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  1. Chaperone receptors: guiding proteins to intracellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; von Löffelholz, Ottilie; Abell, Ben M

    2012-01-01

    Despite mitochondria and chloroplasts having their own genome, 99% of mitochondrial proteins (Rehling et al., Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 5:519-530, 2004) and more than 95% of chloroplast proteins (Soll, Curr Opin Plant Biol 5:529-535, 2002) are encoded by nuclear DNA, synthesised in the cytosol and imported post-translationally. Protein targeting to these organelles depends on cytosolic targeting factors, which bind to the precursor, and then interact with membrane receptors to deliver the precursor into a translocase. The molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 have been widely implicated in protein targeting to mitochondria and chloroplasts, and receptors capable of recognising these chaperones have been identified at the surface of both these organelles (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007). The role of these chaperone receptors is not fully understood, but they have been shown to increase the efficiency of protein targeting (Young et al., Cell 112:41-50, 2003; Qbadou et al., EMBO J 25:1836-1847, 2006). Whether these receptors contribute to the specificity of targeting is less clear. A class of chaperone receptors bearing tetratricopeptide repeat domains is able to specifically bind the highly conserved C terminus of Hsp70 and/or Hsp90. Interestingly, at least of one these chaperone receptors can be found on each organelle (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007), which suggests a universal role in protein targeting for these chaperone receptors. This review will investigate the role that chaperone receptors play in targeting efficiency and specificity, as well as examining recent in silico approaches to find novel chaperone receptors.

  2. Uptake of heavy metals to the extracellular and intracellular compartments in three species of aquatic bryophyte.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M D; López, J; Carballeira, A

    1999-09-01

    Shoot tips of Fontinalis antipyretica, Scapania undulata, and Fissidens polyphyllus were maintained for 60 min with solutions containing 0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 ppm of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, or Zn. A sequential extraction procedure was then used to estimate the amounts of the corresponding metal, and of K and Mg, in the extracellular compartment (extraction with NiCl(2) or EDTA), the intracellular compartment (subsequent extraction with cold dilute HNO(3)), and the particulate fraction (subsequent extraction with hot concentrated HNO(3)). In most cases more metal was taken up to the extracellular compartment than to the intracellular compartment, while particulate-fraction content was negligible. The relationship between metal concentration in the water and metal content in the extracellular compartment was well modeled with a Michaelis-Menten-type equation. Results suggest that in S. undulata extracellular cation-binding sites have a high metal affinity, while in F. polyphyllus it is relatively low. However, postincubation intracellular contents were highest in the latter species. The ranking of the six metals by amounts taken up into the intracellular compartment was the same for all three bryophyte species. Uptake of heavy metals led to considerable losses of intracellular K (probably due to effects on plasma membrane properties), and of extracellular Mg (probably due to displacement from cation-binding sites). Losses of intracellular K were most marked in S. undulata, followed by F. antipyretica. By contrast, S. undulata was the species from which losses of extracellular Mg were lowest.

  3. Automatic Quantification of the Number of Intracellular Compartments in Arabidopsis thaliana Root Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bayle, Vincent; Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-01-01

    In the era of quantitative biology, it is increasingly required to quantify confocal microscopy images. If possible, quantification should be performed in an automatic way, in order to avoid bias from the experimenter, to allow the quantification of a large number of samples, and to increase reproducibility between laboratories. In this protocol, we describe procedures for automatic counting of the number of intracellular compartments in Arabidopsis root cells, which can be used for example to study endocytosis or secretory trafficking pathways and to compare membrane organization between different genotypes or treatments. While developed for Arabidopsis roots, this method can be used on other tissues, cell types and plant species. PMID:28255574

  4. Self-assembled hydrogel fibers for sensing the multi-compartment intracellular milieu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Kohler, Jonathan E.; Blass, Amy; Williams, Miguel; Xu, Chenjie; Chen, Lynna; Jadhav, Swapnil R.; John, George; Soybel, David I.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2014-03-01

    Targeted delivery of drugs and sensors into cells is an attractive technology with both medical and scientific applications. Existing delivery vehicles are generally limited by the complexity of their design, dependence on active transport, and inability to function within cellular compartments. Here, we developed self-assembled nanofibrous hydrogel fibers using a biologically inert, low-molecular-weight amphiphile. Self-assembled nanofibrous hydrogels offer unique physical/mechanical properties and can easily be loaded with a diverse range of payloads. Unlike commercially available E. coli membrane particles covalently bound to the pH reporting dye pHrodo, pHrodo encapsulated in self-assembled hydrogel-fibers internalizes into macrophages at both physiologic (37°C) and sub-physiologic (4°C) temperatures through an energy-independent, passive process. Unlike dye alone or pHrodo complexed to E. coli, pHrodo-SAFs report pH in both the cytoplasm and phagosomes, as well the nucleus. This new class of materials should be useful for next-generation sensing of the intracellular milieu.

  5. Self-assembled hydrogel fibers for sensing the multi-compartment intracellular milieu.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Kohler, Jonathan E; Blass, Amy; Williams, Miguel; Xu, Chenjie; Chen, Lynna; Jadhav, Swapnil R; John, George; Soybel, David I; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2014-03-26

    Targeted delivery of drugs and sensors into cells is an attractive technology with both medical and scientific applications. Existing delivery vehicles are generally limited by the complexity of their design, dependence on active transport, and inability to function within cellular compartments. Here, we developed self-assembled nanofibrous hydrogel fibers using a biologically inert, low-molecular-weight amphiphile. Self-assembled nanofibrous hydrogels offer unique physical/mechanical properties and can easily be loaded with a diverse range of payloads. Unlike commercially available E. coli membrane particles covalently bound to the pH reporting dye pHrodo, pHrodo encapsulated in self-assembled hydrogel-fibers internalizes into macrophages at both physiologic (37°C) and sub-physiologic (4°C) temperatures through an energy-independent, passive process. Unlike dye alone or pHrodo complexed to E. coli, pHrodo-SAFs report pH in both the cytoplasm and phagosomes, as well the nucleus. This new class of materials should be useful for next-generation sensing of the intracellular milieu.

  6. Regulation of intracellular cyclic AMP in skeletal muscle cells involves the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely Oliveira; Costa-Jr, Valter Luiz

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the intracellular and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP in primary rat skeletal muscle cultures, after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Isoprenaline, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and forskolin induced a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP that peaked 5 min after onset stimulation. Under stimulation with isoprenaline or CGRP, the intracellular cyclic AMP initial rise was followed by an exponential decline, reaching 46 and 52% of peak levels in 10 min, respectively. Conversely, the forskolin-dependent accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP decreased slowly and linearly, reaching 49% of the peak level in 30 min. The loss of intracellular cyclic AMP from peak levels, induced by direct or receptor-induced activation of AC, was followed by an increase in the extracellular cyclic AMP. This effect was independent on PDEs, since it was obtained in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Besides, in isoprenaline treated cells, the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol reduced both intra- and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, whereas the organic anion transporter inhibitor probenecid reduced exclusively the extracellular accumulation. Together our data show that direct or receptor-dependent activation of skeletal muscle AC results in a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP, despite the continuous presence of the stimulus. The temporal declining of intracellular cyclic AMP was not dependent on the cyclic AMP breakdown but associated to the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment, by an active transport since it was prevented by probenecid. PMID:12642402

  7. Trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules through intracellular compartments containing HLA-DM.

    PubMed

    Robbins, N F; Hammond, C; Denzin, L K; Pan, M; Cresswell, P

    1996-01-01

    The endosomal site(s) where MHC class II molecules become competent to bind antigenic peptide has not been completely characterized. We identified endocytic compartments through which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules move prior to their expression on the plasma membrane. The compartments co-sediment with lysosomes in the most dense regions of Percoll gradients. The appearance of proteolytic fragments of the invariant chain (I chain), namely leupeptin-induced proteins (LIPs) and class-II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP), in this region of the gradient suggests that the release of MHC class II molecules from I chain association occurs within these vesicles. The formation of SDS-stable alpha beta dimers indicated that MHC class II molecules contained within these compartments are receptive to peptide binding. A majority of the HLA-DM protein was found in the same region of the Percoll gradient, consistent with its established function in MHC class-II-restricted antigen presentation. Immunoelectron micrographs of dense-sedimenting compartments indicated that I chain, MHC class II, and DM molecules are contained within both multivesicular and multilamellar vesicles. The final stages of I chain dissociation from MHC class II molecules and DM-mediated peptide loading probably occur in these compartments.

  8. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias C; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally 'program' the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  9. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthias C.; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R.; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally ‘program’ the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  10. Intracellular lumen formation in Drosophila proceeds via a novel subcellular compartment.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Linda S; Metzstein, Mark M

    2015-11-15

    Cellular tubes have diverse morphologies, including multicellular, unicellular and subcellular architectures. Subcellular tubes are found prominently within the vertebrate vasculature, the insect breathing system and the nematode excretory apparatus, but how such tubes form is poorly understood. To characterize the cellular mechanisms of subcellular tube formation, we have refined methods of high pressure freezing/freeze substitution to prepare Drosophila larvae for transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis. Using our methods, we have found that subcellular tube formation may proceed through a previously undescribed multimembrane intermediate composed of vesicles bound within a novel subcellular compartment. We have also developed correlative light/TEM procedures to identify labeled cells in TEM-fixed larval samples. Using this technique, we have found that Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) and the V-ATPase regulator Rabconnectin-3 are required for subcellular tube formation, probably in a step resolving the intermediate compartment into a mature lumen. In general, our ultrastructural analysis methods could be useful for a wide range of cellular investigations in Drosophila larvae.

