intestinal lesions, and bacterial translocation following loxoprofen sodium was also significantly decreased. GGA protects the small intestine against loxoprofen sodium-induced lesions, probably by inhibiting enterobacterial invasion of the mucosa as a result of the increase in the mucosal barrier. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Origin and propagation of individual slow waves along the intact feline small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Wim J E P; Stephen, Betty

    2008-03-01

    The pattern of propagation of slow waves in the small intestine is not clear. Specifically, it is not known whether propagation is determined by a single dominant ICC-MP (Interstitial cells of Cajal located in the Myenteric Plexus) pacemaker unit or whether there are multiple active pacemakers. To determine this pattern of propagation, waveforms were recorded simultaneously from 240 electrodes distributed along the whole length of the intact isolated feline small intestine. After the experiments, the propagation patterns of successive individual slow waves were analysed. In the intact small intestine, there was only a single slow wave pacemaker unit active, and this was located at or 6-10 cm from the pyloric junction. From this site, slow waves propagated in the aboral direction at gradually decreasing velocities. The majority of slow waves (73%) reached the ileocaecal junction while the remaining waves were blocked. Ligation of the intestine at one to four locations led to: (a) decrease in the distal frequencies; (b) disappearance of distal propagation blocks; (c) increase in velocities; (d) emergence of multiple and unstable pacemaker sites; and (e) propagation from these sites in the aboral and oral directions. In conclusion, in the quiescent feline small intestine a single pacemaker unit dominates the organ, with occasional propagation blocks of the slow waves, thereby producing the well-known frequency gradient.

  17. Robust Cre-Mediated Recombination in Small Intestinal Stem Cells Utilizing the Olfm4 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Schuijers, Jurian; van der Flier, Laurens G.; van Es, Johan; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Summary The epithelium of the small intestine is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in mammals. We previously demonstrated the existence of a long-lived pool of cycling stem cells defined by Lgr5 expression at the bottom of intestinal crypts. An Lgr5-eGFP-IRES-CreERT2 knockin allele has been instrumental in characterizing and profiling these cells, yet its low level expression and its silencing in patches of adjacent crypts have not allowed quantitative gene deletion. Olfactomedin-4 (Olfm4) has emerged from a gene signature of Lgr5 stem cells as a robust marker for murine small intestinal stem cells. We observe that Olfm4null animals show no phenotype and report the generation of an Olfm4-IRES-eGFPCreERT2 knockin mouse model that allows visualization and genetic manipulation of Lgr5+ stem cells in the epithelium of the small intestine. The eGFPCreERT2 fusion protein faithfully marks all stem cells in the small intestine and induces the activation of a conditional LacZ reporter with robust efficiency. PMID:25254337

  18. Metabolism of heme and bilirubin in rat and human small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, F; Bissell, D M

    1982-01-01

    Formation of heme, bilirubin, and bilirubin conjugates has been examined in mucosal cells isolated from the rat upper small intestine. Intact, viable cells were prepared by enzymatic dissociation using a combined vascular and luminal perfusion and incubated with an isotopically labeled precursor, delta-amino-[2,3-3H]levulinic acid. Labeled heme and bile pigment were formed with kinetics similar to those exhibited by hepatocytes. Moreover, the newly formed bilirubin was converted rapidly to both mono- and diglucuronide conjugates. In addition, cell-free extracts of small intestinal mucosa from rats or humans exhibited a bilirubin-UDP-glucuronyl transferase activity that was qualitatively similar to that present in liver. The data suggest that the small intestinal mucosa normally contributes to bilirubin metabolism. PMID:6806320

  19. Mapping Small Intestine Bioelectrical Activity Using High-Resolution Printed-Circuit-Board Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Timothy R.; O’Grady, Gregory; Erickson, Jonathan C.; Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Bissett, Ian P.; Cheng, Leo K.; Pullan, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, novel methods were developed for the in-vivo high-resolution recording and analysis of small intestine bioelectrical activity, using flexible printed-circuit-board (PCB) electrode arrays. Up to 256 simultaneous recordings were made at multiple locations along the porcine small intestine. Data analysis was automated through the application and tuning of the Falling-Edge Variable-Threshold algorithm, achieving 92% sensitivity and a 94% positive-predictive value. Slow wave propagation patterns were visualized through the automated generation of animations and isochronal maps. The methods developed and validated in this study are applicable for use in humans, where future studies will serve to improve the clinical understanding of small intestine motility in health and disease. PMID:22255449

  20. Mapping small intestine bioelectrical activity using high-resolution printed-circuit-board electrodes.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Timothy R; O'Grady, Gregory; Erickson, Jonathan C; Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Bissett, Ian P; Cheng, Leo K; Pullan, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, novel methods were developed for the in-vivo high-resolution recording and analysis of small intestine bioelectrical activity, using flexible printed-circuit-board (PCB) electrode arrays. Up to 256 simultaneous recordings were made at multiple locations along the porcine small intestine. Data analysis was automated through the application and tuning of the Falling-Edge Variable-Threshold algorithm, achieving 92% sensitivity and a 94% positive-predictive value. Slow wave propagation patterns were visualized through the automated generation of animations and isochronal maps. The methods developed and validated in this study are applicable for use in humans, where future studies will serve to improve the clinical understanding of small intestine motility in health and disease.

  1. Rebamipide inhibits indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury: possible involvement of intestinal microbiota modulation by upregulation of α-defensin 5.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Toshio; Otani, Koji; Nadatani, Yuji; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-03-15

    Enterobacteria play important roles in the pathophysiology of small intestinal injuries induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We investigated the effects of rebamipide, a gastrointestinal mucoprotective drug, on indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries, intestinal microbiota, and expression levels of α-defensin 5, which is a Paneth cell-specific antimicrobial peptide and is important for the regulation of intestinal microbiota. Indomethacin (10mg/kg) was orally administered to mice after oral administration of rebamipide (100 or 300 mg/kg) or vehicle for 1 week, and the small intestinal injuries were assessed. After oral administration of rebamipide, the small intestinal contents were subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to assess the intestinal microbiota composition. Further, the expression levels of mRNA and protein for α-defensin 5 in the ileal tissue were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analysis, respectively. Rebamipide inhibited indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries and T-RFLP analysis showed that rebamipide increased the percentage of Lactobacillales and decreased the percentage of Bacteroides and Clostridium than that in vehicle-treated controls. The mice that were treated with rebamipide showed an increase in α-defensin 5 mRNA expression and protein levels in the ileal tissue compared to vehicle-treated control mice. Indomethacin reduced expression of α-defensin 5 mRNA in ileal tissue, while rebamipide reversed expression of α-defensin 5 mRNA. In conclusion, our study results suggest that rebamipide inhibits indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries, possibly by modulating microbiota in the small intestine by upregulation of α-defensin 5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the murine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Muise, Eleanor D; Gandotra, Neeru; Tackett, John J; Bamdad, Michaela C; Cowles, Robert A

    2017-01-15

    Serotonin stimulates enterocyte turnover in the small intestine and studies suggest this is mediated by neuronal signaling via a cholinergic pathway. Distribution of the five known muscarinic receptor subtypes (mAChRs) in the small intestine has not been fully studied, and their role in intestinal growth is unknown. We hypothesized that mAChRs have distinct anatomic distributions within the bowel, and that mAChRs present within intestinal crypts mediate the effects of acetylcholine on the small intestinal mucosa. Small intestine from male C57BL/6 mice ages 2, 4, 6, and 8weeks were harvested. RNA was isolated and cDNA synthesized for PCR-amplification of subtype specific mAChRs. Ileum was fixed with Nakane, embedded in epon, and immunofluorescence microscopy performed using polyclonal antibodies specific to each mAChR1-5. All five mAChR subtypes were present in the mouse duodenum, jejunum, and ileum at all ages by RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence microscopy suggested the presence of mAChR1-5 in association with mature enterocytes along the villus and within the myenteric plexus. Only mAChR2 clearly localized to the crypt stem cell compartment, specifically co-localizing with Paneth cells at crypt bases. Muscarinic receptors are widely distributed along the entire alimentary tract. mAChR2 appears to localize to the crypt stem cell compartment, suggesting it is a plausible regulator of stem cell activity. The location of mAChR2 to the crypt makes it a potential therapeutic target for treatment of intestinal disease such as short bowel syndrome. The exact cellular location and action of each mAChR requires further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with More Serious Small Intestinal Mucosal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-Rui; Chen, Mei-Hui; He, Xing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical and experimental research has revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by intestinal hypomotility, gut microbial dysbiosis, increased gut permeability, microcirculation disorders, circulatory changes, and dysfunction of intestinal stem cells, which may be linked to inflammation of intestinal mucosa. However, the relationship between type 2 DM (T2DM) and macroscopic small intestinal mucosal injuries is still unclear. Therefore, we retrospectively studied capsule endoscopy data to determine the relationship between T2DM and small intestinal mucosal injuries. Materials and Methods We compared the records of 38 T2DM patients with those of 152 non-DM patients for small intestinal mucosal injuries. Different types of mucosal injuries and Lewis scores were compared between T2DM and non-DM patients. The relationships between patients with or without different types of diabetic complications and the Lewis score was assessed. Moreover, the relationships between insulin resistance and Lewis score, between HbA1c and Lewis score, were also both assessed. Results The prevalence of a villous edema in subjects with T2DM was significantly higher than in those without DM (P < 0.001), but incidence of ulcers was not different (P = 1.000). With T2DM, the Lewis score was also significantly higher (P = 0.002). In addition, subjects with diabetic nephropathy showed significantly higher Lewis scores than patients without diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.033). In Pearson’s correlation tests, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value was correlated positively with the Lewis score (γ = 0.175, P = 0.015), but no statistical correlation was found between HbA1c level and Lewis score (γ = 0.039, P = 0.697). Conclusions Subjects with T2DM, especially those with diabetic nephropathy, have higher Lewis scores and more serious small intestinal mucosal lesions. PMID:27598308

  4. Effects of early feeding and exogenous putrescine on growth and small intestinal development in posthatch ducks.

    PubMed

    Peng, P; Xu, J; Chen, W; Tangara, M; Qi, Z L; Peng, J

    2010-02-01

    1. Effects of early feeding with a diet containing added putrescine on duck intestinal development and growth performance were examined by a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement with two different feeding times (6 and 48 h) and two levels of putrescine (0 and 025%). 2. A significant main effect of early feeding on increasing body weight (BW) was observed from hatch to 35 d, whereas dietary putrescine had no significant effect on BW. 3. In the first week posthatch, enhanced small intestinal weight and intestinal density (weight of intestinal tissue/unit length of intestine), increased villus length and reduced crypt depth were observed in the early feeding group, while no effect was observed when putrescine was added to the diet. 4. Maltase and sucrase activity and protein/DNA ratio in jejunum were increased by early feeding in the first week, while decreased by putrescine supplementation. 5. In conclusion, early feeding methods have great potential for small intestine development and thereafter enhanced the growth performance of ducks, but dietary putrescine used during this period should be used cautiously to avoid toxicity.

  5. Effects of phorbol esters on fluid transport and blood flow in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoeqvist, A.; Henderson, L.S.; Fondacaro, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of phorbol esters on intestinal fluid transport and blood flow in the anesthetized cat and enteropooling in the conscious rat. Intraluminal administration of phorbol ester into a segment of isolated small bowel produced a copious intestinal secretion and a concomitant mesenteric hyperemia in the cat. Net fluid movement in the intestine was converted from absorption in the control state to secretion following phorbol ester administration. Intravenous atropine reduced the phorbol ester-induced secretion by 56%; clonidine abolished the remaining secretory response. In the rat, intragastric administration of phorbol ester produced enteropooling comparable to that of other potent intestinal secretagogues. Since phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, these suggest that activation of protein kinase C in the small intestine may lead to a full secretory response. The evidence suggests that this secretion is accompanied by a metabolic hyperemia. These results suggest that protein kinase C plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport.

  6. Diagnostic algorithm to differentiate lymphoma from inflammation in feline small intestinal biopsy samples.

    PubMed

    Kiupel, M; Smedley, R C; Pfent, C; Xie, Y; Xue, Y; Wise, A G; DeVaul, J M; Maes, R K

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and small intestinal lymphoma in cats is often difficult, especially when only endoscopic biopsy specimens are available for evaluation. However, a correct diagnosis is imperative for proper treatment and prognosis. A retrospective study was performed using surgical and endoscopic intestinal biopsy specimens from 63 cats with a history of chronic diarrhea or vomiting or weight loss. A diagnosis of lymphoma or inflammation was based on microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections alone, HE-stained sections plus results of immunohistochemical labeling (IHC) for CD3e and CD79a, and HE staining, immunophenotyping, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results for B and/or T cell clonality. In addition, various histomorphologic parameters were evaluated for significant differences between lymphoma and IBD using Fisher's exact test. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter in the diagnosis of lymphoma were also determined. Results of Bayesian statistical analysis demonstrated that combining histologic evaluation of small intestinal biopsy specimens with immunophenotyping and analysis of clonality of lymphoid infiltrates results in more accurate differentiation of neoplastic versus inflammatory lymphocytes. Important histologic features that differentiated intestinal lymphoma from IBD included lymphoid infiltration of the intestinal wall beyond the mucosa, epitheliotropism (especially intraepithelial nests and plaques), heterogeneity, and nuclear size of lymphocytes. Based on the results of this study, a stepwise diagnostic algorithm that first uses histologic assessment, followed by immunophenotyping and then PCR to determine clonality of the lymphocytes, was developed to more accurately differentiate between intestinal lymphoma and IBD.

  7. Distinct management issues with Crohn's disease of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fong, Steven C M; Irving, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Small bowel Crohn's disease can present with clinical challenges that are specific to its location. In this review, we address some of the areas that present particular problems in small bowel Crohn's disease. A key issue specific to small bowel Crohn's disease relates to its diagnosis given that access to the small bowel is limited. Radiological advances, particularly in small bowel ultrasonography and MRI, as well as the introduction of capsule endoscopy and balloon enteroscopy are helping to address this. In addition, our ability to differentiate small bowel Crohn's disease from other causes of inflammation, such as tuberculosis, is improving on the basis of better understanding of the features that differentiate these conditions. It is also becoming apparent that jejunal Crohn's disease represents a distinct disease phenotype with potentially worse clinical outcomes. Finally, because it is a rare complication, our understanding of small bowel cancer associated with Crohn's disease remains limited. Recent publications are, however, starting to improve our knowledge of this condition. Although small bowel Crohn's disease presents specific management issues not seen in patients with Crohn's disease elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract, our knowledge of how to manage these is improving.

  8. Colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Koji; Watanabe, Toshio; Shimada, Sunao; Takeda, Shogo; Itani, Shigehiro; Higashimori, Akira; Nadatani, Yuji; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome is a large, multiprotein complex that consists of a nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and pro-caspase-1. Activation of the inflammasome results in cleavage of pro-caspase-1 into cleaved caspase-1, which promotes the processing of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β into mature IL-1β. We investigated the effects of colchicine on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury and activation of the NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Colchicine treatment inhibited indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury by 86% (1 mg/kg) and 94% (3 mg/kg) as indicated by the lesion index 24 h after indomethacin administration. Colchicine inhibited the protein expression of cleaved caspase-1 and mature IL-1β, without affecting the mRNA expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β. Although treatment with recombinant IL-1β (0.1 μg/kg) did not change the severity of small intestinal damage, the preventive effects of colchicine were abolished by supplementation with the same dose of recombinant IL-1β. Indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage was reduced by 77%, as determined by the lesion index in NLRP3−/− mice, and colchicine treatment failed to inhibit small intestinal damage in NLRP3−/− mice. These results demonstrate that colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27585971

  9. Cellular differentiation in the emerging fetal rat small intestinal epithelium: mosaic patterns of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Ong, D E; Gordon, J I

    1989-02-01

    We have examined the pattern of differentiation of the small intestinal epithelium in fetal rats during the 17th through 21st days of gestation. Five genes expressed in late fetal, neonatal, and adult enterocytes were used as markers of differentiation. They encode three homologous small cytoplasmic hydrophobic ligand binding proteins--liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), and cellular retinol binding protein II (CRBP II)--and two apolipoproteins--apoAI and apoAIV. RNA blot hybridization studies indicated that gradients in mRNA concentration from the proximal small intestine to colon appear coincident with the initiation of rapid epithelial cell proliferation and villus formation (days 17-19 of the 22-day gestation period). Immunocytochemical studies disclosed a remarkably heterogeneous pattern of cell-specific expression of the three hydrophobic ligand binding proteins that was not apparent with either apoAIV or apoAI. This "mosaic" staining pattern was observed in morphologically similar cells occupying identical topographic positions along nascent villi in 17- to 18-day fetuses. The onset and resolution of this mosaicism varies between I-FABP, L-FABP, and CRBP II in the proximal small bowel, although it completely resolves by the first postnatal day. The distal small intestine exhibits a developmental delay of 1-2 days in the appearance of this heterogeneous pattern of initial gene expression. Double-label immunofluorescent analyses using L-FABP and I-FABP antibodies indicated that on the 18th day of gestation the proximal small intestinal columnar epithelium contains several populations of enterocytes expressing neither, one, or both proteins. The potential significance of this mosaic pattern of intestinal epithelial differentiation is discussed in light of recent studies with transgenic and chimeric mice.

  10. Microbiota Plays a Key Role in Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Small Intestinal Damage.

    PubMed

    Otani, Koji; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Toshio; Shimada, Sunao; Nadatani, Yuji; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) damage the small intestine by causing multiple erosions and ulcers. However, to date, no established therapies and prophylactic agents are available to treat such damages. We reviewed the role of intestinal microbiota in NSAID-induced intestinal damage and identified potential therapeutic candidates. The composition of the intestinal microbiota is an important factor in the pathophysiology of NSAID-induced small intestinal damage. Once mucosal barrier function is disrupted due to NSAID-induced prostaglandin deficiency and mitochondrial malfunction, lipopolysaccharide from luminal gram-negative bacteria and high mobility group box 1 from the injured epithelial cells activate toll-like receptor 4-signaling pathway and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasome; this leads to the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are often used for the prevention of NSAID-induced injuries to the upper gastrointestinal tract. However, several studies indicate that PPIs may induce dysbiosis, which may exacerbate the NSAID-induced small intestinal damage. Our recent research suggests that probiotics and rebamipide could be used to prevent NSAID-induced small intestinal damage by regulating the intestinal microbiota. Key Messages: Intestinal microbiota plays a key role in NSAID-induced small intestinal damage, and modulating the composition of the intestinal microbiota could be a new therapeutic strategy for treating this damage. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Immunohistochemical characterization of cellular proliferation in small intestinal hyperplasia of rats with hepatic Strobilocercus fasciolaris infection.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, J T; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    2008-07-01

    Rats infected with the larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis harbour the intermediate stage of the parasite Strobilocercus fasciolaris within the liver. Affected animals also develop gastric and intestinal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of the gastric hyperplasia has been extensively investigated, but few studies have addressed the nature of the intestinal changes. This study characterizes the proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemical labelling for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. At 6 weeks post-infection (wpi) there was an increase in villous length but crypt depth was normal. At 9 wpi there was evidence of epithelial hyperplasia, increased villous length and crypt depth, and expansion of zones of epithelial proliferation. Immunohistochemical labelling indicated that an increase in the number of proliferating cells produced a greater number of progeny cells. Intestinal hyperplasia during experimental infection with T. taeniaeformis larvae is likely to be related to the associated gastropathy, although the mechanisms underlying both changes remain undefined.

  12. A Rare Type of Primary Internal Hernia Causing Small Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Vandana; Rath, Pratap Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Primary internal hernias are extremely rare in adults. They are an important cause of small intestinal obstruction and lead to high morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Clinical presentation of internal hernia is nonspecific. Imaging has been of limited utility in cases of acute intestinal obstruction; moreover, interpretation of imaging features is operator dependant. Thus, internal hernias are usually detected at laparotomy and preoperative diagnosis in an emergency setting is either difficult or most of the time not suspected. We report herein a case of a 45-year-old male who presented with acute intestinal obstruction which was attributed later to a very rare type of internal hernia on exploratory laparotomy. A loop of ileum was found to enter the retroperitoneum through a hernia gate which was located lateral to the sigmoid colon in the left paracolic gutter. The segment of intestine was reduced and the hernial defect was closed. Our finding represents an extremely rare variant of retroperitoneal hernias. PMID:27999703

  13. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Can a Small Intestine Segment Be an Alternative Biological Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration?

    PubMed

    Arda, Mehmet S; Koçman, Emre A; Özkara, Emre; Söztutar, Erdem; Özatik, Orhan; Köse, Aydan; Çetin, Cengiz

    2017-05-05

    Autologous nerve grafts are used to bridge peripheral nerve defects. Limited sources and donor site morbidity are the major problems with peripheral nerve grafts. Although various types of autologous grafts such as arteries, veins and muscles have been recommended, an ideal conduit has not yet been described. To investigate the effectiveness of a small intestinal conduit for peripheral nerve defects. Animal experimentation. Twenty-one rats were divided into three groups (n=7). Following anaesthesia, sciatic nerve exploration was performed in the Sham group. The 10 mm nerve gap was bridged with a 15 mm ileal segment in the small intestinal conduit group and the defect was replaced with orthotopic nerve in autologous nerve graft group. The functional recovery was tested monthly by walking-track analysis and the sciatic functional index. Histological evaluation was performed on the 12th week. Sciatic functional index tests are better in autologous nerve graft group (-55.09±6.35); however, during follow-up, progress in sciatic functional index was demonstrated, along with axonal regeneration and innervation of target muscles in the small intestinal conduit group (-76.36±12.08) (p<0.05). In histologic sections, distinctive sciatic nerve regeneration was examined in the small intestinal conduit group. The expression of S-100 and neurofilament was observed in small intestinal conduit group but was less organised than in the autologous nerve graft group. Although the counted number (7459.79±1833.50 vs. 4226.51±1063.06 mm2), measured diameter [2.19 (2.15-2.88) vs. 1.74 (1.50-2.09) µm] and myelin sheath thickness [1.18 (1.09-1.44) vs. 0.66 (0.40-1.07) µm] of axons is significantly high in the middle sections of autologous nerve graft compared to the small intestinal conduit group, respectively (p<0.05), the peripheral nerve regeneration was also observed in the small intestinal conduit group. Small intestinal conduit should not be considered as an alternative to

  15. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  16. Compartmentalised expression of meprin in small intestinal mucosa: enhanced expression in lamina propria in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Lottaz, Daniel; Buri, Caroline; Monteleone, Giovanni; Rösmann, Sandra; Macdonald, Thomas T; Sanderson, Ian R; Sterchi, Erwin E

    2007-03-01

    Epithelial cells in the human small intestine express meprin, an astacin-like metalloprotease, which accumulates normally at the brush border membrane and in the gut lumen. Therefore, meprin is targeted towards luminal components. In coeliac disease patients, peptides from ingested cereals trigger mucosal inflammation in the small intestine, disrupting epithelial cell differentiation and function. Using in situ hybridisation on duodenal tissue sections, we observed a marked shift of meprin mRNA expression from epithelial cells, the predominant expression site in normal mucosa, to lamina propria leukocytes in coeliac disease. Meprin thereby gains access to the substrate repertoire present beneath the epithelium.

  17. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant1,2. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds3,4. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)5,6 that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the cryptvillus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response7–9. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies. PMID:25326803

  18. Alterations in the small intestinal wall and motor function after repeated cisplatin in rat.

    PubMed

    Uranga, J A; García-Martínez, J M; García-Jiménez, C; Vera, G; Martín-Fontelles, M I; Abalo, R

    2017-07-01

    Gastrointestinal adverse effects occurring during cancer chemotherapy are well known and feared; those persisting once treatment has finished are relatively unknown. We characterized the alterations occurring in the rat small intestine, after repeated treatment with cisplatin. Male Wistar rats received saline or cisplatin (2 mg kg(-1)  week(-1) , for 5 weeks, ip). Gastric motor function was studied non-invasively throughout treatment (W1-W5) and 1 week after treatment finalization (W6). During W6, upper gastrointestinal motility was also invasively studied and small intestinal samples were collected for histopathological and molecular studies. Structural alterations in the small intestinal wall, mucosa, submucosa, muscle layers, and lymphocytic nodules were histologically studied. Periodic acid-Schiff staining and immunohistochemistry for Ki-67, chromogranin A, and neuronal-specific enolase were used to detect secretory, proliferating, endocrine and neural cells, respectively. The expression of different markers in the tunica muscularis was analyzed by RT/qPCR. Repeated cisplatin induced motility alterations during and after treatment. After treatment (W6), the small intestinal wall showed histopathological alterations in most parameters measured, including a reduction in the thickness of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Expression of c-KIT (for interstitial cells of Cajal), nNOS (for inhibitory motor neurons), pChAT, and cChAT (for excitatory motor neurons) increased significantly (although both ChATs to a lesser extent). Repeated cisplatin induces relatively long-lasting gut dysmotility in rat associated with important histopathological and molecular alterations in the small intestinal wall. In cancer survivors, the possible chemotherapy-induced histopathological, molecular, and functional intestinal sequelae should be evaluated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. What are the effects of proton pump inhibitors on the small intestine?

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shunji

    2015-06-14

    Generally, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have great benefit for patients with acid related disease with less frequently occurring side effects. According to a recent report, PPIs provoke dysbiosis of the small intestinal bacterial flora, exacerbating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury. Several meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported that patients treated with PPIs, as well as post-gastrectomy patients, have a higher frequency of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) compared to patients who lack the aforementioned conditions. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence that these conditions induce Clostridium difficile infection. At this time, PPI-induced dysbiosis is considered a type of SIBO. It now seems likely that intestinal bacterial flora influence many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune diseases. When attempting to control intestinal bacterial flora with probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation, etc., the influence of acid suppression therapy, especially PPIs, should not be overlooked.

  20. Hypersensitivity reactions in small intestine. I Thymus dependence of experimental 'partial villous atrophy'.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A; Jarrett, E E

    1975-01-01

    Rats infected with the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis have crypt hyperplasia with villous atrophy in affected areas of the small intestine. In thymus-deprived (B) rats the course of infection is prolonged but, despite the presence of many worms in the intestinal lumen, villi and crypts appear largely normal. This suggests that the tissue damaged associated with N. brasilliensis infection is caused, not by the worms, but by a local thymus-dependent immune reaction. There is some evidence to implicate lymphocytes rather than antibodies in this reaction. It is already know that T-cell-associated damage to the small intestine, such as occurs in allograft rejection, produces subtotal villous atrophy. The present findings suggest that when T cell react locally with helminth antigens a similar type of damage occurs. The presence of a local cell-mediated immune reaction may be the common factor which causes villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia in many small intestinal diseases, eg, viral enteritis, giardiasis, cow's milk allergy, and coeliac disease. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:1079195

  1. Phloroglucinol Protects Small Intestines of Mice from Ionizing Radiation by Regulating Apoptosis-Related Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Danbee; Bing, So Jin; Cho, Jinhee; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Al-Amin, Mohammad; Park, Suk Jae

    2013-01-01

    Phloroglucinol (PG) is a phenolic compound isolated from Ecklonia cava, a brown algae abundant on Jeju island, Korea. Previous reports have suggested that PG exerts antioxidative and cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress. In this study, we confirmed that PG protected against small intestinal damage caused by ionizing radiation, and we investigated its protective mechanism in detail. Regeneration of intestinal crypts in the PG-treated irradiated group was significantly promoted compared with that in irradiated controls. The expression level of proapoptotic molecules such as p53, Bax, and Bak in the small intestine was downregulated and that of antiapoptotic molecules such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-XS/L was augmented in the PG-treated group. On histological observation of the small intestine, PG inhibited the immunoreactivity of p53, Bax, and Bak and increased that of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XS/L. These results demonstrate the protective mechanisms of PG in mice against intestinal damage from ionizing radiation, providing the benefit of raising the apoptosis threshold of jejunal crypt cells. PMID:23117934

  2. Epithelial cell extrusion during fluid transport in canine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S

    1977-04-01

    Epithelial cell extrusion during fluid transport was studied under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The rate of cell extrusion from the villus tips in vitro increased by about onefold in the villi with obstruction of lymph flow associated with the increase of lymph and tissue fluid pressure. When lymph pressure in the jejunal and ileal villi was increased to 6.4 +/- .2 and 12.3 +/- .5 mmHg, respectively, by injection of Ringer solution into the central lacteals, fluid leaked out of the villi and a shedding of epithelium occurred. Vigorous villus spasmodic contraction induced by cocaine or atropine also caused a shedding of epithelium. Cells always appeared in the lumen of intestine in vivo either during fluid absorption or secretion. A copious secretion of fluid, increase of cell loss, and congestion of blood in the villi occurred by the action of cholera toxin, MgSO4, and choline chloride. The rate of cell loss was highest during fluid secretion induced by an elevation of tissue fluid pressure such as at high venous pressure or during intra-arterial histamine infusion. It is thus concluded that elevated tissue fluid pressure is involved in epithelial cell extrusion during fluid transport.

