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Sample records for intracellular calcium signalling

  1. Revisiting intracellular calcium signaling semantics.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Audran, Emilie; Fève, Marie; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-12-01

    Cells use intracellular free calcium concentration changes for signaling. Signal encoding occurs through both spatial and temporal modulation of the free calcium concentration. The encoded message is detected by an ensemble of intracellular sensors forming the family of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) which must faithfully translate the message using a new syntax that is recognized by the cell. The cell is home to a significant although limited number of genes coding for proteins involved in the signal encoding and decoding processes. In a cell, only a subset of this ensemble of genes is expressed, leading to a genetic regulation of the calcium signal pathways. Calmodulin (CaM), the most ubiquitous expressed intracellular calcium-binding protein, plays a major role in calcium signal translation. Similar to a hub, it is central to a large and finely tuned network, receiving information, integrating it and dispatching the cognate response. In this review, we examine the different steps starting with an external stimulus up to a cellular response, with special emphasis on CaM and the mechanism by which it decodes calcium signals and translates it into exquisitely coordinated cellular events. By this means, we will revisit the calcium signaling semantics, hoping that we will ease communication between scientists dealing with calcium signals in different biological systems and different domains.

  2. Control of Intracellular Calcium Signaling as a Neuroprotective Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R. Scott; Goad, Daryl L.; Grillo, Michael A.; Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Both acute and chronic degenerative diseases of the nervous system reduce the viability and function of neurons through changes in intracellular calcium signaling. In particular, pathological increases in the intracellular calcium concentration promote such pathogenesis. Disease involvement of numerous regulators of intracellular calcium signaling located on the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles has been documented. Diverse groups of chemical compounds targeting ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors, pumps and enzymes have been identified as potential neuroprotectants. The present review summarizes the discovery, mechanisms and biological activity of neuroprotective molecules targeting proteins that control intracellular calcium signaling to preserve or restore structure and function of the nervous system. Disease relevance, clinical applications and new technologies for the identification of such molecules are being discussed. PMID:20335972

  3. Calcium, channels, intracellular signaling and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Jorge-Hernán; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca²⁺) is an important cation able to function as a second messenger in different cells of the immune system, particularly in B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and mastocytes, among others. Recent discoveries related to the entry of Ca²⁺ through the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) has opened a new investigation area about the cell destiny regulated by Ca²⁺ especially in B and T lymphocytes. SOCE acts through calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The function of CRAC depends of two recently discovered regulators: the Ca²⁺ sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum or stromal interaction molecule (STIM-1) and one subunit of CRAC channels called Orai1. This review focuses on the role of Ca²⁺ signals in B and T lymphocytes functions, the signalling pathways leading to Ca²⁺ influx, and the relationship between Ca²⁺ signals and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  5. The role of Noise for Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Calcium signaling is one of the most important and common cellular signaling mechanisms. Calcium signals turn on the wound response in epithelia cells (e.g. the cornea) and brain tissue, play an important role for metabolic processes in liver and pancreas, signal the heart muscle to contract, and are important players in learning and memory. Binding of agonist to receptors in the cell membrane can trigger the release of Ca^2+ from internal stores through small patches of release channels and the formation of intracellular, spatiotemporal calcium patterns that can be observed by using fluorescent markers. What makes these patterns so interesting from the biologic as well as the nonlinear dynamics perspective is that active elements (the release channels) are distributed discretely in small patches (about 100nm in size) that are typically 2mm apart. Processes on this scale are subject to large fluctuations that can dominate the overall calcium signal on a cellular and tissue scale depending on physiologic parameters. Pattern formation in such systems, with discretely distributed active sites and fluctuations poses new challenges that researchers have started to address only in the last years. Recent results in computational modeling of these processes from the elementary release process to the cellular level, are put into context with experimental findings. We focus on the effects of receptor clustering in the context of the cellular Ca^2+ signaling capability.

  6. Practical aspects of measuring intracellular calcium signals with fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Kao, Joseph P Y; Li, Gong; Auston, Darryl A

    2010-01-01

    The use of fluorescent indicators for monitoring calcium (Ca(2+)) signals and for measuring Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) in living cells is described. The following topics are covered in detail: (1) ratiometric and nonratiometric fluorescent indicators and the principles underlying their use, (2) techniques for loading Ca(2+) indicators and Ca(2+) buffers into living cells, (3) calibration of indicator fluorescence intensity measurements to yield values of intracellular [Ca(2+)], (4) analysis of nonratiometric fluorescence intensity data and caveats relating to their interpretation, (5) techniques for manipulating intracellular and extracellular [Ca(2+)], and (6) the use of fluorescent indicators to monitor Ca(2+) signals in mitochondria. The chapter aims to present these fundamental topics in a manner that is practically useful and intuitively accessible. The origins of key mathematical equations used in the article are outlined in two appendices.

  7. Systematic Characterization of Dynamic Parameters of Intracellular Calcium Signals

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Laurent; Mikolajewicz, Nicholas; Komarova, Svetlana V.; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic processes, such as intracellular calcium signaling, are hallmark of cellular biology. As real-time imaging modalities become widespread, a need for analytical tools to reliably characterize time-series data without prior knowledge of the nature of the recordings becomes more pressing. The goal of this study is to develop a signal-processing algorithm for MATLAB that autonomously computes the parameters characterizing prominent single transient responses (TR) and/or multi-peaks responses (MPR). The algorithm corrects for signal contamination and decomposes experimental recordings into contributions from drift, TRs, and MPRs. It subsequently provides numerical estimates for the following parameters: time of onset after stimulus application, activation time (time for signal to increase from 10 to 90% of peak), and amplitude of response. It also provides characterization of the (i) TRs by quantifying their area under the curve (AUC), response duration (time between 1/2 amplitude on ascent and descent of the transient), and decay constant of the exponential decay region of the deactivation phase of the response, and (ii) MPRs by quantifying the number of peaks, mean peak magnitude, mean periodicity, standard deviation of periodicity, oscillatory persistence (time between first and last discernable peak), and duty cycle (fraction of period during which system is active) for all the peaks in the signal, as well as coherent oscillations (i.e., deterministic spikes). We demonstrate that the signal detection performance of this algorithm is in agreement with user-mediated detection and that parameter estimates obtained manually and algorithmically are correlated. We then apply this algorithm to study how metabolic acidosis affects purinergic (P2) receptor-mediated calcium signaling in osteoclast precursor cells. Our results reveal that acidosis significantly attenuates the amplitude and AUC calcium responses at high ATP concentrations. Collectively, our data

  8. Cell adhesion and intracellular calcium signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play indispensable roles in the developing and mature brain by regulating neuronal migration and differentiation, neurite outgrowth, axonal fasciculation, synapse formation and synaptic plasticity. CAM-mediated changes in neuronal behavior depend on a number of intracellular signaling cascades including changes in various second messengers, among which CAM-dependent changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels play a prominent role. Ca2+ is an essential secondary intracellular signaling molecule that regulates fundamental cellular functions in various cell types, including neurons. We present a systematic review of the studies reporting changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels in response to activation of the immunoglobulin superfamily CAMs, cadherins and integrins in neurons. We also analyze current experimental evidence on the Ca2+ sources and channels involved in intracellular Ca2+ increases mediated by CAMs of these families, and systematically review the role of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) in neurite outgrowth induced by activation of these CAMs. Molecular mechanisms linking CAMs to VDCCs and intracellular Ca2+ stores in neurons are discussed. PMID:24330678

  9. Acidic calcium stores open for business: expanding the potential for intracellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandip; Docampo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration are crucial for a variety of cellular processes in all cells. It has long been appreciated that calcium is stored and released from intracellular calcium stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum. However, emerging evidence indicates that calcium is also dynamically regulated by a seemingly disparate collection of acidic organelles. Here, we review the defining features of these acidic calcium stores and highlight recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of uptake and release of calcium from these stores. We also examine the nature of calcium buffering within the stores and summarize the physiological and patho-physiological significance of these ubiquitous organelles in calcium signaling. PMID:20303271

  10. Criticality in intracellular calcium signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Nivala, Michael; Ko, Christopher Y; Nivala, Melissa; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2012-06-06

    Calcium (Ca) is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates many biological functions. The elementary events of local Ca signaling are Ca sparks, which occur randomly in time and space, and integrate to produce global signaling events such as intra- and intercellular Ca waves and whole-cell Ca oscillations. Despite extensive experimental characterization in many systems, the transition from local random to global synchronous events is still poorly understood. Here we show that criticality, a ubiquitous dynamical phenomenon in nature, is responsible for the transition from local to global Ca signaling. We demonstrate this first in a computational model of Ca signaling in a cardiac myocyte and then experimentally in mouse ventricular myocytes, complemented by a theoretical agent-based model to delineate the underlying dynamics. We show that the interaction between the Ca release units via Ca-induced Ca release causes self-organization of Ca spark clusters. When the coupling between Ca release units is weak, the cluster-size distribution is exponential. As the interactions become strong, the cluster-size distribution changes to a power-law distribution, which is characteristic of criticality in thermodynamic and complex nonlinear systems, and facilitates the formation and propagation of Ca waves and whole-cell Ca oscillations. Our findings illustrate how criticality is harnessed by a biological cell to regulate Ca signaling via self-organization of random subcellular events into cellular-scale oscillations, and provide a general theoretical framework for the transition from local Ca signaling to global Ca signaling in biological cells.

  11. Study of neurotoxic intracellular calcium signalling triggered by amyloids.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Caballero, Erica; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Núñez, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated to dishomeostasis of intracellular Ca(2+) induced by amyloid β peptide (Aβ) species. Understanding of the effects of Aβ on intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis requires preparation of the different Aβ assemblies including oligomers and fibrils and the testing of their effects on cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons. Procedures for cerebellar granule cell culture, preparation of Aβ species as well as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons are described.

  12. Acoustic tweezers for studying intracellular calcium signaling in SKBR-3 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Yoon, Chi Woo; Lim, Hae Gyun; Park, Jin Man; Yoon, Sangpil; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K Kirk

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin (FNT) play crucial roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. For better understanding of these associated cellular activities, various microscopic manipulation tools have been used to study their intracellular signaling pathways. Recently, it has appeared that acoustic tweezers may possess similar capabilities in the study. Therefore, we here demonstrate that our newly developed acoustic tweezers with a high-frequency lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer have potentials to study intracellular calcium signaling by FNT-binding to human breast cancer cells (SKBR-3). It is found that intracellular calcium elevations in SKBR-3 cells, initially occurring on the microbead-contacted spot and then eventually spreading over the entire cell, are elicited by attaching an acoustically trapped FNT-coated microbead. Interestingly, they are suppressed by either extracellular calcium elimination or phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. Hence, this suggests that our acoustic tweezers may serve as an alternative tool in the study of intracellular signaling by FNT-binding activities.

  13. Fluoxetine suppresses calcium signaling in human T lymphocytes through depletion of intracellular calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Gobin, V; De Bock, M; Broeckx, B J G; Kiselinova, M; De Spiegelaere, W; Vandekerckhove, L; Van Steendam, K; Leybaert, L; Deforce, D

    2015-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, have recently been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Although the effects on cytokine secretion, proliferation and viability of T lymphocytes have been extensively characterized, little is known about the mechanism behind these effects. It is well known that Ca(2+) signaling is an important step in the signaling transduction pathway following T cell receptor activation. Therefore, we investigated if fluoxetine interferes with Ca(2+) signaling in Jurkat T lymphocytes. Fluoxetine was found to suppress Ca(2+) signaling in response to T cell receptor activation. Moreover, fluoxetine was found to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores, thereby leaving less Ca(2+) available for release upon IP3- and ryanodine-receptor activation. The Ca(2+)-modifying effects of fluoxetine are not related to its capability to block the serotonin transporter, as even a large excess of 5HT did not abolish the effects. In conclusion, these data show that fluoxetine decreases IP3- and ryanodine-receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in Jurkat T lymphocytes, an effect likely to be at the basis of the observed immunosuppression.

  14. Intracellular calcium signals display an avalanche-like behavior over multiple lengthscales

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Lucía; Piegari, Estefanía; Sigaut, Lorena; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2012-01-01

    Many natural phenomena display “self-organized criticality” (SOC), (Bak et al., 1987). This refers to spatially extended systems for which patterns of activity characterized by different lengthscales can occur with a probability density that follows a power law with pattern size. Differently from power laws at phase transitions, systems displaying SOC do not need the tuning of an external parameter. Here we analyze intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signals, a key component of the signaling toolkit of almost any cell type. Ca2+ signals can either be spatially restricted (local) or propagate throughout the cell (global). Different models have suggested that the transition from local to global signals is similar to that of directed percolation. Directed percolation has been associated, in turn, to the appearance of SOC. In this paper we discuss these issues within the framework of simple models of Ca2+ signal propagation. We also analyze the size distribution of local signals (“puffs”) observed in immature Xenopus Laevis oocytes. The puff amplitude distribution obtained from observed local signals is not Gaussian with a noticeable fraction of large size events. The experimental distribution of puff areas in the spatio-temporal record of the image has a long tail that is approximately log-normal. The distribution can also be fitted with a power law relationship albeit with a smaller goodness of fit. The power law behavior is encountered within a simple model that includes some coupling among individual signals for a wide range of parameter values. An analysis of the model shows that a global elevation of the Ca2+ concentration plays a major role in determining whether the puff size distribution is long-tailed or not. This suggests that Ca2+-clearing from the cytosol is key to determine whether IP3-mediated Ca2+ signals can display a SOC-like behavior or not. PMID:22969730

  15. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  16. Spatiotemporal Properties of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Osteocytic and Osteoblastic Cell Networks under Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Lu, X. Lucas; Luo, Erping; Sajda, Paul; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium (Ca2+) responses in osteocytes and osteoblasts. Successful construction of bone cell networks necessitates more elaborate and systematic analysis for the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ signaling in the networks. In the present study, an unsupervised algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) was employed to extract the Ca2+ signals of bone cells in the network. We demonstrated that the ICA-based technology could yield higher signal fidelity than the manual region of interest (ROI) method. Second, the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ signaling in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell networks under laminar and steady fluid flow stimulation were systematically analyzed and compared. MLO-Y4 cells exhibited much more active Ca2+ transients than MC3T3-E1 cells, evidenced by more Ca2+ peaks, less time to the 1st peak and less time between the 1st and 2nd peaks. With respect to temporal properties, MLO-Y4 cells demonstrated higher spike rate and Ca2+ oscillating frequency. The spatial intercellular synchronous activities of Ca2+ signaling in MLO-Y4 cell networks were higher than those in MC3T3-E1 cell networks and also negatively correlated with the intercellular distance, revealing faster Ca2+ wave propagation in MLO-Y4 cell networks. Our findings show that the unsupervised ICA-based technique results in more sensitive and quantitative signal extraction than traditional ROI analysis, with the potential to be widely employed in Ca2+ signaling extraction in the cell networks. The present study also revealed a dramatic spatiotemporal difference in Ca2+ signaling for osteocytic and osteoblastic cell networks in processing the mechanical stimulus. The higher intracellular Ca2+ oscillatory behaviors and intercellular coordination of MLO-Y4 cells provided further evidences that osteocytes may behave as the major mechanical sensor in bone modeling and remodeling processes. PMID:23328496

  17. Moderate increases in intracellular calcium activate neuroprotective signals in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Fahlman, C S

    2004-01-01

    Although large increases in neuronal intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) are lethal, moderate increases in [Ca(2+)](i) of 50-200 nM may induce immediate or long-term tolerance of ischemia or other stresses. In neurons in rat hippocampal slice cultures, we determined the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i), cell death, and Ca(2+)-dependent neuroprotective signals before and after a 45 min period of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Thirty minutes before OGD, [Ca(2+)](i) was increased in CA1 neurons by 40-200 nM with 1 nM-1 microM of a Ca(2+)-selective ionophore (calcimycin or ionomycin-"Ca(2+) preconditioning"). Ca(2+) preconditioning greatly reduced cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate during the following 7 days, even though [Ca(2+)](i) was similar (approximately 2 microM) in preconditioned and control neurons 1 h after the OGD. When pre-OGD [Ca(2+)](i) was lowered to 25 nM (10 nM ionophore in Ca(2+)-free medium) or increased to 8 microM (10 microM ionophore), more than 90% of neurons died. Increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein protein kinase B (Akt) and the MAP kinase ERK (p42/44) were present in preconditioned slices after OGD. Reducing Ca(2+) influx, inhibiting calmodulin, and preventing Akt or MAP kinase p42/44 upregulation prevented Ca(2+) preconditioning, supporting a specific role for Ca(2+) in the neuroprotective process. Further, in continuously oxygenated cultured hippocampal/cortical neurons, preconditioning for 30 min with 10 nM ionomycin reduced cell death following a 4 microM increase in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by 1 microM ionomycin. Thus, a zone of moderately increased [Ca(2+)](i) before a potentially lethal insult promotes cell survival, uncoupling subsequent large increases in [Ca(2+)](i) from initiating cell death processes.

  18. Intracellular calcium signaling regulates autophagy via calcineurin-mediated TFEB dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yanju; Song, Fuyong

    2015-01-01

    The transcription-regulating activity of TFEB is dependent on its phosphorylation modification, but the phosphatase(s) involved in TFEB dephosphorylation have remained elusive. It has now become clear that lysosomal calcium signaling activates calcineurin, an endogenous serine/threonine phosphatase, which dephosphorylate TFEB leading to upregulation of autophagy. PMID:26043755

  19. Intracellular calcium signals regulate growth of hepatic stellate cells via specific effects on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Elwy M; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Sheung, Nina; Yu, Jin; Amaya, Maria Jimina; Nathanson, Michael H; Dranoff, Jonathan A

    2009-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are important mediators of liver fibrosis. Hormones linked to downstream intracellular Ca(2+) signals upregulate HSC proliferation, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. Nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) signals may have distinct effects on cell proliferation, so we expressed plasmid and adenoviral constructs containing the Ca(2+) chelator parvalbumin (PV) linked to either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES) to block Ca(2+) signals in distinct compartments within LX-2 immortalized human HSC and primary rat HSC. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs each targeted to the appropriate intracellular compartment and blocked Ca(2+) signals only within that compartment. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs inhibited HSC growth. Furthermore, blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals arrested growth at the G2/mitosis (G2/M) cell-cycle interface and prevented the onset of mitosis. Blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals downregulated phosphorylation of the G2/M checkpoint phosphatase Cdc25C. Inhibition of calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) had identical effects on LX-2 growth and Cdc25C phosphorylation. We propose that nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) are critical signals that regulate HSC growth at the G2/M checkpoint via CaMK II-mediated regulation of Cdc25C phosphorylation. These data provide a new logical target for pharmacological therapy directed against progression of liver fibrosis.

  20. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  1. Intracellular calcium during signal transduction in the lymphocyte is altered by ELF magnetic and electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liburdy, R.P. )

    1992-02-26

    Research has shown that ELF magnetic and electric fields alter calcium transport in rat thymic T-lymphocytes during signal transduction initiated by mitogen. Interestingly activated T-lymphocytes display a nonlinear dose-response for this basic field interaction which scales with the induced electric field in contrast to the applied magnetic field. Specialized multiring annular well cell culture plates based on Faraday's Law of Current Induction were used to demonstrate that the electric field associated with the magnetic field is the exposure metric of biological interest. The first real-time measurements of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} were recently presented and (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} was shown to be altered by sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields; magnetic fields that induced comparable electric fields yielded similar alterations in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. The author now presents evidence that both parameters, (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} and calcium transport, are altered by ELF fields during calcium signaling in thymocytes and scale with the induced electric field. In addition, (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} studies have been conducted that provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that the mitogen-gated calcium channel present in the plasma cell membrane represents a specific site of interaction for ELF fields.

  2. Intracellular calcium promotes radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells through activating Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is a major therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer but is restricted by radioresistance. Although Akt signaling promotes radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer, it is not well understood how Akt signaling is activated. Since intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) could activate Akt in A549 cells, we investigated the relationship between intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and Akt signaling in radioresistant A549 cells by establishing radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The radioresistant cell line A549 was generated by dose-gradient irradiation of the parental A549 cells. The cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were, respectively, assessed using the cell counting kit-8, EdU labeling, and flow cytometry analysis. The phosphorylation of Akt was evaluated by Western blotting, and the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was assessed by Fluo 4-AM. The radioresistant A549 cells displayed mesenchymal morphology. After additional irradiation, the radioresistant A549 cells showed decreased cell viability and proliferation but increased apoptosis. Moreover, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the phosphorylation level on the Akt473 site in radioresistant A549 cells were higher than those in original cells, whereas the percentage of apoptosis in radioresistant A549 cells was less. All these results could be reversed by verapamil. In conclusion, our study found that intracellular Ca(2+) could promote radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells through phosphorylating of Akt on the 473 site, which contributes to a better understanding on the non-small cell lung cancer radioresistance, and may provide a new target for radioresistance management.

  3. Modelling intracellular competition for calcium: kinetic and thermodynamic control of different molecular modes of signal decoding

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Roque, Antonio C.; Simoes de Souza, Fabio M.

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, a common chemical entity triggers opposite cellular processes, which implies that the components of signalling networks must detect signals not only through their chemical natures, but also through their dynamic properties. To gain insights on the mechanisms of discrimination of the dynamic properties of cellular signals, we developed a computational stochastic model and investigated how three calcium ion (Ca2+)-dependent enzymes (adenylyl cyclase (AC), phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), and calcineurin (CaN)) differentially detect Ca2+ transients in a hippocampal dendritic spine. The balance among AC, PDE1 and CaN might determine the occurrence of opposite Ca2+-induced forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). CaN is essential for LTD. AC and PDE1 regulate, indirectly, protein kinase A, which counteracts CaN during LTP. Stimulations of AC, PDE1 and CaN with artificial and physiological Ca2+ signals demonstrated that AC and CaN have Ca2+ requirements modulated dynamically by different properties of the signals used to stimulate them, because their interactions with Ca2+ often occur under kinetic control. Contrarily, PDE1 responds to the immediate amplitude of different Ca2+ transients and usually with the same Ca2+ requirements observed under steady state. Therefore, AC, PDE1 and CaN decode different dynamic properties of Ca2+ signals. PMID:27033299

  4. Imaging intracellular Ca²⁺ signals in striatal astrocytes from adult mice using genetically-encoded calcium indicators.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruotian; Haustein, Martin D; Sofroniew, Michael V; Khakh, Baljit S

    2014-11-19

    Astrocytes display spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) concentration fluctuations ([Ca(2+)]i) and in several settings respond to neuronal excitation with enhanced [Ca(2+)]i signals. It has been proposed that astrocytes in turn regulate neurons and blood vessels through calcium-dependent mechanisms, such as the release of signaling molecules. However, [Ca(2+)]i imaging in entire astrocytes has only recently become feasible with genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) such as the GCaMP series. The use of GECIs in astrocytes now provides opportunities to study astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i signals in detail within model microcircuits such as the striatum, which is the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia. In the present report, detailed surgical methods to express GECIs in astrocytes in vivo, and confocal imaging approaches to record [Ca(2+)]i signals in striatal astrocytes in situ, are described. We highlight precautions, necessary controls and tests to determine if GECI expression is selective for astrocytes and to evaluate signs of overt astrocyte reactivity. We also describe brain slice and imaging conditions in detail that permit reliable [Ca(2+)]i imaging in striatal astrocytes in situ. The use of these approaches revealed the entire territories of single striatal astrocytes and spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i signals within their somata, branches and branchlets. The further use and expansion of these approaches in the striatum will allow for the detailed study of astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i signals in the striatal microcircuitry.

  5. Imaging Intracellular Ca2+ Signals in Striatal Astrocytes from Adult Mice Using Genetically-encoded Calcium Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruotian; Haustein, Martin D.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Khakh, Baljit S.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes display spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ concentration fluctuations ([Ca2+]i) and in several settings respond to neuronal excitation with enhanced [Ca2+]i signals. It has been proposed that astrocytes in turn regulate neurons and blood vessels through calcium-dependent mechanisms, such as the release of signaling molecules. However, [Ca2+]i imaging in entire astrocytes has only recently become feasible with genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) such as the GCaMP series. The use of GECIs in astrocytes now provides opportunities to study astrocyte [Ca2+]i signals in detail within model microcircuits such as the striatum, which is the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia. In the present report, detailed surgical methods to express GECIs in astrocytes in vivo, and confocal imaging approaches to record [Ca2+]i signals in striatal astrocytes in situ, are described. We highlight precautions, necessary controls and tests to determine if GECI expression is selective for astrocytes and to evaluate signs of overt astrocyte reactivity. We also describe brain slice and imaging conditions in detail that permit reliable [Ca2+]i imaging in striatal astrocytes in situ. The use of these approaches revealed the entire territories of single striatal astrocytes and spontaneous [Ca2+]i signals within their somata, branches and branchlets. The further use and expansion of these approaches in the striatum will allow for the detailed study of astrocyte [Ca2+]i signals in the striatal microcircuitry. PMID:25490346

  6. Heteromerization of dopamine D2 receptors with dopamine D1 or D5 receptors generates intracellular calcium signaling by different mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hasbi, Ahmed; O’Dowd, Brian F.; George, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The repertoire of signal transduction pathways activated by dopamine in brain includes the increase of intracellular calcium. However the mechanism(s) by which dopamine activated this important second messenger system was unknown. Although we showed that activation of the D5 dopamine receptor increased calcium concentrations, the restricted anatomic distribution of this receptor made this unlikely to be the major mechanism in brain. We have identified novel heteromeric dopamine receptor complexes that are linked to calcium signaling. The calcium pathway activated through the D1–D2 receptor heteromer involved coupling to Gq, through phospholipase C and IP3 receptors to result in a rise in intracellular calcium. The calcium rise activated through the D2–D5 receptor heteromer involved a small rise in intracellular calcium through the Gq pathway that triggered a store operated channel mediated influx of extracellular calcium. These novel receptor heteromeric complexes, for the first time, establish the link between dopamine action and rapid calcium signaling. PMID:19897420

  7. Anabolic androgenic steroids and intracellular calcium signaling: a mini review on mechanisms and physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, J M; Estrada, M; Galvis, D; Bravo, R; Contreras, A E; Rotter, D; Szabadkai, G; Hill, J A; Rothermel, B A; Jaimovich, E; Lavandero, S

    2011-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nongenomic effects of testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) operate concertedly with genomic effects. Classically, these responses have been viewed as separate and independent processes, primarily because nongenomic responses are faster and appear to be mediated by membrane androgen receptors, whereas long-term genomic effects are mediated through cytosolic androgen receptors regulating transcriptional activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ in response to AAS. These Ca2+ mediated responses have been seen in a diversity of cell types, including osteoblasts, platelets, skeletal muscle cells, cardiac myocytes and neurons. The versatility of Ca2+ as a second messenger provides these responses with a vast number of pathophysiological implications. In cardiac cells, testosterone elicits voltage-dependent Ca2+ oscillations and IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, leading to activation of MAPK and mTOR signaling that promotes cardiac hypertrophy. In neurons, depending upon concentration, testosterone can provoke either physiological Ca2+ oscillations, essential for synaptic plasticity, or sustained, pathological Ca2+ transients that lead to neuronal apoptosis. We propose therefore, that Ca2+ acts as an important point of crosstalk between nongenomic and genomic AAS signaling, representing a central regulator that bridges these previously thought to be divergent responses.

  8. Calcium inhibition as an intracellular signal for actin–myosin interaction

    PubMed Central

    KOHAMA, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways include both the activation and the inhibition of biological processes. The activation of Ca2+ regulation of actin-myosin interactions was examined first, whereas it took 20 years for the author to clarify the inhibitory mode by using Physarum polycephalum, a lower eukaryote. This review describes the investigation of the inhibitory mode since 1980. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ on myosin was detected chemically by ATPase assays and mechanically by in vitro motility assays. The Ca2+-binding ability of Physarum myosin is as high as that of scallop myosin. Ca2+ inhibits Physarum myosin, whereas it activates scallop myosin. We cloned cDNA of the myosin heavy chain and light chains to express a hybrid of Physarum and scallop myosin, and found that the Ca-binding light chain (CaLc), which belongs to an alkali light chain class, plays a major role in Ca inhibition. The role of CaLc was confirmed by mutating its EF-hand, Ca-binding structure and expressing Physarum myosin as a recombinant protein. Thus, the data obtained by classical protein purification were confirmed by the results obtained with the modern recombinant techniques. However, there are some discrepancies that remain to be solved as described in Section XII. PMID:27941307

  9. Intracellular calcium signalling in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus: understanding the autoregulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dayanithi, G; Sabatier, N; Widmer, H

    2000-03-01

    Oxytocin and vasopressin, released at the soma and dendrites of neurones, bind to specific autoreceptors and induce an increase in [Ca2+]i. In oxytocin cells, the increase results from a mobilisation of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, whereas in vasopressin cells, it results mainly from an influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent channels. The response to vasopressin is coupled to phospholipase C and adenylyl-cyclase pathways which are activated by V1 (V1a and V1b)- and V2-type receptors respectively. Measurements of [Ca2+]i in response to V1a and V2 agonists and antagonists suggest the functional expression of these two types of receptors in vasopressin neurones. The intracellular mechanisms involved are similar to those observed for the action of the pituitary adenylyl-cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Isolated vasopressin neurones exhibit spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations and these are synchronised with phasic bursts of electrical activity. Vasopressin modulates these spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations in a manner that depends on the initial state of the neurone, and such varied effects of vasopressin may be related to those observed on the electrical activity of vasopressin neurones in vivo.

  10. Inositol trisphosphate and calcium signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate is a second messenger that controls many cellular processes by generating internal calcium signals. It operates through receptors whose molecular and physiological properties closely resemble the calcium-mobilizing ryanodine receptors of muscle. This family of intracellular calcium channels displays the regenerative process of calcium-induced calcium release responsible for the complex spatiotemporal patterns of calcium waves and oscillations. Such a dynamic signalling pathway controls many cellular processes, including fertilization, cell growth, transformation, secretion, smooth muscle contraction, sensory perception and neuronal signalling.

  11. Intracellular calcium overloading and oxidative stress in cardiomyocyte necrosis via a mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Mazen; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2011-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF), a common clinical syndrome, has reached epidemic proportions. Its disabling symptoms account for frequent hospitalizations and readmissions. Pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to CHF and account for its progressive nature are of considerable interest. Important scientific observations obtained from Dr Pawan K Singal’s laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba, have provided crucial insights to our understanding of the pathophysiological factors that contribute to cardiomyocyte necrosis (the heart is a postmitotic organ incapable of tolerating an ongoing loss of these cells without adverse functional consequences). This increment in knowledge and the mechanistic insights afforded by Dr Singal and his colleagues have highlighted the role of excessive intracellular calcium accumulation and the appearance of oxidative stress in CHF, in which the rate of reactive oxygen species generation overwhelms their rate of detoxification by antioxidant defenses. They have shown that this common pathophysiological scenario applies to diverse entities such as ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation forms of injury, myocardial infarction and the cardiomyopathies that accompany diabetes and excess levels of catecholamines and adriamycin. The authors are honoured to be invited to contribute to the present focus issue of Experimental & Clinical Cardiology in recognizing Dr Singal’s numerous scholarly accomplishments. The present article reviews the authors’ recent work on a mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway to cardiomyocyte necrosis found in rats with either an acute stressor state that accompanies isoproterenol administration or a chronic stressor state manifested after four weeks of aldosterone/salt treatment. PMID:22131852

  12. Theoretical aspects of calcium signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencea, Corneliu Stefan

    2001-08-01

    Experiments investigating intracellular calcium dynamics have revealed that calcium signals differentially affect a variety of intracellular processes, from fertilization and cell development and differentiation to subsequent cellular activity, ending with cell death. As an intracellular messenger, calcium transmits information within and between cells, thus regulating their activity. To control such a variety of processes, calcium signals have to be very flexible and also precisely regulated. The cell uses a calcium signaling ``toolkit'', where calcium ions can act in different contexts of space, amplitude and time. For different tasks, the cell selects the particular signal, or combination of signals, that triggers the appropriate physiological response. The physical foundations of such a versatile cellular signaling toolkit involving calcium are not completely understood, despite important experimental and theoretical progress made recently. The declared goal of this work is to investigate physical mechanisms on which the propagation of differential signals can be based. The dynamics of calcium near a cluster of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) activated calcium channels has been investigated analytically and numerically. Our work has demonstrated that clusters of different IP3 receptors can show similar bistable behavior, but differ in both the transient and long term dynamics. We have also investigated the conditions under which a calcium signal propagates between a pair of localized stores. We have shown that the propagation of the signal across a random distribution of such stores shows a percolation transition manifested in the shape of the wave front. More importantly, our work indicates that specific distribution of stores can be interpreted as calcium circuits that can perform important signal analyzing task, from unidirectional propagation and coincidence detection to a complete set of logic gates. We believe that phenomena like the ones described are

  13. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  14. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  15. Short food deprivation inhibits orexin receptor 1 expression and orexin-A induced intracellular calcium signaling in acutely isolated duodenal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Magnus W; Mäkelä, Kari; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Flemström, Gunnar

    2009-03-01

    Close intra-arterial infusion of the appetite regulating peptide orexin-A stimulates bicarbonate secretion from the duodenal mucosa. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the ability of orexin-A to induce intracellular calcium signaling in acutely isolated duodenal enterocytes. Freshly isolated clusters of enterocytes, obtained from rat duodenal mucosa or human duodenal biopsies, were loaded with fura 2-AM and mounted in a perfusion chamber. Cryptlike enterocytes were selected (caged), and changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were evaluated by fluorescence imaging. Total RNA was extracted from pellets of enterocytes and reverse transcribed to cDNA, and expression of orexin receptors 1 and 2 (OX1R and OX2R) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Orexin-A at all concentrations tested (1-100 nM) increased [Ca2+]i in enterocytes isolated from continuously fed rats, and the OX1R-antagonist SB-334867 (10 nM) attenuated the response. The primary [Ca2+]i response was a slow increase to a sustained plateau persisting after orexin-A removal, and a similar response was observed in enterocytes from human biopsies. In contrast to orexin-A, the OX2R agonist (Ala11,D-Leu15)-orexin-B (1-10 nM) did not induce calcium signaling. There were no significant [Ca2+]i responses in enterocytes from animals food deprived overnight, and overnight fasting decreased (P<0.01) enterocyte OX1R as well as OX2R mRNA. Induction of intracellular calcium signaling in isolated duodenal enterocytes is thus mediated primarily by OX1R receptors. Short (overnight) food deprivation markedly depresses receptor expression and inhibits orexin-A induced increases in [Ca2+]i. Studies of enterocyte signaling and intestinal secretion requires particular evaluation regarding feeding status.

  16. Calcium in plant defence-signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecourieux, David; Ranjeva, Raoul; Pugin, Alain

    2006-01-01

    In plant cells, the calcium ion is a ubiquitous intracellular second messenger involved in numerous signalling pathways. Variations in the cytosolic concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) couple a large array of signals and responses. Here we concentrate on calcium signalling in plant defence responses, particularly on the generation of the calcium signal and downstream calcium-dependent events participating in the establishment of defence responses with special reference to calcium-binding proteins.

  17. Extra and intracellular calcium signaling pathway(s) differentially regulate histamine-induced myometrial contractions during early and mid-pregnancy stages in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Nakade, Udayraj P; Choudhury, Soumen; Yadav, Rajkumar Singh; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the differential role of calcium signaling pathway(s) in histamine-induced uterotonic action during early and mid-pregnancy stages in buffaloes. Compared to mid pregnancy, tonic contraction, amplitude and mean-integral tension were significantly increased by histamine to produce myometrial contraction during early pregnancy with small effects on phasic contraction and frequency. Although uterotonic action of histamine during both stages of pregnancy is sensitive to nifedipine (a L-type Ca(2+) channels blocker) and NNC55-0396 (T-type Ca(2+) channels blocker), the role of extracellular calcium seems to be more significant during mid-pregnancy as in this stage histamine produced only 9.38±0.96% contraction in Ca(2+) free-RLS compared to 21.60±1.45% in uteri of early pregnancy stage. Intracellular calcium plays major role in histamine-induced myometrial contraction during early pregnancy as compared to mid pregnancy, as in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) Ca(2+)-free RLS, histamine produced significantly higher contraction in myometrial strips of early-pregancy in comparison to mid-pregnancy (10.59±1.58% and 3.13±0.46%, respectively). In the presence of U-73122, the DRC of histamine was significantly shifted towards right with decrease in maximal effect (Emax) only in early pregnancy suggesting the predominant role of phospholipase-C (PL-C) in this stage of pregnancy.

  18. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  19. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations. PMID:19792040

  20. Intracellular pH and calcium signaling as molecular targets of diclofenac-induced apoptosis against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2011-07-01

    The role of intracellular pH and Ca2+ and their association with mitochondrial dysfunction and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are explored in the chemoprevention of colon cancer. 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), a potent procarcinogen with selectivity for the colon, at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight was used to induce initial stages of colon cancer when administered for 6 weeks in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Diclofenac, a preferential cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, was used at the anti-inflammatory dose (8 mg/kg body weight) for chemoprevention. The control group was administered vehicles for both DMH and diclofenac. A diclofenac-alone group with the same dose was also run simultaneously. Intracellular pH values as determined by biscarboxyethyl carboxyfluorescein fluorescence assay showed an alkaline pH in colonocytes from the DMH-treated group as compared with the control group. Moreover, the level of intracellular Ca2+ was also found to be decreased with DMH treatment, as shown by the fura-2 acetoxymethyl study and chlortetracycline assay. Apoptosis was studied by comet assay and Apaf-1 immunofluorescent expression and was found to be markedly decreased in this group, indicating that disturbances in pH and Ca2+ homeostasis promoted proliferation in colon and inhibited apoptosis. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS levels were analyzed in isolated colonocytes by rhodamine 123 and 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate labeling, respectively. DMH treatment promoted a higher mitochondrial membrane potential while reducing ROS levels. These parameters are known to be associated with pH and Ca2+ changes intracellularly and hence can be suggested to be linked with them in this study also. Diclofenac promoted apoptosis in colonocytes when coadministered with DMH and also ameliorated the changes observed in the above parameters, confirming these mechanisms as early events for the onset of apoptosis in cancer cells.

  1. Cardiac alternans and intracellular calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Joshua N.; Blatter, Lothar A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac alternans refers to a condition in which there is a periodic beat-to-beat oscillation in electrical activity and the strength of cardiac muscle contraction at a constant heart rate. Clinically, cardiac alternans occurs in settings that are typical for cardiac arrhythmias and has been causally linked to these conditions. At the cellular level, alternans is defined as beat-to-beat alternations in contraction amplitude (mechanical alternans), action potential duration (APD; electrical or APD alternans), and Ca2+ transient amplitude (Ca2+ alternans). The cause of alternans is multifactorial, however alternans always originate from disturbances of the bi-directional coupling between membrane voltage (Vm) and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Bi-directional coupling refers to the fact that in cardiac cells, Vm depolarization and the generation of action potentials cause the elevation of [Ca2+]i that is required for contraction (a process referred to as excitation-contraction coupling), the changes of [Ca2+]i on the other hand control Vm because important membrane currents are Ca2+-dependent. Evidence is mounting that alternans is ultimately caused by disturbances of cellular Ca2+ signaling. Here we review how two key factors of cardiac cellular Ca2+ cycling - the release of Ca2+ from internal stores and the capability of clearing the cytosol from Ca2+ after each beat - determine the conditions under which alternans occurs. The contributions from key Ca2+ handling proteins - surface membrane channels, ion pumps and transporters, and internal Ca2+ release channels - are discussed. PMID:25040398

  2. Regulation of BMP2-induced intracellular calcium increases in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenfeng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xue; Chiang, Martin Y M; Li, Bo; Xu, Zichen; Liao, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Although bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is a well-characterized regulator that stimulates osteoblast differentiation, little is known about how it regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. In this study, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i ) upon BMP2 application, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src activities were measured in the MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensors. Increase in [Ca(2+) ]i , FAK, and Src activities were observed during BMP2 stimulation. The removal of extracellular calcium, the application of membrane channel inhibitors streptomycin or nifedipine, the FAK inhibitor PF-573228 (PF228), and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) siRNA all blocked the BMP2-stimulated [Ca(2+) ]i increase, while the Src inhibitor PP1 did not. In contrast, a gentle decrease of endoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration was found after BMP2 stimulation, which could be blocked by both streptomycin and PP1. Further experiments revealed that BMP2-induced FAK activation could not be inhibited by PP1, ALP siRNA or the calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine. PF228, but not PP1 or calcium channel inhibitors, suppressed ALP elevation resulting from BMP2 stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that BMP2 can increase [Ca(2+) ]i through extracellular calcium influx regulated by FAK and ALP and can deplete ER calcium through Src signaling simultaneously. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1725-1733, 2016.

  3. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  4. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  5. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  6. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  7. Calcium Signaling and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s disease (HD), and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are very important both for fundamental science and for practical medicine. Despite extensive research into the causes of these diseases, clinical researchers have had very limited progress and, as of now, there is still no cure for any of these diseases. One of the main obstacles in the way of creating treatments for these disorders is the fact that their etiology and pathophysiology still remain unclear. This paper reviews results that support the so–called “calcium hypothesis of neurodegenerative diseases.” The calcium hypothesis states that the atrophic and degenerative processes in the neurons of AD, PD, ALS, HD, and SCA patients are accompanied by alterations in calcium homeostasis. Moreover, the calcium hypothesis states that this deregulation of calcium signaling is one of the early–stage and key processes in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Based on the results we reviewed, we conclude that the calcium channels and other proteins involved in the neuronal calcium signaling system are potential drug targets for AD, PD, ALS, HD, and SCA therapy. PMID:22649630

  8. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms.

  9. Intracellular Signal Modulation by Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive Oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can crucially affect the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways can be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future. PMID:24683030

  10. Intracellular signal modulation by nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can be of crucial importance for the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways have also been shown to be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials, effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future.

  11. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2016-01-01

    Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM) pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation. PMID:26731108

  12. Adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikando, Aristide C.; Kinser, Jason M.

    2006-02-01

    Imaging of signaling phenomena within the intracellular domain is a well studied field. Signaling is the process by which all living cells communicate with their environment and with each other. In the case of signaling calcium waves, numerous computational models based on solving homogeneous reaction diffusion equations have been developed. Typically, the reaction diffusion approach consists of solving systems of partial differential equations at each update step. The traditional methods used to solve these reaction diffusion equations are very computationally expensive since they must employ small time steps in order to reduce the computational error. The presented research suggests the application of fast marching methods to imaging signaling calcium waves, more specifically fertilization calcium waves, in Xenopus laevis eggs. The fast marching approach provides fast and efficient means of tracking the evolution of monotonically advancing fronts. A model that employs biophysical properties of intracellular calcium signaling, and adapts fast marching methods to tracking the propagation of signaling calcium waves is presented. The developed model is used to reproduce simulation results obtained with reaction diffusion based model. Results obtained with our model agree with both the results obtained with reaction diffusion based models, and confocal microscopy observations during in vivo experiments. The adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular protein or macromolecule trafficking is also briefly explored.

  13. Regulation of Intracellular Free Calcium in Neuronal Cells by Opioids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-19

    APPROVAL SHEET Title of Dissertation: "Regulation ofIntracellular Free Calcium in Neuronal Cells by Opioids" Name of Candidate: Tianlai Tang Doctor...Calcium in Neuronal Cells by Opioids" beyond brief excerpts is with the pennission of the copyright owner, and will save and hold harmless the...Intracellular Free Calcium in Neuronal Cells by Opioids Doctor of Philosophy, 1995 Brian M. Cox, Professor, Department of Pharmacology The

  14. Desnitro-imidacloprid activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade via the nicotinic receptor and intracellular calcium mobilization in N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2002-11-01

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is the principal neonicotinoid (the only major new class of synthetic insecticides of the past three decades). The excellent safety profile of IMI is not shared with a metabolite, desnitro-IMI (DNIMI), which displays high toxicity to mammals associated with agonist action at the alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in brain. This study examines the hypothesis that IMI, DNIMI, and (-)-nicotine activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade via primary interaction with the alpha4beta2 nAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. These three nicotinic agonists induce phosphorylation of ERK (p44/p42) in a concentration-dependent manner with an optimal incubation period of 30 min. DNIMI (1 microM)-induced ERK activation is blocked by nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin and muscarinic antagonist atropine. This activation is prevented by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM but not by removal of external Ca(2+) using EGTA and Ca(2+)-free medium. 2-Aminoethoxy-diphenylborate, a blocker for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, inhibits DNIMI-induced ERK activation but a high level of ryanodine (to block ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release) does not. The inhibitor U-73122 for phospholipase C (to suppress IP(3) production) prevents ERK activation evoked by DNIMI. Inhibitors for protein kinase C (PKC) (GF109203X) and ERK kinase (PD98059) block this activation whereas an inhibitor (H-89) for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase does not. Thus, neonicotinoids activate the ERK cascade triggered by primary action at the alpha4beta2 nAChR with an involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization possibly mediated by IP(3). It is further suggested that intracellular Ca(2+) activates a sequential pathway from PKC to ERK.

  15. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  16. The Analysis of Intracellular and Intercellular Calcium Signaling in Human Anterior Lens Capsule Epithelial Cells with Regard to Different Types and Stages of the Cataract.

    PubMed

    Gosak, Marko; Markovič, Rene; Fajmut, Aleš; Marhl, Marko; Hawlina, Marko; Andjelić, Sofija

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigated how modifications of the Ca2+ homeostasis in anterior lens epithelial cells (LECs) are associated with different types of cataract (cortical or nuclear) and how the progression of the cataract (mild or moderate) affects the Ca2+ signaling. We systematically analyzed different aspects of intra- and inter-cellular Ca2+ signaling in the human LECs, which are attached to surgically isolated lens capsule (LC), obtained during cataract surgery. We monitored the temporal and spatial changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration after stimulation with acetylcholine by means of Fura-2 fluorescence captured with an inverted microscope. In our analysis we compared the features of Ca2+ signals in individual cells, synchronized activations, spatio-temporal grouping and the nature of intercellular communication between LECs. The latter was assessed by using the methodologies of the complex network theory. Our results point out that at the level of individual cells there are no significant differences when comparing the features of the signals with regard either to the type or the stage of the cataract. On the other hand, noticeable differences are observed at the multicellular level, despite inter-capsule variability. LCs associated with more developed cataracts were found to exhibit a slower collective response to stimulation, a less pronounced spatio-temporal clustering of LECs with similar signaling characteristics. The reconstructed intercellular networks were found to be sparser and more segregated than in LCs associated with mild cataracts. Moreover, we show that spontaneously active LECs often operate in localized groups with quite well aligned Ca2+ activity. The presence of spontaneous activity was also found to affect the stimulated Ca2+ responses of individual cells. Our findings indicate that the cataract progression entails the impairment of intercellular signaling thereby suggesting the functional importance of altered Ca2+ signaling of

  17. The Analysis of Intracellular and Intercellular Calcium Signaling in Human Anterior Lens Capsule Epithelial Cells with Regard to Different Types and Stages of the Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Gosak, Marko; Markovič, Rene; Fajmut, Aleš; Marhl, Marko; Hawlina, Marko; Andjelić, Sofija

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigated how modifications of the Ca2+ homeostasis in anterior lens epithelial cells (LECs) are associated with different types of cataract (cortical or nuclear) and how the progression of the cataract (mild or moderate) affects the Ca2+ signaling. We systematically analyzed different aspects of intra- and inter-cellular Ca2+ signaling in the human LECs, which are attached to surgically isolated lens capsule (LC), obtained during cataract surgery. We monitored the temporal and spatial changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration after stimulation with acetylcholine by means of Fura-2 fluorescence captured with an inverted microscope. In our analysis we compared the features of Ca2+ signals in individual cells, synchronized activations, spatio-temporal grouping and the nature of intercellular communication between LECs. The latter was assessed by using the methodologies of the complex network theory. Our results point out that at the level of individual cells there are no significant differences when comparing the features of the signals with regard either to the type or the stage of the cataract. On the other hand, noticeable differences are observed at the multicellular level, despite inter-capsule variability. LCs associated with more developed cataracts were found to exhibit a slower collective response to stimulation, a less pronounced spatio-temporal clustering of LECs with similar signaling characteristics. The reconstructed intercellular networks were found to be sparser and more segregated than in LCs associated with mild cataracts. Moreover, we show that spontaneously active LECs often operate in localized groups with quite well aligned Ca2+ activity. The presence of spontaneous activity was also found to affect the stimulated Ca2+ responses of individual cells. Our findings indicate that the cataract progression entails the impairment of intercellular signaling thereby suggesting the functional importance of altered Ca2+ signaling of

  18. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    PubMed

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  19. Astrocyte calcium signalling orchestrates neuronal synchronization in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Abe, Reimi; Nakayama, Ryota; Asada, Akiko; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are thought to detect neuronal activity in the form of intracellular calcium elevations; thereby, astrocytes can regulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Little is known, however, about how the astrocyte calcium signal regulates the activity of neuronal populations. In this study, we addressed this issue using functional multineuron calcium imaging in hippocampal slice cultures. Under normal conditions, CA3 neuronal networks exhibited temporally correlated activity patterns, occasionally generating large synchronization among a subset of cells. The synchronized neuronal activity was correlated with astrocyte calcium events. Calcium buffering by an intracellular injection of a calcium chelator into multiple astrocytes reduced the synaptic strength of unitary transmission between pairs of surrounding pyramidal cells and caused desynchronization of the neuronal networks. Uncaging the calcium in the astrocytes increased the frequency of neuronal synchronization. These data suggest an essential role of the astrocyte calcium signal in the maintenance of basal neuronal function at the circuit level. PMID:24710057

  20. Intracellular calcium strongly potentiates agonist-activated TRPC5 channels

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Nathaniel T.; Kaczmarek, J. Stefan

    2009-01-01

    TRPC5 is a calcium (Ca2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel expressed in several brain regions, including the hippocampus, cerebellum, and amygdala. Although TRPC5 is activated by receptors coupled to phospholipase C, the precise signaling pathway and modulatory signals remain poorly defined. We find that during continuous agonist activation, heterologously expressed TRPC5 currents are potentiated in a voltage-dependent manner (∼5-fold at positive potentials and ∼25-fold at negative potentials). The reversal potential, doubly rectifying current–voltage relation, and permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine remain unchanged during this potentiation. The TRPC5 current potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+: replacement by Ba2+ or Mg2+ abolishes it, whereas the addition of 10 mM Ca2+ accelerates it. The site of action for Ca2+ is intracellular, as simultaneous fura-2 imaging and patch clamp recordings indicate that potentiation is triggered at ∼1 µM [Ca2+]. This potentiation is prevented when intracellular Ca2+ is tightly buffered, but it is promoted when recording with internal solutions containing elevated [Ca2+]. In cell-attached and excised inside-out single-channel recordings, increases in internal [Ca2+] led to an ∼10–20-fold increase in channel open probability, whereas single-channel conductance was unchanged. Ca2+-dependent potentiation should result in TRPC5 channel activation preferentially during periods of repetitive firing or coincident neurotransmitter receptor activation. PMID:19398778

  1. The effect of pulsed electric fields on the electrotactic migration of human neural progenitor cells through the involvement of intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Edin, Fredrik; Li, Hao; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are required for the physiological control of the central nervous system development. Application of the direct current EFs to neural stem cells has been studied for the possibility of stem cell transplantation as one of the therapies for brain injury. EFs generated within the nervous system are often associated with action potentials and synaptic activity, apparently resulting in a pulsed current in nature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pulsed EF, which can reduce the cytotoxicity, on the migration of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs). We applied the mono-directional pulsed EF with a strength of 250mV/mm to hNPCs for 6h. The migration distance of the hNPCs exposed to pulsed EF was significantly greater compared with the control not exposed to the EF. Pulsed EFs, however, had less of an effect on the migration of the differentiated hNPCs. There was no significant change in the survival of hNPCs after exposure to the pulsed EF. To investigate the role of Ca(2+) signaling in electrotactic migration of hNPCs, pharmacological inhibition of Ca(2+) channels in the EF-exposed cells revealed that the electrotactic migration of hNPCs exposed to Ca(2+) channel blockers was significantly lower compared to the control group. The findings suggest that the pulsed EF induced migration of hNPCs is partly influenced by intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

  2. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  3. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: Evolution and general principles

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Calcium as a divalent ion was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, by neurotransmitters, by second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms. PMID:24291103

  4. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  5. Spindle function in Xenopus oocytes involves possible nanodomain calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruizhen; Leblanc, Julie; He, Kevin; Liu, X. Johné

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients are a universal phenomenon at fertilization and are required for egg activation, but the exact role of Ca2+ in second-polar-body emission remains unknown. On the other hand, similar calcium transients have not been demonstrated during oocyte maturation, and yet, manipulating intracellular calcium levels interferes with first-polar-body emission in mice and frogs. To determine the precise role of calcium signaling in polar body formation, we used live-cell imaging coupled with temporally precise intracellular calcium buffering. We found that BAPTA-based calcium chelators cause immediate depolymerization of spindle microtubules in meiosis I and meiosis II. Surprisingly, EGTA at similar or higher intracellular concentrations had no effect on spindle function or polar body emission. Using two calcium probes containing permutated GFP and the calcium sensor calmodulin (Lck-GCaMP3 and GCaMP3), we demonstrated enrichment of the probes at the spindle but failed to detect calcium increase during oocyte maturation at the spindle or elsewhere. Finally, endogenous calmodulin was found to colocalize with spindle microtubules throughout all stages of meiosis. Our results—most important, the different sensitivities of the spindle to BAPTA and EGTA—suggest that meiotic spindle function in frog oocytes requires highly localized, or nanodomain, calcium signaling. PMID:27582389

  6. Measuring near plasma membrane and global intracellular calcium dynamics in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shigetomi, Eiji; Khakh, Baljit S

    2009-04-26

    The brain contains glial cells. Astrocytes, a type of glial cell, have long been known to provide a passive supportive role to neurons. However, increasing evidence suggests that astrocytes may also actively participate in brain function through functional interactions with neurons. However, many fundamental aspects of astrocyte biology remain controversial, unclear and/or experimentally unexplored. One important issue is the dynamics of intracellular calcium transients in astrocytes. This is relevant because calcium is well established as an important second messenger and because it has been proposed that astrocyte calcium elevations can trigger the release of transmitters from astrocytes. However, there has not been any detailed or satisfying description of near plasma membrane calcium signaling in astrocytes. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool to analyze physiologically relevant signaling events within about 100 nm of the plasma membrane of live cells. Here, we use TIRF microscopy and describe how to monitor near plasma membrane and global intracellular calcium dynamics almost simultaneously. The further refinement and systematic application of this approach has the potential to inform about the precise details of astrocyte calcium signaling. A detailed understanding of astrocyte calcium dynamics may provide a basis to understand if, how, when and why astrocytes and neurons undergo calcium-dependent functional interactions.