  11. Essentially All Excess Fibroblast Cholesterol Moves from Plasma Membranes to Intracellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that modestly increasing plasma membrane cholesterol beyond its physiological set point greatly increases the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial pools, thereby eliciting manifold feedback responses that return cell cholesterol to its resting state. The question arises whether this homeostatic mechanism reflects the targeting of cell surface cholesterol to specific intracellular sites or its general equilibration among the organelles. We now show that human fibroblast cholesterol can be increased as much as two-fold from 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin without changing the size of the cell surface pool. Rather, essentially all of the added cholesterol disperses rapidly among cytoplasmic membranes, increasing their overall cholesterol content by as much as five-fold. We conclude that the level of plasma membrane cholesterol is normally at capacity and that even small increments above this physiological set point redistribute essentially entirely to intracellular membranes, perhaps down their chemical activity gradients. PMID:25014655

  12. LINGO-1 protein interacts with the p75 neurotrophin receptor in intracellular membrane compartments.

    PubMed

    Meabon, James S; De Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Wiley, Jesse C; Hudson, Mark P; Bothwell, Mark

    2015-04-10

    Axon outgrowth inhibition in response to trauma is thought to be mediated via the binding of myelin-associated inhibitory factors (e.g. Nogo-66, myelin-associated glycoprotein, oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein, and myelin basic protein) to a putative tripartite LINGO-1·p75(NTR)·Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) complex at the cell surface. We found that endogenous LINGO-1 expression in neurons in the cortex and cerebellum is intracellular. Mutation or truncation of the highly conserved LINGO-1 C terminus altered this intracellular localization, causing poor intracellular retention and increased plasma membrane expression. p75(NTR) associated predominantly with natively expressed LINGO-1 containing immature N-glycans, characteristic of protein that has not completed trans-Golgi-mediated processing, whereas mutant forms of LINGO-1 with enhanced plasma membrane expression did not associate with p75(NTR). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that LINGO-1 and NgR competed for binding to p75(NTR) in a manner that is difficult to reconcile with the existence of a LINGO-1·p75(NTR)·NgR ternary complex. These findings contradict models postulating functional LINGO-1·p75(NTR)·NgR complexes in the plasma membrane.

  13. Insulin stimulates actin comet tails on intracellular GLUT4-containing compartments in differentiated 3T3L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, M; Watson, R T; Khan, A H; Pessin, J E

    2001-12-28

    Incubation of isolated GLUT4-containing vesicles with Xenopus oocyte extracts resulted in a guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP gamma S) and sodium orthovanadate stimulation of actin comet tails. The in vitro actin-based GLUT4 vesicle motility was inhibited by both latrunculin B and a dominant-interfering N-WASP mutant, N-WASP/Delta VCA. Preparations of gently sheared (broken) 3T3L1 adipocytes also displayed GTP gamma S and sodium orthovanadate stimulation of actin comet tails on GLUT4 intracellular compartments. Furthermore, insulin pretreatment of intact adipocytes prior to gently shearing also resulted in a marked increase in actin polymerization and actin comet tailing on GLUT4 vesicles. In addition, the insulin stimulation of actin comet tails was completely inhibited by Clostridum difficile toxin B, demonstrating a specific role for a Rho family member small GTP-binding protein. Expression of N-WASP/Delta VCA in intact cells had little effect on adipocyte cortical actin but partially inhibited insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that insulin can induce GLUT4 vesicle actin comet tails that are necessary for the efficient translocation of GLUT4 from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane.

  14. Muscles that do not cross the knee contribute to the knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral compartment loading during gait.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, Prasanna; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate and explain the individual muscle contributions to the medial and lateral knee compartment forces during gait, and to determine whether these quantities could be inferred from their contributions to the external knee adduction moment. Gait data from eight healthy male subjects were used to compute each individual muscle contribution to the external knee adduction moment, the net tibiofemoral joint reaction force, and reaction moment. The individual muscle contributions to the medial and lateral compartment forces were then found using a least-squares approach. While knee-spanning muscles were the primary contributors, non-knee-spanning muscles (e.g., the gluteus medius) also contributed substantially to the medial compartment compressive force. Furthermore, knee-spanning muscles tended to compress both compartments, while most non-knee-spanning muscles tended to compress the medial compartment but unload the lateral compartment. Muscle contributions to the external knee adduction moment, particularly those from knee-spanning muscles, did not accurately reflect their tendencies to compress or unload the medial compartment. This finding may further explain why gait modifications may reduce the knee adduction moment without necessarily decreasing the medial compartment force.

  15. Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana

    DOE PAGES

    Frontalini, Fabrizio; Curzi, Davide; Cesarini, Erica; ...

    2016-09-07

    In this study, heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) pose a significant health hazard through bioaccumulation and biomagnification. By penetrating cell membranes, heavy metal ions may lead to pathological conditions. Here we examined the responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana, a benthic foraminiferan, to different concentrations of Hg in the artificial sea water. Confocal images of untreated and treated specimens using fluorescent probes (Nile Red and Acridine Orange) provided an opportunity for visualizing the intracellular lipid accumulation and acidic compartment regulation. With increased Hg over time, we observed an increased number of lipid droplets, which may have acted as a detoxifying organellemore » where Hg is sequestered and biologically inactivated. Further, Hg seems to promote the proliferation of lysosomes both in terms of number and dimension that, at the highest level of Hg, resulted in cell death. We report, for the first time, the presence of Hg within the foraminiferal cell: at the basal part of pores, in the organic linings of the foramen/septa, and as cytoplasmic accumulations.« less

  16. Mercury-Pollution Induction of Intracellular Lipid Accumulation and Lysosomal Compartment Amplification in the Benthic Foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana

    PubMed Central

    Curzi, Davide; Cesarini, Erica; Canonico, Barbara; Giordano, Francesco M.; De Matteis, Rita; Bernhard, Joan M.; Pieretti, Nadia; Gu, Baohua; Eskelsen, Jeremy R.; Jubb, Aaron M.; Zhao, Linduo; Pierce, Eric M.; Gobbi, Pietro; Papa, Stefano; Coccioni, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) pose a significant health hazard through bioaccumulation and biomagnification. By penetrating cell membranes, heavy metal ions may lead to pathological conditions. Here we examined the responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana, a benthic foraminiferan, to different concentrations of Hg in the artificial sea water. Confocal images of untreated and treated specimens using fluorescent probes (Nile Red and Acridine Orange) provided an opportunity for visualizing the intracellular lipid accumulation and acidic compartment regulation. With increased Hg over time, we observed an increased number of lipid droplets, which may have acted as a detoxifying organelle where Hg is sequestered and biologically inactivated. Further, Hg seems to promote the proliferation of lysosomes both in terms of number and dimension that, at the highest level of Hg, resulted in cell death. We report, for the first time, the presence of Hg within the foraminiferal cell: at the basal part of pores, in the organic linings of the foramen/septa, and as cytoplasmic accumulations. PMID:27603511

  17. Mercury-Pollution Induction of Intracellular Lipid Accumulation and Lysosomal Compartment Amplification in the Benthic Foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana.

    PubMed

    Frontalini, Fabrizio; Curzi, Davide; Cesarini, Erica; Canonico, Barbara; Giordano, Francesco M; De Matteis, Rita; Bernhard, Joan M; Pieretti, Nadia; Gu, Baohua; Eskelsen, Jeremy R; Jubb, Aaron M; Zhao, Linduo; Pierce, Eric M; Gobbi, Pietro; Papa, Stefano; Coccioni, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) pose a significant health hazard through bioaccumulation and biomagnification. By penetrating cell membranes, heavy metal ions may lead to pathological conditions. Here we examined the responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana, a benthic foraminiferan, to different concentrations of Hg in the artificial sea water. Confocal images of untreated and treated specimens using fluorescent probes (Nile Red and Acridine Orange) provided an opportunity for visualizing the intracellular lipid accumulation and acidic compartment regulation. With increased Hg over time, we observed an increased number of lipid droplets, which may have acted as a detoxifying organelle where Hg is sequestered and biologically inactivated. Further, Hg seems to promote the proliferation of lysosomes both in terms of number and dimension that, at the highest level of Hg, resulted in cell death. We report, for the first time, the presence of Hg within the foraminiferal cell: at the basal part of pores, in the organic linings of the foramen/septa, and as cytoplasmic accumulations.

  18. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María I.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus. PMID:27900285

  19. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, María I; Morrone Seijo, Susana M; Guaimas, Francisco F; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus.

  20. Functional Characterization of Na+/H+ Exchangers of Intracellular Compartments Using Proton-killing Selection to Express Them at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Monet, Michael; Birgy-Barelli, Eléonore; Léna, Isabelle; Counillon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Endosomal acidification is critical for a wide range of processes, such as protein recycling and degradation, receptor desensitization, and neurotransmitter loading in synaptic vesicles. This acidification is described to be mediated by proton ATPases, coupled to ClC chloride transporters. Highly-conserved electroneutral protons transporters, the Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE) 6, 7 and 9 are also expressed in these compartments. Mutations in their genes have been linked with human cognitive and neurodegenerative diseases. Paradoxically, their roles remain elusive, as their intracellular localization has prevented detailed functional characterization. This manuscript shows a method to solve this problem. This consists of the selection of mutant cell lines, capable of surviving acute cytosolic acidification by retaining intracellular NHEs at the plasma membrane. It then depicts two complementary protocols to measure the ion selectivity and activity of these exchangers: (i) one based on intracellular pH measurements using fluorescence video microscopy, and (ii) one based on the fast kinetics of lithium uptake. Such protocols can be extrapolated to measure other non-electrogenic transporters. Furthermore, the selection procedure presented here generates cells with an intracellular retention defective phenotype. Therefore these cells will also express other vesicular membrane proteins at the plasma membrane. The experimental strategy depicted here may therefore constitute a potentially powerful tool to study other intracellular proteins that will be then expressed at the plasma membrane together with the vesicular Na+/H+ exchangers used for the selection. PMID:25867523

  1. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rodrigo César; de Oliveira, Kennedy Martinez; Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Elias, Bruno Adriano Borges; Dos Santos, Paulo Ricardo; de Santiago, Hildemberg Agostinho Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans.

  2. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rodrigo César; de Oliveira, Kennedy Martinez; Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Elias, Bruno Adriano Borges; dos Santos, Paulo Ricardo; de Santiago, Hildemberg Agostinho Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans. PMID:27069895

  3. Acetylation of TUG protein promotes the accumulation of GLUT4 glucose transporters in an insulin-responsive intracellular compartment.