  3. Sexually dimorphic characteristics of the small intestine and colon of prepubescent C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing appreciation for sexually dimorphic effects, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are only partially understood. In the present study, we explored transcriptomics and epigenetic differences in the small intestine and colon of prepubescent male and female mice. In addition, the microbiota composition of the colonic luminal content has been examined. Methods At postnatal day 14, male and female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed and the small intestine, colon and content of luminal colon were isolated. Gene expression of both segments of the intestine was analysed by microarray analysis. DNA methylation of the promoter regions of selected sexually dimorphic genes was examined by pyrosequencing. Composition of the microbiota was explored by deep sequencing. Results Sexually dimorphic genes were observed in both segments of the intestine of 2-week-old mouse pups, with a stronger effect in the small intestine. Amongst the total of 349 genes displaying a sexually dimorphic effect in the small intestine and/or colon, several candidates exhibited a previously established function in the intestine (i.e. Nts, Nucb2, Alox5ap and Retnlγ). In addition, differential expression of genes linked to intestinal bowel disease (i.e. Ccr3, Ccl11 and Tnfr) and colorectal cancer development (i.e. Wt1 and Mmp25) was observed between males and females. Amongst the genes displaying significant sexually dimorphic expression, nine genes were histone-modifying enzymes, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms might be a potential underlying regulatory mechanism. However, our results reveal no significant changes in DNA methylation of analysed CpGs within the selected differentially expressed genes. With respect to the bacterial community composition in the colon, a dominant effect of litter origin was found but no significant sex effect was detected. However, a sex effect on the dominance of specific taxa was observed. Conclusions This study reveals

  4. Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Manuela; Lochner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer’s patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation. PMID

  5. Glycoconjugate histochemistry in the small and large intestine of normal and Solanum glaucophyllum-intoxicated rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zanuzzi, C N; Barbeito, C G; Ortíz, M L; Lozza, F A; Fontana, P A; Portiansky, E L; Gimeno, E J

    2010-10-01

    Vitamin D participates in mineral homeostasis, immunomodulation, cell growth and differentiation. The leaves of Solanum glaucophyllum contain high levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 as glycoside derivatives and their chronic ingestion generates a hypervitaminosis D-like state. We analyzed changes on carbohydrate expression as a cell differentiation indicator on samples of the small and large intestine of S. glaucophyllum-intoxicated rabbits, using conventional and lectin histochemistry. Male New Zealand white rabbits were intoxicated with S. glaucophyllum during two or four weeks and killed the day after. A group of animals ("possibly recovered group") were intoxicated during 15 days and killed at day 45 of the beginning of the experiment. We found changes in the lectin binding pattern in the small and large intestine of the intoxicated rabbits. Some of these changes were reverted in the possibly recovered group. Vitamin D could be a new regulator factor of the intestinal glycosylation process.

  6. A "living bioreactor" for the production of tissue-engineered small intestine.

    PubMed

    Levin, Daniel E; Sala, Frederic G; Barthel, Erik R; Speer, Allison L; Hou, Xiaogang; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe the use of a mouse model as a living bioreactor for the generation of tissue-engineered small intestine. Small intestine is harvested from donor mice with subsequent isolation of organoid units (a cluster of mesenchymal and epithelial cells). Some of these organoid units contain pluripotent stem cells with a preserved relationship with the mesenchymal stem cell niche. A preparation of organoid units is seeded onto a biodegradable scaffold and implanted intraperitoneally within the omentum of the host animal. The cells are nourished initially via imbibition until neovascularization occurs. This technique allows the growth of fully differentiated epithelium (composed of Paneth cells, goblet cells, enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells), muscle, nerve, and blood vessels of donor origin. Variations of this technique have been used to generate tissue-engineered stomach, large intestine, and esophagus. The variations include harvest technique, length of digestion, and harvest times.

  7. Cross-sectional small intestinal surveillance of maintenance hemodialysis patients using video capsule endoscopy: SCHEMA study

    PubMed Central

    Hosoe, Naoki; Matsukawa, Shigeaki; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Naganuma, Makoto; Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Ida, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Yoshitsugu; Hibi, Toshifumi; Ogata, Haruhiko; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Small intestinal pathology in hemodialysis (HD) patients has been studied in only a small number of retrospective case series. One method for noninvasively surveying small intestinal disorders is video capsule endoscopy (VCE). The primary aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of small intestinal abnormalities among asymptomatic maintenance HD outpatients using VCE. The secondary aim was to assess the clinical impact of these abnormalities. Patients and methods: This study consisted of two phases. In phase I, a cross-sectional study, a cohort of patients who received maintenance HD three times weekly at an outpatient hemodialysis clinic were studied using VCE. Phase II was a prospective cohort study with follow up for 1 year after VCE. Results: Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study, and two were excluded from analysis due to capsule retention in the stomach. The prevalence of small bowel abnormalities in HD patients was 64.8 % (35/54) (95 % confidential interval 52.1 % – 77.6 %). Of 54 patients, 21 (38.9 %) had mucosal lesions, 10 (18.5 %) had vascular lesions, and 4 (7.4 %) had both lesion types. During the 1-year follow-up period, events occurred in four patients. A small bowel-associated event was observed in one patient, who underwent laparoscopy-assisted small intestinal partial resection 3 months after diagnosis by VCE. All patients in whom events were seen had small bowel abnormalities; no events were observed in the VCE-negative group. Conclusions: Although asymptomatic maintenance HD patients had a high prevalence of small bowel abnormalities (64.8 %), they did not have a high incidence of small bowel-associated events during the 1-year follow-up. PMID:27227120

  8. Development of lntraepithelial Cells in the Porcine Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Contreras, G.; Bailey, M.; González-Pozos, S.; Stokes, C. R.; Ortega, M. G.; Mondragón-Flores, R.

    2001-01-01

    The number, phenotype, localisation and development of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) from duodenum (Du) and ileum (Il) were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and light and electron microscopy in unweaned (0–7 weeks old) and six months-old pigs. Developmental changes at birth showed that 38% of the total lymphocytes in the villi were IEL, mainly of the CD2+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) phenotype. That proportion rose to over 50% at week 5 after birth, resembling adult proportion, although still with fewer cells than in adult pigs. CD4+ cells appeared relatively early in life although they were confined to the lamina propria (LP) and CD8+ cells were found only in low numbers. In the villi of adult animals, almost half of the total number of lymphocytes were IEL (49% Du, 52% Il). Over half of these IEL (52% Du, 53% Il) showed the CD2+CD4-CD8+ phenotype and were localized at the epithelium's basement membrane. Numerous (43% Du, 42% Il) DN IEL were found grouped at the enterocyte nucleus level and relatively few (5% in Du and Il) granular IEL were found apically in the epithelium. These proportions were homogeneously maintained along the villi's tip, middle and bottom, suggesting that the IEL may have their origin in the LP. Therefore, the IEL compartment in the porcine intestine develops slowly with age and is actually composed by a heterogeneous population of cells (null, DN and CD8+). These results may explain the increased susceptibility of young animals to disease during the lactation period and should be taken into account when functional studies are carried out with IEL. The quantitative results of this paper established a model for studies on the effect of age, diet, normal flora, infection and oral immunization on the IEL of the gut. PMID:11589310

  9. Binding Studies on Isolated Porcine Small Intestinal Mucosa and in vitro Toxicity Studies Reveal Lack of Effect of C. perfringens Beta-Toxin on the Porcine Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Simone; Wyder, Marianne; Candi, Ahmet; Regenscheit, Nadine; Nathues, Christina; van Immerseel, Filip; Posthaus, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Beta-toxin (CPB) is the essential virulence factor of C. perfringens type C causing necrotizing enteritis (NE) in different hosts. Using a pig infection model, we showed that CPB targets small intestinal endothelial cells. Its effect on the porcine intestinal epithelium, however, could not be adequately investigated by this approach. Using porcine neonatal jejunal explants and cryosections, we performed in situ binding studies with CPB. We confirmed binding of CPB to endothelial but could not detect binding to epithelial cells. In contrast, the intact epithelial layer inhibited CPB penetration into deeper intestinal layers. CPB failed to induce cytopathic effects in cultured polarized porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and primary jejunal epithelial cells. C. perfringens type C culture supernatants were toxic for cell cultures. This, however, was not inhibited by CPB neutralization. Our results show that, in the porcine small intestine, CPB primarily targets endothelial cells and does not bind to epithelial cells. An intact intestinal epithelial layer prevents CPB diffusion into underlying tissue and CPB alone does not cause direct damage to intestinal epithelial cells. Additional factors might be involved in the early epithelial damage which is needed for CPB diffusion towards its endothelial targets in the small intestine. PMID:25860161

  10. Depletion of enteric bacteria diminishes leukocyte infiltration following doxorubicin-induced small intestinal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Carr, Jacquelyn S; King, Stephanie; Dekaney, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    While enteric bacteria have been shown to play a critical role in other forms of intestinal damage, their role in mediating the response to the chemotherapeutic drug Doxorubicin (Doxo) is unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of intestinal bacterial depletion to evaluate the role enteric bacteria play in mediating Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and, more specifically, in mediating chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration following Doxo treatment. An understanding of this pathway may allow for development of intervention strategies to reduce chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. Mice were treated with (Abx) or without (NoAbx) oral antibiotics in drinking water for four weeks and then with Doxo. Jejunal tissues were collected at various time points following Doxo treatment and stained and analyzed for apoptosis, crypt damage and restitution, and macrophage and neutrophil number. In addition, RNA expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL1-β, IL-10) and cytokines (CCL2, CC7, KC) was assessed by qRT-PCR. In NoAbx mice Doxo-induced damage was associated with rapid induction of apoptosis in jejunal crypt epithelium and an increase weight loss and crypt loss. In addition, we observed an increase in immune-modulating chemokines CCL2, CCL7 and KC and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils. In contrast, while still positive for induction of apoptosis following Doxo treatment, Abx mice showed neither the overall weight loss nor crypt loss seen in NoAbx mice nor the increased chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration. Enteric bacteria play a critical role in Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and are associated with an increase in immune-modulating chemokines and cells. Manipulation of enteric bacteria or the damage pathway may allow for prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage.

  11. Depletion of enteric bacteria diminishes leukocyte infiltration following doxorubicin-induced small intestinal damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jacquelyn S.; King, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims While enteric bacteria have been shown to play a critical role in other forms of intestinal damage, their role in mediating the response to the chemotherapeutic drug Doxorubicin (Doxo) is unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of intestinal bacterial depletion to evaluate the role enteric bacteria play in mediating Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and, more specifically, in mediating chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration following Doxo treatment. An understanding of this pathway may allow for development of intervention strategies to reduce chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. Methods Mice were treated with (Abx) or without (NoAbx) oral antibiotics in drinking water for four weeks and then with Doxo. Jejunal tissues were collected at various time points following Doxo treatment and stained and analyzed for apoptosis, crypt damage and restitution, and macrophage and neutrophil number. In addition, RNA expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL1-β, IL-10) and cytokines (CCL2, CC7, KC) was assessed by qRT-PCR. Results In NoAbx mice Doxo-induced damage was associated with rapid induction of apoptosis in jejunal crypt epithelium and an increase weight loss and crypt loss. In addition, we observed an increase in immune-modulating chemokines CCL2, CCL7 and KC and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils. In contrast, while still positive for induction of apoptosis following Doxo treatment, Abx mice showed neither the overall weight loss nor crypt loss seen in NoAbx mice nor the increased chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration. Conclusion Enteric bacteria play a critical role in Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and are associated with an increase in immune-modulating chemokines and cells. Manipulation of enteric bacteria or the damage pathway may allow for prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. PMID:28257503

  12. Use of Ligated Segments of Rabbit Small Intestine in Experimental Shigellosis1

    PubMed Central

    Arm, H. G.; Floyd, T. M.; Faber, J. E.; Hayes, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Arm, H. G. (Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, Md.), T. M. Floyd, J. E. Faber, and J. R. Hayes. Use of ligated segments of rabbit small intestine in experimental shigellosis. J. Bacteriol. 89:803–809. 1965.—Inoculation of ligated segments of small intestine in living rabbits with broth cultures or resting-cell suspensions of recently isolated strains of Shigella caused distension of the segments by accumulation of exudate within 12 hr. Histological changes characteristic of an inflammatory response were similar to those of human bacillary dysentery. Tissue response and accumulation of exudate preceded demonstrable increase in numbers of shigellae inoculated as 2 × 1010 resting cells. Capability of shigellae to provoke intestinal response was not related to any particular serological group. The active principles concerned with eliciting intestinal response were associated only with preparations containing living organisms. Ability of recently isolated strains to elicit response diminished rapidly during culture on artificial media. The capability was preserved indefinitely by lyophilization soon after isolation from acute bacillary dysentery infections of man. Advantages of using shigellae recently isolated for investigating possible mechanisms of pathogenesis were indicated. During the summer months, the rabbit small intestine was refractory to the activity of shigellae, and positive responses were not observed. Use of ligated segments of rabbit small intestine qualified as an indicator of virulence for the rabbit; and, virulence for the rabbit showed a high degree of correlation with a short period of culture of shigellae on artificial media after isolation from human bacillary dysentery infections. Images PMID:14273664

  13. Exacerbation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal lesions by antisecretory drugs in rats: the role of intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-11-01

    Antisecretory drugs such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2-RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used for the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the effects of these drugs on NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers are not fully understood. The effects of H2-RAs and PPIs on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions and small intestinal motility were examined in rats. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were used. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg) was administered orally in fasted or fed rats, and gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after indomethacin administration. Intestinal motility was measured by using a balloon method under urethane anesthesia. Indomethacin produced multiple lesions in the gastric corpus in fasted rats and in the small intestine in fed rats: 1) H2-RAs (cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine) and PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) markedly inhibited the formation of gastric lesions. 2) The drugs, except for lansoprazole, increased intestinal lesions. 3) H2-RAs augmented the increase in intestinal motility caused by indomethacin, and the effects of H2-RAs on motility and intestinal lesions were markedly inhibited by atropine. 4) Lansoprazole inhibited the formation of intestinal lesions, and the effect was prevented by both pharmacological ablation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and pretreatment with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a selective inhibitor of nitric-oxide synthesis. The results suggest that: 1) inhibition of acid secretion by antisecretory drugs may exacerbate NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, 2) H2-RAs further aggravate lesions by increasing intestinal motility via the activation of cholinergic pathways, and 3) lansoprazole protects the intestinal mucosa against NSAID-related ulcerative stimuli.

  14. Simultaneously multiparametric spectroscopic monitoring of tissue viability in the brain and small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmasov, Michael; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2007-02-01

    Under body O II imbalance, the Autonomic Nervous System is responsible for redistribution of blood flow with preference to the most vital organs (brain, heart), while the less vital organs (intestine, GI tract) are hypoperfused. The aim of this study was to develop and use an animal model for real time monitoring of tissue viability in the brain, and the small intestine, under various levels of oxygen and blood supply. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized, the brain cortex and intestinal serosa were exposed and connected by optical fibers to the Multi-Site Multi-Parametric (MSMP) monitoring system. Tissue blood flow (TBF) and mitochondrial NADH redox state were monitored simultaneously in the two organs. The rats were subjected to short anoxia, 20 minutes hypoxia or epinephrine (2& 8μg/kg I.V.). Under oxygen deficiency, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was elevated, whereas intestinal TBF was reduced. Mitochondrial NADH was significantly elevated in both organs. Systemic injection of Adrenaline showed a dose-depended increase in systemic blood pressure and CBF response whereas, intestinal TBF similarly decreased in both doses. In addition, NADH was elevated (reduced form) in the intestine whereas oxidation was observed in the brain. In conclusion, our preliminary results may imply the ability of using of the MSMP for monitoring non-vital organs in order to detect early changes in the balance between oxygen supply and demand in the body.

  15. Prolapse of the Small Intestine from the Uterine Perforation at Dilatation and Curettage

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroaki; Ito, Homare; Lefor, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilatation and curettage (D&C) sometimes causes uterine perforation, which usually does not cause a serious problem. Here, we report uterine perforation caused by D&C, in which the small intestine prolapsed from the uterus, requiring intestinal resection. D&C was performed for missed abortion at 9 weeks. After dilating the cervix, forceps grasped tissue that, upon being pulled, resulted in the intestine being prolapsed into the vagina. Laparotomy revealed a perforation at the low anterior uterine wall, through which the ileum had prolapsed. The mesentery of the prolapsed ileum was completely detached and the ileum was necrotic, which was resected. The uterus and the intestine were reconstructed. Although intestinal prolapse is considered to be caused by “unsafe” D&C performed by inexperienced persons or even by nonphysicians in developing countries, this occurred in a tertiary center of a developed country. We must be aware that adverse events such as uterine perforation with intestinal prolapse can occur even during routine D&C. PMID:24716029

  16. Immunological quantitation and localization of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in human liver and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Sakashita, N; Ornvold, K; Lee, O; Chang, E T; Dong, R; Lin, S; Lee, C Y; Strom, S C; Kashyap, R; Fung, J J; Farese, R V; Patoiseau, J F; Delhon, A; Chang, T Y

    2000-09-08

    By using specific anti-ACAT-1 antibodies in immunodepletion studies, we previously found that ACAT-1, a 50-kDa protein, plays a major catalytic role in the adult human liver, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys but not in the intestine. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the intestine may be largely derived from a different ACAT protein. To test this hypothesis, we produced specific polyclonal anti-ACAT-2 antibodies that quantitatively immunodepleted human ACAT-2, a 46-kDa protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In hepatocyte-like HepG2 cells, ACAT-1 comprises 85-90% of the total ACAT activity, with the remainder attributed to ACAT-2. In adult intestines, most of the ACAT activity can be immunodepleted by anti-ACAT-2. ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 do not form hetero-oligomeric complexes. In differentiating intestinal enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ACAT-2 protein content increases by 5-10-fold in 6 days, whereas ACAT-1 protein content remains relatively constant. In the small intestine, ACAT-2 is concentrated at the apices of the villi, whereas ACAT-1 is uniformly distributed along the villus-crypt axis. In the human liver, ACAT-1 is present in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. In contrast, ACAT-2 is evident in fetal but not adult hepatocytes. Our results collectively suggest that in humans, ACAT-2 performs significant catalytic roles in the fetal liver and in intestinal enterocytes.

  17. Bifocal metastasis of melanoma to the small intestine from an unknown primary with intestinal obstruction – case report

    PubMed Central

    Bandurski, Jędrzej; Lewandowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman was hospitalized at an internal care unit, due to growing weakness, dizziness, lack of appetite, anemia and abdominal pain. In anamnesis: past myocardial infarction, post-operative hypothyroidism, type 2 diabetes insulin-dependent, stroke, left kidney cirrhosis, gout and anemia. The physical examination did not reveal pathological changes except for skin paleness. The biochemical tests showed iron deficiency anemia and elevated Ca 125 (54.5 U/ml) (normal range: 0.00–35.00). Other markers were normal. An abdominal CT revealed a bifocal infiltration of the small intestine. Due to the increasing obstruction symptoms, the patient was operated on. A bifocal small bowel tumor was found intra-surgically. A partial resection of the jejunum and distal ileum was made. The intestines were joined end to end. The histopathological diagnosis corresponded to metastases of malignant melanoma. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. She received two cycles of dacarbazine 1000 mg/day. Due to drug intolerance, the chemotherapy was discontinued. Now, she is receiving hospice care. PMID:24596522

  18. Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced oleoylethanolamide signaling in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Dipatrizio, Nicholas V; Guijarro, Ana; Schwartz, Gary J; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-04-13

    Ingestion of dietary fat stimulates production of the small-intestinal satiety factors oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NPPE), which reduce food intake through a combination of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) actions. Previous studies have shown that sympathetic innervation of the gut is necessary for duodenal infusions of fat to induce satiety, suggesting that sympathetic activity may engage small-intestinal satiety signals such as OEA and NPPE. In the present study, we show that surgical resection of the sympathetic celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex, which sends projections to the upper gut, abolishes feeding-induced OEA production in rat small-intestinal cells. These effects are accounted for by suppression of OEA biosynthesis, and are mimicked by administration of the selective β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist ICI-118,551. We further show that sympathetic ganglionectomy or pharmacological blockade of β2-adrenergic receptors prevents NPPE release into the circulation. In addition, sympathetic ganglionectomy increases meal frequency and lowers satiety ratio, and these effects are corrected by pharmacological administration of OEA. The results suggest that sympathetic activity controls fat-induced satiety by enabling the coordinated production of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) satiety signals in the small intestine.

  19. Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced OEA signaling in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jin; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Guijarro, Ana; Schwartz, Gary J; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of dietary fat stimulates production of the small-intestinal satiety factors oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NPPE), which reduce food intake through a combination of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) actions. Previous studies have shown that sympathetic innervation of the gut is necessary for duodenal infusions of fat to induce satiety, suggesting that sympathetic activity may engage small-intestinal satiety signals such as OEA and NPPE. In the present study, we show that surgical resection of the sympathetic celiac superior mesenteric ganglion, which sends projections to the upper gut, abolishes feeding-induced OEA production in rat small-intestinal cells. These effects are accounted for by suppression of OEA biosynthesis, and are mimicked by administration of the selective β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, ICI-118,551. We further show that sympathetic ganglionectomy or pharmacological blockade of β2-adrenergic receptors prevents NPPE release into the circulation. In addition, sympathetic ganglionectomy increases meal frequency and lowers satiety ratio, and these effects are corrected by pharmacological administration of OEA. The results suggest that sympathetic activity controls fat-induced satiety by enabling the coordinated production of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) satiety signals in the small intestine. PMID:21490214

  20. Haemorrhagic necrosis of small intestine and acute pancreatitis following open-heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Horton, E. H.; Murthy, S. K.; Seal, R. M. E.

    1968-01-01

    Five cases of haemorrhagic necrosis of the small intestine occurring after valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass are described. In one case, in addition to the above, there was an unusual complication, namely acute pancreatitis. The possible causes are discussed. The importance of hypotension before, during, or after bypass, or in the post-operative phase, is stressed. Images PMID:5664708

  1. Microsomal quercetin glucuronidation in rat small intestine depends on age and segment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in 3 equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats, n=8/age using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin...

  2. Early postnatal diets affect the bioregional small intestine microbiome and ileal metabolome in neonatal piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exclusive breastfeeding is known to be protective against gastrointestinal disorders and may modify gut development. Although the gut microbiome has been implicated, little is known about how early diet impacts the small intestinal microbiome, and how microbial shifts impact gut metabolic physiology...

  3. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  4. Update: The Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrate and Protein: Role of the Small Intestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leese, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of the small intestine in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Indicates as outdated the view that these materials must be broken down to monomeric units before absorption and that the gut secretes a mixture of digestive juices which brings about absorption. (JN)

  5. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase activities to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Digestion of starch requires activities provided by 6 interactive small intestinal enzymes. Two of these are luminal endo-glucosidases named alpha-amylases. Four are exo-glucosidases bound to the luminal surface of enterocytes. These mucosal activities were identified as 4 different maltases. Two ma...

  6. Intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small-bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pauleau, Ghislain; Commandeur, Diane; Andro, Christophe; Chapellier, Xavier

    2012-07-11

    Persistent omphalomesenteric duct as a cause of small-bowel obstruction is an exceptional finding. A neonate presented with occlusion due to intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Remnants of the duct were successfully resected, and the postoperative course was uneventful. We discuss the presentation of omphalomesenteric duct and its management.

  7. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  9. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  10. Update: The Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrate and Protein: Role of the Small Intestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leese, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of the small intestine in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Indicates as outdated the view that these materials must be broken down to monomeric units before absorption and that the gut secretes a mixture of digestive juices which brings about absorption. (JN)

  11. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacs of the Small Intestine of Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kirk L.; Butt, A. Grant

    2013-01-01

    The Na[superscript +]-glucose cotransporter is a key transport protein that is responsible for absorbing Na[superscript +] and glucose from the luminal contents of the small intestine and reabsorption by the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. Robert K. Crane originally described the cellular model of absorption of Na[superscript +] and…

  12. A study of the small intestinal mucosa using the scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, M. N.; Swift, J. A.

    1969-01-01

    In this paper we describe the features of small intestinal structure in normal control subjects using the scanning electron microscope. ImagesFIGS. 2a and 2bFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIGS. 7a and 7bFIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12FIG. 13FIG. 14FIG. 15 PMID:5358588

  13. Small intestinal volvulus in a free-ranging female dugong (Dugong dugon).

    PubMed

    Gillespie, A; Burgess, E; Lanyon, J; Owen, H

    2011-07-01

    An adult female dugong (Dugong dugon) was found dead and floating in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. This animal was found to have a 360° mesenteric volvulus with infarction of the associated segment of small intestine, and fibrinous peritonitis. Mortality was attributed to the volvulus and its sequelae. The cause was not apparent on gross or histological examination.

  14. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacs of the Small Intestine of Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kirk L.; Butt, A. Grant

    2013-01-01

    The Na[superscript +]-glucose cotransporter is a key transport protein that is responsible for absorbing Na[superscript +] and glucose from the luminal contents of the small intestine and reabsorption by the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. Robert K. Crane originally described the cellular model of absorption of Na[superscript +] and…

  15. Characterization of the diffuse mucosal associated lymphoid tissue of feline small intestine.

    PubMed

    Roccabianca, P; Woo, J C; Moore, P F

    2000-06-30

    Characterization of the feline intestinal mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) will facilitate investigation of intestinal disease in the cat and promote the cat as an animal model for a range of human diseases which involve the intestinal lymphoid tissue. This includes inflammatory bowel disease, viral and non-viral associated intestinal lymphomas and immunodeficiency associated syndromes. Morphologic and phenotypic characterization of the normal small intestinal diffuse MALT in 22 SPF cats was performed using flow cytometry and cytology on isolated intestinal leukocytes from the intra-epithelial and lamina proprial compartments, as well as immunohistology on tissues from the feline duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The intra-epithelial compartment (IEC) was dominated by lymphocytes (>85%) which frequently contained intracytoplasmic granules. The most striking findings in the IEC were the elevated percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (40%), presumed to express CD8 alpha alpha chains, and CD4-/CD8- (double negative) lymphocytes (44%), and the consistent presence of a minor subpopulation of CD3+/CD11d+ IELs (6%). Small percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (10%) were observed such that the IEL CD4:CD8 ratio (0.25) was low. The LPC also contained a majority of T cells and few plasma cells. However, this compartment had reduced percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (28%) and increased percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (27%) relative to the IEC. However, the LPL CD4:CD8 ratio (1.0) remained low compared with the ratio in peripheral blood. In feline MALT, MHC class II expression was lower than in other peripheral lymphoid compartments. The results of this study provide important reference values for future investigations involving feline intestinal lymphocytes and demonstrates that the leukocyte distribution and phenotypic characteristics of the feline diffuse MALT appear largely similar to the murine, rat and human counterparts.

  16. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis.