  7. [Intracellular calcium channels, hormone receptors and intercellular calcium waves].

    PubMed

    Tordjmann, T; Tran, D; Berthon, B; Jacquemin, E; Guillon, G; Combettes, L; Claret, M

    1998-01-01

    The hormone-mediated intercellular Ca2+ waves were analyzed in multiplets of rat hepatocytes by video imaging of fura2 fluorescence. These multicellular systems are composed of groups of several cells (doublets to quintuplets) issued from the liver cell plate, a one cell-thick cord of about 20 hepatocytes long between portal and centrolobular veins. When the multiplets were homogeneously bathed with the glycogenolytic agonists vasopressin, noradrenaline, angiotensin II and ATP, they showed highly organized Ca2+ signals. Surprisingly, for a given agonist, the primary rises in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) originated invariably in the same hepatocyte, then was propagated in a sequential manner to the nearest connected cells (cell 2, then 3, cell 4 in a quadruplet, for example). The sequential activation of the cells appeared to be an intrinsic property of multiplets of rat hepatocytes. The same sequence was observed at each train of oscillations occurring between cells. The order of [Ca2+]i responses was modified neither by repeated additions of hormones nor by the hormonal dose. The mechanical disruption of an intermediate cell did not prevent the activation of the next cell. These results suggest that each hepatocyte in the multiplet displays its own sensitivity to the hormone and that a gradient of sensitivity between each cell could be responsible for directing the intercellular Ca2+ wave. To test this hypothesis, we selectively isolated rat hepatocytes from periportal (PP) and perivenous (PV) areas of the liver cell plate. Periportal (PP) and perivenous (PV) rat hepatocyte suspensions were loaded with quin2/AM and hormonal responses were studied in a spectrofluorimeter. Noradrenaline, angiotensin II, and vasopressin-induced [Ca2+]i rises were greater in PV than in PP hepatocytes. In contrast, PP cells were more responsive than PV cells to ATP. The function of the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) was also studied by measuring the InsP3-mediated 45Ca2+ release

  8. Intracellular Calcium Release at Fertilization in the Sea Urchin Egg

    PubMed Central

    Steinhardt, R.; Zucker, R.; Schattenand, G.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization or ionophore activation of Lytechinus pictus eggs can be monitored after injection with the Ca-sensitive photoprotein aequorin to estimate calcium release during activation. We estimate the peak calcium transient to reach concentrations of 2.5–4.5 μM free calcium 45–60 sec after activation and to last 2–3 min, assuming equal Ca2+ release throughout the cytoplasm. Calcium is released from an intracellular store, since similar responses are obtained during fertilization at a wide range of external calcium concentrations or in zero-calcium seawater in ionophore activations. In another effort to estimate free calcium at fertilization, we isolated egg cortices, added back calcium quantitatively, and fixed for observation with a scanning electron microscope. In this way, we determined that the threshold for discharge of the cortical granules is between 9 and 18 μM Ca2+. Therefore, the threshold for the in vitro cortical reaction is about five times the amount of free calcium, assuming equal distribution in the egg. This result suggests that transient calcium release is confined to the inner subsurface of the egg. PMID:326602

  9. A Miniature Couette to Generate Shear for Flow Cytometry: Studying Real-Time Modulation of Intracellular Calcium in Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zwartz, Gordon J.; Chigaev, Alexandre; Foutz, Terry D.; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular hydrodynamic forces may be transmitted to the interior of cells through the alteration of integrin conformation and affinity. Integrin activation regulates leukocyte recruitment, cell activation, and transmigration. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for integrin activation are not precisely known, although intracellular calcium signaling is involved. Flow cytometry offers a versatile way to study intracellular calcium signaling in real-time. We report a novel method to generate defined shear by using a miniature Couette. Testing involved measuring shear induced intracellular calcium signals of human monoblastoid U937 cells in suspension. The Couette was connected externally to a flow cytometer and pressurized at 6 PSI (4.1 N/m2). Cells were subjected to well-defined shear between 0 and 1000 s−1 and delivered continuously within 10 s to a FACScan at 1 μl/s. Intracellular calcium levels and the percentage of cells activated increased as shear increased in duration and intensity. PMID:22045643

  10. Intracellular calcium buffering declines in aging adrenergic nerves.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H; Hewitt, C W; Buchholz, J N; Duckles, S P

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked norepinephrine release from rat tail artery adrenergic nerves increased with advancing age in the Fischer-344 rat when function of norepinephrine uptake mechanisms and prejunctional alpha-2 adrenoceptors were blocked. When calcium channels were bypassed with the ionophore, ionomycin (4 microM), norepinephrine release from aged nerves (20 months) was still elevated as compared to 6-month-old nerves. Norepinephrine release stimulated by high K+ was also higher in 20-month nerves. The intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2 bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetomethylester (BAPTA/AM), was used to determine whether age-related increases in norepinephrine release could be reversed with the addition of an artificial intracellular calcium buffer. Exposure to BAPTA/AM decreased stimulation-evoked norepinephrine release in both old and young tail arteries; however, the effect was significantly greater in older arteries. When mitochondrial calcium uptake was compromised using the uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, dinitrophenol, BAPTA caused a further decrease in stimulation-evoked norepinephrine release in 20-month tail arteries with much less effect in 6-month-old nerves. These results suggest that intracellular calcium buffering is less efficient in older nerves.

  11. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegg, Mark B.; Rüdiger, Sten; Erban, Radek

    2013-04-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)], 10.1098/rsif.2011.0574 in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with

  12. Modeling of spatially-restricted intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Neves, Susana R

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the signaling capabilities of a cell presents a major challenge, not only due to the number of molecules involved, but also because of the complex network connectivity of intracellular signaling. Recently, the proliferation of quantitative imaging techniques has led to the discovery of the vast spatial organization of intracellular signaling. Computational modeling has emerged as a powerful tool for understanding how inhomogeneous signaling originates and is maintained. This article covers the current imaging techniques used to obtain quantitative spatial data and the mathematical approaches used to model spatial cell biology. Modeling-derived hypotheses have been experimentally tested and the integration of modeling and imaging approaches has led to non-intuitive mechanistic insights.

  13. Arrhythmogenic consequences of intracellular calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Weiss, James N

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+)) waves are known to cause delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs), which have been associated with arrhythmias in cardiac disease states such as heart failure, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and digitalis toxicity. Here we show that, in addition to DADs, Ca(i)(2+) waves also have other consequences relevant to arrhythmogenesis, including subcellular spatially discordant alternans (SDA, in which the amplitude of the local Ca(i)(2+) transient alternates out of phase in different regions of the same cell), sudden repolarization changes promoting the dispersion of refractoriness, and early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Ca(i)(2+) was imaged using a charge-coupled device-based system in fluo-4 AM-loaded isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes paced at constant or incrementally increasing rates, using either field stimulation, current clamp, or action potential (AP) clamp. Ca(i)(2+) waves were induced by Bay K 8644 (50 nM) + isoproterenol (100 nM), or low temperature. When pacing was initiated during a spontaneous Ca(i)(2+) wave, SDA occurred abruptly and persisted during pacing. Similarly, during rapid pacing, SDA typically arose suddenly from spatially concordant alternans, due to an abrupt phase reversal of the subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient in a region of the myocyte. Ca(i)(2+) waves could be visualized interspersed with AP-triggered Ca(i)(2+) transients, producing a rich variety of subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient patterns. With free-running APs, complex Ca(i)(2+) release patterns were associated with DADs, EADs, and sudden changes in AP duration. These findings link Ca(i)(2+) waves directly to a variety of arrhythmogenic phenomena relevant to the intact heart.

  14. Resveratrol Interferes with Fura-2 Intracellular Calcium Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Richard F; Leech, Colin A; Roe, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol found in some fruits and especially in grapes, has been reported to provide diverse health benefits. Resveratrol's mechanism of action is the subject of many investigations, and some studies using the ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2 suggest that it modulates cellular calcium responses. In the current study, contradictory cellular calcium responses to resveratrol applied at concentrations exceeding 10 μM were observed during in vitro imaging studies depending on the calcium indicator used, with Fura-2 indicating an increase in intracellular calcium while Fluo-4 and the calcium biosensor YC3.60 indicated no response. When cells loaded with Fura-2 were treated with 100 μM resveratrol, excitation at 340 nm resulted in a large intensity increase at 510 nm, but the expected concurrent decline with 380 nm excitation was not observed. Pre-treatment of cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM did not prevent a rise in the 340/380 ratio when resveratrol was present, but it did prevent an increase in 340/380 when ATP was applied, suggesting that the resveratrol response was an artifact. Cautious data interpretation is recommended from imaging experiments using Fura-2 concurrently with resveratrol in calcium imaging experiments.

  15. Calcium Signaling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is a highly versatile second messenger that regulates a wide range of functions in every type of cell and tissue. To achieve this versatility, the Ca2+ signaling system operates in a variety of ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range. This is particularly well exemplified for Ca2+ signals in the liver, which modulate diverse and specialized functions such as bile secretion, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. These Ca2+ signals are organized to control distinct cellular processes through tight spatial and temporal coordination of [Ca2+]i signals, both within and between cells. This article will review the machinery responsible for the formation of Ca2+ signals in the liver, the types of subcellular, cellular, and intercellular signals that occur, the physiological role of Ca2+ signaling in the liver, and the role of Ca2+ signaling in liver disease. PMID:23720295

  16. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  17. Measurement of intracellular Ca2+ concentration in single cells using ratiometric calcium dyes.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is useful to study the upstream and downstream events of Ca(2+) signaling. Ca(2+)-binding proteins including EF-hand-containing proteins are important downstream effector molecules after an increase of [Ca(2+)](i). Conversely, these proteins can also act as key modulators for regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) by sensing the Ca(2+) levels in the intracellular organelles and cytoplasm. Here we describe a single-cell Ca(2+) imaging technique that was used to measure the intracellular Ca(2+) levels to examine the function of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, STIM1 and Calcium release-activated Calcium channel regulator 2A (CRACR2A), using ratiometric Ca(2+) dye Fura-2 in adherent and non-adherent cells.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acids. Influence on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; Kindom, S. E.; Peterson, D. A.; Peller, J.; Krantz, K. E.; White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Decanoyl-, palmitoyl-, and oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were studied for their effects on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux. Palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA both caused a concentration-dependent aggregation of human blood platelets at concentrations of 12--300 microM. Aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was enhanced at slightly lower concentrations. First-wave aggregation induced by these LPAs was not blocked by aspirin, indomethacin, or heparin, suggesting similarities to ADP aggregation. However, in washed platelets with a high calcium concentration, no serotonin secretion was observed, even though full aggregation occurred, suggesting that aggregation was not due to released ADP. This concept was supported by studies of platelets deficient in the storage pool of ADP and serotonin, which had a normal first-wave aggregation response to palmitoyl-LPA. Aggregation induced by palmitoyl LPA was inhibited by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), theophylline, and ethylenediaminotetraacetate (EDTA), though in the presence of EDTA shape change occurred. Aggregation stimulated by palmitoyl-LPA or oleoyl-LPA was characterized by changes in the shape of the platelets with development of pseudopods and centralization of granules closely surrounded by contractile microfilaments and supporting microtubules. The addition of palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA, but not decanoyl-LPA, caused the release of calcium from a platelet membrane fraction that contains elements of the intracellular calcium storage system and actively concentrates this cation in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and magnesium. It is suggested that LPAs cause aggregation by stimulating the release of calcium intracellularly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Text-Figure 6 PMID:112871

  19. Modulation of calcium signalling by the endoplasmic reticulum in Carassius neurons.

    PubMed

    Lukyanets, Igor A; Lukyanetz, Elena A

    2013-04-19

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum (ER), being a calcium store participates in the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration. Ca-ATPase of the ER is one of the crucial agents providing the calcium-accumulating function of this intracellular structure. We studied the role of the ER in modulation of calcium signalling in Carassius neurons using a Ca2+-imaging technique. We tested the role of the ER in the maintenance of a steady state calcium level in the cytoplasm and in modulation of Ca2+ transients evoked by cell depolarizations. The ER calcium stores were depleted using inhibitors of ER Ca-ATPase, which provided blocking of Ca2+ uptake by the ER. Our experiments firstly showed that the ER can significantly modulate the characteristics of intracellular calcium signals in Carassius neurons during their activity. These findings also indicate that the ER modulates the shape of Ca2+ signals rather than the basal level of intracellular Ca2+ in these neurons.

  20. Calcium signalling in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2014-11-01

    Molecular cascades responsible for Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) signalling could be assembled in highly plastic toolkits that define physiological adaptation of cells to the environment and which are intimately involved in all types of cellular pathology. Control over Ca(2+) concentration in different cellular compartments is intimately linked to cell metabolism, because (i) ATP production requires low Ca(2+), (ii) Ca(2+) homeostatic systems consume ATP and (iii) Ca(2+) signals in mitochondria stimulate ATP synthesis being an essential part of excitation-metabolic coupling. The communication between the ER and mitochondria plays an important role in this metabolic fine tuning. In the insulin resistance state and diabetes this communication has been impaired leading to different disorders, for instance, diminished insulin production by pancreatic β cells, reduced heart and skeletal muscle contractility, reduced NO production by endothelial cells, increased glucose production by liver, increased lipolysis by adipose cells, reduced immune responses, reduced cognitive functions, among others. All these processes eventually trigger degenerative events resulting in overt diabetes due to reduction of pancreatic β cell mass, and different complications of diabetes, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and different cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Human β-Cell Proliferation and Intracellular Signaling: Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob A.; García-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C.; Bhushan, Anil; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This is the third in a series of Perspectives on intracellular signaling pathways coupled to proliferation in pancreatic β-cells. We contrast the large knowledge base in rodent β-cells with the more limited human database. With the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes and the recognition that type 2 diabetes is also due in part to a deficiency of functioning β-cells, there is great urgency to identify therapeutic approaches to expand human β-cell numbers. Therapeutic approaches might include stem cell differentiation, transdifferentiation, or expansion of cadaver islets or residual endogenous β-cells. In these Perspectives, we focus on β-cell proliferation. Past Perspectives reviewed fundamental cell cycle regulation and its upstream regulation by insulin/IGF signaling via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, glucose, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and liver kinase B1, protein kinase Cζ, calcium-calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells, epidermal growth factor/platelet-derived growth factor family members, Wnt/β-catenin, leptin, and estrogen and progesterone. Here, we emphasize Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription, Ras/Raf/extracellular signal–related kinase, cadherins and integrins, G-protein–coupled receptors, and transforming growth factor β signaling. We hope these three Perspectives will serve to introduce these pathways to new researchers and will encourage additional investigators to focus on understanding how to harness key intracellular signaling pathways for therapeutic human β-cell regeneration for diabetes. PMID:25999530

  2. Estrogen evokes a rapid effect on intracellular calcium in neurons characterized by calcium oscillations in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Oliver; Kow, Lee-Ming; Bogun, Magda; Pfaff, Donald W

    2007-06-01

    Rapid estrogen effects became an interesting topic to explain estrogen effects not associated with the classical nuclear pathway. The rapid estrogen effect on intracellular calcium oscillations was characterized in neurons of the arcuate nucleus. Ratiometric calcium imaging (fura-2AM) was used to measure intracellular calcium in brain slices of female Swiss Webster mice (median of age 27 days p.n.). Calcium oscillations were dependent on intracellular calcium and also on calcium influx from the extracellular space. The perfusion of slices with calcium-free solution inhibited spontaneous calcium oscillations. The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD (5 microM) and low concentrated ryanodine (100 nM) induced intracellular calcium release when slices were perfused with calcium-free solution. 17beta-estradiol (10 nM) also induced intracellular calcium release in calcium-free ACSF. This effect was inhibited by the preceding administration of thapsigargin (2 microM) indicating the association of the rapid estrogen effect with intracellular calcium stores. The administration of the non-selective phospholipase C-inhibitor ET-18 (30 microM), but not U73122 (10 microM), and the inhibition of protein kinase A by H-89 (0.25 microM) suppressed the rapid estrogen effect. Analyses indicated a qualitative, but not quantitatively significant effect of 17beta-estradiol on calcium oscillations.

  3. The Mechanical Environment Modulates Intracellular Calcium Oscillation Activities of Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Charles; Follonier Castella, Lysianne; Smith, Eric A.; Talele, Nilesh; Chow, Melissa L.; Garonna, Adriano; Hinz, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair. PMID:23691248

  4. Application of the optical method in experimental cardiology: action potential and intracellular calcium concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Ronzhina, M; Cmiel, V; Janoušek, O; Kolářová, J; Nováková, M; Babula, P; Provazník, I

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that, in addition to conventional contact electrode techniques, optical methods using fluorescent dyes can be successfully used for cardiac signal measurement. In this review, the physical and technical fundamentals of the method are described, as well as the properties of the most common systems for measuring action potentials and intracellular calcium concentration. Special attention is paid to summarizing limitations and trends in developing this method.

  5. Testosterone induces an intracellular calcium increase by a nongenomic mechanism in cultured rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel; Chiong, Mario; Soto, Dagoberto; Parra, Valentina; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    Androgens are associated with important effects on the heart, such as hypertrophy or apoptosis. These responses involve the intracellular androgen receptor. However, the mechanisms of how androgens activate several membrane signaling pathways are not fully elucidated. We have investigated the effect of testosterone on intracellular calcium in cultured rat cardiac myocytes. Using fluo3-AM and epifluorescence microscopy, we found that exposure to testosterone rapidly (1-7 min) led to an increase of intracellular Ca2+, an effect that persisted in the absence of external Ca2+. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that these effects occurred before translocation of the intracellular androgen receptor to the perinuclear zone. Pretreatment of the cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester and thapsigargin blocked this response, suggesting the involvement of internal Ca2+ stores. U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, and xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, abolished the Ca2+ signal. The rise in intracellular Ca2+ was not inhibited by cyproterone, an antagonist of intracellular androgen receptor. Moreover, the cell impermeant testosterone-BSA complex also produced the Ca2+ signal, indicating its origin in the plasma membrane. This effect was observed in cultured neonatal and adult rat cardiac myocytes. Pertussis toxin and the adenoviral transduction of beta- adrenergic receptor kinase carboxy terminal peptide, a peptide inhibitor of betagamma-subunits of G protein, abolished the testosterone-induced Ca2+ release. In summary, this is the first study of rapid, nongenomic intracellular Ca2+ signaling of testosterone in cardiac myocytes. Using various inhibitors and testosterone-BSA complex, the mechanism for the rapid, testosterone-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ is through activation of a plasma membrane receptor associated with a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein-phospholipase C

  6. Impaired mitochondria and intracellular calcium transients in the salivary glands of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Ittichaicharoen, Jitjiroj; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Tanajak, Pongpan; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Long-term consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) causes not only obese-insulin resistance, but is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several organs. However, the effect of obese-insulin resistance on salivary glands has not been investigated. We hypothesized that obese-insulin resistance induced by HFD impaired salivary gland function by reducing salivation, increasing inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as impairing mitochondrial function and calcium transient signaling. Male Wistar rats (200-220 g) were fed either a ND or an HFD (n = 8/group) for 16 weeks. At the end of week 16, salivary flow rates, metabolic parameters, and plasma oxidative stress were determined. Rats were then sacrificed and submandibular glands were removed to determine inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and dynamics, and intracellular calcium transient signaling. Long-term consumption of an HFD caused obese-insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress, fibrosis, inflammation, and apoptosis in the salivary glands. In addition, impaired mitochondrial function, as indicated by increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and mitochondrial swelling in salivary glands and impaired intracellular calcium regulation, as indicated by a reduced intracellular calcium transient rising rate, decay rates, and amplitude of salivary acinar cells, were observed in HFD-fed rats. However, salivary flow rate and level of aquaporin 5 protein were not different between both groups. Although HFD consumption did not affect salivation, it caused obese-insulin resistance, leading to pathophysiological alteration of salivary glands, including impaired intracellular calcium transients, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and salivary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Calcium signaling in membrane repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiping; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-01-01

    Resealing allows cells to mend damaged membranes rapidly when plasma membrane (PM) disruptions occur. Models of PM repair mechanisms include the “lipid-patch”, “endocytic removal”, and “macro-vesicle shedding” models, all of which postulate a dependence on local increases in intracellular Ca2+ at injury sites. Multiple calcium sensors, including synaptotagmin (Syt) VII, dysferlin, and apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2), are involved in PM resealing, suggesting that Ca2+ may regulate multiple steps of the repair process. Although earlier studies focused exclusively on external Ca2+, recent studies suggest that Ca2+ release from intracellular stores may also be important for PM resealing. Hence, depending on injury size and the type of injury, multiple sources of Ca2+ may be recruited to trigger and orchestrate repair processes. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which the resealing process is promoted by vesicular Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ sensors that accumulate at damage sites. PMID:26519113

  8. NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform persistent activity requires calcium release from intracellular stores in prefrontal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Jun; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S

    2006-02-01

    Various normal and pathological forms of synchronized population activity are generated by recurrent excitation among pyramidal neurons in the neocortex. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying this activity remain poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the cellular properties of synchronized epileptiform activity in the prefrontal cortex with particular emphasis on a potential role of intracellular calcium stores. We find that the zero-magnesium-induced synchronized activity is blocked by inhibition of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, and the ryanodine receptor. This same activity is, however, not affected by application of metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR) agonists, nor by introduction of an mGluR antagonist. These results suggest that persistent synchronized activity in vitro is dependent upon calcium release from internal calcium stores through the activation of PLC-IP3 receptor pathway. Our findings also raise the possibility that intracellular calcium release may be involved in the generation of pathologic synchronized activity in epilepsy in vivo and in physiological forms of synchronized cortical activity.

  9. Activation of Oral Trigeminal Neurons by Fatty Acids is Dependent upon Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Shah, Bhavik P.; Hansen, Dane R.; Park-York, MieJung; Gilbertson, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The chemoreception of dietary fat in the oral cavity has largely been attributed to activation of the somatosensory system that conveys the textural properties of fat. However, the ability of fatty acids, which are believed to represent the proximate stimulus for fat taste, to stimulate rat trigeminal neurons has remained unexplored. Here, we found that several free fatty acids are capable of activating trigeminal neurons with different kinetics. Further, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleic acid (LA), activates trigeminal neurons by increasing intracellular calcium concentration and generating depolarizing receptor potentials. Ion substitution and pharmacological approaches reveal that intracellular calcium store depletion is crucial for LA-induced signaling in a subset of trigeminal neurons. Using pseudorabies virus (PrV) as a live cell tracer, we identified a subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons that respond to different subsets of fatty acids. Quantitative real-time PCR of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel markers in individual neurons validated that PrV labeled a subset but not the entire population of lingual-innervated trigeminal neurons. We further confirmed that the LA-induced intracellular calcium rise is exclusively coming from the release of calcium stores from the endoplasmic reticulum in this subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons. PMID:22644615

  10. Regulation of neurogenesis by calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Shum, Andrew K.; Prakriya, Murali

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling has essential roles in the development of the nervous system from neural induction to the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural cells. Ca2+ signaling pathways are shaped by interactions among metabotropic signaling cascades, intracellular Ca2+ stores, ion channels, and a multitude of downstream effector proteins that activate specific genetic programs. The temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca2+ signals are widely presumed to control the highly diverse yet specific genetic programs that establish the complex structures of the adult nervous system. Progress in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the functional architecture of Ca2+ signaling networks involved in neurogenesis. In this review, we assess the literature on the molecular and functional organization of Ca2+ signaling networks in the developing nervous system and its impact on neural induction, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the growing evidence for the involvement of store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in these processes. PMID:27020657

  11. Uncoupling Caveolae from Intracellular Signaling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kraehling, Jan R.; Hao, Zhengrong; Lee, Monica Y.; Vinyard, David J.; Velazquez, Heino; Liu, X.; Stan, Radu V.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Sessa, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Caveolin-1 negatively regulates eNOS derived NO production and this has been mapped to several residues on Cav-1 including F92. Herein, we reasoned that endothelial expression of an F92ACav-1 transgene would let us decipher the mechanisms and relationships between caveolae structure and intracellular signaling. Objective This study was designed to separate caveolae formation from its downstream signaling effects. Methods and Results An endothelial-specific doxycycline-regulated mouse model for the expression of Cav-1-F92A was developed. Blood pressure by telemetry and nitric oxide bioavailability by electron paramagnetic resonance and phosphorylation of VASP were determined. Caveolae integrity in the presence of Cav-1-F92A was measured by stabilization of Cav-2, sucrose gradient and electron microscopy. Histological analysis of heart and lung, echocardiography and signaling were performed. Conclusions This study shows that mutant Cav-1-F92A forms caveolae structures similar to WT but leads to increases in NO bioavailability in vivo thereby demonstrating that caveolae formation and downstream signaling events occur through independent mechanisms. PMID:26602865

  12. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor stimulation in human colonic epithelial cells induces intracellular calcium oscillations and proliferation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rey, Osvaldo; Young, Steven H; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Moyer, Mary P; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    The extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) is increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions in the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. However, the signaling mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. Here we examined signaling pathways activated by the CaR, including Ca(2+) oscillations, in individual human colon epithelial cells. Single cell imaging of colon-derived cells expressing the CaR, including SW-480, HT-29, and NCM-460 cells, shows that stimulation of this receptor by addition of aromatic amino acids or by an elevation of the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration promoted striking intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to extracellular Ca(2+) were of sinusoidal pattern and mediated by the phospholipase C/diacylglycerol/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway as revealed by a biosensor that detects the accumulation of diacylglycerol in the plasma membrane. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to aromatic amino acids were of transient type, that is, Ca(2+) spikes that returned to baseline levels, and required an intact actin cytoskeleton, a functional Rho, Filamin A and the ion channel TRPC1. Further analysis showed that re-expression and stimulation of the CaR in human epithelial cells derived from normal colon and from colorectal adenocarcinoma inhibits their proliferation. This inhibition was associated with the activation of the signaling pathway that mediates the generation of sinusoidal, but not transient, intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. Thus, these results indicate that the CaR can function in two signaling modes in human colonic epithelial cells offering a potential link between gastrointestinal responses and food/nutrients uptake and metabolism.

  13. Imaging atrial arrhythmic intracellular calcium in intact heart

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenjun; Santulli, Gaetano; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Melanie; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ signaling have been proposed to play an essential role in the pathophysiology of atrial arrhythmias. However, a direct observation of intracellular Ca2+ in atrial myocytes during atrial arrhythmias is lacking. Here, we have developed an ex vivo model of simultaneous Ca2+ imaging and electrocardiographic recording in cardiac atria. Using this system we were able to record atrial arrhythmic intracellular Ca2+ activities. Our results indicate that atrial arrhythmias can be tightly linked to intracellular Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ alternans. Moreover, we applied this strategy to analyze Ca2+ signals in the hearts of WT and knock-in mice harboring a ‘leaky’ type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2-R2474S). We showed that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ leak increases the susceptibility to Ca2+ alternans and Ca2+ waves increasing the incidence of atrial arrhythmias. Reduction of SR Ca2+ leak via RyR2 by acute treatment with S107 reduced both Ca2+ alternans and Ca2+ waves, and prevented atrial arrhythmias. PMID:24041536

  14. Imaging atrial arrhythmic intracellular calcium in intact heart.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjun; Santulli, Gaetano; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Melanie; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R

    2013-11-01

    Abnormalities in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling have been proposed to play an essential role in the pathophysiology of atrial arrhythmias. However, a direct observation of intracellular Ca(2+) in atrial myocytes during atrial arrhythmias is lacking. Here, we have developed an ex vivo model of simultaneous Ca(2+) imaging and electrocardiographic recording in cardiac atria. Using this system we were able to record atrial arrhythmic intracellular Ca(2+) activities. Our results indicate that atrial arrhythmias can be tightly linked to intracellular Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+) alternans. Moreover, we applied this strategy to analyze Ca(2+) signals in the hearts of WT and knock-in mice harboring a 'leaky' type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2-R2474S). We showed that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) leak increases the susceptibility to Ca(2+) alternans and Ca(2+) waves increasing the incidence of atrial arrhythmias. Reduction of SR Ca(2+) leak via RyR2 by acute treatment with S107 reduced both Ca(2+) alternans and Ca(2+) waves, and prevented atrial arrhythmias.

  15. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  16. Regulation of PKC Mediated Signaling by Calcium during Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  17. Another dimension to calcium signaling: a look at extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2005-03-01

    Cell biologists know the calcium ion best as a vital intracellular second messenger that governs countless cellular functions. However, the recent identification of cell-surface detectors for extracellular Ca(2+) has prompted consideration of whether Ca(2+) also functions as a signaling molecule in the extracellular milieu. The cast of Ca(2+) sensors includes the well-characterized extracellular-Ca(2+)-sensing receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor originally isolated from the parathyroid gland. In addition, other receptors, channels and membrane proteins, such as gap junction hemichannels, metabotropic glutamate receptors, HERG K(+) channels and the receptor Notch, are all sensitive to external [Ca(2+)] fluctuations. A recently cloned Ca(2+) sensor (CAS) in Arabidopsis extends this concept to the plant kingdom. Emerging evidence indicates that [Ca(2+)] in the local microenvironment outside the cell undergoes alterations potentially sufficient to exert biological actions through these sensor proteins. The extracellular space might therefore constitute a much more dynamic Ca(2+) signaling compartment than previously appreciated.

  18. Tumour suppressors hamartin and tuberin: intracellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Krymskaya, Vera P

    2003-08-01

    Tumour suppressors hamartin and tuberin, encoded by tuberous sclerosis complex 1(TSC1) and TSC2 genes, respectively, are critical regulators of cell growth and proliferation. Mutations in TSC1 and TSC2 genes are the cause of an autosomal dominant disorder known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Another genetic disorder, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), is also associated with mutations in the TSC2 gene. Hamartin and tuberin control cell growth by negatively regulating S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), potentially through their upstream modulator mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Growth factors and insulin promote Akt/PKB-dependent phosphorylation of tuberin, which in turn, releases S6K1 from negative regulation by tuberin and results in the activation of S6K1. Although much has been written regarding the molecular genetics of TSC and LAM, which is associated with either the loss of or mutation in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes, few reviews have addressed the intracellular signalling pathways regulated by hamartin and tuberin. The current review will fill the gap in our understanding of their role in cellular signalling networks, and by improving this understanding, an integrated picture regarding the normal function of tuberin and hamartin is beginning to emerge.

  19. Towards the Physics of Calcium Signalling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Martins, Teresa; Evans, Matthew J.; Woolfenden, Hugh C.; Morris, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is an abundant element with a wide variety of important roles within cells. Calcium ions are inter- and intra-cellular messengers that are involved in numerous signalling pathways. Fluctuating compartment-specific calcium ion concentrations can lead to localised and even plant-wide oscillations that can regulate downstream events. Understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these complex patterns that vary both in space and time can be challenging, even in cases for which individual components have been identified. Taking a systems biology approach, mathematical and computational techniques can be employed to produce models that recapitulate experimental observations and capture our current understanding of the system. Useful models make novel predictions that can be investigated and falsified experimentally. This review brings together recent work on the modelling of calcium signalling in plants, from the scale of ion channels through to plant-wide responses to external stimuli. Some in silico results that have informed later experiments are highlighted. PMID:27137393

  20. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca2+]i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca2+]i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) when the external calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca2+]i. We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. PMID:27980039

  1. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  2. Localization of intracellular calcium release in cells injured by venom from the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) and dependence of calcium mobilization on G-protein activation.

    PubMed

    Rivers, David B; Crawley, Timothy; Bauser, Holly

    2005-02-01

    Venom from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis induces cellular injury that appears to involve the release of intracellular calcium stores via the activation of phospholipase C, and culminates in oncotic death. A linkage between release of intracellular Ca2+ and oncosis has not been clearly established and was the focus of this study. When BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells were treated with suramin, an uncoupler of G-proteins, venom-induced swelling and oncotic death were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner for at least 24 h. Suramin also blocked increases in free cytosolic [Ca2+], arguing that venom induces calcium mobilization through G-protein signaling pathways. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was predicted to be the source of intracellular calcium release, but labeling with the fluorescent probe ER-tracker revealed no indication of organelle swelling or loss of membrane integrity as would be expected if the Ca(2+)-ATPase pump was disabled by crude venom. Incubation of cell monolayers with calmodulin or nitrendipine, modulators of ER calcium release channels, neither attenuated nor augmented the effects of wasp venom. These results suggest that wasp venom stimulates calcium release from ER compartments distinct from RyRs, L-type Ca2+ channels, and the Ca(2+)-ATPase pump, or calcium is released from some other intracellular store. A reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential delta psi(m) appeared to precede a rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ as evidenced by fluorescent microscopy using the calcium-sensitive probe fluo-4 AM. This argues that the initial insult to the cell resulting from venom elicits a rapid loss of (delta psi(m)), followed by unregulated calcium efflux from mitochondria into the cytosol. Mobilization of calcium in this fashion could stimulate cAMP formation, and subsequently promote calcium release from NAADP-sensitive stores.

  3. Increased intracellular free calcium and sensitivity to angiotensin II in platelets of preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Oeney, T; Hauck, U; Distler, A; Philipp, T

    1989-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by a generalized vasoconstriction and increased vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II. Intracellular free calcium, implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction, has been found to be elevated in platelets of other hypertensive disorders. We therefore measured intracellular free calcium concentrations by using the fluorescent probe quin-2 in platelets of six patients with preeclampsia and compared them to measurements in ten normotensive pregnant women and ten age-matched nonpregnant women. Intracellular free calcium was also determined in the preeclamptic women after delivery. We found that intracellular free calcium was slightly elevated in normal pregnancy (102 +/- 13 nmol/L v 87 +/- 17 nmol/L) but was markedly increased in preeclampsia (138 +/- 13 nmol/L, P less than .05). This increase disappeared six weeks after delivery (84 + 10 nmol/L, P less than .01). To investigate whether the increased intracellular free calcium was related to angiotensin II, the platelets were exposed to thrombin and angiotensin II in vitro. Exposure to thrombin and angiotensin II caused a dose-dependent increase in intracellular free calcium. The intracellular response to thrombin was not significantly different in the three groups. However, stimulation with angiotensin II revealed an increased response in intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia (P less than .05) that disappeared after delivery. Our findings show a sustained increase in platelet intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia and suggest a functional alteration of the angiotensin II receptor in this disease.

  4. The use of size-defined DNA-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles to minimise intracellular calcium disturbance during transfection.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sebastian; Kovtun, Anna; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Epple, Matthias; Heumann, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based transfection methods are frequently used to transfer DNA into living cells. However, it has so far not been studied in detail to what extend the different transfection methods lead to a net calcium uptake. Upon subsequent resolution of the calcium phosphate, intracellular free ionic calcium-surges could result, inducing as side effect various physiological responses that may finally result in cell death. Here we investigated the overall calcium uptake by the human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 during the standard calcium phosphate transfection method and also during transfection with custom-made calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles by isotope labelling with (45)calcium. (45)Calcium uptake was strongly increased after 7h of standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if the transfection was performed with calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Time lapse imaging microscopy using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2 revealed large transient increases of the intracellular free calcium level during the standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if calcium phosphate nanoparticles were used. Consistently, the viability of cells transfected by calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles was not changed, in remarkable contrast to the standard method where considerable cell death occurred.

  5. Design and mechanistic insight into ultrafast calcium indicators for monitoring intracellular calcium dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Podor, Borbala; Fine, Alan; Török, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-based genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicators (GCaMP-s) are powerful tools of imaging calcium dynamics from cells to freely moving animals. High affinity indicators with slow kinetics however distort the temporal profile of calcium transients. Here we report the development of reduced affinity ultrafast variants of GCaMP6s and GCaMP6f. We hypothesized that GCaMP-s have a common kinetic mechanism with a rate-limiting process in the interaction of the RS20 peptide and calcium-calmodulin. Therefore we targeted specific residues in the binding interface by rational design generating improved indicators with GCaMP6fu displaying fluorescence rise and decay times (t1/2) of 1 and 3 ms (37 °C) in vitro, 9 and 22-fold faster than GCaMP6f respectively. In HEK293T cells, GCaMP6fu revealed a 4-fold faster decay of ATP-evoked intracellular calcium transients than GCaMP6f. Stimulation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with five action potentials fired at 100 Hz resulted in a single dendritic calcium transient with a 2-fold faster rise and 7-fold faster decay time (t1/2 of 40 ms) than GCaMP6f, indicating that tracking high frequency action potentials may be limited by calcium dynamics. We propose that the design strategy used for generating GCaMP6fu is applicable for the acceleration of the response kinetics of GCaMP-type calcium indicators. PMID:27922063

  6. Plant organellar calcium signalling: an emerging field

    PubMed Central

    Stael, Simon; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mair, Andrea; Mehlmer, Norbert; Vothknecht, Ute C.; Teige, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the established and emerging roles that organelles play in calcium signalling. The function of calcium as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks is well documented in all eukaryotic organisms, but so far existing reviews have hardly addressed the role of organelles in calcium signalling, except for the nucleus. Therefore, a brief overview on the main calcium stores in plants—the vacuole, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the apoplast—is provided and knowledge on the regulation of calcium concentrations in different cellular compartments is summarized. The main focus of the review will be the calcium handling properties of chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Recently, it became clear that these organelles not only undergo calcium regulation themselves, but are able to influence the Ca2+ signalling pathways of the cytoplasm and the entire cell. Furthermore, the relevance of recent discoveries in the animal field for the regulation of organellar calcium signals will be discussed and conclusions will be drawn regarding potential homologous mechanisms in plant cells. Finally, a short overview on bacterial calcium signalling is included to provide some ideas on the question where this typically eukaryotic signalling mechanism could have originated from during evolution. PMID:22200666

  7. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    PubMed

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  8. Origins of intracellular calcium mobilization evoked by infrared laser stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsovsky, Cory A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2015-03-01

    Cellular delivery of pulsed IR laser energy has been shown to stimulate action potentials in neurons. The mechanism for this stimulation is not completely understood. Certain hypotheses suggest the rise in temperature from IR exposure could activate temperature- or pressure-sensitive channels, or create pores in the cellular outer membrane. Studies using intensity-based Ca2+-responsive dyes show changes in Ca2+ levels after various IR stimulation parameters; however, determination of the origin of this signal proved difficult. An influx of larger, typically plasma-membrane-impermeant ions has been demonstrated, which suggests that Ca2+ may originate from the external solution. However, activation of intracellular signaling pathways, possibly indicating a more complex role of increasing Ca2+ concentration, has also been shown. By usingCa2+ sensitive dye Fura-2 and a high-speed ratiometric imaging system that rapidly alternates the excitation wavelengths, we have quantified the Ca2+ mobilization in terms of influx from the external solution and efflux from intracellular organelles. CHO-K1 cells, which lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and NG-108 neuroblastoma cells, which do not produce action potentials in an early undifferentiated state, are used to determine the origin of the Ca2+ signals and investigate the role these mechanisms may play in IR neural stimulation.

  9. Abortive and Propagating Intracellular Calcium Waves: Analysis from a Hybrid Model

    PubMed Central

    Guisoni, Nara; Ferrero, Paola; Layana, Carla; Diambra, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The functional properties of inositol(1,4,5)-triphosphate (IP3) receptors allow a variety of intracellular Ca2+ phenomena. In this way, global phenomena, such as propagating and abortive Ca2+ waves, as well as local events such as puffs, have been observed. Several experimental studies suggest that many features of global phenomena (e.g., frequency, amplitude, speed wave) depend on the interplay of biophysical processes such as diffusion, buffering, efflux and influx rates, which in turn depend on parameters such as buffer concentration, Ca2+ pump density, cytosolic IP3 level, and intercluster distance. Besides, it is known that cells are able to modify some of these parameters in order to regulate the Ca2+ signaling. By using a hybrid model, we analyzed different features of the hierarchy of calcium events as a function of two relevant parameters for the calcium signaling, the intercluster distance and the pump strength or intensity. In the space spanned by these two parameters, we found two modes of calcium dynamics, one dominated by abortive calcium waves and the other by propagating waves. Smaller distances between the release sites promote propagating calcium waves, while the increase of the efflux rate makes the transition from propagating to abortive waves occur at lower values of intercluster distance. We determined the frontier between these two modes, in the parameter space defined by the intercluster distance and the pump strength. Furthermore, we found that the velocity of simulated calcium waves accomplishes Luther’s law, and that an effective rate constant for autocatalytic calcium production decays linearly with both the intercluster distance and the pump strength. PMID:25602295

  10. Abortive and propagating intracellular calcium waves: analysis from a hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara; Ferrero, Paola; Layana, Carla; Diambra, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The functional properties of inositol(1,4,5)-triphosphate (IP3) receptors allow a variety of intracellular Ca(2+) phenomena. In this way, global phenomena, such as propagating and abortive Ca(2+) waves, as well as local events such as puffs, have been observed. Several experimental studies suggest that many features of global phenomena (e.g., frequency, amplitude, speed wave) depend on the interplay of biophysical processes such as diffusion, buffering, efflux and influx rates, which in turn depend on parameters such as buffer concentration, Ca(2+) pump density, cytosolic IP3 level, and intercluster distance. Besides, it is known that cells are able to modify some of these parameters in order to regulate the Ca(2+) signaling. By using a hybrid model, we analyzed different features of the hierarchy of calcium events as a function of two relevant parameters for the calcium signaling, the intercluster distance and the pump strength or intensity. In the space spanned by these two parameters, we found two modes of calcium dynamics, one dominated by abortive calcium waves and the other by propagating waves. Smaller distances between the release sites promote propagating calcium waves, while the increase of the efflux rate makes the transition from propagating to abortive waves occur at lower values of intercluster distance. We determined the frontier between these two modes, in the parameter space defined by the intercluster distance and the pump strength. Furthermore, we found that the velocity of simulated calcium waves accomplishes Luther's law, and that an effective rate constant for autocatalytic calcium production decays linearly with both the intercluster distance and the pump strength.

  11. The influence of extracellular and intracellular calcium on the secretion of renin

    PubMed Central

    Atchison, Douglas K.; Beierwaltes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in plasma, extracellular and intracellular calcium can affect renin secretion from the renal juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Elevated intracellular calcium directly inhibits renin release from JG cells by decreasing the dominant second messenger intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) via actions on calcium-inhibitable adenylyl cyclases and calcium-activated phosphodiesterases. Increased extracellular calcium also directly inhibits renin release by stimulating the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on JG cells, resulting in parallel changes in the intracellular environment and decreasing intracellular cAMP. In vivo, acutely elevated plasma calcium inhibits plasma renin activity (PRA) via parathyroid hormone-mediated elevations in renal cortical interstitial calcium that stimulate the JG cell CaSR. However, chronically elevated plasma calcium or CaSR activation may actually stimulate PRA. This elevation in PRA may be a compensatory mechanism resulting from calcium-mediated polyuria. Thus, changing the extracellular calcium in vitro or in vivo results in inversely related acute changes in cAMP, and therefore renin release, but chronic changes in calcium may result in more complex interactions dependent upon the duration of changes and the integration of the body’s response to these changes. PMID:22538344

  12. Location matters: somatic and dendritic SK channels answer to distinct calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Stephanie; Thanawala, Monica S

    2015-07-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) couple neuronal activity to diverse intracellular signals with exquisite spatiotemporal specificity. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiology, Jones and Stuart (J Neurosci 33: 19396-19405, 2013) examined the intimate relationship between distinct types of VDCCs and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels that contribute to the compartmentalized control of excitability in the soma and dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons. Here we discuss the importance of calcium domains for signal specificity, explore the possible functions and mechanisms for local control of SK channels, and highlight technical considerations for the optical detection of calcium signals.

  13. A physiologic signaling role for the γ-secretase-derived intracellular fragment of APP

    PubMed Central

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Murphy, M. Paul; Mead, Tonya R.; Akbari, Yama; Sugarman, Michael C.; Jannatipour, Mehrdad; Anliker, Brigitte; Müller, Ulrike; Saftig, Paul; De Strooper, Bart; Wolfe, Michael S.; Golde, Todd E.; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2002-01-01

    Presenilins mediate an unusual intramembranous proteolytic activity known as γ-secretase, two substrates of which are the Notch receptor (Notch) and the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). γ-Secretase-mediated cleavage of APP, like that of Notch, yields an intracellular fragment [APP intracellular domain (AICD)] that forms a transcriptively active complex. We now demonstrate a functional role for AICD in regulating phosphoinositide-mediated calcium signaling. Genetic ablation of the presenilins or pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase activity (and thereby AICD production) attenuated calcium signaling in a dose-dependent and reversible manner through a mechanism involving the modulation of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Cells lacking APP (and hence AICD) exhibited similar calcium signaling deficits, and—notably—these disturbances could be reversed by transfection with APP constructs containing an intact AICD, but not by constructs lacking this domain. Our findings indicate that the AICD regulates phosphoinositide-mediated calcium signaling through a γ-secretase-dependent signaling pathway, suggesting that the intramembranous proteolysis of APP may play a signaling role analogous to that of Notch. PMID:11917117

  14. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  15. Measurement of intracellular calcium gradients in single living cells using optical sectioning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao V.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    1992-06-01

    Intracellular free calcium has been recognized as a regulator of many cellular processes and plays a key role in mediating actions of many drugs. To elucidate subcellular spatial calcium changes throughout the cell in three dimensions (3-D), optical sectioning microscopy was applied using digital imaging coupled fluorescence microscopy. The cell was loaded with a fluorescent indicator, fura-2, and a stack of sectional fluorescent images were acquired, digitized and finally stored on-line for post image analysis. Each sectional image was then deconvolved, to remove contaminating light signals from adjacent planes, using the Nearest Neighboring Deconvolution Algorithm (NNDA) and the overall imaging system's empirical Point Spread Function (PSF) that is measured with a 0.25 micrometers fluorescent bead. Using this technique, we measured that the addition of growth factors caused a 2 - 3 fold increase (1) in nuclear calcium compared to cytosolic calcium in blood cells and (2) in both nuclear and cytosolic calcium in liver cells. Such spatial information, which is important in understanding subcellular processes, would not be possible to measure with other methods.

  16. Intracellular calcium movements of boar spermatozoa during 'in vitro' capacitation and subsequent acrosome exocytosis follow a multiple-storage place, extracellular calcium-dependent model.

    PubMed

    Yeste, M; Fernández-Novell, J M; Ramió-Lluch, L; Estrada, E; Rocha, L G; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Muiño-Blanco, T; Concha, I I; Ramírez, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J E

    2015-07-01

    This work analysed intracellular calcium stores of boar spermatozoa subjected to 'in vitro' capacitation (IVC) and subsequent progesterone-induced acrosome exocytosis (IVAE). Intracellular calcium was analysed through two calcium markers with different physico-chemical properties, Fluo-3 and Rhod-5N. Indicative parameters of IVC and IVAE were also evaluated. Fluo-3 was located at both the midpiece and the whole head. Rhod-5N was present at the sperm head. This distribution did not change in any of the assayed conditions. Induction of IVC was concomitant with an increase in both head and midpiece Ca(2+) signals. Additionally, while IVC induction was concurrent with a significant (p < 0.05) increase in sperm membrane permeability, no significant changes were observed in O2 consumption and ATP levels. Incubation of boar spermatozoa in the absence of calcium showed a loss of both Ca(2+) labellings concomitantly with the sperm's inability to achieve IVC. The absence of extracellular calcium also induced a severe decrease in the percentage of spermatozoa exhibiting high mitochondrial membrane potential (hMMP). The IVAE was accompanied by a fast increase in both Ca(2+) signalling in control spermatozoa. These peaks were either not detected or much lessened in the absence of calcium. Remarkably, Fluo-3 marking at the midpiece increased after progesterone addition to sperm cells incubated in a medium without Ca(2+) . The simultaneous addition of progesterone with the calcium chelant EGTA inhibited IVAE, and this was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the intensity of progesterone Ca(2+) -induced peak, O2 consumption and ATP levels. Our results suggest that boar spermatozoa present different calcium deposits with a dynamic equilibrium among them and with the extracellular environment. Additionally, the modulation role of the intracellular calcium in spermatozoa function seems to rely on its precise localization in boar spermatozoa.

  17. Chemokines, selectins and intracellular calcium flux: temporal and spatial cues for leukocyte arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Neha; Simon, Scott I.