    PubMed

    Belman, Jonathan P; Bian, Rachel R; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Li, Don T; Jurczak, Michael J; Alcázar-Román, Abel; McNally, Leah J; Shulman, Gerald I; Bogan, Jonathan S

    2015-02-13

    Insulin causes the exocytic translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to stimulate glucose uptake in fat and muscle. Previous results support a model in which TUG traps GLUT4 in intracellular, insulin-responsive vesicles termed GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Insulin triggers TUG cleavage to release the GSVs; GLUT4 then recycles through endosomes during ongoing insulin exposure. The TUG C terminus binds a GSV anchoring site comprising Golgin-160 and possibly other proteins. Here, we report that the TUG C terminus is acetylated. The TUG C-terminal peptide bound the Golgin-160-associated protein, ACBD3 (acyl-CoA-binding domain-containing 3), and acetylation reduced binding of TUG to ACBD3 but not to Golgin-160. Mutation of the acetylated residues impaired insulin-responsive GLUT4 trafficking in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ACBD3 overexpression enhanced the translocation of GSV cargos, GLUT4 and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), and ACBD3 was required for intracellular retention of these cargos in unstimulated cells. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, bound TUG and deacetylated the TUG peptide. SIRT2 overexpression reduced TUG acetylation and redistributed GLUT4 and IRAP to the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mutation of the acetylated residues in TUG abrogated these effects. In mice, SIRT2 deletion increased TUG acetylation and proteolytic processing. During glucose tolerance tests, glucose disposal was enhanced in SIRT2 knock-out mice, compared with wild type controls, without any effect on insulin concentrations. Together, these data support a model in which TUG acetylation modulates its interaction with Golgi matrix proteins and is regulated by SIRT2. Moreover, acetylation of TUG enhances its function to trap GSVs within unstimulated cells and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

  4. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30–40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered. PMID:27170190

  5. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  6. Facile Synthesis of pH-sensitive Germanium Nanocrystals with High Quantum Yield for Intracellular Acidic Compartment Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shuqing; Wang, Hai; Tang, Zhiyong; Nie, Guangjun

    2015-04-24

    A green-light emitting germanium nanocrystal-based biosensor to monitor lysosomal pH changes is developed. The Ge nanocrystals are synthesized in an aqueous solution with a significantly enhanced photoluminescence quantum yield of 26%. This synthesis involves a facile solution based route which avoided the use of toxic or environmentally unfriendly agents. Importantly, the photoluminescence intensity of the synthesized Ge nanocrystals is particularly sensitive to changes in pH between 5 and 6. When incubated with cultured cells, the nanocrystals are internalized and subsequently translocated via the lysosomal pathway, and the Ge nanocrystals' fluorescence are greatly enhanced, even when the lysosomal pH is only slightly increased. These results reveal that the Ge nanocrystals possess high pH sensitivity compared to a commercially available dye, LysoSensor Green DND-189. The fluorescent properties of the Ge nanocrystals are demonstrated to be dependent on both the crystal form and their surface chemistry. The superior fluorescence properties and bioapplicability of the Ge nanocrystals makes them a promising intracellular bioimaging probe for monitoring various pH-sensitive processes in cells.

  7. Optical oximetry of volume-oscillating vascular compartments: contributions from oscillatory blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of dynamic diffuse optical measurements to obtain oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in volume oscillating compartments. We used a phasor representation of oscillatory hemodynamics at the heart rate and respiration frequency to separate the oscillations of tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (O) and deoxyhemoglobin (D) into components due to blood volume (subscript V) and blood flow (subscript F): O=OV+OF, D=DV+DF. This is achieved by setting the phase angle Arg(OF)-Arg(O), which can be estimated by a hemodynamic model that we recently developed. We found this angle to be -72 deg for the cardiac pulsation at 1 Hz, and -7 deg for paced breathing at 0.1 Hz. Setting this angle, we can obtain the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin of the volume-oscillating vascular compartment, SV=|OV|/(|OV|+|DV|). We demonstrate this approach with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy measurements on healthy volunteers at rest (n=4) and during 0.1 Hz paced breathing (n=3) with a 24-channel system. Rest data at the cardiac frequency were used to calculate the arterial saturation, S(a); over all subjects and channels, we found ==0.96±0.02. In the case of paced breathing, we found =0.66±0.14, which reflects venous-dominated hemodynamics at the respiratory frequency.

  8. Mercury-pollution induction of intracellular lipid accumulation and lysosomal compartment amplification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia parkinsoniana

    SciTech Connect

    Frontalini, Fabrizio; Curzi, Davide; Cesarini, Erica; Canonico, Barbara; Giordano, Francesco M.; De Matteis, Rita; Bernhard, Joan M.; Pieretti, Nadia; Gu, Baohua; Eskelsen, Jeremy R.; Jubb, Aaron M.; Zhao, Linduo; Pierce, Eric M.; Gobbi, Pietro; Papa, Stefano; Coccioni, Rodolfo; Hu, Yi

    2016-09-07

    In this study, heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) pose a significant health hazard through bioaccumulation and biomagnification. By penetrating cell membranes, heavy metal ions may lead to pathological conditions. Here we examined the responses of Ammonia parkinsoniana, a benthic foraminiferan, to different concentrations of Hg in the artificial sea water. Confocal images of untreated and treated specimens using fluorescent probes (Nile Red and Acridine Orange) provided an opportunity for visualizing the intracellular lipid accumulation and acidic compartment regulation. With increased Hg over time, we observed an increased number of lipid droplets, which may have acted as a detoxifying organelle where Hg is sequestered and biologically inactivated. Further, Hg seems to promote the proliferation of lysosomes both in terms of number and dimension that, at the highest level of Hg, resulted in cell death. We report, for the first time, the presence of Hg within the foraminiferal cell: at the basal part of pores, in the organic linings of the foramen/septa, and as cytoplasmic accumulations.

  9. Contribution of intracellular negative ion capacity to Donnan effect across the membrane in alkaliphilic Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshitaka; Hirabayashi, Toshinao; Morimoto, Hajime; Yamazaki, Koji; Inoue, Norio; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the energy production mechanism of alkaliphiles, the relationship between the H(+) extrusion rate by the respiratory chain and the corresponding ATP synthesis rate was determined in the facultative alkaliphile Bacillus cohnii YN-2000 and compared with those in the obligate alkaliphile Bacillus clarkii DSM 8720(T) and the neutralophile Bacillus subtilis IAM 1026. Under high aeration condition, much higher ATP synthesis rates and larger Δψ in the alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. grown at pH 10 than those in the neutralophilic B. subtilis grown at pH 7 were observed. This high ATP productivity could be attributed to the larger Δψ in alkaliphiles than in B. subtilis because the H(+) extrusion rate in alkaliphiles cannot account for the high ATP productivity. However, the large Δψ in the alkaliphiles could not be explained only by the H(+) translocation rate in the respiratory chain in alkaliphiles. There is a possibility that the Donnan effect across the membrane has the potential to contribute to the large Δψ. To estimate the contribution of the Donnan effect to the large Δψ in alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. grown at pH 10, intracellular negative ion capacity was examined. The intracellular negative ion capacities in alkaliphiles grown at pH 10 under high aeration condition corresponding to their intracellular pH (pH 8.1) were much higher than those in alkaliphiles grown under low aeration condition. A proportional relationship is revealed between the negative ion capacity and Δψ in alkaliphiles grown under different aeration conditions. This relationship strongly suggests that the intracellular negative ion capacity contributes to the formation of Δψ through the Donnan effect in alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. grown at pH 10.

  10. Intracellular Proton Conductance of the Hepatitis C Virus p7 Protein and Its Contribution to Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Ann L.; Griffin, Stephen; Rowlands, David; Harris, Mark; Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.; Weinman, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) p7 protein is critical for virus production and an attractive antiviral target. p7 is an ion channel when reconstituted in artificial lipid bilayers, but channel function has not been demonstrated in vivo and it is unknown whether p7 channel activity plays a critical role in virus production. To evaluate the contribution of p7 to organelle pH regulation and virus production, we incorporated a fluorescent pH sensor within native, intracellular vesicles in the presence or absence of p7 expression. p7 increased proton (H+) conductance in vesicles and was able to rapidly equilibrate H+ gradients. This conductance was blocked by the viroporin inhibitors amantadine, rimantadine and hexamethylene amiloride. Fluorescence microscopy using pH indicators in live cells showed that both HCV infection and expression of p7 from replicon RNAs reduced the number of highly acidic (pH<5) vesicles and increased lysosomal pH from 4.5 to 6.0. These effects were not present in uninfected cells, sub-genomic replicon cells not expressing p7, or cells electroporated with viral RNA containing a channel-inactive p7 point mutation. The acidification inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, partially restored virus production to cells electroporated with viral RNA containing the channel inactive mutation, yet did not in cells containing p7-deleted RNA. Expression of influenza M2 protein also complemented the p7 mutant, confirming a requirement for H+ channel activity in virus production. Accordingly, exposure to acid pH rendered intracellular HCV particles non-infectious, whereas the infectivity of extracellular virions was acid stable and unaffected by incubation at low pH, further demonstrating a key requirement for p7-induced loss of acidification. We conclude that p7 functions as a H+ permeation pathway, acting to prevent acidification in otherwise acidic intracellular compartments. This loss of acidification is required for productive HCV infection, possibly through

  11. Direct Visualization of Peptide/MHC Complexes at the Surface and in the Intracellular Compartments of Cells Infected In Vivo by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Cazareth, Julie; Hoebeke, Johan; Lippuner, Christoph; Davalos-Misslitz, Ana; Aebischer, Toni; Muller, Sylviane; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Mougneau, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    Protozoa and bacteria infect various types of phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells and eosinophils. However, it is not clear which of these cells process and present microbial antigens in vivo and in which cellular compartments parasite peptides are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules. To address these issues, we have infected susceptible BALB/c (H-2d) mice with a recombinant Leishmania major parasite expressing a fluorescent tracer. To directly visualize the antigen presenting cells that present parasite-derived peptides to CD4+ T cells, we have generated a monoclonal antibody that reacts to an antigenic peptide derived from the parasite LACK antigen bound to I-Ad Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecule. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of in vivo infected cells showed that intracellular I-Ad/LACK complexes were present in the membrane of amastigote-containing phagosomes in dendritic cells, eosinophils and macrophages/monocytes. In both dendritic cells and macrophages, these complexes were also present in smaller vesicles that did not contain amastigote. The presence of I-Ad/LACK complexes at the surface of dendritic cells, but neither on the plasma membrane of macrophages nor eosinophils was independently confirmed by flow cytometry and by incubating sorted phagocytes with highly sensitive LACK-specific hybridomas. Altogether, our results suggest that peptides derived from Leishmania proteins are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules in the phagosomes of infected phagocytes. Although these complexes are transported to the cell surface in dendritic cells, therefore allowing the stimulation of parasite-specific CD4+ T cells, this does not occur in other phagocytic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules bound to peptides derived from a parasite protein have been visualized within and at the surface of