  17. Characterization of the developing small intestine in the absence of either GATA4 or GATA6.

    PubMed

    Walker, Emily M; Thompson, Cayla A; Kohlnhofer, Bridget M; Faber, Mary L; Battle, Michele A

    2014-12-11

    Studies of adult mice lacking either GATA4 or GATA6 in the small intestine demonstrate roles for these factors in small intestinal biology. Deletion of Gata4 in the adult mouse intestine revealed an essential role for GATA4 in jejunal function. Deletion of Gata6 in the adult mouse ileum alters epithelial cell types and ileal enterocyte gene expression. The effect of deletion of Gata4 or Gata6 alone during embryonic small intestinal development, however, has not been examined. We recently demonstrated that loss of both factors in double conditional knockout embryos causes severe defects in jejunal development. Therefore, the goal of this study is to provide phenotypic analysis of the small intestine of single Gata4 and Gata6 conditional knockout embryos. Villin-Cre was used to delete Gata4 or Gata6 in the developing intestinal epithelium. Elimination of either GATA4 or GATA6 in the jejunum, where these factors are co-expressed, caused changes in enterocyte and enteroendocrine cell gene expression. Ectopic expression of markers of the ileal-specific bile acid metabolism pathway was induced in GATA4-deficient jejunum but not in GATA6-deficient jejunum. A subtle increase in goblet cells was also identified in jejunum of both mutants. In GATA6-deficient embryonic ileum, villus length was altered, and enterocyte gene expression was perturbed including ectopic expression of the colon marker Car1. Goblet cells were increased, and enteroendocrine cells were decreased. Overall, we show that aspects of the phenotypes observed in the small intestine of adult Gata4 and Gata6 conditional knockout mice emerge during development. The effect of eliminating GATA6 from the developing ileum was greater than that of eliminating either GATA4 or GATA6 from the developing jejunum likely reflecting functional redundancy between these factors in the jejunum. Although GATA4 and GATA6 functions overlap, our data also suggest unique functions for GATA4 and GATA6 within the developing intestine

  18. Role of the Small Intestine in Developmental Programming: Impact of Maternal Nutrition on the Dam and Offspring.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Allison M; Caton, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    Small-intestinal growth and function are critical for optimal animal growth and health and play a major role in nutrient digestion and absorption, energy and nutrient expenditure, and immunological competence. During fetal and perinatal development, the small intestine is affected by the maternal environment and nutrient intake. In ruminants, altered small-intestinal mass, villi morphology, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, vascularity, and gene expression have been observed as a result of poor gestational nutrition or intrauterine growth restriction. Although many of these data come from fetal stages, data have also demonstrated that nutrition during mid- and late gestation affects lamb small-intestinal growth, vascularity, digestive enzyme activity, and gene expression at 20 and 180 d of age as well. The small intestine is known to be a highly plastic tissue, changing with nutrient intake and physiological state even in adulthood, and the maternal small intestine adapts to pregnancy and advancing gestation. In ruminants, the growth, vascularity, and gene expression of the maternal small intestine also adapt to the nutritional plane and specific nutrient intake such as high selenium during pregnancy. These changes likely alter both pre- and postnatal nutrient delivery to offspring. More research is necessary to better understand the role of the offspring and maternal small intestines in whole-animal responses to developmental programming, but programming of this plastic tissue seems to play a dynamic role in gestational nutrition impacts on the whole animal.

  19. Role of the Small Intestine in Developmental Programming: Impact of Maternal Nutrition on the Dam and Offspring123

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Allison M; Caton, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    Small-intestinal growth and function are critical for optimal animal growth and health and play a major role in nutrient digestion and absorption, energy and nutrient expenditure, and immunological competence. During fetal and perinatal development, the small intestine is affected by the maternal environment and nutrient intake. In ruminants, altered small-intestinal mass, villi morphology, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, vascularity, and gene expression have been observed as a result of poor gestational nutrition or intrauterine growth restriction. Although many of these data come from fetal stages, data have also demonstrated that nutrition during mid- and late gestation affects lamb small-intestinal growth, vascularity, digestive enzyme activity, and gene expression at 20 and 180 d of age as well. The small intestine is known to be a highly plastic tissue, changing with nutrient intake and physiological state even in adulthood, and the maternal small intestine adapts to pregnancy and advancing gestation. In ruminants, the growth, vascularity, and gene expression of the maternal small intestine also adapt to the nutritional plane and specific nutrient intake such as high selenium during pregnancy. These changes likely alter both pre- and postnatal nutrient delivery to offspring. More research is necessary to better understand the role of the offspring and maternal small intestines in whole-animal responses to developmental programming, but programming of this plastic tissue seems to play a dynamic role in gestational nutrition impacts on the whole animal. PMID:27180380

  20. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  1. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption. PMID:27437400

  2. Dietary fibers affect viscosity of solutions and simulated human gastric and small intestinal digesta.

    PubMed

    Dikeman, Cheryl L; Murphy, Michael R; Fahey, George C

    2006-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the viscosities of both soluble and insoluble dietary fibers. In Expt. 1, corn bran, defatted rice bran, guar gum, gum xanthan, oat bran, psyllium, soy hulls, stabilized rice bran, wheat bran, wood cellulose, and 2 methylcellulose controls (Ticacel 42, Ticacel 43) were hydrated in water overnight at 0.5, 1, 1.5, or 2% concentrations. In Expt. 2, guar gum, oat bran, psyllium, rice bran, wheat bran, and wood cellulose were subjected to a 2-stage in vitro gastric and small intestinal digestion simulation model. Viscosity was measured every 2 and 3 h during gastric and small intestinal simulation, respectively. Viscosities in both experiments were measured at multiple shear rates. Viscosities of all fiber solutions were concentration- and shear rate-dependent. Rice brans, soy hulls, and wood cellulose had the lowest viscosities, whereas guar gum, psyllium, and xanthan gum had the highest viscosities, regardless of concentration. During gastric simulation, viscosity was higher (P < 0.05) at 4 h than at 0 h for guar gum, psyllium, rice bran, and wheat bran. During small intestinal simulation, viscosities were higher (P < 0.05) between 3 and 9 h compared with 18 h for guar gum, oat bran, and rice bran. Guar gum, psyllium, and oat bran exhibited viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal simulation, indicating potential for these fibers to elicit blood glucose and lipid attenuation. Wheat and rice brans and wood cellulose did not exhibit viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal digestion; thus, they may be beneficial for laxation.

  3. Laparoscopic evaluation of the small intestine in the standing horse: Technique and effects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R E; Ragle, Claude A; Anderson, Dusty; Scott, Coryelle

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical outcomes after laparoscopic evaluation of the small intestines via laparoscopy. Prospective pilot study. Healthy adult horses (n = 5). Horses were restrained in standing stocks and received an infusion of detomidine. One port was placed in the left last intercostal space and 3 ports were placed in the right paralumbar fossa. The small intestine was run with atraumatic laparoscopic grasping forceps, from the duodenocolic plica to the ileocecal plica. Postoperative pain was scored every 4 hours for the first 48 hours. Horses were monitored via physical examinations for 2 weeks. Second look laparoscopy was repeated at 2 weeks, to run the small intestine and assess iatrogenic changes. An exploratory celiotomy was performed in 2 horses, 2 months later and long-term follow-up was recorded in 3 horses. Laparoscopic evaluation of the entire small intestine was successfully completed twice in every horse. This evaluation lasted 39 ± 21.2 minutes (mean ± SD), while total surgery time was 73 ± 34.1 minutes. Postoperative physical examinations remained normal in all horses, and pain scores were scored as mild. The only abnormalities at second look laparoscopy consisted of multifocal petechiae and ecchymoses in all horses, resolved by 2 months in the 2 horses explored via celiotomy. Three horses with long-term follow-up were healthy 8 months after the study. Running the small intestine laparoscopically is a feasible procedure in standing normal horses, and does not cause significant discomfort nor complications. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Small intestinal morphometric and biomechanical changes during physiological growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2005-03-01

    Changes in small intestinal geometry, residual strain and stress-strain properties during physiological growth were studied in rats ranging from 1 to 32 weeks of age. Small intestinal mass and dimensions increased many-fold with age, e.g. the weight per unit length increased five-fold with age and the wall cross-sectional area increased four-fold. The opening angle of duodenum obtained at zero-stress state was approximately 220 degrees and 290 degrees during the first and second week after birth and decreased to 170 degrees at other ages (p < 0.005). The opening angle of ileum ranged between 120 degrees and 150 degrees . The residual strain of duodenum at the mucosal surface did not vary with age (p > 0.05) whereas the residual strain of ileum at the mucosal surface decreased with age (p < 0.001). The circumferential and longitudinal stress-strain curves fitted well to a mono-exponential function. At a given circumferential stress, the corresponding strain values increased during the first 8 weeks of age (p < 0.05) where after no further change was observed. Hence, the small intestine became more compliant during early life. At a given longitudinal stress, the corresponding strains of ileum and duodenum became larger during the first 2-4 weeks of age (p < 0.05) where after no further change was observed. The small intestine was stiffer in longitudinal direction compared to the circumferential direction. In conclusion, pronounced morphometric and biomechanical changes were observed in the rat small intestine during physiological growth. Such data may prove useful in the understanding of the functional changes of the digestive tract during early life.

  5. Factors affecting long-term survival of horses recovering from surgery of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Proudman, C J; Edwards, G B; Barnes, J; French, N R

    2005-07-01

    Epiploic foramen entrapment (EFE) has been associated with a particularly poor post operative prognosis for equine colic cases, but the reasons for this are unknown. To identify variables associated with post operative survival following surgery for small intestinal disease; develop a model describing long-term post operative survival; and identify reasons for the poor prognosis associated with EFE. Data from 382 horses undergoing surgery were used to identify variables associated with survival. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model for post operative survival was developed and model fit evaluated. The final model included the variables total plasma protein (TP) and packed cell volume (PCV) at admission, duration of surgery and the dichotomous variable relaparotomy (yes/no). Risk of death was positively associated with increasing PCV, but negatively associated with increasing TP (which decreased the probability of death). In a univariable model, EFE cases had a significantly higher death rate than other types of small intestinal disease (hazard ratio = 1.7, P = 0.035). Multivariable modelling indicated that some of the increased risk associated with EFE cases was due to lower TP values and longer duration of surgery. Preoperative TP is associated negatively with the risk of post operative death in horses recovering from small intestinal surgery. Other variables associated with the probability of survival are preoperative PCV, duration of surgery and relaparotomy. The increased post operative death rate of EFE cases can be explained in part by lower TP and longer surgery times of these cases. Total plasma protein may be not simply a measure of hydration status in small intestinal colic cases, but an important determinant of survival. Further investigation of this relationship is warranted. Our model for post operative survival highlights the importance of preoperative TP, PCV and duration of surgery as prognostic indicators. This information should allow a

  6. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Masanori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nakasono, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5(+) stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay.

  7. A case of unexpected regeneration of small intestinal mucosal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Youn Joon

    2012-01-01

    If full-thickness mucosa, including the mucosal crypt, has been almost denuded, mucosa cannot regenerate as has been shown by animal models. The authors experienced an unusual mucosal regeneration exceed denuded bowel that occur in midgut volvulus of duration 2 days in a 6-day-old infant. Santulli's jejunostomy was performed using seriously denuded small bowel to prevent short bowel syndrome, despite the risks of leakage or stricture. Subsequently, stomal mucosa was fully regenerated when grossly identified 19 days after the second operation without any surgical complications.

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  9. [Preoperative care and surgical treatment of small-intestinal fistulas in children].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, E A; Smirnov, A N; Beliaeva, I D; Aleksandrov, A V; Zilbert, E V; Musselius, Iu S; Prigaro, E I; Gassan, T A

    2003-01-01

    Experience in using complex treatment in 42 children with unformed small-intestinal fistulas, generalized defects of the anterior abdominal wall and severe disorders of alimentary status is presented. Their preoperative preparation included parenteral alimentation, enteral probe feeding with special elementary milk formulas, correction of metabolic disorders. Intestinoplication during surgery was carried out with the medicinal glue MK-7 to prevent intestinal obstruction and formation of interloop abscesses. The use of portions of the tendinous part of the musculus tensor fasciale late was one the simple and effective methods for plasty of anterior abdominal wall defects.

  10. SMALL INTESTINAL ADENOCARCINOMA WITH CARCINOMATOSIS IN A SWIFT FOX (VULPES VELOX).

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Shambhunath; Andrews, Gordon A; Carpenter, James W

    2015-09-01

    A 7-yr-old, intact, female swift fox (Vulpes velox) presented to the Veterinary Health Center at Kansas State University with a history of chronic weight loss, lethargy, inappetence, and myiasis. On physical examination, a firm mass was palpated in the mid- to cranial abdomen. The fox was euthanatized as a result of the grave prognosis. Gross necropsy and histologic findings included a small intestinal adenocarcinoma with diffuse transperitoneal spread throughout the abdominal cavity (carcinomatosis). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal adenocarcinoma with carcinomatosis in a swift fox.

  11. Biochemical investigation and gene expression analysis of the immunostimulatory functions of an edible Salacia extract in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Kamei, Asuka; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Roots and bark from plants belonging to genus Salacia of the family Hippocrateaceae (Salacia reticulata, Salacia oblonga, etc.) have been used for traditional Ayurvedic medicine, particularly for the treatment of diabetes. In our study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles in the small intestinal epithelium of rats that were given a Salacia plant extract to gain insight into its effects on the small intestine. In detail, DNA microarray analysis was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in the rat ileal epithelium. The intestinal bacterial flora was also studied using T-RFLP (Nagashima method) in these rats. Expressions of many immune-related genes, especially Th1-related genes associated with cell-mediated immunity, were found to increase in the small intestinal epithelium and the intestinal bacterial flora became similar to those in the case with Salacia plant extract administration. Our study thus revealed that Salacia plant extract exerts bioregulatory functions by boosting intestinal immunity.

  12. Interactions between CD36 and global intestinal alkaline phosphatase in mouse small intestine and effects of high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lynes, Matthew; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Widmaier, Eric P

    2011-12-01

    The mechanisms of the saturable component of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) transport across the small intestinal epithelium and its regulation by a high-fat diet (HFD) are uncertain. It is hypothesized here that the putative fatty acid translocase/CD36 and intestinal alkaline phosphatases (IAPs) function together to optimize LCFA transport. Phosphorylated CD36 (pCD36) was expressed in mouse enterocytes and dephosphorylated by calf IAP (CIAP). Uptake of fluorescently tagged LCFA into isolated enteroctyes was increased when cells were treated with CIAP; this was blocked with a specific CD36 inhibitor. pCD36 colocalized in enterocytes with the global IAP (gIAP) isozyme and, specifically, coimmunoprecipitated with gIAP, but not the duodenal-specific isozyme (dIAP). Purified recombinant gIAP dephosphorylated immunoprecipitated pCD36, and antiserum to gIAP decreased initial LCFA uptake in enterocytes. Body weight, adiposity, and plasma leptin and triglycerides were significantly increased in HFD mice compared with controls fed a normal-fat diet. HFD significantly increased immunoreactive CD36 and gIAP, but not dIAP, in jejunum, but not duodenum. Uptake of LCFA was increased in a CD36-dependent manner in enterocytes from HFD mice. It is concluded that CD36 exists in its phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in mouse enterocytes, that pCD36 is a substrate of gIAP, and that dephosphorylation by IAPs results in increased LCFA transport capability. HFD upregulates CD36 and gIAP in parallel and enhances CD36-dependent fatty acid uptake. The interactions between these proteins may be important for efficient fat transport in mouse intestine, but whether the changes in gIAP and CD36 in enterocytes contribute to HFD-induced obesity remains to be determined.

  13. Interactions between CD36 and global intestinal alkaline phosphatase in mouse small intestine and effects of high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Lynes, Matthew; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of the saturable component of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) transport across the small intestinal epithelium and its regulation by a high-fat diet (HFD) are uncertain. It is hypothesized here that the putative fatty acid translocase/CD36 and intestinal alkaline phosphatases (IAPs) function together to optimize LCFA transport. Phosphorylated CD36 (pCD36) was expressed in mouse enterocytes and dephosphorylated by calf IAP (CIAP). Uptake of fluorescently tagged LCFA into isolated enteroctyes was increased when cells were treated with CIAP; this was blocked with a specific CD36 inhibitor. pCD36 colocalized in enterocytes with the global IAP (gIAP) isozyme and, specifically, coimmunoprecipitated with gIAP, but not the duodenal-specific isozyme (dIAP). Purified recombinant gIAP dephosphorylated immunoprecipitated pCD36, and antiserum to gIAP decreased initial LCFA uptake in enterocytes. Body weight, adiposity, and plasma leptin and triglycerides were significantly increased in HFD mice compared with controls fed a normal-fat diet. HFD significantly increased immunoreactive CD36 and gIAP, but not dIAP, in jejunum, but not duodenum. Uptake of LCFA was increased in a CD36-dependent manner in enterocytes from HFD mice. It is concluded that CD36 exists in its phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in mouse enterocytes, that pCD36 is a substrate of gIAP, and that dephosphorylation by IAPs results in increased LCFA transport capability. HFD upregulates CD36 and gIAP in parallel and enhances CD36-dependent fatty acid uptake. The interactions between these proteins may be important for efficient fat transport in mouse intestine, but whether the changes in gIAP and CD36 in enterocytes contribute to HFD-induced obesity remains to be determined. PMID:21900644

  14. [Electron microscope observation on effect of kudingcha inspissation tea on small intestine villus in the adiposity rats].

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Liu, H

    1999-12-01

    Experimental study on pharmacological action of Guang Dong kudingcha inspissation tea on small intestine villus in the adiposity rats (nutrition obesity). By using electron microscope method, check on small intestine villus of 60 experiment rats of just wean and count and analyse and conclude. Under the scan electron imcroscope, the surface configuration on small intestine villus of model group and various kudingcha dosage groups is similar to the blank (P > 0.05), but fenfluramine group appear constriction on top end of small intestine villus. Compring with fenfluramine, Guang Dong kudingcha inspissation tea has not effect on configuration of small intestine of adiposity rats (nutrition obesity), but has more strong modulation function on fat tissue lipocyte hypertrophy and quantitative.

  15. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  16. Cholesterol synthesis and high density lipoprotein uptake are regulated independently in rat small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Lutton, C; Champarnaud, G

    1994-01-01

    The rates of high density lipoprotein HDL uptake and cholesterol synthesis were compared in the normocholesterolaemic (SW) and genetically hypercholesterolaemic (RICO) rat intestine. The RICO rat has a hyperintestinal cholesterol synthesis. 14C sucrose, a marker which becomes irreversibly entrapped within the cells, was used to measure total rat HDL uptake over 24 hours in the various cells of the small intestinal mucosa. The rates of sterol synthesis were estimated in vivo with 1-14C acetate, as previously validated. The rates of HDL uptake in the upper villus cells were similar along the length of the small intestine in both types of rat, but the rates of sterol synthesis varied up to eightfold. When the mucosal epithelium was divided along the villus/crypt axis, HDL uptake increased two to threefold and cholesterol synthesis two to fivefold in the upper villus compared with the crypt cells in both SW and RICO rats. The high cholesterogenesis in the mucosal cells of the RICO rat is not related to a modified HDL cholesterol uptake. Thus, cholesterol synthesis and HDL uptake seem to be regulated independently in the rat small intestinal mucosa. PMID:8150344

  17. Effect of fasting in the digestive system: histological study of the small intestine in house sparrows.

    PubMed

    Funes, Samanta Celeste; Filippa, Verónica Palmira; Cid, Fabricio Damián; Mohamed, Fabián; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Chediack, Juan Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    In birds and mammals the metabolic response to fasting has been studied and can be characterized by three consecutive phases reflecting metabolic and physiological adjustments. An effective way to minimize energy expenditure during food scarcity is to decrease the mass of the organs. As the digestive system is metabolically expensive to maintain, the small intestine and the liver are the most affected organs. We evaluated the effects of phase III starvation on the mass of the different organs and histological parameters on house sparrows, a small non-migrant bird. In a short period of time (34 h) we observed a larger reduction in the digestive organ mass when compared to the mass of the body and non-alimentary tissues. Furthermore, the intestinal mass was proportionally more reduced than its length and nominal surface area. A reduction on the intestinal mucosal layer also resulted in a shortening of villus (length and thickness) and crypt depth. Moreover, the morphology of the enterocytes changed from cylindrical to cubical, suggesting that the surface exposed to the lumen was conserved. This may indicate an adaptive response to the moment of refeeding. The nominal surface area/body mass remained constant in both groups and several histological parameters were reduced, suggesting that starving induces the atrophy of the small intestine. However, the goblet cells were conserved after fasting indicating a protective tendency.

  18. The assay and partial characterization of macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Young, E; Horner, A A

    1979-06-15

    Homogenates of rat small intestine can depolymerize macromolecular rat skin heparin (RS heparin) to products similar in size to commercial heparin [Horner (1972) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 69, 3469--3473]. This activity is attributed to an enzyme provisionally named 'macromolecular heparin depolymerase'. An assay for macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine has been developed, based on the action of the enzyme on 35S-labelled macromolecular RS heparin. The depolymerized products are separated into two peaks by gel chromatography through columns of Bio-Gel A-15m. The amount of label in the second peak, expressed as a percentage of the total radioactivity, is the index of enzyme activity. The pH optimum was found to be 6.0 and the temperature optimum 45 degrees C. The enzyme was shown to be most stable in 50mM-Tris/maleate buffer containing 1 mM-EDTA. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity measured as a function of time and substrate concentration produced curves typical of an enzymic reaction. Evidence was obtained demonstrating that the activity did not originate from bacteria in the intestine. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity was increased by dilution and storage at 7 degrees C for 24 h. This suggests that homogenates of rat small intestine contain an unstable inhibitor of the enzyme.

  19. The assay and partial characterization of macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Young, E; Horner, A A

    1979-01-01

    Homogenates of rat small intestine can depolymerize macromolecular rat skin heparin (RS heparin) to products similar in size to commercial heparin [Horner (1972) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 69, 3469--3473]. This activity is attributed to an enzyme provisionally named 'macromolecular heparin depolymerase'. An assay for macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine has been developed, based on the action of the enzyme on 35S-labelled macromolecular RS heparin. The depolymerized products are separated into two peaks by gel chromatography through columns of Bio-Gel A-15m. The amount of label in the second peak, expressed as a percentage of the total radioactivity, is the index of enzyme activity. The pH optimum was found to be 6.0 and the temperature optimum 45 degrees C. The enzyme was shown to be most stable in 50mM-Tris/maleate buffer containing 1 mM-EDTA. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity measured as a function of time and substrate concentration produced curves typical of an enzymic reaction. Evidence was obtained demonstrating that the activity did not originate from bacteria in the intestine. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity was increased by dilution and storage at 7 degrees C for 24 h. This suggests that homogenates of rat small intestine contain an unstable inhibitor of the enzyme. PMID:39552

  20. Intussusception caused by heterotopic gastric mucosa in small intestine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Anand, Priyanka; Singh, Sompal; Sarin, Namrata

    2017-09-12

    Intestinal intussusception is the most frequent cause of small bowel obstruction in children between the ages of 2 months and 5 years and often remains idiopathic in etiology, even after surgery. On microscopic examination, in intussusception normal mucosa is noted but in a few cases heterotopic tissue can be seen. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the small intestine is extremely rare except for its occurrence in remnants of Meckel's diverticulum. In view of the rarity of this condition, we report a case of ectopic gastric mucosa in the small intestine that was not associated with remnants of vitelline duct. A 6-year-old boy of Indo-Aryan ethnicity from India presented with episodes of acute abdominal pain and distension with vomiting and non-passage of stools. On ultrasonography intussusception was suspected. A laparotomy was done and the ileal segment (tip of intussusception) was sent for histopathological examination. On histopathology, sections from the tip of intussusception showed extensive gastric metaplasia of the mucosa. A definitive diagnosis of heterotopic gastric mucosa is established by histopathological examination and it is important to differentiate heterotopia, which is a developmental anomaly, from metaplasia, which is an acquired condition. Heterotopic gastric mucosa is usually clinically silent and surgical intervention can be considered in patients with complications such as gastrointestinal hemorrhage and intestinal obstruction.

  1. A simple new method to calculate small intestine absorptive surface in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kisielinski, K; Willis, S; Prescher, A; Klosterhalfen, B; Schumpelick, V

    2002-11-01

    The rat is an established model for studying intestinal adaptations following abdominal surgery. In the study of functional and morphological adaptations of the small intestine, it is helpful to estimate the mucosal surface area. In order to simplify measurements and calculation we developed a new mathematical model for calculation of the mucosal surface area on histological sections. In contrast to other methods, it requires only cross-sections of small intestine and includes the measurement of only three histological parameters: length and width of villus and width of crypt. The new approach was compared with the most commonly used procedures, the Harris and the Fisher-Parsons methods, under experimental conditions. An animal study including single-pass perfusion, fixation, staining and subsequent histomorphometry of jejunum and ileum using these different methods was performed. The new method showed the least work and presented no significant differences compared with the precise Harris method. In conclusion, the method described is an adequate tool to estimate the mucosal surface area with less work and with comparable results to established methods. The less-complex method may be a valuable tool in experimental research of small intestine adaptations in rats.

  2. Extensive Expression Differences along Porcine Small Intestine Evidenced by Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Núria; Berri, Mustapha; Esquerré, Diane; Chevaleyre, Claire; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Billon, Yvon; Lepage, Patricia; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Doré, Joël; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Estellé, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse gene expression along the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum) and in the ileal Peyer's patches in four young pigs with no clinical signs of disease by transcriptome sequencing. Multidimensional scaling evidenced that samples clustered by tissue type rather than by individual, thus prefiguring a relevant scenario to draw tissue-specific gene expression profiles. Accordingly, 1,349 genes were found differentially expressed between duodenum and jejunum, and up to 3,455 genes between duodenum and ileum. Additionally, a considerable number of differentially expressed genes were found by comparing duodenum (7,027 genes), jejunum (6,122 genes), and ileum (6,991 genes) with ileal Peyer's patches tissue. Functional analyses revealed that most of the significant differentially expressed genes along small intestinal tissues were involved in the regulation of general biological processes such as cell development, signalling, growth and proliferation, death and survival or cell function and maintenance. These results suggest that the intrinsic large turnover of intestinal tissues would have local specificities at duodenum, ileum and jejunum. In addition, in concordance with their biological function, enteric innate immune pathways were overrepresented in ileal Peyer's patches. The reported data provide an expression map of the cell pathway variation in the different small intestinal tissues. Furthermore, expression levels measured in healthy individuals could help to understand changes in gene expression that occur in dysbiosis or pathological states. PMID:24533095

  3. Collagen accumulation and dysfunctional mucosal barrier of the small intestine in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, Gregory P; Kostyukevich, Olga I; Serov, Roman A; Rylova, Natalya V; Bylova, Nadezda A

    2008-04-10

    Chronic heart failure is a systemic disease with a devastating prognosis, which affects many organ systems other than the cardiovascular system. A total of 45 Chronic heart failure patients of ischemic etiology and 18 control subjects aged 45-65 years were recruited. All subjects underwent a physical examination by a qualified physician, echocardiography, an evaluation of the trophological status (including height and weight assessment) and net-of-fat body mass (NFBM) determination, an evaluation of intestinal functional activity based on fat and protein excretion with feces, and biopsy examination from the small intestine (see below). For all of them were performed functional tests of the small intestine and morphological examination of the small intestine and biopsy collection. Staining for collagen content of the mucosal wall showed that collagen content differed significantly between the four cohorts studied. In fact, relative collagen content was highest in advanced stages of the disease. However, patients with cardiac cachexia displayed even higher relative amounts of collagen than those of the same functional class without cardiac cachexia. Both fat loss and protein loss with the feces correlated with relative collagen area.

  4. Subcellular localization of enterokinase (enteropeptidase EC 3.4.21.9) in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lebenthal, E; Morrissey, G W

    1977-04-27

    The subcellular localization of enterokinase is controversial. In this study, enterokinase was extracted from a soluble fraction and a brush border fraction of rat small intestine by differential centrifugation. The soluble fraction contained 41% of the initial enterokinase activity while the brush border fraction contained only 4.6% of the initial activity. In contrast, alkaline phosphatase monitored as a brush border marker, yielded 26.3% in the brush border fraction and only 6% in the soluble fraction. Further separation of the soluble fraction on a Sepharose 4B column revealed three peaks of enterokinase activity. One small peak (3%) of a bound enzyme (Mr, 2 - 10(6)) and two larger peaks of free enzyme (Mr, 3 - 10(5) and 9 -10). In contrast, alkaline phosphatase major fraction was in a high molecular weight peak of bound enzyme. When the brush border fraction was chromatographed only a single peak of bound enterokinase and alkaline phosphatase were found. In the lower part of the small intestine, no brush border-bound enterokinase was found, while the peak of alkaline phosphatase was the same as in the upper intestine. These data suggest that enterokinase activity in the rat intestine is mainly in a free form localized in the mucin and soluble fraction and to a negligible extent in the brush border.

  5. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  6. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  7. The Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues in the Small Intestine, Not the Large Intestine, Play a Major Role in Oral Prion Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, David S.; Else, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulations of abnormally folded cellular prion protein in affected tissues. Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally, and following exposure, the early replication of some prion isolates upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) within gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for the efficient spread of disease to the brain (neuroinvasion). Prion detection within large intestinal GALT biopsy specimens has been used to estimate human and animal disease prevalence. However, the relative contributions of the small and large intestinal GALT to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. To address this issue, we created mice that specifically lacked FDC-containing GALT only in the small intestine. Our data show that oral prion disease susceptibility was dramatically reduced in mice lacking small intestinal GALT. Although these mice had FDC-containing GALT throughout their large intestines, these tissues were not early sites of prion accumulation or neuroinvasion. We also determined whether pathology specifically within the large intestine might influence prion pathogenesis. Congruent infection with the nematode parasite Trichuris muris in the large intestine around the time of oral prion exposure did not affect disease pathogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that the small intestinal GALT are the major early sites of prion accumulation and neuroinvasion after oral exposure. This has important implications for our understanding of the factors that influence the risk of infection and the preclinical diagnosis of disease. IMPORTANCE Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally. After exposure, the accumulation of some prion diseases in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for efficient spread of disease to the brain. However, the relative contributions of GALT in the small and large intestines to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. We show that the

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Mouse Small Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Schwank, Gerald; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an RNA-guided genome-editing tool that has been recently developed based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas immune defense system. Due to its versatility and simplicity, it rapidly became the method of choice for genome editing in various biological systems, including mammalian cells. Here we describe a protocol for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in murine small intestinal organoids, a culture system in which somatic stem cells are maintained by self-renewal, while giving rise to all major cell types of the intestinal epithelium. This protocol allows the study of gene function in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and pathophysiology and can be extended to epithelial organoids derived from other internal mouse and human organs.