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to acute sites of injury or infection requires spatial and temporal cues that fine tune precise sites of firm adhesion and guide migration to endothelial junctions where they undergo diapedesis to sites of insult. Many detailed studies on the location and gradient of chemokines such as IL-8 and other CXCR ligands reveal that their recognition shortly after selectin-mediated capture and rolling exerts acute effects on integrin activation and subsequent binding to their ligands on the endothelium, which directs firm adhesion, adhesion strengthening, and downstream migration. In this process, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling has been found to play an integral role in activating and mobilizing intracellular stores of calcium, GTPases such as Rap-1 and Rho and cytokeletal proteins such as Talin and F-actin to facilitate cell polarity and directional pseudopod formation. A critical question remaining is how intracellular Ca2+ flux from CRAC channels such as Orai1 synergizes with cytosolic stores to mediate a rapid flux which is critical to the onset of PMN arrest and polarization. Our review will highlight a specific role for calcium as a signaling messenger in activating focal clusters of integrins bound to the cytoskeleton which allows the cell to attain a migratory phenotype. The precise interplay between chemokines, selectins, and integrins binding under the ubiquitous presence of shear stress from blood flow provides an essential cooperative signaling mechanism for effective leukocyte recruitment. PMID:22787461

  18. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)/calcineurin signaling is a novel pathway regulating intracellular calcium accumulation which might be involved in ventricular arrhythmias in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongwei; Cai, Hui; Zhu, Haitao; Toque, Haroldo; Zhao, Na; Qiu, Chuan; Guan, Gongchang; Dang, Yonghui; Wang, Junkui

    2014-12-01

    We previously found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was involved in ventricular arrhythmias in diabetic cardiomyopathy. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible mechanism. In the in vivo study, diabetes cardiomyopathy (DCM) was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) injection. Hemodynamic and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) detections were used to evaluate cardiac functions; ECG was used to assess the vulnerability to arrhythmias by recording ventricular arrhythmia events (VAEs). In the in vitro study, high-glucose incubation was employed to mimic the diabetic environment of myocytes. Immunofluorescent staining was used to investigate the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) nuclear translocation and (FK506-binding protein 12.6) FKBP12.6 disassociation. [(3)H]-ryanodine binding assay was implemented to assess the channel activity of ryanodine receptor. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, activity of calcineurin was determined by colorimetric method, and western blotting was used to detect protein expression levels. In the in vivo study, we found that inhibition of both of ER stress and PERK activation decreased the VAEs in DCM rats, accompanied by reduced activity of calcineurin in myocardial tissue. In the in vitro study, in high-glucose incubated myocytes, the depletion of PERK reduced activity of calcineurin, decreased NFAT translocation and FKBP12.6 disassociation from ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2). Furthermore, PERK deletion also reduced RyR2 channel activity and consequently impaired intracellular calcium accumulation. We concluded that PERK/calcineurin-pathway was involved in intracellular calcium regulation in myocytes in diabetic heart, which might be the mechanism inducing arrhythmias in DCM.

  19. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  20. Hydrogen peroxide attenuates refilling of intracellular calcium store in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mi Na; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Se Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) oscillation is an initial event in digestive enzyme secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Reactive oxygen species are known to be associated with a variety of oxidative stress-induced cellular disorders including pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on intracellular Ca2+ accumulation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Perfusion of H2O2 at 300 µM resulted in additional elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels and termination of oscillatory Ca2+ signals induced by carbamylcholine (CCh) in the presence of normal extracellular Ca2+. Antioxidants, catalase or DTT, completely prevented H2O2-induced additional Ca2+ increase and termination of Ca2+ oscillation. In Ca2+-free medium, H2O2 still enhanced CCh-induced intracellular Ca2+ levels and thapsigargin (TG) mimicked H2O2-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase. Furthermore, H2O2-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels was abolished under sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase-inactivated condition by TG pretreatment with CCh. H2O2 at 300 µM failed to affect store-operated Ca2+ entry or Ca2+ extrusion through plasma membrane. Additionally, ruthenium red, a mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter blocker, failed to attenuate H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ elevation. These results provide evidence that excessive generation of H2O2 in pathological conditions could accumulate intracellular Ca2+ by attenuating refilling of internal Ca2+ stores rather than by inhibiting Ca2+ extrusion to extracellular fluid or enhancing Ca2+ mobilization from extracellular medium in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:28280417

  1. Detection and measurement of the intracellular calcium variation in follicular cells.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Navarro, Ana M; Terol-Villalobos, Iván R; Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde; Gonzalez-Barboza, José-Joel

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new method for measuring the variation of intracellular calcium in follicular cells. The proposal consists in two stages: (i) the detection of the cell's nuclei and (ii) the analysis of the fluorescence variations. The first stage is performed via watershed modified transformation, where the process of labeling is controlled. The detection process uses the contours of the cells as descriptors, where they are enhanced with a morphological filter that homogenizes the luminance variation of the image. In the second stage, the fluorescence variations are modeled as an exponential decreasing function, where the fluorescence variations are highly correlated with the changes of intracellular free Ca(2+). Additionally, it is introduced a new morphological called medium reconstruction process, which helps to enhance the data for the modeling process. This filter exploits the undermodeling and overmodeling properties of reconstruction operators, such that it preserves the structure of the original signal. Finally, an experimental process shows evidence of the capabilities of the proposal.

  2. Role of intracellular free calcium in killing Penicillium marneffei within human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) promote phagocyte antimicrobial responses. Here, we investigated macrophages stimulated by Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei). [Ca(2+)]c was determined in macrophages loaded with the fluorescent calcium probe Fura 2/AM as they were stimulated by P. marneffei. We found that P. marneffei induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in human macrophages. Further, increased [Ca(2+)]c with the ionophore A23187 promoted phagosomal acidification and maturation and reduced intracellular replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages, whereas decreased [Ca(2+)]c with the chelation MAPTAM decreased TNF-α production, inhibited phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular replication of P. marneffei. These data indicate that Ca(2+) signaling may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei within macrophages.

  3. Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is required for neurotrophin-induced potentiation in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Schuman, E M

    2000-03-24

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of neurotrophin function in adult synaptic plasticity. In an effort to characterize the intracellular signaling pathways that couple Trk receptor activation to the final physiological effects of neurotrophins, we have examined the role of intracellular calcium rises in neurotrophin-induced synaptic enhancement in hippocampal slices. Using pharmacological blockers to two different calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sources, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) stores, we show that the potentiating effects of neurotrophins in hippocampal slices are mediated by intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Although basal synaptic transmission between hippocampal CA3 and CA1 neurons was not affected by nifedipine or thapsigargin, both drugs significantly attenuated brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3-induced synaptic enhancement. The pharmacological blockade of Ca(2+) signaling is effective only during the initial period of neurotrophin-induced potentiation. These data suggest that the minimal requirements for inducing potentiation by neurotrophins involve a transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, via voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and/or intracellular Ca(2+) stores.

  4. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  5. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  6. An intracellular calcium store is present in Leishmania donovani glycosomes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shreedhara; Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Banerjee, Shouvik; Das, Banasri; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    A fourth intracellular Ca2+ pool in Leishmania donovani was identified by permeabilizing plasma membrane with digitonin. In Fura 2 loaded cells Ca2+ was released synergistically when mitochondrial function was blocked by antimycin and oligomycin. Vanadate did not have any effect if applied before incorporation of these mitochondrial poisons. However, the same inhibitor which inhibits Ca2+-ATPase activity of endoplasmic reticulum was able to release Ca2+ at a slow rate when added after antimycin and oligomycin. Alkalization of cytoplasmic pH allowed further release of Ca2+ essentially from the acidocalcisome. Purified glycosomes could mediate Ca2+ uptake mechanism in presence of vanadate whereas bafilomycin, a specific and potent inhibitor of vacuolar proton pump did not have any effect. Glycosomal Ca2+-ATPase activity was optimum at pH 7.5. The apparent Km for calciumin presence of vanadate was 12 nM. Taken together, it may be suggested that a vanadate-insensitive Ca2+-ATPase is present in the membrane of this microbody. Presence of glycosomal Ca2+ was further confirmed by imaging of Ca2+ activity in the Fura 2 loaded purified organelle using confocal laser. Results reveal that newly localized glycosomal calcium may essentially be an effective candidate to play a significant role in cellular function.

  7. Regulation of melatonin production and intracellular calcium concentrations in the trout pineal organ.

    PubMed

    Meissl, H; Kroeber, S; Yáñez, J; Korf, H W

    1996-12-01

    The present in vitro study correlates measurements of the melatonin production from trout pineal organs with those of the intracellular calcium concentration in pinealocytes. Melatonin production increases with decreasing irradiance and shows maximal values in darkness. Some pinealocytes exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations, although most of them have a stable basal calcium concentration. Diminishing extracellular calcium and enhancing magnesium reduces melatonin release in the light-and dark-adapted state. The application of Co2+ decreases melatonin secretion in the mesopic and scotopic range, reversibly blocks spontaneous calcium oscillations, reduces the basal intracellular calcium concentration in non-oscillating pinealocytes, and inhibits the KCl-induced rise in intracellular calcium. Application of glutamate, norepinephrine, isoproterenol, or dopamine has no significant effect on melatonin secretion. Norepinephrine does not influence the calcium concentration in any of the trout pinealocytes. Treatment with the GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol causes a slight reduction of melatonin release in the mesopic and scotopic range of illumination, without affecting intracellular calcium concentrations. Thus, Co2+ and low calcium/high magnesium buffer reduce melatonin release through an action on the calcium concentration in trout pinealocytes and not through a blockade of synaptic transmission. All the data show that the trout pineal organ synthesizes and releases melatonin in relation to the irradiance of the incident light and that neuronal inputs have a minor, if any, influence on melatonin synthesis.

  8. Polycystin-1 Mediates Mechanical Strain-Induced Osteoblastic Mechanoresponses via Potentiation of Intracellular Calcium and Akt/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Wen; Ma, Junqing; Pan, Yongchu; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Weibing

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical regulation of bone formation involves a complex biophysical process, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Polycystin-1 (PC1) is postulated to function as a mechanosensory molecule mediating mechanical signal transduction in renal epithelial cells. To investigate the involvement of PC1 in mechanical strain-induced signaling cascades controlling osteogenesis, PKD1 gene was stably silenced in osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 by using lentivirus-mediated shRNA technology. Here, our findings showed that mechanical tensile strain sufficiently enhanced osteogenic gene expressions and osteoblastic proliferation. However, PC1 deficiency resulted in the loss of the ability to sense external mechanical stimuli thereby promoting osteoblastic osteogenesis and proliferation. The signal pathways implicated in this process were intracellular calcium and Akt/β-catenin pathway. The basal levels of intracellular calcium, phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β and nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin were significantly attenuated in PC1 deficient osteoblasts. In addition, PC1 deficiency impaired mechanical strain-induced potentiation of intracellular calcium, and activation of Akt-dependent and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, which was able to be partially reversed by calcium ionophore A23187 treatment. Furthermore, applications of LiCl or A23187 in PC1 deficient osteoblasts could promote osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation under mechanical strain conditions. Therefore, our results demonstrated that osteoblasts require mechanosensory molecule PC1 to adapt to external mechanical tensile strain thereby inducing osteoblastic mechanoresponse, partially through the potentiation of intracellular calcium and downstream Akt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:24618832

  9. The effect of methylprednisolone on intracellular calcium of normal and dystrophic human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vandebrouck, C; Imbert, N; Duport, G; Cognard, C; Raymond, G

    1999-07-09

    Clinical trials have shown that a glucocorticoid, the methyiprednisolone (PDN), has a beneficial effect on muscle strength and function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. The aim of this study was to test if the effect of PDN could be mediated via a possible action on intracellular calcium. The intracellular calcium activity, at rest and during calcium mobilizing drug superfusion protocols was recorded in normal and dystrophic human cocultured muscle cells. PDN (10 microM) pretreatment induced an elevation of the resting calcium concentration of 51, 34 and 38% in proliferating normal myoblasts, DMD myoblasts and DMD myotubes, respectively, while normal myotubes resting [Ca2+]i was not altered.

  10. Peptidoglycan Induces the Production of Interleukin-8 via Calcium Signaling in Human Gingival Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Son, Aran; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of periodontal disease is multifactorial. Exogenous stimuli such as bacterial pathogens can interact with toll-like receptors to activate intracellular calcium signaling in gingival epithelium and other tissues. The triggering of calcium signaling induces the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-8 as part of the inflammatory response; however, the exact mechanism of calcium signaling induced by bacterial toxins when gingival epithelial cells are exposed to pathogens is unclear. Here, we investigate calcium signaling induced by bacteria and expression of inflammatory cytokines in human gingival epithelial cells. We found that peptidoglycan, a constituent of gram-positive bacteria and an agonist of toll-like receptor 2, increases intracellular calcium in a concentration-dependent manner. Peptidoglycan-induced calcium signaling was abolished by treatment with blockers of phospholipase C (U73122), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, indicating the release of calcium from intracellular calcium stores. Peptidoglycan-mediated interleukin-8 expression was blocked by U73122 and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester). Moreover, interleukin-8 expression was induced by thapsigargin, a selective inhibitor of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, when thapsigargin was treated alone or co-treated with peptidoglycan. These results suggest that the gram-positive bacterial toxin peptidoglycan induces calcium signaling via the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway, and that increased interleukin-8 expression is mediated by intracellular calcium levels in human gingival epithelial cells. PMID:25605997

  11. Increased intracellular calcium activates serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) through a calmodulin-calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase pathway in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Seiji; Okayama, Naotsuka; Shimizu, Manabu; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-04-04

    SGK1 is one of the protein-serine/threonine kinases that is activated by insulin in a PI3K-dependent manner. Although SGK1 mediates a variety of biological activities, the mechanisms regulating its activity remain unclear. In this study, we examined the potential roles of calcium signaling in the activation of SGK1. Treatment of CHO-IR cells with a cell-permeable calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, abolished the insulin-induced activation of SGK1. Increasing intracellular calcium concentration by treating cells with thapsigargin or ionomycin induced a 6-8 fold increase in SGK1 activation. This was not affected by a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, but was completely inhibited by the calmodulin inhibitors, W 7 and W 5. Co-transfection of CHO cells with FLAG-SGK1 and CaMKK revealed the direct association of CaMKK with SGK1. These results suggest a calcium-triggered signaling cascade in which an increase in intracellular calcium concentration directly stimulates SGK1 through CaMKK.

  12. Relationship of intracellular calcium and oxygen radicals to Cisplatin-related renal cell injury.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Nakao, Takafumi; Kunimura, Naoshi; Kohda, Yuka; Gemba, Munekazu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium in nephrotoxicity related to an antitumor agent, cisplatin. In this study, we employed cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK1). Cisplatin at 500 microM significantly increased the production of ROS 5 h and caused cell injury. This agent significantly increased the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner 1 h or more after exposure. DPPD (N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine), an antioxidant, inhibited a cisplatin-related increase in active oxygen production and cell injury but did not inhibit an early increase in the [Ca2+]i level. An intracellular calcium-chelating compound BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl) ester) inhibited an increase in ROS production and cell injury induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, BAPTA-AM suppressed the rise of [Ca2+]i level in 1 h after exposure; however, an extracellular calcium chelator EGTA and a calcium antagonist nicardipine did not inhibit the rise in [Ca2+]i level in the early phase. An NADPH oxidase inhibitor inhibited a cisplatin-related increase in ROS production and cell disorder. These results suggest that cisplatin-related calcium release from the site of intracellular calcium storage in the early phase causes oxidative stress in renal tubular epithelial cells. Cisplatin may increase the intracellular production of ROS via NADPH oxidase.

  13. Involvement of intracellular calcium stores during oxygen/glucose deprivation in striatal large aspiny interneurons.

    PubMed

    Pisani, A; Bonsi, P; Centonze, D; Giacomini, P; Calabresi, P

    2000-05-01

    Striatal large aspiny interneurons were recorded from a slice preparation using a combined electrophysiologic and microfluorometric approach. The role of intracellular Ca2+ stores was analyzed during combined oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Before addressing the role of the stores during energy deprivation, the authors investigated their function under physiologic conditions. Trains of depolarizing current pulses caused bursts of action potentials coupled to transient increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (30 micromol/L), a selective inhibitor of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps, or when ryanodine receptors were directly blocked with ryanodine (20 [micromol/L), the [Ca2+]i transients were progressively smaller in amplitude, suggesting that [Ca2+]i released from intracellular stores helps to maintain a critical level of [Ca2+]i during physiologic firing activity. As the authors have recently reported, brief exposure to combined OGD induced a membrane hyperpolarization coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. In the presence of cyclopiazonic acid or ryanodine, the hyperpolarization and the rise in [Ca2+]i induced by OGD were consistently reduced. These data support the hypothesis that Ca2+ release from ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ pools is involved not only in the potentiation of the Ca2+ signals resulting from cell depolarization, but also in the amplification of the [Ca2+]i rise and of the concurrent membrane hyperpolarization observed in course of OGD in striatal large aspiny interneurons.

  14. Role of intracellular membranes in transcellular calcium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.R.; Young, L.B.; Wade, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Models can be tested through the use of various agents that affect different portions of the overall mechanism. The calcium ionophore A23187 can be used to increase the rate of calcium entry through the brush border, effectively removing diffusion through the brush border as a rate-limiting step. It would be expected that treatment with A23187 would thus increase the overall rate of calcium transcellular transport. In contrast, chlorpromazine has been shown to inhibit in vitro calcium uptake by Golgi membranes. Consequently if the model is correct, treatment with A23187 and chlorpromazine would tend to raise the cytoplasmic calcium concentration, since the Golgi membrane uptake mechanism would be inhibited, and calcium would accumulate in mitochondria with little or no increase in transcellular transport. Finally, Golgi membranes have been shown to release calcium in response to ATP. Sodium azide inhibits ATP generation and calcium uptake by mitochondria. Thus, treatment with A23187 and soidum azide should cause accumulation of calcium in the Golgi membranes, if the proposed model is correct. The purpose of this investigation was to use coordinated electron probe x-ray microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy to test the response of the intestinal absorptive cells to the agents mentioned.

  15. Markov chain models of coupled intracellular calcium channels: Kronecker structured representations and benchmark stationary distribution calculations.

    PubMed

    Deremigio, Hilary; Kemper, Peter; Lamar, M Drew; Smith, Gregory D

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of stochastic calcium excitability (i.e., calcium puffs and sparks). We present a Kronecker structured representation for calcium release site models and perform benchmark stationary distribution calculations using numerical iterative solution techniques that leverage this structure. In this context we find multi-level methods and certain preconditioned projection methods superior to simple Gauss-Seidel type iterations. Response measures such as the number of channels in a particular state converge more quickly using these numerical iterative methods than occupation measures calculated via Monte Carlo simulation.

  16. Role of intracellular calcium handling in force-interval relationships of human ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Gwathmey, J K; Slawsky, M T; Hajjar, R J; Briggs, G M; Morgan, J P

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were performed in human working myocardium to investigate the relationship of intracellular calcium handling and availability to alterations in the strength of contraction produced by changes in stimulation rate and pattern. Both control and myopathic muscles exhibited potentiation of peak isometric force during the postextrasystolic contraction which was associated with an increase in the peak intracellular calcium transient. Frequency-related force potentiation was attenuated in myopathic muscles compared to controls. This occurred despite an increase in resting intracellular calcium and in the peak amplitude of the calcium transient as detected with aequorin. Therefore, abnormalities in contractile function of myopathic muscles during frequency-related force potentiation are not due to decreased availability of intracellular calcium, but more likely reflect differences in myofibrillar calcium responsiveness. Sarcolemmal calcium influx may also contribute to frequency-related changes in contractile force in myopathic muscles as suggested by a decrease in action potential duration with increasing stimulation frequency which is associated with fluctuations in peak calcium transient amplitude. PMID:2332508

  17. Force-dependent calcium signaling and its pathway of human neutrophils on P-selectin in flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Ling, Yingchen; Lin, Jiangguo; Du, Xin; Fang, Ying; Wu, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    P-selectin engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) causes circulating leukocytes to roll on and adhere to the vascular surface, and mediates intracellular calcium flux, a key but unclear event for subsequent arresting firmly at and migrating into the infection or injured tissue. Using a parallel plate flow chamber technique and intracellular calcium ion detector (Fluo-4 AM), the intracellular calcium flux of firmly adhered neutrophils on immobilized P-selectin in the absence of chemokines at various wall shear stresses was investigated here in real time by fluorescence microscopy. The results demonstrated that P-selectin engagement of PSGL-1 induced the intracellular calcium flux of firmly adhered neutrophils in flow, increasing P-selectin concentration enhanced cellular calcium signaling, and, force triggered, enhanced and quickened the cytoplasmic calcium bursting of neutrophils on immobilized P-selectin. This P-selectin-induced calcium signaling should come from intracellular calcium release rather than extracellular calcium influx, and be along the mechano-chemical signal pathway involving the cytoskeleton, moesin and Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). These results provide a novel insight into the mechano-chemical regulation mechanism for P-selectin-induced calcium signaling of neutrophils in flow.

  18. Danger signals, inflammasomes, and the intricate intracellular lives of chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Matthew A; Abdul-Sater, Ali; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ojcius, David M

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens, and as such are sensitive to alterations in the cellular physiology of their hosts. Chlamydial infections often cause pathologic consequences due to prolonged localized inflammation. Considerable advances have been made in the last few years regarding our understanding of how two key inflammation-associated signaling pathways influence the biology of Chlamydia infections: inflammation regulating purinergic signaling pathways significantly impact intracellular chlamydial development, and inflammasome activation modulates both chlamydial growth and infection mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We review here elements of both pathways, presenting the latest developments contributing to our understanding of how chlamydial infections are influenced by inflammasomes and purinergic signaling.

  19. Impact of Calcium Signaling during Infection of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells. PMID:25464500

  20. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Control of Local Intracellular Calcium Concentration with Dynamic-Clamp Controlled 2-Photon Uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Idoux, Erwin; Mertz, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The variations of the intracellular concentration of calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) are at the heart of intracellular signaling, and their imaging is therefore of enormous interest. However, passive [Ca2+]i imaging provides no control over these variations, meaning that a full exploration of the functional consequences of [Ca2+]i changes is difficult to attain. The tools designed so far to modify [Ca2+]i, even qualitatively, suffer drawbacks that undermine their widespread use. Here, we describe an electro-optical technique to quantitatively set [Ca2+]i, in real time and with sub-cellular resolution, using two-photon Ca2+ uncaging and dynamic-clamp. We experimentally demonstrate, on neurons from acute olfactory bulb slices of Long Evans rats, various capabilities of this technique previously difficult to achieve, such as the independent control of the membrane potential and [Ca2+]i variations, the functional knocking-in of user-defined virtual voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and the standardization of [Ca2+]i patterns across different cells. Our goal is to lay the groundwork for this technique and establish it as a new and versatile tool for the study of cell signaling. PMID:22216105

  2. Modulation of iron metabolism by iron chelation regulates intracellular calcium and increases sensitivity to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Yalcintepe, Leman; Halis, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Increased intracellular iron levels can both promote cell proliferation and death, as such; iron has a “two-sided effect” in the delicate balance of human health. Though the role of iron in the development of cancer remains unclear, investigations of iron chelators as anti-tumor agents have revealed promising results. Here, we investigated the influence of iron and desferrioxamine (DFO), the iron chelating agent on intracellular calcium in a human leukemia cell line, K562. Iron uptake is associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Therefore, we showed that iron also caused dose-dependent ROS generation in K562 cells. The measurement of intracellular calcium was determined using Furo-2 with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The iron delivery process to the cytoplasmic iron pool was examined by monitoring the fluorescence of cells loaded with calcein-acetoxymethyl. Our data showed that iron increased intracellular calcium, and this response was 8 times higher when cells were incubated with DFO. K562 cells with DFO caused a 3.5 times increase of intracellular calcium in the presence of doxorubicin (DOX). In conclusion, DFO induces intracellular calcium and increases their sensitivity to DOX, a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26773173

  3. TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced iNOS expression increased by prostaglandin E2 in rat primary astrocytes via EP2-evoked cAMP/PKA and intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Han-Yun; Mak, Oi-Tong; Yang, Chung-Shi; Liu, Yu-Peng; Fang, Kuan-Ming; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2007-01-15

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glia in the central nervous system (CNS), produce a large amount of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in response to proinflammatory mediators after CNS injury. However, it is unclear whether PGE(2) has a regulatory role in astrocytic activity under the inflamed condition. In the present work, we showed that PGE(2) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (T/I) in astrocytes. Pharmacological and RNA interference approaches further indicated the involvement of the receptor EP2 in PGE(2)-induced iNOS upregulation in T/I-treated astrocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and gel mobility shift assays also demonstrated that PGE(2) increased iNOS transcription through EP2-induced cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Consistently, the effect of EP2 was significantly attenuated by the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 and partially suppressed by the inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which serves as one of the downstream components of the PKA-dependent pathway. Interestingly, EP2-mediated PKA signaling appeared to increase intracellular Ca(2+) release through inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor activation, which might in turn stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation to promote iNOS production in T/I-primed astrocytes. By analyzing the expression of astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we found that PGE(2) alone only triggered the EP2-induced cAMP/PKA/p38MAPK signaling pathway in astrocytes. Collectively, PGE(2) may enhance T/I-induced astrocytic activation by augmenting iNOS/NO production through EP2-mediated cross-talk between cAMP/PKA and IP3/Ca(2+) signaling pathways.

  4. Continuous Fluorescence Imaging of Intracellular Calcium by Use of Ion-Selective Nanospheres with Adjustable Spectra.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenye; Qin, Yu; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-08-10

    Continuous fluorescence imaging of intracellular ions in various spectral ranges is important for biological studies. In this paper, fluorescent calcium-selective nanospheres, including calix[4]arene-functionalized bodipy (CBDP) or 9-(diethylamino)-5-[(2-octyldecyl)imino]benzo[a]phenoxazine (ETH 5350) as the chromoionophore, were prepared to demonstrate intracellular calcium imaging in visible or near-IR regions, respectively. The fluorescence of the nanospheres was controlled by the chromoionophore, and thus the spectral range for detection was adjustable by choosing the proper chromoionophore. The response time of the nanospheres to calcium was typically 1 s, which allowed accurate measurement of intracellular calcium. These nanospheres were loaded into cells through free endocytosis and exhibited fluorescence for 24 h, and their intensity was correlated with the elevation of intracellular calcium upon stimulation. The successful demonstration of calcium imaging by use of ion-selective nanospheres within two spectral ranges in 24 h supported that these nanospheres could be applied for continuous imaging of intracellular ions with adjustable spectra.

  5. Monitoring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration and synaptic efficacy in the mollusc Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Ludwar, Bjoern Ch; Evans, Colin G; Cropper, Elizabeth C

    2012-07-15

    It has been suggested that changes in intracellular calcium mediate the induction of a number of important forms of synaptic plasticity (e.g., homosynaptic facilitation). These hypotheses can be tested by simultaneously monitoring changes in intracellular calcium and alterations in synaptic efficacy. We demonstrate how this can be accomplished by combining calcium imaging with intracellular recording techniques. Our experiments are conducted in a buccal ganglion of the mollusc Aplysia californica. This preparation has a number of experimentally advantageous features: Ganglia can be easily removed from Aplysia and experiments use adult neurons that make normal synaptic connections and have a normal ion channel distribution. Due to the low metabolic rate of the animal and the relatively low temperatures (14-16 °C) that are natural for Aplysia, preparations are stable for long periods of time. To detect changes in intracellular free calcium we will use the cell impermeant version of Calcium Orange which is easily 'loaded' into a neuron via iontophoresis. When this long wavelength fluorescent dye binds to calcium, fluorescence intensity increases. Calcium Orange has fast kinetic properties and, unlike ratiometric dyes (e.g., Fura 2), requires no filter wheel for imaging. It is fairly photo stable and less phototoxic than other dyes (e.g., fluo-3). Like all non-ratiometric dyes, Calcium Orange indicates relative changes in calcium concentration. But, because it is not possible to account for changes in dye concentration due to loading and diffusion, it can not be calibrated to provide absolute calcium concentrations. An upright, fixed stage, compound microscope was used to image neurons with a CCD camera capable of recording around 30 frames per second. In Aplysia this temporal resolution is more than adequate to detect even a single spike induced alteration in the intracellular calcium concentration. Sharp electrodes are simultaneously used to induce and record

  6. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  7. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  8. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function.

  9. Evaluation of a novel method for measurement of intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Satoh, Ryosuke; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of metal and metalloid species in each of the cell compartments is termed as "metallome". It is important to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial or toxic effects exerted by a given metal or metalloid on human health. Therefore, we developed a method to measure intracellular metal ion concentration (particularly, intracellular calcium ion) in fission yeast. We evaluated the effects of nitric acid (HNO3), zymolyase, and westase treatment on cytolysis in fission yeast. Moreover, we evaluated the changes in the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast in response to treatment with/without micafungin. The fission yeast undergoes lysis when treated with 60% HNO3, which is simpler and cheaper compared to the other treatments. Additionally, the intracellular calcium ion concentration in 60% HNO3-treated fission yeast was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. This study yields significant information pertaining to measurement of the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast, which is useful for elucidating the physiological or pathological functions of calcium ion in the biological systems. This study is the first step to obtain perspective view on the effect of the metallome in biological systems.

  10. Role of intracellular calcium stores in hair-cell ribbon synapse

    PubMed Central

    Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular calcium stores control many neuronal functions such as excitability, gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and synaptic release. Although the existence of calcium stores along with calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) has been demonstrated in conventional and ribbon synapses, functional significance and the cellular mechanisms underlying this role remains unclear. This review summarizes recent experimental evidence identifying contribution of CICR to synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in the CNS, retina and inner ear. In addition, the potential role of CICR in the recruitment of vesicles to releasable pools in hair-cell ribbon synapses will be specifically discussed. PMID:24971053

  11. Intracellular signalling involved in volume regulatory decrease.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E K

    2000-01-01

    The following volume-sensitive channels are characterized in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC), (i) a tamoxifen- and AA acid sensitive, outwardly rectifying small anion channel (I(Cl,vol)) with low field anion selectivity (I(-)>Cl(-)) and moderate depolarisation-induced inactivation, (ii) a separate DIDS- and niflumic acid-sensitive organic osmolyte/anion channel (OOC) transporting predominantly taurine, and (iii) a clofilium- and Ba(2+)-sensitive, voltage- and Ca(2+)-insensitive 5 pS K(+) channel (I(K,vol)), resistant to a range of K(+) channel inhibitors including ChTX, clotrimazole, apamin, kaliotoxin, margatoxin, and TEA, and with a pH(o) dependence reminiscent of the two-pore domain background K(+) channels TASK. Cell swelling leads to an immediate and transient 3.3 fold increase in the rate of AA release resulting from activation of cPLA(2)alpha, which is found to be translocated to the nucleus upon cell swelling (probably to the inner nuclear membrane), where it is phosphorylated and activated by a G-protein coupled process. AA is a precursor for LTC(4), which is transported out of the cell, where it is converted to LTD(4), which activates I(K,vol), and OOC, whereas I(Cl,vol) is activated via a different pathway. In the absence of an increase in [Ca(2+)](i), the unitary conductance, kinetics, and pharmacological profile are similar for I(K,vol) and the K(+)-channels activated by LTD(4). Tyrosine phosphorylations are involved in the volume regulatory pathways and in defining the volume set-point. Tyrosin kinases appear to be involved in the signalling sequence leading to opening of the channels, and tyrosin phosphatases seem to be involved in closing of the channels. Finally a significant de-polymerization of F-actin is observed after cell swelling, the potential role of which in the volume regulatory mechanisms is under investigation.

  12. Detection and Measurement of the Intracellular Calcium Variation in Follicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Navarro, Ana M.; Terol-Villalobos, Iván R.; Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde; Gonzalez-Barboza, José-Joel

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new method for measuring the variation of intracellular calcium in follicular cells. The proposal consists in two stages: (i) the detection of the cell's nuclei and (ii) the analysis of the fluorescence variations. The first stage is performed via watershed modified transformation, where the process of labeling is controlled. The detection process uses the contours of the cells as descriptors, where they are enhanced with a morphological filter that homogenizes the luminance variation of the image. In the second stage, the fluorescence variations are modeled as an exponential decreasing function, where the fluorescence variations are highly correlated with the changes of intracellular free Ca2+. Additionally, it is introduced a new morphological called medium reconstruction process, which helps to enhance the data for the modeling process. This filter exploits the undermodeling and overmodeling properties of reconstruction operators, such that it preserves the structure of the original signal. Finally, an experimental process shows evidence of the capabilities of the proposal. PMID:25342958

  13. The vasopressin-induced excitation of hypoglossal and facial motoneurons in young rats is mediated by V1a but not V1b receptors, and is independent of intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Reymond-Marron, I; Tribollet, E; Raggenbass, M

    2006-09-01

    As a hormone, vasopressin binds to three distinct receptors: V1a and V1b receptors, which induce phospholipase-Cbeta (PLCbeta) activation and Ca2+ mobilization; and V2 receptors, which are coupled to adenylyl cyclase. V1a and V1b receptors are also present in neurons. In particular, hypoglossal (XII) and facial (VII) motoneurons are excited following vasopressin-V1a receptor binding. The aim of the present study was double: (i) to determine whether V1b receptors contribute to the excitatory effect of vasopressin in XII and VII motoneurons; and (ii) to establish whether the action of vasopressin on motoneurons is mediated by Ca2+ signalling. Patch-clamp recordings were performed in brainstem slices of young rats. Vasopressin depolarized the membrane or generated an inward current. By contrast, [1-deamino-4-cyclohexylalanine] arginine vasopressin (d[Cha4]AVP), a V1b agonist, had no effect. The action of vasopressin was suppressed by Phaa-D-Tyr(Et)-Phe-Gln-Asn-Lys-Pro-Arg-NH2, a V1a antagonist, but not by SSR149415, a V1b antagonist. Thus, the vasopressin-induced excitation of brainstem motoneurons was exclusively mediated by V1a receptors. Light microscopic autoradiography failed to detect V1b binding sites in the facial nucleus. In motoneurons loaded with GTP-gamma-S, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, the effect of vasopressin was suppressed, indicating that neuronal V1a receptors are G-protein-coupled. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation suppressed a Ca2+-activated potassium current, but did not affect the vasopressin-evoked current. H7 and GF109203, inhibitors of protein kinase C, were without effect on the vasopressin-induced excitation. U73122 and D609, PLCbeta inhibitors, were also without effect. Thus, excitation of brainstem motoneurons by V1a receptor activation is probably mediated by a second messenger distinct from that associated with peripheral V1a receptors.

  14. Application of fluorescent indicators to analyse intracellular calcium and morphology in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rakesh; Raina, Sheetal; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Kerrigan, Mark J P

    2011-01-01

    A novel staining and quantification method to investigate changes in intracellular calcium levels [Ca(2+)](i) and morphology in filamentous fungus is presented. Using a simple protocol, two fluorescent dyes, Fluo-4-AM and Cell trace calcein red-orange-AM were loaded into the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. The present study investigates the applicability of using Ca(2+)-sensitive dye to quantify and image [Ca(2+)](i) in P. chrysogenum cultures chosen for its potential as an experimental system to study Ca(2+) signalling in elicited cultures. The dye loading was optimised and investigated at different pH loading conditions. It was observed that the fluorophore was taken up throughout the hyphae, retaining cell membrane integrity and no dye compartmentalisation within organelles was observed. From the fluorescent plate-reader studies a significant rise (p<0.001) in the relative fluorescence levels corresponding to [Ca(2+)](i) levels in the hyphae was observed when challenged with an elicitor (mannan oligosaccharide, 150mgL(-1)) which was dependent upon extracellular calcium. Concurrently a novel application of dye-loaded hyphae for morphological analysis was also examined using the imaging software Filament Tracer (Bitplane). Essential quantitative mycelial information including the length and diameter of the segments and number of branch points was obtained using this application based on the three-dimensional data.

  15. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    PubMed

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-06-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed.

  16. Extrinsic periodic information interpolates between monostable and bistable states in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2015-06-01

    Extrinsic periodic information including physiological cyclical and circadian replacement would affect inevitably a real cell, in this paper we investigate the effect of extrinsic periodic information on intracellular calcium dynamics by means of second-order algorithm for stochastic simulation colored noises. By simulating time evolutions and stationary probability distribution of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, the results show: (i) intracellular calcium oscillation between cytosol and calcium store shows synchronous and anti-synchronous oscillation as intensity and frequency of extrinsic periodic information vary; (ii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from bistable state → monostable state → bistable state → monostable state as frequency of extrinsic periodic information increases; (iii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from monostable state → bistable state as intensity of extrinsic periodic information increases.

  17. Intracellular calcium levels as screening tool for nanoparticle toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Kueznik, Tatjana; Bösch, Martina; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered nano-sized materials led to revolutionary developments in many industrial applications and in the medical field. These materials, however, also may cause cytotoxicity. In addition to size, surface properties and shape were identified as relevant parameters for cell damage. Cell damage may occur as disruption of membrane integrity, induction of apoptosis and by organelle damage. Generation of oxidative stress may serve as an indicator for cytotoxicity. Effects occurring upon short contact of particles with cells, for instance in the systemic blood circulation, could be identified according to increases of intracellular [Ca2+] levels, which are caused by variety of toxic stimuli. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane disruption, apoptosis, lysosome function, intracellular [Ca2+] levels and generation of oxidative stress. Silica particles served to test this hypothesis. Twenty nm polystyrene particles as well as 12 nm and 40 nm silica particles caused membrane damage and apoptosis with no preference of the surface charge. Only 20 nm plain and amine functionalized polystyrene particles cause oxidative stress and only the plain particles lysosomal damage. A potential role of surface charge was identified for 200 nm polystyrene particles, where only the amidine particles caused lysosomal damage. Increases in intracellular [Ca2+] levels and cytotoxicity after 24 h was often linked but determination of intracellular [Ca2+] levels could serve to characterize further the type of membrane damage. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Nano-sized materials may cause cytotoxicity. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes and silica nanoparticles were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane

  18. Intracellular calcium affects prestin's voltage operating point indirectly via turgor-induced membrane tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent identification of a calmodulin binding site within prestin's C-terminus indicates that calcium can significantly alter prestin's operating voltage range as gauged by the Boltzmann parameter Vh (Keller et al., J. Neuroscience, 2014). We reasoned that those experiments may have identified the molecular substrate for the protein's tension sensitivity. In an effort to understand how this may happen, we evaluated the effects of turgor pressure on such shifts produced by calcium. We find that the shifts are induced by calcium's ability to reduce turgor pressure during whole cell voltage clamp recording. Clamping turgor pressure to 1kPa, the cell's normal intracellular pressure, completely counters the calcium effect. Furthermore, following unrestrained shifts, collapsing the cells abolishes induced shifts. We conclude that calcium does not work by direct action on prestin's conformational state. The possibility remains that calcium interaction with prestin alters water movements within the cell, possibly via its anion transport function.

  19. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  20. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  1. Fibroblast circadian rhythms of PER2 expression depend on membrane potential and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W; Pan, Haiyun; Welsh, David K

    2012-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca(2+). However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, the authors investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. Rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K(+) concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than loss of synchrony among cells. In lower Ca(2+) concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca(2+) by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of inositol triphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca(2+). Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) may mediate the effects of membrane potential observed in this study.

  2. Intracellular calcium and the relationship to contractility in an avian model of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C. S.; Doye, A. A.; Davidoff, A. J.; Maki, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global contractile heart failure was induced in turkey poults by furazolidone feeding (700 ppm). Abnormal calcium regulation appears to be a key factor in the pathophysiology of heart failure, but the cellular mechanisms contributing to changes in calcium fluxes have not been clearly defined. Isolated ventricular myocytes from non-failing and failing hearts were therefore used to determine whether the whole heart and ventricular muscle contractile dysfunctions were realized at the single cell level. Whole cell current- and voltage-clamp techniques were used to evaluate action potential configurations and L-type calcium currents, respectively. Intracellular calcium transients were evaluated in isolated myocytes with fura-2 and in isolated left ventricular muscles using aequorin. Action potential durations were prolonged in failing myocytes, which correspond to slowed cytosolic calcium clearing. Calcium current-voltage relationships were normal in failing myocytes; preliminary evidence suggests that depressed transient outward potassium currents contribute to prolonged action potential durations. The number of calcium channels (as measured by radioligand binding) were also similar in non-failing and failing hearts. Isolated ventricular muscles from failing hearts had enhanced inotropic responses, in a dose-dependent fashion, to a calcium channel agonist (Bay K 8644). These data suggest that changes in intracellular calcium mobilization kinetics and longer calcium-myofilament interaction may be able to compensate for contractile failure. We conclude that the relationship between calcium current density and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release is a dynamic process that may be altered in the setting of heart failure at higher contraction rates. PMID:10935520

  3. The role of intracellular calcium phosphate in osteoblast-mediated bone apatite formation

    PubMed Central

    Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Gentleman, Eileen; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Evans, Nicholas D.; McComb, David W.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralization is a ubiquitous process in the animal kingdom and is fundamental to human development and health. Dysfunctional or aberrant mineralization leads to a variety of medical problems, and so an understanding of these processes is essential to their mitigation. Osteoblasts create the nano-composite structure of bone by secreting a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) on which apatite crystals subsequently form. However, despite their requisite function in building bone and decades of observations describing intracellular calcium phosphate, the precise role osteoblasts play in mediating bone apatite formation remains largely unknown. To better understand the relationship between intracellular and extracellular mineralization, we combined a sample-preparation method that simultaneously preserved mineral, ions, and ECM with nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques to examine osteoblasts in an in vitro model of bone formation. We identified calcium phosphate both within osteoblast mitochondrial granules and intracellular vesicles that transported material to the ECM. Moreover, we observed calcium-containing vesicles conjoining mitochondria, which also contained calcium, suggesting a storage and transport mechanism. Our observations further highlight the important relationship between intracellular calcium phosphate in osteoblasts and their role in mineralizing the ECM. These observations may have important implications in deciphering both how normal bone forms and in understanding pathological mineralization. PMID:22879397

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection of Host Epithelial Cells via Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transiently Induces Calcium Release from Intracellular Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Räth, Susann; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) that interacts in a human-specific manner with the ectodomain of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) produced by respiratory epithelial cells. This interaction promotes bacterial colonization and bacterial internalization by initiating host signal transduction cascades. Here, we examined alterations of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels in epithelial cells during host cell infections with pneumococci via the PspC-hpIgR mechanism. The release of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores in host cells was significantly increased by wild-type pneumococci but not by PspC-deficient pneumococci. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on phospholipase C as pretreatment of cells with a phospholipase C-specific inhibitor U73122 abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we demonstrated the effect of [Ca2+]i on pneumococcal internalization by epithelial cells. Uptake of pneumococci was significantly increased after pretreatment of epithelial cells with the cell-permeable calcium chelator 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid-tetraacetoxymethyl ester or use of EGTA as an extracellular Ca2+-chelating agent. In contrast, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase, which increases [Ca2+]i in a sustained fashion, significantly reduced pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, pneumococcal adherence to pIgR-expressing cells was not altered in the presence of inhibitors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that pneumococcal infections induce mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores. This may constitute a defense response of host cells as the experimental reduction of intracellular calcium levels facilitates pneumococcal internalization by pIgR-expressing cells, whereas elevated calcium levels diminished bacterial internalization by host epithelial

  5. Calcium Efflux Systems in Stress Signaling and Adaptation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Jayakumar; Pottosin, Igor I.; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Palmgren, Michael G.; Shabala, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Transient cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) elevation is an ubiquitous denominator of the signaling network when plants are exposed to literally every known abiotic and biotic stress. These stress-induced [Ca2+]cyt elevations vary in magnitude, frequency, and shape, depending on the severity of the stress as well the type of stress experienced. This creates a unique stress-specific calcium “signature” that is then decoded by signal transduction networks. While most published papers have been focused predominantly on the role of Ca2+ influx mechanisms to shaping [Ca2+]cyt signatures, restoration of the basal [Ca2+]cyt levels is impossible without both cytosolic Ca2+ buffering and efficient Ca2+ efflux mechanisms removing excess Ca2+ from cytosol, to reload Ca2+ stores and to terminate Ca2+ signaling. This is the topic of the current review. The molecular identity of two major types of Ca2+ efflux systems, Ca2+-ATPase pumps and Ca2+/H+ exchangers, is described, and their regulatory modes are analyzed in detail. The spatial and temporal organization of calcium signaling networks is described, and the importance of existence of intracellular calcium microdomains is discussed. Experimental evidence for the role of Ca2+ efflux systems in plant responses to a range of abiotic and biotic factors is summarized. Contribution of Ca2+-ATPase pumps and Ca2+/H+ exchangers in shaping [Ca2+]cyt signatures is then modeled by using a four-component model (plasma- and endo-membrane-based Ca2+-permeable channels and efflux systems) taking into account the cytosolic Ca2+ buffering. It is concluded that physiologically relevant variations in the activity of Ca2+-ATPase pumps and Ca2+/H+ exchangers are sufficient to fully describe all the reported experimental evidence and determine the shape of [Ca2+]cyt signatures in response to environmental stimuli, emphasizing the crucial role these active efflux systems play in plant adaptive responses to environment. PMID:22639615

  6. Intracellular calcium rise is not a necessary step for the stimulated actin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Yassin, R.

    1986-03-01

    Stimulation of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils by many chemotactic (formyl Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine (fMLP), Leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/)) and non-chemotactic (phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), platelet activating factor (PAF), and the calcium ionophore A23187) factors produces rapid and dose dependent increases in the amount of actin associated with the cytoskeleton. The stimulated increase in cytoskeletal actin does not appear to require a rise in the intracellular concentration of free calcium. The increase in cytoskeletal actin produced by A23187 is transient and does not depend on the presence of calcium in the suspending medium. In the presence of extracellular calcium, the effect of the ionophore is biphasic with respect to concentration. The increases in actin association with cytoskeletal produced by fMLP, LTB/sub 4/, and A23187 but not by PMA, are inhibited by hyperosmolarity and pertussis toxin pretreatment. On the other hand, the addition of hyperosmolarity or pertussis toxin has small effect on the rise in the intracellular calcium produced by A23187. The results presented here suggest that an increase in the intracellular concentration of free calcium is not necessary for the stimulated increases in cytoskeletal actin.

  7. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  8. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  9. 4-aminopyridine-induced contracture in frog ventricle is due to calcium released from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, A; Subbanna, P K; Arasan, S; Rajapathy, J; Rao, J P; Subramani, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the presence of intracellular calcium store in frog ventricle based on contractures induced by 4-aminopyridine in calcium-free media. Frog-ventricular strips were subjected to field stimulation at 0.2 Hz and the force of contraction was recorded after stabilization. The preparation was then kept quiescent for some time in solutions with different sodium concentrations, containing 0 or 1 mmol/L calcium. Caffeine, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), or tetraethylammonium chloride was then added. Frog skeletal muscle preparations were used as positive controls for the caffeine experiments. Frog ventricular preparations did not develop contractures (sustained contractions) in the presence of caffeine (25 mmol/L), while frog skeletal muscle preparations developed caffeine-induced contractures. However, 4-AP (16 mmol/L) was able to induce contractures in quiescent frog ventricular preparations, even when they were superfused with calcium-free solution. 4-AP contractures in frog ventricle were seen in the presence of nifedipine also. Amplitude of 4-AP evoked contractures in frog ventricle were much larger in low sodium (30 mmol/L) and sodium-free (sodium substituted by lithium) solutions than in normal sodium solution, suggesting that the route of extrusion of the cytosolic calcium (released from intracellular stores by 4-AP) is the sodium calcium exchanger, which gets reversed in low sodium solutions. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was not able to induce contractures in frog ventricle suggesting that the contracture evoked by 4-AP is not due to its potassium channel blocking effect. In quiescent frog skeletal muscle preparations, caffeine as well as 4-AP induced contractures in calcium-free solutions. We therefore conclude that there is a caffeine-insensitive, 4-AP sensitive intracellular calcium store in the frog ventricle.

  10. Fast Kinetics of Calcium Signaling and Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shen; Reddish, Florence; Zhuo, You; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    Fast calcium signaling is regulated by numerous calcium channels exhibiting high spatiotemporal profiles which are currently measured by fluorescent calcium sensors. There is still a strong need to improve the kinetics of genetically encoded calcium indicators (sensors) to capture calcium dynamics in the millisecond time frame. In this review, we summarize several major fast calcium signaling pathways and discuss the recent developments and application of genetically encoded calcium indicators to detect these pathways. A new class of genetically encoded calcium indicators designed with site-directed mutagenesis on the surface of beta-barrel fluorescent proteins to form a pentagonal bipyramidal-like calcium binding domain dramatically accelerates calcium binding kinetics. Furthermore, novel genetically encoded calcium indicators with significantly increased fluorescent lifetime change are advantageous in deep-field imaging with high light-scattering and notable morphology change. PMID:26151819

  11. Ca2+ signaling and intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Niki, I; Yokokura, H; Sudo, T; Kato, M; Hidaka, H

    1996-10-01

    Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations evoke a wide range of cellular responses and intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins are the key molecules to transduce Ca2+ signaling via enzymatic reactions or modulation of protein/protein interations (Fig.1). The EF hand proteins, like calmodulin and S100 proteins, are considered to exert Ca(2+)-dependent actions in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. The Ca2+/phospholipid binding proteins are classified into two groups, the annexins and the C2 region proteins. These proteins, distributed mainly in the cytoplasm, translocate to the plasma membrane in response to an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and function in the vicinity of the membrane. Ca2+ storage proteins in the endoplasmic or sarcoplasmic reticulum provide the high Ca2+ capacity of the Ca2+ store sites, which regulate intracellular Ca2+ distribution. The variety and complexity of Ca2+ signaling result from the cooperative actions of specific Ca(2+)-binding proteins. This review describes biochemical properties of intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins and their proposed roles in mediating Ca2+ signaling.

  12. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  13. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating.

  14. Calcium binding proteins and calcium signaling in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Delfina C; Guragain, Manita; Patrauchan, Marianna

    2015-03-01

    With the continued increase of genomic information and computational analyses during the recent years, the number of newly discovered calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) in prokaryotic organisms has increased dramatically. These proteins contain sequences that closely resemble a variety of eukaryotic calcium (Ca(2+)) binding motifs including the canonical and pseudo EF-hand motifs, Ca(2+)-binding β-roll, Greek key motif and a novel putative Ca(2+)-binding domain, called the Big domain. Prokaryotic CaBPs have been implicated in diverse cellular activities such as division, development, motility, homeostasis, stress response, secretion, transport, signaling and host-pathogen interactions. However, the majority of these proteins are hypothetical, and only few of them have been studied functionally. The finding of many diverse CaBPs in prokaryotic genomes opens an exciting area of research to explore and define the role of Ca(2+) in organisms other than eukaryotes. This review presents the most recent developments in the field of CaBPs and novel advancements in the role of Ca(2+) in prokaryotes.

  15. INHIBITOR OF APOPTOSIS PROTEINS AS INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING INTERMEDIATES

    PubMed Central

    Kocab, Andrew J.; Duckett, Colin S.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early studies describing their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving for the vital roles played by the IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades that have been associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of the IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in the TNF receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. Since these receptors can modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the roles of the c-IAPs in these pathways provide additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may impact c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multifaceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate the importance of the c-IAPs as intracellular signaling intermediates. PMID:26462035

  16. Intracellular signaling by phospholipase D as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Steed, P M; Chow, A H

    2001-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has recently focused on intracellular signaling as a means to integrate the multiple facets of complex disease states, such as inflammation, because these pathways respond to numerous extracellular signals and coordinate a collection of cell responses contributing to pathology. One critical aspect of intracellular signaling is regulation of key cell functions by lipid mediators, in particular the generation of a key mediator, phosphatidic acid (PA) via the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by phospholipase D (PLD). Research in this field has intensified, due in part to the recent cloning and partial characterization of the two PLD isoforms in mammalian cells, and this work has contributed significantly to our understanding of events downstream of PA generation. It is these effector functions of PLD activity that make this pathway attractive as a therapeutic target while the biochemical properties of the PLD isozymes make them amenable to small molecule intervention. Recent studies indicate that PA, and its immediate metabolites diacylglycerol and lyso-PA, affect numerous cellular pathways including ligand-mediated secretion, cytoskeletal reorganisations, respiratory burst, prostaglandin release, cell migration, cytokine release, and mitogenesis. This review summarises the data implicating signaling via PLD in these cell functions, obtained from: (i) molecular analyses of PLD/effector interactions, (ii) correlation between PA production and cell responses, (iii) experimental manipulation of PA levels, (iv) inhibition of PLD regulators, and (v) direct inhibition of PA production. The utility of targeting PLD signaling for the treatment of acute/chronic inflammation and other indications is discussed in light of these data.

  17. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins as intracellular signaling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kocab, Andrew J; Duckett, Colin S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early reports that described their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving regarding the vital roles played by IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell-cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. As these receptors modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the involvement of the c-IAPs in these pathways provides an additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP-binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may affect c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multi-faceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate their importance as intracellular signaling intermediates.