  12. Hydro-Alcoholic Cinnamon Extract, Enhances Glucose Transporter Isotype-4 Translocation from Intracellular Compartments into the Cytoplasmic Membrane of C2C12 Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Abdorrahim; Mohiti-Ardakani, Javad; Hadinedoushan, Hossein; Khalili, Mohammad Ali

    2012-10-01

    Cinnamon has been used as an anti-diabetic agent for centuries but only in recent few years its mechanism of action has been under investigation. Previous studies showed that cinnamon might exert its anti-diabetic effect via increasing glucose transporter isotype-4 (GLUT4) gene and glycoprotein contents in fat cells. To study if hydro-alcoholic cinnamon extract (HACE) enhances GLUT4 translocation from intracellular compartments of nuclear or endoplasmic reticulum membranes (N/ER) into the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). C2C12 myoblastic cell line were seeded in DMEM plus 20 % FBS and differentiated to myotubes using 2 % horse serum. After myotubes formation, 100 or 1,000 μg/ml HACE, as intervention, and as control 1 % DMSO were added for 3 h. Cells were washed and homogenized followed by ultracentrifuge fractionation, protein separation by SDS-PAGE and GLUT4 detection using semi-quantitative Western blotting. Data analysis was done by two-independent samples t test for comparison of mean ± SD of GLUT4 percent in categories. GLUT4 contents were higher in CM of groups 100 and 1,000 μg/ml HACE and lower in 1 % DMSO treated myotubes (CI = 0.95, P < 0.05). For N/ER reverse results were obtained (CI = 0.95, P < 0.05). As our results have shown HACE induces GLUT4 translocation from intra-cell into cell surface. We conclude that cinnamon maybe a choice of type-2 diabetes mellitus treatment because its extract enhances GLUT4 contents in CM where it facilitates glucose entrance into the cell. However it is necessary to trace the signaling pathways which are activated by HACE in muscular tissue.

  13. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  14. Modulation of the expression of an apical plasma membrane protein of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells: cell-cell interactions control the appearance of a novel intracellular storage compartment

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Experimental conditions that abolish or reduce to a minimum intercellular contacts between Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells result in the appearance of an intracellular storage compartment for apical membrane proteins. Subconfluent culture, incubation in 1-5 microM Ca++, or inclusion of dissociated cells within agarose or collagen gels all caused the intracellular accumulation of a 184-kD apical membrane protein within large (0.5-5 micron) vacuoles, rich in microvilli. Influenza virus hemagglutinin, an apically targeted viral glycoprotein, is concentrated within these structures but the basolateral glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus and a cellular basolateral 63-kD membrane protein of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells were excluded. This novel epithelial organelle (VAC), which we designate the vacuolar apical compartment, may play an as yet unrecognized role in the biogenesis of the apical plasma membrane during the differentiation of normal epithelia. PMID:3553208

  15. Raised Intracellular Calcium Contributes to Ischemia-Induced Depression of Evoked Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Jalini, Shirin; Ye, Hui; Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Charlton, Milton P.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leads to depression of evoked synaptic transmission, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i during transient OGD contributes to the depression of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs). Additionally, we hypothesized that increased buffering of intracellular calcium would shorten electrophysiological recovery after transient ischemia. Mouse hippocampal slices were exposed to 2 to 8 min of OGD. fEPSPs evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation were recorded in the stratum radiatum, and whole cell current or voltage clamp recordings were performed in CA1 neurons. Transient ischemia led to increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i, (shown by calcium imaging), increased spontaneous miniature EPSP/Cs, and depressed evoked fEPSPs, partially mediated by adenosine. Buffering of intracellular Ca2+ during OGD by membrane-permeant chelators (BAPTA-AM or EGTA-AM) partially prevented fEPSP depression and promoted faster electrophysiological recovery when the OGD challenge was stopped. The blocker of BK channels, charybdotoxin (ChTX), also prevented fEPSP depression, but did not accelerate post-ischemic recovery. These results suggest that OGD leads to elevated presynaptic [Ca2+]i, which reduces evoked transmitter release; this effect can be reversed by increased intracellular Ca2+ buffering which also speeds recovery. PMID:26934214

  16. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  17. Comparative contribution of CD1 on the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Chun, T; Wang, C R

    2000-01-15

    CD1 molecules are MHC class I-like glycoproteins whose expression is essential for the development of a unique subset of T cells, the NK T cells. To evaluate to what extent CD1 contributes to the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, we generated CD1oIIo and CD1oTAPo mice and compared the generation of T cells in these double-mutant mice and IIo or TAPo mice. FACS analysis showed that the number of CD4+ T cells in CD1oIIo mice was reduced significantly compared with the corresponding population in IIo mice. Both CD4+ NK1.1+ and the CD4+ NK1.1- population were reduced in CD1oIIo mice, suggesting that CD1 can select not only CD4+ NK1.1+ T cells but also some NK1.1- CD4+ T cells. Functional analysis showed that the residual CD4+ cells in CD1oIIo can secrete large amounts of IFN-gamma and a significant amount of IL-4 during primary stimulation with anti-CD3, suggesting that this population may be enriched for NK T cells restricted by other class I molecules. In contrast to the CD4+ population, no significant differences in the CD8+ T cell compartment can be detected between TAPo and CD1oTAPo mice in all lymphoid tissues tested, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Our data suggest that, unlike other MHC class I molecules, CD1 does not contribute in a major way to the development of CD8+ T cells.

  18. Traffic into the prevacuolar/endosomal compartment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a VPS45-dependent intracellular route and a VPS45-independent, endocytic route.

    PubMed

    Bryant, N J; Piper, R C; Gerrard, S R; Stevens, T H

    1998-05-01

    The vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutants have been used to dissect and characterize the vacuolar biogenesis pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The vps mutants were isolated through their loss of ability to correctly sort the vacuolar hydrolase CPY, which travels from Golgi membranes to the vacuole through a prevacuolar compartment. Over 50 VPS genes have been divided into 6 classes according to vacuolar morphology. Mutations in any one of the class E VPS genes, such as VPS27, lead to an exaggerated form of the prevacuolar compartment. This class E compartment contains endocytosed proteins as well as proteins en route to the vacuole, and is thus taken to represent an intersection point between the endocytic and biosynthetic pathways. Mutations in the class D gene VPS45 can be used to define a second transport intermediate along the vacuolar biogenesis pathway, Golgi-derived transport vesicles carrying vacuolar membrane proteins on their way to the vacuole. Here we demonstrate that the Sec1p-like protein Vps45p is required for the fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the prevacuolar compartment indicating that VPS45 functions before VPS27 in the vacuolar biogenesis pathway. In addition, we show that VPS45 function is not required for the delivery of endocytosed proteins to the prevacuolar compartment from the plasma membrane suggesting that the function of Vps45p is restricted to a single vesicular pathway.

  19. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Stacy D.; Chen, Guanqun; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Tomasi, Pernell; Jayawardhane, Kethmi; Dyer, John M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2016-01-01

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis. GPATs 4–8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Recently, GPAT9 was reported to be essential for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in developing Arabidopsis seeds. The enzymatic properties and possible functions of GPAT9 in surface lipid, polar lipid and TAG biosynthesis in non-seed organs, however, have not been investigated. Here we show that Arabidopsis GPAT9 exhibits sn-1 acyltransferase activity with high specificity for acyl-coenzyme A, thus providing further evidence that this GPAT is involved in storage lipid biosynthesis. We also confirm a role for GPAT9 in seed oil biosynthesis and further demonstrate that GPAT9 contributes to the biosynthesis of both polar lipids and TAG in developing leaves, as well as lipid droplet production in developing pollen grains. Conversely, alteration of constitutive GPAT9 expression had no obvious effects on surface lipid biosynthesis. Taken together, these studies expand our understanding of GPAT9 function to include modulation of several different intracellular glycerolipid pools in plant cells. PMID:27325892

  20. The impact of pH inhomogeneities on CHO cell physiology and fed-batch process performance - two-compartment scale-down modelling and intracellular pH excursion.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthias; Braun, Philipp; Doppler, Philipp; Posch, Christoph; Behrens, Dirk; Herwig, Christoph; Fricke, Jens

    2017-01-12

    Due to high mixing times and base addition from top of the vessel, pH inhomogeneities are most likely to occur during large-scale mammalian processes. The goal of this study was to set-up a scale-down model of a 10-12 m(3) stirred tank bioreactor and to investigate the effect of pH perturbations on CHO cell physiology and process performance. Short-term changes in extracellular pH are hypothesized to affect intracellular pH and thus cell physiology. Therefore, batch fermentations, including pH shifts to 9.0 and 7.8, in regular one-compartment systems are conducted. The short-term adaption of the cells intracellular pH are showed an immediate increase due to elevated extracellular pH. With this basis of fundamental knowledge, a two-compartment system is established which is capable of simulating defined pH inhomogeneities. In contrast to state-of-the-art literature, the scale-down model is included parameters (e.g. volume of the inhomogeneous zone) as they might occur during large-scale processes. pH inhomogeneity studies in the two-compartment system are performed with simulation of temporary pH zones of pH 9.0. The specific growth rate especially during the exponential growth phase is strongly affected resulting in a decreased maximum viable cell density and final product titer. The gathered results indicate that even short-term exposure of cells to elevated pH values during large-scale processes can affect cell physiology and overall process performance. In particular, it could be shown for the first time that pH perturbations, which might occur during the early process phase, have to be considered in scale-down models of mammalian processes.