  9. [Effects of ischemia and revascularization on the epithelium of the small intestine: study on swine].

    PubMed

    Barthod, F

    1994-05-01

    Ischaemia of the small intestine leads to the destruction of the intestinal mucosa. The capacity of the epithelium to regenerate is proportional to the duration of revascularization. The aim of this work was to analyze the kinetic aspects of intestinal epithelial regeneration after destruction due to prolonged ischaemia. This study was conducted in 44 animals (swine) after development of an ischaemia-revascularization protocol of a jejunal loop and bipolar secondary cutaneous exteriorization. After a first series with ischaemia times of 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours, the 4 hour period of ischaemia was chosen for further analysis of the regeneration kinetics over a period of 21 days since it leads to regular and total destruction of the epithelium compatible with regeneration. This analysis included (1) a histological examination (semi-thin slices), (2) immunofluorescent detection of intestinal brush border proteins on frozen slices (villin, saccharase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV) and mucines, (3) measurement of specific intestinal hydrolase activities (saccharase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and alkaline phosphatase) in enriched brush border fractions, and (4) an analysis of variations in intestinal flora. After the 4 hour ischaemia, total destruction of the epithelium with disappearance of the villin and intestinal hydrolases and disorganization of the mucosa invaded by mucosal lacks was observed. Epithelial regeneration was rapid and two days later the histological aspect of the mucosa showed apical expression (still discontinuous), villin and intestinal hydrolase activity. Luminal apical expression of the markers became continuous on day 4, demonstrating the total recovery of the intestinal barrier as confirmed by stable microbial flora. Mucine expression also returned to normal. This regeneration was however incomplete since the mucosa was seen to be flat, without villosities. Immunofluorescence showed the weak intensity of brush

  10. Pathway underlying small intestine apoptosis by dietary nickel chloride in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bangyuan; Guo, Hongrui; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Huang, Jianying

    2016-01-05

    The aims of this study were to investigate the pathways which dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) affects small intestine apoptosis in broiler chickens by observing the ultrastructure, and bcl-2, bax, and caspase-3 protein expression and mRNA expression, and cytochrome C, bak and caspase-9 mRNA expression of the small intestine. A total of 240 one-day-old avian broilers were divided into four groups and fed a corn-soybean basal diet as the control diet or three experimental diets supplemented with 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg of NiCl2 for 42 days. Ultrastructurally, the microvilli were apparently exfoliated, and the mitochondria were swollen and the number of lysosomes increased in the intestinal cells of three experimental groups. As measured by TUNEL and flow cytometry (FCM), the percentage of apoptotic cells in the small intestine and the lymphocytes in the ileum were significantly increased in three experimental groups when compared with those of the control group. Meanwhile, immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that the protein expression, mRNA expression levels were decreased in the bcl-2, whereas those of bax and caspase-3, and the cytochrome C, bak and caspase-9 mRNA expression levels were increased in three experimental groups. The abovementioned results show that pathway of dietary NiCl2-induced small intestine apoptosis is related to the mitochondrial damage and promotion of the cytochrome C release from mitochondria, which activates the mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis pathway.

  11. Effect of weaning on small intestinal structure and function in the piglet.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xianhong; Li, Defa; She, Ruiping

    2002-08-01

    Fifty-four piglets were selected from 12 litters weaned at 17 (Treatment 1), 21 (Treatment 2), 28 (Treatment 3) and 35 (Treatment 4) days old, respectively, to determine the effect of weaning age on small intestinal villus morphology, immunology and histochemistry. From proximal duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and middle ileum, intestinal samples with three replicates (piglets) in each treatment were taken at 18, 22, 28 and 36; 22, 28, 36 and 43; 28, 36, 43, and 50; and 18, 22, 28, 36, 43 and 50 d of age in Treatment 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. This was equivalent to 12 h, 3 d, 1 week, 2 week postweaning in Treatment 1; 12 h, 1 week, 2 week, 3 week postweaning in Treatment 2 and 3, and all the same age in Treatment 4 as in Treatment 1, 2, 3, respectively. The results showed that villous height of duodenum and proximal jejunum decreased significantly in Treatment 1 and 3. Crypt depth in the duodenum, proximal jejunum and ileum also decreased significantly in Treatment 1. Date had significant effect on villous height of the duodenum, distal jejunum and ileum with the shortest on day 29 and crypt depth of all positions increased with piglet age except the crypt depth in proximal jejunum decreased on day 50. Weaning age and day of age had significant effects on intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) number and goblet cell (GC) number at all positions of small intestinal mucosa in piglets. The number of IEL at all segments of small intestinal mucosa in Treatment 3 increased significantly compared to those in other treatments, but IEL number at all locations of small intestinal mucosa in Treatment 2 decreased significantly compared to those in other treatments. The number of GC in small intestinal mucosa increased significantly in early-weaned (< day 21) piglets. It appears that providing fluid milk replacer for a few days postweaning could dramatically reduce the negative impact of weaning on villous morphology and digestive and absorptive function, especially in

  12. PANCREATIC DIGESTIVE ENZYME BLOCKADE IN THE SMALL INTESTINE PREVENTS INSULIN RESISTANCE IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    DeLano, Frank A.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 hours) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution) and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared to control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine lead to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared to controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels two hours after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock, but is restored in when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  13. Pancreatic digestive enzyme blockade in the small intestine prevents insulin resistance in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 h) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution), and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared with control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine led to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared with controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels 2 h after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock but is restored when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  14. Characteristics of Jeffrey fluid model for peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S.; Lee, Changhoon

    In the present article we have analyzed the Jeffrey fluid model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in the small intestine. We have formulated the problem using two non-periodic sinusoidal waves of different wavelengths propagating with same speed c along the outer wall of the tube. Governing equations for the problem under consideration have been simplified under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation (such assumptions are consistent since Re (Reynolds number) is very small and long wavelength approximation also exists in the small intestine). Exact solutions have been calculated for velocity and pressure rise. Physical behavior of different parameters of Jeffrey fluid has been presented graphically for velocity, pressure rise, pressure gradient and frictional forces. The trapping phenomenon is also discussed at the end of the article.

  15. TLR signaling modulates side effects of anticancer therapy in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Magdalena; Hennenberg, Eva Maria; Eyking, Annette; Rünzi, Michael; Gerken, Guido; Scott, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Walker, Alan W.; Cario, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis represents the most common complication of intensive chemotherapy, which has a severe adverse impact on quality of life of cancer patients. However, the precise pathophysiology remains to be clarified and there is so far no successful therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated the role of innate immunity through TLR signaling in modulating genotoxic chemotherapy-induced small intestinal injury in vitro and in vivo. Genetic deletion of TLR2, but not MD-2, in mice resulted in severe chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in the proximal jejunum with villous atrophy, accumulation of damaged DNA, CD11b+-myeloid cell infiltration and significant gene alterations in xenobiotic metabolism, including a decrease in ABCB1/MDR1 p-glycoprotein (p-gp) expression. Functionally, stimulation of TLR2 induced synthesis and drug efflux activity of ABCB1/MDR1 p-gp in murine and human CD11b+-myeloid cells, thus inhibiting chemotherapy-mediated cytotoxicity. Conversely, TLR2 activation failed to protect small intestinal tissues genetically deficient in MDR1A against DNA-damaging drug-induced apoptosis. Gut microbiota depletion by antibiotics led to increased susceptibility to chemotherapy-induced mucosal injury in wildtype mice, which was suppressed by administration of a TLR2 ligand, preserving ABCB1/MDR1 p-gp expression. Findings were confirmed in a preclinical model of human chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis using duodenal biopsies, by demonstrating that TLR2 activation limited the toxic-inflammatory reaction and maintained assembly of the drug transporter p-gp. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel molecular link between innate immunity and xenobiotic metabolism. TLR2 acts as a central regulator of xenobiotic defense via the multidrug transporter ABCB1/MDR1 p-gp. Targeting TLR2 may represent a novel therapeutic approach in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. PMID:25589072

  16. Human, rat and chicken small intestinal Na+-Cl−-creatine transporter: functional, molecular characterization and localization

    PubMed Central

    Peral, M J; García-Delgado, M; Calonge, M L; Durán, J M; De La Horra, M C; Wallimann, T; Speer, O; Ilundáin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In spite of all the fascinating properties of oral creatine supplementation, the mechanism(s) mediating its intestinal absorption has(have) not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize intestinal creatine transport. [14C]Creatine uptake was measured in chicken enterocytes and rat ileum, and expression of the creatine transporter CRT was examined in human, rat and chicken small intestine by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results show that enterocytes accumulate creatine against its concentration gradient. This accumulation was electrogenic, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, with a probable stoichiometry of 2 Na+: 1 Cl−: 1 creatine, and inhibited by ouabain and iodoacetic acid. The kinetic study revealed a Km for creatine of 29 μm. [14C]Creatine uptake was efficiently antagonized by non-labelled creatine, guanidinopropionic acid and cyclocreatine. More distant structural analogues of creatine, such as GABA, choline, glycine, β-alanine, taurine and betaine, had no effect on intestinal creatine uptake, indicating a high substrate specificity of the creatine transporter. Consistent with these functional data, messenger RNA for CRT was detected only in the cells lining the intestinal villus. The sequences of partial clones, and of the full-length cDNA clone, isolated from human and rat small intestine were identical to previously cloned CRT cDNAs. Immunological analysis revealed that CRT protein was mainly associated with the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This study reports for the first time that mammalian and avian enterocytes express CRT along the villus, where it mediates high-affinity, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, apical creatine uptake. PMID:12433955

  17. Internal herniation of the small and large intestines in 18 cattle.

    PubMed

    Ruf-Ritz, Julia; Braun, Ueli; Hilbe, Monika; Muggli, Evelyne; Trösch, Luzia; Nuss, Karl

    2013-08-01

    Internal intestinal hernia was diagnosed during laparotomy in 18 cattle with a tentative diagnosis of ileus; the diagnosis was made during a second laparotomy in two cases. In 14 cattle, the hernial orifice was in the visceral layer of the greater omentum and the intestines had herniated into the caudal recess of the omental bursa. In two animals both the visceral and parietal layers had an opening; in one, the orifice was in the mesoduodenum, and in the other in the mesojejunum. The length of the hernial orifice ranged from 3 to >25 cm and the length of the herniated intestine ranged from 30 cm to the entire length of the small and large intestines. The omental rents were located near the caudal flexure of the duodenum (n=9), ventrally near the rumen (n=6) or in both of these locations (n=1). Seven cattle were euthanased intraoperatively because of incarceration of the jejunum; three of these had ruptured intestines and localised peritonitis; another animal was euthanased following a second laparotomy because of peritonitis. Ten animals, two of which underwent jejunal resection-anastomosis, recovered and were discharged. Nine of these survived a 6-month-postoperative period (mean ± SD: 27 ± 18 months) and remained free of colic, and one was slaughtered 3 months postoperatively because of rupture of the mammary suspensory ligament.

  18. Microbiota of the Small Intestine Is Selectively Engulfed by Phagocytes of the Lamina Propria and Peyer’s Patches

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Masatoshi; Tsujibe, Satoshi; Kiyoshima-Shibata, Junko; Watanabe, Yohei; Kato-Nagaoka, Noriko; Shida, Kan; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytes such as dendritic cells and macrophages, which are distributed in the small intestinal mucosa, play a crucial role in maintaining mucosal homeostasis by sampling the luminal gut microbiota. However, there is limited information regarding microbial uptake in a steady state. We investigated the composition of murine gut microbiota that is engulfed by phagocytes of specific subsets in the small intestinal lamina propria (SILP) and Peyer’s patches (PP). Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequences revealed that: 1) all the phagocyte subsets in the SILP primarily engulfed Lactobacillus (the most abundant microbe in the small intestine), whereas CD11bhi and CD11bhiCD11chi cell subsets in PP mostly engulfed segmented filamentous bacteria (indigenous bacteria in rodents that are reported to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells); and 2) among the Lactobacillus species engulfed by the SILP cell subsets, L. murinus was engulfed more frequently than L. taiwanensis, although both these Lactobacillus species were abundant in the small intestine under physiological conditions. These results suggest that small intestinal microbiota is selectively engulfed by phagocytes that localize in the adjacent intestinal mucosa in a steady state. These observations may provide insight into the crucial role of phagocytes in immune surveillance of the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:27701454

  19. The first case of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with rosuvastatin: colonic involvement coexisting with small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun; Erfan, Gamze; Oznur, Meltem; Erdogan, Cuneyt

    2014-03-19

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small vessels. It is the most common systemic vasculitis in children, and is rare in adults. Serious gastrointestinal complications are more common in childhood. Infections and drugs are the most prominent factors in the aetiology. Wall thickening in segments of the small intestine is commonly seen in imaging studies in gastrointestinal system (GIS) involvement. Simultaneous involvement of small intestine and colon is rare. An HSP case involving small intestine and colon in an adult patient due to the use of rosuvastatin, an antihyperlipidaemic agent, is presented, and is first of its kind reported in the literature.

  20. Kinetics of phosphorus absorption in ligated small intestinal segments of broilers.

    PubMed

    Liu, S B; Hu, Y X; Liao, X D; Lu, L; Li, S F; Zhang, L Y; Tan, H Z; Yang, L; Suo, H Q; Luo, X G

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted using 22-d-old Arbor Acres male broilers to study the kinetics of inorganic P absorption and the effect of P treatment on Type IIb sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaP-IIb) mRNA and protein levels in ligated segments from different intestinal regions. In Exp. 1, the P absorption in different small intestinal segments at different postperfusion times (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, or 40 min) were compared. In Exp. 2, different small intestinal loops were perfused with solutions containing 0, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 mmol P/L as KHPO, and P concentrations in perfusates were determined at 20 min after perfusion. The mRNA levels of NaP-IIb in different small intestinal loops and protein expression levels in the duodenums from the control group and the 6 or 48 mmol P/L group were analyzed. The results from Exp. 1 showed that P absorption increased in an asymptotic response to postperfusion time within 40 min in all the intestinal segments and P absorption was greater ( < 0.04) in the duodenum than in the other 2 segments at 20 min after perfusion, indicating that the duodenum is the main site of P absorption in the small intestine of chicks. In Exp. 2, the kinetic curves showed that P absorption in the duodenum was a saturated carrier mediated process and in the jejunum or ileum occurred with a nonsaturated diffusion process. In addition, the b mRNA levels were greater ( < 0.0001) in the duodenum than in the other 2 segments in the 3 groups (0, 6, or 48 mmol P/L), further indicating that P absorption in the duodenum occurred mainly by a saturated carrier mediated process. However, no significant differences ( = 0.20) in the NaP-IIb protein levels of the duodenum were observed among the 0, 6, and 48 mmol P/L groups. In conclusion, this study suggests by our criteria in ligated intestinal loops that the duodenum is the main site of P absorption and that P absorption may be a saturated carrier mediated process in the duodenum but a nonsaturated diffusion

  1. Mucosal pathobiology and molecular signature of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Castro, Ana M; Martínez, Cristina; Salvo-Romero, Eloísa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders in developed countries. Its etiology remains unknown; however, a common finding, regardless of IBS subtype, is the presence of altered intestinal barrier. In fact, signaling and location of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, in connection with increased immune activity, seem abnormal in the intestinal epithelium of IBS patients. Despite that most research is performed on distal segments of the intestine, altered permeability has been reported in both, the small and the large bowel of all IBS subtypes. The small intestine carries out digestion and nutrient absorption and is also the site where the majority of immune responses to luminal antigens takes place. In fact, the upper intestine is more exposed to environmental antigens than the colon and is also a site of symptom generation. Recent studies have revealed small intestinal structural alterations of the epithelial barrier and mucosal immune activation in association with intestinal dysfunction, suggesting the commitment of the intestine as a whole in the pathogenesis of IBS. This review summarizes the most recent findings on mucosal barrier alterations and its relationship to symptoms arising from the small intestine in IBS, including epithelial structural abnormalities, mucosal immune activation, and microbial dysbiosis, further supporting the hypothesis of an organic origin of IBS. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Estimating fermentative amino acid catabolism in the small intestine of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Columbus, D A; Cant, J P; de Lange, C F M

    2015-11-01

    Fermentative catabolism (FAAC) of dietary and endogenous amino acids (AA) in the small intestine contributes to loss of AA available for protein synthesis and body maintenance functions in pigs. A continuous isotope infusion study was performed to determine whole body urea flux, urea recycling and FAAC in the small intestine of ileal-cannulated growing pigs fed a control diet (CON, 18.6% CP; n=6), a high fibre diet with 12% added pectin (HF, 17.7% CP; n = 4) or a low-protein diet (LP, 13.4% CP; n = 6). (15)N-ammonium chloride and (13)C-urea were infused intragastrically and intravenously, respectively, for 4 days. Recovery of ammonia at the distal ileum was increased by feeding additional fibre when compared with the CON (P > 0.05) but was not affected by dietary protein (0.24, 0.39 and 0.14 mmol nitrogen/kg BW/day for CON, HF and LP, respectively; P < 0.05). Lowering protein intake reduced urea flux (25.3, 25.7 and 10.3 mmol nitrogen/kg BW/day; P < 0.01), urinary urea excretion (14.4, 15.0 and 6.2 mmol N/kg BW/day; P < 0.001) and urea recycling (12.1, 11.3 and 3.23 mmol nitrogen/kg BW/day; P< 0 .01) compared with CON. There was a rapid reduction in (15)N-ammonia enrichment in digesta along the small intestine suggesting rapid absorption of ammonia before the distal ileum and lack of uniformity of enrichment in the digesta ammonia pool. A two-pool model was developed to determine possible value ranges for nitrogen flux in the small intestine assuming rapid absorption of ammonia.Maximum estimated FAAC based on this model was significantly lower when dietary protein content was decreased (32.9, 33.4 and 17.4 mmol nitrogen/kg BW/day; P < 0.001). There was no impact of dietary fibre on estimates of small intestine nitrogen flux( P > 0.05)compared with CON. The two-pool model developed in the present study allows for estimation of FAAC but still has limitations. Quantifying FAAC in the small intestine of pigs, as well as other non-ruminants and humans, offers a number

  3. Melibiose, a Nondigestible Disaccharide, Promotes Absorption of Quercetin Glycosides in Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiya; Shinoki, Aki; Hara, Hiroshi

    2016-12-14

    We demonstrated that melibiose, a nondigestible disaccharide composed of galactose and glucose with α-1,6 glycoside linkage, promotes the absorption of water-soluble quercetin glycosides in ligated small intestinal loop of anesthetized rats. Water-soluble quercetin glycoside, a quercetin-3-O-glucoside mixture (Q3GM), includes quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G, 31.9%), mono (21.2%) and di (17.1%), glucose adducts with α-1,4 linkages. After instillation of Q3GM into the intestinal loop with or without melibiose, the plasma concentration of quercetin derivatives in the portal blood was considerably higher in the melibiose group at 60 min. Furthermore, we evaluated the hydrolytic rate of Q3G by the mucosal homogenate of the small intestine with six different disaccharides. Melibiose and isomaltose, which have α-1,6 glycoside linkage, were found to promote Q3G hydrolysis to aglycone. These results suggest that melibiose promotes quercetin glycoside absorption in rats by increasing glycoside hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen and that α-1,6 linkage is involved in this process.

  4. The reduction of inorganic sulphate to inorganic sulphite in the small intestine of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, H. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. Whole scrapings of rat intestinal mucosa were incubated with carrier-free sodium [35S]sulphate. Radioactivity was found in S-sulphocysteine and to a small extent in S-sulphoglutathione. 2. Whole scrapings of rat intestinal mucosa incubated with carrier-free sodium [35S]sulphate and oxidized glutathione formed S[35S]-sulphoglutathione as the main radioactive product. The amount of S[35S]-sulphocysteine formed was considerably lower than in a control that contained no oxidized glutathione. 3. The supernatant fraction of homogenates of rat intestinal mucosa catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-sulphatophosphate to inorganic sulphite. NADH or GSH fail to replace NADPH as reducing agents. 4. The formation of inorganic [35S]sulphite from inorganic [35S]-sulphate may account for the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into S-sulphoglutathione by the small intestine of the rat in vivo and in vitro. PMID:14340059

  5. Rebamipide attenuates 5-Fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jin Hyun; Moon, Won; Park, Jongha; Park, Seun Ja; Song, Geun Am; Han, Seung Hee; Lee, Jong Hun

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis is one of the most common morbidities in chemotherapy and involves the reactive oxygen species (ROS) system, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines. Rebamipide exerts a mucosal-protective effect, mediated through several mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rebamipide in 5-FU-induced mouse small-intestinal mucositis. BALB/c mice were assigned randomly to four groups; (1) control group (n=10; receiving saline orally for 6 d), (2) rebamipide group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally), (3) 5-FU group (n=10; 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and (4) rebamipide +5-FU group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally and 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, i.p.). Body weights and diarrhea scales were assessed. At day 5, the mice were sacrificed. Small intestinal tissue was used for: (1) hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining for determination of small intestinal villi height, (2) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, (3) immunohistochemistry for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), F4/80, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, (4) measurement of serum and tissue GSH levels, and (5) measurement of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. Rebamipide attenuated the severity of mucosal injury reflected by body weight changes, degrees of diarrhea, and heights of villi. Rebamipide reduced the expression of iNOS and TGF-β1, apoptosis, macrophage accumulation, serum TNF-α levels, and prevented reductions in serum and tissue glutathione (GSH) levels by 5-FU administration. These results suggest that rebamipide promotes several mechanisms of mucosal protection and attenuated the 5-FU-induced mucosal injury. In conclusion, administration of rebamipide may have significant protective effects against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis.

  6. [Estimation of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with constipation and diarrhea irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Łokieć, Katarzyna; Klupińska, Grazyna; Walecka-Kapica, Ewa; Błońska, Aleksandra

    2014-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common reason for gastroenterology consultations. The diverse in symptomatology of the disease comes from its rich etiopathogenesis. Recently studies talk about infectious etiology of IBS and because of that it is necessary to expand its diagnostics by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) test. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with constipation (IBS-C) and diarrhea (IBS-D) irritable bowel syndrome with regard to nutrition. The study involved 46 subjects (33 women and 13 men) in average age of 44 years, which were divided into two groups: diarrhea and constipation IBS. All patients underwent hydrogen breath test studying bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. In addition, each person had fulfilled a feeding questionnaire. Student's t-test, Pearson test. It has been shown that there is no statistical significances between the prevalence of SIBO in form of diarrheal IBS and constipation IBS and gender. Average value of increments of hydrogen in breath during the test was higher in IBS-C in comparison with IBS-D, which was the highest in the intestine bacterial overgrowth in patients with IBS-C. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS showed that there is no relationship between the type and frequency of consumption of milk, meat, fruit and vegetables, sweets and coffee and the prevalence of SIBO in form of diarrhea and constipation IBS. The occurrence of constipation or diarrhea irritable bowel syndrome is not related to gender. SIBO is more common in patients with IBS-C than in IBS-D group. There is no relationship between the type of food consumed and the amount of SIBO in people with IBS. Type of food intake do not affect the status of the intestinal flora of people with IBS.

  7. The small intestine and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a batch process model.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Brian C

    2008-11-01

    Faults in a batch process model of the small intestine create the symptoms of all types of irritable bowel syndrome. The model has three sequential processing sections corresponding to the natural divisions of the intestine. It is governed by a brain controller that is divided into four sub-controllers, each with a unique neurotransmitter. Each section has a sub-controller to manage transport. Sensors in the walls of the intestine provide input and output goes to the muscles lining the walls of the intestine. The output controls the speed of the food soup, moves it in both directions, mixes it, controls absorption, and transfers it to the next section at the correct speed (slow). The fourth sub-controller manages the addition of chemicals. It obtains input from the first section of the process via the signalling hormone Cholecystokinin and sends output to the muscles that empty the gall bladder and pancreas. The correct amounts of bile salts and enzymes are then added to the first section. The sub-controllers produce output only when input is received. When output is missing the enteric nervous system applies a default condition. This default condition normally happens when no food is in the intestine. If food is in the intestine and a transport sub-controller fails to provide output then the default condition moves the food soup to the end of that section. The movement is in one direction only (forward), at a speed dependent on the amount and type of fibre present. Cereal, bean and vegetable fibre causes high speeds. This default high speed transport causes irritable bowel syndrome. A barrier is created when a section moving fast at the default speed, precedes a section controlled by a transport sub-controller. Then the sub-controller constricts the intestine to stop the fast flow. The barrier causes constipation, cramping, and bloating. Diarrhoea results when the section terminating the process moves at the fast default speed. Two problems can occur to prevent

  8. Prevalence of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites of small ruminants in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, R; Rani, N; Ponnudurai, G; Anbarasi, P

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the prevalence of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites of small ruminants (Sheep and Goats) in North Western part of Tamil Nadu, India. A total of 630 faecal samples (251-sheep, 379-goats) and 554 blood smears (242-sheep, 312-goats) were examined, for the presence of eggs of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites, respectively. The samples were received from the Veterinary college hospital and Veterinary dispensaries in North Western part of Tamil Nadu. Faecal samples were processed by sedimentation technique and examined under low power objective (×10), and blood smears were stained using Giemsa's technique and examined under oil immersion (×100). The analysis of data on the prevalence of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites of sheep and goats in North Western part of Tamil Nadu for the period from 2004 to 2013, showed an overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was found to be 67% and 35% in sheep and goats, respectively, whereas only 11% of sheep and 3% of goats had the haemoprotozoan parasitic infection. Highly, significant difference (p<0.01) in the prevalence of intestinal (χ(2)=65), and hemoprotozoan (χ(2)=15.4) parasitism was observed between sheep and goats. Intestinal parasites such as strongyles, Trichuris, Moniezia, amphistome, and coccidia were identified in which the highest prevalence was observed with coccidia, followed by strongyles, Monezia, Trichuris, and least with amphistome in both the sheep and goats. The haemoprotozoan parasites recorded were Theileria and Anaplasma species, of which, Anaplasma spp. being the highest and Theileria spp. the least prevalent in both the sheep and goats. The seasonal prevalence of intestinal parasites showed highest in rainy season, followed by moderate in winter and least with summer in both the sheep and goats, whereas the haemoprotozoan parasites recorded were the highest in summer followed by winter and least with rainy season. The present study suggests

  9. Prevalence of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites of small ruminants in Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Velusamy, R.; Rani, N.; Ponnudurai, G.; Anbarasi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the prevalence of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites of small ruminants (Sheep and Goats) in North Western part of Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 630 faecal samples (251-sheep, 379-goats) and 554 blood smears (242-sheep, 312-goats) were examined, for the presence of eggs of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites, respectively. The samples were received from the Veterinary college hospital and Veterinary dispensaries in North Western part of Tamil Nadu. Faecal samples were processed by sedimentation technique and examined under low power objective (×10), and blood smears were stained using Giemsa’s technique and examined under oil immersion (×100). Result: The analysis of data on the prevalence of intestinal and haemoprotozoan parasites of sheep and goats in North Western part of Tamil Nadu for the period from 2004 to 2013, showed an overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was found to be 67% and 35% in sheep and goats, respectively, whereas only 11% of sheep and 3% of goats had the haemoprotozoan parasitic infection. Highly, significant difference (p<0.01) in the prevalence of intestinal (χ2=65), and hemoprotozoan (χ2=15.4) parasitism was observed between sheep and goats. Intestinal parasites such as strongyles, Trichuris, Moniezia, amphistome, and coccidia were identified in which the highest prevalence was observed with coccidia, followed by strongyles, Monezia, Trichuris, and least with amphistome in both the sheep and goats. The haemoprotozoan parasites recorded were Theileria and Anaplasma species, of which, Anaplasma spp. being the highest and Theileria spp. the least prevalent in both the sheep and goats. The seasonal prevalence of intestinal parasites showed highest in rainy season, followed by moderate in winter and least with summer in both the sheep and goats, whereas the haemoprotozoan parasites recorded were the highest in summer followed by winter and least with rainy

  10. Retrospective comparison of Computed Tomography Enterography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography in diagnosing small intestine disease.