  18. Intracellular calcium handling in ventricular myocytes from mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Iwan A; Allen, David G

    2007-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal degenerative disease of skeletal muscle, characterized by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Some DMD patients show a dilated cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure. This study explores the possibility that dystrophin is involved in the regulation of a stretch-activated channel (SAC), which in the absence of dystrophin has increased activity and allows greater Ca(2+) into cardiomyocytes. Because cardiac failure only appears late in the progression of DMD, we examined age-related effects in the mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD. Ca(2+) measurements using a fluorescent Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fluo-4 were performed on single ventricular myocytes from mdx and wild-type mice. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry were performed on whole hearts to determine expression levels of key proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Old mdx mice had raised resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Isolated ventricular myocytes from young and old mdx mice displayed abnormal Ca(2+) transients, increased protein expression of the ryanodine receptor, and decreased protein expression of serine-16-phosphorylated phospholamban. Caffeine-induced Ca(2+) transients showed that the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger function was increased in old mdx mice. Two SAC inhibitors streptomycin and GsMTx-4 both reduced resting [Ca(2+)](i) in old mdx mice, suggesting that SACs may be involved in the Ca(2+)-handling abnormalities in these animals. This finding was supported by immunoblotting data, which demonstrated that old mdx mice had increased protein expression of canonical transient receptor potential channel 1, a likely candidate protein for SACs. SACs may play a role in the pathogenesis of the heart failure associated with DMD. Early in the disease process and before the onset of clinical symptoms increased, SAC activity may underlie the abnormal Ca(2+) handling in young mdx mice.

  19. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Blanco, Víctor M; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2015-10-27

    Viable cancer cells expose elevated levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms leading to elevated PS exposure in viable cancer cells have not been defined. We previously showed that externalized PS may be used to monitor, target and kill tumor cells. In addition, PS on tumor cells is recognized by macrophages and has implications in antitumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular details of PS exposure on cancer cells in order to improve therapeutic targeting. Here we explored the mechanisms regulating the surface PS exposure in human cancer cells and found that differential flippase activity and intracellular calcium are the major regulators of surface PS exposure in viable human cancer cells. In general, cancer cell lines with high surface PS exhibited low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium, whereas cancer cells with low surface PS exhibited high flippase activity and low intracellular calcium. High surface PS cancer cells also had higher total cellular PS than low surface PS cells. Together, our results indicate that the amount of external PS in cancer cells is regulated by calcium dependent flippase activity and may also be influenced by total cellular PS.

  20. The role of PIP2 and the IP3/DAG pathway in intracellular calcium release and cell survival during nanosecond electric pulse exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phospholipid of particular importance in cell-signaling pathways. Hydrolysis of PIP2 releases inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) from the membrane, activating IP3 receptors on the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and facilitating a release of intracellular calcium stores and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recent studies suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause depletion of PIP2 in the cellular membrane, activating the IP3 signaling pathway. However, the exact mechanism(s) causing this observed depletion of PIP2 are unknown. Complicating the matter, nsPEF create nanopores in the plasma membrane, allowing calcium to enter the cell and thus causing an increase in intracellular calcium. While elevated intracellular calcium can cause activation of phospholipase C (PLC) (a known catalyst of PIP2 hydrolysis), PIP2 depletion has been shown to occur in the absence of both extracellular and intracellular calcium. These observations have led to the hypothesis that the high electric field itself may be playing a direct role in the hydrolysis of PIP2 from the plasma membrane. To support this hypothesis, we used edelfosine to block PLC and prevent activation of the IP3/DAG pathway in Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells prior to applying nsPEF. Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor intracellular calcium bursts during nsPEF, while MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) survivability assays were utilized to determine whether edelfosine improved cell survival during nsPEF exposure. This work is critical to refine the role of PIP2 in the cellular response to nsPEF, and also to determine the fundamental biological effects of high electric field exposures.

  1. Subcellular Imaging of Voltage and Calcium Signals Reveals Neural Processing In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Helen H; St-Pierre, François; Sun, Xulu; Ding, Xiaozhe; Lin, Michael Z; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2016-06-30

    A mechanistic understanding of neural computation requires determining how information is processed as it passes through neurons and across synapses. However, it has been challenging to measure membrane potential changes in axons and dendrites in vivo. We use in vivo, two-photon imaging of novel genetically encoded voltage indicators, as well as calcium imaging, to measure sensory stimulus-evoked signals in the Drosophila visual system with subcellular resolution. Across synapses, we find major transformations in the kinetics, amplitude, and sign of voltage responses to light. We also describe distinct relationships between voltage and calcium signals in different neuronal compartments, a substrate for local computation. Finally, we demonstrate that ON and OFF selectivity, a key feature of visual processing across species, emerges through the transformation of membrane potential into intracellular calcium concentration. By imaging voltage and calcium signals to map information flow with subcellular resolution, we illuminate where and how critical computations arise.

  2. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  3. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  4. Modeling intracellular signaling underlying striatal function in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anu G; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Blackwell, Kim T; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    Striatum, which is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia, integrates cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs with dopaminergic afferents from the substantia nigra pars compacta. The combination of dopamine and glutamate strongly modulates molecular and cellular properties of striatal neurons and the strength of corticostriatal synapses. These actions are performed via intracellular signaling networks, containing several intertwined feedback loops. Understanding the role of dopamine and other neuromodulators requires the development of quantitative dynamical models for describing the intracellular signaling, in order to provide precise unambiguous descriptions and quantitative predictions. Building such models requires integration of data from multiple data sources containing information regarding the molecular interactions, the strength of these interactions, and the subcellular localization of the molecules. Due to the uncertainty, variability, and sparseness of these data, parameter estimation techniques are critical for inferring or constraining the unknown parameters, and sensitivity analysis evaluates which parameters are most critical for a given observed macroscopic behavior. Here, we briefly review the modeling approaches and tools that have been used to investigate biochemical signaling in the striatum, along with some of the models built around striatum. We also suggest a future direction for the development of such models from the, now becoming abundant, high-throughput data. PMID:24560149

  5. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  6. Involvement of aberrant calcium signalling in herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Rebekah A; Hanani, Menachem

    2016-03-01

    Alpha-herpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV), are pathogens of the peripheral nervous system. After primary infection, these viruses establish latency within sensory ganglia, while retaining the ability to reactivate. Reactivation of VZV results in herpes zoster, a condition characterized by skin lesions that leads to post-herpetic neuralgia. Recurrent reactivations of HSV, which cause mucocutaneous lesions, may also result in neuralgia. During reactivation of alpha-herpesviruses, satellite glial cells (SGCs), which surround neurons in sensory ganglia, become infected with the replicating virus. SGCs are known to contribute to neuropathic pain in a variety of animal pain models. Here we investigated how infection of short-term cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia with HSV-1 affects communication between SGCs and neurons, and how this altered communication may increase neuronal excitability, thus contributing to herpetic neuralgia. Mechanical stimulation of single neurons or SGCs resulted in intercellular calcium waves, which were larger in cultures infected with HSV-1. Two differences were observed between control and HSV-1 infected cultures that could account for this augmentation. Firstly, HSV-1 infection induced cell fusion among SGCs and neurons, which would facilitate the spread of calcium signals over farther distances. Secondly, using calcium imaging and intracellular electrical recordings, we found that neurons in the HSV-1 infected cultures exhibited augmented influx of calcium upon depolarization. These virally induced changes may not only cause more neurons in the sensory ganglia to fire action potentials, but may also increase neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic terminals in the spinal cord. They are therefore likely to be contributing factors to herpetic neuralgia.

  7. Dietary calcium attenuates platelet aggregation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otsuka, K.; Watanabe, M.; Yue, Q.; McCarron, D. A.; Hatton, D.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are known to be blood pressure sensitive to dietary calcium. The effects of dietary calcium on platelet aggregation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization were assessed by turbidimetric methods and fura-2 methods, respectively, in washed platelets of SHR. Ca2+ ATPase activity was examined in aortic membrane fractions. Six weeks of dietary calcium supplementation attenuated the increase of systolic blood pressure (SBP 199 +/- 16 v 170 +/- 9 mm Hg, P < .001) and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (84.5 +/- 3.7 v 73.7 +/- 7.4%, P < .004) at 9 weeks of age. The ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) peak in the absence of external Ca2+, which reflects [Ca2+]i storage size, and thrombin-evoked [Ca2+]i release from [Ca2+]i storage were decreased by 2.0% Ca diet (472 +/- 55 v 370 +/- 23 nmol/L, P < .001, 339 +/- 29 v 278 +/- 33 nmol/L, P < .002). In addition, SBP was positively correlated with platelet aggregation (r = 0.703, P = .0088), thrombin-evoked [Ca2+]i (r = 0.739, P = .0044), and ionomycin-induced [Ca2+]i (r = 0.591, P = .0415), respectively. However, there was no significant effect of dietary calcium on Ca2+-ATPase activity in aortic membranes. These results suggest that dietary calcium supplementation had a beneficial effect on platelets of SHR by attenuating [Ca2+]i mobilization from [Ca2+]i storage. The hypotensive effect of dietary calcium might be associated with attenuated [Ca2+]i mobilization in SHR.

  8. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M.; Davies, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium’s other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  9. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LANGE, INGO; MOSCHNY, JULIA; TAMANYAN, KAMILLA; KHUTSISHVILI, MANANA; ATHA, DANIEL; BORRIS, ROBERT P.; KOOMOA, DANA-LYNN

    2016-01-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  10. Calcium signaling during reproduction and biotrophic fungal interactions in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junyi; Gutjahr, Caroline; Bleckmann, Andrea; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Many recent studies have indicated that cellular communications during plant reproduction, fungal invasion, and defense involve identical or similar molecular players and mechanisms. Indeed, pollen tube invasion and sperm release shares many common features with infection of plant tissue by fungi and oomycetes, as a tip-growing intruder needs to communicate with the receptive cells to gain access into a cell and tissue. Depending on the compatibility between cells, interactions may result in defense, invasion, growth support, or cell death. Plant cells stimulated by both pollen tubes and fungal hyphae secrete, for example, small cysteine-rich proteins and receptor-like kinases are activated leading to intracellular signaling events such as the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the generation of calcium (Ca(2+)) transients. The ubiquitous and versatile second messenger Ca(2+) thereafter plays a central and crucial role in modulating numerous downstream signaling processes. In stimulated cells, it elicits both fast and slow cellular responses depending on the shape, frequency, amplitude, and duration of the Ca(2+) transients. The various Ca(2+) signatures are transduced into cellular information via a battery of Ca(2+)-binding proteins. In this review, we focus on Ca(2+) signaling and discuss its occurrence during plant reproduction and interactions of plant cells with biotrophic filamentous microbes. The participation of Ca(2+) in ROS signaling pathways is also discussed.

  11. Intracellular signals of lung cancer cells as possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Kumano, Keiki; Ueno, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several molecularly targeted therapies have been developed as part of lung cancer treatment; they have produced dramatically good results. However, among the many oncogenes that have been identified to be involved in the development of lung cancers, a number of oncogenes are not covered by these advanced therapies. For the treatment of lung cancers, which is a group of heterogeneous diseases, persistent effort in developing individual therapies based on the respective causal genes is important. In addition, for the development of a novel therapy, identification of the lung epithelial stem cells and the origin cells of lung cancer, and understanding about candidate cancer stem cells in lung cancer tissues, their intracellular signaling pathways, and the mechanism of dysregulation of the pathways in cancer cells are extremely important. However, the development of drug resistance by cancer cells, despite the use of molecularly targeted drugs for the causal genes, thus obstructing treatment, is a well-known phenomenon. In this article, we discuss major causal genes of lung cancers and intracellular signaling pathways involving those genes, and review studies on origin and stem cells of lung cancers, as well as the possibility of developing molecularly targeted therapies based on these studies. PMID:25707772

  12. Intracellular free calcium mediates glioma cell detachment and cytotoxicity after photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Jiang, Feng; Kalkanis, Steven N; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Zhang, Xuepeng; Zheng, Xuguang; Jiang, Hao; Chopp, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Photofrin photodynamic therapy (PDT) caused a dose-dependent decrease of enzymatic cell detachment by trypsin/ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) in human glioma U251n and U87 cells. This happened coincidently with the increase of intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)). Thapsigargin, which increased [Ca(2+)](i), induced further decrease in enzymatic cell detachment and increased cytotoxicity. Opposite effects were observed when 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, was used. PDT-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and cell detachment were not blocked by calcium channel antagonists nickel (Ni(2+)) or nimodipine, nor were they altered when cells were irradiated in a buffer free from Ca(2+) and magnesium (Mg(2+)), suggesting that [Ca(2+)](i) is derived from the internal calcium stores. Decreased cell migration was observed after PDT, as assessed by chemotactic and wound-healing assays. Our findings indicated that internal calcium store-derived [Ca(2+)](i) plays an important role in PDT-induced enzymatic cell detachment decrease and cytotoxicity. Cell migration may be affected by these changes.

  13. Antagonists of the TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Modulate Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Jennifer; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Bernstein, Kyra; Barajas, Matthew B.; Zhang, Yi; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Pawan K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists continues to challenge anesthesiologists and intensivists. The TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulates airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We hypothesized that TMEM16A antagonists would relax ASM contraction by modulating membrane potential and calcium flux. Methods Human ASM, guinea pig tracheal rings or mouse peripheral airways were contracted with acetylcholine (Ach) or leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and then treated with the TMEM16A antagonists: benzbromarone, T16Ainh-A01, MONNA or B25. In separate studies, guinea pig tracheal rings were contracted with Ach and then exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0.01nM-10μM) ± benzbromarone. Plasma membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in human ASM cells. Results Benzbromarone was the most potent TMEM16A antagonist tested for relaxing an Ach-induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings (n=6). Further studies were done to investigate benzbromarone’s clinical utility. In human ASM, benzbromarone relaxed either an acetylcholine- or LTD4-induced contraction (n=8). Benzbromarone was also effective in relaxing peripheral airways (n=9) and potentiating relaxation by β-agonists (n=5–10). In cellular mechanistic studies, benzbromarone hyperpolarized human ASM cells (n=9–12) and attenuated intracellular calcium flux from both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum (n=6–12). Conclusions TMEM16A antagonists work synergistically with β-agonists and through a novel pathway of interrupting ion flux both at the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum to acutely relax human airway smooth muscle. PMID:26181339

  14. Controlling metabolism and cell death: at the heart of mitochondrial calcium signalling

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Transient increases in intracellular calcium concentration activate and coordinate a wide variety of cellular processes in virtually every cell type. This review describes the main homeostatic mechanisms that control Ca2+ transients, focusing on the mitochondrial checkpoint. We subsequently extend this paradigm to the cardiomyocyte and to the interplay between cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria that occurs beat-to-beat in excitation-contraction coupling. The mechanisms whereby mitochondria decode fast cytosolic calcium spikes are discussed in the light of the results obtained with recombinant photoproteins targeted to the mitochondrial matrix of contracting cardiomyocytes. Mitochondrial calcium homeostasis is then highlighted as a crucial point of convergence of the environmental signals that mediate cardiac cell death, both by necrosis and by apoptosis. Altogether we point to a role of the mitochondrion as an integrator of calcium signalling and fundamental decision maker in cardiomyocyte metabolism and survival. PMID:19285982

  15. FRET imaging of calcium signaling in live cells in the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Tongcheng; Lu, Shaoying; Ma, Hongwei; Fang, Jing; Zhong, Wenxuan; Wang, Yingxiao

    2013-02-01

    The microenvironment has been shown to regulate cellular functions including cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, migration, cancer development and metastasis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unclear. We have integrated micro-pattern technology and molecular biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to visualize calcium responses in cells constrained to grow on a micro-patterned surface. Upon ATP stimulation, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured on different surface micro-patterns had a shorter decay time and a reduced peak of a transient intracellular calcium rise compared to control cells without constraints. The decay time is regulated by the plasma membrane and the membrane calcium channels, while the peak by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium release. Further results revealed that voltage operated channels (VOCs), coupling the plasma membrane and ER, can affect both the decay time and the peak of calcium response. The inhibition of VOCs can eliminate the effect of different micro-patterns on calcium signals. When two connected HUVECs were constrained to grow on a micro-pattern, drastically distinct calcium responses upon ATP stimulation can be observed, in contrast to the similar responses of two connected cells cultured without patterns. Interestingly, the inhibition of VOCs also blocked this difference of calcium responses between two connected cells on micro-patterns. These results indicate that a micro-patterned surface can have a profound effect on the calcium responses of HUVECs under ATP stimulation, largely mediated by VOCs. Therefore, our results shed new light on the molecular mechanism by which HUVECs perceive the microenvironment and regulate intracellular calcium signals.

  16. D1/D5 dopamine receptors stimulate intracellular calcium release in primary cultures of neocortical and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Nelson; Bergson, Clare

    2002-04-01

    D1/D5 dopamine receptors in basal ganglia, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex modulate motor, reward, and cognitive behavior. Previous work with recombinant proteins revealed that in cells primed with heterologous G(q/11)-coupled G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, the typically G(s)-linked D1/D5 receptors can stimulate robust release of calcium from internal stores when coexpressed with calcyon. To learn more about the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying these D1/D5 receptor regulated behaviors, we explored the possibility that endogenous receptors stimulate internal release of calcium in neurons. We have identified a population of neurons in primary cultures of hippocampus and neocortex that respond to D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonists with a marked increase in intracellular calcium (Ca) levels. The D1/D5 receptor stimulated responses occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) indicating the rises in Ca involve release from internal stores. In addition, the responses were blocked by D1/D5 receptor antagonists. Further, the D1/D5 agonist-evoked responses were state dependent, requiring priming with agonists of G(q/11)-coupled glutamate, serotonin, muscarinic, and adrenergic receptors or with high external K(+) solution. In contrast, D1/D5 receptor agonist-evoked Ca(2+) responses were not detected in neurons derived from striatum. However, D1/D5 agonists elevated cAMP levels in striatal cultures as effectively as in neocortical and hippocampal cultures. Further, neither forskolin nor 8-Br-cAMP stimulation following priming was able to mimic the D1/D5 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) response in neocortical neurons indicating that increased cAMP levels are not sufficient to stimulate Ca release. Our data suggest that D1-like dopamine receptors likely modulate neocortical and hippocampal neuronal excitability and synaptic function via Ca(2+) as well as cAMP-dependent signaling.

  17. Optimal microscopic systems for long-term imaging of intracellular calcium using a ratiometric genetically-encoded calcium indicator.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Bannai, Hiroko; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2013-05-03

    Monitoring the pattern of intracellular Ca(2+) signals that control many diverse cellular processes is essential for understanding regulatory mechanisms of cellular functions. Various genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GECIs) are used for monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) changes under several types of microscope systems. However, it has not yet been explored which microscopic system is ideal for long-term imaging of the spatiotemporal patterns of Ca(2+) signals using GECIs. We here compared the Ca(2+) signals reported by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ratiometric GECI, yellow cameleon 3.60 (YC3.60), stably expressed in DT40 B lymphocytes, using three different imaging systems. These systems included a wide-field fluorescent microscope, a multipoint scanning confocal system, and a single-point scanning confocal system. The degree of photobleaching and the signal-to-noise ratio of YC3.60 in DT40 cells were highly dependent on the fluorescence excitation method, although the total illumination energy was maintained at a constant level within each of the imaging systems. More strikingly, the Ca(2+) responses evoked by B-cell antigen receptor stimulation in YC3.60-expressing DT40 cells were different among the imaging systems, and markedly affected by the illumination power used. Our results suggest that optimization of the imaging system, including illumination and acquisition conditions, is crucial for accurate visualization of intracellular Ca(2+) signals.

  18. DC electric fields direct breast cancer cell migration, induce EGFR polarization, and increase the intracellular level of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Ma, Xiuli; Lin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Migration of cancer cells leads to invasion of primary tumors to distant organs (i.e., metastasis). Growing number of studies have demonstrated the migration of various cancer cell types directed by applied direct current electric fields (dcEF), i.e., electrotaxis, and suggested its potential implications in metastasis. MDA-MB-231 cell, a human metastatic breast cancer cell line, has been shown to migrate toward the anode of dcEF. Further characterizations of MDA-MB-231 cell electrotaxis and investigation of its underlying signaling mechanisms will lead to a better understanding of electrically guided cancer cell migration and metastasis. Therefore, we quantitatively characterized MDA-MB-231 cell electrotaxis and a few associated signaling events. Using a microfluidic device that can create well-controlled dcEF, we showed the anode-directing migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, surface staining of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and confocal microscopy showed the dcEF-induced anodal EGFR polarization in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we showed an increase of intracellular calcium ions in MDA-MB-231 cells upon dcEF stimulation. Altogether, our study provided quantitative measurements of electrotactic migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, and demonstrated the electric field-mediated EGFR and calcium signaling events, suggesting their involvement in breast cancer cell electrotaxis.

  19. Calcium-Sensing Receptor: A Key Target for Extracellular Calcium Signaling in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Though both clinicians and scientists have long recognized the influence of extracellular calcium on the function of muscle and nervous tissue, recent insights reveal that the mechanisms allowing changes in extracellular calcium to alter cellular excitability have been incompletely understood. For many years the effects of calcium on neuronal signaling were explained only in terms of calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels and biophysical charge screening. More recently however, it has been recognized that the calcium-sensing receptor is prevalent in the nervous system and regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal activity via multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the multiplicity of mechanisms by which changes in extracellular calcium alter neuronal signaling and propose that multiple mechanisms are required to describe the full range of experimental observations. PMID:27065884

  20. Overexpression of Sly41 suppresses COPII vesicle–tethering deficiencies by elevating intracellular calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    SLY41 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of loss of Ypt1, a Rab GTPase essential for COPII vesicle tethering at the Golgi complex. SLY41 encodes a polytopic membrane protein with homology to a class of solute transporter proteins, but how overexpression suppresses vesicle-tethering deficiencies is not known. Here we show that Sly41 is efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and actively cycles between the ER and Golgi compartments. SLY41 displays synthetic negative genetic interactions with PMR1, which encodes the major Golgi-localized Ca2+/Mn2+ transporter and suggests that Sly41 influences cellular Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. Experiments using the calcium probe aequorin to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in live cells reveal that Sly41 overexpression significantly increases cytosolic calcium levels. Although specific substrates of the Sly41 transporter were not identified, our findings indicate that localized overexpression of Sly41 to the early secretory pathway elevates cytosolic calcium levels to suppress vesicle-tethering mutants. In vitro SNARE cross-linking assays were used to directly monitor the influence of Ca2+ on tethering and fusion of COPII vesicles with Golgi membranes. Strikingly, calcium at suppressive concentrations stimulated SNARE-dependent membrane fusion when vesicle-tethering activity was reduced. These results show that calcium positively regulates the SNARE-dependent fusion stage of ER–Golgi transport. PMID:27030673

  1. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C.; Dalzell, Danielle R.; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (<2 nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores (>2 nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  2. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (<2  nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores (>2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  3. Calcium signaling in plant cell organelles delimited by a double membrane.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tou-Cheu; Bourque, Stéphane; Lecourieux, David; Amelot, Nicolas; Grat, Sabine; Brière, Christian; Mazars, Christian; Pugin, Alain; Ranjeva, Raoul

    2006-11-01

    Increases in the concentration of free calcium in the cytosol are one of the general events that relay an external stimulus to the internal cellular machinery and allow eukaryotic organisms, including plants, to mount a specific biological response. Different lines of evidence have shown that other intracellular organelles contribute to the regulation of free calcium homeostasis in the cytosol. The vacuoles, the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell wall constitute storage compartments for mobilizable calcium. In contrast, the role of organelles surrounded by a double membrane (e.g. mitochondria, chloroplasts and nuclei) is more complex. Here, we review experimental data showing that these organelles harbor calcium-dependent biological processes. Mitochondria, chloroplasts as well as nuclei are equipped to generate calcium signal on their own. Changes in free calcium in a given organelle may also favor the relocalization of proteins and regulatory components and therefore have a profound influence on the integrated functioning of the cell. Studying, in time and space, the dynamics of different components of calcium signaling pathway will certainly give clues to understand the extraordinary flexibility of plants to respond to stimuli and mount adaptive responses. The availability of technical and biological resources should allow breaking new grounds by unveiling the contribution of signaling networks in integrative plant biology.

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 couples cellular prion protein to intracellular signalling in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Laura T.; Salazar, Santiago V.; Kostylev, Mikhail A.; Um, Ji Won; Kaufman, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease-related phenotypes in mice can be rescued by blockade of either cellular prion protein or metabotropic glutamate receptor 5. We sought genetic and biochemical evidence that these proteins function cooperatively as an obligate complex in the brain. We show that cellular prion protein associates via transmembrane metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 with the intracellular protein mediators Homer1b/c, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and the Alzheimer’s disease risk gene product protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta. Coupling of cellular prion protein to these intracellular proteins is modified by soluble amyloid-β oligomers, by mouse brain Alzheimer’s disease transgenes or by human Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Amyloid-β oligomer-triggered phosphorylation of intracellular protein mediators and impairment of synaptic plasticity in vitro requires Prnp–Grm5 genetic interaction, being absent in transheterozygous loss-of-function, but present in either single heterozygote. Importantly, genetic coupling between Prnp and Grm5 is also responsible for signalling, for survival and for synapse loss in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic model mice. Thus, the interaction between metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and cellular prion protein has a central role in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis, and the complex is a potential target for disease-modifying intervention. PMID:26667279

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 couples cellular prion protein to intracellular signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Laura T; Salazar, Santiago V; Kostylev, Mikhail A; Um, Ji Won; Kaufman, Adam C; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes in mice can be rescued by blockade of either cellular prion protein or metabotropic glutamate receptor 5. We sought genetic and biochemical evidence that these proteins function cooperatively as an obligate complex in the brain. We show that cellular prion protein associates via transmembrane metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 with the intracellular protein mediators Homer1b/c, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and the Alzheimer's disease risk gene product protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta. Coupling of cellular prion protein to these intracellular proteins is modified by soluble amyloid-β oligomers, by mouse brain Alzheimer's disease transgenes or by human Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid-β oligomer-triggered phosphorylation of intracellular protein mediators and impairment of synaptic plasticity in vitro requires Prnp-Grm5 genetic interaction, being absent in transheterozygous loss-of-function, but present in either single heterozygote. Importantly, genetic coupling between Prnp and Grm5 is also responsible for signalling, for survival and for synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease transgenic model mice. Thus, the interaction between metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and cellular prion protein has a central role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, and the complex is a potential target for disease-modifying intervention.

  6. Trichloroethylene-mediated cytotoxicity in human epidermal keratinocytes is mediated by the rapid accumulation of intracellular calcium: Interception by naringenin.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Khan, A Q; Khan, R; Sultana, S

    2016-02-01

    Industrial solvents pose a significant threat to the humankind. The mechanisms of their toxicity still remain in debate. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread industrial solvent responsible for severe liver dysfunction, cutaneous toxicity in occupationally exposed humans. We utilized an in vitro system of human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells in this study to avoid complex cell and extracellular interactions. We report the cytotoxicity of organic solvent TCE in HaCaT and its reversal by a natural flavanone, naringenin (Nar). The cytotoxicity was attributed to the rapid intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+)) release, which might lead to the elevation of protein kinase C along with robust free radical generation, instability due to energy depletion, and sensitization of intracellular stress signal transducer nuclear factor κB. These effects were actually seen to induce significant amount of genomic DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, all these effects of TCE were effectively reversed by the treatment of Nar, a natural flavanone. Our studies identify intracellular Ca as a unique target used by organic solvents in the cytotoxicity and highlight the Ca(2+) ion stabilizer properties of Nar.

  7. A highly calcium-selective cation current activated by intracellular calcium release in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Delles, C; Haller, T; Dietl, P

    1995-08-01

    1. The whole-cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence microscopy with the Ca2+ indicators fura-2 and fluo-3 were used to measure the whole-cell current and the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. 2. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, thapsigargin (TG) caused a transient increase of [Ca2+]i. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ caused a long lasting elevation of [Ca2+]i. 3. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, extracellular application of TG, ATP or ionomycin, or intracellular application of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), caused a small but significant inward current (Iin) and a transient outward Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), consistent with intracellular Ca2+ release. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ induced a prominent Iin with a current density of -4.2 +/- 0.7 pA pF-1. This Iin was unaffected by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4). 4. Na+ replacement by mannitol, N-methyl-D-glucamine+ (NMG+), aminomethylidin-trimethanol+ (Tris+) or choline+ reduced Iin by 54, 65, 52 and 56%, respectively. This indicates an apparent Ca2+ selectivity over Na+ of 26:1. Iin was, however, unaffected by replacing Cl- with gluconate- or by the K+ channel blocker charybdotoxin (CTX). 5. Iin was completely blocked by La3+ (IC50 = 0.77 microM). Consistently, La3+ completely reversed the TG-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. SK&F 96365 (1-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propoxyl]-1-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-ethyl-1H-im idazole) HCl did not inhibit the TG-induced Iin. It did, however, exhibit a biphasic effect on [Ca2+]i, consisting of an initial Ca2+ decay and a subsequent Ca2+ elevation. La3+ completely reversed the SK&F 96365-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. 6. In the absence of Na+, Iin was dependent on the bath Ca2+ concentration (EC50 = 1.02 mM). Ca2+ replacement by Ba2+ or Mn2+ resulted in a reduction of Iin by 95 and 94%, respectively. 7. From these experiments we conclude that Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, induced by different independent

  8. Neutrophil cell surface receptors and their intracellular signal transduction pathways☆

    PubMed Central

    Futosi, Krisztina; Fodor, Szabina; Mócsai, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but their inappropriate activation also contributes to tissue damage during autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils express a large number of cell surface receptors for the recognition of pathogen invasion and the inflammatory environment. Those include G-protein-coupled chemokine and chemoattractant receptors, Fc-receptors, adhesion receptors such as selectins/selectin ligands and integrins, various cytokine receptors, as well as innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins. The various cell surface receptors trigger very diverse signal transduction pathways including activation of heterotrimeric and monomeric G-proteins, receptor-induced and store-operated Ca2 + signals, protein and lipid kinases, adapter proteins and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here we provide an overview of the receptors involved in neutrophil activation and the intracellular signal transduction processes they trigger. This knowledge is crucial for understanding how neutrophils participate in antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory tissue damage and may also point to possible future targets of the pharmacological therapy of neutrophil-mediated autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23994464

  9. Microscopic imaging of intracellular calcium in live cells using lifetime-based ratiometric measurements of Oregon Green BAPTA-1.

    PubMed

    Lattarulo, Carli; Thyssen, Diana; Kuchibholta, Kishore V; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskaiq, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger that has important functions in normal neuronal function. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to alter calcium homeostasis in neurons and astrocytes. Several calcium dye indicators are available to measure intracellular calcium within cells, including Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB-1). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we adapted this single wavelength calcium dye into a ratiometric dye to allow quantitative imaging of cellular calcium. We used this approach for in vitro calibrations, single-cell microscopy, high-throughput imaging in automated plate readers, and in single cells in the intact living brain. While OGB is a commonly used fluorescent dye for imaging calcium qualitatively, there are distinct advantages to using a ratiometric approach, which allows quantitative determinations of calcium that are independent of dye concentration. Taking advantage of the distinct lifetime contrast of the calcium-free and calcium-bound forms of OGB, we used time-domain lifetime measurements to generate calibration curves for OGB lifetime ratios as a function of calcium concentration. In summary, we demonstrate approaches using commercially available tools to measure calcium concentrations in live cells at multiple scales using lifetime contrast. These approaches are broadly applicable to other fluorescent readouts that exhibit lifetime contrast and serve as powerful alternatives to spectral or intensity readouts in multiplexing experiments.

  10. Raised Intracellular Calcium Contributes to Ischemia-Induced Depression of Evoked Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Jalini, Shirin; Ye, Hui; Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Charlton, Milton P.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leads to depression of evoked synaptic transmission, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i during transient OGD contributes to the depression of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs). Additionally, we hypothesized that increased buffering of intracellular calcium would shorten electrophysiological recovery after transient ischemia. Mouse hippocampal slices were exposed to 2 to 8 min of OGD. fEPSPs evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation were recorded in the stratum radiatum, and whole cell current or voltage clamp recordings were performed in CA1 neurons. Transient ischemia led to increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i, (shown by calcium imaging), increased spontaneous miniature EPSP/Cs, and depressed evoked fEPSPs, partially mediated by adenosine. Buffering of intracellular Ca2+ during OGD by membrane-permeant chelators (BAPTA-AM or EGTA-AM) partially prevented fEPSP depression and promoted faster electrophysiological recovery when the OGD challenge was stopped. The blocker of BK channels, charybdotoxin (ChTX), also prevented fEPSP depression, but did not accelerate post-ischemic recovery. These results suggest that OGD leads to elevated presynaptic [Ca2+]i, which reduces evoked transmitter release; this effect can be reversed by increased intracellular Ca2+ buffering which also speeds recovery. PMID:26934214

  11. Effects of treppe and calcium on intracellular calcium and function in the failing heart from the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Brooks, W W; Bing, O H; Litwin, S E; Conrad, C H; Morgan, J P

    1994-09-01

    We studied functional and intracellular calcium responses to treppe and extracellular calcium in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) hearts during the transition from compensated pressure overload to failure. Intracellular calcium was measured using aequorin, a bioluminescent Ca2+ indicator. Experiments were performed with intact, isovolumically contracting, buffer-perfused hearts from three rat groups: (1) aging SHR with evidence of heart failure (SHR-F), (2) age-matched SHR with no evidence of heart failure (SHR-NF), and (3) age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In each experiment, left ventricular pressure and intracellular calcium transients were simultaneously recorded. Hearts were studied at 30 degrees C and paced at a rate of 1.6 Hz while being perfused with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit solution (95% O2/5% CO2) at 100 mm Hg. At the baseline state, peak systolic pressure was greatest in the SHR-NF group and lowest in the SHR-F group. Peak and resting [Ca2+]i were not significantly different among groups; however, the calcium transient was prolonged in the SHR-NF and SHR-F groups. With increasing perfusate [Ca2+]o from 0.5 to 3.0 mmol/L, the relative increases in peak [Ca2+]i and peak systolic pressure were similar among groups. When stimulation rate was increased from 1.6 to 2.0, 2.4, 2.8, and 3.2 Hz, peak [Ca2+]i, peak systolic pressure, and +/- dP/dt fell in SHR-F hearts. Peak systolic pressure decreased in the SHR-NF group at rates above 2.4 Hz but did not decline in the WKY group. Peak [Ca2+]i increased in the WKY and SHR-NF groups with increasing heart rates. Peak systolic pressure did not fall significantly in the WKY group at any heart rate. Elevation of diastolic [Ca2+]i and/or calcium transient and pressure alternans were present in 8 of 13 SHR-F hearts at the highest stimulation rate, findings that were absent in both the WKY and SHR-NF hearts. We conclude the following: (1) Under baseline conditions, depressed contractile function of

  12. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Kordyum, E L

    2003-01-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus-response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface tension

  13. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  14. Effects of caffeine on intracellular calcium, calcium current and calcium-dependent potassium current in anterior pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kramer, R H; Mokkapatti, R; Levitan, E S

    1994-01-01

    Caffeine elicits physiological responses in a variety of cell types by triggering the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular organelles. Here we investigate the effects of caffeine on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and ionic currents in anterior pituitary cells (GH3) cells. Caffeine has a biphasic effect on Ca(2+)-activated K+ current [IK(Ca)]: it induces a transient increase superimposed upon a sustained inhibition. While the transient increase coincides with a rise in [Ca2+]i, the sustained inhibition of IK(Ca) is correlated with a sustained inhibition of the L-type Ca2+ current. The L-type Ca2+ current is also inhibited by other agents that mobilize intracellular Ca2+, including thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and ryanodine, but in a matter distinct from caffeine. Unlike the caffeine effect, the TRH-induced inhibition "washes-out" under whole-cell patch-clamp conditions and is eliminated by intracellular Ca2+ chelators. Likewise, the ryanodine-induced inhibition desensitizes while the caffeine-induced inhibition does not. Simultaneous [Ca2+]i and Ca2+ current measurements show that caffeine can inhibit Ca2+ current without changing [Ca2+]i. Single-channel recordings show that caffeine reduces mean open time without affecting single-channel conductance of L-type channels. Hence the effects of caffeine on ion channels in GH3 cells are attributable both to mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ and to a direct effect on the gating of L-type Ca2+ channels.

  15. Intracellular calcium signaling in the fertilized eggs of Annelida.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takeshi; Deguchi, Ryusaku; Kyozuka, Keiichiro

    2014-08-01

    Fertilization is such a universal and indispensable step in sexual reproduction, but a high degree of variability exists in the way it takes place in the animal kingdom. As discussed in other reviews in this issue, recent works on this subject clarified many points. However, important results on the mechanisms of fertilization are obtained mainly from a few restricted model organisms. In this sense, it is utterly important to collect more information from various phyla. In this review, we have re-introduced Annelida as one of the most suitable models for the analysis of fertilization process. We have briefly reviewed the historical works on the fertilization of Annelida. Then, we have described recent findings on the two independent Ca(2+) increases in the fertilized eggs of Annelida, which arise from two different mechanisms and may have distinct physiological roles toward sperm entry and egg activation. We propose that the Ca(2+) increase in the fertilized eggs reflect the specific needs of the zygote in a given species.

  16. Liraglutide directly protects cardiomyocytes against reperfusion injury possibly via modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shun-Ying; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Ping-Jun; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yun-Dai

    2017-01-01

    Background Liraglutide is glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for treating patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our previous studies have demonstrated that liraglutide protects cardiac function through improving endothelial function in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The present study will investigate whether liraglutide can perform direct protective effects on cardiomyocytes against reperfusion injury. Methods In vitro experiments were performed using H9C2 cells and neonatal rat ventricular cadiomyocytes undergoing simulative hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induction. Cardiomyocytes apoptosis was detected by fluorescence TUNEL. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by JC-1 and DHE, respectively. Fura-2/AM was used to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentration and calcium transient. Immunofluorescence staining was used to assess the expression level of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a). In vivo experiments, myocardial apoptosis and expression of SERCA2a were detected by colorimetric TUNEL and by immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Results In vitro liraglutide inhibited cardiomyotes apoptosis against H/R. ΔΨm of cardiomyocytes was higher in liraglutide group than H/R group. H/R increased ROS production in H9C2 cells which was attenuated by liraglutide. Liraglutide significantly lowered Ca2+ overload and improved calcium transient compared with H/R group. Immunofluorescence staining results showed liraglutide promoted SERCA2a expression which was decreased in H/R group. In ischemia/reperfusion rat hearts, apoptosis was significantly attenuated and SERCA2a expression was increased by liraglutide compared with H/R group. Conclusions Liraglutide can directly protect cardiomyocytes against reperfusion injury which is possibly through modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:28270843

  17. The Role of Intracellular Calcium for the Development and Treatment of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satheesh, Noothan Jyothi; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second most common paediatric cancer. It develops from undifferentiated simpatico-adrenal lineage cells and is mostly sporadic; however, the aetiology behind the development of neuroblastoma is still not fully understood. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) is a secondary messenger which regulates numerous cellular processes and, therefore, its concentration is tightly regulated. This review focuses on the role of [Ca2+]i in differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation in neuroblastoma. It describes the mechanisms by which [Ca2+]i is regulated and how it modulates intracellular pathways. Furthermore, the importance of [Ca2+]i for the function of anti-cancer drugs is illuminated in this review as [Ca2+]i could be a target to improve the outcome of anti-cancer treatment in neuroblastoma. Overall, modulations of [Ca2+]i could be a key target to induce apoptosis in cancer cells leading to a more efficient and effective treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:26010602

  18. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca2+ response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca2+]i response, whereas the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca2+]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca2+ channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  19. MC1R signaling. Intracellular partners and pathophysiological implications.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; Olivares, Conchi

    2017-03-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) preferentially expressed in melanocytes is best known as a key regulator of the synthesis of epidermal melanin pigments. Its paracrine stimulation by keratinocyte-derived melanocortins also activates DNA repair pathways and antioxidant defenses to build a complex, multifaceted photoprotective response. Many MC1R actions rely on cAMP-dependent activation of two transcription factors, MITF and PGC1α, but pleiotropic MC1R signaling also involves activation of mitogen-activated kinases and AKT. MC1R partners such as β-arrestins, PTEN and the E3 ubiquitin ligase MGRN1 differentially regulate these pathways. The MC1R gene is complex and polymorphic, with frequent variants associated with skin phenotypes and increased cancer risk. We review current knowledge of signaling from canonical MC1R, its splice isoforms and natural polymorphic variants. Recently discovered intracellular targets and partners are also discussed, to highlight the diversity of mechanisms that may contribute to normal and pathological variation of pigmentation and sensitivity to solar radiation-induced damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Melanocortin Receptors - edited by Ya-Xiong Tao.

  20. Chondrocyte intracellular calcium, cytoskeletal organization, and gene expression responses to dynamic osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; West, Alan C; Hung, Clark T

    2006-10-01

    While chondrocytes in articular cartilage experience dynamic stimuli from joint loading activities, few studies have examined the effects of dynamic osmotic loading on their signaling and biosynthetic activities. We hypothesize that dynamic osmotic loading modulates chondrocyte signaling and gene expression differently than static osmotic loading. With the use of a novel microfluidic device developed in our laboratory, dynamic hypotonic loading (-200 mosM) was applied up to 0.1 Hz and chondrocyte calcium signaling, cytoskeleton organization, and gene expression responses were examined. Chondrocytes exhibited decreasing volume and calcium responses with increasing loading frequency. Phalloidin staining showed osmotic loading-induced changes to the actin cytoskeleton in chondrocytes. Real-time PCR analysis revealed a stimulatory effect of dynamic osmotic loading compared with static osmotic loading. These studies illustrate the utility of the microfluidic device in cell signaling investigations, and their potential role in helping to elucidate mechanisms that mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction to dynamic stimuli.

  1. Calcium paradox of the heart: a role for intracellular sodium ions.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R A; Rodrigo, G C; Tunstall, J; Yates, R J; Busselen, P

    1984-11-01

    Hearts that have been perfused in low calcium fluids suffer, on return to normal calcium solutions, an impairment of function which can be irreversible-- the "calcium paradox." In hypothermic mammalian, amphibian, and fish heart the strong contracture, which is a typical first stage in the development of the calcium paradox, is reversible and appears to depend on a large rise in intracellular Na concentration ([Na]i), which occurs during the period of Ca deprivation. This rise is mainly due to a maintained inward Na flux through the Ca channels and causes a depolarization of the membrane potential, which stabilizes at about -20 mV. In frog atrial muscle if the membrane potential is clamped to values more negative than -50 mV during the period of Ca deprivation, no contracture develops on the restoration of the extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]o). In all tissues the depolarization, the rise in [Na]i, and the Ca addition contracture are blocked by Ca channel blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, and Mg ions if present in the Ca-free fluid. These agents are ineffective, however, if applied after a period of Ca deprivation when [Na]i has already risen. The influx of Ca ions, on Ca repletion, is therefore unlikely to be via the Ca channels and would seem to be through the Na-Ca exchange.

  2. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  3. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  4. Rapid intracellular release of calcium in human platelets by stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Erne, P.; Pletscher, A.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ( [Ca2+]i) in human blood platelets was measured by use of the fluorescent probe quin-2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of Ca2+ in the medium. The [Ca2+]i-rise was less marked in the absence of Ca2+ and could be antagonized by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate-hydrochloride (TMB-8), an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores. 5-HT induced a shape change reaction in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, but the pEC50 of 5-HT was slightly higher in the presence of the cation. Shape change reaction and [Ca2+]i-rise showed similar time courses. Various 5-HT-agonists caused a rise of [Ca2+]i, whereas 5-HT-antagonists, but not the 5-HT-uptake inhibitor desmethylimipramine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, counteracted the 5-HT-induced rise of the cation in a stereospecific manner. The antagonists were more potent than the agonists. The orders of potencies of the drugs affecting [Ca2+]i and platelet shape were similar. It is concluded that stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors of platelets causes a rapid release of intracellular calcium which, by activation of the contractile system, mediates the shape change reaction. PMID:3156650

  5. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7–7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish. PMID:27506155

  6. Selenoprotein K modulate intracellular free Ca(2+) by regulating expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Ruimin; Huang, Yalan; Wang, Miao; Yang, Fan; Huang, Dana; Wu, Chunli; Li, Yue; Tang, Yijun; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Jinquan

    2017-03-18

    Selenoprotein K (SelK) is an 11-kDa selenoprotein, which may be involved in the regulation of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and immune response. To explore the function of SelK in the process of immune response, several short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA) were designed for the construction of recombinant plasmids to down-regulate the expression of SelK gene in vitro. These shRNAs specifically and efficiently interfered with the expression of SelK at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) and the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were significantly down-regulated in anti-CD3 stimulated SelK-knockdown cells. The expression of Interleukin 2 receptor alpha chain (IL-2Rα) and the secretion of Interleukin 4 (IL-4), which play a significant role in the process of T cell activation and proliferation, were also reduced in SelK-knockdown cells. Selenomethionine (Se-Met) at an optimum concentration of 5 μM could up-regulate SelK expression and reverse the change of the expression of CHERP and the intracellular free calcium caused by SelK-knockdown. These results hereby imply SelK may regulate the release of Ca(2+) by CHERP and play an important role in the proliferation and differentiation of T cell by TCR stimulation.

  7. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-08-10

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7-7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish.

  8. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7–7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish.

  9. Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations and T cell activation by prickly pear polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Aires, Virginie; Adote, Sylvie; Hichami, Aziz; Moutairou, Kabirou; Boustani, Es-Saddik E; Khan, Naim A

    2004-05-01

    Opuntia ficus indica (prickly pear) polyphenolic compounds (OFPC) triggered an increase in [Ca2+]i in human Jurkat T-cell lines. Furthermore, OFPC-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was significantly curtailed in calcium-free buffer (0% Ca2+) as compared to that in 100% Ca2+ medium. Preincubation of cells with tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels, significantly diminished the OFPC-induced sustained response on the increases in [Ca2+]i. Lanthanum and nifedipine, the respective inhibitors of voltage-dependent and L-type calcium channels, failed to curtail significantly the OFPC-induced calcium response. As OFPC still stimulated increases in [Ca2+]i in 0% Ca2+ medium, the role of intracellular calcium was investigated. Hence, addition of thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), during the OFPC-induced peak response exerted an additive effect, indicating that the mechanism of action of these two agents are different. Furthermore, U73122, an inhibitor of IP3 production, completely abolished increases in [Ca2+]i, induced by OFPC, suggesting that these polyphenols induce the production of IP3 that recruits calcium from ER pool. Polyphenolic compounds do act extracellularly as addition of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (BSA) significantly diminished the rise in [Ca2+]i evoked by the formers. OFPC also induced plasma membrane hyperpolarisation which was reversed by addition of BSA. OFPC were found to curtail the expression of IL-2 mRNA and T-cell blastogenesis. Together these results suggest that OFPC induce increases in [Ca2+]i via ER pool and opening of CRAC channels, and exert immunosuppressive effects in Jurkat T-cells.

  10. Regionally different elevation of intracellular free calcium in hippocampus of septic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhan, R Z; Fujiwara, N; Shimoji, K

    1996-10-01

    The effect of sepsis on cellular calcium homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS) was investigated using hippocampal slices of rats in which sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Hippocampal slices were prepared from septic or sham-operated rats at 24 h after abdominal surgery. The basal intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and its response to oxygen-glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices were measured for assessing cellular calcium homeostasis using fura-2 fluorescent imaging technique. The levels of [Ca2+]i were estimated by the fluorescence ratio (R340/380). Twenty-four hours after CLP, spontaneous movement was reduced and plasma lactate was increased in the septic rats in comparison with the sham-operated rats in which laparotomy was performed without CLP. Basal level of R340/380 in the CA4 ara (.72 +/- .07) was significantly higher (p < .001) in the septic group than that in the sham-operated group (.55 +/- (.06). The fluorescence ratio of septic vs. sham-operated in other hippocampal regions were .55 +/- .09 vs. .48 +/- .06 in CA1 (not significant) and .65 +/- .10 vs. .59 +/- .08 (not significant) in CA3, respectively. Increase in [Ca2+]i due to oxygen-glucose deprivation was significant in CA1 and CA3 of the septic group and in all hippocampal regions of sham-operated group. However, it was not significantly increased in CA4 of the septic group. These results suggest that regional deregulation of cellular calcium occurs in the CNS following CLP. Cellular calcium deregulation may be one of the pathogeneses occurred in clinically observed septic encephalopathy.

  11. NADPH oxidase-2 inhibition restores contractility and intracellular calcium handling and reduces arrhythmogenicity in dystrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel R; Treuer, Adriana V; Lamirault, Guillaume; Mayo, Vera; Cao, Yenong; Dulce, Raul A; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy may affect cardiac muscle, producing a dystrophic cardiomyopathy in humans and the mdx mouse. We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress participates in disrupting calcium handling and contractility in the mdx mouse with established cardiomyopathy. We found increased expression (fivefold) of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2 in the mdx hearts compared with wild type, along with increased superoxide production. Next, we tested the impact of NOX2 inhibition on contractility and calcium handling in isolated cardiomyocytes. Contractility was decreased in mdx myocytes compared with wild type, and this was restored toward normal by pretreating with apocynin. In addition, the amplitude of evoked intracellular Ca(2+) concentration transients that was diminished in mdx myocytes was also restored with NOX2 inhibition. Total sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content was reduced in mdx hearts and normalized by apocynin treatment. Additionally, NOX2 inhibition decreased the production of spontaneous diastolic calcium release events and decreased the SR calcium leak in mdx myocytes. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) synthase 1 (NOS-1) expression was increased eightfold in mdx hearts compared with wild type. Nevertheless, cardiac NO production was reduced. To test whether this paradox implied NOS-1 uncoupling, we treated cardiac myocytes with exogenous tetrahydrobioterin, along with the NOX inhibitor VAS2870. These agents restored NO production and phospholamban phosphorylation in mdx toward normal. Together, these results demonstrate that, in mdx hearts, NOX2 inhibition improves the SR calcium handling and contractility, partially by recoupling NOS-1. These findings reveal a new layer of nitroso-redox imbalance in dystrophic cardiomyopathy.

  12. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  13. Connexin 43 hemichannels and intracellular signaling in bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2014-01-01

    Cell function and survival are controlled by intracellular signals, and modulated by surrounding cells and the extracellular environment. Connexin channels participate in these processes by mediating cell-to-cell communication. In bone cells, gap junction channels were detected in the early 1970s, and are present among bone resorbing osteoclasts, bone forming osteoblasts, and osteocytes - mature osteoblasts embedded in the mineralized matrix. These channels are composed mainly by Cx43, although the expression of other connexins (45, 46, and 37) has also been reported. It is now believed that undocked Cx43 hemichannels (connexons) formed in unopposed cell membranes facing the extracellular environment participate in the interaction of bone cells with the extracellular environment, and in their communication with neighboring cells. Thus, we and others demonstrated the presence of active hemichannels in osteoblastic and osteocytic cells. These hemichannels open in response to pharmacological and mechanical stimulation. In particular, preservation of the viability of osteoblasts and osteocytes by the anti-osteoporotic drugs bisphosphonates depends on Cx43 expression in vitro and in vivo, and is mediated by undocked hemichannels. Cx43 hemichannels are also required for the release of prostaglandins and ATP by osteocytes, and for cell survival induced by mechanical stimulation in vitro. Moreover, they are required for the anti-apoptotic effect of parathyroid hormone in osteoblastic cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the presence and function of undocked connexons, and the role of hemichannel regulation for the maintenance of bone cell viability and, potentially, bone health. PMID:24772090

  14. Intracellular Calcium Decreases Upon Hyper Gravity-Treatment of Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, Maren; Denn, Tamara; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    Cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana ( A. t.) respond to changes in the gravitational field strength with fluctuations of the amount of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+). In parabolic flight experiments, where hyper- and μg phases follow each other, μg clearly increased Ca2+, while hyper-g caused a slight reduction. Since the latter observation had not been reported before, we studied this effect in more detail. Using a special centrifuge for heavy items (ZARM, Bremen, Germany), we determined the hyper-g-dependent intracellular Ca2+ level with transgenic cell lines expressing the Ca2+ sensor, cameleon. This sensor exhibits a shift in fluorescence from 480 to 530 nm in response to Ca2+ binding. The data show a drop in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration with a threshold gravity of around 3 g. This is above hypergravity levels achieved during parabolic flights (1.8 g). The use of mutants with different sub-cellular targets of cameleon expression (nucleus, tonoplast, plasma membrane) gave the same results, i.e. Ca2+ is obviously exported from several intracellular compartments.