  1. Contribution of elevated intracellular calcium to pulmonary arterial myocyte alkalinization during chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Trevor; Shimoda, Larissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the lung, exposure to chronic hypoxia (CH) causes pulmonary hypertension, a debilitating disease. Development of this condition arises from increased muscularity and contraction of pulmonary vessels, associated with increases in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). In this study, we explored the interaction between pHi and [Ca2+]i in PASMCs from rats exposed to normoxia or CH (3 weeks, 10% O2). PASMC pHi and [Ca2+]i were measured with fluorescent microscopy and the dyes BCECF and Fura-2. Both pHi and [Ca2+]i levels were elevated in PASMCs from hypoxic rats. Exposure to KCl increased [Ca2+]i and pHi to a similar extent in normoxic and hypoxic PASMCs. Conversely, removal of extracellular Ca2+ or blockade of Ca2+ entry with NiCl2 or SKF 96365 decreased [Ca2+]i and pHi only in hypoxic cells. Neither increasing pHi with NH4Cl nor decreasing pHi by removal of bicarbonate impacted PASMC [Ca2+]i. We also examined the roles of Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX) and Na+/H+ exchange (NHE) in mediating the elevated basal [Ca2+]i and Ca2+-dependent changes in PASMC pHi. Bepridil, dichlorobenzamil, and KB-R7943, which are NCX inhibitors, decreased resting [Ca2+]i and pHi only in hypoxic PASMCs and blocked the changes in pHi induced by altering [Ca2+]i. Exposure to ethyl isopropyl amiloride, an NHE inhibitor, decreased resting pHi and prevented changes in pHi due to changing [Ca2+]i. Our findings indicate that, during CH, the elevation in basal [Ca2+]i may contribute to the alkaline shift in pHi in PASMCs, likely via mechanisms involving reverse-mode NCX and NHE. PMID:27076907

  2. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  3. Contributions of epsinR and gadkin to clathrin-mediated intracellular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R.; Borner, Georg H. H.; Li, Sam; Sahlender, Daniela A.; Antrobus, Robin; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The precise functions of most of the proteins that participate in clathrin-mediated intracellular trafficking are unknown. We investigated two such proteins, epsinR and gadkin, using the knocksideways method, which rapidly depletes proteins from the available pool by trapping them onto mitochondria. Although epsinR is known to be an N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-specific adaptor, the epsinR knocksideways blocked the production of the entire population of intracellular clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs), suggesting a more global function. Using the epsinR knocksideways data, we were able to estimate the copy number of all major intracellular CCV proteins. Both sides of the vesicle are densely covered, indicating that CCVs sort their cargo by molecular crowding. Trapping of gadkin onto mitochondria also blocked the production of intracellular CCVs but by a different mechanism: vesicles became cross-linked to mitochondria and pulled out toward the cell periphery. Both phenotypes provide new insights into the regulation of intracellular CCV formation, which could not have been found using more conventional approaches. PMID:26179914

  4. TRPM2 contributes to LPC-induced intracellular Ca(2+) influx and microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heejin; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Yunsin; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2017-02-20

    Microglia are the resident immune cells which become activated in some pathological conditions in central nervous system (CNS). Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), an endogenous inflammatory phospholipid, is implicated in immunomodulatory function of glial cells in the CNS. Although several studies uncovered that LPC induces intracellular Ca(2+) influx and morphologic change in microglia, there is still no direct evidence showing change of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 (p-p38), a widely used microglia activation marker, by LPC. Furthermore, the cellular mechanism of LPC-induced microglia activation remains unknown. In this study, we found that LPC induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase in primary cultured microglia, which was blocked in the presence of Gd(3+), non-selective transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blocker. RT-PCR and whole cell patch clamp recordings revealed molecular and functional expression of TRP melastatin 2 (TRPM2) in microglia. Using western blotting, we also observed that LPC increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and the increase of p-p38 expression is also reversed in TRPM2-knockout (KO) microglia. Moreover, LPC induced membrane trafficking of TRPM2 and intrathecal injection of LPC increased Iba-1 immunoreactivity in the spinal cord, which were significantly reduced in KO mice. In addition, LPC-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase and inward currents were abolished in TRPM2-KO microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that LPC induces intracellular Ca(2+) influx and increases phosphorylation of p38 MAPK via TRPM2, which in turn activates microglia.

  5. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... compartment will lead to increased pressure in that area. This raised pressure, presses the muscles, blood vessels, ... Decreased sensation, numbness, tingling, weakness of the affected area Paleness of skin Severe pain that doesn't ...

  6. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  7. Peptide and RNA contributions to iron-sulphur chemical gardens as life's first inorganic compartments, catalysts, capacitors and condensers.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Kanik, Isik; Russell, Michael J

    2012-06-28

    Hydrothermal chimneys and compartments comprising transition metal sulphides and associated minerals have been proposed as likely locations for the beginnings of life. In laboratory simulations of off-axis alkaline springs, it is shown that the interaction of a simulated alkaline sulphide-bearing submarine vent solution with a primeval anoxic iron-bearing ocean leads to the formation of chimney structures reminiscent of chemical gardens. These chimneys display periodicity in their deposition and exhibit diverse morphologies and mineralogies, affording the possibilities of catalysis and molecular sequestration. The addition of peptides and RNA to the alkaline solution modifies the elemental stoichiometry of the chimneys-perhaps indicating the very initial stage of the organic takeover on the way to living cells by charged organic polymers potentially synthesized in this same environment.

  8. Water compartments in cells.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Gary D; Cameron, Ivan L

    2007-01-01

    Human experience in the macrobiological world leads scientists to visualize water compartments in cells analogous to the bladder in the human pelvis or ventricles in the brain. While such water-filled cellular compartments likely exist, the volume contributions are insignificant relative to those of biomolecular hydration compartments. The purpose of this chapter is to identify and categorize the molecular water compartments caused by proteins, the primary macromolecular components of cells. The categorical changes in free energy of water molecules on proteins cause these compartments to play dominant roles in osmoregulation and provide important adjuncts to fundamental understanding of osmosensing and osmosignaling mechanisms. Water compartments possess differences in molecular motion, enthalpy, entropy, freezing point depression, and other properties because of electrostatic interaction of polar water molecules with electric fields generated by covalently bound pairs of opposite charge caused by electronegative oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the protein. Macromolecules, including polypeptides, polynucleotides, and polysaccharides, are stiff molecular chains with restricted folding capacities due to inclusion of rigid ring structures or double amide bonds in the backbone sequence. This creates "irreducible spatial charge separation" between positive and negative partial charges, causing elevated electrostatic energy. In the fully hydrated in vivo state of living cells the high dielectric coefficient of water reduces protein electrostatic free energy by providing polar "water bridge networks" between charges, thereby creating four measurably different compartments of bound water with distinct free energy differences.

  9. TRPV1: Contribution to Retinal Ganglion Cell Apoptosis and Increased Intracellular Ca2+ with Exposure to Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M.; Sidorova, Tatiana; Long, Daniel J.; Calkins, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Elevated hydrostatic pressure induces retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis in culture. The authors investigated whether the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, which contributes to pressure sensing and Ca2+-dependent cell death in other systems, also contributes to pressure-induced RGC death and whether this contribution involves Ca2+. Methods trpv1 mRNA expression in RGCs was probed with the use of PCR and TRPV1 protein localization through immunocytochemistry. Subunit-specific antagonism (iodo-resiniferatoxin) and agonism (capsaicin) were used to probe how TRPV1 activation affects the survival of isolated RGCs at ambient and elevated hydrostatic pressure (+70 mm Hg). Finally, for RGCs under pressure, the authors tested whether EGTA chelation of Ca2+ improves survival and whether, with the Ca2+ dye Fluo-4 AM, TRPV1 contributes to increased intracellular Ca2+. Results RGCs express trpv1 mRNA, with robust TRPV1 protein localization to the cell body and axon. For isolated RGCs under pressure, TRPV1 antagonism increased cell density and reduced apoptosis to ambient levels (P ≤ 0.05), whereas for RGCs at ambient pressure, TRPV1 agonism reduced density and increased apoptosis to levels for elevated pressure (P ≤ 0.01). Chelation of extracellular Ca2+ reduced RGC apoptosis at elevated pressure by nearly twofold (P ≤ 0.01). Exposure to elevated hydrostatic pressure induced a fourfold increase in RGC intracellular Ca2+ that was reduced by half with TRPV1 antagonism. Finally, in the DBA/2 mouse model of glaucoma, levels of TRPV1 in RGCs increased with elevated IOP. Conclusions RGC apoptosis induced by elevated hydrostatic pressure arises substantially through TRPV1, likely through the influx of extracellular Ca2+. PMID:18952924

  10. Contribution of Host Intracellular Transport Machineries to Intercellular Movement of Turnip Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Richard S.; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of different host cell transport systems in the intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was investigated. To discriminate between primary infections and secondary infections associated with the virus intercellular movement, a gene cassette expressing GFP-HDEL was inserted adjacent to a TuMV infectious cassette expressing 6K2:mCherry, both within the T-DNA borders of the binary vector pCambia. In this system, both gene cassettes were delivered to the same cell by a single binary vector and primary infection foci emitted green and red fluorescence while secondarily infected cells emitted only red fluorescence. Intercellular movement was measured at 72 hours post infiltration and was estimated to proceed at an average rate of one cell being infected every three hours over an observation period of 17 hours. To determine if the secretory pathway were important for TuMV intercellular movement, chemical and protein inhibitors that blocked both early and late secretory pathways were used. Treatment with Brefeldin A or Concanamycin A or expression of ARF1 or RAB-E1d dominant negative mutants, all of which inhibit pre- or post-Golgi transport, reduced intercellular movement by the virus. These treatments, however, did not inhibit virus replication in primary infected cells. Pharmacological interference assays using Tyrphostin A23 or Wortmannin showed that endocytosis was not important for TuMV intercellular movement. Lack of co-localization by endocytosed FM4-64 and Ara7 (AtRabF2b) with TuMV-induced 6K2-tagged vesicles further supported this conclusion. Microfilament depolymerizing drugs and silencing expression of myosin XI-2 gene, but not myosin VIII genes, also inhibited TuMV intercellular movement. Expression of dominant negative myosin mutants confirmed the role played by myosin XI-2 as well as by myosin XI-K in TuMV intercellular movement. Using this dual gene cassette expression system and transport inhibitors, components of the secretory

  11. Contribution of forensic autopsy to scene reconstruction in mass fire casualties: a case of alleged arson on a floor consisting of small compartments in a building.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A fire is an important cause of mass disasters, involving various forensic issues. Before dawn on an early morning, 16 male visitors in their twenties to sixties were killed in a possibly incendiary fire at a 'private video parlor' consisting of small compartments in a building. The main causes of death as determined by forensic autopsy were acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication for all of the 15 found-dead victims, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following acute CO intoxication for a victim who died in hospital. Burns were mild (<20% of body surface) in most victims, except for three victims found between the entrance and the estimated fire-outbreak site; thus, identification was completed without difficulty, supported by DNA analysis. Blood carboxyhemoglobin saturation (COHb) was higher for victims found dead in the inner area. Blood cyanide levels were sublethal, moderately correlated to COHb, but were higher in victims found around the estimated fire-outbreak site. There was no evidence of thinner, alcohol or drug abuse, or an attack of disease as a possible cause of an accidental fire outbreak. These observations contribute to evidence-based reconstruction of the fire disaster, and suggest how deaths could have been prevented by appropriate disaster measures.