    PubMed

    Pei-You, Gong; Jun-Xia, Li; Feng-Li, Liu; Liang-Ming, Zhang; Hai-Zhu, Xie; Yan-Bin, Sui

    2015-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in diagnosing small intestinal diseases. The retrospective study comparing computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography for diagnosing diseases related to small intestine was conducted at Department of Radiology, Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Shandong, China, from July 2012 to February 2014. The efficacy of computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography results were evaluated for randomly-selected cases to compare the location and characteristics of small intestinal diseases together with small bowel endoscopy and clinical pathology observations. Of the 30 patients in the study, 19(63.3%) were males and 11 (36.7%) were females with an overall mean age of 33.6±19.2 years (range: 24-67 years). the clinical diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography was 24(80%) and 21(70%) cases respectively (p>0.05). Computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography are two techniques that complement each other for diagnostic purposes.

  11. Correlation between capillary oxygen saturation and small intestinal wall thickness in the equine colic patient

    PubMed Central

    Mirle, Elisabeth; Wogatzki, Anna; Kunzmann, Robert; Schoenfelder, Axel M; Litzke, Lutz F

    2017-01-01

    The surgical evaluation of haemorrhagic infarcted intestine and the decision for or against bowel resection require a lot of experience and are subjective. The aim of this prospective, clinical study was to examine the correlation between oxygen saturation and small intestinal wall (IW) thickness, using two objective methods. In 22 colicky horses, the blood flow, oxygen saturation and relative amount of haemoglobin were measured intraoperatively via laser Doppler and white light spectroscopy (O2C, oxygen to see, LEA Medizintechnik) at six measuring points (MPs) in small and large intestines. Furthermore, the IW thickness was measured ultrasonographically. Nine of 22 horses had an increased small IW thickness greater than 4 mm (Freeman 2002, Scharner and others 2002, le Jeune and Whitcomb 2014) at measuring point 1 (MP1) (strangulated segment), four horses had a thickened bowel wall at measuring point 3 (MP3) (poststenotic) and one at measuring point 2 (MP2). The oxygen saturation was 0 at MP1 in six horses, at MP3 in two horses and at MP2 (prestenotic) in one. Oxygen saturation and small IW thickness were independent of each other at MP1 and MP2. At MP3, the two parameters were negatively correlated. In summary, it is not possible to draw conclusions about oxygen saturation based on IW thickness. PMID:28761667

  12. Correlation between capillary oxygen saturation and small intestinal wall thickness in the equine colic patient.

    PubMed

    Mirle, Elisabeth; Wogatzki, Anna; Kunzmann, Robert; Schoenfelder, Axel M; Litzke, Lutz F

    2017-01-01

    The surgical evaluation of haemorrhagic infarcted intestine and the decision for or against bowel resection require a lot of experience and are subjective. The aim of this prospective, clinical study was to examine the correlation between oxygen saturation and small intestinal wall (IW) thickness, using two objective methods. In 22 colicky horses, the blood flow, oxygen saturation and relative amount of haemoglobin were measured intraoperatively via laser Doppler and white light spectroscopy (O2C, oxygen to see, LEA Medizintechnik) at six measuring points (MPs) in small and large intestines. Furthermore, the IW thickness was measured ultrasonographically. Nine of 22 horses had an increased small IW thickness greater than 4 mm (Freeman 2002, Scharner and others 2002, le Jeune and Whitcomb 2014) at measuring point 1 (MP1) (strangulated segment), four horses had a thickened bowel wall at measuring point 3 (MP3) (poststenotic) and one at measuring point 2 (MP2). The oxygen saturation was 0 at MP1 in six horses, at MP3 in two horses and at MP2 (prestenotic) in one. Oxygen saturation and small IW thickness were independent of each other at MP1 and MP2. At MP3, the two parameters were negatively correlated. In summary, it is not possible to draw conclusions about oxygen saturation based on IW thickness.

  13. Regionalization of pIgR expression in the mucosa of mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo A; Reina-Garfias, Humberto; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2010-01-18

    Few reports exist on the differences in cell populations or immunological functions between the proximal and distal segments of the small intestine (SI). In the current contribution we analyzed the expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and alpha chains as well as the density of IgA-producing cells from the proximal and distal intestinal segments from Balb/c mice. Furthermore, by using real-time RT-PCR we quantified the expression of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and TGF-beta), Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) involved in pIgR expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In this study, for the first time it has been demonstrated that the expression of the pIgR as well as alpha chain was greater in the proximal than the distal segment of the small intestine of normal mice. Moreover, we found striking differences in the expression of cytokines at the different intestinal compartments. Whereas the expression of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and TGF-beta was higher in lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) of the distal than proximal segment, it was higher in IEC of the proximal than distal segment. In contrast, the expression of the gene for IL-4 was higher in the LPL of the proximal segment and the IEC of the distal segment. Although the overall expression of TNF-alpha, IL-4, IFN-gamma and TGF-beta was higher in the whole mucosa of the distal than proximal segment, we propose that cytokines produced by epithelial cells (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and TGF-beta) autocrinally up-regulate the expression of mRNA for the pIgR. Finally the expression of the GR was higher in the proximal segment, while the expression of the gene for TLR-4 was significantly higher in the IEC of the distal than proximal segment. The higher expression of pIgR found in the proximal segment is probably related to the effect on epithelial cells of the higher production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and TGF-beta, as well as the higher expression of the

  14. SMIT2 mediates all myo-inositol uptake in apical membranes of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Aouameur, Rym; Da Cal, Sandra; Bissonnette, Pierre; Coady, Michael J; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    This study presents the characterization of myo-inositol (MI) uptake in rat intestine as evaluated by use of purified membrane preparations. Three secondary active MI cotransporters have been identified; two are Na(+) coupled (SMIT1 and SMIT2) and one is H(+) coupled (HMIT). Through inhibition studies using selective substrates such as d-chiro-inositol (DCI, specific for SMIT2) and l-fucose (specific for SMIT1), we show that SMIT2 is exclusively responsible for apical MI transport in rat intestine; rabbit intestine appears to lack apical transport of MI. Other sugar transport systems known to be present in apical membranes, such as SGLT1 or GLUT5, lacked any significant contribution to MI uptake. Functional analysis of rat SMIT2 activity, via electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes, demonstrated similarities to the activities of SMIT2 from other species (rabbit and human) displaying high affinities for MI (0.150 +/- 0.040 mM), DCI (0.31 +/- 0.06 mM), and phlorizin (Pz; 0.016 +/- 0.007 mM); low affinity for glucose (36 +/- 7 mM); and no affinity for l-fucose. Although these functional characteristics essentially confirmed those found in rat intestinal apical membranes, a unique discrepancy was seen between the two systems studied in that the affinity constant for glucose was approximately 40-fold lower in vesicles (K(i) = 0.94 +/- 0.35 mM) than in oocytes. Finally, the transport system responsible for the basolateral efflux transporter of glucose in intestine, GLUT2, did not mediate any significant radiolabeled MI uptake in oocytes, indicating that this transport system does not participate in the basolateral exit of MI from small intestine.

  15. Relevance and challenges in modeling human gastric and small intestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Aurélie; Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Livrelli, Valérie; Denis, Sylvain; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Alric, Monique

    2012-11-01

    Gastric and small intestinal (GSI) models are increasingly used as an alternative to in vivo assays to answer many questions raised by industry and researchers. A broad range of in vitro systems is available, from static monocompartmental to dynamic multicompartmental models. However, these models require a compromise between technological complexity and biological significance. Further efforts and technological innovations are still needed to improve in vitro models and meet growing demands in the areas of nutrition and health. This review describes the models available to date for the human stomach and small intestine and highlights their relevance in nutritional, toxicological, pharmaceutical, and microbiological studies. Limitations and challenges facing artificial digestion technology are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. PMID:16473946

  17. Blood and small intestine cell kinetics under radiation exposures: Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biophysical models, which describe the dynamics of vital body systems (namely, hematopoiesis and small intestinal epithelium) in mammals exposed to acute and chronic radiation, are developed. These models, based on conventional biological theories, are realized as the systems of nonlinear differential equations. Their variables and constant parameters have real biological meaning, that provides successful identification and verification of the models in hand. The explanation of a number of radiobiological effects, including those of the low-level long-term exposures, is proposed proceeding from the modeling results. It is proved that the predictions the models agree with the respective experimental data at both qualitative and quantitative levels. All this testifies to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in investigation and prediction of radiation effects on the hematopoietic and small intestinal epithelium systems, that can be used for the radiation risk assessment in the long-term space missions such as lunar colony and Mars voyage.

  18. Functional development of small intestine of Japanese quail hatched on MIR orbital station.

    PubMed

    Lenhardt, L; Cigankova, V; Zibrin, M; Kocisova, J; Tomkova, I; Sabo, V; Boda, K; Dadasheva, O A; Gurieva, T S; Mozes, S

    2001-06-01

    The effect of microgravity on functional development of the small intestine of Japanese quails incubated for 2-3 d and hatched on the orbital station MIR was examined. After 5 d of space flight duodenal and jejunal alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity of the experimental group was compared with the AP activity in quails of the same age hatched on the Earth (laboratory controls). Short-term microgravity leading to decreased food intake resulted in significant increase of AP activity in both duodenal and jejunal enterocytes (P<0.001) of the experimental quails. The results suggest that increased AP activity probably reflects the delayed functional development of the small intestine as a consequence of inappropriate food intake during non-physiological conditions of space flight.

  19. Diabetes-related dysfunction of the small intestine and the colon: focus on motility.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Viktor József; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Izbéki, Ferenc; Körei, Anna Erzsébet; Gerő, László; Lengyel, Csaba; Kempler, Péter; Várkonyi, Tamás

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to gastric dysfunction, diabetes-related functional impairments of the small and large intestine have been studied less intensively. The gastrointestinal tract accomplishes several functions, such as mixing and propulsion of luminal content, absorption and secretion of ions, water, and nutrients, defense against pathogens, and elimination of waste products. Diverse functions of the gut are regulated by complex interactions among its functional elements, including gut microbiota. The network-forming tissues, the enteric nervous system) and the interstitial cells of Cajal, are definitely impaired in diabetic patients, and their loss of function is closely related to the symptoms in diabetes, but changes of other elements could also play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus-related motility disorders. The development of our understanding over the recent years of the diabetes-induced dysfunctions in the small and large intestine are reviewed in this article.

  20. Intestinal calcium-binding protein 3 months after massive small bowel resection in the piglet.

    PubMed

    Margolis, A; Ricour, C; Harouchi, A; Guyot, M; Laouari, D; Balsan, S

    1977-12-01

    Changes in intestinal calcium-binding protein and calcium binding activity were studied at resection and 3 months after 90% small bowel resection in piglets and one adult pig. A calcium-binding protein (MW congruent to 11.000) with calcium-dependent eletrophoretic mobility was partially purified from mucosal extract of proximal jejunum, mid-gut, and ileum. The concentration of calcium-binding protein and the calcium-binding activity of the intact animals were found highest in the proximal jejunal segment, lowest in the ileal segment. After resection in the four surviving animals out of nine, a significant increase in calcium-binding activity was observed in the proximal jejunum and in the distal ileal segment. The change in calcium-binding activity was much more marked in the ileum than the jejunum. These data demonstrate that pig intestinal mucosa possesses an adaptive capacity to increase the synthesis of calcium-binding protein after massive small bowel resection.

  1. Rebamipide Promotes the Regeneration of Aspirin-Induced Small-Intestine Mucosal Injury through Accumulation of β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu; Zhong, Wa; Yu, Tao; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Jie-Yao; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide on repairing intestinal mucosal damage induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism whereby rebamipide could promote the regeneration of aspirin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. BALB/c mice were administered aspirin (200 mg/kg/d) for 5 days to induce acute small intestinal injury (SII). Subsequently, SII mice were treated with rebamipide (320 mg/kg/d) for 5 days. The structure of intestinal barrier was observed with transmission electron microscope, and Zo-1 and occludin expressions were detected. The proliferative index was indicated by the percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the small intestine tissues were measured by an enzyme immunoassay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX) and β-catenin signal were detected in the small intestine using quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. COX expression was significantly down-regulated in aspirin induced SII (P < 0.05). In SII mice treated with rebamipide, histopathological findings of aspirin-induced intestinal inflammation were significantly milder and tight junctions between intestinal epithelial cells were improved significantly. The proliferative index increased after rebamipide treatment when compared with that in the control mice. The expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and c-myc and the PGE2 concentrations in small intestinal tissues were significantly increased in mice with rebamipide treatments (P < 0.05). Rebamipide administration in aspirin-induced SII mice could improve the intestinal barrier structure and promote the regeneration of small intestinal epithelial injury through up-regulating COX-2 expression and the accumulation of β-catenin.

  2. Rebamipide Promotes the Regeneration of Aspirin-Induced Small-Intestine Mucosal Injury through Accumulation of β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Jie-Yao; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of rebamipide on repairing intestinal mucosal damage induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism whereby rebamipide could promote the regeneration of aspirin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. Methods BALB/c mice were administered aspirin (200 mg/kg/d) for 5 days to induce acute small intestinal injury (SII). Subsequently, SII mice were treated with rebamipide (320 mg/kg/d) for 5 days. The structure of intestinal barrier was observed with transmission electron microscope, and Zo-1 and occludin expressions were detected. The proliferative index was indicated by the percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the small intestine tissues were measured by an enzyme immunoassay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX) and β-catenin signal were detected in the small intestine using quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results COX expression was significantly down-regulated in aspirin induced SII (P < 0.05). In SII mice treated with rebamipide, histopathological findings of aspirin-induced intestinal inflammation were significantly milder and tight junctions between intestinal epithelial cells were improved significantly. The proliferative index increased after rebamipide treatment when compared with that in the control mice. The expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and c-myc and the PGE2 concentrations in small intestinal tissues were significantly increased in mice with rebamipide treatments (P < 0.05). Conclusion Rebamipide administration in aspirin-induced SII mice could improve the intestinal barrier structure and promote the regeneration of small intestinal epithelial injury through up-regulating COX-2 expression and the accumulation of β-catenin. PMID:26135128

  3. Augmented cholesterol absorption and sarcolemmal sterol enrichment slow small intestinal transit in mice, contributing to cholesterol cholelithogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meimin; Kotecha, Vijay R; Andrade, Jon David P; Fox, James G; Carey, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol gallstones are associated with slow intestinal transit in humans as well as in animal models, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We investigated in C57L/J mice whether the components of a lithogenic diet (LD; 1.0% cholesterol, 0.5% cholic acid and 17% triglycerides), as well as distal intestinal infection with Helicobacter hepaticus, influence small intestinal transit time. By quantifying the distribution of 3H-sitostanol along the length of the small intestine following intraduodenal instillation, we observed that, in both sexes, the geometric centre (dimensionless) was retarded significantly (P < 0.05) by LD but not slowed further by helicobacter infection (males, 9.4 ± 0.5 (uninfected), 9.6 ± 0.5 (infected) on LD compared with 12.5 ± 0.4 and 11.4 ± 0.5 on chow). The effect of the LD was reproduced only by the binary combination of cholesterol and cholic acid. We inferred that the LD-induced cholesterol enrichment of the sarcolemmae of intestinal smooth muscle cells produced hypomotility from signal-transduction decoupling of cholecystokinin (CCK), a physiological agonist for small intestinal propulsion in mice. Treatment with ezetimibe in an amount sufficient to block intestinal cholesterol absorption caused small intestinal transit time to return to normal. In most cholesterol gallstone-prone humans, lithogenic bile carries large quantities of hepatic cholesterol into the upper small intestine continuously, thereby reproducing this dietary effect in mice. Intestinal hypomotility promotes cholelithogenesis by augmenting formation of deoxycholate, a pro-lithogenic secondary bile salt, and increasing the fraction of intestinal cholesterol absorbed. PMID:22331417

  4. Angiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Grafting with Prefabricated Small-Diameter, Small-Intestinal Submucosa Grafts in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Obermiller, Josef; Uchida, Barry T.; Van Alstine, William; Edwards, James M.; Landry, Gregory J.; Kaufman, John A.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the longitudinal angiographic evaluation of prefabricated lyophilized small-intestinal submucosa (SIS) grafts placed in ovine carotid arteries and to demonstrate a variety of complications that developed. A total of 24 grafts, 10 cm long and 6 mm in diameter, were placed surgically as interposition grafts. Graft patency at 1 week was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, and angiography was used for follow-up at 1 month and at 3 to 4 months. A 90% patency rate was found at 1 week, 65% at 1 month, and 30% at 3 to 4 months. On the patent grafts, angiography demonstrated a variety of changes, such as anastomotic stenoses, graft diffuse dilations and dissections, and aneurysm formation. These findings have not been previously demonstrated angiographically by other investigators reporting results with small-diameter vessel grafts made from fresh small-intestinal submucosa (SIS). The complications found were partially related to the graft construction from four SIS layers. Detailed longitudinal angiographic study should become an essential part of any future evaluation of small-vessel SIS grafting.

  5. Global microRNA profiling of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Essaghir, Ahmed; Martijn, Cécile; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors are rare malignancies. They arise from enterochromaffin cells and very little is known about differential microRNA (miRNA) expression. The aim of this study was to identify the miRNA profile of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors, which may have a critical role in tumor development, progression and potentially develop miRNAs as novel clinical biomarkers. Specimens from two test groups, 24 small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor specimens at different stages of malignancy, are included in this study. Total RNA from the first test group, five primary tumors, five mesentery metastases and five liver metastases was hybridized onto the Affymetrix Genechip miRNA arrays to perform a genome-wide profile. The results were validated by using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) and northern blot analyses. We then expanded the investigation to laser capture microdissected small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor cells and immuno-laser capture microdissected normal enterochromaffin cells of the first test group. Furthermore, a second test group, three primary tumors, three mesentery metastases and three liver metastases, was included in the study. Thus, two independent test groups validated the data by QRT-PCR. Moreover, we characterized nine miRNAs, five (miR-96, -182, -183, -196a and -200a), which are upregulated during tumor progression, whereas four (miR-31, -129-5p, -133a and -215) are downregulated. Several online software programs were used to predict potential miRNA target genes to map a number of putative target genes for the aberrantly regulated miRNAs, through an advanced and novel bioinformatics analysis. Our findings provide information about pivotal miRNAs, which may lead to further insights into tumorigenesis, progression mechanisms and novel therapeutic targets recognition. PMID:23328977

  6. Study of biological rhythms of small intestinal cryptic epithelial mitosis of different periodicity by fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Zharkova, N A; Antochin, A I; Zakharchenko, A V

    2009-05-01

    Rhythms of cell division with different periods in the mouse small intestinal cryptic epithelium were studied using Fourier analysis. It was found that the proliferative system of the crypt is characterized by an intricate spatial and temporal organization. The amplitude of low-frequency rhythms increases, while the amplitude of high-frequency rhythms decreased in the direction from the crypt bottom to the neck.

  7. Interleukin 2 modulates ion secretion and cell proliferation in cultured human small intestinal enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    O'Loughlin, E; Pang, G; Noltorp, R; Koina, C; Batey, R; Clancy, R

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine if interleukin 2 (IL-2) alters epithelial transport and barrier function in cultured human small intestinal enterocytes.
METHODS—Confluent monolayers of small intestinal cells derived from duodenal biopsies were treated with IL-2 0.2-50 U/ml for 24 hours prior to study. Transport measurements were performed under short circuited conditions in Ussing chambers, with and without the secretagogues forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine (IBMX). Serosal to mucosal flux of 3[H] mannitol (permeability) and 3[H] thymidine uptake (proliferation) were measured. IL-2 receptor and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA were identified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
RESULTS—IL-2 did not alter baseline electrical parameters but caused a significant increase in cAMP dependent chloride secretion. The effect was mediated by the IL-2 receptor and paralleled a rapid increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, janus kinase 1, and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) 1, 3, and 5. IL-2 significantly increased proliferation but at a lower dose than observed for enhanced secretion but did not alter permeability. IL-2 receptor β and γc chains and CFTR mRNA were identified by RT-PCR.
CONCLUSIONS—IL-2 treatment enhances cAMP stimulated chloride secretion and cellular proliferation in a human small intestinal cell line expressing a functional IL-2 receptor.


Keywords: interleukin 2; ion secretion; cell proliferation; enterocytes; small intestine PMID:11600465

  8. Comparison between Cultured Small-Intestinal and Fecal Microbiotas in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Mentula, Silja; Harmoinen, Jaana; Heikkilä, Matti; Westermarck, Elias; Rautio, Merja; Huovinen, Pentti; Könönen, Eija

    2005-01-01

    The microbiota of the small intestine is poorly known because of difficulties in sampling. In this study, we examined whether the organisms cultured from the jejunum and feces resemble each other. Small-intestinal fluid samples were collected from 22 beagle dogs with a permanent jejunal fistula in parallel with fecal samples. In addition, corresponding samples from seven of the dogs were collected during a 4-week period (days 4, 10, 14, and 28) to examine the stability of the microbiota. In the jejunal samples, aerobic/facultative and anaerobic bacteria were equally represented, whereas anaerobes dominated in the fecal samples. Despite lower numbers of bacteria in the jejunum (range, 102 to 106 CFU/g) than in feces (range, 108 to 1011 CFU/g), some microbial groups were more prevalent in the small intestine: staphylococci, 64% versus 36%; nonfermentative gram-negative rods, 27% versus 9%; and yeasts, 27% versus 5%, respectively. In contrast, part of the fecal dominant microbiota (bile-resistant Bacteroides spp., Clostridium hiranonis-like organisms, and lactobacilli) was practically absent in the jejunum. Many species were seldom isolated simultaneously from both sample types, regardless of their overall prevalence. In conclusion, the small intestine contains a few bacterial species at a time with vastly fluctuating counts, opposite to the results obtained for the colon, where the major bacterial groups remain relatively constant over time. Qualitative and quantitative differences between the corresponding jejunal and fecal samples indicate the inability of fecal samples to represent the microbiotas present in the upper gut. PMID:16085799

  9. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  11. Characterization of slow waves generated by myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal of the rabbit small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Retsu; Ward, Sean M.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2014-01-01

    Slow waves (slow wavesICC) were recorded from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in situ in the rabbit small intestine, and their properties were compared with those of mouse small intestine. Rabbit slow wavesICC consisted of an upstroke depolarization followed by a distinct plateau component. Ni2+ and nominally Ca2+-free solutions reduced the rate-of-rise and amplitude of the upstroke depolarization. Replacement of Ca2+ with Sr2+ enhanced the upstroke component but decreased the plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In contrast, replacing Ca2+ with Sr2+ decreased both components of mouse slow wavesICC. The plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC was inhibited in low-extracellular-Cl−-concentration (low-[Cl−]o) solutions and by 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an inhibitor of Cl− channels, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an inhibitor of internal Ca2+ pumps, or bumetanide, an inhibitor of Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1). Bumetanide also inhibited the plateau component of mouse slow wavesICC. NKCC1-like immunoreactivity was observed mainly in ICC-MY in the rabbit small intestine. Membrane depolarization with a high-K+ solution reduced the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In cells depolarized with elevated external K+, DIDS, CPA, and bumetanide blocked slow wavesICC. These results suggest that the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC is partially mediated by voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx, whereas the plateau component is dependent on Ca2+-activated Cl− efflux. NKCC1 is likely to be responsible for Cl− accumulation in ICC-MY. The results also suggest that the mechanism of the upstroke component differs in rabbit and mouse slow wavesICC in the small intestine. PMID:25540230

  12. Characterization of slow waves generated by myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal of the rabbit small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Mitsui, Retsu; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2015-03-01

    Slow waves (slow wavesICC) were recorded from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in situ in the rabbit small intestine, and their properties were compared with those of mouse small intestine. Rabbit slow wavesICC consisted of an upstroke depolarization followed by a distinct plateau component. Ni(2+) and nominally Ca(2+)-free solutions reduced the rate-of-rise and amplitude of the upstroke depolarization. Replacement of Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) enhanced the upstroke component but decreased the plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In contrast, replacing Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) decreased both components of mouse slow wavesICC. The plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC was inhibited in low-extracellular-Cl(-)-concentration (low-[Cl(-)]o) solutions and by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an inhibitor of Cl(-) channels, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an inhibitor of internal Ca(2+) pumps, or bumetanide, an inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1). Bumetanide also inhibited the plateau component of mouse slow wavesICC. NKCC1-like immunoreactivity was observed mainly in ICC-MY in the rabbit small intestine. Membrane depolarization with a high-K(+) solution reduced the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In cells depolarized with elevated external K(+), DIDS, CPA, and bumetanide blocked slow wavesICC. These results suggest that the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC is partially mediated by voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx, whereas the plateau component is dependent on Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) efflux. NKCC1 is likely to be responsible for Cl(-) accumulation in ICC-MY. The results also suggest that the mechanism of the upstroke component differs in rabbit and mouse slow wavesICC in the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Validation study of villous atrophy and small intestinal inflammation in Swedish biopsy registers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Small intestinal biopsy with villous atrophy (VA) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). We validated VA (Marsh 3) and small intestinal inflammation without VA (Marsh 1+2) in Swedish regional biopsy registers. Methods All pathology departments in Sweden (n = 28) were searched to identify individuals with VA or duodenal/jejunal inflammation. The validation consisted of blinded examination of biopsy samples, manual review of biopsy reports, web surveys, and patient chart reviews of 121 individuals with VA and 39 with inflammation. Results We identified 29,148 individuals with VA and 13,446 individuals with inflammation. In a blinded examination, Swedish pathologists correctly classified 90% of biopsies with VA. Manual screening of 1,534 biopsy reports (performed by co-author JFL and a research assistant) found that comorbidity other than CD was rare. IBD was the most common comorbidity and occurred in 0.3% of biopsies with VA (1.6% in inflammation). Among 114 patients with VA and available data, 108 (95%) had a clinical diagnosis of CD. 79% of the validated individuals with VA and 64% of those with inflammation had documented gastrointestinal symptoms prior to biopsy. 88% of the validated individuals with VA had positive CD serology before their first biopsy. 172/180 (96%) of Swedish gastroenterologists and 68/68 (100%) of pediatricians perform a small intestinal biopsy in at least 9 out of 10 individuals prior to diagnosis of CD. Conclusion Regional biopsy data are feasible to identify individuals with CD and small-intestinal inflammation. The specificity of CD is high in villous atrophy. PMID:19284576

  14. Validation study of villous atrophy and small intestinal inflammation in Swedish biopsy registers.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Brandt, Lena; Montgomery, Scott M; Granath, Fredrik; Ekbom, Anders

    2009-03-11

    Small intestinal biopsy with villous atrophy (VA) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). We validated VA (Marsh 3) and small intestinal inflammation without VA (Marsh 1+2) in Swedish regional biopsy registers. All pathology departments in Sweden (n = 28) were searched to identify individuals with VA or duodenal/jejunal inflammation. The validation consisted of blinded examination of biopsy samples, manual review of biopsy reports, web surveys, and patient chart reviews of 121 individuals with VA and 39 with inflammation. We identified 29,148 individuals with VA and 13,446 individuals with inflammation. In a blinded examination, Swedish pathologists correctly classified 90% of biopsies with VA. Manual screening of 1,534 biopsy reports (performed by co-author JFL and a research assistant) found that comorbidity other than CD was rare. IBD was the most common comorbidity and occurred in 0.3% of biopsies with VA (1.6% in inflammation). Among 114 patients with VA and available data, 108 (95%) had a clinical diagnosis of CD. 79% of the validated individuals with VA and 64% of those with inflammation had documented gastrointestinal symptoms prior to biopsy. 88% of the validated individuals with VA had positive CD serology before their first biopsy. 172/180 (96%) of Swedish gastroenterologists and 68/68 (100%) of pediatricians perform a small intestinal biopsy in at least 9 out of 10 individuals prior to diagnosis of CD. Regional biopsy data are feasible to identify individuals with CD and small-intestinal inflammation. The specificity of CD is high in villous atrophy.

  15. [The x-ray microanalysis of the mucosa of the rat small intestine].

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, A G; Matys, Iu V

    1990-01-01

    A rat small intestine mucosa is shown to accumulate significant amount of potassium and chloride. There was found a correlation between the content of these chemical elements and glycoprotein compartmentalization in goblet cell secret, brush border of enterocytes and a mucus layer. In this connection a role of mucus glycoproteins in membrane digestion is discussed. For preparation of samples the cryotechniques of electron microscopy are used.

  16. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05). Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine. PMID:26107628

  17. Rumen Degradability and Small Intestinal Digestibility of the Amino Acids in Four Protein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Jin, L.; Wen, Q. N.; Kopparapu, N. K.; Liu, J.; Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Y. G.