  15. Agouti regulation of intracellular calcium: Role in the insulin resistance of viable yellow mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, M.B.; Kim, J.H.; Woychik, R.P.; Michaud, E.J.; Hadwell, S.H.; Patel, I.R.; Wilkison, W.O.

    1995-05-23

    Several dominant mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse cause a syndrome of marked obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Although it is known that the agouti gene is expressed in an ectopic manner in these mutants, the precise mechanism by which the agouti gene product mediates these effects is unclear. Since intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is believed to play a role in mediating insulin action and dysregulation of Ca{sup 2+} flux is observed in diabetic animals and humans, we examined the status of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in mice carrying the dominant agouti allele, viable yellow (A{sup vy}). We show here that in mice carrying this mutation, the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is elevated in skeletal muscle, and the degree of elevation is closely correlated with the degree to which the mutant traits are expressed in individual animals. Moreover, we demonstrate that the agouti gene product is capable of inducing increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in cultured and freshly isolated skeletal muscle myocytes from wild-type mice. Based on these findings, we present a model in which we propose that the agouti polypeptide promotes insulin resistance in mutant animals through its ability to increase [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Modifies NMDA Receptor Mediated Release of Intracellular Calcium: Implications for Endocannabinoid Control of Hippocampal Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Robert E.; Miller, Frances; Palchik, Guillermo; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) leads to continuous suppression of neuronal plasticity in hippocampus and other brain regions, suggesting that endocannabinoids may have a functional role in synaptic processes that produce state-dependent transient modulation of hippocampal cell activity. In support of this, it has previously been shown in vitro that cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulate second messenger systems in hippocampal neurons that can modulate intracellular ion channels, including channels which release calcium from intracellular stores. Here we demonstrate in hippocampal slices a similar endocannabinoid action on excitatory glutamatergic synapses via modulation of NMDA-receptor mediated intracellular calcium levels in confocal imaged neurons. Calcium entry through glutamatergic NMDA-mediated ion channels increases intracellular calcium concentrations via modulation of release from ryanodine-sensitive channels in endoplasmic reticulum. The studies reported here show that NMDA-elicited increases in Calcium Green fluorescence are enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists (i.e. rimonabant), and inhibited by CB1 agonists (i.e. WIN 55,212-2). Suppression of endocannabinoid breakdown by either reuptake inhibition (AM404) or fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibition (URB597) produced suppression of NMDA elicited calcium increases comparable to WIN 55,212-2, while enhancement of calcium release provoked by endocannabinoid receptor antagonists (Rimonabant) was shown to depend on the blockade of CB1 receptor mediated de-phosphorylation of Ryanodine receptors. Such CB1 receptor modulation of NMDA elicited increases in intracellular calcium may account for the respective disruption and enhancement by CB1 agents of trial-specific hippocampal neuron ensemble firing patterns during performance of a short-term memory task, reported previously from this laboratory. PMID:21288475

  17. Nicotine elicits prolonged calcium signaling along ventral hippocampal axons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have long been implicated in the modulation of CNS circuits. We previously reported that brief exposure to low concentrations of nicotine induced sustained potentiation of glutamatergic transmission at ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-striatal synapses. Here, we exploited nAChR subtype-selective antagonists and agonists and α7*nAChR knockout mutant mice (α7-/-) to elucidate the signaling mechanisms underlying nAChR-mediated modulation of synaptic transmission. Using a combination of micro-slices culture from WT and α7-/-mice, calcium imaging, and immuno-histochemical techniques, we found that nicotine elicits localized and oscillatory increases in intracellular Ca(2+) along vHipp axons that persists for up to 30 minutes. The sustained phase of the nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response was blocked by α-BgTx but not by DHβE and was mimicked by α7*nAChR agonists but not by non-α7*nAChR agonists. In vHipp slices from α7-/- mice, nicotine elicited only transient increases of axonal Ca(2+) signals and did not activate CaMKII. The sustained phase of the nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response required localized activation of CaMKII, phospholipase C, and IP3 receptor mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). In conclusion, activation of presynaptic nAChRs by nicotine elicits Ca(2+) influx into the presynaptic axons, the sustained phase of the nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response requires that axonal α7*nAChR activate a downstream signaling network in the vHipp axons.

  18. Combined analysis of intracellular calcium with dual excitation fluorescence photometry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1995-10-01

    We have developed an integrated microscopy system combining fast dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and digital image analysis with high spatial resolution, based mainly on standard components. With the combination of these well-established techniques in one setup it is possible to monitor intracellular calcium with both sufficiently high temporal and high spatial resolution on the same preparation for many biological applications. Our system consists of a commercially available dual-excitation photometric system, an attached ICCD camera, and a frame grabber board. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode and the imaging mode. We used the system to record Fura-2 calcium images (340/380 nm ratios), which were correlated with the faster spot measurements and were analyzed by means of image processing. As an example for its application we reconstructed caffeine-induced calcium transient released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of isolated and permeabilized skeletal muscle fiber preparations. Such a combined technique will also be important for cellular studies using other fluorescence indicators. Additionally, the described system has an external trigger facility that enables combination with other cell physiological methods, e.g., electrophysiological techniques.

  19. Three types of ependymal cells with intracellular calcium oscillation are characterized by distinct cilia beating properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongyu; Jin, Xingjian; Prasad, Rahul M; Sari, Youssef; Nauli, Surya M

    2014-09-01

    Ependymal cells are multiciliated epithelial cells that line the ventricles in the adult brain. Abnormal function or structure of ependymal cilia has been associated with various neurological deficits. For the first time, we report three distinct ependymal cell types, I, II, and III, based on their unique ciliary beating frequency and beating angle. These ependymal cells have specific localizations within the third ventricle of the mouse brain. Furthermore, neither ependymal cell types nor their localizations are altered by aging. Our high-speed fluorescence imaging analysis reveals that these ependymal cells have an intracellular pacing calcium oscillation property. Our study further shows that alcohol can significantly repress the amplitude of calcium oscillation and the frequency of ciliary beating, resulting in an overall decrease in volume replacement by the cilia. Furthermore, the pharmacological agent cilostazol could differentially increase cilia beating frequency in type II, but not in type I or type III, ependymal cells. In summary, we provide the first evidence of three distinct types of ependymal cells with calcium oscillation properties.

  20. Calcium Signaling in Interstitial Cells: Focus on Telocytes

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Banciu, Adela; Banciu, Daniel Dumitru; Radu, Mihai; Cretoiu, Dragos; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we describe the current knowledge on calcium signaling pathways in interstitial cells with a special focus on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs), and telocytes. In detail, we present the generation of Ca2+ oscillations, the inositol triphosphate (IP3)/Ca2+ signaling pathway and modulation exerted by cytokines and vasoactive agents on calcium signaling in interstitial cells. We discuss the physiology and alterations of calcium signaling in interstitial cells, and in particular in telocytes. We describe the physiological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the pacemaking activity (e.g., intestinal, urinary, uterine or vascular pacemaking activity) and to the reproductive function. We also present the pathological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the aortic valve calcification or intestinal inflammation. Moreover, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by calcium signaling in telocytes in the uterine, cardiac and urinary physiology, and also in various pathologies, including immune response, uterine and cardiac pathologies. PMID:28208829

  1. Calcium Signaling in Interstitial Cells: Focus on Telocytes.

    PubMed

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Banciu, Adela; Banciu, Daniel Dumitru; Radu, Mihai; Cretoiu, Dragos; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria

    2017-02-13

    In this review, we describe the current knowledge on calcium signaling pathways in interstitial cells with a special focus on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs), and telocytes. In detail, we present the generation of Ca(2+) oscillations, the inositol triphosphate (IP₃)/Ca(2+) signaling pathway and modulation exerted by cytokines and vasoactive agents on calcium signaling in interstitial cells. We discuss the physiology and alterations of calcium signaling in interstitial cells, and in particular in telocytes. We describe the physiological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the pacemaking activity (e.g., intestinal, urinary, uterine or vascular pacemaking activity) and to the reproductive function. We also present the pathological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the aortic valve calcification or intestinal inflammation. Moreover, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by calcium signaling in telocytes in the uterine, cardiac and urinary physiology, and also in various pathologies, including immune response, uterine and cardiac pathologies.

  2. Probing the intracellular calcium sensitivity of transmitter release during synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-03-06

    In nerve terminals, residual Ca(2+) remaining from previous activity can cause facilitation of transmitter release by a mechanism that is still under debate. Here we show that the intracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity of transmitter release at the calyx of Held is largely unchanged during facilitation, which leaves an increased microdomain Ca(2+) signal as a possible mechanism for facilitation. We measured the Ca(2+) dependencies of facilitation, as well as of transmitter release, to estimate the required increment in microdomain Ca(2+). These measurements show that linear summation of residual and microdomain Ca(2+) accounts for only 30% of the observed facilitation. However, a small degree of supralinearity in the summation of intracellular Ca(2+) signals, which might be caused by saturation of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer(s), is sufficient to explain facilitation at this CNS synapse.

  3. Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk Even small amount in 30s, 40s appears ... their arteries are already at risk of a heart attack, a new study finds. Among those 32 to ...

  4. Novel vistas of calcium-mediated signalling in the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Pape, Hans-Christian; Munsch, Thomas; Budde, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    Traditionally, the role of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) in thalamic neurons has been viewed as that of electrical charge carriers. Recent experimental findings in thalamic cells have only begun to unravel a highly complex Ca(2+) signalling network that exploits extra- and intracellular Ca(2+) sources. In thalamocortical relay neurons, interactions between T-type Ca(2+) channel activation, Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity and the hyperpolarization-activated cation current ( I(h)) regulate oscillatory burst firing during periods of sleep and generalized epilepsy, while a functional triad between Ca(2+) influx through high-voltage-activated (most likely L-type) Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and a repolarizing mechanism (possibly via K(+) channels of the BK(Ca) type) supports tonic spike firing as required during wakefulness. The mechanisms seem to be located mostly at dendritic and somatic sites, respectively. One functional compartment involving local GABAergic interneurons in certain thalamic relay nuclei is the glomerulus, in which the dendritic release of GABA is regulated by Ca(2+) influx via canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPC), thereby presumably enabling transmitters of extrathalamic input systems that are coupled to phospholipase C (PLC)-activating receptors to control feed-forward inhibition in the thalamus. Functional interplay between T-type Ca(2+) channels in dendrites and the A-type K(+) current controls burst firing, contributing to the range of oscillatory activity observed in these interneurons. GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic (RT) nucleus recruit a specific set of Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms for the generation of rhythmic burst firing, of which a particular T-type Ca(2+) channel in the dendritic membrane, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of non-specific cation channels ( I(CAN)) and of K(+) channels (SK(Ca) type) are key players. Glial Ca(2+) signalling in

  5. Ca2+ signalling in cardiovascular disease: the role of the plasma membrane calcium pumps.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Oceandy, Delvac; Austin, Clare; Neyses, Ludwig

    2011-08-01

    The plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCA) are a family of genes which extrude Ca(2+) from the cell and are involved in the maintenance of intracellular free calcium levels and/or with Ca(2+) signalling, depending on the cell type. In the cardiovascular system, Ca(2+) is not only essential for contraction and relaxation but also has a vital role as a second messenger in signal transduction pathways. A complex array of mechanisms regulate intracellular free calcium levels in the heart and vasculature and a failure in these systems to maintain normal Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to both heart failure and hypertension. This article focuses on the functions of PMCA, in particular isoform 4 (PMCA4), in the heart and vasculature and the reported links between PMCAs and contractile function, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac rhythm and sudden cardiac death, and blood pressure control and hypertension. It is becoming clear that this family of calcium extrusion pumps have essential roles in both cardiovascular health and disease.

  6. Acetylcholine increases intracellular calcium of arterial chemoreceptor cells of adult cats.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, M; Fitzgerald, R S; Sham, J S

    1997-11-01

    Acetylcholine increases intracellular calcium of arterial chemoreceptor cells of adult cats. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2388-2395, 1997. Several neurotransmitters have been reported to play important roles in the chemoreception of the carotid body. Among them acetylcholine (ACh) appears to be involved in excitatory processes in the cat carotid body. As one of the steps to elucidate possible roles of ACh in carotid body chemoreception in the cat, we examined the effect of ACh on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) of cultured carotid body cells. The carotid body from adult cats was dissociated and cultured for up to 2 wk. [Ca2+]i was measured from clusters of cells with a microfluorometric technique using Indo-1 AM. Experiments were performed at 37 degrees C, and cells were continuously superfused with modified Krebs solutions equilibrated with 5% CO2-16% O2-79% N2. ACh (100 mu M) caused a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in approximately 70% of clusters, and the responses to 1-300 mu M of ACh were concentration dependent. The magnitude and kinetics of the ACh response were mimicked by the application of nicotine, whereas muscarinic agonists, pilocarpine, and muscarine failed to evoke a similar response. ACh-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on extracellular Ca2+: it was greatly reduced or completely abolished by a transient removal of extracellular Ca2+. The response was consistently but only partially reduced by caffeine (5 mM) or nifedipine (10 mu M). The effect of mecamylamine (100 mu M) was inhibitory but small. Moreover, the increase in [Ca2+]i in response to ACh was also observed in some clusters that did not respond to high K (100 mM) Krebs. These results suggest that ACh increases [Ca2+]i of cultured carotid body cells by activating neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors, leading to Ca2+ influx via nicotinic channels. In addition, other pathways such as Ca2+ influx through L-type calcium channels, perhaps secondary to membrane depolarization, and Ca2

  7. Nanoparticle PEBBLE sensors for quantitative nanomolar imaging of intracellular free calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Si, Di; Epstein, Tamir; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-17

    Ca(2+) is a universal second messenger and plays a major role in intracellular signaling, metabolism, and a wide range of cellular processes. To date, one of the most successful approaches for intracellular Ca(2+) measurement involves the introduction of optically sensitive Ca(2+) indicators into living cells, combined with digital imaging microscopy. However, the use of free Ca(2+) indicators for intracellular sensing and imaging has several limitations, such as nonratiometric measurement for the most-sensitive indicators, cytotoxicity of the indicators, interference from nonspecific binding caused by cellular biomacromolecules, challenging calibration, and unwanted sequestration of the indicator molecules. These problems are minimized when the Ca(2+) indicators are encapsulated inside porous and inert polyacrylamide nanoparticles. We present PEBBLE nanosensors encapsulated with rhodamine-based Ca(2+) fluorescence indicators. The rhod-2-containing PEBBLEs presented here show a stable sensing range at near-neutral pH (pH 6-9). Because of the protection of the PEBBLE matrix, the interference of protein-nonspecific binding to the indicator is minimal. The rhod-2 PEBBLEs give a nanomolar dynamic sensing range for both in-solution (K(d) = 478 nM) and intracellular (K(d) = 293 nM) measurements. These nanosensors are useful quantitative tools for the measurement and imaging of the cytosolic nanomolar free Ca(2+) levels.

  8. Dynamic kisspeptin receptor trafficking modulates kisspeptin-mediated calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Min, Le; Soltis, Kathleen; Reis, Ana Claudia S; Xu, Shuyun; Kuohung, Wendy; Jain, Manisha; Carroll, Rona S; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of reproduction. We investigated the role of kisspeptin-stimulated KISS1R internalization, recycling, and degradation in the modulation of KISS1R signaling. Kisspeptin stimulation of Chinese hamster ovary or GT1-7 cells expressing KISS1R resulted in a biphasic increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i), with a rapid acute increase followed by a more sustained second phase. In contrast, stimulation of the TRH receptor, another Gq/11-coupled receptor, resulted in a much smaller second-phase [Ca(2+)]i response. The KISS1R-mediated second-phase [Ca(2+)]i response was abolished by removal of kisspeptin from cell culture medium. Notably, the second-phase [Ca(2+)]i response was also inhibited by dynasore, brefeldin A, and phenylarsine oxide, which inhibit receptor internalization and recycling, suggesting that KISS1R trafficking contributes to the sustained [Ca(2+)]i response. We further demonstrated that KISS1R undergoes dynamic ligand-dependent and -independent recycling. We next investigated the fate of the internalized kisspeptin-KISS1R complex. Most internalized kisspeptin was released extracellularly in degraded form within 1 hour, suggesting rapid processing of the internalized kisspeptin-KISS1R complex. Using a biotinylation assay, we demonstrated that degradation of cell surface KISS1R was much slower than that of the internalized ligand, suggesting dissociated processing of the internalized kisspeptin-KISS1R complex. Taken together, our results suggest that the sustained calcium response to kisspeptin is dependent on the continued presence of extracellular ligand and is the result of dynamic KISS1R trafficking.

  9. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  10. Novel targets for treating heart and muscle disease: stabilizing ryanodine receptors and preventing intracellular calcium leak.

    PubMed

    Lehnart, Stephan E

    2007-04-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) function as intracellular Ca(2+) release channels on the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes. In striated muscles, Ca(2+) release through RyRs controls muscle excitation-contraction coupling. RyR channel function is regulated by a cytoplasmic scaffold domain that forms a macromolecular signaling complex including calstabin (formerly known as FK506-binding protein), calmodulin, phosphodiesterase, kinase and phosphatase proteins. An increasing number of genetic and acquired diseases has been associated with intracellular Ca(2+) leak. In heart failure, for instance, the RyR complex becomes altered, resulting in chronic channel dysfunction and chronic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) leak. Recently, the efficacy of novel Ca(2+) release channel-stabilizing drugs has been demonstrated in cardiac and skeletal muscle disease models.

  11. [Curve-fit with hybrid logistic function for intracellular calcium transient].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Morita, Shigeho; Araki, Junichi; Otsuji, Mikiya; Hanaoka, Kazuo; Kurihara, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    As the left ventricular (LV) pressure curve and myocardial tension curve in heart are composed of contraction and relaxation processes, we have found that hybrid logistic (HL) function calculated as the difference between two logistic functions curve-fits better the isovolumic LV pressure curve and the isometric twitch tension curve than the conventional polynomial exponential and sinusoidal functions. Increase and decrease in intracellular Ca2+ concentration regulate myocardial contraction and relaxation. Recently, we reported that intracellular Ca2+ transient (CaT) curves measured using the calcium-sensitive bioluminescent protein, aequorin, were better curve-fitted by HL function compared to the polynomial exponential function in the isolated rabbit RV and mouse LV papillary muscles. We speculate that the first logistic component curve of HL fit represents the concentration of the Ca2+ inflow into the cytoplasmic space, the concentration of Ca2+ released from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the concentration of Ca2+ binding to troponin C (TnC), and the attached number of cross-bridge (CB) and their time courses, and that the second logistic component curve of HL fit represents the concentration of Ca2+ sequestered into SR, the concentration of Ca2+ removal from the cytoplasmic space, the concentration of Ca2+ released from TnC, and the detached number of CB and their time courses. This HL approach for CaT curve may provide a more useful model for investigating Ca2+ handling, Ca(2+) -TnC interaction, and CB cycling.

  12. Cell swelling-induced ATP release is tightly dependent on intracellular calcium elevations

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Francis; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical stresses release ATP from a variety of cells by a poorly defined mechanism(s). Using custom-designed flow-through chambers, we investigated the kinetics of cell swelling-induced ATP secretion, cell volume and intracellular calcium changes in epithelial A549 and 16HBE14o− cells, and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Fifty per cent hypotonic shock triggered transient ATP release from cell confluent monolayers, which consistently peaked at around 1 min 45 s for A549 and NIH/3T3, and at 3 min for 16HBE14o− cells, then declined to baseline within the next 15 min. Whereas the release time course had a similar pattern for the three cell types, the peak rates differed significantly (294 ± 67, 70 ± 22 and 17 ± 2.8 pmol min−1 (106 cells)−1, for A549, 16HBE14o− and NIH/3T3, respectively). The concomitant volume changes of substrate-attached cells were analysed by a 3-dimensional cell shape reconstruction method based on images acquired from two perpendicular directions. The three cell types swelled at a similar rate, reaching maximal expansion in 1 min 45 s, but differed in the duration of the volume plateau and regulatory volume decrease (RVD). These experiments revealed that ATP release does not correlate with either cell volume expansion and the expected activation of stretch-sensitive channels, or with the activation of volume-sensitive, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid-inhibitable anion channels during RVD. By contrast, ATP release was tightly synchronized, in all three cell types, with cytosolic calcium elevations. Furthermore, loading A549 cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly diminished ATP release (71% inhibition of the peak rate), while the calcium ionophore ionomycin triggered ATP release in the absence of cell swelling. Lowering the temperature to 10°C almost completely abolished A549 cell swelling-induced ATP release (95% inhibition of the peak rate). These results strongly suggest that calcium-dependent exocytosis plays a

  13. Intracellular calcium and cAMP regulate directional pigment movements in teleost erythrophores

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Teleost pigment cells (erythrophores and melanophores) are useful models for studying the regulation of rapid, microtubule-dependent organelle transport. Previous studies suggest that melanophores regulate the direction of pigment movements via changes in intracellular cAMP (Rozdzial and Haimo, 1986a; Sammak et al., 1992), whereas erythrophores may use calcium- (Ca(2+)-) based regulation (Luby- Phelps and Porter, 1982; McNiven and Ward, 1988). Despite these observations, there have been no direct measurements in intact erythrophores or any cell type correlating changes of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) with organelle movements. Here we demonstrate that extracellular Ca2+ is necessary and that a Ca2+ influx via microinjection is sufficient to induce pigment aggregation in erythrophores, but not melanophores of squirrel fish. Using the Ca(2+)- sensitive indicator, Fura-2, we demonstrate that [Ca2+]i rises dramatically concomitant with aggregation of pigment granules in erythrophores, but not melanophores. In addition, we find that an erythrophore stimulated to aggregate pigment will immediately transmit a rise in [Ca2+]i to neighboring cells, suggesting that these cells are electrically coupled. Surprisingly, we find that a fall in [Ca2+]i is not sufficient to induce pigment dispersion in erythrophores, contrary to the findings obtained with the ionophore and lysed-cell models (Luby- Phelps and Porter, 1982; McNiven and Ward, 1988). We find that a rise in intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]i) induces pigment dispersion, and that this dispersive stimulus can be overridden by an aggregation stimulus, suggesting that both high [cAMP]i and low [Ca2+]i are necessary to produce pigment dispersion in erythrophores. PMID:8106546

  14. Modulation of a sustained calcium current by intracellular pH in horizontal cells of fish retina

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A sustained high voltage-activated (HVA), nifedipine- and cadmium- sensitive calcium current and a sustained calcium action potential (AP) were recorded from horizontal cells isolated from catfish retina. pH indicator dyes showed that superfusion with NH4Cl alkalinized these cells and that washout of NH4Cl or superfusion with Na-acetate acidified them. HVA current was slightly enhanced during superfusion of NH4Cl but was suppressed upon NH4Cl washout or application of Na- acetate. When 25 mM HEPES was added to the patch pipette to increase intracellular pH buffering, the effects of NH4Cl and Na-acetate on HVA current were reduced. These results indicated that intracellular acidification reduces HVA calcium current and alkalinization increases it. Sustained APs, recorded with high resistance, small diameter microelectrodes, were blocked by cobalt and cadmium and their magnitude varied with extracellular calcium concentration. These results provide confirmatory evidence that the HVA current is a major component of the AP and indicate that the AP can be used as a measure of how the HVA current can be modified in intact, undialyzed cells. The duration of APs was increased by superfusion with NH4Cl and reduced by washout of NH4Cl or superfusion with Na-acetate. The Na-acetate and NH4Cl washout- dependent shortening of the APs was observed in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, a calcium chelator, IBMX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and in Na-free or TEA-enriched saline. These findings provide supportive evidence that intracellular acidification may directly suppress the HVA calcium current in intact cells. Intracellular pH changes would thereby be expected to modulate not only the resting membrane potential of these cells in darkness, but calcium- dependent release of neurotransmitter from these cells as well. Furthermore, this acidification-dependent suppression of calcium current could serve a protective role by reducing calcium entry during retinal ischemia, which

  15. Effects of TRIM on tension, intracellular calcium and nitrergic transmission in the rat anococcygeus muscle.

    PubMed

    Che, Yan; Potocnik, Simon; Ellis, Anthie; Li, Chun Guang

    2007-02-01

    The effects of the putatively selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole (TRIM) were investigated on contractility, intracellular calcium and nitrergic relaxations in the rat anococcygeus muscle. TRIM (100-1000 microM) reduced the tension of rat anococcygeus muscles when contracted with guanethidine (10 microM) and clonidine (0.1 microM). Relaxations to TRIM persisted in the presence of the non-selective NOS inhibitor L-NAME (100 microM) and the inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase ODQ (1 microM). TRIM also reduced tension when muscles were contracted with phenylephrine (3 microM), noradrenaline (3 microM) or high K physiological salt solution (high KPSS; 60mM). Influx of calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in response to high KPSS was significantly reduced in the presence of TRIM (1mM). TRIM also inhibited the influx of (45)Ca(2+) induced by KPSS, but had no effect on the influx induced by phenylephrine (10 microM). TRIM (300 microM) had a modest, but significant, inhibitory effect on nitrergic relaxations that were evoked by electrical field stimulation (1-10 Hz, 15 V, 10s trains) in muscles contracted with guanethidine and clonidine. In contrast, L-NAME (1-100 microM) inhibited these nitrergic responses with an IC(50) of 9.31+/-0.87 microM (n=4). The results suggest that the smooth muscle relaxant effect of TRIM in the rat anococcygeus muscle may affect the entry of Ca(2+) possibly through voltage-operated calcium channels. Furthermore, the relatively modest effect of TRIM on nitrergic responses indicates that it is not a particularly reliable inhibitor of nNOS.

  16. [Intracellular signal systems in the epithelium- and endothelium-dependent relaxation of smooth muscles].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Kovalev, I V; Baskakov, M B; Medvedev, M A

    2001-01-01

    calmodulin, is capable to carry out a hydrolysis of both cyclic nucleotides, and the affinity native phospodiesterase to cGMP exceeds affinity to cAMP more, than on the order. It is impossible to eliminate immediate interference of NO-dependent processes in a regulation of activity contractile proteins. The ability cGMP-dependent processes to depressing mechanisms of phosphorylation and intensifying of a dephosphorylization of contraktion proteins SM is shown. At these processes can variate and affinity of the acto-miosin complex to ions of calcium, producing a release phenomenon of smooth muscles. On all visibility, production relaxing of the factor and the implementation is epithelial and endothelium-SM of mutual relation in a respiratory tract and pots comes true by modulating influence at the calcium signal system of other systems. For example, production relaxing of the factor by an epithelium and endothelium, being calcium-dependent process, is regulated at involvement calmodulin-similar Ca(2+)-connecting proteins and protein kinase C. Control of tone SM through change of membrane potential relaxing factor carries out by paravariation of potassium conduction of a membrane SM, and, is more probable than all through calcium-dependent and ATP-sensitive components. Potencial-dependent control of a muscle tone comes true through change of efficacy of an operation from a branch of the calcium signal system and calcium pompes at submaximal concentrations of free calcium in citosolium.

  17. Elevated polyamines in urothelial cells from OAB subjects mediate oxotremorine-evoked rapid intracellular calcium rise and delayed acetylcholine release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkai; Sun, Yan; Tomiya, Noboru; Hsu, Yuchao

    2013-01-01

    Increased polyamine signaling in bladder urothelial cells (BUC) may play a role in the pathophysiology of overactive bladder (OAB). We quantitated intracellular polyamine levels in cultured BUC from OAB and asymptomatic (NB) subjects. We assessed whether polyamines modulated rapid intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) changes and delayed acetylcholine (ACh) release evoked by oxotremorine (OXO, a muscarinic agonist). BUC were cultured from cystoscopic biopsies. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantitated intracellular putrescine, spermidine, and spermine levels. Five-millimeter difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), and one-millimeter methylglyoxalbisguanylhydrazone (MGBG) treatments were used to deplete intracellular polyamines. Ten micrometers of OXO were used to increase [Ca2+]i levels (measured by fura 2 microfluorimetry) and trigger extracellular ACh release (measured by ELISA). Polyamine levels were elevated in OAB compared with NB BUC (0.5 ± 0.15 vs. 0.16 ± 0.03 nmol/mg for putrescine, 2.4 ± 0.21 vs. 1.01 ± 0.13 nmol/mg for spermidine, and 1.90 ± 0.27 vs. 0.86 ± 0.26 nmol/mg for spermine; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). OXO evoked greater [Ca2+]i rise in OAB (205.10 ± 18.82% increase over baseline) compared with in NB BUC (119.54 ± 13.01%; P < 0.05). After polyamine depletion, OXO evoked [Ca2+]i rise decreased in OAB and NB BUC to 43.40 ± 6.45 and 38.82 ± 3.5%, respectively. OXO tended to increase ACh release by OAB vs. NB BUC (9.02 ± 0.1 vs. 7.04 ± 0.09 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Polyamine depletion reduced ACh release by both OAB and NB BUC. In conclusion, polyamine levels were elevated twofold in OAB BUC. OXO evoked greater increase in [Ca2+]i and ACh release in OAB BUC, although these two events may be unrelated. Depletion of polyamines caused OAB BUC to behave similarly to NB BUC. PMID:23698115

  18. Vasopressin and interactive calcium, cyclic AMP and purinergic signaling in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chebib, Fouad T.; Sussman, Caroline R.; Wang, Xiaofang; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common monogenic kidney disease and the fourth leading cause of end-stage renal disease, responsible for 5–10% of cases. The disease is characterized by relentless development and growth of cysts causing progressive kidney enlargement associated with hypertension, pain, reduced quality of life, and eventually kidney failure. It is caused by mutations to PKD1 or PKD2, encoding polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, respectively. Their function and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of polycystic kidney disease are not well understood. The objective of this review is to synthesize a large body of literature that examines how reduction of functional PC1 or PC2 at the primary cilia and/or the endoplasmic reticulum directly disrupts intracellular calcium signaling and indirectly disrupts calcium regulated cAMP and purinergic signaling. We propose a hypothetical model where dysregulated metabolism of cAMP and purinergic signaling increase the sensitivity of principal cells in collecting ducts and of tubular epithelial cells in the distal nephron to the constant tonic action of vasopressin. The resulting magnified response to vasopressin further enhances the disruption of calcium signaling initiated by mutations to PC1 or PC2 and activates downstream signaling pathways responsible for impaired tubulogenesis, cell proliferation, increased fluid secretion and interstitial inflammation. PMID:25870007

  19. D1-D2 Dopamine Receptor Synergy Promotes Calcium Signaling via Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Lani S.; Free, R. Benjamin; Doyle, Trevor B.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Rankin, Michele L.

    2013-01-01

    The D1 dopamine receptor (D1R) has been proposed to form a hetero-oligomer with the D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), which in turn results in a complex that couples to phospholipase C–mediated intracellular calcium release. We have sought to elucidate the pharmacology and mechanism of action of this putative signaling pathway. Dopamine dose-response curves assaying intracellular calcium mobilization in cells heterologously expressing the D1 and D2 subtypes, either alone or in combination, and using subtype selective ligands revealed that concurrent stimulation is required for coupling. Surprisingly, characterization of a putative D1-D2 heteromer-selective ligand, 6-chloro-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-1-(3-methylphenyl)-1H-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol (SKF83959), found no stimulation of calcium release, but it did find a broad range of cross-reactivity with other G protein–coupled receptors. In contrast, SKF83959 appeared to be an antagonist of calcium mobilization. Overexpression of Gqα with the D1 and D2 dopamine receptors enhanced the dopamine-stimulated calcium response. However, this was also observed in cells expressing Gqα with only the D1R. Inactivation of Gi or Gs with pertussis or cholera toxin, respectively, largely, but not entirely, reduced the calcium response in D1R and D2R cotransfected cells. Moreover, sequestration of Gβγ subunits through overexpression of G protein receptor kinase 2 mutants either completely or largely eliminated dopamine-stimulated calcium mobilization. Our data suggest that the mechanism of D1R/D2R–mediated calcium signaling involves more than receptor-mediated Gq protein activation, may largely involve downstream signaling pathways, and may not be completely heteromer-specific. In addition, SKF83959 may not exhibit selective activation of D1-D2 heteromers, and its significant cross-reactivity to other receptors warrants careful interpretation of its use in vivo. PMID:23680635

  20. Barcoding T Cell Calcium Response Diversity with Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS)

    PubMed Central

    Sergé, Arnauld; Bernard, Anne-Marie; Phélipot, Marie-Claire; Bertaux, Nicolas; Fallet, Mathieu; Grenot, Pierre; Marguet, Didier; He, Hai-Tao; Hamon, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS), a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells. PMID:24086124

  1. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Miller, Cassandra L.; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Zou, Juan; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs) play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o) homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids, and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT) domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR's cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs) in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics. PMID:27746744

  2. Influence of zinc on calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways during aluminium-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2014-10-01

    Metals perform important functions in the normal physiological system, and alterations in their levels may lead to a number of diseases. Aluminium (Al) has been implicated as a major risk factor, which is linked to several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, zinc (Zn) is considered as a neuromodulator and an essential dietary element that regulates a number of biological activities in our body. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Zn supplementation, if any, in ameliorating the changes induced by Al on calcium signalling pathway. Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 140-160 g were divided into four different groups viz.: normal control, aluminium treated (100 mg/kg b.wt./day via oral gavage), zinc treated (227 mg/l in drinking water) and combined aluminium and zinc treated. All the treatments were carried out for a total duration of 8 weeks. Al treatment decreased the Ca(2+) ATPase activity whereas increased the levels of 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, intracellular calcium and total calcium content in both the cerebrum and cerebellum, which, however, were modulated upon Zn supplementation. Al treatment exhibited a significant elevation in the protein expressions of phospholipase C, inositol triphosphate and protein kinase A but decreased the expression of protein kinase C, which, however, was reversed upon Zn co-treatment. Al treatment also revealed alterations in neurohistoarchitecture in the form of calcium deposits, which were improved upon zinc co-administration. The present study, therefore, suggests that zinc regulates the intracellular calcium signalling pathway during aluminium-induced neurodegeneration.

  3. Calcium signaling in skeletal muscle development, maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tu, Michelle K; Levin, Jacqueline B; Hamilton, Andrew M; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle-specific stem cells are pivotal for tissue development and regeneration. Muscle plasticity, inherent in these processes, is also essential for daily life activities. Great advances and efforts have been made in understanding the function of the skeletal muscle-dedicated stem cells, called muscle satellite cells, and the specific signaling mechanisms that activate them for recruitment in the repair of the injured muscle. Elucidating these signaling mechanisms may contribute to devising therapies for muscular injury or disease. Here we review the studies that have contributed to our understanding of how calcium signaling regulates skeletal muscle development, homeostasis and regeneration, with a focus on the calcium dynamics and calcium-dependent effectors that participate in these processes.

  4. Mechanisms of Borrelia burgdorferi internalization and intracellular innate immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Kern, Aurelie

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease is a long-term infection whose most severe pathology is characterized by inflammatory arthritis of the lower bearing joints, carditis, and neuropathy. The inflammatory cascades are initiated through the early recognition of invading Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes by cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophage. B. burgdorferi does not have an intracellular niche and thus much research has focused on immune pathways activated by pathogen recognition molecules at the cell surface, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, in recent years, studies have shown that internalization of the bacterium by host cells is an important component of the defense machinery in response to B. burgdorferi. Upon internalization, B. burgdorferi is trafficked through an endo/lysosomal pathway resulting in the activation of a number of intracellular pathogen recognition receptors including TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs). Here we will review the innate immune molecules that participate in both cell surface and intracellular immune activation by B. burgdorferi.

  5. The fragile X mental retardation protein developmentally regulates the strength and fidelity of calcium signaling in Drosophila mushroom body neurons.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Charles R; Broadie, Kendal

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a broad-spectrum neurological disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli, hyperactivity and severe cognitive impairment. FXS is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, whose FMRP product regulates mRNA translation downstream of synaptic activity to modulate changes in synaptic architecture, function and plasticity. Null Drosophila FMR1 (dfmr1) mutants exhibit reduced learning and loss of protein synthesis-dependent memory consolidation, which is dependent on the brain mushroom body (MB) learning and memory center. We targeted a transgenic GFP-based calcium reporter to the MB in order to analyze calcium dynamics downstream of neuronal activation. In the dfmr1 null MB, there was significant augmentation of the calcium transients induced by membrane depolarization, as well as elevated release of calcium from intracellular organelle stores. The severity of these calcium signaling defects increased with developmental age, although early stages were characterized by highly variable, low fidelity calcium regulation. At the single neuron level, both calcium transient and calcium store release defects were exhibited by dfmr1 null MB neurons in primary culture. Null dfmr1 mutants exhibit reduced brain mRNA expression of calcium-binding proteins, including calcium buffers calmodulin and calbindin, predicting that the inability to appropriately sequester cytosolic calcium may be the common mechanistic defect causing calcium accumulation following both influx and store release. Changes in the magnitude and fidelity of calcium signals in the absence of dFMRP likely contribute to defects in neuronal structure/function, leading to the hallmark learning and memory dysfunction of FXS.

  6. Modeling of [Formula: see text]-mediated calcium signaling in vascular endothelial cells induced by fluid shear stress and ATP.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Fei; Xiang, Cheng; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2015-10-01

    The calcium signaling plays a vital role in flow-dependent vascular endothelial cell (VEC) physiology. Variations in fluid shear stress and ATP concentration in blood vessels can activate dynamic responses of cytosolic-free [Formula: see text] through various calcium channels on the plasma membrane. In this paper, a novel dynamic model has been proposed for transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 [Formula: see text]-mediated intracellular calcium dynamics in VECs induced by fluid shear stress and ATP. Our model includes [Formula: see text] signaling pathways through P2Y receptors and [Formula: see text] channels (indirect mechanism) and captures the roles of the [Formula: see text] compound channels in VEC [Formula: see text] signaling in response to fluid shear stress (direct mechanism). In particular, it takes into account that the [Formula: see text] compound channels are regulated by intracellular [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] concentrations. The simulation studies have demonstrated that the dynamic responses of calcium concentration produced by the proposed model correlate well with the existing experimental observations. We also conclude from the simulation studies that endogenously released ATP may play an insignificant role in the process of intracellular [Formula: see text] response to shear stress.

  7. Glycolytic inhibition: effects on diastolic relaxation and intracellular calcium handling in hypertrophied rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Y; Weinberg, E O; Ito, N; Mochizuki, T; Barry, W H; Lorell, B H

    1995-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that glycolytic inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose causes greater impairment of diastolic relaxation and intracellular calcium handling in well-oxygenated hypertrophied adult rat myocytes compared with control myocytes. We simultaneously measured cell motion and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) with indo-1 in isolated paced myocytes from aortic-banded rats and sham-operated rats. There was no difference in either the end-diastolic or peak-systolic [Ca2+]i between control and hypertrophied myocytes (97 +/- 18 vs. 105 +/- 15 nM, 467 +/- 92 vs. 556 +/- 67 nM, respectively). Myocytes were first superfused with oxygenated Hepes-buffered solution containing 1.2 mM CaCl2, 5.6 mM glucose, and 5 mM acetate, and paced at 3 Hz at 36 degrees C. Exposure to 20 mM 2-deoxyglucose as substitution of glucose for 15 min caused an upward shift of end-diastolic cell position in both control (n = 5) and hypertrophied myocytes (n = 10) (P < 0.001 vs. baseline), indicating an impaired extent of relaxation. Hypertrophied myocytes, however, showed a greater upward shift in end-diastolic cell position and slowing of relaxation compared with control myocytes (delta 144 +/- 28 vs. 55 +/- 15% of baseline diastolic position, P < 0.02). Exposure to 2-deoxyglucose increased end-diastolic [Ca2+]i in both groups (P < 0.001 vs. baseline), but there was no difference between hypertrophied and control myocytes (218 +/- 38 vs. 183 +/- 29 nM, respectively). The effects of 2-deoxyglucose were corroborated in isolated oxygenated perfused hearts in which glycolytic inhibition which caused severe elevation of isovolumic diastolic pressure and prolongation of relaxation in the hypertrophied hearts compared with controls. In summary, the inhibition of the glycolytic pathway impairs diastolic relaxation to a greater extent in hypertrophied myocytes than in control myocytes even in well-oxygenated conditions. The severe impairment of diastolic relaxation induced by 2

  8. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ryan C; Fees, Colby P; Holland, William L; Winger, Courtney C; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca](i)). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 min after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca](i) and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA specifically bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca](i), PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca](i) release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca](i) release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization.

  9. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Zhou, Bin; Lai, Xiaohan; Wang, Liyun; Luo, Erping; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes have been hypothesized to be the major mechanosensors in bone. How in situ osteocytes respond to mechanical stimuli is still unclear because of technical difficulties. In vitro studies have shown that osteocytes exhibited unique calcium (Ca2+) oscillations to fluid shear. However, whether this mechanotransduction phenomenon holds for in situ osteocytes embedded within a mineralized bone matrix under dynamic loading remains unknown. Using a novel synchronized loading/imaging technique, we successfully visualized in real time and quantified Ca2+ responses in osteocytes and bone surface cells in situ under controlled dynamic loading on intact mouse tibia. The resultant fluid-induced shear stress on the osteocyte in the lacunocanalicular system (LCS) was also quantified. Osteocytes, but not surface cells, displayed repetitive Ca2+ spikes in response to dynamic loading, with spike frequency and magnitude dependent on load magnitude, tissue strain, and shear stress in the LCS. The Ca2+ oscillations were significantly reduced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depletion and P2 purinergic receptor (P2R)/phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. This study provides direct evidence that osteocytes respond to in situ mechanical loading by Ca2+ oscillations, which are dependent on the P2R/PLC/inositol trisphosphate/ER pathway. This study develops a novel approach in skeletal mechanobiology and also advances our fundamental knowledge of bone mechanotransduction.—Jing, D., Baik, A. D., Lu, X. L., Zhou, B., Lai, X., Wang, L., Luo, E., Guo, X. E. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading. PMID:24347610

  10. LOX-1 regulates estrogenesis via intracellular calcium release from bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, J M; Vernunft, A; Krüger, B; Plinski, C; Viergutz, T

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol produced by ovarian granulosa cells triggers the luteinizing hormone surge which in turn initiates ovulation in female mammals. Disturbances in estradiol production from granulosa cells are a major reason for reproductive dysfunctions in dairy cows. Endogenous estradiol production might be altered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), a receptor of ox-LDL, leads to increased estrogenesis in granulosa cells. This activity is mediated by calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-dependent and ER-independent calcium pools. Inhibition of the LOX-1 signal transduction pathway is followed by mitochondrial alterations. The membrane potential ΔΨ increases and the ROS production decreases in mitochondria after blocking LOX-1. Our data indicate that blocking the LOX-1 receptor signal pathway might be a promising way to improve steroid hormone concentrations in metabolically highly active female mammals and, therefore, to defend against reproductive dysfunctions in humans and animals.

  11. Calcium and signal transduction in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Reddy, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental and hormonal signals control diverse physiological processes in plants. The mechanisms by which plant cells perceive and transduce these signals are poorly understood. Understanding biochemical and molecular events involved in signal transduction pathways has become one of the most active areas of plant research. Research during the last 15 years has established that Ca2+ acts as a messenger in transducing external signals. The evidence in support of Ca2+ as a messenger is unequivocal and fulfills all the requirements of a messenger. The role of Ca2+ becomes even more important because it is the only messenger known so far in plants. Since our last review on the Ca2+ messenger system in 1987, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating various aspects of Ca(2+) -signaling pathways in plants. These include demonstration of signal-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+, calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins, identification of different Ca2+ channels, characterization of Ca(2+) -dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) both at the biochemical and molecular levels, evidence for the presence of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, and increased evidence in support of the role of inositol phospholipids in the Ca(2+) -signaling system. Despite the progress in Ca2+ research in plants, it is still in its infancy and much more needs to be done to understand the precise mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of these recent developments in Ca2+ research as it relates to signal transduction in plants.

  12. Calcium Signaling of Lysophosphatidylethanolamine through LPA1 in Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Soo-Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), a lyso-type metabolite of phosphatidylethanolamine, has been reported to be an intercellular signaling molecule. LPE mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ through G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in some cells types. However, GPCRs for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were not implicated in the LPE-mediated activities in LPA GPCR overexpression systems or in SK-OV3 ovarian cancer cells. In the present study, in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, experiments with LPA1 antagonists showed LPE induced intracellular Ca2+ increases in an LPA1 GPCR-dependent manner. Furthermore, LPE increased intracellular Ca2+ through pertussis-sensitive G proteins, edelfosine-sensitive-phospholipase C, 2-APB-sensitive IP3 receptors, Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, and subsequent Ca2+ influx across plasma membranes, and LPA acted on LPA1 and LPA2 receptors to induce Ca2+ response in a 2-APB-sensitive and insensitive manner. These findings suggest novel involvements for LPE and LPA in calcium signaling in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. PMID:27302965

  13. Calcium Signaling of Lysophosphatidylethanolamine through LPA1 in Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Soo-Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), a lyso-type metabolite of phosphatidylethanolamine, has been reported to be an intercellular signaling molecule. LPE mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) through G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in some cells types. However, GPCRs for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were not implicated in the LPE-mediated activities in LPA GPCR overexpression systems or in SK-OV3 ovarian cancer cells. In the present study, in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, experiments with LPA1 antagonists showed LPE induced intracellular Ca(2+) increases in an LPA1 GPCR-dependent manner. Furthermore, LPE increased intracellular Ca(2+) through pertussis-sensitive G proteins, edelfosine-sensitive-phospholipase C, 2-APB-sensitive IP3 receptors, Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and subsequent Ca(2+) influx across plasma membranes, and LPA acted on LPA1 and LPA2 receptors to induce Ca(2+) response in a 2-APB-sensitive and insensitive manner. These findings suggest novel involvements for LPE and LPA in calcium signaling in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

  14. The symphony of autophagy and calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhiyuan; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy), including phosphorylating and dephosphorylating components of the autophagy-related (Atg) core machinery and the corresponding upstream transcriptional factors, is important for the precise modulation of autophagy levels. Several kinases that are involved in phosphorylating autophagy-related proteins have been identified in both yeast and mammalian cells. However, there has been much less research published with regard to the identification of the complementary phosphatases that function in autophagy. A recent study identified PPP3/calcineurin, a calcium-dependent phosphatase, as a regulator of autophagy, and demonstrated that one of the key targets of PPP3/calcineurin is TFEB, a master transcriptional factor that controls autophagy and lysosomal function in mammalian cells.

  15. Calcium Signaling in Oomycetes: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Limian; Mackrill, John J

    2016-01-01

    Oomycetes are a family of eukaryotic microbes that superficially resemble fungi, but which are phylogenetically distinct from them. These organisms cause major global economic losses to agriculture and fisheries, with representative pathogens being Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late potato blight and Saprolegnia diclina, the instigator of "cotton molds" in fish. As in all eukaryotes, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) is a key second messenger in oomycetes, regulating life-cycle transitions, controlling motility and chemotaxis and, in excess, leading to cell-death. Despite this, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations in these organisms. Consequently, this review analyzed the presence of candidate calcium channels encoded within the nine oomycete genomes that are currently available. This revealed key differences between oomycetes and other eukaryotes, in particular the expansion and loss of different channel families, and the presence of a phylum-specific group of proteins, termed the polycystic kidney disease tandem ryanodine receptor domain (PKDRR) channels.

  16. Spatial separation of two different pathways accounting for the generation of calcium signals in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oschmann, Franziska; Mergenthaler, Konstantin; Obermayer, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes integrate and process synaptic information and exhibit calcium (Ca2+) signals in response to incoming information from neighboring synapses. The generation of Ca2+ signals is mostly attributed to Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores evoked by an elevated metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity. Different experimental results associated the generation of Ca2+ signals to the activity of the glutamate transporter (GluT). The GluT itself does not influence the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but it indirectly activates Ca2+ entry over the membrane. A closer look into Ca2+ signaling in different astrocytic compartments revealed a spatial separation of those two pathways. Ca2+ signals in the soma are mainly generated by Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores (mGluR-dependent pathway). In astrocytic compartments close to the synapse most Ca2+ signals are evoked by Ca2+ entry over the plasma membrane (GluT-dependent pathway). This assumption is supported by the finding, that the volume ratio between the internal Ca2+ store and the intracellular space decreases from the soma towards the synapse. We extended a model for mGluR-dependent Ca2+ signals in astrocytes with the GluT-dependent pathway. Additionally, we included the volume ratio between the internal Ca2+ store and the intracellular compartment into the model in order to analyze Ca2+ signals either in the soma or close to the synapse. Our model results confirm the spatial separation of the mGluR- and GluT-dependent pathways along the astrocytic process. The model allows to study the binary Ca2+ response during a block of either of both pathways. Moreover, the model contributes to a better understanding of the impact of channel densities on the interaction of both pathways and on the Ca2+ signal. PMID:28192424

  17. Contractility and calcium signaling of human myometrium are profoundly affected by cholesterol manipulation: implications for labor?

    PubMed

    Jie Zhang; Kendrick, Annabelle; Quenby, Siobhan; Wray, Susan

    2007-07-01

    The authors elucidate cholesterol's effect on human uterine contractility and calcium signaling to test the hypotheses that elevation of cholesterol decreases uterine activity and that oxytocin cannot augment contraction when cholesterol is elevated. The effects of cholesterol extraction with methyl beta-cyclodextrin and enrichment with low-density lipoproteins and cholesterol on contractile activity and intracellular calcium signaling in spontaneous or oxytocin-stimulated myometrium are determined. Force occurring spontaneously and with oxytocin is significantly increased by cholesterol extraction. Cholesterol enrichment profoundly inhibits force production in a dose-dependent manner and could reverse the effects of cholesterol extraction. Qualitatively similar results are found for nonpregnant and pregnant laboring and non-laboring myometrium. These contractile changes are related to changes in intracellular Ca2+ . Thus, elevated cholesterol is deleterious to contractility and Ca2+ signaling in human myometrium. Cholesterol may contribute to uterine quiescence but could cause difficulties in labor in obese/dyslipidemic women, consistent with their increased cesarean delivery rates.

  18. Calcium signals drive cell shape changes during zebrafish midbrain-hindbrain boundary formation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Srishti U; Visetsouk, Mike R; Garde, Ryan J; Hennes, Leah; Kwas, Constance; Gutzman, Jennifer H

    2017-02-01

    One of the first morphogenetic events in the vertebrate brain is the formation of the highly conserved midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB). Specific cell shape changes occur at the point of deepest constriction of the MHB, the midbrain-hindbrain boundary constriction (MHBC), and are critical for proper MHB formation. These cell shape changes are controlled by non-muscle myosin II (NMII) motor proteins which are tightly regulated via the phosphorylation of their associated myosin regulatory light chains (MRLC). However, the upstream signaling pathways that initiate the regulation of NMII to mediate cell shape changes during MHB morphogenesis are not known. We show that intracellular calcium signals are critical for the regulation of cell shortening during initial MHB formation. We demonstrate that the MHB region is poised to respond to calcium transients that occur in the MHB at the onset of MHB morphogenesis and that calcium mediates phosphorylation of MRLC specifically in MHB tissue. Our results indicate that calmodulin 1a (calm1a), expressed specifically in the MHB, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), together mediate MHBC cell length. Our data suggest that modulation of NMII activity by calcium is critical for proper regulation of cell length to determine embryonic brain shape during development.

  19. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  20. Mycobacterium bovis-mediated induction of human beta-defensin-2 in epithelial cells is controlled by intracellular calcium and p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Alba, Laura; Trejo, Artemisa

    2007-05-01

    Induction of human beta defensin-2 (HBD-2) by mycobacteria has been reported. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which mycobacteria up-regulates HBD-2 gene expression in epithelial cells remains poorly understood. In this work, we provide evidence that the induction of HBD-2 mRNA in response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by pretreatment with a cell-permeable BAPTA-AM, which chelates intracellular calcium. Our data also demonstrate that HBD-2 mRNA induction by M. bovis in A549 lung epithelial cells requires activation of calmodulin. Interestingly, HBD-2 mRNA expression in response to M. bovis BCG was attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK]), but not by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK): PD98059. Furthermore, we found that a second p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190) significantly blocked M. bovis BCG-mediated HBD-2 induction in A549 lung epithelial cells. Together, these data suggest that M. bovis BCG induces HBD-2 mRNA expression in A549 lung epithelial cells at least in part mediated through intracellular calcium flux as well as activation of signaling protein of p38MAPK, but not ERK.