  12. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C. A. V.; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  13. MDMA causes a redistribution of serotonin transporter from the cell surface to the intracellular compartment by a mechanism independent of phospho-p38-mitogen activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Kivell, B; Day, D; Bosch, P; Schenk, S; Miller, J

    2010-06-16

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes long-term serotonin depletion and reduced serotonin transporter (SERT) function in humans and in animal models. Using quantitative Western blotting and real-time PCR, we have shown that total SERT protein in the striatum and nucleus accumbens and mRNA levels in the dorsal raphe nucleus were not significantly changed following MDMA exposure in rats (4 x 2 h i.p. injections, 10 mg/kg each). In mouse neuroblastoma (N(2)A) cells transiently expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged human SERT (GFP-hSERT), we have shown redistribution of SERT from the cell surface to intracellular vesicles on exposure to MDMA using cell surface biotinylation, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and live-cell confocal microscopy. To investigate the mechanism responsible for SERT redistribution, we used specific antibodies to phospho-p38-mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), a known signalling pathway involved in SERT membrane expression. We found that p38 MAPK activation was not involved in the MDMA-induced redistribution of SERT from the cell-surface to the cell interior. A loss of SERT from the cell surface on acute exposure to MDMA may contribute to the decreased SERT function seen in rats exposed to MDMA.

  14. Evolution of intracellular compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2013-01-15

    Cells compartmentalize their biochemical functions in a variety of ways, notably by creating physical barriers that separate a compartment via membranes or proteins. Eukaryotes have a wide diversity of membrane-based compartments, many that are lineage- or tissue-specific. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that membrane-based compartmentalization of the cytosolic space is observed in multiple prokaryotic lineages, giving rise to several types of distinct prokaryotic organelles. Endosymbionts, previously believed to be a hallmark of eukaryotes, have been described in several bacteria. Protein-based compartments, frequent in bacteria, are also found in eukaryotes. In the present review, we focus on selected intracellular compartments from each of these three categories, membrane-based, endosymbiotic and protein-based, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We review their diversity and the current theories and controversies regarding the evolutionary origins. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutionary processes acting on the genetic basis of intracellular compartments and how those differ across the domains of life. We conclude that the distinction between eukaryotes and prokaryotes no longer lies in the existence of a compartmentalized cell plan, but rather in its complexity.

  15. ZIP7-mediated intracellular zinc transport contributes to aberrant growth factor signaling in antihormone-resistant breast cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn M; Vichova, Petra; Jordan, Nicola; Hiscox, Stephen; Hendley, Rhiannon; Nicholson, Robert I

    2008-10-01

    Antiestrogens such as tamoxifen are the mainstay of treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. However, their effectiveness is limited by the development of endocrine resistance, allowing tumor regrowth and progression. Importantly, in vitro MCF7 cell models of acquired tamoxifen resistance (TamR cells) display an aggressive, invasive phenotype in which activation of epithelial growth factor receptor/IGF-I receptor/Src signaling plays a critical role. In this study, we report that TamR cells have increased levels of zinc and zinc transporter, ZIP7 [solute carrier family 39 (zinc transporter) member 7, also known as SLC39A7], resulting in an enhanced response to exogenous zinc, which is manifested as a greatly increased growth factor receptor activation, leading to increased growth and invasion. Removal of ZIP7, using small interfering RNA, destroys this activation of epithelial growth factor receptor/IGF-I receptor/Src signaling by reducing intracellular zinc levels. Similarly, it also blocks the activation of HER2, -3, and -4. These data suggest that intracellular zinc levels may be a critical factor in determining growth factor responses and that the targeting of zinc transporters may have novel therapeutic implications. We show that ZIP7 is a critical component in the redistribution of zinc from intracellular stores to the cytoplasm and, as such, is essential for the zinc-induced inhibition of phosphatases, which leads to activation of growth factor receptors. Removal of ZIP7 therefore offers a means through which zinc-induced activation of growth factor receptors may be effectively suppressed and provides a mechanism of targeting multiple growth factor pathways, increasing tumor kill, and preventing further development of resistance in breast cancer.

  16. Compartment-specific Control of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging by Antioxidant Pathway Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swati; Sidor, Agnieszka; O'Rourke, Brian

    2016-05-20

    Oxidative stress arises from an imbalance in the production and scavenging rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a key factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and aging. The presence of parallel pathways and multiple intracellular compartments, each having its own ROS sources and antioxidant enzymes, complicates the determination of the most important regulatory nodes of the redox network. Here we quantified ROS dynamics within specific intracellular compartments in the cytosol and mitochondria and determined which scavenging enzymes exert the most control over antioxidant fluxes in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts. We used novel targeted viral gene transfer vectors expressing redox-sensitive GFP fused to sensor domains to measure H2O2 or oxidized glutathione. Using genetic manipulation in heart-derived H9c2 cells, we explored the contribution of specific antioxidant enzymes to ROS scavenging and glutathione redox potential within each intracellular compartment. Our findings reveal that antioxidant flux is strongly dependent on mitochondrial substrate catabolism, with availability of NADPH as a major rate-controlling step. Moreover, ROS scavenging by mitochondria significantly contributes to cytoplasmic ROS handling. The findings provide fundamental information about the control of ROS scavenging by the redox network and suggest novel interventions for circumventing oxidative stress in cardiac cells.

  17. An Na(+)-independent short-chain fatty acid transporter contributes to intracellular pH regulation in murine colonocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are the major anions in the colonic lumen. Experiments studied how intracellular pH (pHi) of isolated colonocytes was affected by exposure to SCFAs normally found in the colon. Isolated crypt fragments were loaded with SNARF-1 (a fluorescent dye with pH-sensitive excitation and emission spectra) and studied in a digital imaging microscope. Intracellular pH was measured in individual colonocytes as the ratio of fluorescence intensity in response to alternating excitation wavelengths (575/505 nm). After exposure to 65 mM acetate, propionate, n-butyrate, or iso-butyrate in isosmotic Na(+)- free media (substituted with tetramethylammonia), all colonocytes acidified rapidly and then > 90% demonstrated a pHi alkalinization (Na(+)-independent pHi recovery). Upon subsequent removal of the SCFA, pHi alkalinized beyond the starting pHi (a pHi overshoot). Using propionate as a test SCFA, experiments demonstrate that the acidification and pHi overshoot are explained by transmembrane influx and efflux of nonionized SCFA, respectively. The basis for the pHi overshoot is shown to be accumulation of propionate during pHi alkalinization. The Na(+)-independent pHi recovery (a) demonstrates saturable propionate activation kinetics; (b) demonstrates substrate specificity for unmodified aliphatic carbon chains; (c) occurs after exposure to SCFAs of widely different metabolic activity, (d) is electroneutral; and (e) is not inhibited by changes in the K+ gradient, Cl- gradient or addition of the anion transport inhibitors DIDS (1 mM), SITS (1 mM), alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (4 mM), or probenicid (1 mM). Results suggest that most mouse colonocytes have a previously unreported SCFA transporter which mediates Na(+)-independent pHi recovery. PMID:7658194

  18. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Contribute to Caulobacter crescentus Cellular Fitness by Preventing Intracellular S-Layer Protein Accumulation

    DOE PAGES

    Overton, K. Wesley; Park, Dan M.; Yung, Mimi C.; ...

    2016-09-23

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions, including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport the S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior.Caulobacter crescentusis unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFaand RsaFb, which together with other components form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology toEscherichia coliTolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Heremore » we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFaand RsaFbare not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFaand RsaFbare required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFaand RsaFbled to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that loss of both RsaFaand RsaFbled to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein misfolding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFaand RsaFbin cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels inC. crescentus. IMPORTANCEDecreased growth rate and reduced cell fitness are common side effects of protein production in overexpression systems. Inclusion bodies typically form inside the cell, largely due to a lack of sufficient export machinery to transport the overexpressed proteins to the extracellular environment. This phenomenon can

  19. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E.; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects. PMID:27245473

  20. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-07-02

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects.

  1. Compartmented electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Shimotake, Hiroshi; Gay, Eddie C.; Martino, Fredric J.

    1977-06-14

    Electrodes for secondary electrochemical cells are provided with compartments for containing particles of the electrode reactant. The compartments are defined by partitions that are generally impenetrable to the particles of reactant and, in some instances, to the liquid electrolyte used in the cell. During cycling of the cell, reactant material initially loaded into a particular compartment is prevented from migrating and concentrating within the lower portion of the electrode or those portions of the electrode that exhibit reduced electrical resistance.

  2. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Contribute to Caulobacter crescentus Cellular Fitness by Preventing Intracellular S-Layer Protein Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, K. Wesley; Park, Dan M.; Yung, Mimi C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Smit, John; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-09-23

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions, including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport the S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior.Caulobacter crescentusis unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFaand RsaFb, which together with other components form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology toEscherichia coliTolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFaand RsaFbare not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFaand RsaFbare required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFaand RsaFbled to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that loss of both RsaFaand RsaFbled to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein misfolding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFaand RsaFbin cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels inC. crescentus.

  3. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Contribute to Caulobacter crescentus Cellular Fitness by Preventing Intracellular S-Layer Protein Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, K. Wesley; Park, Dan M.; Yung, Mimi C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Smit, John; Jiao, Yongqin; Parales, R. E.