    2016-01-01

    The supplementation of livestock feed with animal protein is a present cause for public concern, and plant protein shortages have become increasingly prominent in China. This conflict may be resolved by fully utilizing currently available sources of plant protein. We estimated the rumen degradability and the small intestinal digestibility of the amino acids (AA) in rapeseed meal (RSM), soybean meal (SBM), sunflower seed meal (SFM) and sesame meal (SSM) using the mobile nylon bag method to determine the absorbable AA content of these protein supplements as a guide towards dietary formulations for the dairy industry. Overall, this study aimed to utilize protein supplements effectively to guide dietary formulations to increase milk yield and save plant protein resources. To this end, we studied four cows with a permanent rumen fistula and duodenal T-shape fistula in a 4×4 Latin square experimental design. The results showed that the total small intestine absorbable amino acids and small intestine absorbable essential amino acids were higher in the SBM (26.34% and 13.11% dry matter [DM], respectively) than in the SFM (13.97% and 6.89% DM, respectively). The small intestine absorbable Lys contents of the SFM, SSM, RSM and SBM were 0.86%, 0.88%, 1.43%, and 2.12% (DM basis), respectively, and the absorbable Met contents of these meals were 0.28%, 1.03%, 0.52%, and 0.47% (DM basis), respectively. Among the examined food sources, the milk protein score of the SBM (0.181) was highest followed by those of the RSM (0.136), SSM (0.108) and SFM (0.106). The absorbable amino acid contents of the protein supplements accurately reflected protein availability, which is an important indicator of the balance of feed formulation. Therefore, a database detailing the absorbable AA should be established. PMID:26732449

  18. Crypt cell production rate in the small intestine of the zinc-supplemented mouse.

    PubMed

    Duff, Michael; Ettarh, Rajunor R

    2002-01-01

    Zinc is a trace element which is necessary in the body and the daily requirement is usually provided mainly through food intake. The effects of zinc deficiency are multisystemic and in the gastrointestinal tract include ulceration and inflammation. Many of these effects in the mammalian small intestine are reversible by zinc replenishment in a manner that is thought to be linked to the effect of this element on intestinal mucosal cell kinetics. However, the effects of continued replenishment (supplementation) have not been closely examined. This study examined the effects of zinc supplementation on gut crypt cell production in zinc-replete animals. Fifteen CD-1 mice were given zinc sulphate (0.3 mmol/l) in tap water while a second (control) group of 15 mice received only tap water. After 14 days, the small intestine was removed, measured and divided into four equal lengths and then sampled at the midpoint of each of the resulting four segments. Whole crypt numbers and crypt cell production rate were determined for each intestinal site for both groups of mice. While crypt dimensions and crypt numbers in zinc-fed mice showed no significant change from control levels, the crypt cell production in zinc-fed mice was significantly increased and duration of mitosis reduced in the third (distal) intestinal segment when compared to values from control mice. These findings show that the addition of subtoxic quantities of zinc to diet in zinc-replete animals enhances cell production and indicate that the reversal of zinc deficiency-induced gut damage following dietary zinc replenishment may be due to a direct effect on cell kinetics. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Modulation of small intestinal homeostasis along with its microflora during acclimatization at simulated hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Adak, Atanu; Ghosh; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2014-11-01

    At high altitude (HA) hypobaric hypoxic environment manifested several pathophysiological consequences of which gastrointestinal (GI) disorder are very common phenomena. To explore the most possible clue behind this disorder intestinal flora, the major player of the GI functions, were subjected following simulated hypobaric hypoxic treatment in model animal. For this, male albino rats were exposed to 55 kPa (approximately 4872.9 m) air pressure consecutively for 30 days for 8 h/day and its small intestinal microflora, their secreted digestive enzymes and stress induced marker protein were investigated of the luminal epithelia. It was observed that population density of total aerobes significantly decreased, but the quantity of total anaerobes and Escherichia coli increased significantly after 30 days of hypoxic stress. The population density of strict anaerobes like Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp. and Lactobacillus sp. and obligate anaerobes like Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus sp. were expanded along with their positive growth direction index (GDI). In relation to the huge multiplication of anaerobes the amount of gas formation as well as content of IgA and IgG increased in duration dependent manner. The activity of some luminal enzymes from microbial origin like a-amylase, gluco-amylase, proteinase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase were also elevated in hypoxic condition. Besides, hypoxia induced in formation of malondialdehyde along with significant attenuation of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activity and lowered GSH/GSSG pool in the intestinal epithelia. Histological study revealed disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier with higher infiltration of lymphocytes in lamina propia and atrophic structure. It can be concluded that hypoxia at HA modified GI microbial imprint and subsequently causes epithelial barrier dysfunction which may relate to the small intestinal dysfunction at HA.

  20. Effect of incubation temperature on nutrient transporters and small intestine morphology of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Barri, A; Honaker, C F; Sottosanti, J R; Hulet, R M; McElroy, A P

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of elevated incubation temperature on posthatch nutrient transporter gene expression, integrity of the intestinal epithelium, organ development, and performance in Ross 308 broiler chickens. Ross × Ross 308 fertile eggs (n = 900) were incubated at different eggshell temperatures during development. From embryonic day (ED) 1 to ED12, all eggs were incubated at 37.1°C, whereas from ED13 to ED21, the eggs were divided into 2 groups for incubation at 37.4°C (S) or 39.6°C (H). Performance characteristics were measured at day of hatch (DOH) and d 7, 14, 21, 30, and 42. Small intestine and residual yolk sacs were collected at DOH and d 2, 4, 6, and 10 and weighed individually. Intestinal samples from the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were evaluated for mucosal morphology and relative nutrient transporter gene expression. No significant differences were found in performance or organ weights. The intestinal morphology results showed a temperature × age interaction in duodenum villus height (P = 0.02) and crypt depth (P = 0.05) and in ileum villus height-to-crypt depth ratios (P = 0.02). There was a main effect of temperature, resulting in deeper crypts (P = 0.02) in the jejunum of chicks incubated at H compared with S. In the nutrient gene expression evaluation, peptide transporter (PepT1) showed a temperature × age interaction. On DOH and d 2, 4, and 10, PepT1 expression was similar between chicks incubated at S and H. However, on d 6, chicks incubated at S had significantly higher expression of PepT1 than those incubated at H. This study presents the effects of elevated incubation temperature on small intestine morphology and relative expression of nutrient transporter mRNA in high-yield broiler chicks, which can be important for the availability of nutrients and distribution of energy.

  1. Effects of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate in rats.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aynur; Ozcicek, Adalet; Suleyman, Bahadir; Coban, Taha Abdulkadir; Cimen, Ferda Keskin; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Altuner, Durdu; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal mucositis is one of the major problems in the patients receiving cancer treatment. Nimesulide is a drug with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiulcer features. We aimed to investigate the effect of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate (MTX) in rats. Experimental animals were divided into the control group, MTX group (MTXG) and nimesulide+MTX administered group (NMTXG) with eight rats per group. The control and MTXG groups were given distilled water by gavage and the NMTXG was given nimesulide 100 mg/kg orally. After one hour, the NMTXG and MTXG rat groups were administered oral MTX 5 mg/kg. This procedure was repeated once a day for 15 days and the rats were sacrificed. The duodenum and jejunum of each rat was removed for the assessment of biochemical markers and histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the duodenal and jejunal tissues of the animals which received MTX, compared to the control and NMTXG (P<0.001). Also, the levels of total glutathione (tGSH), glutathione reductase (GSHRd), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly lower in the MTXG (P<0.001) compared to other groups. MTX led to villus and crypt epithelial damage and inflammation containing marked PMNL and eosinophils in the intestinal tissues histopathologically. Whereas, there was only mild irregularities in the villus structures of the NMTXG. Nimesulide protected the small intestines against damage by MTX. Intestinal mucositis caused by MTX may be preventable by co-administered nimesulide.

  2. Effects of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Aynur; Ozcicek, Adalet; Suleyman, Bahadir; Coban, Taha Abdulkadir; Cimen, Ferda Keskin; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Altuner, Durdu; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is one of the major problems in the patients receiving cancer treatment. Nimesulide is a drug with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiulcer features. We aimed to investigate the effect of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate (MTX) in rats. Experimental animals were divided into the control group, MTX group (MTXG) and nimesulide+MTX administered group (NMTXG) with eight rats per group. The control and MTXG groups were given distilled water by gavage and the NMTXG was given nimesulide 100 mg/kg orally. After one hour, the NMTXG and MTXG rat groups were administered oral MTX 5 mg/kg. This procedure was repeated once a day for 15 days and the rats were sacrificed. The duodenum and jejunum of each rat was removed for the assessment of biochemical markers and histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the duodenal and jejunal tissues of the animals which received MTX, compared to the control and NMTXG (P<0.001). Also, the levels of total glutathione (tGSH), glutathione reductase (GSHRd), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly lower in the MTXG (P<0.001) compared to other groups. MTX led to villus and crypt epithelial damage and inflammation containing marked PMNL and eosinophils in the intestinal tissues histopathologically. Whereas, there was only mild irregularities in the villus structures of the NMTXG. Nimesulide protected the small intestines against damage by MTX. Intestinal mucositis caused by MTX may be preventable by co-administered nimesulide. PMID:27333839

  3. In vivo deep tissue fluorescence imaging of the murine small intestine and colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosignani, Viera; Dvornikov, Alexander; Aguilar, Jose S.; Stringari, Chiara; Edwards, Roberts; Mantulin, Williams; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-03-01

    Recently we described a novel technical approach with enhanced fluorescence detection capabilities in two-photon microscopy that achieves deep tissue imaging, while maintaining micron resolution. This technique was applied to in vivo imaging of murine small intestine and colon. Individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), commonly presenting as Crohn's disease or Ulcerative Colitis, are at increased risk for developing colorectal cancer. We have developed a Giα2 gene knock out mouse IBD model that develops colitis and colon cancer. The challenge is to study the disease in the whole animal, while maintaining high resolution imaging at millimeter depth. In the Giα2-/- mice, we have been successful in imaging Lgr5-GFP positive stem cell reporters that are found in crypts of niche structures, as well as deeper structures, in the small intestine and colon at depths greater than 1mm. In parallel with these in vivo deep tissue imaging experiments, we have also pursued autofluorescence FLIM imaging of the colon and small intestine-at more shallow depths (roughly 160μm)- on commercial two photon microscopes with excellent structural correlation (in overlapping tissue regions) between the different technologies.

  4. Feasibility study of Tethered Capsule Endomicroscopy (TCE) deployment in the small intestine (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otuya, David O.; Verma, Yogesh; Dong, Jing; Gora, Michalina J.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2017-02-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a poorly understood disease of the small intestine that causes nutrient malabsorption in children, predominantly from low and middle income countries. The clinical importance of EED is neurological and growth stunting that remains as the child grows into adulthood. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy (TCE) has the potential to improve the understanding of EED and could be used to determine the effectiveness of EED interventions. TCE in the adult esophagus and the duodenum has been demonstrated for Barrett`s esophagus and celiac disease diagnosis, respectively. While adult subjects can independently swallow these capsules, it is likely that infants will not, and, as a result, new strategies for introducing these devices in young children aged 0.5-2 years need to be investigated. Our first approach will be to introduce the TCE devices in infants under the aid of endoscopic guidance. To determine the most effective method, we have tested endoscopic approaches for introducing TCE devices into the small intestine of living swine. These methods will be compared and contrasted to discuss the most effective means for endoscopic tethered capsule introduction into the small intestine.

  5. Quercetin tests negative for genotoxicity in transcriptome analyses of liver and small intestine of mice.

    PubMed

    Hoek-van den Hil, Elise F; van Schothorst, Evert M; van der Stelt, Inge; Hollman, Peter C H; Keijer, Jaap; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-07-01

    Given the positive results of quercetin in in vitro genotoxicity studies, the in vivo genotoxic properties of this important dietary flavonoid warrant testing, especially considering possible high intake via widely available food supplements. Here, this was done by transcriptome analyses of the most relevant tissues, liver and small intestine, of quercetin supplemented mice. Quercetin (0.33%) supplemented to a high-fat diet was administered to mice during 12 weeks. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels revealed no indications for hepatotoxicity. Microarray pathway analysis of liver and small intestine showed no regulation of genotoxicity related pathways. Analysis of DNA damage related genes also did not point at genotoxicity. Furthermore, a published classifier set of transcripts for identifying genotoxic compounds did not indicate genotoxicity. Only two transcripts of the classifier set were regulated, but in the opposite direction compared with the genotoxic compounds 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Based on the weight of evidence of three different types of analysis, we conclude that supplementation with quercetin at ~350 mg/kg bw/day for 12 weeks in mice showed no up-regulation of genotoxicity related pathways in liver and small intestine.

  6. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  7. Dclk1+ small intestinal epithelial tuft cells display the hallmarks of quiescence and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Taylor, Vivian E.; Li, James D.; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Qante, Michael; Wang, Timothy C.; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no discrete genetic signature has been defined for isolated Dclk1+ tuft cells within the small intestine. Furthermore, recent reports on the functional significance of Dclk1+ cells in the small intestine have been inconsistent. These cells have been proposed to be fully differentiated cells, reserve stem cells, and tumor stem cells. In order to elucidate the potential function of Dclk1+ cells, we FACS-sorted Dclk1+ cells from mouse small intestinal epithelium using transgenic mice expressing YFP under the control of the Dclk1 promoter (Dclk1-CreER;Rosa26-YFP). Analysis of sorted YFP+ cells demonstrated marked enrichment (~6000 fold) for Dclk1 mRNA compared with YFP− cells. Dclk1+ population display ~6 fold enrichment for the putative quiescent stem cell marker Bmi1. We observed significantly greater expression of pluripotency genes, pro-survival genes, and quiescence markers in the Dclk1+ population. A significant increase in self-renewal capability (14-fold) was observed in in vitro isolated Dclk1+ cells. The unique genetic report presented in this manuscript suggests that Dclk1+ cells may maintain quiescence, pluripotency, and metabolic activity for survival/longevity. Functionally, these reserve characteristics manifest in vitro, with Dclk1+ cells exhibiting greater ability to self-renew. These findings indicate that quiescent stem-like functionality is a feature of Dclk1-expressing tuft cells. PMID:26362399

  8. Evidence of native starch degradation with human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (recombinant).

    PubMed

    Ao, Zihua; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Sim, Lyann; Nichols, Buford L; Rose, David R; Sterchi, Erwin E; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2007-05-29

    Action of human small intestinal brush border carbohydrate digesting enzymes is thought to involve only final hydrolysis reactions of oligosaccharides to monosaccharides. In vitro starch digestibility assays use fungal amyloglucosidase to provide this function. In this study, recombinant N-terminal subunit enzyme of human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (rhMGAM-N) was used to explore digestion of native starches from different botanical sources. The susceptibilities to enzyme hydrolysis varied among the starches. The rate and extent of hydrolysis of amylomaize-5 and amylomaize-7 into glucose were greater than for other starches. Such was not observed with fungal amyloglucosidase or pancreatic alpha-amylase. The degradation of native starch granules showed a surface furrowed pattern in random, radial, or tree-like arrangements that differed substantially from the erosion patterns of amyloglucosidase or alpha-amylase. The evidence of raw starch granule degradation with rhMGAM-N indicates that pancreatic alpha-amylase hydrolysis is not a requirement for native starch digestion in the human small intestine.

  9. A paradigm shift in enteric coating: achieving rapid release in the proximal small intestine of man.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Basit, Abdul W

    2010-10-15

    The in vivo performance of a novel enteric double-coating technology designed to accelerate release in the proximal small intestine of humans was investigated. Tablet cores were coated with a double layer formulation consisting of an inner layer of EUDRAGIT L 30 D-55 neutralised to pH 6.0 in the presence of 10% citric acid, and an outer layer of standard EUDRAGIT L 30 D-55. A conventional single coating of EUDRAGIT L 30 D-55 was also applied to tablets for comparison purposes, with the identical coating formulation and thickness (5mg/cm(2)) as the outer layer of the double coating. Eight fasted volunteers received the double-coated and single-coated tablets in a two-way crossover study. The formulations were radiolabelled and followed by gamma scintigraphy; the disintegration times and positions were recorded. After leaving the stomach, tablets coated with the single-coating formulation showed a significant time delay before disintegration occurred in the mid to distal small intestine, with a mean disintegration time of 66 ± 22 min post gastric emptying. The double-coated tablets disintegrated earlier at 28 ± 6min post gastric emptying with consistent disintegration in the proximal small intestine. The accelerated in vivo disintegration of the double-coating system can overcome the limitations of conventional enteric coatings.

  10. Small intestinal enteropathy in non-obese diabetic mice fed a diet containing wheat.

    PubMed

    Maurano, F; Mazzarella, G; Luongo, D; Stefanile, R; D'Arienzo, R; Rossi, M; Auricchio, S; Troncone, R

    2005-05-01

    A deranged mucosal immune response and dietary factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. The aims of our work were to look for the presence of small intestinal enteropathy in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in relation to the presence of wheat proteins in the diet, and to assess their role in the risk of developing diabetes. Female NOD mice were fed a standard or gluten-free diet or a gluten-free diet with the addition of wheat proteins (MGFD). Small intestine architecture, intraepithelial CD3(+) infiltration, epithelial expression of H2-IA, mRNA for IFN-gamma and IL-4 were assessed. NOD mice fed a standard diet showed reduced villous height, increased intraepithelial infiltration by CD3(+) cells and enhanced expression of H2-IA and IFN-gamma mRNA when compared with mice on the gluten-free diet. The cumulative diabetes incidence at 43 weeks of age was 65% in the latter and 97% in the former (p<0.01). Mice on MGFD also showed increased epithelial infiltration and a higher incidence of diabetes. Mice fed a wheat-containing diet showed a higher incidence of diabetes, signs of small intestinal enteropathy and higher mucosal levels of proinflammatory cytokines.

  11. Histological and mucin histochemical study of the small intestine of the Persian squirrel (Sciurus anomalus).

    PubMed

    Tootian, Zahra; Sadeghinezhad, Javad; Sheibani, Mohammad Taghi; Fazelipour, Simin; De Sordi, Nadia; Chiocchetti, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the histological and mucin histochemical properties of the small intestine of the Persian squirrel (Sciurus anomalus). This species is widely distributed in the Middle East and can be found as a companion animal. The histological studies revealed that the plicae circulares were not visible in the tunica mucosa. The maximum height and width of the villi were observed in the duodenum, which then decreased toward the ileum. The muscularis mucosa was scattered, whereas the tunica submucosa was composed of dense connective tissue. The lymphatic nodules were seen in the submucosa of the distal part of the jejunum and ileum, and Brunner's glands were embedded in the initial portion of the duodenum. The tunica muscularis was significantly thicker in the ileum, and the circular muscle layer was thicker than the longitudinal muscle layer throughout the entire length of the small intestine. The mucin histochemistry, which was examined using the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and alcian blue (AB) (pH 1.0 and 2.5) and also PAS-AB (pH 2.5) and aldehyde fuchsin-AB (pH 2.5) techniques coupled with methylation and saponification reaction for some sections, showed that the small intestine mucous content included both carboxylated and sulfated acidic mucins with few neutral mucins. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the histological and histochemical characteristics of the gastrointestinal tracts of exotic mammals and provide data for comparison with other mammals.

  12. Relationships between disaccharide hydrolysis and sugar transport in amphibian small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, D. S.; Prichard, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    1. A study is described of the relationships which exist between disaccharide hydrolysis and glucose transport in the small intestine of Rana pipiens and Bufo vulgaris. The experiments were undertaken on the intestine perfused in vitro through the vascular system and with fluid circulating through the intestinal lumen. For this system it was found that, with [U-14C]glucose in the intestinal lumen, the apparent specific activity of the glucose appearing in the vascular effluent was not significantly different from that in the lumen. 2. Changes of ionic composition of vascular and luminal fluids, and the presence of phloridzin or strophanthin, had little effect upon the maltase activity in situ in R. pipiens, although this activity was somewhat reduced when the sodium of the intestinal lumen was replaced by lithium. In contrast, in all cases a marked reduction was found in the rate of glucose translocation in the vascular effluent. 3. With Tris substituted for the luminal sodium, there was evidence of a competitive inhibition of the maltase activity in situ by the buffer cation. At the same time, the rate of glucose translocation into the vascular effluent was but little affected and there was an apparent increase in the efficiency with which the cellular systems responsible for the translocation were able to capture the glucose liberated. 4. It was found that competition for transepithelial translocation occurred between the glucose initially present in the intestinal lumen, and glucose derived from either maltose or trehalose. There was no evidence for competition for hydrolysis between maltose and trehalose, yet the glucose units derived from these two disaccharides competed with each other for translocation. 5. The significance is discussed of the finding that it is possible to dissociate the processes of disaccharide hydrolysis from those underlying the translocation of hexose units into the vascular effluent. It is suggested that monosaccharide units released

  13. Longitudinal residual strain and stress-strain relationship in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yanling; Fan, Yanhua; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-06-07

    To obtain a more detailed description of the stress-free state of the intestinal wall, longitudinal residual strain measurements are needed. Furthermore, data on longitudinal stress-strain relations in visceral organs are scarce. The present study aims to investigate the longitudinal residual strain and the longitudinal stress-strain relationship in the rat small intestine. The longitudinal zero-stress state was obtained by cutting tissue strips parallel to the longitudinal axis of the intestine. The longitudinal residual stress was characterized by a bending angle (unit: degrees per unit length and positive when bending outwards). Residual strain was computed from the change in dimensions between the zero-stress state and the no-load state. Longitudinal stresses and strains were computed from stretch experiments in the distal ileum at luminal pressures ranging from 0-4 cmH2O. Large morphometric variations were found between the duodenum and ileum with the largest wall thickness and wall area in the duodenum and the largest inner circumference and luminal area in the distal ileum (p < 0.001). The bending angle did not differ between the duodenum and ileum (p > 0.5). The longitudinal residual strain was tensile at the serosal surface and compressive at the mucosal surface. Hence, the neutral axis was approximately in the mid-wall. The longitudinal residual strain and the bending angle was not uniform around the intestinal circumference and had the highest values on the mesenteric sides (p < 0.001). The stress-strain curves fitted well to the mono-exponential function with determination coefficients above 0.96. The alpha constant increased with the pressure, indicating the intestinal wall became stiffer in longitudinal direction when pressurized. Large longitudinal residual strains reside in the small intestine and showed circumferential variation. This indicates that the tissue is not uniform and cannot be treated as a homogenous material. The longitudinal stiffness

  14. Longitudinal residual strain and stress-strain relationship in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Yanling; Fan, Yanhua; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Background To obtain a more detailed description of the stress-free state of the intestinal wall, longitudinal residual strain measurements are needed. Furthermore, data on longitudinal stress-strain relations in visceral organs are scarce. The present study aims to investigate the longitudinal residual strain and the longitudinal stress-strain relationship in the rat small intestine. Methods The longitudinal zero-stress state was obtained by cutting tissue strips parallel to the longitudinal axis of the intestine. The longitudinal residual stress was characterized by a bending angle (unit: degrees per unit length and positive when bending outwards). Residual strain was computed from the change in dimensions between the zero-stress state and the no-load state. Longitudinal stresses and strains were computed from stretch experiments in the distal ileum at luminal pressures ranging from 0–4 cmH2O. Results Large morphometric variations were found between the duodenum and ileum with the largest wall thickness and wall area in the duodenum and the largest inner circumference and luminal area in the distal ileum (p < 0.001). The bending angle did not differ between the duodenum and ileum (p > 0.5). The longitudinal residual strain was tensile at the serosal surface and compressive at the mucosal surface. Hence, the neutral axis was approximately in the mid-wall. The longitudinal residual strain and the bending angle was not uniform around the intestinal circumference and had the highest values on the mesenteric sides (p < 0.001). The stress-strain curves fitted well to the mono-exponential function with determination coefficients above 0.96. The α constant increased with the pressure, indicating the intestinal wall became stiffer in longitudinal direction when pressurized. Conclusion Large longitudinal residual strains reside in the small intestine and showed circumferential variation. This indicates that the tissue is not uniform and cannot be treated as a homogenous

  15. Protection of the small intestine against irradiation by means of a removable prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sezeur, A.; Abbou, C.; Chopin, D.; Rey, P.; Leandri, J. )

    1990-07-01

    In radiation therapy of tumors, several techniques are used to prevent injury of the intestinal loops. Their purpose is to drive the intestine out of the external beam. Understanding the disadvantages they present, a temporary prosthesis which effectively protects the small bowel, and is easy to remove, has been developed. The device is a 600 to 1,000 ml, silicone rubber, expandable balloon. When implanted in the pelvis or retroperitoneal cavity, and filled, this balloon displaces the intestinal loops out of the pelvic irradiation field. It may remain either filled or empty between each irradiation session. Due to its particular elliptical shape, once empty, the balloon can be removed through a 3 cm incision under local or peridural anesthesia at the completion of radiotherapy. Eleven patients with recurrent (8) or primary (3) cancer have been implanted. The protective effect has been evaluated on successive biologic tests, performed during treatment. No problem related to the prosthesis, no alteration of the biologic tests, nor bowel injury have been observed after several months follow-up. This device is suitable for preventing intestinal complications during therapy, allowing a higher dose of radiations in some cases.

  16. Food intake regulates oleoylethanolamide formation and degradation in the proximal small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Astarita, Giuseppe; Gaetani, Silvana; Kim, Janet; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2007-01-12

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is a lipid mediator that inhibits food intake by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha. In the rodent small intestine OEA levels decrease during food deprivation and increase upon refeeding, suggesting that endogenous OEA may participate in the regulation of satiety. Here we show that feeding stimulates OEA mobilization in the mucosal layer of rat duodenum and jejunum but not in the serosal layer from the same intestinal segments in other sections of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, ileum, colon) or in a broad series of internal organs and tissues (e.g. liver, brain, heart, plasma). Feeding also increases the levels of other unsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) (e.g. linoleoylethanolamide) without affecting those of saturated FAEs (e.g. palmitoylethanolamide). Feeding-induced OEA mobilization is accompanied by enhanced accumulation of OEA-generating N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs) increased activity and expression of the OEA-synthesizing enzyme NAPE-phospholipase D, and decreased activity and expression of the OEAdegrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase. Immunostaining studies revealed that NAPE-phospholipase D and fatty acid amide hydrolase are expressed in intestinal enterocytes and lamina propria cells. Collectively, these results indicate that nutrient availability controls OEA mobilization in the mucosa of the proximal intestine through a concerted regulation of OEA biosynthesis and degradation.

  17. Characterization of colloidal structures during intestinal lipolysis using small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rezhdo, Oljora; Di Maio, Selena; Le, Peisi; Littrell, Kenneth C; Carrier, Rebecca L; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2017-08-01

    Bile micelles are thought to mediate intestinal absorption, in part by providing a phase into which compounds can partition. Solubilizing capacity of bile micelles is enhanced during the digestion of fat rich food. We hypothesized that the intestinal digestion of triglycerides causes an increase in volume of micelles that can be quantitatively monitored over the course of digestion using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and that SANS can enable evaluation of the contribution of each of the components present during digestion to the size of micelles. SANS was used to characterize the size and shape of micelles present prior to and during the in vitro simulated intestinal digestion of a model food-associated lipid, triolein. Pre-lipolysis mixtures of a bile salt and phospholipid simulating bile concentrations in fed conditions were organized in micelles with an average volume of 40 nm(3). During lipolysis, the micelle volume increased 2.5-fold over a 2-h digestion period due to growth in one direction as a result of insertion of monoglycerides and fatty acids. These efforts represent a basis for quantitative mechanistic understanding of changes in solubilizing capacity of the intestinal milieu upon ingestion of a fat-rich meal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and predictors of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in systemic sclerosis patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tauber, M; Avouac, J; Benahmed, A; Barbot, L; Coustet, B; Kahan, A; Allanore, Y

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of data available on small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). The objectives of the study were to estimate the prevalence of SIBO in SSc patients exhibiting intestinal symptoms and identify patients at risk of SIBO regarding clinical and biological presentations and gastrointestinal symptoms captured by standardized questionnaires. Between 2011 and 2012, patients exhibiting intestinal complaints underwent glucose H2/CH4 breath tests (BT) and blood assays. They were interviewed using the University of California Los Angeles Scleroderma Clinical Trial Consortium Gastrointestinal Tract Instrument 2.0 (UCLA SCTC GTI) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). For patients diagnosed with SIBO, BT was repeated 1 to 4 months after the end of antibiotics. Among 120 consecutive patients, 37 patients (29 women) exhibiting intestinal complaints were included (median age: 60 years). Fourteen patients (38%) were diagnosed with SIBO; patients from this subset had a longer disease duration (p=0.02), a significant weight loss within the past 6 months (p=0.03) and a higher total UCLA SCTC GTI score (p=0.03). The SF-36 assessment was not discriminant. Among the 14 patients treated for SIBO, 6 had a negative control BT, 4 remained positive, 2 failed to repeat the test and 2 patients died due to severe chronic malabsorption. SIBO is a not uncommon, late onset, severe and not easy to treat complication of SSc. Higher UCLA SCTC GTI score and weight loss appeared to be strongly associated with SIBO.