  1. Contribution of calcium ions and hydrogen ions to the signal transduction chain in phytochrome-mediated spore germination. [Onoclea sensibilis L

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, R.

    1985-01-01

    Red light stimulates germination in the spores of Onoclea sensibilis L. Phytochrome is confirmed to be the photoreceptor pigment in the germination response by demonstrating red-far-red photoreversibility. External Ca/sup 2 +/ is required for this response with a threshold at a submicromolar concentration. Red light stimulates an increase in the total concentration of intracellular calcium in the spores as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Subsequent exposure to far-red light inhibits the red light-induced increase in intracellular calcium. The majority of the increase occurs 5 minutes after the onset of irradiation. The calcium-antagonist, La/sup 3 +/ inhibits both germination and the red light-induced increase in intracellular calcium. Using /sup 31/P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the author tested the hypothesis that a sustained increase in intracellular pH contributes to the signal transduction chain. He never detected a red light-induced increase in intracellular pH or a change in portion efflux. An artificially induced change in intracellular pH of greater than 1 pH unit (5.8-7.2) has no effect on germination. Although the intracellular pH can be varied in magnitude greater than it would be expected to change if it were acting as an intracellular signal, germination of Onoclea spores is independent of intracellular pH in this range. These data indicate that a sustained increase in intracellular pH does not contribute to the single transduction chain phytochrome-mediated fern spore germination. Therefore, Ca/sup 2 +/, but not pH, contributes to the signal transduction chain in phytochrome-mediated fern spore germination.

  2. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  3. NG2 glial cells integrate synaptic input in global and dendritic calcium signals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjing; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Nicolas, Vicky; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic signaling to NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells (NG2 cells) could be key to rendering myelination of axons dependent on neuronal activity, but it has remained unclear whether NG2 glial cells integrate and respond to synaptic input. Here we show that NG2 cells perform linear integration of glutamatergic synaptic inputs and respond with increasing dendritic calcium elevations. Synaptic activity induces rapid Ca2+ signals mediated by low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels under strict inhibitory control of voltage-gated A-type K+ channels. Ca2+ signals can be global and originate throughout the cell. However, voltage-gated channels are also found in thin dendrites which act as compartmentalized processing units and generate local calcium transients. Taken together, the activity-dependent control of Ca2+ signals by A-type channels and the global versus local signaling domains make intracellular Ca2+ in NG2 cells a prime signaling molecule to transform neurotransmitter release into activity-dependent myelination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16262.001 PMID:27644104

  4. NG2 glial cells integrate synaptic input in global and dendritic calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Nicolas, Vicky; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2016-09-19

    Synaptic signaling to NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells (NG2 cells) could be key to rendering myelination of axons dependent on neuronal activity, but it has remained unclear whether NG2 glial cells integrate and respond to synaptic input. Here we show that NG2 cells perform linear integration of glutamatergic synaptic inputs and respond with increasing dendritic calcium elevations. Synaptic activity induces rapid Ca(2+) signals mediated by low-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels under strict inhibitory control of voltage-gated A-type K(+) channels. Ca(2+) signals can be global and originate throughout the cell. However, voltage-gated channels are also found in thin dendrites which act as compartmentalized processing units and generate local calcium transients. Taken together, the activity-dependent control of Ca(2+) signals by A-type channels and the global versus local signaling domains make intracellular Ca(2+) in NG2 cells a prime signaling molecule to transform neurotransmitter release into activity-dependent myelination.

  5. The Notch intracellular domain integrates signals from Wnt, Hedgehog, TGFβ/BMP and hypoxia pathways.

    PubMed

    Borggrefe, Tilman; Lauth, Matthias; Zwijsen, An; Huylebroeck, Danny; Oswald, Franz; Giaimo, Benedetto Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Notch signaling is a highly conserved signal transduction pathway that regulates stem cell maintenance and differentiation in several organ systems. Upon activation, the Notch receptor is proteolytically processed, its intracellular domain (NICD) translocates into the nucleus and activates expression of target genes. Output, strength and duration of the signal are tightly regulated by post-translational modifications. Here we review the intracellular post-translational regulation of Notch that fine-tunes the outcome of the Notch response. We also describe how crosstalk with other conserved signaling pathways like the Wnt, Hedgehog, hypoxia and TGFβ/BMP pathways can affect Notch signaling output. This regulation can happen by regulation of ligand, receptor or transcription factor expression, regulation of protein stability of intracellular key components, usage of the same cofactors or coregulation of the same key target genes. Since carcinogenesis is often dependent on at least two of these pathways, a better understanding of their molecular crosstalk is pivotal.

  6. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses.

  7. Intracellular calcium levels correlate with speed and persistent forward motion in migrating neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, J T; Ghosh, R N; Maxfield, F R

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and human neutrophil motility was studied by video microscopy. Neutrophils stimulated by a uniform concentration of an N-formylated peptide chemoattractant (f-Met-Leu-Phe) were tracked during chemokinetic migration on albumin, fibronectin, and vitronectin. [Ca2+]i buffering with quin2 resulted in significant decreases in mean speed on albumin. To further characterize the relationship between [Ca2+]i changes and motility we carried out a cross-correlation analysis of [Ca2+]i with several motility parameters. Cross-correlations between [Ca2+]i and each cell's speed, angle changes, turn strength, and persistent forward motion revealed (i) a positive correlation between [Ca2+]i and cell speed (p < 0.05), (ii) no significant correlation between turns and calcium spikes, and (iii) the occurrence of turns during periods of low speed. Significant negative correlations between [Ca2+]i and angle change were noted on the high adhesion substrates vitronectin and fibronectin but not on the low adhesion substrate albumin. These data imply that there is a general temporal relationship between [Ca2+]i, speed, and persistent motion. However, the correlations are not sufficiently strong to imply that changes in [Ca2+]i are required proximal signals for velocity changes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:7787012

  8. ERK1/2 mediates sperm acrosome reaction through elevation of intracellular calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Jaldety, Yael; Breitbart, Haim

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilization capacity after residing in the female reproductive tract for a few hours in a process called capacitation. Only capacitated sperm can bind the zona pellucida (ZP) of the egg and undergo the acrosome reaction, a process that allows penetration and fertilization. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) mediates signalling in many cell types, however its role in sperm function is largely unknown. Here we show that ERK1/2 is highly phosphorylated/activated after a short incubation of mouse sperm under capacitation conditions and that this phosphorylation is reduced after longer incubation. Further phosphorylation was observed upon addition of crude extract of egg ZP or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The mitogen-activated ERK-kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 abolished ERK1/2 phosphorylation, in vitro fertilization rate and the acrosome reaction induced by ZP or EGF but not by the Ca2+-ionophore A23187. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 along the capacitation process diminished almost completely the sperm's ability to go through the acrosome reaction, while inhibition at the end of capacitation attenuated the acrosome reaction rate by only 45%. The fact that the acrosome reaction, induced by the Ca2+ -ionophore A23187, was not inhibited by U0126 suggests that ERK1/2 mediates the acrosome reaction by activating Ca2+ transport into the cell. Direct determination of intracellular [Ca2+] revealed that Ca2+ influx induced by EGF or ZP was completely blocked by U0126. Thus, it has been established that the increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation/activation in response to ZP or by activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by EGF, is a key event for intracellular Ca2+ elevation and the subsequent occurrence of the acrosome reaction.

  9. Intracellular Ca2+ signals in human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cells (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Squires, P E; Amiranoff, B; Dunne, M J

    1994-10-01

    Single-cell microfluorimetry techniques have been used to examine the effects of acetylcholine (0.1-100 microM) on the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cell line, QGP-1N. When applied to the bath solution, acetylcholine was found to evoke a marked and rapid increase in [Ca2+]i at all concentrations tested. These responses were either sustained, or associated with the generation of complex patterns of [Ca2+]i transients. Overall, the pattern of response was concentration related. In general, 0.1-10 microM acetylcholine initiated a series of repetitive oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+, whilst at higher concentrations the responses consisted of a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i followed by a smaller more sustained increase. Without external Ca2+, 100 microM acetylcholine caused only a transient rise in [Ca2+]i, whereas lower concentrations of the agonist were able to initiate, but not maintain, [Ca2+]i oscillations. Acetylcholine-evoked Ca2+ signals were abolished by atropine (1-10 microM), verapamil (100 microM) and caffeine (20 mM). Nifedipine failed to have any significant effect upon agonist-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, whilst 50 mM KCl, used to depolarise the cell membrane, only elicited a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Ryanodine (50-500 nM) and caffeine (1-20 mM) did not increase basal Ca2+ levels, but the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-hydroquinone (TBQ) and thapsigargin both elevated [Ca2+]i levels. These data demonstrate for the first time cytosolic Ca2+ signals in single isolated somatostatin-secreting cells of the pancreas. We have demonstrated that acetylcholine will evoke both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilisation, and we have partially addressed the subcellular mechanism responsible for these events.

  10. [Electrophysiology and calcium signalling in human bronchial smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Marthan, R; Hyvelin, J M; Roux, E; Savineau, J P

    1999-01-01

    Recently, cells isolated from airways have been used to characterize precisely the electrophysiological properties of this smooth muscle and to describe the changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) occurring upon agonist stimulation. Although most studies have produced consistent results in terms of types of ion channel and pathways of calcium signalling implicated in the mechanical activity of airways, there are differences according to (i) the site along the bronchial tree (trachea vs. bronchi); (ii) the proliferating status of the cells (freshly isolated vs. cultured) and (iii) the species (human vs. animals). With regard to the electrophysiological properties of airway smooth muscle, the contribution to [Ca2+]i rise of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels depends on the balance between depolarization related to non-specific cation channel and/or chloride channel activation and hyperpolarization related to activation of a variety of potassium channels. Most of the above-mentioned channels appear to be controlled, directly or indirectly, by agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle. With regard to calcium signalling, the pattern of agonist-induced [Ca2+]i responses, the so-called [Ca2+]i oscillations, has been observed recently in freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells. The role and the calcium sources involved in these oscillations in human bronchial smooth muscle are currently being investigated.

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channels function as Ca2+-activated signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2014-02-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are transmembrane cell surface proteins responsible for multifunctional signals. In response to voltage, VGCCs trigger synaptic transmission, drive muscle contraction, and regulate gene expression. Voltage perturbations open VGCCs enabling Ca(2+) binding to the low affinity Ca(2+) binding site of the channel pore. Subsequent to permeation, Ca(2+) targets selective proteins to activate diverse signaling pathways. It is becoming apparent that the Ca(2+)-bound channel triggers secretion in excitable cells and drives contraction in cardiomyocytes prior to Ca(2+) permeation. Here, I highlight recent data implicating receptor-like function of the Ca(2+)-bound channel in converting external Ca(2+) into an intracellular signal. The two sequential mechanistic perspectives of VGCC function are discussed in the context of the prevailing and long-standing current models of depolarization-evoked secretion and cardiac contraction.

  12. Increases in Intracellular Calcium Triggered by Channelrhodopsin-2 Potentiate the Response of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor mGluR7*

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, John H.; Herin, Greta Ann; Nagel, Georg; Bamberg, Ernst; Scheschonka, Astrid; Betz, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7a (mGluR7a), a heptahelical Gαi/o-coupled protein, has been shown to be important for presynaptic feedback inhibition at central synapses and certain forms of long term potentiation and long term depression. The intracellular C terminus of mGluR7a interacts with calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and calmodulin antagonists have been found to abolish presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release in neurons and mGluR7a-induced activation of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK) channels in HEK293 cells. Here, we characterized the Ca2+ dependence of mGluR7a signaling in Xenopus oocytes by using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), a Ca2+-permeable, light-activated ion channel for triggering Ca2+ influx, and a GIRK3.1/3.2 concatemer to monitor mGluR7a responses. Application of the agonist (S)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (l-AP4) (1–100 μm) caused a dose-dependent inward current in high K+ solutions due to activation of GIRK channels by G-protein βγ subunits released from mGluR7a. Elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ by light stimulation of ChR2 markedly increased the amplitude of l-AP4 responses, and this effect was attenuated by the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester). l-AP4 responses were potentiated by submembranous [Ca2+] levels within physiological ranges and with a threshold close to resting [Ca2+]i values, as determined by recording the endogenous Xenopus Ca2+-activated chloride conductance. Together, these results show that l-AP4-dependent mGluR7a signaling is potentiated by physiological levels of [Ca2+]i, consistent with a model in which presynaptic mGluR7a acts as a coincidence detector of Ca2+ influx and glutamate release. PMID:18599484

  13. The calcium signaling toolkit of the Apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Sebastian; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-03-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have complex life cycles, frequently split between different hosts and reliant on rapid responses as the parasites react to changing environmental conditions. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) signaling is consequently essential for the cellular and developmental changes that support Apicomplexan parasitism. Apicomplexan genomes reveal a rich repertoire of genes involved in calcium signaling, although many of the genes responsible for observed physiological changes remain unknown. There is evidence, for example, for the presence of a nifedipine-sensitive calcium entry mechanism in Toxoplasma, but the molecular components involved in Ca(2+) entry in both Toxoplasma and Plasmodium, have not been identified. The major calcium stores are the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the acidocalcisomes, and the plant-like vacuole in Toxoplasma, or the food vacuole in Plasmodium spp. Pharmacological evidence suggests that Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores may be mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) or cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) although there is no molecular evidence for the presence of receptors for these second messengers in the parasites. Several Ca(2+)-ATPases are present in Apicomplexans and a putative mitochondrial Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger has been identified. Apicomplexan genomes contain numerous genes encoding Ca(2+)-binding proteins, with the notable expansion of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), whose study has revealed roles in gliding motility, microneme secretion, host cell invasion and egress, and parasite differentiation. Microneme secretion has also been shown to depend on the C2 domain containing protein DOC2 in both Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma, providing further evidence for the complex transduction of Ca(2+) signals in these organisms. The characterization of these pathways could lead to the discovery of novel drug targets and to a better understanding of the role of Ca(2+) in these parasites.

  14. ATP releasing connexin 30 hemichannels mediate flow-induced calcium signaling in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30(-/-) mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs) from wild type and Cx30(-/-) mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca(2+)]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30(-/-) CCDs ([Ca(2+)]i increased only 1.2-fold, p < 0.0001 vs. WT, n = 6 each). To further test our hypothesis we performed CD [Ca(2+)]i imaging in intact mouse kidneys in vivo using multiphoton microscopy and micropuncture delivery of the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Rhod-2. We found intrinsic, spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in free-flowing CDs of wild type but not Cx30(-/-) mice. The [Ca(2+)]i oscillations were sensitive also to P2-receptor inhibition by suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption.

  15. ATP Releasing Connexin 30 Hemichannels Mediate Flow-Induced Calcium Signaling in the Collecting Duct

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L.; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30−/− mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs) from wild type and Cx30−/− mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca2+]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30−/− CCDs ([Ca2+]i increased only 1.2-fold, p < 0.0001 vs. WT, n = 6 each). To further test our hypothesis we performed CD [Ca2+]i imaging in intact mouse kidneys in vivo using multiphoton microscopy and micropuncture delivery of the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Rhod-2. We found intrinsic, spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations in free-flowing CDs of wild type but not Cx30−/− mice. The [Ca2+]i oscillations were sensitive also to P2-receptor inhibition by suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption. PMID:24137132

  16. Noise decomposition of intracellular biochemical signaling networks using nonequivalent reporters

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Alex; Cheong, Raymond; Levchenko, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Experimental measurements of biochemical noise have primarily focused on sources of noise at the gene expression level due to limitations of existing noise decomposition techniques. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework that extends classical extrinsic–intrinsic noise analysis and enables mapping of noise within upstream signaling networks free of such restrictions. The framework applies to systems for which the responses of interest are linearly correlated on average, although the framework can be easily generalized to the nonlinear case. Interestingly, despite the high degree of complexity and nonlinearity of most mammalian signaling networks, three distinct tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling network branches displayed linearly correlated responses, in both wild-type and perturbed versions of the network, across multiple orders of magnitude of ligand concentration. Using the noise mapping analysis, we find that the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway generates higher noise than the NF-κB pathway, whereas the activation of c-Jun adds a greater amount of noise than the activation of ATF-2. In addition, we find that the A20 protein can suppress noise in the activation of ATF-2 by separately inhibiting the TNF receptor complex and JNK pathway through a negative feedback mechanism. These results, easily scalable to larger and more complex networks, pave the way toward assessing how noise propagates through cellular signaling pathways and create a foundation on which we can further investigate the relationship between signaling system architecture and biological noise. PMID:25404303

  17. Intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Ogawa, Taisuke; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujii, Hiroaki; Ando, Masaki

    2014-11-01

    The role of perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses in cognitive behavior was examined focusing on synaptic Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired when extracellular Zn(2+) levels were decreased by injection of clioquinol and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylendediamine. To pursue the effect of the loss and/or blockade of Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells, ZnAF-2DA (100 pmol, 0.1 mM/1 µl), an intracellular Zn(2+) chelator, was locally injected into the dentate molecular layer of rats. ZnAF-2DA injection, which was estimated to chelate intracellular Zn(2+) signaling only in the dentate gyrus, affected object recognition memory 1 h after training without affecting intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in the dentate molecular layer. In vivo dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) was affected under the local perfusion of the recording region (the dentate granule cell layer) with 0.1 mM ZnAF-2DA, but not with 1-10 mM CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator, suggesting that the blockade of intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells affects dentate gyrus LTP. The present study demonstrates that intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory, probably via dentate gyrus LTP expression.

  18. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Cittadini, A; Monti, MG; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, PN; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2010-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the β-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) handling, oxygen consumption, and β-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca2+ handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca2+–force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6±0.2 versus 2.7±0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca2+ available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca2+-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca2+–force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. β-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1 levels, and

  19. Cross-talk of intracellular calcium stores in the response to neuronal ischemia and ischemic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lehotský, Ján; Racay, Peter; Pavlíková, Martina; Tatarková, Zuzana; Urban, Peter; Chomová, Mária; Kovalská, Mária; Kaplán, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Ischemic/reperfusion brain injury (IRI) is a very severe event with the multiple etiopathogenesis. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is an important phenomenon of adaptation of CNS to subsequent ischemia. An altered cross-talk between intracellular calcium stores is presumed in the mechanisms of ischemic damage/protection. We show here that IRI leads to the inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and IV, however due to the excess of their capacities, the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake rate is not significantly depressed. IPC acts at the level of both initiation and execution of IRI-induced mitochondrial apoptosis and protects from IRI-associated changes in integrity of mitochondrial membranes. IPC also activates inhibition of p53 translocation to mitochondria. Inhibition of the mitochondrial p53 pathway might thus provide a potentially important mechanism of neuronal survival after ischemic brain damage. In addition, IRI initiates a time dependent differences in endoplasmic reticular (ER) gene expression of the key UPR proteins at both the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, gene expression of the UPR proteins is affected by preischemic treatment by the increased expression of Ca(2+) binding protein: GRP 78 and transcriptional factor ATF6 in reperfusion times. Thus, IPC exerts a role in the attenuation of ER stress response, which might be involved in the neuroprotective phenomenon of ischemic tolerance. Hippocampal cells respond to the IRI by the specific expression pattern of the secretory pathways Ca(2+) pump (SPCA1) and this pattern is affected by preischemic challenge. IPC also incompletely suppresses lipo- and protein oxidation of hippocampal membranes and leads to partial recovery of the ischemic-induced depression of SPCA activity. The data suggests the correlation of SPCA function with the role of secretory pathways (Golgi apparatus) in response to preischemic challenge. Documented functional alterations of mitochondria, ER and Golgi apparatus put

  20. Intracellular sensing of microbes and danger signals by the inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabor L; Schrum, Jacob E; De Nardo, Christine M; Latz, Eicke

    2011-09-01

    The cells of the innate immune system mobilize a coordinated immune response towards invading microbes and after disturbances in tissue homeostasis. These immune responses typically lead to infection control and tissue repair. Exaggerated or uncontrolled immune responses, however, can also induce acute of chronic inflammatory pathologies that are characteristic for many common diseases such as sepsis, arthritis, atherosclerosis, or Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, the concerted efforts of many scientists have uncovered numerous mechanisms by which immune cells detect foreign or changed self-substances that appear in infections or during tissue damage. These substances stimulate signaling receptors, which leads to cellular activation and the induction of effector mechanisms. Here, we review the role of inflammasomes, a family of signaling molecules that form multi-molecular signaling platforms and activate inflammatory caspases and interleukin-1β cytokines.

  1. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC.

  2. Internal calcium release and activation of sea urchin eggs by cGMP are independent of the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, T; McDougall, A; Crossley, I; Swann, K; Whitaker, M

    1992-01-01

    We show that microinjecting cyclic GMP (cGMP) into unfertilized sea urchin eggs activates them by stimulating a rise in the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i). The increase in [Ca2+]i is similar in both magnitude and duration to the transient that activates the egg at fertilization. It is due to mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but is not prevented by the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) antagonist heparin. Furthermore, cGMP does not stimulate the eggs Na+/H+ antiport when the [Ca2+]i transient is blocked by the calcium chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), suggesting that cGMP does not activate eggs by interacting with the their phosphoinositide signaling pathway. However, the [Ca2+]i increase and activation are prevented in eggs in which the InsP3-sensitive calcium stores have been emptied by the prior microinjection of the InsP3 analogue inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphorothioate. These data indicate that cGMP activates eggs by stimulating the release of calcium from an InsP3-sensitive calcium store via a novel, though unidentified, route independent of the InsP3 receptor. PMID:1320962

  3. Potassium permeability activated by intracellular calcium ion concentration in the pancreatic beta-cell.

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, I; Dawson, C M; Ribalet, B; Rojas, E

    1979-01-01

    1. Membrane potentials and input resistance were measured in beta-cells from mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans in a study designed to assess the role of a K permeability specifically blocked by quinine or quinidine and activated by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+])i-activated PK). 2. Addition of 100 microM-quinine to the perifusion medium resulted in a 10--30 mV depolarization of the membrane and an increase in the input resistance of ca. 4.10(7) omega. 3. In the absence of glucose, 100 microM-quinine induced electrical activity. 4. In the presence of glucose, 100 microM-quinine abolished the burst pattern of electrical activity and very much reduced the graded response of spike frequency normally seen with different concentrations of glucose. 5. Addition of mitochondrial inhibitors, KCN, NaN3, DNP, CCCP, FCCP, to the perifusion medium containing glucose rapidly hyperpolarized the beta-cell membrane, inducing a concomitant decrease in input resistance. 6. In the presence of glucose, these mitochondrial inhibitors reversibly blocked electrical activity; upon removal of the inhibitor, recovery of electrical activity followed a biphasic pattern. 7. The effects of mitochondrial inhibitors were partially reversed by 100 microM-quinine. 8. It is proposed that the membrane potential of the beta-cell in the absence of glucose is predominantly controlled by the [Ca2+]i-activated PK. It is further suggested that this permeability to K controls the level for glucose stimulation and leads to the generation of the burst pattern. PMID:381636

  4. Potassium current kinetics in bursting secretory neurons: effects of intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J J; Onetti, C G; García, E; Hernández, S

    1991-11-01

    1. The kinetics of delayed rectifier (IK) and transient potassium (IA) currents and their modification by intracellular calcium ions in bursting X-organ neurons of the crayfish were studied with whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Activation and inactivation kinetics were analyzed according to Hodgkin and Huxley-type equations. 2. IK activates with sigmoidal time course at membrane potentials more positive than -38.4 +/- 3.5 (SD) mV (n = 5), and does not inactivate. The conductance through delayed rectifier channels (gK) is described by the equation gK = GKn2. 3. IA activates at membrane potentials close to the resting potential (-52.2 +/- 4.3 mV, n = 5) and, after a peak, inactivates completely. The conductance through A-channels (gA) can be described by the product of independent activation and inactivation parameters: gA = GAa4b. Both activation and inactivation processes are voltage and time dependent. 4. Steady-state activation of IK and IA as well as inactivation of IA can be described by Boltzmann distributions for single particles with valencies of 2.55 +/- 0.01 (n = 5), 1.60 +/- 0.25 (n = 5), and 3.87 +/- 0.39 (n = 3), respectively. 5. Increasing [Ca2+]i, we observed the following: 1) a considerable inactivation of IK during test pulses, 2) an increase of maximal conductance for IA, 3) a reduction of the valency of IA inactivation gating particle (from 3.87 to 2.27), 4) a reduction of the inactivation time constants of IA, and 5) a shift of the inactivation steady-state curve to more positive membrane potentials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Plastid-nucleus communication involves calcium-modulated MAPK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hailong; Feng, Peiqiang; Chi, Wei; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Lu, Congming; David Rochaix, Jean; Leister, Dario; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signals play important roles in coordinating the plastid and nuclear gene expression and are critical for proper chloroplast biogenesis and for maintaining optimal chloroplast functions in response to environmental changes in plants. Until now, the signals and the mechanisms for retrograde signalling remain poorly understood. Here we identify factors that allow the nucleus to perceive stress conditions in the chloroplast and to respond accordingly by inducing or repressing specific nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. We show that ABI4, which is known to repress the LHCB genes during retrograde signalling, is activated through phosphorylation by the MAP kinases MPK3/MPK6 and the activity of these kinases is regulated through 14-3-3ω-mediated Ca2+-dependent scaffolding depending on the chloroplast calcium sensor protein CAS. These findings uncover an additional mechanism in which chloroplast-modulated Ca2+ signalling controls the MAPK pathway for the activation of critical components of the retrograde signalling chain. PMID:27399341

  6. Elevated intracellular calcium triggers recruitment of the receptor cross-talk accessory protein calcyon to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Kutub; Bergson, Clare

    2003-12-19

    Calcyon is called a "cross-talk accessory protein" because the mechanism by which it enables the typically Gs-linked D1 dopamine receptor to stimulate intracellular calcium release depends on a priming step involving heterologous Gq-linked G-protein-coupled receptor activation. The details of how priming facilitates the D1R calcium response have yet to be precisely elucidated. The present work shows that calcyon is constitutively localized both in vesicular and plasma membrane compartments within HEK293 cells. In addition, surface biotinylation and luminescence assays revealed that priming stimulates a 2-fold increase in the levels of calcyon expressed on the cell surface and that subsequent D1R activation produces further accumulation of the protein in the plasma membrane. The effects of priming and D1R agonists were blocked by nocodazole implicating microtubules in the delivery of calcyon-containing vesicles to the cell surface. Accumulation of calcyon in the plasma membrane correlated well with increased intracellular calcium levels as thapsigargin mimicked, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane abrogated, the effects of priming. KN-62, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also blocked the effects of priming and D1R agonists. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active forms of the kinase bypassed the requirement for priming indicating that CaMKII is a key effector in the Ca2+ and microtubule-dependent delivery of calcyon to the cell surface.

  7. Sonic hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of rat gastric mucosal cells through ERK activation by elevating intracellular calcium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Osawa, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Hirohide . E-mail: hohnishi@jichi.ac.jp; Takano, Koji; Noguti, Takasi; Mashima, Hirosato; Hoshino, Hiroko; Kita, Hiroto; Sato, Kiichi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Sugano, Kentaro

    2006-06-02

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a member of hedgehog peptides family, is expressed in gastric gland epithelium. To elucidate Shh function to gastric mucosal cells, we examined the effect of Shh on the proliferation of a rat normal gastric mucosal cell line, RGM-1. RGM-1 cells express essential components of Shh receptor system, patched-1, and smoothened. Shh enhanced DNA synthesis in RGM-1 cells and elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). In addition, Shh as well as calcium ionophore A32187 rapidly activated ERK. However, Shh failed to activate ERK under calcium-free culture condition. Pretreatment of cells with PD98059 attenuated the DNA synthesis promoted by Shh. Moreover, when cells were pretreated with cyclopamine, Shh could not elevate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, activate ERK or promote DNA synthesis. On the other hand, although Shh induced Gli-1 nuclear accumulation in RGM-1 cells, Shh activated ERK even in cells pretreated with actinomycin D. These results indicate that Shh promotes the proliferation of RGM-1 cells through an intracellular calcium- and ERK-dependent but transcription-independent pathway via Patched/Smoothened receptor system.

  8. Regulation of the intracellular free calcium concentration in single rat dorsal root ganglion neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, S A; Miller, R J

    1990-01-01

    1. Simultaneous whole-cell patch-clamp and Fura-2 microfluorimetric recordings of calcium currents (ICa) and the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were made from neurones grown in primary culture from the dorsal root ganglion of the rat. 2. Cells held at -80 mV and depolarized to 0 mV elicited a ICa that resulted in an [Ca2+]i transient which was not significantly buffered during the voltage step and lasted long after the cell had repolarized and the current ceased. The process by which the cell buffered [Ca2+]i back to basal levels could best be described with a single-exponential equation. 3. The membrane potential versus ICa and [Ca2+]i relationship revealed that the peak of the [Ca2+]i transient evoked at a given test potential closely paralleled the magnitude of the ICa suggesting that neither voltage-dependent nor Ca2(+)-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores made a significant contribution to the [Ca2+]i transient. 4. When the cell was challenged with Ca2+ loads of different magnitude by varying the duration or potential of the test pulse, [Ca2+]i buffering was more effective for larger Ca2+ loads. The relationship between the integrated ICa and the peak of the [Ca2+]i transient reached an asymptote at large Ca2+ loads indicating that Ca2(+)-dependent processes became more efficient or that low-affinity processes had been recruited. 5. Inhibition of Ca2+ influx with neuropeptide Y demonstrated that inhibition of a large ICa produced minor alterations in the peak of the [Ca2+]i transient, while inhibition of smaller currents produced corresponding decreases in the [Ca2+]i transient. Thus, inhibition of the ICa was reflected by a change in the peak [Ca2+]i only when submaximal Ca2+ loads were applied to the cell, implying that modulation of [Ca2+]i is dependent on the activation state of the cells. 6. Intracellular dialysis with the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake blocker Ruthenium Red in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments removed the buffering

  9. Intracellular study of calcium-related events in cat magnocellular neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, M; Andrew, R D

    1991-01-01

    1. Magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of mammals synthesize vasopressin or oxytocin and release these hormones systemically from their neurohypophysial axon terminals. In the rat, release is facilitated by bursts of action potentials generated by the MNC. However MNC units in the intact cat discharge more slowly and do not display the repetitive bursts (phasic firing) that promote vasopressin secretion. The reasons why these cat endocrine neurones differ so dramatically in their firing behaviour from the rat model were examined using intracellular recording. 2. Cat and rat MNCs displayed similar mean resting potentials approximating -60 mV, and were usually linear in their voltage-current relationship in the hyperpolarizing direction. However cat MNCs displayed a higher mean cell input resistance (301 M omega; n = 56) than those of rat (150 M omega; n = 105). 3. Calcium influx to cat MNCs during firing appeared comparable to rat based on (a) the similar range of action potential broadening observed during a spike train, (b) the shoulder on the action potential's falling phase which was blocked in low-Ca2+ saline, and (c) the ability to evoke tetrodotoxin (TTX)-insensitive spiking and non-synaptic depolarizing potentials, both calcium-mediated events observed in the rat. 4. In cat MNCs, a depolarizing current pulse (100-500 ms; 0.1-0.3 nA) elicited a train of action potentials followed by a prominent after-hyperpolarization (AHP) several times the duration of its counterpart in the rat. The AHP reversed near the equilibrium potential for K+, was not voltage dependent and represented an increased membrane conductance. It was suppressed in low-Ca2+ saline and completely eliminated by the calcium-activated potassium current (IK(Ca)) blockers apamin (100 nM) or d-tubocurarine (50-200 microM). Both blockers decreased spike frequency adaptation but did not induce bursting. Therefore the cat AHP probably represents a Ca(2+)-activated

  10. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  11. The Impact of Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Mechanisms of Cell Calcium Signaling in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lajdova, Ingrid; Spustova, Viera; Oksa, Adrian; Kaderjakova, Zuzana; Chorvat, Dusan; Morvova, Marcela; Sikurova, Libusa; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium concentration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is significantly increased, and the regulatory mechanisms maintaining cellular calcium homeostasis are impaired. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin D3 on predominant regulatory mechanisms of cell calcium homeostasis. The study involved 16 CKD stages 2-3 patients with vitamin D deficiency treated with cholecalciferol 7000-14000 IU/week for 6 months. The regulatory mechanisms of calcium signaling were studied in PBMCs and red blood cells. After vitamin D3 supplementation, serum concentration of 25(OH)D3 increased (P < 0.001) and [Ca(2+)]i decreased (P < 0.001). The differences in [Ca(2+)]i were inversely related to differences in 25(OH)D3 concentration (P < 0.01). Vitamin D3 supplementation decreased the calcium entry through calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channels and purinergic P2X7 channels. The function of P2X7 receptors was changed in comparison with their baseline status, and the expression of these receptors was reduced. There was no effect of vitamin D3 on P2X7 pores and activity of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases. Vitamin D3 supplementation had a beneficial effect on [Ca(2+)]i decreasing calcium entry via CRAC and P2X7 channels and reducing P2X7 receptors expression.

  12. [Neurotransmitters, calcium signalling and neuronal communication].

    PubMed

    Eguiagaray, J G; Egea, J; Bravo-Cordero, J J; García, A G

    2004-04-01

    In this article we show some recent findings that constitute a great progress in the molecular knowledge of synaptic dynamics. To communicate, neurons use a code that includes electrical (action potentials) and chemical signals (neurotransmitters, neuromodulators). At the moment a great variety of molecules are known, whose neurotransmitter function in brain and the peripheral nervous system are out of question. Monoamines like acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, histamine, serotonin, glutamate, aspartate, glycine, ATP and GABA are good examples. Opioid neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neurokinines (substance P), somatostatin, neurotensin, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinine, vasopressin or oxitocin have been related to the control of the stress response, sexual behaviour, food intake, pain, learning and memory, qualities that are also related to nitric oxide (NO). A great part of the molecular structure of the secretory machinery is known to be responsible for fast neurotransmitter release at the synapse, in response to action potentials. Proteins like sinaptobrevin (located in the membrane of the synaptic vesicle), sintaxin and SNAP-25 (both located at the presynaptic plasma membrane) constitute a trimeric complex which is responsible of the vesicular docking at the active sites for exocytosis. From this strategic location, vesicles release their neurotransmitter within few milliseconds, when the action potential invades the nerve terminal and activates the opening of the different subtypes of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. The asymmetric geographical distribution of each type of channel, in different neurons, rose the hypothesis that Ca2+ that enters through each subtype of channel is compartmentalised, thus favouring the generation of Ca2+ microdomains, in the cytosol and the nucleus, involved in different cellular functions. This great biochemical synaptic heterogeneity is facilitating the selection of many biological targets

  13. Detection of light-induced changes of intracellular ionized calcium concentration in Limulus ventral photoreceptors using arsenazo III

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. E.; Brown, P. K.; Pinto, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    1. The metallochromic indicator dye, arsenazo III, was injected intracellularly into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells to concentrations greater than 1 mM. 2. The absorption spectrum (450-750 nm) of the dye in single dark-adapted cells was measured by a scanning microspectrophotometer. When a cell was light-adapted, the absorption of the dye changed; the difference spectrum had two maxima at about 610 and 660 nm, a broad minimum at about 540 nm and an isosbestic point at about 585 nm. 3. When intracellular calcium concentration was raised in dark-adapted cells previously injected with arsenazo III, the difference spectum had two maxima at about 610 and 660 nm, a broad minimum at about 530 nm and an isosbestic point at about 585 nm. The injection of Mg2+ into dark-adapted cells previously injected with the dye induced a difference spectrum that had a single maximum at about 620 nm. Also, decreasing the intracellular pH of cells previously injected with the dye induced a difference spectrum that had a minimum at about 620 nm. The evidence suggests that there is a rise of intracellular ionized calcium when a Limulus ventral photoreceptor is light-adapted. 4. The intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]1, in light-adapted photoreceptors was estimated to reach at least 10-4 M by compaing the light-induced difference spectra measured in ventral photoreceptors with a standard curve determined in microcuvettes containing 2mM arsenazo III in 400 mM-KCl, 1 mM-MgCl2 and 25 mM MOPS at pH 7·0. 5. In cells injected to less than 3 mM arsenazo III, light induced a transient decrease in optical transmission at 660 nm (T660). This decrease in T660 indicates that illumination of a ventral photoreceptor normally causes a transient increase of [Ca2+]1. 6. Arsenazo III was found to be sensitive, selective and rapid enough to measure light-induced changes of intracellular ionized calcium in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. PMID:17732

  14. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP. sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems which are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells. PMID:21490586

  15. Purinergic and Calcium Signaling in Macrophage Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bimal N.; Leitinger, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    In addition to a fundamental role in cellular bioenergetics, the purine nucleotide adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays a crucial role in the extracellular space as a signaling molecule. ATP and its metabolites serve as ligands for a family of receptors that are collectively referred to as purinergic receptors. These receptors were first described and characterized in the nervous system but it soon became evident that they are expressed ubiquitously. In the immune system, purinergic signals regulate the migration and activation of immune cells and they may also orchestrate the resolution of inflammation (1, 2). The intracellular signal transduction initiated by purinergic receptors is strongly coupled to Ca2+-signaling, and co-ordination of these pathways plays a critical role in innate immunity. In this review, we provide an overview of purinergic and Ca2+-signaling in the context of macrophage phenotypic polarization and discuss the implications on macrophage function in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25505897

  16. Juice of Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) inhibits oxytocin-induced increase of the intracellular calcium concentration in human myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Simões-Wüst, A P; Grãos, M; Duarte, C B; Brenneisen, R; Hamburger, M; Mennet, M; Ramos, M H; Schnelle, M; Wächter, R; Worel, A M; von Mandach, U

    2010-10-01

    The use of preparations from Bryophyllum pinnatum in tocolysis is supported by both clinical (retrospective comparative studies) and experimental (using uterus strips) evidence. We studied here the effect of B. pinnatum juice on the response of cultured human myometrial cells to stimulation by oxytocin, a hormone known to be involved in the control of uterine contractions by increasing the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In this work, [Ca2+]i was measured online during stimulation of human myometrial cells (hTERT-C3 and M11) with oxytocin, which had been pre-incubated in the absence or in the presence of B. pinnatum juice. Since no functional voltage-gated Ca2+ channels could be detected in these myometrial cells, the effect of B. pinnatum juice was as well studied in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which are known to have such channels and can be depolarised with KCl. B. pinnatum juice prevented the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in hTERT-C3 human myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner, achieving a ca. 80% inhibition at a 2% concentration. Comparable results were obtained with M11 human primary myometrial cells. In hTERT-C3 cells, prevention of the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration and of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels. B. pinnatum juice delayed, but did not prevent the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, the data suggest a specific and concentration-dependent effect of B. pinnatum juice on the oxytocin signalling pathway, which seems to corroborate its use in tocolysis. Such a specific mechanism would explain the rare and minor side-effects in tocolysis with B. pinnatum as well as its high therapeutic index.

  17. Functional Role of Intracellular Calcium Receptor Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Type 1 in Rat Hippocampus after Neonatal Anoxia.

    PubMed

    Ikebara, Juliane Midori; Takada, Silvia Honda; Cardoso, Débora Sterzeck; Dias, Natália Myuki Moralles; de Campos, Beatriz Crossiol Vicente; Bretherick, Talitha Amanda Sanches; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Ferraz, Mariana Sacrini Ayres; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Anoxia is one of the most prevalent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in preterm neonates, constituting an important public health problem due to permanent neurological sequelae observed in patients. Oxygen deprivation triggers a series of simultaneous cascades, culminating in cell death mainly located in more vulnerable metabolic brain regions, such as the hippocampus. In the process of cell death by oxygen deprivation, cytosolic calcium plays crucial roles. Intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are important regulators of cytosolic calcium levels, although the role of these receptors in neonatal anoxia is completely unknown. This study focused on the functional role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP3R1) in rat hippocampus after neonatal anoxia. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decrease of IP3R1 gene expression 24 hours after neonatal anoxia. We detected that IP3R1 accumulates specially in CA1, and this spatial pattern did not change after neonatal anoxia. Interestingly, we observed that anoxia triggers translocation of IP3R1 to nucleus in hippocampal cells. We were able to observe that anoxia changes distribution of IP3R1 immunofluorescence signals, as revealed by cluster size analysis. We next examined the role of IP3R1 in the neuronal cell loss triggered by neonatal anoxia. Intrahippocampal injection of non-specific IP3R1 blocker 2-APB clearly reduced the number of Fluoro-Jade C and Tunel positive cells, revealing that activation of IP3R1 increases cell death after neonatal anoxia. Finally, we aimed to disclose mechanistics of IP3R1 in cell death. We were able to determine that blockade of IP3R1 did not reduced the distribution and pixel density of activated caspase 3-positive cells, indicating that the participation of IP3R1 in neuronal cell loss is not related to classical caspase-mediated apoptosis. In summary, this study may contribute to new perspectives in the investigation of

  18. Functional Role of Intracellular Calcium Receptor Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Type 1 in Rat Hippocampus after Neonatal Anoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ikebara, Juliane Midori; Takada, Silvia Honda; Cardoso, Débora Sterzeck; Dias, Natália Myuki Moralles; de Campos, Beatriz Crossiol Vicente; Bretherick, Talitha Amanda Sanches; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Ferraz, Mariana Sacrini Ayres

    2017-01-01

    Anoxia is one of the most prevalent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in preterm neonates, constituting an important public health problem due to permanent neurological sequelae observed in patients. Oxygen deprivation triggers a series of simultaneous cascades, culminating in cell death mainly located in more vulnerable metabolic brain regions, such as the hippocampus. In the process of cell death by oxygen deprivation, cytosolic calcium plays crucial roles. Intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are important regulators of cytosolic calcium levels, although the role of these receptors in neonatal anoxia is completely unknown. This study focused on the functional role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP3R1) in rat hippocampus after neonatal anoxia. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decrease of IP3R1 gene expression 24 hours after neonatal anoxia. We detected that IP3R1 accumulates specially in CA1, and this spatial pattern did not change after neonatal anoxia. Interestingly, we observed that anoxia triggers translocation of IP3R1 to nucleus in hippocampal cells. We were able to observe that anoxia changes distribution of IP3R1 immunofluorescence signals, as revealed by cluster size analysis. We next examined the role of IP3R1 in the neuronal cell loss triggered by neonatal anoxia. Intrahippocampal injection of non-specific IP3R1 blocker 2-APB clearly reduced the number of Fluoro-Jade C and Tunel positive cells, revealing that activation of IP3R1 increases cell death after neonatal anoxia. Finally, we aimed to disclose mechanistics of IP3R1 in cell death. We were able to determine that blockade of IP3R1 did not reduced the distribution and pixel density of activated caspase 3-positive cells, indicating that the participation of IP3R1 in neuronal cell loss is not related to classical caspase-mediated apoptosis. In summary, this study may contribute to new perspectives in the investigation of

  19. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  20. Can calcium signaling be harnessed for cancer immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Rooke, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of the immune system in controlling tumor appearance and growth. Immunotherapy is defined as the treatment of a disease by inducing, enhancing or suppressing an immune response. In the context of cancer treatment, it involves breaking tolerance to a cancer-specific self-antigen and/or enhancing the existing anti-tumor immune response, be it specific or not. Part of the complexity in developing such treatment is that cancers are selected to escape adaptive or innate immune responses. These escape mechanisms are numerous and they may cumulate in one cancer. Moreover, different cancers of a same type may present different combinations of escape mechanisms. The limited success of immunotherapeutics in the clinic as stand-alone products may in part be explained by the fact that most of them only activate one facet of the immune response. It is important to identify novel methods to broaden the efficacy of immunotherapeutics. Calcium signaling is central to numerous cellular processes, leading to immune responses, cancer growth and apoptosis induced by cancer treatments. Calcium signaling in cancer therapy and control will be integrated to current cancer immunotherapy approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau.

  1. Small caliber arterial endothelial cells calcium signals elicited by PAR2 are preserved from endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, John C; Stuyvers, Bruno D; McGuire, John J

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC)-dependent vasodilation by proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is preserved in small caliber arteries in disease states where vasodilation by muscarinic receptors is decreased. In this study, we identified and characterized the PAR2-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca2+)-release mechanisms in EC from small caliber arteries in healthy and diseased states. Mesenteric arterial EC were isolated from PAR2 wild-type (WT) and null mice, after saline (controls) or angiotensin II (AngII) infusion, for imaging intracellular calcium and characterizing the calcium-release system by immunofluorescence. EC Ca2+ signals comprised two forms of Ca2+-release events that had distinct spatial-temporal properties and occurred near either the plasmalemma (peripheral) or center of EC. In healthy EC, PAR2-dependent increases in the densities and firing rates of both forms of Ca2+-release were abolished by inositol 1,4,5- trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor, but partially reduced by transient potential vanilloid channels inhibitor ruthenium red (RR). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced less overall Ca2+-release than PAR2 activation, but enhanced selectively the incidence of central events. PAR2-dependent Ca2+-activity, inhibitors sensitivities, IP3R, small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels expressions were unchanged in EC from AngII WT. However, the same cells exhibited decreases in ACh-induced Ca2+-release, RR sensitivity, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, indicating AngII-induced dysfunction was differentiated by receptor, Ca2+-release, and downstream targets of EC activation. We conclude that PAR2 and muscarinic receptors selectively elicit two elementary Ca2+ signals in single EC. PAR2-selective IP3R-dependent peripheral Ca2+-release mechanisms are identical between healthy and diseased states. Further study of PAR2-selective Ca2+-release for eliciting pathological and/or normal EC functions is warranted. PMID:25729579

  2. Intracellular Calcium Gradients in Single Living Cells: Measurement and Analysis by Optical and Digital Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao Viswanadha

    Intracellular calcium (Ca^{2+ }) has been considered as a regulator of many cellular processes. In addition, Ca^{2+ } also plays a key role in mediating actions of many hormones, growth factors, and drugs. This thesis describes two general approaches, digital video and photomultiplier (PMT) based fluorescence microscopic systems, to measure such Ca^{2+} changes throughout the cell. They reveal the heterogeneous spatial and fast temporal changes of Ca^{2+} within a single isolated living cell. In order to measure spatial Ca^ {2+} in three dimensions (3-D), optical section microscopy (OSM) coupled to digital video imaging is introduced. With this approach, an increase in nuclear Ca^{2+} compared to cytosolic Ca^{2+} is detected in human erythroblasts and rat hepatocytes under the addition of growth factors: erythropoietin and epidermal growth factor respectively. In addition, the primary effect of non growth-promoting hormone vasopressin, raise in cytosolic Ca^{2+}, is also observed. These observations are the first to underscore the importance of nuclear Ca^{2+} increase in cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, to track fast Ca^ {2+} transients (mesc) during excitation -contraction (EC) cycle and then examine alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in healthy and diseased (hypertensive) heart cells, a PMT based system is implemented. Significant alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in hypertensive heart cells were observed. This finding is compatible with the clinical finding that patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy suffer a lack of adequate relaxation. Finally, to correlate the Ca^{2+} dynamics in an EC cycle with mechanical activity, a hybrid optical digital processor was developed. The performance of the hybrid processor is analyzed and applied simultaneously with the PMT based system. The mechanical contraction and relaxation of a single cardiac cell closely paralleled that of Ca^{2+} dynamics during an EC cycle. In summary, this thesis illustrates

  3. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  4. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  5. Preventive effects of imperatorin on perfluorohexanesulfonate-induced neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunkyung; Choi, So-Young; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Early life neuronal exposure to environmental toxicants has been suggested to be an important etiology of neurodegenerative disease development. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), one of the major perfluoroalkyl compounds, is widely distributed environmental contaminants. We have reported that PFHxS induces neuronal apoptosis via ERK-mediated pathway. Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin found in various edible plants and has a wide range of pharmacological effects including neuroprotection. In this study, the effects of imperatorin on PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms are examined using cerebellar granule cells (CGC). CGC were isolated from seven-day old rats and were grown in culture for seven days. Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining were used to determine neuronal apoptosis. PFHxS-induced apoptosis of CGC was significantly reduced by imperatorin and PD98059, an ERK pathway inhibitor. PFHxS induced a persistent increase in intracellular calcium, which was significantly blocked by imperatorin, NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 and the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers, diltiazem and nifedipine. The activation of caspase-3 by PFHxS was also inhibited by MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. PFHxS-increased ERK activation was inhibited by imperatorin, MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. Taken together, imperatorin protects CGC against PFHxS-induced apoptosis via inhibition of NMDA receptor/intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway. PMID:27382356

  6. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A.; Sundier, Stephanie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  7. The appetite-inducing peptide, ghrelin, induces intracellular store-mediated rises in calcium in addiction and arousal-related laterodorsal tegmental neurons in mouse brain slices.

    PubMed

    Hauberg, Katrine; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2015-03-01

    Ghrelin, a gut and brain peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in motivated behavior and regulation of the sleep and wakefulness cycle. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) is involved in appetitive behavior and control of the arousal state of an organism, and accordingly, behavioral actions of ghrelin could be mediated by direct cellular actions within this nucleus. Consistent with this interpretation, postsynaptically mediated depolarizing membrane actions of ghrelin on LDT neurons have been reported. Direct actions were ascribed solely to closure of a potassium conductance however this peptide has been shown in other cell types to lead to rises in calcium via release of calcium from intracellular stores. To determine whether ghrelin induced intracellular calcium rises in mouse LDT neurons, we conducted calcium imaging studies in LDT brain slices loaded with the calcium binding dye, Fura-2AM. Ghrelin elicited TTX-insensitive changes in dF/F indicative of rises in calcium, and a portion of these rises were independent of membrane depolarization, as they persisted in conditions of high extracellular potassium solutions and were found to involve SERCA-pump mediated intracellular calcium stores. Involvement of the ghrelin receptor (GHR-S) in these actions was confirmed. Taken together with other studies, our data suggest that ghrelin has multiple cellular actions on LDT cells. Ghrelin's induction of calcium via intracellular release in the LDT could play a role in behavioral actions of this peptide as the LDT governs processes involved in stimulation of motivated behavior and control of cortical arousal.

  8. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848

  9. Proline induces calcium-mediated oxidative burst and salicylic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiugeng; Zhang, Yueqin; Wang, Cuiping; Lü, Weitao; Jin, Jing Bo; Hua, Xuejun

    2011-05-01

    Although free proline accumulation is a well-documented phenomenon in many plants in response to a variety of environmental stresses, and is proposed to play protective roles, high intracellular proline content, by either exogenous application or endogenous over-production, in the absence of stresses, is found to be inhibitory to plant growth. We have shown here that exogenous application of proline significantly induced intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation in tobacco and calcium-dependent ROS production in Arabidopsis seedlings, which subsequently enhanced salicylic acid (SA) synthesis and PR genes expression. This suggested that proline can promote a reaction similar to hypersensitive response during pathogen infection. Other amino acids, such as glutamate, but not arginine and phenylalanine, were also found to be capable of inducing PR gene expression. In addition, proline at concentration as low as 0.5 mM could induce PR gene expression. However, proline could not induce the expression of PDF1.2 gene, the marker gene for jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Furthermore, proline-induced SA production is mediated by NDR1-dependent signaling pathway, but not that mediated by PAD4. Our data provide evidences that exogenous proline, and probably some other amino acids can specifically induce SA signaling and defense response.