    2016-09-23

    ABSTRACT

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions, including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport the S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior.Caulobacter crescentusis unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFaand RsaFb, which together with other components form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology toEscherichia coliTolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFaand RsaFbare not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFaand RsaFbare required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFaand RsaFbled to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that loss of both RsaFaand RsaFbled to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein misfolding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFaand RsaFbin cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels inC. crescentus

  4. Contribution of sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchange and intracellular calcium release to force development in isolated canine ventricular muscle

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    frequency in 70 mM [Na+]o was not a consequence of a decreased rate of refilling of a releasable pool of Ca2+ within the cell. These results demonstrate that frequency-dependent changes of contractile strength and intracellular Ca2+ loading in 140 mM [Na+]o require the presence of a functional sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange process. The possibility that the negative staircase in 70 mM [Na+]o is related to inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced release of Ca2+ from the SR by various cellular mechanisms is discussed. PMID:1640221

  5. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  6. Upregulation of arginase activity contributes to intracellular ROS production induced by high glucose in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Sun, Chuan-Bo; Liu, Chao; Fan, Yue; Zhu, Hong-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Wei; Hu, Liang; Li, Qing-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Arginase is upregulated in some tissues under diabetes states. Arginase can compete with nitroxide synthase (NOS) for the common substrate L-arginine and thus increases oxidative stress by NOS uncoupling. We want to analyze whether arginase is upregulated and contribute to oxidative stress in H9c2 cells during high glucose treatment. H9c2 cells were cultured in normal or high glucose DMEM. Arginase activity increased in parallel with increased cell death and oxidative stress. Arginase inhibitor N ω-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) and NOS inhibitor N ω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) could reverse these effects. Despite of upregulated NOS activity, NO production was impaired which could be preserved by nor-NOHA, suggesting a decreased substrate availability of NOS due to increased arginase activity. L-arginine supplementation decreased superoxide production while it could not protect cells from death. Upregulated arginase activity in H9c2 treated with high glucose can cause NOS uncoupling and subsequently reactive oxygen species augmentation and cell death. These findings suggest that arginase will be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  7. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  8. Psoas compartment block.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D M

    2000-05-01

    The psoas compartment acts as a conduit for the nerve roots of the lumbar plexus. Originating at approximately the 12th thoracic vertebrae, this potential compartment continues on caudally, bordered posterolaterally by fascia of the quadratus lumborum and iliacus muscles, medially by the fascia of the psoas major muscle, and anteriorly by the transversalis fascia. This natural "gutter" acts as a repository for local anesthetic agents and provides an excellent method of unilateral anterior lower extremity anesthesia. After elicitation of a motor evoked response in the muscles of the anterior thigh, 30 to 40 milliliters of local anesthetic is incrementally injected into the compartment. Spread of the anesthetic to all roots of the plexus occurs in 15 to 20 minutes. Profound sensory and motor blockade can be achieved providing surgical anesthesia as well as long duration postoperative pain relief.

  9. Rab5 activity regulates GLUT4 sorting into insulin-responsive and non-insulin-responsive endosomal compartments: a potential mechanism for development of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tessneer, Kandice L; Jackson, Robert M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2014-09-01

    Glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter mediating glucose uptake in adipose and skeletal muscle. Reduced GLUT4 translocation from intracellular storage compartments to the plasma membrane is a cause of peripheral insulin resistance. Using a chronic hyperinsulinemia (CHI)-induced cell model of insulin resistance and Rab5 mutant overexpression, we determined these manipulations altered endosomal sorting of GLUT4, thus contributing to the development of insulin resistance. We found that CHI induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by retaining GLUT4 in a Rab5-activity-dependent compartment that is unable to equilibrate with the cell surface in response to insulin. Furthermore, CHI-mediated retention of GLUT4 in this non-insulin-responsive compartment impaired filling of the transferrin receptor (TfR)-positive and TfR-negative insulin-responsive storage compartments. Our data suggest that hyperinsulinemia may inhibit GLUT4 by chronically maintaining GLUT4 in the Rab5 activity-dependent endosomal pathway and impairing formation of the TfR-negative and TfR-positive insulin-responsive GLUT4 pools. This model suggests that an early event in the development of insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose tissue is to alter the intracellular localization of GLUT4 to a compartment that does not efficiently equilibrate with the cell surface when insulin levels are elevated for prolonged periods of time.

  10. Mathematical model for the contribution of individual organs to non-zero y-intercepts in single and multi-compartment linear models of whole-body energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Kaiyala, Karl J

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models for the dependence of energy expenditure (EE) on body mass and composition are essential tools in metabolic phenotyping. EE scales over broad ranges of body mass as a non-linear allometric function. When considered within restricted ranges of body mass, however, allometric EE curves exhibit 'local linearity.' Indeed, modern EE analysis makes extensive use of linear models. Such models typically involve one or two body mass compartments (e.g., fat free mass and fat mass). Importantly, linear EE models typically involve a non-zero (usually positive) y-intercept term of uncertain origin, a recurring theme in discussions of EE analysis and a source of confounding in traditional ratio-based EE normalization. Emerging linear model approaches quantify whole-body resting EE (REE) in terms of individual organ masses (e.g., liver, kidneys, heart, brain). Proponents of individual organ REE modeling hypothesize that multi-organ linear models may eliminate non-zero y-intercepts. This could have advantages in adjusting REE for body mass and composition. Studies reveal that individual organ REE is an allometric function of total body mass. I exploit first-order Taylor linearization of individual organ REEs to model the manner in which individual organs contribute to whole-body REE and to the non-zero y-intercept in linear REE models. The model predicts that REE analysis at the individual organ-tissue level will not eliminate intercept terms. I demonstrate that the parameters of a linear EE equation can be transformed into the parameters of the underlying 'latent' allometric equation. This permits estimates of the allometric scaling of EE in a diverse variety of physiological states that are not represented in the allometric EE literature but are well represented by published linear EE analyses.

  11. Neonatal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B; Treharne, L

    2016-01-01

    A term neonate was born with a grossly swollen and discoloured left hand and forearm. He was transferred from the local hospital to the plastic surgical unit, where a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent emergency forearm fasciotomies at six hours of age. Following serial debridements of necrotic tissue, he underwent split-thickness skin grafting of the resultant defects of his forearm, hand and digits. At the clinic follow-up appointment two months after the procedure, he was found to have developed severe flexion contractures despite regular outpatient hand therapy and splintage. He has had further reconstruction with contracture release, use of artificial dermal matrix, and K-wire fixation of the thumb and wrist. Despite this, the long term outcome is likely to be an arm with poor function. The key learning point from this case is that despite prompt transfer, diagnosis and appropriate surgical management, the outcome for neonatal compartment syndrome may still be poor. PMID:27138850

  12. Detection of functional class II-associated antigen: role of a low density endosomal compartment in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a functional assay to identify processed antigen in subcellular fractions from antigen-presenting cells; stimulatory activity in this assay may be caused by either free peptide fragments or by complexes of peptide fragments and class II molecules present on organellar membrane sheets and vesicles. In addition, we have developed a functional assay to identify proteolytic activity in subcellular fractions capable of generating antigenic peptides from intact proteins. These techniques permit the direct identification of intracellular sites of antigen processing and class II association. Using a murine B cell line stably transfected with a phosphorylcholine (PC)-specific membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig), we show that PC- conjugated antigens are rapidly internalized and efficiently degraded to generate processed antigen within an early low density compartment. Proteolytic activity capable of generating antigenic peptide fragments from intact proteins is found within low density endosomes and a dense compartment consistent with lysosomes. However, neither processed peptide nor peptide-class II complexes are detected in lysosomes from antigen-pulsed cells. Furthermore, blocking the intracellular transport of internalized antigen from the low density endosome to lysosomes does not inhibit the generation of processed antigen. Therefore, antigens internalized in association with membrane Ig on B cells can be efficiently processed in low density endosomal compartments without the contribution of proteases present within denser organelles. PMID:7722450

  13. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  14. Intracellular shunting of O{sub 2}{sup −} contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    SciTech Connect

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica

    2013-07-15

    depolarization and pH{sub i} decrease. • Intracellular shunting of O{sub 2}{sup −} contributes to charge compensation in neutrophils.

  15. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A.; Phillips, John D.; Raven, Emma L.; Reddi, Amit R.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models. PMID:27528661

  16. Compartment Syndrome of the Hand.

    PubMed

    Oak, Nikhil R; Abrams, Reid A

    2016-07-01

    Hand compartment syndrome has many etiologies; untreated, it has dire functional consequences. Intracompartmental pressure exceeding capillary filling pressure causes decreased tissue perfusion resulting in progressive ischemic death of compartment contents. Clinical findings can evolve. Serial physical examinations are recommended and, if equivocal, interstitial pressure monitoring is indicated. Definitive management is emergent fasciotomies with incisions designed to decompress the involved hand compartments, which could include the thenar, hypothenar, and interosseous compartments, and the carpal tunnel. Careful wound care, edema management, splinting, and hand therapy are critical. Therapy should start early postoperatively, possibly before wound closure.

  17. Targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rawat, A; Vaidya, B; Khatri, K; Goyal, A K; Gupta, P N; Mahor, S; Paliwal, R; Rai, S; Vyas, S P

    2007-09-01

    During the last decade, intracellular drug delivery has become an emerging area of research in the medical and pharmaceutical field. Many therapeutic agents such as drugs and DNA/oligonucleotides can be delivered not just to the cell but also to a particular compartment of that cell to achieve better activity e.g. proapoptotic drugs to the mitochondria, antibiotics and enzymes to the lysosomes and various anticancer drugs and gene to the nucleus. The lipidic nature of biological membrans is the major obstacle to the intracellular delivery of macromolecular and ionic drugs. Additionally, after endocytosis, the lysosome, the major degradation compartment, needs to be avoided for better activity. To avoid these problems, various carriers have been investigated for efficient intracellular delivery, either by direct entry to cytoplasm or by escaping the endosomal compartment. These include cell penetrating peptides, and carrier systems such as liposomes, cationic lipids and polymers, polymeric nanoparticles, etc. Various properties of these carriers, including size, surface charge, composition and the presence of cell specific ligands, alter their efficacy and specificity towards particular cells. This review summarizes various aspects of targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics including pathways, mechanisms and approaches. Various carrier constructs having potential for targeted intracellular delivery are also been discussed.