  19. The Effect of Impaired Angiogenesis on Intestinal Function Following Massive Small Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Miron, Jose; Sun, Raphael; Choi, Pamela; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Mei, Junjie; Worthen, G. Scott; Warner, Brad W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal adaptation involves villus lengthening, crypt deepening, and increased capillary density following small bowel resection (SBR). Mice lacking the proangiogenic chemokine CXCL5 have normal structural adaptation but impaired angiogenesis. This work evaluates the impact of incomplete adaptive angiogenesis on the functional capacity of the intestine after SBR. Methods CXCL5 knockout (KO) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice underwent 50% SBR. Magnetic resonance imaging measured weekly body composition. Intestinal absorptive capacity was evaluated through fecal fat analysis. Gene expression profiles for select macronutrient transporters were measured via RT-PCR. Postoperative crypt and villus measurements assessed for structural adaptation. Submucosal capillary density was measured through CD31 immunohistochemistry. Results Comparable postoperative weight gain occurred initially. Diminished weight gain, impaired fat absorption, and elevated steatorrhea occurred in KO mice after instituting high-fat diet. Greater postoperative upregulation of ABCA1 fat transporter occurred in WT mice, while PEPT1 protein transporter was significantly downregulated in KO mice. KO mice had impaired angiogenesis but intact structural adaptation. Conclusion After SBR, KO mice display an inefficient intestinal absorption profile with perturbed macronutrient transporter expression, impaired fat absorption, and slower postoperative weight gain. In addition to longer villi and deeper crypts, an intact angiogenic response may be required to achieve functional adaptation to SBR. PMID:25818317

  20. Comparison of microbial populations in the small intestine, large intestine and feces of healthy horses using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The composition of the microbiota of the equine intestinal tract is complex. Determining whether the microbial composition of fecal samples is representative of proximal compartments of the digestive tract could greatly simplify future studies. The objectives of this study were to compare the microbial populations of the duodenum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum (feces) within and between healthy horses, and to determine whether rectal (fecal) samples are representative of proximal segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Intestinal samples were collected from ten euthanized horses. 16S rRNA gene PCR-based TRFLP was used to investigate microbiota richness in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract, and dice similarity indices were calculated to compare the samples. Results Within horses large variations of microbial populations along the gastrointestinal tract were seen. The microbiota in rectal samples was only partially representative of other intestinal compartments. The highest similarity was obtained when feces were compared to the cecum. Large compartmental variations were also seen when microbial populations were compared between six horses with similar dietary and housing management. Conclusion Rectal samples were not entirely representative of intestinal compartments in the small or large intestine. This should be taken into account when designing studies using fecal sampling to assess other intestinal compartments. Similarity between horses with similar dietary and husbandry management was also limited, suggesting that parts of the intestinal microbiota were unique to each animal in this study. PMID:23497580

  1. Heat-treated colostrum feeding promotes beneficial bacteria colonization in the small intestine of neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Chen, Yanhong; Liang, Guanxiang; Goonewardene, Laksiri A; Guan, Le Luo

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of heat-treated colostrum feeding on the bacterial colonization in calf small intestine of neonatal calves within the first 12h of life. Newborn Holstein bull calves (n=32) were assigned to 3 treatment groups and fed with either fresh colostrum (FC, n=12) or heat-treated (60°C, 60 min) colostrum (HC, n=12) soon after birth, whereas the control (NC, n=8) group did not receive colostrum or water. Small intestinal tissues and contents were collected from proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum at 6 and 12h after birth, following euthanasia. Quantitative real time-PCR was used to explore the colonization of total bacteria, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Escherichia coli. The feeding of colostrum soon after birth increased the colonization of total bacteria in calf gut within the first 12h compared with NC. In contrast, the prevalence of Lactobacillus was lower in HC and FC compared to NC. Remarkable changes in the prevalence of small intestinal tissue-attached Bifidobacterium were observed with the feeding of HC, but not that in small intestinal contents. The prevalence of Bifidobacterium was 3.2 and 5.2 fold higher in HC than FC and NC, respectively, at 6h. Although the feeding of FC did not enhance the prevalence of tissue-attached Bifidobacterium at 6h compared with NC, it displayed a gradual increase over the time that was higher than NC, but similar to that of HC at 12h. Moreover, the colonization of E. coli was drastically reduced in HC calves compared with FC and NC. Thus, the present study suggests that the feeding of HC enhances the colonization of Bifidobacterium but lessens E. coli in the calf small intestine immediately postpartum compared with that of FC and NC. The increased colonization of beneficial bacteria along with the decreased colonization of potential pathogens in calf gut may also diminish the neonatal calf diarrhea when calves are fed heat-treated colostrum soon after birth.

  2. Small intestinal transit in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal dysmotility may be involved in the development of bacterial translocation and infection in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of the present study was to describe gastric, small intestinal and colorectal motility and transit in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension using a magnet-based Motility Tracking System (MTS-1) and standard radiopaque markers. Methods We included 15 patients with liver cirrhosis (8 Child-Pugh A, 6 Child-Pugh B, and 1 Child-Pugh C) and portal hypertension (11 males, median age 54 years (range 38–73), median hepatic venous pressure gradient 18 mmHg (range 12–37)), and 18 healthy controls (8 males, median age 58 years (range 34–64)). The gastric emptying time and small intestinal motility were evaluated by MTS-1, and the total gastrointestinal transit time was assessed by radiopaque markers and abdominal radiographs. Results The velocity through the proximal small intestine was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients (median 1.27 metres (m)/hour, range 0.82–2.68) than in the healthy controls (median 1.00 m/hour, range 0.46–1.88) (p = 0.03). Likewise, the magnet travelled significantly longer in both fast (p = 0.04) and slow movements (p = 0.05) in the patient group. There was no significant difference in either gastric emptying time—23 minutes (range 5–131) in patients and 29 minutes (range 10.5–182) in healthy controls (p = 0.43)—or total gastrointestinal transit time—1.6 days (range 0.5–2.9) in patients and 2.0 days (range 1.0–3.9) in healthy controls (p = 0.33). No correlation was observed between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the velocity of the magnet through the small intestine. Conclusion Patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension demonstrated faster-than-normal transit through the proximal small intestine. This may be due to an overactive bowel, as suggested by previous studies. PMID:23216853

  3. Influence of the Gut Microflora and of Biliary Constituents on Morphological Changes in the Small Intestine in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Quraishy, M. Saeed; Chescoe, Dawn; Mullervy, Jenny; Coates, Marie; Hinton, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased amounts of intestinal endotoxin are absorbed in obstructive jaundice. The precise mechanism is not known but the increased absorption may arise from alterations in the luminal contents, in the intestinal flora, in the gut wall or in interactions between all three. To examine the effects of the intestinal flora we have compared the morphological changes in the small intestine in obstructive jaundice in germ free and conventional rats while the effects of bile constituents have been examined by addition of bile constituents to the diet of bile duct ligated rats. Changes in the intestine were examined, histologically, by enzyme histochemistry, and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed no differences in response between germ free and conventional rats. Feeding of diets containing bile salts exacerbated the lesion. Feeding of diets containing cholesterol, however, reduced the degree of intestinal changes produced by cholestasis and completely antagonised the increase in damage caused by feeding of bile salts. PMID:9187547

  4. Polyamidoamine dendrimers as novel potential absorption enhancers for improving the small intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yulian; Fujimori, Takeo; Kawaguchi, Naoko; Tsujimoto, Yuiko; Nishimi, Mariko; Dong, Zhengqi; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2011-01-05

    Effects of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs were examined by an in situ closed loop method in rats. 5(6)-Carboxyfluorescein (CF), fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) with various molecular weights, calcitonin and insulin were used as model drugs of poorly absorbable drugs. The absorption of CF, FD4 and calcitonin from the rat small intestine was significantly enhanced in the presence of PAMAM dendrimers. The absorption-enhancing effects of PAMAM dendrimers for improving the small intestinal absorption of CF were concentration and generation dependent and a maximal absorption-enhancing effect was observed in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) G2 PAMAM dendrimer. However, G2 PAMAM dendrimer had almost no absorption-enhancing effect on the small intestinal absorption of macromolecular drugs including FD10 and insulin. Overall, the absorption-enhancing effects of G2 PAMAM dendrimer in the small intestine decreased as the molecular weights of drug increased. However, G2 PAMAM dendrimer did not enhance the intestinal absorption of these drugs with different molecular weights in the large intestine. Furthermore, we evaluated the intestinal membrane damage with or without G2 PAMAM dendrimer. G2 PAMAM dendrimer (0.5% (w/v)) significantly increased the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the amounts of protein released from the intestinal membranes, but the activities and amounts of these toxic markers were less than those in the presence of 3% Triton X-100 used as a positive control. Moreover, G2 PAMAM dendrimer at concentrations of 0.05% (w/v) and 0.1% (w/v) did not increase the activities and amounts of these toxic markers. These findings suggested that PAMAM dendrimers at lower concentrations might be potential and safe absorption enhancers for improving absorption of poorly absorbable drugs from the small intestine.

  5. Commensal microbiota-induced microRNA modulates intestinal epithelial permeability through the small GTPase ARF4.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kazuaki; Sugi, Yutaka; Narabayashi, Hikari; Kobayakawa, Tetsuro; Nakanishi, Yusuke; Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2017-09-15

    The intestinal tract contains many commensal bacteria that modulate various physiological host functions. Dysbiosis of commensal bacteria triggers dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, leading to the induction or aggravation of intestinal inflammation. To elucidate whether microRNA plays a role in commensal microbiome-dependent intestinal epithelial barrier regulation, we compared transcripts in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from conventional and germ-free mice and found that commensal bacteria induced the expression of miR-21-5p in IECs. miR-21-5p increased intestinal epithelial permeability and up-regulated ADP ribosylation factor 4 (ARF4), a small GTPase, in the IEC line Caco-2. We also found that ARF4 expression was up-regulated upon suppression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), which are known miR-21-5p targets, by RNAi. Furthermore, ARF4 expression in epithelial cells of the large intestine was higher in conventional mice than in germ-free mice. ARF4 suppression in the IEC line increased the expression of tight junction proteins and decreased intestinal epithelial permeability. These results indicate that commensal microbiome-dependent miR-21-5p expression in IECs regulates intestinal epithelial permeability via ARF4, which may therefore represent a target for preventing or managing dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Experimental and Automated Analysis Techniques for High-resolution Electrical Mapping of Small Intestine Slow Wave Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Timothy R; O'Grady, Gregory; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Erickson, Jonathan C; Du, Peng; Pullan, Andrew J; Bissett, Ian P

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestine motility is governed by an electrical slow wave activity, and abnormal slow wave events have been associated with intestinal dysmotility. High-resolution (HR) techniques are necessary to analyze slow wave propagation, but progress has been limited by few available electrode options and laborious manual analysis. This study presents novel methods for in vivo HR mapping of small intestine slow wave activity. Methods Recordings were obtained from along the porcine small intestine using flexible printed circuit board arrays (256 electrodes; 4 mm spacing). Filtering options were compared, and analysis was automated through adaptations of the falling-edge variable-threshold (FEVT) algorithm and graphical visualization tools. Results A Savitzky-Golay filter was chosen with polynomial-order 9 and window size 1.7 seconds, which maintained 94% of slow wave amplitude, 57% of gradient and achieved a noise correction ratio of 0.083. Optimized FEVT parameters achieved 87% sensitivity and 90% positive-predictive value. Automated activation mapping and animation successfully revealed slow wave propagation patterns, and frequency, velocity, and amplitude were calculated and compared at 5 locations along the intestine (16.4 ± 0.3 cpm, 13.4 ± 1.7 mm/sec, and 43 ± 6 µV, respectively, in the proximal jejunum). Conclusions The methods developed and validated here will greatly assist small intestine HR mapping, and will enable experimental and translational work to evaluate small intestine motility in health and disease. PMID:23667749

  7. In vivo effects of s-pantoprazole, polaprenzinc, and probiotic blend on chronic small intestinal injury induced by indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Byun, S J; Lim, T J; Lim, Y J; Seo, J G; Chung, M J

    2016-11-30

    Treatment and prevention methods for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy have not yet been established. We tested the preventive effects of s-pantoprazole sodium trihydrate (PAN), polaprezinc (PZ), and probiotics on an indomethacin (Indo)-induced small intestinal injury in a rat model. Rats were randomised into 6 groups to receive: normal saline (control), Indo (6 mg/kg), PZ plus Indo, PAN plus Indo, or probiotics plus Indo (at 10(8) and 10(9) cfu/head) for 2 weeks. We measured body weight, food intake, severity of small intestinal damage, haemoglobin (Hb) levels in the small intestinal fluid, intestinal inflammatory cytokines, and a few groups of faecal bacteria. The experimental groups were found to have the following survival rates: 0% for the Indo, PZ, and PAN groups; 50% for both probiotic groups; and 100% for control. Treatment with probiotics of different concentrations reduced small intestinal lesion scores and intestinal fluid Hb as compared with the Indo group, while these parameters did not reduce in the PZ and PAN groups. The anti-inflammatory marker interleukin 10 increased in both probiotic groups. Analysis of a few groups of faecal bacteria revealed that Indo-induced a significant increase in Gram-negative bacteria and decreases in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. Similar changes were also observed in the PZ and PAN groups. However, opposite effects were found in both probiotic groups. The use of probiotics appeared to be beneficial in preventing Indo-induced chronic small intestinal injury.

  8. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography for the detection and assessment of Crohn disease: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenjing; Ma, Xuelei; Xue, Luqi; Xu, Jing; Li, Qingfang; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disease. Imaging modalities are essential for the diagnosis and assessment of CD. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a well-tolerated, noninvasive and radiation-free modality and has shown potential in CD assessment. We aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of SICUS in the detection and assessment of small-bowel lesions and complications in CD. We searched PubMed database for relevant studies published before April 24, 2016. We integrated the true positive, false positive, false negative, and true negative into the pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio. Forest plots were to represent the pooled results of all studies. Thirteen articles were finally considered eligible. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SICUS in detecting small-bowel lesions were 0.883 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.847-0.913) and 0.861 (95% CI 0.828-0.890), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 39.123 (95% CI 20.014-76.476) and the area under the curve of summary receiver operating characteristic was 0.9273 (standard error: 0.0152). In subgroup analyses, SICUS represented fine sensitivity and specificity in proximal and distal small intestine lesion, as well as in CD-related complications such as stricture, dilation, abscess, and fistula. SICUS is accurate enough to make a complete assessment about the location, extent, number, and almost all kinds of complications in CD small-bowel lesions.

  9. The mesenterially perfused rat small intestine: A versatile approach for pharmacological testings.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Dominik; Klotz, Markus; Laures, Kerstin; Clasohm, Jasmin; Bischof, Michael; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds enter the body via several major natural gateways; i.e. the lung, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Drug application during surgical operations can lead to severe impairment of gastrointestinal motility, which can contribute to a paralytic ileus. Here we investigated an ex vivo perfused small intestine model that allows us to ascertain the influence of pharmaceuticals upon the gut. Corresponding segments from the proximal jejunum of adult rats were used. Their mesenteric arteries and veins were cannulated and the jejunal segment excised. The individual segments were placed in a custom designed perfusion chamber and perfusion performed through the intestinal lumen as well as the mesenteric superior artery. Three test drugs, which are commonly used in anesthesiology; i.e. pentobarbital, propofol and ketamine were administered via the blood vessels. Their effects upon gastrointestinal motility patterns were evaluated by optical measurements. Longitudinal and pendular movements were distinguishable and separately analyzed. Pharmacological effects of the individual substances could be investigated. Propofol (50-200 μg/ml) was found to decrease intestinal motility, especially longitudinal movements in a dose dependent manner. Pentobarbital decreased intestinal motility only at high concentrations, above 2.5 mg/ml. A dose of 2.5 mg/ml lead to an increase in longitudinal- and pendular movements in comparison to control, while ketamine (2.5-10 mg/ml) did not alter intestinal motility at all. Histological examination of the perfused segments revealed only minor changes in tissue morphology after perfusion. The perfusion approach shown here allows for the identification of compounds which interfere with gut motility in a highly sophisticated way. It is suitable for characterization of drug and dose specific changes in motility patterns and can be used in drug development and preclinical studies.

  10. Dexamethasone damages the rat stomach but not small intestine during inhibition of COX-1.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Aya; Taniguchi, Masaki; Takahira, Yuka; Tanaka, Akiko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2007-06-01

    We previously reported that inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2 is required for the gastrointestinal ulcerogenic properties of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Inhibition of COX-1 up-regulates COX-2 expression, and the prostaglandins (PGs) produced by COX-2 help to maintain the mucosal integrity during inhibition of COX-1. In the present study we investigated whether dexamethasone damages rat gastrointestinal mucosa during inhibition of COX-1 and further developed the idea that COX-2 expression is a key event in the ulcerogenic actions of NSAIDs. Dexamethasone was given p.o. in the absence or presence of SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor), and the stomach or intestine was examined 8 or 24 hr later, respectively. Neither dexamethasone nor SC-560 alone damaged the gastrointestinal mucosa. In the presence of SC-560, however, dexamethasone damaged the stomach but not small intestine. SC-560 decreased PGE(2) levels in both tissues, with a gradual recovery accompanying the up-regulation of COX-2 expression, and both the recovery of PGE(2) levels and the expression of COX-2 were inhibited by dexamethasone. In the animals treated with SC-560, iNOS expression was up-regulated in the intestinal but not the gastric mucosa, and this response was also inhibited by dexamethasone. These results suggest a risk from steroid therapy in the stomach when COX-2 expression is up-regulated. Dexamethasone does not provoke damage in the intestine, despite inhibiting the up-regulation of COX-2 expression under conditions of PG deficiency; at least one of the reasons is that this agent prevents the expression of iNOS, a major factor in the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions.

  11. Morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-12-16

    The present study aimed to study the morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of the experiments. Morphometry data was obtained by measuring the wall thickness and cross-sectional area. The mechanical test was done as a step-wise distension experiment. The intestinal diameter and length were obtained from digitized images of the segments at pre-selected pressure levels and at the no-load and zero-stress states. Circumferential and longitudinal stresses (force per area) and strains (deformation) were computed from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The duodenal and ileal dimensions increased slightly from 6 to 22 months, e.g. the wall thickness and the wall cross-sectional area increased about 4% and 25% for duodenum and 5% and 8% for ileum. The opening angle gradually decreased from 154 to 117 degrees for duodenum and from 144 to 87 degrees for ileum during aging. The circumferential stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 22 months (p<0.05) whereas the longitudinal stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 18 months (p<0.01) both for duodenum and ileum. The intestinal wall became stiffer circumferentially and longitudinally during the aging. Furthermore, the intestinal wall was stiffer longitudinally than circumferentially. In conclusion, pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling occurred in the rat intestine during aging.

  12. Giant polypoid gastric heterotopia in the small intestine in a boy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Yu, Haibo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Heterotopic gastric mucosa has been described at various locations of the body; however, the polyp composed of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the small intestine is rare. Patient concerns: A 15-year-old boy visited us for investigation of recurrent episodes of melena. Capsule endoscopy (CE) revealed a polypoid tumor in the ileum, with an active nearby hemorrhage. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) showed a tumor in the right quadrant of the abdomen, with a diameter of about 18 × 14 mm. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with polypoid gastric heterotopia. Interventions: We performed an operation to resect the lesion. Outcomes: The patient recovered smoothly after surgery and was discharged on postoperative day 7 and followed up for 3 months. He has not experienced gastrointestinal intestinal (GI) symptoms up to now. Lessons: Giant polypoid gastric heterotopia in the small intestine is extremely rare, which can express as an occasional finding with or without symptoms. Surgical resection is the preferred therapy when symptoms appear. PMID:28072748

  13. Migration of epithelial cells in the small intestine of mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5.

    PubMed

    Shadoff, N; Loria, R M; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S A

    1979-03-01

    The rate of cell migration in the small intestine during enteric viral infections has not been assessed previously. CD-1 mice (33 days old) were infected perorally with 1.0 X 10(8) plague-forming units of coxsackievirus B5 and 12 hr later were injected intraperitoneally with 2 micron Ci of [3H]thymidine/g of body weight. After 2, 12, 24, 48, 60, and 72 hr, mice were killed, and the small intestine was removed. Specimens obtained at each interval were examined by radioautography; similar specimens were titrated for virus by plaque assay in HeLa cells. In mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5, epithelial cells migrated from crypt to villus tip in 60 hr, as compared with 48 hr in uninfected control mice and 24 hr previously reported for mice perorally infected with enteric bacteria (e.g., Salmonella typhimurium). Virus was recovered from intestinal tissue, but no inflammatory response in the limina propria was apparent. These observations are consistent with previous report that substrate absorption rates may be altered during viral and bacterial enteric infection.

  14. Signalling pathways involved in the detection of peptones by murine small intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 is an insulinotropic hormone released from intestinal L-cells in response to food ingestion. Here, we investigated mechanisms underlying the sensing of peptones by primary small intestinal L-cells. Meat, casein and vegetable-derived peptones (5 mg/ml), the L-amino acids Phe, Trp, Gln and Ala (20 mM each), and the dipeptide glycine-sarcosine (20 mM) stimulated GLP-1 secretion from primary cultures prepared from the small intestine. Further mechanistic studies were performed with meat peptone, and revealed the elevation of intracellular calcium in L-cells. Inhibition of the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and Q-type voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) significantly attenuated peptone-stimulated GLP-1 release and reduced intracellular Ca2+ responses. CaSR inhibition also attenuated the GLP-1 secretory response to Gln. Targeting these pathways in L-cells could be used to increase endogenous production of GLP-1 and offer exploitable avenues for the development of therapeutics to treat diabetes and obesity. PMID:26215048

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Danielsen, E Michael

    2009-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP together with other proteins acting in the innate immune response of the gut, such as lysozyme, defensins and intelectin.

  16. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD. PMID:27175112

  17. Design and Preliminary Experimental Investigation of a Capsule for Measuring the Small Intestine Contraction Pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengbo; Kothari, Vishal; Terry, Benjamin S

    2015-11-01

    A tethered pressure measurement capsule was developed for measuring the small intestine contraction pressure to assist in locating capsules within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and quantifying the contact force between the capsule and the small intestine lumen. The capsule was calibrated statically and dynamically in depth-controlled water at body temperature (37-38 °C). In vitro tests were performed on an intestinal simulator to verify the measurement function of the capsule. To perform a preliminary evaluation of its pressure measuring capabilities, the capsule was tested at a single location in a live pig model. The pressure signal from the live animal test was analyzed in the time domain, and then, the empirical mode decomposition and fast Fourier transformation were applied to analyze the contraction pressure and ambient pressure in the frequency domain. The contraction rate was 9.4 to 11.0 times per minute. The peak value of the contraction pressure was 0.24 ± 0.05 kPa. The successful test of this prototype lays the groundwork for a future untethered, swallowable version of the capsule, which will be capable of measuring dynamic pressures while in transit.

  18. Postprandial increase of oleoylethanolamide mobilization in small intestine of the Burmese python (Python molurus).

    PubMed

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Rourke, Bryan C; Andersen, Johnnie B; Fu, Jin; Kim, Janet H; Bennett, Albert F; Hicks, James W; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-05-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator that inhibits feeding in rats and mice by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha). In rodents, intestinal OEA levels increase about threefold upon refeeding, a response that may contribute to the induction of between-meal satiety. Here, we examined whether feeding-induced OEA mobilization also occurs in Burmese pythons (Python molurus), a species of ambush-hunting snakes that consume huge meals after months of fasting and undergo massive feeding-dependent changes in gastrointestinal hormonal release and gut morphology. Using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), we measured OEA levels in the gastrointestinal tract of fasted (28 days) and fed (48 h after feeding) pythons. We observed a nearly 300-fold increase in OEA levels in the small intestine of fed compared with fasted animals (322 +/- 121 vs. 1 +/- 1 pmol/mg protein, n = 3-4). In situ OEA biosynthesis was suggested by the concomitant increase of N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine species that serve as potential biosynthetic precursors for OEA. Furthermore, we observed a concomitant increase in saturated, mono- and diunsaturated, but not polyunsaturated fatty-acid ethanolamides (FAE) in the small intestine of fed pythons. The identification of OEA and other FAEs in the gastrointestinal tract of Python molurus suggests that this class of lipid messengers may be widespread among vertebrate groups and may represent an evolutionarily ancient means of regulating energy intake.

  19. Single incision laparoscopic surgery approach for obscure small intestine bleeding localized by CT guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Juan Carlos; Thomas, Jamie L.; Lukaszczyk, John J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Traditionally, localization of small intestine sources of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has been a challenge. Advances in the field of endoscopy with the introduction of capsule endoscopy and radiographic imaging with computed tomography angiography and visceral angiography have facilitated more accurate visualization of the small intestine. If a bleeding lesion is identified on angiography and surgery is indicated, the use of methylene blue for enteric mapping is very effective to aid intraoperative localization of the culprit. However, when this is not an option, more invasive surgical techniques are required. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a new technique used in a patient with angiodysplasia of the small intestine, in where preoperative localization was done using percutaneous computed tomography (CT) guided injection of methylene blue dye. This allowed us to perform a single incision laparoscopic small intestine resection of the culprit. PMID:25460480

  20. [Morpho-functional evaluation of the small intestine patients with Crohn disease. Enema of the small intestine versus post-heparin plasma diamine oxidase].

    PubMed

    Fondacaro, R; Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; Noviello, A; Ciacci, C; D'Agostino, L; Tamburrini, O

    1987-03-01

    Our study was directed not only towards the diagnosis of small bowel Crohn's disease, but especially to a quantitative analysis, for a correct therapeutical approach. This experimental trial is based on the relationship between radiological evidence, measured during small bowel enema, and the seriousness of the morphological and functional damage to the intestinal mucosal membrane, evaluated with a post-heparin diamine-oxidase activity test. With this method we studied 35 selected patients; 16 of them were affected by the disease with an exclusive localization in the small bowel and 5 have been considered separately, because 3 patients had already been operated and the other 2 showed different localizations. In our results, the two parameters were not constantly related to each other. In other words the enema's morphological data sometimes do not accord with the mucosal membrane integrity index expressed by the enzyme. Anyway the importance of this study is the attempt of making an objective comparison between an anatomic situation and its functional consequence. These aspects have a great significance in Crohn's disease.

  1. Small intestinal hydrolysis of plant glucosides: higher glucohydrolase activities in rodents than passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Lessner, Krista M; Dearing, M Denise; Izhaki, Ido; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Arad, Zeev; Karasov, William H

    2015-09-01

    Glycosides are a major group of plant secondary compounds characterized by one or more sugars conjugated to a lipophilic, possibly toxic aglycone, which is released upon hydrolysis. We compared small intestinal homogenate hydrolysis activity of three rodent and two avian species against four substrates: amygdalin and sinigrin, two plant-derived glucosides, the sugar lactose, whose hydrolysis models some activity against flavonoid and isoflavonoid glucosides, and the disaccharide sugar maltose (from starch), used as a comparator. Three new findings extend our understanding of physiological processing of plant glucosides: (1) the capacity of passerine birds to hydrolyze plant glucosides seems relatively low, compared with rodents; (2) in this first test of vertebrates' enzymic capacity to hydrolyze glucosinolates, sinigrin hydrolytic capacity seems low; (3) in laboratory mice, hydrolytic activity against lactose resides on the enterocytes' apical membrane facing the intestinal lumen, but activity against amygdalin seems to reside inside enterocytes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. The value of proximal small intestinal biopsy in the differential diagnosis of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, A G; Phillips, A D; Walker-Smith, J A

    1992-01-01

    The value of proximal intestinal mucosal biopsy was reviewed in 381 children presenting with chronic diarrhoea over an eight year period. An enteropathy was detected in 44% of cases and was more frequently seen in those aged less than 6 months. A diagnosis was established in 91% of cases. The most common diagnosis was the postenteritis syndrome where the presence of an enteropathy indicated those requiring treatment with a cows' milk free diet. Other conditions where a biopsy facilitated diagnosis or treatment included giardiasis, enteropathogenic Escheriichia coli, crytosporidiosis, autoimmune enteropathy, and microvillous atrophy. Coeliac disease was considered in 55% of children and established in 8%, clearly identifying those requiring a gluten free diet. This also emphasises the important role of the biopsy procedure in the exclusion of specific diseases. Proximal small intestinal mucosal biopsy is an essential investigation in children with chronic diarrhoea in whom an enteropathy is suspected. PMID:1626996

  3. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. [The role of the small intestine in the development of metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vakhrushev, Ia M; Liapina, M V

    2012-01-01

    To comprehensively investigate the function of the small intestine (SI) in metabolic syndrome (MS). Seventy-eight patients with MS were examined using, in addition to clinical studies, comprehensive ones of the function of SI: evaluation of its motor, digestive, and absorptive functions. The specific features of the hormonal and autonomic status were studied in the patients with MS. Clinical local and common signs of SI lesion were seen in 82.9% of the patients. Examination of SI function revealed its impairments at all stages of hydrolysis and resorption in the presence of hypomotor dyskinesia in the postprandial period and hypersympaticotonia in the patients with MS. New pathogenic patterns were found in relation to the role of hormones in intestinal digestive and absorptive dysfunctions in MS. The findings may suggest that SI functional changes found in MS are an important component of its complex pathogenetic circle.