  10. 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 membrane-initiated calcium signaling modulates exocytosis and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Zhang; Payal, Biswas; Melissa, Owraghi; Zanello, Laura P

    2007-03-01

    1alpha,25(OH)(2)-vitamin D(3) (1,25D) is considered a bone anabolic hormone. 1,25D actions leading to bone formation involve gene transactivation, on one hand, and modulation of cytoplasmic signaling, on the other. In both cases, a functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) appears to be required. Here we study 1,25D-stimulated calcium signaling that initiates at the cell membrane and leads to exocytosis of bone materials and increased osteoblast survival. We found that rapid 1,25D-induction of exocytosis couples to cytoplasmic calcium increase in osteoblastic ROS 17/2.8 cells. In addition, we found that elevation of cytoplasmic calcium concentration is involved in 1,25D anti-apoptotic effects via Akt activation in ROS 17/2.8 cells and non-osteoblastic CV-1 cells. In both cases, 1,25D-stimulated elevation of intracellular calcium is due in part to activation of L-type Ca(2+) channels. We conclude that 1,25D bone anabolic effects that involve increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in osteoblasts can be explained at two levels. At the single-cell level, 1,25D promotes Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic activities. At the tissue level, 1,25D protects osteoblasts from apoptosis via a Ca(2+)-dependent Akt pathway. Our studies contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of bone diseases characterized by decreased bone formation and mineralization.

  11. Nuclear calcium sensors reveal that repetition of trains of synaptic stimuli boosts nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Freitag, H Eckehard; Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-12-15

    Nuclear calcium is a key signal in the dialogue between synapse and nucleus that controls the genomic responses required for persistent adaptations, including memory and acquired neuroprotection. The amplitude and duration of nuclear calcium transients specify activity-induced transcriptional changes. However, the precise relationship between synaptic input and nuclear calcium output is unknown. Here, we used stereotaxic delivery to the rat brain of recombinant adeno-associated viruses encoding nuclear-targeted calcium sensors to assess nuclear calcium transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons after stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals. We show that in acute hippocampal slices, a burst of synaptic activity elicits a nuclear calcium signal with a regenerative component at above-threshold stimulation intensities. Using classical stimulation paradigms (i.e., high-frequency stimulation (HFS) and θ burst stimulation (TBS)) to induce early LTP (E-LTP) and transcription-dependent late LTP (L-LTP), we found that the magnitude of nuclear calcium signals and the number of action potentials activated by synaptic stimulation trains are greatly amplified by their repetition. Nuclear calcium signals and action potential generation were reduced by blockade of either NMDA receptors or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, but not by procedures that lead to internal calcium store depletion or by blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors. These findings identify a repetition-induced switch in nuclear calcium signaling that correlates with the transition from E-LTP to L-LTP, and may explain why the transcription-dependent phase of L-LTP is not induced by a single HFS or TBS but requires repeated trains of activity. Recombinant, nuclear-targeted indicators may prove useful for further analysis of nuclear calcium signaling in vivo.

  12. The use of flow cytometry to examine calcium signalling by TRPV1 in mixed cell populations.

    PubMed

    Assas, Bakri M; Adbulaal, Wesam; Wakid, Majed H; Zakai, Haytham A; Miyan, J; Pennock, J L

    2017-03-31

    Flow cytometric analysis of calcium mobilisation has been in use for many years in the study of specific receptor engagement or isolated cell:cell communication. However, calcium mobilisation/signaling is key to many cell functions including apoptosis, mobility and immune responses. Here we combine multiplex surface staining of whole spleen with Indo-1 AM to visualise calcium mobilisation and examine calcium signaling in a mixed immune cell culture over time. We demonstrate responses to a TRPV1 agonist in distinct cell subtypes without the need for cell separation. Multi parameter staining alongside Indo-1 AM to demonstrate calcium mobilization allows the study of real time calcium signaling in a complex environment.

  13. Noradrenaline effects on pyruvate decarboxylation: correlation with calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Hertz, L

    1999-11-15

    Noradrenaline effects on the rate of metabolism of pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, catalyzed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was measured in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes as rate of production of labeled CO(2) from 1-[(14) C]pyruvate in the absence of competing glucose in the medium. The subtype specificity of a noradrenaline-stimulated increase in rate of CO(2) formation was identical to that for noradrenaline-induced increase in free intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)), suggesting a causal relationship between these two phenomena. The noradrenaline-induced stimulation of pyruvate decarboxylation was abolished in the presence of 10 mM magnesium chloride in the medium, combined with the omission of calcium, a procedure known to prevent an increased [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol from raising intramitochondrial [Ca(2+)]. Thus, the stimulation of metabolic flux through the reaction catalyzed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex appears to result from an increase in intramitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ions in astrocytes. Such a mechanism for stimulation of the same enzyme has been convincingly demonstrated in other cell types, primarily heart muscle and hepatic cells, but it has not previously been demonstrated in any cell type from the central nervous system.

  14. Disruption of intracellular calcium regulation is integral to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Esterberg, Robert; Hailey, Dale W; Coffin, Allison B; Raible, David W; Rubel, Edwin W

    2013-04-24

    Intracellular Ca(2+) is a key regulator of life or death decisions in cultured neurons and sensory cells. The role of Ca(2+) in these processes is less clear in vivo, as the location of these cells often impedes visualization of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics. We generated transgenic zebrafish lines that express the genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator GCaMP in mechanosensory hair cells of the lateral line. These lines allow us to monitor intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in real time during aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. After exposure of live larvae to aminoglycosides, dying hair cells undergo a transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+) that occurs shortly after mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) elevation through either caged chelators or pharmacological inhibitors of Ca(2+) effectors mitigates toxic effects of aminoglycoside exposure. Conversely, artificial elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) by caged Ca(2+) release agents sensitizes hair cells to the toxic effects of aminoglycosides. These data suggest that alterations in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis play an essential role in aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death, and indicate several potential therapeutic targets to stem ototoxicity.

  15. Intracellular Calcium Plays a Critical Role in the Microcystin-LR-Elicited Neurotoxicity Through PLC/IP3 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fei; Liu, Jue; Li, Cairong; Wang, Jianghua

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxicity of microcystin-leucine-arginine (MCLR) has been widely reported. However, the mechanism is not fully understood. Using primary hippocampal neurons, we tested the hypothesis that MCLR-triggered activation in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) induces the death of neurons. Microcystin-leucine-arginine inhibited cell viability at a range of 0.1 to 30 μmol/L and caused a dose-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was observed in Ca(2+)-free media and blocked by an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor, suggesting intracellular Ca(2+) release. Moreover, pretreatment of hippocampal neurons with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator (O,O'-bis (2-aminophenyl) ethyleneglycol-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetraacetoxy-methyl ester) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) could block both the Ca(2+) mobilization and the neuronal death following MCLR exposure. In contrast, the ryanodine receptor inhibitor (dantrolene) did not ameliorate the effect of MCLR. In conclusion, MCLR disrupts [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis in neurons by releasing Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, and this increase in [Ca(2+)](i) may be a key determinant in the mechanism underlying MCLR-induced neurotoxicity.

  16. Cytosolic calcium and pH signaling in plants under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Kader, Md Abdul; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2010-03-01

    Calcium is one of the essential nutrients for growth and development of plants. It is an important component of various structures in cell wall and membranes. Besides some fundamental roles under normal condition, calcium functions as a major secondary-messenger molecule in plants under different developmental cues and various stress conditions including salinity stress. Also changes in cytosolic pH, pH(cyt), either individually, or in coordination with changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, [Ca(2+)](cyt), evoke a wide range of cellular functions in plants including signal transduction in plant-defense responses against stresses. It is believed that salinity stress, like other stresses, is perceived at cell membrane, either extra cellular or intracellular, which then triggers an intracellular-signaling cascade including the generation of secondary messenger molecules like Ca(2+) and protons. The variety and complexity of Ca(2+) and pH signaling result from the nature of the stresses as well as the tolerance level of the plant species against that specific stress. The nature of changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt) concentration, in terms of amplitude, frequency and duration, is likely very important for decoding the specific downstream responses for salinity stress tolerance in planta. It has been observed that the signatures of [Ca(2+)](cyt) and pH differ in various studies reported so far depending on the techniques used to measure them, and also depending on the plant organs where they are measured, such as root, shoot tissues or cells. This review describes the recent advances about the changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt) and pH(cyt) at both cellular and whole-plant levels under salinity stress condition, and in various salinity-tolerant and -sensitive plant species.

  17. Intracellular calcium dynamics permit a Purkinje neuron model to perform toggle and gain computations upon its inputs.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Without synaptic input, Purkinje neurons can spontaneously fire in a repeating trimodal pattern that consists of tonic spiking, bursting and quiescence. Climbing fiber input (CF) switches Purkinje neurons out of the trimodal firing pattern and toggles them between a tonic firing and a quiescent state, while setting the gain of their response to Parallel Fiber (PF) input. The basis to this transition is unclear. We investigate it using a biophysical Purkinje cell model under conditions of CF and PF input. The model can replicate these toggle and gain functions, dependent upon a novel account of intracellular calcium dynamics that we hypothesize to be applicable in real Purkinje cells.

  18. Melatonin counteracts alterations in oxidative metabolism and cell viability induced by intracellular calcium overload in human leucocytes: changes with age.

    PubMed

    Espino, Javier; Bejarano, Ignacio; Paredes, Sergio D; González, David; Barriga, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2010-07-01

    Ageing is associated with an increased production of free radicals and alterations in the mechanisms of adaptation to oxidative stress. In fact, the free radical theory of ageing proposes that deleterious actions of free radicals are responsible for the functional deterioration associated with ageing. Moreover, a close relationship exists between calcium homeostasis and oxidative stress. The current work was aimed at proving that intracellular calcium overload induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and/or thapsigargin leads to oxidative stress. We additionally examined the effect of melatonin on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell viability in human leucocytes collected from young (20-30-year-old) and elderly (65-75-year-old) individuals under both basal and oxidative stress-induced conditions. Treatments with 10 nM FMLP and/or 1 microM thapsigargin induced a transient increase in cytosolic free-calcium concentration ([Ca(2 + )](c)) in human leucocytes due to calcium release from internal stores, and led in turn to oxidative stress, as assessed by intracellular ROS measurement. Non-treated leucocytes from aged individuals exhibited higher ROS levels and lower rates of cell survival when compared to leucocytes from young individuals. Similar results were obtained in FMLP and/or thapsigargin-treated leucocytes from elderly individuals when compared to those from the young individuals. Melatonin treatment significantly reduced both hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and superoxide anion levels, likely due to its free-radical scavenging properties, and enhanced leucocyte viability in both age groups. Therefore, melatonin may be a useful tool for the treatment of disease states and processes where an excessive production of oxidative damage occurs.

  19. Modulation of intracellular calcium mobilization and GABAergic currents through subtype-specific metabotropic glutamate receptors in neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Taketo, M; Matsuda, H

    2010-01-15

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and are thought to modulate neuronal excitability, by mobilizing intracellular Ca(2+). Difference in Ca(2+) mobilization among subclasses of the receptors has been reported, and regarded as a possible cause of variant neuronal modifications. In hippocampal interneurons, several subclasses of mGluRs including mGluR1 and mGluR5 have been immunohistochemically identified. The subclass-specific physiological effects of mGluRs on neuronal transmission in hippocampus, however, have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, effects of group I mGluR agonist, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) on intracellular calcium concentration were examined in hippocampal interneurons. Application of DHPG increased fluorescence ratio in neonatal CA3 stratum oriens/alveus interneurons. The DHPG-induced calcium mobilization was markedly inhibited by mGluR1-specific antagonist, cyclopropan[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate (CPCCOEt). Inhibition of the calcium elevation by mGluR5-specific antagonist, 6-methyl-2-(phenylazo)-3-pyrindol (MPEP), was weaker than that of CPCCOEt. The fluorescence ratio was not significantly changed by application of mGluR5-specific agonist, (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG). DHPG induced calcium responses in CA1 interneurons as in CA3, and the responses were partially inhibited by MPEP treatment. Effects of group I mGluR agonist and antagonist were also investigated, on GABA(A) receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in CA3 pyramidal neurons. The GABAergic sIPSCs were facilitated by DHPG perfusion, and the potentiation was reduced by CPCCOEt, and less distinctly by MPEP. The sIPSCs were not significantly potentiated by CHPG application. These results indicate that mGluR1 is functional in hippocampal interneurons, and DHPG exerts its effect mainly through this receptor at early developmental period.

  20. Intracellular Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPase regulates calcium influx and acrosomal exocytosis in bull and ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Dragileva, E; Rubinstein, S; Breitbart, H

    1999-11-01

    Calcium influx is required for the mammalian sperm acrosome reaction (AR), an exocytotic event occurring in the sperm head prior to fertilization. We show here that thapsigargin, a highly specific inhibitor of the microsomal Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPase (Ca(2+) pump), can initiate acrosomal exocytosis in capacitated bovine and ram spermatozoa. Initiation of acrosomal exocytosis by thapsigargin requires an influx of Ca(2+), since incubation of cells in the absence of added Ca(2+) or in the presence of the calcium channel blocker, La(3+), completely inhibited thapsigargin-induced acrosomal exocytosis. ATP-Dependent calcium accumulation into nonmitochondrial stores was detected in permeabilized sperm in the presence of ATP and mitochondrial uncoupler. This activity was inhibited by thapsigargin. Thapsigargin elevated the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), and this increase was inhibited when extracellular Ca(2+) was chelated by EGTA, indicating that this rise in Ca(2+) is derived from the external medium. This rise of [Ca(2+)](i) took place first in the head and later in the midpiece of the spermatozoon. However, immunostaining using a polyclonal antibody directed against the purified inositol 1,4,5-tris-phosphate receptor (IP(3)-R) identified specific staining in the acrosome region, in the postacrosome, and along the tail, but not in the midpiece region. No staining in the acrosome region was observed in sperm without acrosome, indicating that the acrosome cap was stained in intact sperm. The presence of IP(3)-R in the anterior acrosomal region as well as the induction, by thapsigargin, of intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in the acrosomal region and acrosomal exocytosis, implicates the acrosome as a potential cellular Ca(2+) store. We suggest here that the cytosolic Ca(2+) is actively transported into the acrosome by an ATP-dependent, thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) pump and that the accumulated Ca(2+) is released from the acrosome via an IP(3)-gated calcium

  1. Ca analysis: an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Greensmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow.

  2. Light generation of intracellular Ca2+ signals by a genetically encoded protein BACCS

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Sato, Koji; Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Miura, Shigenori; Touhara, Kazushige; Takeuchi, Shoji; Nakata, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ signals are highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner in numerous cellular physiological events. Here we report a genetically engineered blue light-activated Ca2+ channel switch (BACCS), as an optogenetic tool for generating Ca2+ signals. BACCS opens Ca2+-selective ORAI ion channels in response to light. A BACCS variant, dmBACCS2, combined with Drosophila Orai, elevates the Ca2+ concentration more rapidly, such that Ca2+ elevation in mammalian cells is observed within 1 s on light exposure. Using BACCSs, we successfully control cellular events including NFAT-mediated gene expression. In the mouse olfactory system, BACCS mediates light-dependent electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, we generate BACCS mutants, which exhibit fast and slow recovery of intracellular Ca2+. Thus, BACCSs are a useful optogenetic tool for generating temporally various intracellular Ca2+ signals with a large dynamic range, and will be applicable to both in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:26282514

  3. Redox Regulation of Intracellular Zinc: Molecular Signaling in the Life and Death of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aizenman, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Zn2+ has emerged as a major regulator of neuronal physiology, as well as an important signaling agent in neural injury. The intracellular concentration of this metal is tightly regulated through the actions of Zn2+ transporters and the thiol-rich metal binding protein metallothionein, closely linking the redox status of the cell to cellular availability of Zn2+. Accordingly, oxidative and nitrosative stress during ischemic injury leads to an accumulation of neuronal free Zn2+ and the activation of several downstream cell death processes. While this Zn2+ rise is an established signaling event in neuronal cell death, recent evidence suggests that a transient, sublethal accumulation of free Zn2+ can also play a critical role in neuroprotective pathways activated during ischemic preconditioning. Thus, redox-sensitive proteins, like metallothioneins, may play a critical role in determining neuronal cell fate by regulating the localization and concentration of intracellular free Zn2+. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2249–2263. PMID:20849376

  4. Aquaporin-3 mediates hydrogen peroxide uptake to regulate downstream intracellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Evan W.; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by cell-surface NADPH Oxidase (Nox) enzymes is emerging as an important signaling molecule for growth, differentiation, and migration processes. However, how cells spatially regulate H2O2 to achieve physiological redox signaling over nonspecific oxidative stress pathways is insufficiently understood. Here we report that the water channel Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) can facilitate the uptake of H2O2 into mammalian cells and mediate downstream intracellular signaling. Molecular imaging with Peroxy Yellow 1 Methyl-Ester (PY1-ME), a new chemoselective fluorescent indicator for H2O2, directly demonstrates that aquaporin isoforms AQP3 and AQP8, but not AQP1, can promote uptake of H2O2 specifically through membranes in mammalian cells. Moreover, we show that intracellular H2O2 accumulation can be modulated up or down based on endogenous AQP3 expression, which in turn can influence downstream cell signaling cascades. Finally, we establish that AQP3 is required for Nox-derived H2O2 signaling upon growth factor stimulation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the downstream intracellular effects of H2O2 can be regulated across biological barriers, a discovery that has broad implications for the controlled use of this potentially toxic small molecule for beneficial physiological functions. PMID:20724658

  5. Dendritic diameters affect the spatial variability of intracellular calcium dynamics in computer models

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Haroon; Roome, Christopher J.; Nedelescu, Hermina; Chen, Weiliang; Kuhn, Bernd; De Schutter, Erik

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding calcium dynamics in dendrites, both experimentally and computationally. Many processes influence these dynamics, but in dendrites there is a strong contribution of morphology because the peak calcium levels are strongly determined by the surface to volume ratio (SVR) of each branch, which is inversely related to branch diameter. In this study we explore the predicted variance of dendritic calcium concentrations due to local changes in dendrite diameter and how this is affected by the modeling approach used. We investigate this in a model of dendritic calcium spiking in different reconstructions of cerebellar Purkinje cells and in morphological analysis of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We report that many published models neglect diameter-dependent effects on calcium concentration and show how to implement this correctly in the NEURON simulator, both for phenomenological pool based models and for implementations using radial 1D diffusion. More detailed modeling requires simulation of 3D diffusion and we demonstrate that this does not dissipate the local concentration variance due to changes of dendritic diameter. In many cases 1D diffusion of models of calcium buffering give a good approximation provided an increased morphological resolution is implemented. PMID:25100945

  6. Angiotensin II and FCCP mobilizes calcium from different intracellular pools in adrenal glomerulosa cells; analysis of calcium fluxes.

    PubMed

    Balla, T; Szebeny, M; Kanyar, B; Spät, A

    1985-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of angiotensin II on the different pools of exchangeable Ca2+ in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. On the basis of steady state analysis of 45Ca exchange curves at least three kinetically distinct Ca2+ compartments are present in these cells. The most rapidly exchangeable compartment was regarded as Ca2+ loosely bound to the glycocalyx and the other compartments were considered to be intracellular Ca2+ pools. The effect of angiotensin II on different intracellular compartments was examined by adding the hormone at different phases of Ca2+ washout. Angiotensin increased the rate of 45Ca efflux within 1.5 min when added at the beginning of the washout. This effect, however, could not be detected when the hormone was added at the 30th min of washout, indicating that at least one hormone sensitive pool had lost most of its radioactivity by this time. In contrast to angiotensin II, the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP mobilized almost the same quantity of 45Ca irrespective of the time of its addition during the washout. This latter finding suggests that this presumably mitochondrial Ca2+ pool has a slow rate of exchange and thus differs from the pool initially mobilized by angiotensin II. The initial Ca2+ mobilizing effect of angiotensin II was also observed in a Ca2+-free media which contained EGTA, indicating that this effect is not triggered by increased Ca2+ influx. In the present study we demonstrate in the intact glomerulosa cell that angiotensin II mobilizes Ca2+ from an intracellular Ca2+ store which appears to be distinct from the FCCP-sensitive store.

  7. Influence of Na/Ca exchange and mobilization of intracellular calcium on the time course of the slow afterhyperpolarization current (IAHP) in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Goh, J W; Sanchez-Vives, M V; Sanches-Vives, M V; Pennefather, P S

    1992-04-13

    IAHP is a calcium dependent potassium current that underlies slow afterhyperpolarizations following action potentials in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion neurons. The decay rate of IAHP increases with increasing calcium loads. This effect was found not to be due to mobilization on intracellular calcium from ryanodine and caffeine sensitive stores. The relation is not affected by ryanodine at concentrations that block mobilization in the presence of caffeine, a drug that enhances mobilization of those stores. Nor does the relation seem to be due to a reduction of the driving force of the Na/Ca exchange process. The relation between decay rate and calcium load persists when Na+ is replaced by Li+. Our results suggest that Na/Ca exchange and mobilization of intracellular calcium normally have little influence in determining the time course of IAHP in these neurons.

  8. Endogenous intracellular calcium buffering and the activation/inactivation of HVA calcium currents in rat dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Granule cells acutely dissociated from the dentate gyrus of adult rat brains displayed a single class of high-threshold, voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ channels. The kinetics of whole-cell Ca2+ currents recorded with pipette solutions containing an intracellular ATP regenerating system but devoid of exogenous Ca2+ buffers, were fit best by Hodgkin- Huxley kinetics (m2h), and were indistinguishable from those recorded with the nystatin perforated patch method. In the absence of exogenous Ca2+ buffers, inactivation of HVA Ca2+ channels was a predominantly Ca(2+)-dependent process. The contribution of endogenous Ca2+ buffers to the kinetics of inactivation was investigated by comparing currents recorded from control cells to currents recorded from neurons that have lost a specific Ca(2+)-binding protein, Calbindin-D28K (CaBP), after kindling-induced epilepsy. Kindled neurons devoid of CaBP showed faster rates of both activation and inactivation. Adding an exogenous Ca2+ chelator, 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), to the intracellular solution largely eliminated inactivation in both control and kindled neurons. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that endogenous intraneuronal CaBP contributes significantly to submembrane Ca2+ sequestration at a concentration range and time domain that regulate Ca2+ channel inactivation. PMID:1662686

  9. Regulation of transepithelial ion transport and intracellular calcium by extracellular ATP in human normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, S. J.; Paradiso, A. M.; Boucher, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    1 The role of extracellular nucleotides in regulation of ion transport activities (short circuit current, Isc) of human respiratory epithelia was studied. 2 Application of nucleotides to the apical or basolateral membrane of human nasal epithelium induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc. 3 The rank order of potency of purine- or pyrimidine-induced changes in Isc of normal human nasal epithelium when applied to the apical membrane (UTP greater than or equal to ATP greater than ATP gamma S greater than 2MeSATP greater than ADP beta S much greater than beta gamma MeATP greater than or equal to alpha beta MeATP) or basolateral membrane (2MeSATP greater than UTP greater than ATP greater than ATP gamma S greater than alpha beta MeATP greater than beta gamma MeATP) is consistent with involvement of a P2 purinoceptor. A similar rank order of potencies was observed for nucleotide effects on intracellular calcium measured by Fura-2 fluorescence using microspectrofluorimetry. 4 Similar nucleotide potency in the regulation of ion transport and intracellular calcium in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelium (UTP greater than or equal to ATP) was observed, suggesting purinoceptors might be used to stimulate ion transport processes that would promote hydration of airway secretions and facilitate their clearance from CF lungs. 5 These data provide evidence for the regulation of ion transport by P2 purinoceptors in normal and cystic fibrosis human airway epithelium. PMID:1718521

  10. Lymphocyte adhesion-dependent calcium signaling in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) can undergo dramatic phenotypic and functional alterations in response to humoral and cellular stimuli. These changes promote endothelial participation in the inflammatory response through active recruitment of immune effector cells, increased vascular permeability, and alteration in vascular tone. In an attempt to define early events in lymphocyte-mediated EC signaling, we investigated cytosolic-free calcium (Ca2+) changes in single, Fluo-3- labeled human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), using an ACAS interactive laser cytometer. Of all lymphocyte subsets tested, allogeneic CD3-, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells uniquely elicited oscillatory EC Ca2+ signals in cytokine (interleukin [IL]-1- or tumor necrosis factor [TNF])-treated ECs. The induction of these signals required avid intercellular adhesion, consisted of both Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular influx, and was associated with EC inositol phosphate (IP) generation. Simultaneous recording of NK and EC Ca2+ signals using two-color fluorescence detection revealed that, upon adhesion, NK cells flux prior to EC. Lymphocyte Ca2+ buffering with 1,2-bis-5-methyl-amino- phenoxylethane-N,N,N'-tetra-acetoxymethyl acetate (MAPTAM) demonstrated that lymphocyte fluxes are, in fact, prerequisites for the adhesion- dependent EC signals. mAb studies indicate that the beta 2 integrin- intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 adhesion pathway is critically involved. However, ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of IL-1- mediated ICAM-1 hyperinduction had no effect on EC Ca2+ signaling in lymphocyte-EC conjugates, indicating that additional cytokine-induced EC alteration is required. These experiments combine features of lymphocyte-endothelial interactions, intercellular adhesion, EC cytokine activation and transmembrane signaling. The results implicate the IP/Ca2+ second messenger pathway in EC outside-in signaling induced by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and suggest that these signals may play a

  11. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  12. (Z)3,4,5,4‧-trans-tetramethoxystilbene, a new analogue of resveratrol, inhibits gefitinb-resistant non-small cell lung cancer via selectively elevating intracellular calcium level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xing-Xing; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Su Wei; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; He, Jian-Xing; Ding, Jian; Xue, Wei-Wei; Mujtaba, Tahira; Michelangeli, Francesco; Huang, Min; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Da-Kai; Jiang, Ze-Bo; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Kin-Ting Kam, Richard; Liu, Liang; Lai-Han Leung, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Calcium is a second messenger which is required for regulation of many cellular processes. However, excessive elevation or prolonged activation of calcium signaling would lead to cell death. As such, selectively regulating calcium signaling could be an alternative approach for anti-cancer therapy. Recently, we have identified an effective analogue of resveratrol, (Z)3,4,5,4‧-trans-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) which selectively elevated the intracellular calcium level in gefitinib-resistant (G-R) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. TMS exhibited significant inhibitory effect on G-R NSCLC cells, but not other NSCLC cells and normal lung epithelial cells. The phosphorylation and activation of EGFR were inhibited by TMS in G-R cells. TMS induced caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy by directly binding to SERCA and causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and AMPK activation. Proteomics analysis also further confirmed that mTOR pathway, which is the downstream of AMPK, was significantly suppressed by TMS. JNK, the cross-linker of ER stress and mTOR pathway was significantly activated by TMS. In addition, the inhibition of JNK activation can partially block the effect of TMS. Taken together, TMS showed promising anti-cancer activity by mediating calcium signaling pathway and inducing apoptosis as well as autophagy in G-R NSCLC cells, providing strategy in designing multi-targeting drug for treating G-R patients.

  13. Lipid raft-dependent uptake, signaling, and intracellular fate of Porphyromonas gingivalis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains involved in cellular trafficking and implicated as portals for certain pathogens. We sought to determine whether the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis enters macrophages via lipid rafts, and if so, to examine the impact of raft entry on its intracellular fate. Using J774A.1 mouse macrophages, we found that P. gingivalis colocalizes with lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent way. Depletion of cellular cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin resulted in about 50% inhibition of P. gingivalis uptake, although this effect was reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. The intracellular survival of P. gingivalis was dramatically inhibited in cholesterol-depleted cells relative to untreated or cholesterol-reconstituted cells, even when infections were adjusted to allow equilibration of the initial intracellular bacterial load. P. gingivalis thus appeared to exploit raft-mediated uptake for promoting its survival. Consistent with this, lipid raft disruption enhanced the colocalization of internalized P. gingivalis with lysosomes. In contrast, raft disruption did not affect the expression of host receptors interacting with P. gingivalis, although it significantly inhibited signal transduction. In summary, P. gingivalis uses macrophage lipid rafts as signaling and entry platforms, which determine its intracellular fate to the pathogen’s own advantage. PMID:18547335

  14. Intracellular light-induced release of signaling molecules from gold-coated liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Williams, Joshua D.; Romanowski, Marek

    2014-03-01

    The combination of laser light and composite nanovesicles enables unique opportunities for precise delivery to, and ondemand release of molecular compounds within, single cells at high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate precise delivery and intracellular release of molecules from gold-coated liposomes via near infrared (NIR) light. The plasmon resonant gold shell provides a light-sensitive trigger for on-demand content release from thermosensitive liposomes. Two demonstrations of intracellular delivery and release from gold-coated liposomes are presented here. The first example uses microinjection to preload gold-coated liposomes into a single cell, followed by exposure to onresonant NIR laser light to trigger release of a fluorescent nuclear dye intracellularly. In the second delivery and release demonstration, gold-coated liposomes encapsulating inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous secondary messenger in cell signaling cascades, passively accumulate within cells via endocytosis. Exposure to on-resonant NIR laser wavelength of light induces rapid release of IP3 from the intracellular liposomes and subsequent activation of Ca2+ signaling at a single cell, monitored by changes in fluorescence intensity of a Ca 2+-sensitive dye.

  15. Intracellular ionic consequences of dietary salt loading in essential hypertension. Relation to blood pressure and effects of calcium channel blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, L M; Gupta, R K; DiFabio, B; Barbagallo, M; Mann, S; Marion, R; Laragh, J H

    1994-01-01

    To study the ionic basis of salt sensitivity in hypertension, 19F-, 13P-, and 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to measure cytosolic free calcium (Cai), pH (pHi), free magnesium (Mgi), and sodium (Nai) in erythrocytes of essential hypertensive subjects (n = 19). Individuals were studied for 2 mo each on low- (UNaV < 50 meq/d) and high- (UNaV > 200 meq/d) salt diets, with the concomitant administration of nifedipine (10 mg t.i.d.) or placebo tablets for 1 mo of each diet. Salt loading elevated Cai and Nai while suppressing Mgi and pHi; these changes occurred predominantly in salt-sensitive subjects (n = 9). Nifedipine blunted the pressor response to salt loading > 50% (delta diastolic BP [high-low salt vs placebo] = 5 +/- 2 vs 14 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.05) and reversed salt-induced ionic changes, lowering Cai and elevating Mgi and pHi. Regardless of the definition of salt sensitivity, continuous relationships were observed between the pressure response to salt loading, the levels of Cai (r = 0.726, P < 0.001), Nai (r = 0.747, P < 0.001), and pHi (r = -0.754, P < 0.001), and the salt-induced change in Mgi (r = -0.757, P < 0.001). Altogether, these results emphasize the reciprocal and coordinate nature of intracellular ionic changes in response to dietary salt loading and calcium channel blockade in essential hypertension. They suggest that salt sensitivity is mediated by cellular calcium accumulation from the extracellular space, in association with magnesium depletion and acidification. Lastly, interpretation of intracellular ion measurements in the future will require concurrent assessment of dietary salt intake. Images PMID:8083368

  16. An atmospheric-pressure cold plasma leads to apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by accumulating intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R. N.; Feng, H. Q.; Liang, Y. D.; Zhang, Q.; Tian, Y.; Su, B.; Zhang, J.; Fang, J.

    2013-07-01

    A non-thermal plasma is known to induce apoptosis of various cells but the mechanism is not yet clear. A eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiaewas used to investigate the cellular and biochemical regulations of cell apoptosis and cell cycle after an atmospheric-pressure cold plasma treatment. More importantly, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) was first involved in monitoring the process of plasma-induced apoptosis in this study. We analysed the cell apoptosis and cell cycle by flow cytometry and observed the changes in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ concentration, cell mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) as well as nuclear DNA morphology via fluorescence staining assay. All experimental results indicated that plasma-generated ROS leads to the accumulation of intracellular ROS and Ca2+ that ultimately contribute to apoptosis associated with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through depolarization of Δψm and fragmenting nuclear DNA. This work provides a novel insight into the physical and biological mechanism of apoptosis induced by a plasma which could benefit for promoting the development of plasmas applied to cancer therapy.

  17. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  18. Leptin regulated calcium channels of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons by activation of different signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-H; Wang, F; Yang, M-J; Yu, D-F; Wu, W-N; Liu, J; Ma, L-Q; Cai, F; Chen, J-G

    2008-09-22

    The fat-derived hormone leptin regulates food intake and body weight in part by modulating the activity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). To investigate the electrophysiological activity of these neurons and their responses to leptin, we recorded whole-cell calcium currents on NPY and POMC neurons in the ARC of rats, which we identified by morphologic features and immunocytochemical identification at the end of recording. Leptin decreased the peak amplitude of high voltage-activated calcium currents (I(HVA)) in the isolated neurons from ARC, which were subsequently shown to be immunoreactive for NPY. The inhibition was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). In contrast, leptin increased the amplitude of I(HVA) in POMC-containing neurons. The stimulations of I(HVA) were inhibited by blockers of JAK2 and phosphatidylino 3-kinase (PI3-k). Both of these effects were counteracted by the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, suggesting that L-type calcium channels were involved in the regulation induced by leptin. These data indicated that leptin exerted opposite effects on these two classes of neurons. Leptin directly inhibited I(HVA) in NPY neurons via leptin receptor (LEPR) -JAK2-MAPK pathways, whereas evoked I(HVA) in POMC neurons by LEPR-JAK2-PI3-k pathways. These neural pathways and intracellular signaling mechanisms may play key roles in regulating NPY and POMC neuron activity, anorectic action of leptin and, thereby, feeding.

  19. Pseudopterosin A inhibits phagocytosis and alters intracellular calcium turnover in a pertussis toxin sensitive site in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Moya, Claudia E; Jacobs, Robert S

    2006-08-01

    The free living ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila was chosen as a cellular model in order to investigate the mode of action of the anti-inflammatory marine natural product Pseudopterosin A (PsA). In this paper we present evidence that PsA inhibits phagosome formation (KD=10.5 microM) and triggers a discrete intracellular calcium release (depletion) from a site in T. thermophila cells (KD=6.4 microM). Pre-treatment with the Gi/o protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX), inhibits PsA activity of both responses providing pharmacological evidence that the site of action for PsA is at a PTX sensitive G protein or a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Addition of extracellular calcium induced a concentration dependent increase in the incidence of phagosome formation (KD=30.3 microM) and was blocked by PsA pre-treatment. This particular effect of PsA on extracellular calcium was not blocked by PTX pre-treatment.

  20. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of (/sup 3/H)NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release.

  1. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  2. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  3. Photochemically Initiated Intracellular Astrocytic Calcium Waves in Living Mice Using Two-Photon Uncaging of IP3

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a caged IP3 analogue for two-photon photolysis in living animals. This probe is a cell permeable version and was coloaded with a fluorescent Ca2+ dye into astrocytes in layer 1 of the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized mice. Two-photon irradiation of single cells at 720 nm produced rapid and robust increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations monitored using two-photon microscopy at 950 nm. The photoevoked intracellular Ca2+ waves were similar in magnitude to intrinsic signals in wild type mice. These waves did not propagate to other cells beyond the targeted astrocyte. In contrast, we observed intercellular astrocytic Ca2+ waves in two mouse models of familial Alzheimer’s disease. These data suggest that Alzheimer’s might perturb gliotransmission but not IP3 signaling per se in mouse models of the disease. PMID:22778846

  4. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  5. Spatial characteristics to calcium signalling; the calcium wave as a basic unit in plant cell calcium signalling

    PubMed Central

    Malhó, R.

    1998-01-01

    Many signals that modify plant cell growth and development initiate changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+. The subsequent movement of Ca2+ in the cytoplasm is thought to take place via waves of free Ca2+. These waves may be initiated at defined regions of the cell and movement requires release from a reticulated endoplasmic reticulum and the vacuole. The mechanism of wave propagation is outlined and the possible basis of repetitive reticulum wave formation, Ca2+ oscillations and capacitative Ca2+ signalling is discussed. Evidence for the presence of Ca2+ waves in plant cells is outlined, and from studies on raphides it is suggested that the capabilities for capacitative Ca2+ signalling are also present. The paper finishes with an outline of the possible interrelation between Ca2+ waves and organelles and describes the intercellular movement of Ca2+ waves and the relevance of such information communication to plant development.

  6. Cadmium-Induced Apoptosis in Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons Culture Is Mediated by a Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sun, Ya; Hu, Fei-fei; Bian, Jian-chun; Liu, Xue-zhong; Gu, Jian-hong; Liu, Zong-ping

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an extremely toxic metal, capable of severely damaging several organs, including the brain. Studies have shown that Cd disrupts intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis, leading to apoptosis in a variety of cells including primary murine neurons. Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular ion which acts as a signaling mediator in numerous cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival/death. However, little is known about the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells. Thus we investigated the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons. Consistent with known toxic properties of Cd, exposure of cerebral cortical neurons to Cd caused morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and cell death. It also induced elevation of [Ca2+]i and inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase activities. This Cd-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was suppressed by an IP3R inhibitor, 2-APB, suggesting that ER-regulated Ca2+ is involved. In addition, we observed elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, dysfunction of cytochrome oxidase subunits (COX-I/II/III), depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) during Cd exposure. Z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor, partially prevented Cd-induced apoptosis and cell death. Interestingly, apoptosis, cell death and these cellular events induced by Cd were blocked by BAPTA-AM, a specific intracellular Ca2+ chelator. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed an up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulated expression of Bax. However, these were not blocked by BAPTA-AM. Thus Cd toxicity is in part due to its disruption of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, by compromising ATPases activities and ER-regulated Ca2+, and this elevation in Ca2+ triggers the activation of the Ca2+-mitochondria apoptotic signaling pathway. This

  7. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; Appel, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  8. Characteristics of calcium signaling in astrocytes induced by photostimulation with femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2010-05-01

    Astrocytes have been identified to actively contribute to brain functions through Ca2+ signaling, serving as a bridge to communicate with neurons and other brain cells. However, conventional stimulation techniques are hard to apply to delicate investigations on astrocytes. Our group previously reported photostimulation with a femtosecond laser to evoke astrocytic calcium (Ca2+) waves, providing a noninvasive and efficient approach with highly precise targeting. In this work, detailed characteristics of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling induced by photostimulation are presented. In a purified astrocytic culture, after the illumination of a femtosecond laser onto one cell, a Ca2+ wave throughout the network with reduced speed is induced, and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations are observed. The intercellular propagation is pharmacologically confirmed to be mainly mediated by ATP through P2Y receptors. Different patterns of Ca2+ elevations with increased amplitude in the stimulated astrocyte are discovered by varying the femtosecond laser power, which is correspondingly followed by broader intercellular waves. These indicate that the strength of photogenerated Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes has a positive relationship with the stimulating laser power. Therefore, distinct Ca2+ signaling is feasibly available for specific studies on astrocytes by employing precisely controlled photostimulation.

  9. Characteristics of calcium signaling in astrocytes induced by photostimulation with femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes have been identified to actively contribute to brain functions through Ca(2+) signaling, serving as a bridge to communicate with neurons and other brain cells. However, conventional stimulation techniques are hard to apply to delicate investigations on astrocytes. Our group previously reported photostimulation with a femtosecond laser to evoke astrocytic calcium (Ca(2+)) waves, providing a noninvasive and efficient approach with highly precise targeting. In this work, detailed characteristics of astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling induced by photostimulation are presented. In a purified astrocytic culture, after the illumination of a femtosecond laser onto one cell, a Ca(2+) wave throughout the network with reduced speed is induced, and intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations are observed. The intercellular propagation is pharmacologically confirmed to be mainly mediated by ATP through P(2)Y receptors. Different patterns of Ca(2+) elevations with increased amplitude in the stimulated astrocyte are discovered by varying the femtosecond laser power, which is correspondingly followed by broader intercellular waves. These indicate that the strength of photogenerated Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytes has a positive relationship with the stimulating laser power. Therefore, distinct Ca(2+) signaling is feasibly available for specific studies on astrocytes by employing precisely controlled photostimulation.

  10. Engendering biased signalling from the calcium-sensing receptor for the pharmacotherapy of diverse disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leach, K; Sexton, P M; Christopoulos, A; Conigrave, A D

    2014-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is widely expressed in the body, where its activity is regulated by multiple orthosteric and endogenous allosteric ligands. Each ligand stabilizes a unique subset of conformational states, which enables the CaSR to couple to distinct intracellular signalling pathways depending on the extracellular milieu in which it is bathed. Differential signalling arising from distinct receptor conformations favoured by each ligand is referred to as biased signalling. The outcome of CaSR activation also depends on the cell type in which it is expressed. Thus, the same ligand may activate diverse pathways in distinct cell types. Given that the CaSR is implicated in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes, it is an ideal target for biased ligands that could be rationally designed to selectively regulate desired signalling pathways in preferred cell types. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24111791

  11. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Osorio, Cristina; Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram; Alzate, Oscar

    2011-11-15

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca{sup 2+}-mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit {beta} (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant

  12. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  13. An Intracellular Antioxidant Determines the Expression of a Melanin-Based Signal in a Bird

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Ismael; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To understand how traits used in animal communication evolved and are maintained as honest signals, we need to understand the mechanisms that prevent cheating. It has been proposed that honest signaling is guaranteed by the costs associated with the signal expression. However, the nature of these costs is still under debate. Melanin-based signals are intriguing because their expression seems to be tightly controlled by genes and the resource involved (i.e. melanin) seems to be not limited. However, in vertebrates, low levels of a key intracellular antioxidant (i.e. glutathione) are needed to promote melanogenesis. We propose that melanin-based ornaments can signal the ability to cope with oxidative stress because those individuals with low enough levels of glutathione, such as those required for melanin production, should manage well the whole of the antioxidant machinery in order to maintain a certain oxidative status. We analysed the expression of a melanin-based signal: the well-known black stripe of the great tit (Parus major). Great tit nestlings were injected with a specific inhibitor of glutathione production (DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine; BSO) throughout their development. BSO effectively decreased intracellular glutathione levels without apparent side effects on growth or body condition. Instead, treated nestlings developed black breast stripes 70–100% larger than controls. Moreover, treated nestlings also compensated the decrease in glutathione levels by increasing the levels of circulating antioxidants. Results indicate that melanin-based signals can be at least partially permeable to environmental influences such as those associated to oxidative stress. They also reveal a potential handicap associated to the expression of this kind of signals. Finally, although other contributing factors could have been present, our findings emphasize the role of oxidative stress in shaping the evolution of animal signals in general and, in particular, those produced

  14. Dual origins of the intracellular circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Ono, Daisuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, the master circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where most neurons show circadian rhythms of intracellular Ca2+ levels. However, the origin of these Ca2+ rhythms remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully monitored the intracellular circadian Ca2+ rhythms together with the circadian PER2 and firing rhythms in a single SCN slice ex vivo, which enabled us to explore the origins. The phase relation between the circadian PER2 and Ca2+ rhythms, but not between the circadian PER2 and firing rhythms, was significantly altered in Cry1/Cry2 double knockout mice, which display a loss of intercellular synchronization in the SCN. In addition, in Cry1/Cry2 double knockout mice, circadian Ca2+ rhythms were abolished in the dorsolateral SCN, but were maintained in the majority of the ventromedial SCN. These findings indicate that intracellular circadian Ca2+ rhythms are composed of an exogenous and endogenous component involving PER2 expression. PMID:28155916

  15. Intracellular calcium mobilization and phospholipid degradation in sphingosylphosphorylcholine-stimulated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orlati, S; Porcelli, A M; Hrelia, S; Lorenzini, A; Rugolo, M

    1998-01-01

    Extracellular sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) caused a remarkable elevation in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in immortalized human airway epithelial cells (CFNP9o-). An increase in total inositol phosphates formation was determined; however, the dose responses for [Ca2+]i elevation and inositol phosphates production were slightly different and, furthermore, PMA and pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited [Ca2+]i mobilization by SPC, whereas inositol phosphates production was only partially reduced. The possible direct interaction of SPC with Ca2+ channels of intracellular stores was determined by experiments with permeabilized cells, where SPC failed to evoke Ca2+ release, whereas lysophosphatidic acid was shown to be effective. The level of phosphatidic acid was increased by SPC only in the presence of AACOCF3, a specific inhibitor of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and blocked by both pertussis toxin and R59022, an inhibitor of diacylglycerol kinase. R59022 enhanced diacylglycerol production by SPC and also significantly reduced [Ca2+]i mobilization. Only polyunsaturated diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid were generated by SPC. Lastly, SPC caused stimulation of arachidonic acid release, indicating the involvement of PLA2. Taken together, these data suggest that, after SPC stimulation, phospholipase C-derived diacylglycerol is phosphorylated by a diacylglycerol kinase to phosphatidic acid, which is further hydrolysed by PLA2 activity to arachidonic and lysophosphatidic acids. We propose that lysophosphatidic acid might be the intracellular messenger able to release Ca2+ from internal stores. PMID:9729473

  16. Two helices in the third intracellular loop determine anoctamin 1 (TMEM16A) activation by calcium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jesun; Jung, Jooyoung; Tak, Min Ho; Wee, Jungwon; Lee, Byeongjoon; Jang, Yongwoo; Chun, Hyeyeon; Yang, Dong-Jin; Yang, Young Duk; Park, Sang Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Hyun, Soonsil; Yu, Jaehoon; Cho, Hawon; Hartzell, H Criss; Oh, Uhtaek

    2015-08-01

    Anoctamin 1 (ANO1)/TMEM16A is a Cl(-) channel activated by intracellular Ca(2+) mediating numerous physiological functions. However, little is known of the ANO1 activation mechanism by Ca(2+). Here, we demonstrate that two helices, "reference" and "Ca(2+) sensor" helices in the third intracellular loop face each other with opposite charges. The two helices interact directly in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Positively and negatively charged residues in the two helices are essential for Ca(2+)-dependent activation because neutralization of these charges change the Ca(2+) sensitivity. We now predict that the Ca(2+) sensor helix attaches to the reference helix in the resting state, and as intracellular Ca(2+) rises, Ca(2+) acts on the sensor helix, which repels it from the reference helix. This Ca(2+)-dependent push-pull conformational change would be a key electromechanical movement for gating the ANO1 channel. Because chemical activation of ANO1 is viewed as an alternative means of rescuing cystic fibrosis, understanding its gating mechanism would be useful in developing novel treatments for cystic fibrosis.

  17. PMCA2 VIA PSD-95 CONTROLS CALCIUM SIGNALING BY α7-CONTAINING NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS ON ASPINY INTERNEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela; Schoellerman, Jeff; Peters, Eric C.; Berg, Darwin K.

    2012-01-01

    Local control of calcium concentration within neurons is critical for signaling and regulation of synaptic communication in neural circuits. How local control can be achieved in the absence of physical compartmentalization is poorly understood. Challenging examples are provided by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that contain α7 nicotinic receptor subunits (α7-nAChRs). These receptors are highly permeable to calcium and are concentrated on aspiny dendrites of interneurons which lack obvious physical compartments for constraining calcium diffusion. Using functional proteomics on rat brain, we show that α7-nAChRs are associated with the membrane calcium pump PMCA2. Analysis of α7-nAChR function in hippocampal interneurons in culture shows that PMCA2 activity limits the duration of calcium elevations produced by the receptors. Unexpectedly, PMCA2 inhibition triggers rapid calcium-dependent loss of α7-nAChR clusters. This extreme regulatory response is mediated by CaMKII, involves proteasome activity, depends on the second intracellular loop of α7-nAChR subunits, and is specific in that it does not alter two other classes of calcium-permeable ionotropic receptors on the same neurons. A critical link is provided by the scaffold protein PSD-95, which is associated with α7-nAChRs and constrains their mobility as revealed by single-particle tracking on neurons. The PSD-95 link is required for PMCA2-mediated removal of α7-nAChR clusters. This three-component combination of PMCA2/PSD-95/α7-nAChR offers a novel mechanism for tight control of calcium dynamics in neurons. PMID:22593058

  18. Antagonizing amyloid-β/calcium-sensing receptor signaling in human astrocytes and neurons: a key to halt Alzheimer's disease progression?

    PubMed Central

    Dal Prà, Ilaria; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes’ roles in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) promotion are important, since they survive soluble or fibrillar amyloid-β peptides (Aβs) neurotoxic effects, undergo alterations of intracellular and intercellular Ca2+ signaling and gliotransmitters release via the Aβ/α7-nAChR (α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor) signaling, and overproduce/oversecrete newly synthesized Aβ42 oligomers, NO, and VEGF-A via the Aβ/CaSR (calcium-sensing receptor) signaling. Recently, it was suggested that the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) inhibitor nitromemantine would block the synapse-destroying effects of Aβ/α7-nAChR signaling. Yet, this and the progressive extracellular accrual and spreading of Aβ42 oligomers would be stopped well upstream by NPS 2143, an allosteric CaSR antagonist (calcilytic). PMID:25883618

  19. G beta gamma signaling reduces intracellular cAMP to promote meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gill, Arvind; Hammes, Stephen R

    2007-02-01

    In nearly every vertebrate species, elevated intracellular cAMP maintains oocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Prior to ovulation, gonadotropins trigger various intra-ovarian processes, including the breakdown of gap junctions, the activation of EGF receptors, and the secretion of steroids. These events in turn decrease intracellular cAMP levels in select oocytes to allow meiotic progression, or maturation, to resume. Studies suggest that cAMP levels are kept elevated in resting oocytes by constitutive G protein signaling, and that the drop in intracellular cAMP that accompanies maturation may be due in part to attenuation of this inhibitory G protein-mediated signaling. Interestingly, one of these G protein regulators of meiotic arrest is the Galpha(s) protein, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise intracellular cAMP in two important animal models of oocyte development: Xenopus leavis frogs and mice. In addition to G(alpha)(s), constitutive Gbetagamma activity similarly stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise cAMP and prevent maturation in Xenopus oocytes; however, the role of Gbetagamma in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes has not been examined. Here we show that Gbetagamma does not contribute to the maintenance of murine oocyte meiotic arrest. In fact, contrary to observations in frog oocytes, Gbetagamma signaling in mouse oocytes reduces cAMP and promotes oocyte maturation, suggesting that Gbetagamma might in fact play a positive role in promoting oocyte maturation. These observations emphasize that, while many general concepts and components of meiotic regulation are conserved from frogs to mice, specific differences exist that may lead to important insights regarding ovarian development in vertebrates.

  20. Calcium Signaling During Meiotic Cell Cycle Regulation and Apoptosis in Mammalian Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2017-05-01

    Calcium (Ca(++) ) is one of the major signal molecules that regulate various aspects of cell functions including cell cycle progression, arrest, and apoptosis in wide variety of cells. This review summarizes current knowledge on the differential roles of Ca(++) in meiotic cell cycle resumption, arrest, and apoptosis in mammalian oocytes. Release of Ca(++) from internal stores and/or Ca(++) influx from extracellular medium causes moderate increase of intracellular Ca(++) ([Ca(++) ]i) level and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increase of Ca(++) as well as ROS levels under physiological range trigger maturation promoting factor (MPF) destabilization, thereby meiotic resumption from diplotene as well as metaphase-II (M-II) arrest in oocytes. A sustained increase of [Ca(++) ]i level beyond physiological range induces generation of ROS sufficient enough to cause oxidative stress (OS) in aging oocytes. The increased [Ca(++) ]i triggers Fas ligand-mediated oocyte apoptosis. Further, OS triggers mitochondria-mediated oocyte apoptosis in several mammalian species. Thus, Ca(++) exerts differential roles on oocyte physiology depending upon its intracellular concentration. A moderate increase of [Ca(++) ]i as well as ROS mediate spontaneous resumption of meiosis from diplotene as well as M-II arrest, while their high levels cause meiotic cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by operating both mitochondria- as well as Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic pathways. Indeed, Ca(++) regulates cellular physiology by modulating meiotic cell cycle and apoptosis in mammalian oocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 976-981, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Model-based control of the temporal patterns of intracellular signaling in silico

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yohei; Koyama, Masanori; Oba, Shigeyuki; Kuroda, Shinya; Ishii, Shin

    2017-01-01

    The functions of intracellular signal transduction systems are determined by the temporal behavior of intracellular molecules and their interactions. Of the many dynamical properties of the system, the relationship between the dynamics of upstream molecules and downstream molecules is particularly important. A useful tool in understanding this relationship is a methodology to control the dynamics of intracellular molecules with an extracellular stimulus. However, this is a difficult task because the relationship between the levels of upstream molecules and those of downstream molecules is often not only stochastic, but also time-inhomogeneous, nonlinear, and not one-to-one. In this paper, we present an easy-to-implement model-based control method that makes the target downstream molecule to trace a desired time course by changing the concentration of a controllable upstream molecule. Our method uses predictions from Monte Carlo simulations of the model to decide the strength of the stimulus, while using a particle-based approach to make inferences regarding unobservable states. We applied our method to in silico control problems of insulin-dependent AKT pathway model and EGF-dependent Akt pathway model with system noise. We show that our method can robustly control the dynamics of the intracellular molecules against unknown system noise of various strengths, even in the absence of complete knowledge of the true model of the target system. PMID:28275530

  2. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens.