  5. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Case of congenital short small intestine: survival with use of long-term parenteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Dorney, S F; Byrne, W J; Ament, M E

    1986-03-01

    Isolated congenital short small intestine is a rare anomaly. Of six (one male, five females) previously reported cases, four died in infancy from intractable diarrhea. We report the case of 7-year-old boy with this syndrome in whom a 2-year period of parenteral feeding at home allowed normal weight gain, growth, and development while intestinal adaptation occurred. Parenteral feeding was discontinued at age 2 1/3 years, and for the past 5 years his weight has remained between the tenth and 25th percentiles and his stature between the 25th and 50th percentiles. His development has been normal and he functions at or above grade level at school. Coefficient of fat absorption has increased from 54% to 81%. Vitamin B12 absorption has improved but has not normalized. He remains lactose intolerant. We believe his survival, growth, and development would have been compromised if he had not received a prolonged period of parenteral feeding.

  7. Enteric coccidia (Apicomplexa) in the small intestine of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina).

    PubMed

    Hoberg, E P; Cawthorn, R J; Hedstrom, O R

    1993-07-01

    Sporulated oocysts (mean dimensions = 13.0 x 10.8 microns) and sporocysts (11.3 x 5.5 microns) of a coccidian resembling Frenkelia sp. or Sarcocystis sp. were present in the lamina propria of the small intestine of a naturally-infected northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) collected near Medford, Oregon (USA). Dimensions of these oocytes and sporocysts appear to be considerably smaller than those from other sarcocystid species with avian definitive hosts. Additionally, numerous developmental stages and unsporulated oocysts (mean dimensions 22.8 x 17.8 microns) of a possible species of Isospora also were observed in the intestinal epithelium. This constitutes the first report of enteric coccidia from spotted owls. Neither parasite appeared to cause the death of the bird.

  8. Impact of high-fat diet on the intestinal microbiota and small intestinal physiology before and after the onset of obesity.

    PubMed

    Araújo, João Ricardo; Tomas, Julie; Brenner, Christiane; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2017-10-01

    The modulation of the intestinal microbiota by high-fat diet (HFD) has a major impact on both immunological and metabolic functions of the host. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this contribution is to review the impact of HFD on microbiota profile and small intestinal physiology before and after the onset of obesity and its metabolic complications. Evidence from animal studies suggest that before the onset of obesity and its metabolic complications, HFD induces intestinal dysbiosis - encompassing changes in composition balance and massive redistribution with bacteria occupying intervillous spaces and crypts - associated with early physiopathological changes, predominantly in the ileum, such as low-grade inflammation, decreased antimicrobial peptides expression, impaired mucus production, secretion and layer's thickness, and decreased expression of tight junction proteins. With time, major inflammatory signals (e.g. toll-like receptor-4 dependent) become activated, thereby stimulating proinflammatory cytokines secretion in the small intestine. This inflammatory state might subsequently exacerbate disruption of the mucus layer barrier and increase epithelial permeability of the small intestine, thereby creating an environment that facilitates the passage of bacterial components (e.g. lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and flagellin) and metabolites from the intestinal lumen (e.g. secondary bile acids) to the circulation and peripheral tissues (i.e. leaky gut), eventually promoting the development of systemic inflammation, obesity, adiposity, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance preceding hyperglycemia. Although the mechanisms are still not completely understood, prebiotics, probiotics, polyphenols, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists (such as rosiglitazone) and exercise have been shown to reverse HFD-induced intestinal phenotype and to attenuate the severity of obesity and its associated metabolic complications. Copyright © 2017

  9. Human Enteroids as a Model of Upper Small Intestinal Ion Transport Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Yin, Jianyi; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Estes, Mary K; de Jonge, Hugo; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Human intestinal crypt-derived enteroids are a model of intestinal ion transport that require validation by comparison with cell culture and animal models. We used human small intestinal enteroids to study neutral Na(+) absorption and stimulated fluid and anion secretion under basal and regulated conditions in undifferentiated and differentiated cultures to show their functional relevance to ion transport physiology and pathophysiology. Human intestinal tissue specimens were obtained from an endoscopic biopsy or surgical resections performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Crypts were isolated, enteroids were propagated in culture, induced to undergo differentiation, and transduced with lentiviral vectors. Crypt markers, surface cell enzymes, and membrane ion transporters were characterized using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, or immunofluorescence analyses. We used multiphoton and time-lapse confocal microscopy to monitor intracellular pH and luminal dilatation in enteroids under basal and regulated conditions. Enteroids differentiated upon withdrawal of WNT3A, yielding decreased crypt markers and increased villus-like characteristics. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 activity was similar in undifferentiated and differentiated enteroids, and was affected by known inhibitors, second messengers, and bacterial enterotoxins. Forskolin-induced swelling was completely dependent on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and partially dependent on Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 inhibition in undifferentiated and differentiated enteroids. Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate with forskolin caused enteroid intracellular acidification in HCO3(-)-free buffer. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-induced enteroid intracellular pH acidification as part of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion appears to require cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and electrogenic Na(+)/HCO3(-) cotransporter 1

  10. Rare small intestinal volvulus from entrapment in hepato-diaphragmatic adhesions in a 45-year-old lady

    PubMed Central

    Olaoye, Iyiade Olatunde; Adesina, Micheal Dapo

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal volvulus is rare in adults and rarely caused by string adhesions between the liver and the diaphragm. Similar adhesions were described in Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. We report a 45-year-old lady with small intestinal volvulus from entrapment of a loop in string adhesions between the liver and the diaphragm. Her plain radiographs showed a significant shadow of the trapped loop. PMID:28003317

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  12. Immunomodulatory Properties of Streptococcus and Veillonella Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Wells, Jerry M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    The human small intestine is a key site for interactions between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal immune system. Here we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of representative species of commonly dominant small-intestinal microbial communities, including six streptococcal strains (four Streptococcus salivarius, one S. equinus, one S. parasanguinis) one Veillonella parvula strain, one Enterococcus gallinarum strain, and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 as a bench mark strain on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. The different streptococci induced varying levels of the cytokines IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-12p70, while the V. parvula strain showed a strong capacity to induce IL-6. E. gallinarum strain was a potent inducer of cytokines and TLR2/6 signalling. As Streptococcus and Veillonella can potentially interact metabolically and frequently co-occur in ecosystems, immunomodulation by pair-wise combinations of strains were also tested for their combined immunomodulatory properties. Strain combinations induced cytokine responses in dendritic cells that differed from what might be expected on the basis of the results obtained with the individual strains. A combination of (some) streptococci with Veillonella appeared to negate IL-12p70 production, while augmenting IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α responses. This suggests that immunomodulation data obtained in vitro with individual strains are unlikely to adequately represent immune responses to mixtures of gut microbiota communities in vivo. Nevertheless, analysing the immune responses of strains representing the dominant species in the intestine may help to identify immunomodulatory mechanisms that influence immune homeostasis. PMID:25479553

  13. Synergistic Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin and Beta Toxin in Rabbit Small Intestinal Loops

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Gurjar, Abhijit; Theoret, James R.; Garcia, Jorge P.; Beingesser, Juliann; Freedman, John C.; Fisher, Derek J.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens type C to cause human enteritis necroticans (EN) is attributed to beta toxin (CPB). However, many EN strains also express C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), suggesting that CPE could be another contributor to EN. Supporting this possibility, lysate supernatants from modified Duncan-Strong sporulation (MDS) medium cultures of three CPE-positive type C EN strains caused enteropathogenic effects in rabbit small intestinal loops, which is significant since CPE is produced only during sporulation and since C. perfringens can sporulate in the intestines. Consequently, CPE and CPB contributions to the enteropathogenic effects of MDS lysate supernatants of CPE-positive type C EN strain CN3758 were evaluated using isogenic cpb and cpe null mutants. While supernatants of wild-type CN3758 MDS lysates induced significant hemorrhagic lesions and luminal fluid accumulation, MDS lysate supernatants of the cpb and cpe mutants caused neither significant damage nor fluid accumulation. This attenuation was attributable to inactivating these toxin genes since complementing the cpe mutant or reversing the cpb mutation restored the enteropathogenic effects of MDS lysate supernatants. Confirming that both CPB and CPE are needed for the enteropathogenic effects of CN3758 MDS lysate supernatants, purified CPB and CPE at the same concentrations found in CN3758 MDS lysates also acted together synergistically in rabbit small intestinal loops; however, only higher doses of either purified toxin independently caused enteropathogenic effects. These findings provide the first evidence for potential synergistic toxin interactions during C. perfringens intestinal infections and support a possible role for CPE, as well as CPB, in some EN cases. PMID:24778117

  14. Ingestion of potato starch containing esterified phosphorus increases alkaline phosphatase activity in the small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Hitoshi; Morikawa, Nao; Ohmi, Sayako; Ishida, Kyo; Machida, Ayaka; Kanazawa, Takumi; Chiji, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Michihiro; Noda, Takahiro

    2010-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) hydrolyzes a variety of monophosphate esters and plays an important role in phosphorus (P) metabolism. Several nutrients in food have been reported to affect intestinal ALP activity in animal models. Previous reports indicated that high levels of P or phosphate in diets decreased intestinal ALP activity in rats. Because potato starch contains considerable amounts of esterified P, unlike other starch-derived plants, we hypothesized that the feeding of potato starch would decrease ALP activity in the intestinal tract. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were fed 3 different types of diet containing 60% corn starch or 1 of 2 types of potato starch with different esterified P content for 1 or 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake of each rat were measured every day throughout the experimental periods. At the end of the feeding periods, the small intestine was removed to determine ALP activity in the mucosal tissues. Significant differences were observed in ALP activity in the small intestine between the 2 feeding periods, among the 4 segments of the small intestine, and among the 3 diet groups. Significant positive linear correlations between the amount of P derived from the starch and mucosal ALP activity were obtained in the jejunum and jejunoileum in rats after feeding for 5 weeks. We concluded, contrary to our hypotheses, that the ingestion of potato starch adaptively increases ALP activity in the upper part of the small intestine of growing rats in an esterified P content-dependent manner.

  15. Proximal duodenoileal anastomosis for treatment of small intestinal obstruction and volvulus in a green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Wills, Sarah; Beaufrère, Hugues; Watrous, Gwyneth; Oblak, Michelle L; Smith, Dale A

    2016-11-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 13-year-old female green iguana (Iguana iguana) was examined because of a 6-day history of vomiting, anorexia, and lethargy and a 4-day history of decreased fecal and urate output. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed a distended abdomen, signs of depression, pallor, tachycardia, harsh lung sounds, and vomiting. Abdominal radiographs revealed gas distention of the stomach and small intestine with fluid lines evident on the lateral view. Plasma biochemical analysis indicated hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, hyperglycemia, and hyperuricemia. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Exploratory laparotomy confirmed a diagnosis of small intestinal entrapment and 170° volvulus involving approximately 80% (20 to 30 cm) of the small intestine. The portion of the small intestine extending from the middle portion of the duodenum to the caudal extent of the ileum was resected, and end-to-end anastomosis of the remaining small intestine was performed. The iguana recovered without apparent complications and was reportedly doing well 1 year after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that iguanas, as hindgut fermenters, may tolerate > 70% resection of the small intestine with a good outcome and no clinical evidence of residual gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  16. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of protein deficiency on macroelement and trace element levels of weanling rats' small intestine and liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Kilicalp, D; Dede, S; Belge, F; Tatar, M

    2005-12-01

    Protein energy malnutrition has become a major health issue in developing countries. In the present study, the effect of protein deficiency on the small intestine and liver tissue content of macroelements and trace elements was investigated in weanling rats. Forty-five male weanling Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. The control group (C) was fed a standard diet containing 25% casein, whereas the two experimental groups E1 and E2 consumed 12% and 3% casein, respectively, over a period of 45 d. The tissue samples were analyzed for zinc, copper, iron, manganese, calcium, and magnesium by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The protein-deficient groups showed increased levels of iron in both tissues and decreased manganese in small intestine tissue from the E1 group. No other differences were found for the other elements. These results suggest that protein deficiency might cause iron accumulation in the liver and intestine and decreases of manganese in the small intestine.

  18. Small Intestine but Not Liver Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) Deficiency Has a Dominant Effect on Plasma Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Inamul; Li, Zhiqiang; Bui, Hai H; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gao, Guangping; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) is involved in phosphatidylcholine remodeling in the small intestine and liver. We investigated lipid metabolism in inducible intestine-specific and liver-specificLpcat3gene knock-out mice. We producedLpcat3-Flox/villin-Cre-ER(T2)mice, which were treated with tamoxifen (at days 1, 3, 5, and 7), to deleteLpcat3specifically in the small intestine. At day 9 after the treatment, we found that Lpcat3 deficiency in enterocytes significantly reduced polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines in the enterocyte plasma membrane and reduced Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), CD36, ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), and ABCG8 levels on the membrane, thus significantly reducing lipid absorption, cholesterol secretion through apoB-dependent and apoB-independent pathways, and plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and phospholipid levels, as well as body weight. Moreover, Lpcat3 deficiency does not cause significant lipid accumulation in the small intestine. We also utilized adenovirus-associated virus-Cre to depleteLpcat3in the liver. We found that liver deficiency only reduces plasma triglyceride levels but not other lipid levels. Furthermore, there is no significant lipid accumulation in the liver. Importantly, small intestine Lpcat3 deficiency has a much bigger effect on plasma lipid levels than that of liver deficiency. Thus, inhibition of small intestine Lpcat3 might constitute a novel approach for treating hyperlipidemia.

  19. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against acrylamide toxicity in liver and small and large intestine tissues.

    PubMed

    Altinoz, E; Turkoz, Y; Vardi, N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine against acrylamide toxicity in liver and small and large intestine tissues in rats.The rats were divided into four groups. Acrylamide administration increased MDA levels in all tissues significantly (p < 0.05). But acrylamide+NAC administration decreased MDA levels significantly as compared to the acrylamide group, and lowered it to a level close to the control group values (p < 0.05). GSH levels in liver and small intestine tissues reduced significantly in the acrylamide group (p < 0.05). But acrylamide+NAC administration increased GSH levels significantly in all tissues. Whereas GST activity decreased significantly in the acrylamide group in liver and small intestine tissues as compared to the other groups (p < 0.05), the GST activity increased significantly in the acrylamide+NAC group in all tissues as compared to the acrylamide group (p < 0.05). Liver histopathology showed that the liver epithelial cells were damaged significantly in the acrylamide group. Small intestine histopathology showed that the intestinal villous epithelial cells were damaged significantly in the acrylamide group.Our results indicate that a high level of acrylamide causes oxidative damage in liver and small and large intestine tissues, while N-acetylcysteine administration in a pharmacological dose shows to have an antioxidant effect in preventing this damage (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 66).

  20. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: reversibility of reduced-energy status associated with the course of expulsion from the small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Kenji; Watanabe, Naohiro

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes require energy for active establishment in the gut against intestinal flow and peristaltic motion. In this study we employed CellTiter-Glo Luminescent Cell Viability Assay to measure the ATP value of individual adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis during the course of immune-mediated expulsion from the small intestine in rats. The ATP values of adult worms taken from the lumen of the distal small intestine were lower than worms collected from the lumen of the proximal small intestine. Moreover, values from worms in the lumen of the proximal small intestine were lower than those from worms in the mucosa, the preferred site of adult N. brasiliensis. The reduction of ATP values in worms from each region was observed not only at expulsion phase, but also at established phases of the infection suggesting that energy metabolism of the parasites is independent of host immune response. When adult worms with low ATP values on day 12 post-infection were implanted surgically into the small intestine of naïve rats, the worms re-established in recipients and completely restored the ATP values. Short in vitro culture of adult worms under low oxygen tension resulted in low ATP value in the worms. These results suggested that adult worms were dislodged from their preferred site by intact energy metabolism activity.

  1. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 in response to thermal injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Tao; Wan, Changrong; Liu, Xiaoxi; Gao, Zhimin; Hou, Xiaolin; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua

    2015-07-11

    Our previous studies indicated that heat stress can cause significant damage to the intestinal epithelium and induce differential expression of many genes in rat small intestine. The transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB, which act as important mediators by binding to specific DNA sequences within gene promoters, regulate the transcription of genes associated with immune regulation, stress response and cell fate. To determine whether AP-1 and NF-κB are involved in hyperthermia-induced injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells, we investigated their activity, and the expression of related proteins, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and western blotting, respectively. Heat stress resulted in severe damage to the epithelium of the small intestine. The cell morphology and viability were obviously altered when IEC-6 cell was exposed to hyperthermia. AP-1 was activated in the small intestine of heat-stressed rats, as was phosphorylation of the JNK signaling pathway. In IEC-6 cell line, AP-1 activation in groups exposed to 42 °C for 1 h, 2 h and 4 h was significantly increased. In contrast, NF-κB was not activated in both in vivo and in vitro models. These results reveal that AP-1 is likely to play an important role in regulating gene transcription in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells during exposure to heat stress.

  2. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A.; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Pin, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.—Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. PMID:27811059

  3. EFFECTS OF NEOMYCIN AND PENICILLIN ADMINISTRATION ON MUCOSAL PROLIFERATION OF THE MOUSE SMALL INTESTINE

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Kenneth A.; Floch, Martin H.; Herskovic, Teodoro

    1969-01-01

    The effects of an oral neomycin and penicillin regimen on intestinal bacteriology and on morphology and function of the small intestine of mice were investigated. Quantitative and qualitative stool cultures on selective media of the treated animals revealed only growth of yeast organisms. The treated animals developed enlargement of the ceca with fluid contents and watery stools, resembling characteristics of germfree animals. Radioautography with tritiated thymidine revealed an increased epithelial cell migration rate in the mice treated with the antibiotics for 3 to 5 wk. A slight increase in villus height was also noted. The treated male mice showed greater variance than the treated females in epithelial cell migration rates. Histochemical staining reactions showed a decrease in nonspecific esterase and in NADH dehydrogenase activity in the proximal gut of the antibiotic animals. Stains of distal gut and those for acid and alkaline phosphatase, NADPH dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and succinic dehydrogenase were similar to the controls. A slight increase in sucrase activity and a slight decrease in lactase activity in the antibiotic animals was observed in contrast to control animals. Germfree mice, however, had greater sucrase and lactase activity. Transport of L-methionine was slightly reduced in the distal segment of the treated animals. Since the direction of these changes is away from the intestinal state observed in germfree animals, they are probably the result of the direct action of the antibiotics on the gut. PMID:4388518

  4. A proteomic adaptation of small intestinal mucosa in response to dietary protein limitation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunfu; Qiu, Kai; Sun, Wenjuan; Jiao, Ning; Zhang, Xin; Che, Lianqiang; Zhao, Haiyi; Shen, Hexiao; Yin, Jingdong

    2016-11-14

    Dietary protein limitation (PL) is not only beneficial to human health but also applied to minimize nitrogen excretion in livestock production. However, the impact of PL on intestinal physiology is largely unknown. In this study, we identified 5275 quantitative proteins using a porcine model in which pigs suffered PL. A total of 202 proteins |log2 fold-change| > 1 were taken as differentially expressed proteins and subjected to functional and pathway enrichment analysis to reveal proteomic alterations of the jejunal mucosa. Combining with the results of western blotting analysis, we found that protein/carbohydrate digestion, intestinal mucosal tight junction and cell adhesion molecules, and the immune response to foreign antigens were increased in the jejunal mucosa of the pigs upon PL. In contrast, amino acid transport, innate and auto immunity, as well as cell proliferation and apoptosis were reduced. In addition, the expression of functional proteins that involved in DNA replication, transcription and mRNA splicing as well as translation were altered in the jejunal mucosa in response to PL. Furthermore, PL may reduce amino acid transport and cell proliferation through the depression of mTOR pathway. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the small intestinal response to PL.

  5. Transport phenomena of microbial flora in the small intestine with peristalsis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Sato, T; Mohit, G; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2011-06-21

    The gastrointestinal tract of humans is colonized by indigenous prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial cells that form a complex ecological system called microbial flora. Although the microbial flora has diverse functions, its homeostasis inside the gastrointestinal tract is still largely unknown. Therefore, creating a model for investigating microbial flora in the gastrointestinal tract is important. In this study, we developed a novel numerical model to explore the transport phenomena of microbial flora in the small intestine. By simultaneously solving the flow field generated by peristalsis, the concentrations of oxygen and nutrient, and the densities of moderate anaerobes and aerobes, the effects of fluid mechanics on the transport phenomena of microbial flora are discussed. The results clearly illustrated that fluid mechanics have considerable influence not only on the bacterial population, but also on the concentration distributions of oxygen and nutrient. Especially, the flow field enhances the radial variation of the concentration fields. We also show scaling arguments for bacterial growth and oxygen consumption, which capture the main features of the results. Additionally, we investigated the transport phenomena of microbial flora in a long tube with 40 constrictions. The results showed a high growth rate of aerobes in the upstream side and a high growth rate of anaerobes in the downstream side, which qualitatively agrees with experimental observations of human intestines. These new findings provide the fundamental basis for a better understanding of the transport phenomena of microbial flora in the intestine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Protocol for Multiple Gene Knockout in Mouse Small Intestinal Organoids Using a CRISPR-concatemer

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Alessandra; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Mustata, Roxana C.; Li, Taibo; Kim, Hyunki; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology has greatly improved the feasibility and speed of loss-of-function studies that are essential in understanding gene function. In higher eukaryotes, paralogous genes can mask a potential phenotype by compensating the loss of a gene, thus limiting the information that can be obtained from genetic studies relying on single gene knockouts. We have developed a novel, rapid cloning method for guide RNA (gRNA) concatemers in order to create multi-gene knockouts following a single round of transfection in mouse small intestinal organoids. Our strategy allows for the concatemerization of up to four individual gRNAs into a single vector by performing a single Golden Gate shuffling reaction with annealed gRNA oligos and a pre-designed retroviral vector. This allows either the simultaneous knockout of up to four different genes, or increased knockout efficiency following the targeting of one gene by multiple gRNAs. In this protocol, we show in detail how to efficiently clone multiple gRNAs into the retroviral CRISPR-concatemer vector and how to achieve highly efficient electroporation in intestinal organoids. As an example, we show that simultaneous knockout of two pairs of genes encoding negative regulators of the Wnt signaling pathway (Axin1/2 and Rnf43/Znrf3) renders intestinal organoids resistant to the withdrawal of key growth factors. PMID:28745625

  7. Friction enhancement via micro-patterned wet elastomer adhesives on small intestinal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jiwoon; Cheung, Eugene; Park, Sukho; Sitti, Metin

    2006-12-01

    A micro-pillar-based silicone rubber adhesive coated with a thin silicone oil layer is investigated in this paper for developing friction-based clamping mechanisms for robotic endoscopic microcapsules. These adhesives are shown to enhance the frictional force between the capsule and the intestinal wall by a factor of about seven over a non-patterned flat elastomer material. In this study, tests performed on fresh samples of pig small intestine are used to optimize the diameter of the micro-pillars to maximize the frictional forces. In addition, the effects of other factors such as the oil viscosity and applied normal forces are investigated. It is demonstrated that the proposed micro-pillar pattern based elastomer adhesive exhibits a maximal frictional force when the pillar diameter is 140 microm and coated silicon oil has a very high viscosity (10,000 cSt). It is also found that the frictional force of the micro-patterned adhesive increases nonlinearly in proportion to the applied normal force. These adhesives would be used as a robust attachment material for developing robotic capsule endoscopes inside intestines with clamping capability.

  8. Infection with fully mature Corynosoma cf. validum causes ulcers in the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Ito, Takahiro; Sato, Tomonobu; Goto, Mitsuru; Kawamoto, Toru; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yoshinori; Nakao, Minoru; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-06-01

    Corynosoma is a parasite that can normally be found in the intestinal tract of fish-eating mammals, particularly in seals and birds. The present case proposed that Corynosoma could attain full maturity in the human intestine. A 70-year-old female complained of abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a swelling of the intraperitoneal lymph nodes with no responsible lesion. Video capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy detected several ulcerations and one parasite in the ileum, which was tightly attached at the bottom of the ulcerations. The parasite was cylindrical and measured approximately 10 mm (long) x 3 mm (wide). Pathologically, the worm had a four-layered body wall and contained embryonated eggs. The sequences of the parasite-derived nuclear ribosomal DNA fragment and mitochondrial DNA fragment of cox1 were almost identical to those of Corynosoma validum. The patient's abdominal pain immediately improved after the administration of pyrantel pamoate (1,500 mg). Corynosoma was possibly the responsible disease in a patient who complained of abdominal pain and in whom no responsible lesion was detected by CT, gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Examinations of the small intestines should be aggressively performed in such cases.

  9. The transport of uric acid across mouse small intestine in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bronk, J R; Shaw, M I

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro recirculation technique was used to study the uptake and transport of uric acid by the jejunum of mouse small intestine. Three components of the serosal secretions appeared to be endogenously derived nucleic acid derivatives; two of these were identified as uric acid and uracil. There was no detectable metabolism of uric acid by the intestine. Uric acid transported from the lumen appeared in the serosal fluid at a concentration higher than that in the lumen. The final serosal/luminal concentration ratio of about 1.18 for exogenous uric acid was found to be constant over the concentration range studied (0.01-0.1 mM). The presence of exogenous uric acid in the lumen did not affect the production of endogenous uric acid by the intestine and its release into the serosal secretions. Mucosal concentration of exogenous uric acid was below, but the total mucosal concentration (exogenous+endogenous) was above, that in the lumen. There was no evidence for the secretion of endogenous uric acid into the lumen. Oxypurinol significantly decreased the rate of serosal appearance of exogenous uric acid. Allopurinol did not affect the transport of exogenous uric acid from the lumen and there was negligible metabolism of allopurinol to oxypurinol by the tissue. Uracil did not affect the transport of exogenous uric acid from the lumen, or the serosal appearance of endogenous uric acid. Likewise uracil transport was unaffected by luminal uric acid. PMID:3795104

  10. A proteomic adaptation of small intestinal mucosa in response to dietary protein limitation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chunfu; Qiu, Kai; Sun, Wenjuan; Jiao, Ning; Zhang, Xin; Che, Lianqiang; Zhao, Haiyi; Shen, Hexiao; Yin, Jingdong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein limitation (PL) is not only beneficial to human health but also applied to minimize nitrogen excretion in livestock production. However, the impact of PL on intestinal physiology is largely unknown. In this study, we identified 5275 quantitative proteins using a porcine model in which pigs suffered PL. A total of 202 proteins |log2 fold-change| > 1 were taken as differentially expressed proteins and subjected to functional and pathway enrichment analysis to reveal proteomic alterations of the jejunal mucosa. Combining with the results of western blotting analysis, we found that protein/carbohydrate digestion, intestinal mucosal tight junction and cell adhesion molecules, and the immune response to foreign antigens were increased in the jejunal mucosa of the pigs upon PL. In contrast, amino acid transport, innate and auto immunity, as well as cell proliferation and apoptosis were reduced. In addition, the expression of functional proteins that involved in DNA replication, transcription and mRNA splicing as well as translation were altered in the jejunal mucosa in response to PL. Furthermore, PL may reduce amino acid transport and cell proliferation through the depression of mTOR pathway. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the small intestinal response to PL. PMID:27841298

  11. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

  12. The impact of inflammatory cells in malignant ascites on small intestinal ICCs’ morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kong, Dan; He, Yan; Wang, Xiuli; Gao, Lei; Li, Jiade; Yan, Meisi; Liu, Duanyang; Wang, Yufu; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Malignant ascites is one of the common complication at the late stage of abdominal cancers, which may deteriorate the environment of abdominal cavity and lead to potential damage of functional cells. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells that function normal gastrointestinal motility. The pathological changes of ICCs or the reduced number may lead to the motility disorders of gastrointestinal tr