  3. Dissection of calcium signaling events in exocrine secretion.

    PubMed

    Ambudkar, Indu S

    2011-07-01

    The secretion of fluid and electrolytes by salivary gland acinar cells requires the coordinated regulation of multiple ion channel and transporter proteins, signaling components, and water transport. Importantly, neurotransmitter stimulated increase in the cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) is critical for the regulation of salivary gland secretion as it regulates several major ion fluxes that together establish the sustained osmotic gradient to drive fluid secretion. The mechanisms that act to modulate these increases in [Ca(2+)](i) are therefore central to the process of salivary fluid secretion. Such modulation involves membrane receptors for neurotransmitters, as well as mechanisms that mediate intracellular Ca(2+) release, and Ca(2+) entry, as well as those that maintain cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Together, these mechanisms determine the spatial and temporal aspects of the [Ca(2+)](i) signals that regulate fluid secretion. Molecular cloning of these transporters and channels as well as development of mice lacking these proteins has established the physiological significance of key components that are involved in regulating [Ca(2+)](i) in salivary glands. This review will discuss these important studies and the findings which have led to resolution of the Ca(2+) signaling mechanisms that determine salivary gland fluid secretion.

  4. Biphasic Role of Calcium in Mouse Sperm Capacitation Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alvau, Antonio; Escoffier, Jessica; Krapf, Dario; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Salicioni, Ana M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilizing ability in the female tract in a process known as capacitation. At the molecular level, capacitation is associated with up-regulation of a cAMP-dependent pathway, changes in intracellular pH, intracellular Ca2+ and an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. How these signaling systems interact during capacitation is not well understood. Results presented in this study indicate that Ca2+ ions have a biphasic role in the regulation of cAMP-dependent signaling. Media without added Ca2+ salts (nominal zero Ca2+) still contain micromolar concentrations of this ion. Sperm incubated in this medium did not undergo PKA activation or the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting that these phosphorylation pathways require Ca2+. However, chelation of the extracellular Ca2+ traces by EGTA induced both cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. The EGTA effect in nominal zero Ca2+ media was mimicked by two calmodulin antagonists, W7 and calmidazolium, and by the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A. These results suggest that Ca2+ ions regulate sperm cAMP and tyrosine phosphorylation pathways in a biphasic manner and that some of its effects are mediated by calmodulin. Interestingly, contrary to wild type mouse sperm, sperm from CatSper1 KO mice underwent PKA activation and an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation upon incubation in nominal zero Ca2+ media. Therefore, sperm lacking Catsper Ca2+ channels behave as wild-type sperm incubated in the presence of EGTA. This latter result suggests that Catsper transports the Ca2+ involved in the regulation of cAMP-dependent and tyrosine phosphorylation pathways required for sperm capacitation. PMID:25597298

  5. Nanoelectropulse intracellular perturbation and electropermeabilization technology: phospholipid translocation, calcium bursts, chromatin rearrangement, cardiomyocyte activation, and tumor cell sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vernier, P Thomas; Sun, Yinghua; Wang, Jingjing; Thu, Mya Mya; Garon, Edward; Valderrabano, Miguel; Marcu, Laura; Koeffler, H Phillip; Gundersen, Martin A

    2005-01-01

    Nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields scramble the asymmetric arrangement of phospholipids in the plasma membrane, release intracellular calcium, trigger cardiomyocyte activity, and induce apoptosis in mammalian cancer cells, without the permeabilizing effects associated with longer, lower-field pulses. Dose dependencies with respect to pulse width, amplitude, and repetition rate, and total pulse count are observed for all of these phenomena. Sensitivities vary among cell types; cells of lymphoid origin growing in suspension are more susceptible to nanoelectropulse exposure than solid tumor lines. Simple electrical models of the cell are useful for first-order explanations, but more sophisticated treatments will be required for analysis and prediction at both biomolecular and tissue levels.

  6. Contribution of sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchange and intracellular calcium release to force development in isolated canine ventricular muscle

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    frequency in 70 mM [Na+]o was not a consequence of a decreased rate of refilling of a releasable pool of Ca2+ within the cell. These results demonstrate that frequency-dependent changes of contractile strength and intracellular Ca2+ loading in 140 mM [Na+]o require the presence of a functional sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange process. The possibility that the negative staircase in 70 mM [Na+]o is related to inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced release of Ca2+ from the SR by various cellular mechanisms is discussed. PMID:1640221

  7. Calcium influx-mediated signaling is required for complete mouse egg activation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yi-Liang; Stein, Paula; Jefferson, Wendy N; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Williams, Carmen J

    2012-03-13

    Mammalian fertilization is accompanied by oscillations in egg cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations that are critical for completion of egg activation. These oscillations are initiated by Ca(2+) release from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular stores. We tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane was a requisite component of egg activation signaling, and not simply a Ca(2+) source for store repletion. Using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and standard in vitro fertilization (IVF), we found that Ca(2+) influx was not required to initiate resumption of meiosis II. However, even if multiple oscillations in intracellular Ca(2+) occurred, in the absence of Ca(2+) influx, the fertilized eggs failed to emit the second polar body, resulting in formation of three pronuclei. Additional experiments using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA/AM, demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx is sufficient to support polar body emission and pronucleus formation after only a single sperm-induced Ca(2+) transient, whereas BAPTA/AM-treated ICSI or fertilized eggs cultured in Ca(2+)-free medium remained arrested in metaphase II. Inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry had no effect on ICSI-induced egg activation, so Ca(2+) influx through alternative channels must participate in egg activation signaling. Ca(2+) influx appears to be upstream of CaMKIIγ activity because eggs can be parthenogenetically activated with a constitutively active form of CaMKIIγ in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). These results suggest that Ca(2+) influx at fertilization not only maintains Ca(2+) oscillations by replenishing Ca(2+) stores, but also activates critical signaling pathways upstream of CaMKIIγ that are required for second polar body emission.

  8. Microglial Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling in Synaptic Development and its Alterations in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Yoshito; Monji, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction, difficulties with language and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Microglia are resident innate immune cells which release many factors including proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) when they are activated in response to immunological stimuli. Recent in vivo imaging has shown that microglia sculpt and refine the synaptic circuitry by removing excess and unwanted synapses and be involved in the development of neural circuits or synaptic plasticity thereby maintaining the brain homeostasis. BDNF, one of the neurotrophins, has various important roles in cell survival, neurite outgrowth, neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and the maintenance of neural circuits in the CNS. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling is important for microglial functions including ramification, de-ramification, migration, phagocytosis and release of cytokines, NO and BDNF. BDNF induces a sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation through the upregulation of the surface expression of canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels in rodent microglia. BDNF might have an anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of microglial activation and TRPC3 could play important roles in not only inflammatory processes but also formation of synapse through the modulation of microglial phagocytic activity in the brain. This review article summarizes recent findings on emerging dual, inflammatory and non-inflammatory, roles of microglia in the brain and reinforces the importance of intracellular Ca2+ signaling for microglial functions in both normal neurodevelopment and their potential contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders such as ASDs. PMID:28367116

  9. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  10. F NMR measurement of intracellular free calcium in human red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Schanne, F.A.X.

    1986-03-01

    Optical techniques for the measurement of intracellular Ca are not readily applicable to the human red cell because of the intense absorption of hemoglobin. The authors have therefore examined the use of /sup 19/F NMR of 5,5'-difluoro-1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (5FBAPTA) introduced non-disruptively by intracellular hydrolysis of the membrane-permeant acetoxymethyl ester derivative. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of 5FBAPTA-containing erythrocytes at 188 MHz displayed two well resolved resonances corresponding to the free and Ca-bound forms of the chelator, the resonance of the free form being ten-fold larger than that of the Ca-bound form. Addition of the ionophore A23187 resulted in the disappearance of the resonance of the free anion and a quantitative increase in the intensity of the resonance of the Ca-complex. From these data, and a K/sub D/ of 708 nM for the Ca-5FBAPTA complex, the authors estimate red cell free Ca to be 70 nM, which is in the range of values obtained for other cells, despite the fact that the human red cell, which lacks intracellular organelles for storing Ca, possesses only 1 ..mu..mol total Ca/1. cells in comparison to mmols of total Ca found in other cells. The authors ability to use /sup 19/F NMR to measure free Ca in the red blood cell paves the way for future NMR studies of red cell free Ca concentrations in human essential hypertension as well as in other diseases states in which alterations in cellular Ca homeostasis may be involved.

  11. Regulation of intracellular calcium by bupivacaine isomers in cardiac myocytes from Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chedid, Núbia G B; Sudo, Roberto T; Aguiar, Marli I S; Trachez, Margarete M; Masuda, Masako O; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2006-03-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of a racemic mixture of bupivacaine (RS(+/-)bupivacaine) and its isomers (S(-)bupivacaine and R(+)bupivacaine) on the Ca2+ handling by ventricular myocytes from Wistar rats. Single ventricular myocytes were enzymatically isolated and loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2-am to estimate intracellular Ca2+ concentration during contraction and relaxation cycles. S(-)bupivacaine (10 muM) significantly increased peak amplitude and the rate of increase of Ca2+ transients in 155% +/- 54% (P < 0.05) and 194% +/- 94% (P < 0.01) of control. However, exposure to R(+)bupivacaine had no effect on either peak amplitude or rate of increase at any concentration tested. Saponin-skinned ventricular fibers were used to investigate the effect of bupivacaine on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and on the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile system. S(-), R(+), and RS(+/-)bupivacaine induced Ca2+ release from SR (P < 0.01). In SR-disrupted skinned ventricular cells, bupivacaine and its isomers (5 mM) increased the sensitivity of contractile system to Ca(2+). S(-), RS(+/-), and R(+)bupivacaine significantly increased pCa50 from 5.8 +/- 0.1, 5.8 +/- 0.1, and 5.8 +/- 0.1, to 6.1 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.05), 6.0 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.05), and 6.1 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.05). Ca2+ release from SR through RyR2 activation could explain the increase of Ca2+ transients in cardiac cells. Increased intracellular Ca2+ in cardiac myocytes display a stereoselectivity to S(-)bupivacaine.

  12. Crystal Structures of the GCaMP Calcium Sensor Reveal the Mechanism of Fluorescence Signal Change and Aid Rational Design

    SciTech Connect

    Akerboom, Jasper; Velez Rivera, Jonathan D.; Rodriguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Tian, Lin; Hires, S. Andrew; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2009-03-16

    The genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP2 shows promise for neural network activity imaging, but is currently limited by low signal-to-noise ratio. We describe x-ray crystal structures as well as solution biophysical and spectroscopic characterization of GCaMP2 in the calcium-free dark state, and in two calcium-bound bright states: a monomeric form that dominates at intracellular concentrations observed during imaging experiments and an unexpected domain-swapped dimer with decreased fluorescence. This series of structures provides insight into the mechanism of Ca{sup 2+}-induced fluorescence change. Upon calcium binding, the calmodulin (CaM) domain wraps around the M13 peptide, creating a new domain interface between CaM and the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein domain. Residues from CaM alter the chemical environment of the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein chromophore and, together with flexible inter-domain linkers, block solvent access to the chromophore. Guided by the crystal structures, we engineered a series of GCaMP2 point mutants to probe the mechanism of GCaMP2 function and characterized one mutant with significantly improved signal-to-noise. The mutation is located at a domain interface and its effect on sensor function could not have been predicted in the absence of structural data.

  13. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  14. Ca analysis: An Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Greensmith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow. PMID:24125908

  15. The effect of feeding during recovery from aerobic exercise on skeletal muscle intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Konopka, Adam R; Hinkley, J Matthew; Undem, Miranda K; Harber, Matthew P

    2014-02-01

    We previously reported an increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis during fasted and fed recovery from nonexhaustive aerobic exercise (Harber et al., 2010). The current study examined skeletal muscle intracellular signaling in the same subjects to further investigate mechanisms of skeletal muscle protein metabolism with and without feeding following aerobic exercise. Eight males (VO₂peak: 52 ± 2 ml⁻¹·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) performed 60-min of cycle ergometry at 72 ± 1% VO₂peak on two occasions in a counter-balanced design. Exercise trials differed only in the postexercise nutritional intervention: EX-FED (5 kcal, 0.83 g carbohydrate, 0.37 g protein, 0.03 g fat per kg body weight) and EX-FAST (noncaloric, isovolumic placebo) ingested immediately and one hour after exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis at rest (on a separate day) and two hours postexercise to assess intracellular signaling via western blotting of p70S6K1, eEF2, 4EBP1, AMPKα and p38 MAPK. p70S6K1 phosphorylation was elevated (p < .05) in EX-FED relative to REST and EX-FAST. eEF2, 4EBP1, AMPKα and p38 MAPK signaling were unaltered at 2 h after exercise independent of feeding status when expressed as the ratio of phosphorylated to total protein normalized to actin. These data demonstrate that feeding after a nonexhaustive bout of aerobic exercise stimulates skeletal muscle p70S6K1 intracellular signaling favorable for promoting protein synthesis which may, as recent literature has suggested, better prepare the muscle for subsequent exercise bouts. These data provide further support into the role of feeding on mechanisms regulating muscle protein metabolism during recovery from aerobic exercise.

  16. Glibenclamide decreases ATP-induced intracellular calcium transient elevation via inhibiting reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo-ling; Ma, Zhi-yong; Fu, Zhi-jie; Ling, Ming-ying; Yan, Chuan-zhu; Zhang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that glibenclamide has a wide range of anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is unclear whether glibenclamide can affect the resting and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) handling in Raw 264.7 macrophages. In the present study, [Ca(2+)]i transient, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial activity were measured by the high-speed TILLvisION digital imaging system using the indicators of Fura 2-am, DCFDA and rhodamine-123, respectively. We found that glibenclamide, pinacidil and other unselective K(+) channel blockers had no effect on the resting [Ca(2+)]i of Raw 264.7 cells. Extracellular ATP (100 µM) induced [Ca(2+)]i transient elevation independent of extracellular Ca(2+). The transient elevation was inhibited by an ROS scavenger (tiron) and mitochondria inhibitor (rotenone). Glibenclamide and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) also decreased ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]i transient elevation, but pinacidil and other unselective K(+) channel blockers had no effect. Glibenclamide also decreased the peak of [Ca(2+)]i transient induced by extracellular thapsigargin (Tg, 1 µM). Furthermore, glibenclamide decreased intracellular ROS and mitochondrial activity. When pretreated with tiron and rotenone, glibenclamide could not decrease ATP, and Tg induced maximal [Ca(2+)]i transient further. We conclude that glibenclamide may inhibit ATP-induced [Ca(2+)]i transient elevation by blocking mitochondria KATP channels, resulting in decreased ROS generation and mitochondrial activity in Raw 264.7 macrophages.

  17. Regulation of intracellular calcium in cortical neurons transgenic for human Aβ40 and Aβ42 following nutritive challenge

    PubMed Central

    Shirwany, Najeeb A; Xie, Jun; Guo, Qing

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is not fully understood. Amyloid plaques could be causally linked to neuronal loss in AD. Two proteolytic products of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), Amyloid β40 (Aβ40) and Amyloid β42 (Aβ42), are considered to be critical in the neurodegeneration seen in AD. However, in transgenic mice that overexpress human Aβ40 or Aβ42, it was shown that Aβ42 was much more amyloidogenic than Aβ40. In contrast to this observation, we have found that cultured cortical neurons from mice transgenic for human Aβ40 and for Aβ42 are both and statistically equally vulnerable to nutritive challenge induced by trophic factor withdrawal (TFW). Aberrant regulation of InsP3R (Inositol triphosphate receptor)-mediated calcium release has been implicated in neuronal cell death. It is however not clear whether this pathway plays a critical role in cortical neurons transgenic for different species of human Aβ. We now report that Aβ40 and Aβ42 equally exacerbated intracellular calcium response to TFW in cortical neurons following TFW. When bradykinin (BK), a potent stimulant of InsP3R-mediated calcium release from ER, was applied to these cells, wild-type (WT) neurons exhibited a steep rise in [Ca2+]i but this was not observed in either Aβ transgenic type. Similarly, when 1 μM Xestopongin C (XeC), a specific blocker of InsP3R, was applied to these neurons, WT cells showed a significant attenuation of increase in [Ca2+]i following TFW, while elevation in [Ca2+]i induced by TFW remained largely unchanged in Aβ40 and Aβ42 cells. Finally, when we treated these cells with a Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA; 10 μM), all three cell types had a marked attenuation of [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that the exacerbated calcium dysregulation following TFW in Aβ transgenic neurons are likely to be mediated by calcium channels other than ER InsP3R receptors. Overall, our results also suggest that a highly amyloidogenic Abeta species, such as Aβ42

  18. The deiodinases and the control of intracellular thyroid hormone signaling during cellular differentiation☆

    PubMed Central

    Dentice, Monica; Marsili, Alessandro; Zavacki, AnnMarie; Larsen, P. Reed; Salvatore, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormone influences gene expression in virtually all vertebrates. Its action is initiated by the activation of T4 to T3, an outer ring deiodination reaction that is catalyzed by the type 1 or the type 2 iodothyronine selenodeiodinases (D1 or D2). Inactivation of T4 and T3 occurs via inner ring deiodination catalyzed by the type 3 iodothyronine selenodeiodinases (D3). The T4 concentration is generally quite stable in human plasma, with T3 levels also remaining constant. Deiodinase actions are tightly regulated in both pre- and post-natal life when they are required to make local adjustments of intracellular T3 concentrations in a precise spatio- and temporal manner. Although all the signals governing the dynamic expression of deiodinases in specific cell types are not known, many important regulatory factors have been deciphered. Scope of review This review provides striking examples from the recent literature illustrating how the expression of D2 and D3 is finely tuned during maturation of different organs, and how their action play a critical role in different settings to control intracellular T3 availability. Major conclusions Emerging evidence indicates that in various cell contexts, D2 and D3 are expressed in a dynamic balance, in which the expression of one enzyme is coordinately regulated with that of the other to tightly control intracellular T3 levels commensurate with cell requirements at that time. General significance Deiodinases control TH action in a precise spatio-temporal fashion thereby providing a novel mechanism for the local paracrine and autocrine regulation of TH action. This remarkable tissue-specific regulation of intracellular thyroid status remains hidden due to the maintenance of constant circulating TH concentrations by the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Thyroid hormone signalling. PMID:22634734

  19. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium increases the intracellular free calcium concentration in rat cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    SUN, MEIQUN; LIU, HONGLI; MIN, SHENGPING; WANG, HONGTAO; WANG, XIAOJING

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the activation of astrocytes. A previous study showed that CNTF-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) contributed to the increase of the calcium current and the elevation of corresponding ion channels in cortical neurons. On this basis, it is reasonable to assume that CNTF-ACM may increase the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neurons. In the present study, the effects of CNTF-ACM on [Ca2+]i in rat cortical neurons were determined, and on this basis, the aim was to investigate the potential active ingredients in ACM that are responsible for this biological process. As expected, the data indicated that CNTF-ACM resulted in a clear elevation of [Ca2+]i in neurons. Additionally, the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) contained in the CNTF-ACM was found to participate in the upregulation of [Ca2+]i. Taken together, CNTF induces the production of active factors (at least including FGF-2) released from astrocytes, which finally potentiate the increase of [Ca2+]i in cortical neurons. PMID:27073624

  20. Aluminum Chloride Induces Osteoblasts Apoptosis via Disrupting Calcium Homeostasis and Activating Ca(2+)/CaMKII Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qiuyue; Sun, Xudong; Li, Yanfei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminum promotes osteoblast (OB) apoptosis. Apoptosis is induced by the disordered calcium homeostasis. Therefore, to investigate the relationship between Al-induced OB apoptosis and calcium homeostasis, calvarium OBs from neonatal rats (3-4 days) were cultured and exposed to 0.048-mg/mL Al(3+) or 0.048-mg/mL Al(3+) combined with 5 μM BAPTA-AM (OBs were pretreated with 5 μM BAPTA-AM for 1 h, then added 0.048 mg/mL Al(3+)), respectively. Then OB apoptosis rate, intracellular calcium ions concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), mRNA expression level of calmodulin (CaM), and protein expression levels of CaM and p-CaMKII in OBs were examined. The result showed that AlCl3 increased OB apoptosis rate, and [Ca(2+)]i and p-CaMKII expression levels and decreased CaM expression levels, whereas BAPTA-AM relieved the effects. These results proved that AlCl3 induced OB apoptosis by disrupting the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and activating the Ca(2+)/CaMKII signal pathway. Our findings can provide new insights for revealing the apoptosis mechanism of OBs exposed to AlCl3.

  1. Axial tubule junctions control rapid calcium signaling in atria

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Sören; Kohl, Tobias; Williams, George S.B.; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A.; Hebisch, Elke; Dura, Miroslav; Didié, Michael; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Kohl, Peter; Ward, Christopher W.; Lehnart, Stephan E.

    2016-01-01

    The canonical atrial myocyte (AM) is characterized by sparse transverse tubule (TT) invaginations and slow intracellular Ca2+ propagation but exhibits rapid contractile activation that is susceptible to loss of function during hypertrophic remodeling. Here, we have identified a membrane structure and Ca2+-signaling complex that may enhance the speed of atrial contraction independently of phospholamban regulation. This axial couplon was observed in human and mouse atria and is composed of voluminous axial tubules (ATs) with extensive junctions to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that include ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) clusters. In mouse AM, AT structures triggered Ca2+ release from the SR approximately 2 times faster at the AM center than at the surface. Rapid Ca2+ release correlated with colocalization of highly phosphorylated RyR2 clusters at AT-SR junctions and earlier, more rapid shortening of central sarcomeres. In contrast, mice expressing phosphorylation-incompetent RyR2 displayed depressed AM sarcomere shortening and reduced in vivo atrial contractile function. Moreover, left atrial hypertrophy led to AT proliferation, with a marked increase in the highly phosphorylated RyR2-pS2808 cluster fraction, thereby maintaining cytosolic Ca2+ signaling despite decreases in RyR2 cluster density and RyR2 protein expression. AT couplon “super-hubs” thus underlie faster excitation-contraction coupling in health as well as hypertrophic compensatory adaptation and represent a structural and metabolic mechanism that may contribute to contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias. PMID:27643434

  2. Hypergravity stimulation induces changes in intracellular calcium concentration in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, M.; Furuichi, T.; Tatsumi, H.; Sokabe, M.

    Gravity affects growth and morphogenesis in higher plants. Recently, it has become clear that hypergravity induces morphological changes such as inhibition of elongation growth and promotion of lateral growth. Some indirect evidence suggests that changes in the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c) play an important role in these hypergravity-induced modifications of growth. However, the hypothetical changes in [Ca2+]c under hypergravity have not been examined. Here, we report the measurement of the [Ca2+]c changes induced by hypergravity stimuli in Arabidopsis seedlings expressing the calcium reporter, aequorin. When the seedlings are subjected to 20g-hypergravity produced by centrifugation, [Ca2+]c transiently increased and decayed exponentially during the hypergravity stimulation. Larger [Ca2+]c-increase was observed when the magnitude of hypergravity was increased up to 300g. The [Ca2+]c-response showed a strong desensitization, and it could not be elicited even 45 min after the cessation of the first stimulation. The [Ca2+]c-increase was inhibited by externally applied La3+ or Gd3+, potential mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable channel inhibitors, suggesting that the hypergravity-induced [Ca2+]c-increase is mediated by the activation of Ca2+-permeable channels in the plasma membrane.

  3. Intracellular ionized calcium concentration in muscles from humans with malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    López, J R; Alamo, L; Caputo, C; Wikinski, J; Ledezma, D

    1985-06-01

    Ca2+ selective microelectrodes have been used to determine the free myoplasmic [Ca2+] in human skeletal muscle obtained from patients who had developed early signs associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH) during anesthesia. Intercostal muscle biopsies were performed under local anesthesia in four MH patients 15 days to 4 months after developing the MH crisis and in three control subjects. We used only microelectrodes that showed a Nernstian response between pCa3 and pCa7 (30.5 mV per decade at 37 degrees C). Membrane resting potential (V(m)) and calcium potential (V(Ca)) were obtained from superficial fibers. The free cytosolic [Ca2+] was 0.39 +/- 0.1 microM (mean +/- SEM, n = 18) in muscle fibers obtained from malignant hyperthermic patients, whereas in control subjects it was 0.11 +/- 0.02 microM (n = 10). These results suggest that this syndrome might be related to an abnormally high myoplasmic free resting calcium concentration, probably due to a defective function of the plasma membrane or the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Intracellular distributions and putative functions of calcium-binding proteins in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Steyger, P. S.; Schuff, N. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs were immunolabeled by monoclonal and polyclonal antisera against calbindin (CaB), calmodulin (CaM), calretinin (CaR), and parvalbumin (PA). S-100, previously shown to immunolabel striolar hair cells in fish vestibular organs, only weakly immunolabeled hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs. Immunolabeling was not detected in supporting cells. With the exception of CaR, myelinated axons and unmyelinated nerve terminals were immunolabeled by all of the above antisera. Immunolabeling was seen in all saccular hair cells, although hair cells at the macular margins were immunolabeled more intensely for CaB, CaM, and PA than more centrally located hair cells. As the macula margins are known to be a growth zone, this labeling pattern suggests that marginal hair cells up-regulate their calcium-binding proteins during hair cell development. In the utriculus, immunolabeling for CaM and PA was generally restricted to striolar hair cells. CaR immunolabeling was restricted to the stereociliary array. Immunolabeling for other calcium-binding proteins was generally seen in both the cell body and hair bundles of hair cells, although this labeling was often localized to the stereociliary array and the apical portion of the cell body. CaM and PA immunolabeling in the stereociliary array in saccular and utricular striolar cells suggests a functional role for these proteins in mechanoelectric transduction and adaptation.

  5. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors.

  6. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  7. Structural Basis of Intracellular TGF-β Signaling: Receptors and Smads.

    PubMed

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Bullock, Alex N

    2016-11-01

    Stimulation of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family receptors activates an intracellular phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascade that culminates in Smad transcriptional activation and turnover. Structural studies have identified a number of allosteric mechanisms that control the localization, conformation, and oligomeric state of the receptors and Smads. Such mechanisms dictate the ordered binding of substrate and adaptor proteins that determine the directionality of the signaling process. Activation of the pathway has been illustrated by the various structures of the receptor-activated Smads (R-Smads) with SARA, Smad4, and YAP, respectively, whereas mechanisms of down-regulation have been elucidated by the structural complexes of FKBP12, Ski, and Smurf1. Interesting parallels have emerged between the R-Smads and the Forkhead-associated (FHA) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-associated domains, as well as the Hippo pathway. However, important questions remain as to the mechanism of Smad-independent signaling.

  8. A tidal wave of signals: calcium and ROS at the forefront of rapid systemic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Simon; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Miller, Gad; Choi, Won-Gyu; Toyota, Masatsugu; Devireddy, Amith R; Mittler, Ron

    2014-10-01

    Systemic signaling pathways enable multicellular organisms to prepare all of their tissues and cells to an upcoming challenge that may initially only be sensed by a few local cells. They are activated in plants in response to different stimuli including mechanical injury, pathogen infection, and abiotic stresses. Key to the mobilization of systemic signals in higher plants are cell-to-cell communication events that have thus far been mostly unstudied. The recent identification of systemically propagating calcium (Ca(2+)) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) waves in plants has unraveled a new and exciting cell-to-cell communication pathway that, together with electric signals, could provide a working model demonstrating how plant cells transmit long-distance signals via cell-to-cell communication mechanisms. Here, we summarize recent findings on the ROS and Ca(2+) waves and outline a possible model for their integration.

  9. The effects of caffeine on tension development and intracellular calcium transients in rat ventricular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, M; Kurihara, S; Sakai, T

    1984-01-01

    The effects of caffeine on tension and intracellular [Ca2+] were investigated in rat ventricular muscle using the Ca2+-sensitive photoprotein, aequorin. Contracture was induced by rapid application of 0.5-10 mM-caffeine solution at 20 degrees C. In normal Tyrode solution at 8 degrees C, or in Na+-deficient solution in which Na+ was isotonically replaced by sucrose, peak tension of caffeine contracture was potentiated and relaxation was prolonged. Caffeine contracture could not be induced immediately after a prior contracture. Repriming time was 10 min in Tyrode solution, and was much shorter in Na+-deficient solution or in high-K+ solution containing 105.9 mM-K+. Caffeine prolonged the plateau of action potential dose dependently. At low temperature, prolongation of the plateau phase by caffeine was more marked. Twitch tension showed a triphasic change after application of caffeine; peak tension transiently increased in a potentiating phase (P phase), and then decreased below control level in an inhibitory phase (I phase) followed by gradual recovery in a recovery phase (R phase). The effects of caffeine on the Ca2+ transients during a twitch were also complex, depending on time after application and dose of caffeine. In low caffeine concentration (below 0.5 mM) the peak of the Ca2+ transient was potentiated in the I phase, although the peak tension was suppressed. At high concentration (above 3 mM) the peaks of both the Ca2+ transient and twitch tension were suppressed. In every concentration of caffeine tested (0.1-5 mM), time to the Ca2+ transient and twitch tension peaks was prolonged, and the falling phases of both were delayed. Caffeine might release Ca2+ from intracellular store(s) and enhance the slow inward current. The Ca2+ transient obtained in this study clearly indicate that the prolonged time to peak tension in the presence of caffeine is due to the slow rise of intracellular [Ca2+] and prolonged time to peak of the Ca2+ transient. It is also quite

  10. Atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotypic modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs via down-regulation the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Liu, Baoqin; Kong, Dehui; Li, Si; Li, Chao; Wang, Huaqin; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the onset and progression of proliferative vascular diseases. In adult tissue, VSMCs exist in a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype, which is defined by lack of the ability of proliferation and migration, while high expression of contractile marker proteins. After injury to the vessel, VSMC shifts from a contractile phenotype to a pathological synthetic phenotype, associated with increased proliferation, migration and matrix secretion. It has been demonstrated that PDGF-BB is a critical mediator of VSMCs phenotypic switch. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl l coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, exhibits various protective effects against VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin calcium on phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and the related intracellular signal transduction pathways. Treatment of VSMCs with atorvastatin calcium showed dose-dependent inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced proliferation. Atorvastatin calcium co-treatment inhibited the phenotype modulation and cytoskeleton rearrangements and improved the expression of contractile phenotype marker proteins such as α-SM actin, SM22α and calponin in comparison with PDGF-BB alone stimulated VSMCs. Although Akt phosphorylation was strongly elicited by PDGF-BB, Akt activation was attenuated when PDGF-BB was co-administrated with atorvastatin calcium. In conclusion, atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, indicating that Akt might play a vital role in the modulation of phenotype.

  11. Ion channel regulation of intracellular calcium and airway smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F; Karner, Charlotta; Ito, Satoru; Shepherd, Malcolm; Alrashdan, Yazan; Sanderson, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Airway hyper-responsiveness associated with asthma is mediated by airway smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and has a complicated etiology involving increases in cell contraction and proliferation and the secretion of inflammatory mediators. Although these pathological changes are diverse, a common feature associated with their regulation is a change in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Because the [Ca(2+)](i) itself is a function of the activity and expression of a variety of ion channels, in both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum of the SMC, the modification of this ion channel activity may predispose airway SMCs to hyper-responsiveness. Our objective is to review how ion channels determine the [Ca(2+)](i) and influence the function of airway SMCs and emphasize the potential of ion channels as sites for therapeutic approaches to asthma.

  12. Effects of low-level laser exposure on calcium channels and intracellular release in cultured astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Maneshi, Mohammed M.; Shucard, David W.; Hua, Susan; Sachs, Frederick

    2016-03-01

    Prompted by a study of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a model system of cultured astrocytes, we discovered that low level laser illumination (LLL) at 660nm elevates the level of intracellular Ca2+. The coherence of the illumination was not essential since incoherent red light also worked. For cells bathed in low Ca2+ saline so that influx was suppressed, the Ca2+ level rose with no significant latency following illumination and consistent with a slow leak of Ca2+ from storage such as from the endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. When the cells were bathed in normal Ca2+ saline, the internal Ca2+ rose, but with a latency of about 17 seconds from the beginning of illumination. Pharmacologic studies with ryanodine inhibited the light effect. Testing the cells with fluid shear stress as used in the TBI model showed that mechanically induced elevation of cell Ca2+ was unaffected by illumination.

  13. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  14. Fluctuations in intracellular calcium concentration and their effect on tonic tension in canine cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Kort, A A; Lakatta, E G; Marban, E; Stern, M D; Wier, W G

    1985-01-01

    Ca2+-activated aequorin luminescence and tension were measured in dog Purkinje fibres during twitches and during the increase in resting force produced by exposure of the fibres to a low-Na+ solution after 3 min without external K+. Over the restricted range which could be examined, the relation between tension and 'mean' aequorin luminescence (luminescence filtered at 0.2 Hz) was approximately linear during the development and maintenance of contracture. For a given level of force, the mean aequorin luminescence during contracture was up to 20 times greater than the peak luminescence during the twitch. Noise analysis of aequorin luminescence and tension during contracture indicated the presence of periodic fluctuations, with a predominant frequency in the range 1-4 Hz. Ryanodine (1 microM) or caffeine (10 mM) abolished the fluctuations in luminescence and tension and made the relation between tension and mean aequorin luminescence much steeper. A mathematical model, the key feature of which is periodicity in the asynchronous occurrence of spatially localized regions of relatively high [Ca2+], reproduces the experimental data derived from contractures. From the model analysis, we infer that tonic tension is produced by recruitment of increasing numbers of regions of high [Ca2+], rather than by homogeneous graded activation. These results indicate that during contracture or 'tonic tension', intracellular [Ca2+] is not at steady state, but rather undergoes large, asynchronous spatio-temporal fluctuations. Thus the assumptions that intracellular [Ca2+] is at steady state or homogeneous during tonic tension are not valid. PMID:4057100

  15. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca(2+) with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca(2+) signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca(2+) level could be induced by applying a high-K(+) solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca(2+) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na(+) channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca(2+) oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na(+) channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca(2+) oscillations are discussed.

  16. Comparative biology of sperm factors and fertilization-induced calcium signals across the animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Kashir, Junaid; Deguchi, Ryusaku; Jones, Celine; Coward, Kevin; Stricker, Stephen A

    2013-10-01

    Fertilization causes mature oocytes or eggs to increase their concentrations of intracellular calcium ions (Ca²⁺) in all animals that have been examined, and such Ca²⁺ elevations, in turn, provide key activating signals that are required for non-parthenogenetic development. Several lines of evidence indicate that the Ca²⁺ transients produced during fertilization in mammals and other taxa are triggered by soluble factors that sperm deliver into oocytes after gamete fusion. Thus, for a broad-based analysis of Ca²⁺ dynamics during fertilization in animals, this article begins by summarizing data on soluble sperm factors in non-mammalian species, and subsequently reviews various topics related to a sperm-specific phospholipase C, called PLCζ, which is believed to be the predominant activator of mammalian oocytes. After characterizing initiation processes that involve sperm factors or alternative triggering mechanisms, the spatiotemporal patterns of Ca²⁺ signals in fertilized oocytes or eggs are compared in a taxon-by-taxon manner, and broadly classified as either a single major transient or a series of repetitive oscillations. Both solitary and oscillatory types of fertilization-induced Ca²⁺ signals are typically propagated as global waves that depend on Ca²⁺ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in response to increased concentrations of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP₃). Thus, for taxa where relevant data are available, upstream pathways that elevate intraoocytic IP3 levels during fertilization are described, while other less-common modes of producing Ca²⁺ transients are also examined. In addition, the importance of fertilization-induced Ca²⁺ signals for activating development is underscored by noting some major downstream effects of these signals in various animals.

  17. Emerin suppresses Notch signaling by restricting the Notch intracellular domain to the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byongsun; Lee, Tae-Hee; Shim, Jaekyung

    2017-02-01

    Emerin is an inner nuclear membrane protein that is involved in maintaining the mechanical integrity of the nuclear membrane. Increasing evidence supports the involvement of emerin in the regulation of gene expression; however, its precise function remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that emerin downregulated genes downstream of Notch signaling, which are activated exclusively by the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). Deletion mutant experiments revealed that the transmembrane domain of emerin is important for the inhibition of Notch signaling. Emerin interacted directly and colocalized with the NICD at the nuclear membrane. Emerin knockdown induced the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT, increased endogenous Notch signaling, and inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Notably, the downregulation of barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) or lamin A/C increased Notch signaling by inducing the release of emerin into the cytosol, implying that nuclear membrane-bound emerin acts as an endogenous inhibitor of Notch signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that emerin negatively regulates Notch signaling by promoting the retention of the NICD at the nuclear membrane. This mechanism could constitute a new therapeutic target for the treatment of emerin-related diseases.

  18. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  19. Effects of ATP on the intracellular calcium level in the osteoblastic TBR31-2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Naomi; Nejime, Namie; Yamauchi, Chisako; Yanai, Nobuaki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Nakabayashi, Toshikatsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of extracellular ATP on TBR31-2 cells established from the bone marrow of transgenic mice harboring the temperature-sensitive simian virus (SV) 40 T-antigen gene. These cells showed the capacity to differentiate toward osteoblasts and could be enhanced by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, an inducer of osteoblasts. The intracellular calcium ion level ([Ca(2+)](i)) in differentiating TBR31-2 cells was measured by fluorescence confocal microscopic imaging using the Ca(2+)-sensitive probe, Calcium Green 1/AM. P2 receptor agonists, such as ATP (1 microM), uridine 5'-triphosphate (1 microM), and ADP (1 microM), significantly increased the [Ca(2+)](i) of TBR31-2 cells in 2-d and 5-d cultures, but a potent P2X receptor agonist, alpha,beta-methylene ATP (10 microM), did not increase [Ca(2+)](i). The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ATP in the 2-d culture tended to be higher than in the 5-d culture. The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) of both cultures was inhibited by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid, a P2 receptor antagonist. However, in an external Ca(2+)-free condition ATP-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was unchanged at either stage. U73122, phospholipase C inhibitor and Thapsigargin, a calcium-pump inhibitor, significantly inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) at both stages. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the expression of P2Y receptor mRNA was higher in the 2-d culture than in the 5-d culture. These results indicate that ATP induces the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) from the calcium store through activating P2Y receptors in TBR31-2 cells and that the 2-d culture can respond to ATP more than the 5-d culture due to the higher expression of P2Y receptors. This suggests that the physiological role of ATP in osteoblasts is altered during differentiation.

  20. Agonist-Biased Signaling via Proteinase Activated Receptor-2: Differential Activation of Calcium and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Mathur, Maneesh; Rochdi, Moulay Driss; Bouvier, Michel; DeFea, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of different trypsin-revealed tethered ligand (TL) sequences of rat proteinase-activated receptor 2 (rPAR2) and the corresponding soluble TL-derived agonist peptides to trigger agonist-biased signaling. To do so, we mutated the proteolytically revealed TL sequence of rPAR2 and examined the impact on stimulating intracellular calcium transients and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The TL receptor mutants, rPAR2-Leu37Ser38, rPAR2-Ala37–38, and rPAR2-Ala39–42 were compared with the trypsin-revealed wild-type rPAR2 TL sequence, S37LIGRL42—. Upon trypsin activation, all constructs stimulated MAP kinase signaling, but only the wt-rPAR2 and rPAR2-Ala39–42 triggered calcium signaling. Furthermore, the TL-derived synthetic peptide SLAAAA-NH2 failed to cause PAR2-mediated calcium signaling but did activate MAP kinase, whereas SLIGRL-NH2 triggered both calcium and MAP kinase signaling by all receptors. The peptides AAIGRL-NH2 and LSIGRL-NH2 triggered neither calcium nor MAP kinase signals. Neither rPAR2-Ala37–38 nor rPAR2-Leu37Ser38 constructs recruited β-arrestins-1 or -2 in response to trypsin stimulation, whereas both β-arrestins were recruited to these mutants by SLIGRL-NH2. The lack of trypsin-triggered β-arrestin interactions correlated with impaired trypsin-activated TL-mutant receptor internalization. Trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activation by the TL-mutated receptors was not blocked by inhibitors of Gαi (pertussis toxin), Gαq [N-cyclohexyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-6-methylindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide (GP2A)], Src kinase [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], or the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor [4-(3′-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (AG1478)], but was inhibited by the Rho-kinase inhibitor (R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide, 2HCl (Y27362). The data indicate that the proteolytically revealed TL sequence(s) and the mode

  1. Polymodal Responses in C. elegans Phasmid Neurons Rely on Multiple Intracellular and Intercellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wenjuan; Cheng, Hankui; Li, Shitian; Yue, Xiaomin; Xue, Yadan; Chen, Sixi; Kang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Animals utilize specialized sensory neurons enabling the detection of a wide range of environmental stimuli from the presence of toxic chemicals to that of touch. However, how these neurons discriminate between different kinds of stimuli remains poorly understood. By combining in vivo calcium imaging and molecular genetic manipulation, here we investigate the response patterns and the underlying mechanisms of the C. elegans phasmid neurons PHA/PHB to a variety of sensory stimuli. Our observations demonstrate that PHA/PHB neurons are polymodal sensory neurons which sense harmful chemicals, hyperosmotic solutions and mechanical stimulation. A repulsive concentration of IAA induces calcium elevations in PHA/PHB and both OSM-9 and TAX-4 are essential for IAA-sensing in PHA/PHB. Nevertheless, the PHA/PHB neurons are inhibited by copper and post-synaptically activated by copper removal. Neuropeptide is likely involved in copper removal-induced calcium elevations in PHA/PHB. Furthermore, mechanical stimulation activates PHA/PHB in an OSM-9-dependent manner. Our work demonstrates how PHA/PHB neurons respond to multiple environmental stimuli and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms of polymodal signaling, such as nociception, in more complex organisms. PMID:28195191

  2. Limiting angiotensin II signaling with a cell penetrating peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of the angiotensin II type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Mierke, Dale; Berg, Eric; Shia, Michael; Fishman, Jordan; Sallum, Christine; Polgar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide consisting of the second intracellular loop (IC2) of the Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) linked to the HIV transactivating regulatory protein (TAT) domain was used to identify the role of this motif for intracellular signal transduction. HEK-293 cells stably transfected with AT1R cDNA and primary cultures of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressing endogenous AT1 receptor were exposed to the cell-penetrating peptide construct and the effect on angiotensin II signaling determined. The AT1 IC2 peptide effectively inhibited AngII stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover and calcium influx. It also limited the activation of Akt/PKB as determined by an inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and completely abolished the AngII dependent activation of the transcriptional factor NFκB. In contrast, the AT1 IC2 peptide had no effect on AngII/AT1 receptor activation of ERK. These results illustrate the potential of using cell penetrating peptides to both delineate receptor-mediated signal transduction as well as to selectively regulate G protein coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20492449

  3. Luteinizing hormone modulates intracellular calcium, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and motility during human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Aideé S; González-González, María E; Mata-Martínez, Esperanza; Larrea, Fernando; Treviño, Claudia L; Chirinos, Mayel

    2017-02-05

    In order to fertilize, spermatozoa must undergo physiological and biochemical changes during their transit along the female reproductive tract before reaching and fusing with the oocyte, process known as capacitation. Sperm modifications associated with capacitation are modulated by their interaction with molecules present in the female reproductive tract. During the woman fertile window, some reproductive hormones reach their maximum concentrations in serum, such as the luteinizing hormone (LH). Since spermatozoa preparing to fertilize may be exposed to LH, the purpose of this work was to study the effects of this hormone on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), protein tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm motility and acrosome reaction under capacitating conditions. The results showed that LH increases the duration and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. Furthermore, motility analysis indicated that LH decreases rapid progressive motility and that sperm hyperactivation as well as several kinetic parameters augment in the presence of 0.5 and 1 μg/ml of the hormone. In addition, these two hormone concentrations also consistently promoted protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, no effects on acrosome reaction were observed. In conclusion, the evidence indicates that LH modulates several sperm function variables involved in capacitation, suggesting that may have an important and unexplored role during human fertilization.

  4. A Specific Transitory Increase in Intracellular Calcium Induced by Progesterone Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis in Mouse Sperm.

    PubMed

    Romarowski, Ana; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Ramírez-Gómez, Héctor V; Puga Molina, Lis del C; Treviño, Claudia L; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Darszon, Alberto; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-03-01

    During capacitation, sperm acquire the ability to undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an essential step in fertilization. Progesterone produced by cumulus cells has been associated with various physiological processes in sperm, including stimulation of AR. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) is necessary for AR to occur. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal correlation between the changes in [Ca(2+)]i and AR in single mouse spermatozoa in response to progesterone. We found that progesterone stimulates an [Ca(2+)]i increase in five different patterns: gradual increase, oscillatory, late transitory, immediate transitory, and sustained. We also observed that the [Ca(2+)]i increase promoted by progesterone starts at either the flagellum or the head. We validated the use of FM4-64 as an indicator for the occurrence of the AR by simultaneously detecting its fluorescence increase and the loss of EGFP in transgenic EGFPAcr sperm. For the first time, we have simultaneously visualized the rise in [Ca(2+)]i and the process of exocytosis in response to progesterone and found that only a specific transitory increase in [Ca(2+)]i originating in the sperm head promotes the initiation of AR.

  5. ROLE OF INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM AND PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 IN ARACHIDONIC ACID-INDUCED TOXICITY IN LIVER CELLS OVEREXPRESSING CYP2E1*

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Cederbaum, Arthur I.

    2007-01-01

    Liver cells (HepG2 and primary hepatocytes) overexpressing CYP2E1 and exposed to arachidonic acid (AA) were previously shown to lose viability together with enhanced lipid peroxidation. These events were blocked in cells pre-incubated with antioxidants (α -tocopherol, glutathione ethyl ester), or in HepG2 cells not expressing CYP2E1. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the role of calcium and calcium-activated hydrolases in these CYP2E1-AA interactions. CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells treated with AA showed an early increase in cytosolic calcium and partial depletion of ionomycin-sensitive calcium stores. These changes in calcium were blocked by α -tocopherol. AA activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in CYP2E1-expressing liver cells, and this was inhibited by PLA2 inhibitors or α -tocopherol. PLA2 inhibitors prevented the cell death caused by AA, without affecting CYP2E1 activity or lipid peroxidation. AA toxicity and PLA2 activation were inhibited in calcium-depleted cells, but not by removal of extracellular calcium alone. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the early increase in cytosolic calcium caused by AA. CYP2E1 overexpressing HepG2 cells exposed to AA showed a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, which was prevented by the PLA2 inhibitors. These results suggest that AA-induced toxicity to CYPE1-expressing cells: (i) is associated with release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores that depends mainly on oxidative membrane damage; (ii) is associated with activation of PLA2 that depends on intracellular calcium and lipid peroxidation; iii) does not depend on increased influx of extracellular calcium, and iv) depends on the effect of converging events (lipid peroxidation, intracellular calcium, activation of PLA2) on mitochondria to induce bioenergetic failure and necrosis. These interactions may play a role in alcohol liver toxicity, which requires polyunsaturated fatty acids, and involves induction of CYP2E1. PMID:17118330

  6. Walnut extracts protect cultured microglia against LPS-induced neurotoxicity via modulation of intracellular calcium concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walnuts are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA), as compared to other edible plants. Previously, our laboratory had demonstrated that dietary walnut supplementation in aged animals enhanced protective signaling pathways, altered membrane microstructures, an...

  7. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  8. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  9. Correlation between oxidative stress and alteration of intracellular calcium handling in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Alvarez-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Yáñez, Lucía; Vidrio, Susana; Martínez, Lidia; Rosas, Gisele; Yáñez, Mario; Ramírez, Sotero; de Sánchez, Victoria Chagoya

    2006-09-01

    Myocardial Ca(2+) overload and oxidative stress are well documented effects associated to isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial necrosis, but information correlating these two issues is scarce. Using an ISO-induced myocardial infarction model, 3 stages of myocardial damage were defined: pre-infarction (0-12 h), infarction (12-24 h) and post-infarction (24-96 h). Alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis and oxidative stress were studied in mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasmalemma by measuring the Ca(2+) content, the activity of Ca(2+) handling proteins, and by quantifying TBARs, nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative protein damage (changes in carbonyl and thiol groups). Free radicals generated system, antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress (GSH/GSSG ratio) were also monitored at different times of ISO-induced cardiotoxicity. The Ca(2+) overload induced by ISO was counterbalanced by a diminution in the ryanodine receptor activity and the Na(+)-Ca(+2) exchanger as well as by the increase in both calcium ATPases activities (vanadate- and thapsigargine-sensitive) and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during pre-infarction and infarction stages. Pro-oxidative reactions and antioxidant defences during the 3 stages of cardiotoxicity were observed, with maximal oxidative stress during the infarction. Significant correlations were found among pro-oxidative reactions with plasmalemma and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases, and ryanodine receptor activities at the onset and development of ISO-induced infarction. These findings could be helpful in the design of antioxidant therapies in this pathology.

  10. Characterization of NAADP-mediated calcium signaling in human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Tusie, A.A.; Vasudevan, S.R.; Churchill, G.C.; Nishigaki, T.; Treviño, C.L.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Human sperm cells synthesize NAADP. •NAADP-AM mediates [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases in human sperm in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. •Human sperm have two acidic compartments located in the head and midpiece. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} signaling in spermatozoa plays a crucial role during processes such as capacitation and release of the acrosome, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a potent Ca{sup 2+}-releasing second messenger in a variety of cellular processes. The presence of a NAADP synthesizing enzyme in sea urchin sperm has been previously reported, suggesting a possible role of NAADP in sperm Ca{sup 2+} signaling. In this work we used in vitro enzyme assays to show the presence of a novel NAADP synthesizing enzyme in human sperm, and to characterize its sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} and pH. Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the permeable form of NAADP (NAADP-AM) induces intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}] increases in human sperm even in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Using LysoTracker®, a fluorescent probe that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments, we identified two such stores in human sperm cells. Their acidic nature was further confirmed by the reduction in staining intensity observed upon inhibition of the endo-lysosomal proton pump with Bafilomycin, or after lysosomal bursting with glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide. The selective fluorescent NAADP analog, Ned-19, stained the same subcellular regions as LysoTracker®, suggesting that these stores are the targets of NAADP action.

  11. Multiple Model-Informed Open-Loop Control of Uncertain Intracellular Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Jeffrey P.; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Rundell, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  12. Multiple model-informed open-loop control of uncertain intracellular signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perley, Jeffrey P; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2014-04-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  13. Effects of intracellular calcium on sodium current density in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chiamvimonvat, N; Kargacin, M E; Clark, R B; Duff, H J

    1995-01-01

    1. Na+ channel mRNA levels in the heart can be modulated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). We have investigated whether this regulation of Na+ channel biosynthesis by cytosolic Ca2+ translates into functional Na+ channels that can be detected electrophysiologically. 2. Whole-cell Na+ currents (INa) were recorded using patch-clamp techniques from single ventricular myocytes isolated from neonatal rats and maintained in tissue culture for 24 h. Na+ current density, measured at a membrane potential of -10 mV, was significantly decreased in the cells which were exposed for 24 h to culture medium containing 10 mM of both external Ca2+ and K+ in order to raise [Ca2+]i compared with control cells which were maintained in culture medium containing 2 and 5 mM of Ca2+ and K+, respectively. In contrast, Na+ current density (at -10 mV) was significantly increased in cells exposed for 24 h to 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA AM; a cell membrane-permeable Ca2+ chelator) which lowered the average [Ca2+]i compared with control. 3. Changes in current density were not associated with changes in the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of INa. There were no changes in single-channel conductances. 4. It is concluded that Na+ current density in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes is modulated by [Ca2+]i. The findings suggest that the differences in current density are attributable to a change in Na+ channel numbers rather than to changes in single-channel conductance or gating. These changes are consistent with the previously documented modulation of Na+ channel biosynthesis by cytosolic Ca2+. PMID:7650605

  14. Contribution of elevated intracellular calcium to pulmonary arterial myocyte alkalinization during chronic hypoxia