  18. COMPARTMENTED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Cain, F.M. Jr.

    1962-09-11

    A method of making a nuclear reactor fuel element of the elongated red type is given wherein the fissionable fuel material is enclosed within a tubular metal cladding. The method comprises coating the metal cladding tube on its inside wall with a brazing alloy, inserting groups of cylindrical pellets of fissionable fuel material into the tube with spacing members between adjacent groups of pellets, sealing the ends of the tubes to leave a void space therewithin, heating the tube and its contents to an elevated temperature to melt the brazing alloy and to expand the pellets to their maximum dimensions under predetermined operating conditions thereby automatically positioning the spacing members along the tube, and finally cooling the tube to room temperature whereby the spacing disks become permanently fixed at their edges in the brazing alloy and define a hermetically sealed compartment for each fl group of fuel pellets. Upon cooling, the pellets contract thus leaving a space to accommodate thermal expansion of the pellets when in use in a reactor. The spacing members also provide lateral support for the tubular cladding to prevent collapse thereof when subjected to a reactor environment. (AEC)

  19. The contribution of both oxygen and nitrogen intermediates to the intracellular killing mechanisms of C1q-opsonized Listeria monocytogenes by the macrophage-like IC-21 cell line.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Domínguez, C; Carrasco-Marín, E; López-Mato, P; Leyva-Cobián, F

    2000-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen which is internalized by host mammalian cells upon binding to their surface. Further listerial growth occurs in the cytosol after escape from the phagosomal-endosomal compartment. We have previously reported that C1q is able to potentiate L. monocytogenes phagocytosis upon bacterial opsonization by ingestion through C1q-binding structures. In this report, we analysed the post-phagocytic events upon internalization of C1q-opsonized L. monocytogenes and found an induction of macrophage (Mphi)-like IC-21 cell bactericidal mechanisms displayed by the production of oxygen and nitrogen metabolites. Both types of molecules are effective in L. monocytogenes killing. Further analysis of the cellular responses promoted by interaction of C1q with its surface binding structures, leads us to consider C1q as a collaborative molecule involved in Mphi activation. Upon interaction with surface binding structures, C1q was able to trigger and/or amplify the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates induced by stimuli such as interferon-gamma and L. monocytogenes phagocytosis.

  20. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  1. Dual-Compartment Inflatable Suitlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Guirgis, Peggy L.; Boyle, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for an improvement over current NASA Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology. The technology must allow the capacity for quicker, more efficient egress/ingress, allow for shirtsleeve suit maintenance, be compact in transport, and be applicable to environments ranging from planetary surface (partial-g) to orbital or deep space zero-g environments. The technology must also be resistant to dust and other foreign contaminants that may be present on or around a planetary surface. The technology should be portable, and be capable of docking with a variety of habitats, ports, stations, vehicles, and other pressurized modules. The Dual-Compartment Inflatable Suitlock (DCIS) consists of three hard inline bulkheads, separating two cylindrical membrane-walled compartments. The Inner Bulkhead can be fitted with a variety of hatch types, docking flanges, and mating hardware, such as the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM), for the purpose of mating with vehicles, habitats, and other pressurized modules. The Inner Bulkhead and Center Bulkhead function as the end walls of the Inner Compartment, which during operations, would stay pressurized, either matching the pressure of the habitat or acting as a lower-pressure transitional volume. The Inner Compartment contains donning/doffing fixtures and inner suit-port hatches. The Center Bulkhead has two integrated suit-ports along with a maintenance hatch. The Center Bulkhead and Outer Bulkhead function as the end walls of the Outer Compartment, which stays at vacuum during normal operations. This allows the crewmember to quickly don a suit, and egress the suitlock without waiting for the Outer Compartment to depressurize. The Outer Compartment can be pressurized infrequently for both nominal and off-nominal suit maintenance tasks, allowing shirtsleeve inspections and maintenance/repair of the environmental suits. The Outer Bulkhead has a pressure-assisted hatch door that stays open and stowed during EVA operations, but can

  2. Dual-Compartment Inflatable Suitlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Scott; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Guirgis, Peggy L.

    2012-01-01

    A paper discusses a dual-compartment inflatable suitlock (DCIS) for Extra - vehicular Activity (EVA) that will allow for dust control, suit maintenance, and efficient EVA egress/ingress. The expandable (inflatable technologies) aspect of the design will allow the unit to stow in a compact package for transport. The DCIS consists of three hard, in line bulkheads, separating two cylindrical membrane-walled compartments. The inner bulkhead can be fitted with a variety of hatch types, docking flanges, and mating hardware, such as the common berthing mechanism (CBM), for the purpose of mating with vehicles, habitats, and other pressurized modules. The inner bulkhead and center bulkhead function as the end walls of the inner compartment, which, during operations, would stay pressurized, either matching the pressure of the habitat or acting as a lower-pressure transitional volume. The suited crewmember can quickly don a suit, and egress the suitlock without waiting for the compartment to depressurize. The outer compartment can be pressurized infrequently, when a long dwell time is expected prior to the next EVA, or during off-nominal suit maintenance tasks, allowing shirtsleeve inspections and maintenance of the space suits. The outer bulkhead has a pressure-assisted hatch door that stays open and stowed routinely, but can be closed for suit maintenance and pressurization as needed.

  3. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  4. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag proteins are processed in two cellular compartments.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, A H; Swanstrom, R

    1991-01-01

    The structural proteins of the retroviral capsid are translated as a polyprotein (the Gag precursor) that is cleaved by a virally encoded protease. Processing of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag precursor Pr55 was analyzed through a combination of pulse-chase labeling, cell fractionation, and immunoprecipitation. We observed a membrane-associated processing pathway for the Gag precursor that gives rise to virions. In addition, we found that a significant amount of processing occurs in the cytoplasm of infected cells resulting in the intracellular accumulation of appropriately processed viral proteins. This observation suggests the viral protease is active in the cytoplasmic compartment of the cell. Processing of the Gag protein was blocked in both compartments by the addition of a viral protease inhibitor. A comparison of the amount of cytoplasmic processing seen in lytically infected cells with that seen in chronically infected cells showed that cytoplasmic processing was associated with the lytic infection. These observations raise the possibility that activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease in the cytoplasm of lytically infected cells might result in the cleavage of cellular proteins and thus contribute to cytotoxicity. Images PMID:2034693

  6. Corynebacterium diphtheriae putative tellurite-resistance protein (CDCE8392_0813) contributes to the intracellular survival in human epithelial cells and lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Santos, Louisy Sanches Dos; Antunes, Camila Azevedo; Santos, Cintia Silva Dos; Pereira, José Augusto Adler; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; Luna, Maria das Graças de; Azevedo, Vasco; Hirata Júnior, Raphael; Burkovski, Andreas; Asad, Lídia Maria Buarque de Oliveira; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-08-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the aetiologic agent of diphtheria, also represents a global medical challenge because of the existence of invasive strains as causative agents of systemic infections. Although tellurite (TeO32-) is toxic to most microorganisms, TeO32--resistant bacteria, including C. diphtheriae, exist in nature. The presence of TeO32--resistance (TeR) determinants in pathogenic bacteria might provide selective advantages in the natural environment. In the present study, we investigated the role of the putative TeR determinant (CDCE8392_813gene) in the virulence attributes of diphtheria bacilli. The disruption of CDCE8392_0813 gene expression in the LDCIC-L1 mutant increased susceptibility to TeO32- and reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), but not to other antimicrobial agents. The LDCIC-L1 mutant also showed a decrease in both the lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans and the survival inside of human epithelial cells compared to wild-type strain. Conversely, the haemagglutinating activity and adherence to and formation of biofilms on different abiotic surfaces were not regulated through the CDCE8392_0813 gene. In conclusion, the CDCE8392_813 gene contributes to the TeR and pathogenic potential of C. diphtheriae.

  7. Metabolic coupling in urothelial bladder cancer compartments and its correlation to tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L.; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    abstract Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are vital for intracellular pH homeostasis by extruding lactate from highly glycolytic cells. These molecules are key players of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, and evidence indicates a potential contribution in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) aggressiveness and chemoresistance. However, the specific role of MCTs in the metabolic compartmentalization within bladder tumors, namely their preponderance on the tumor stroma, remains to be elucidated. Thus, we evaluated the immunoexpression of MCTs in the different compartments of UBC tissue samples (n = 111), assessing the correlations among them and with the clinical and prognostic parameters. A significant decrease in positivity for MCT1 and MCT4 occurred from normoxic toward hypoxic regions. Significant associations were found between the expression of MCT4 in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma. MCT1 staining in normoxic tumor areas, and MCT4 staining in hypoxic regions, in the tumor stroma and in the blood vessels were significantly associated with UBC aggressiveness. MCT4 concomitant positivity in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma, as well as positivity in each of these regions concomitant with MCT1 positivity in normoxic tumor cells, was significantly associated with an unfavourable clinicopathological profile, and predicted lower overall survival rates among patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Our results point to the existence of a multi-compartment metabolic model in UBC, providing evidence of a metabolic coupling between catabolic stromal and cancer cells’ compartments, and the anabolic cancer cells. It is urgent to further explore the involvement of this metabolic coupling in UBC progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26636903

  8. Subcellular storage compartments of bacteriopheophorbide sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Dembeck, U.; Hubert, M.; Spengler, Bernhard; Bayer, Rainer; Wagner, Birgit

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence colocalization with the Golgi specific stain, NBD-ceramide, and the mitochondrial localizing stain, Rhodamine 123, confirmed the earlier assumption that the Golgi apparatus is one of the prominent storage compartments for bacteriopheophorbide esters in OAT 75 SCLC cells and several amelanotic melanoma cell lines (A375, Melur SP18, SkAMel 25). Furthermore, a diffuse staining of mitochondria, of non-structured cytoplasm, and an additional storage in melanine vesicles of the amelanotic melanoma cells suggests further storage compartments with quantitatively different contributions to the phototoxicity of bacteriochlorophyll-derived photosensitizers. Independent observations of early phototoxic effects on microfilamentous networks, enzymatic activities (succinate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase), and redistribution phenomena following primary uptake of the sensitizers let us assume that only a part of the 108 molecules taken up by a cell contribute directly to phototoxicity. Thus it may be asked if a proper subcellular positioning of only a few sensitizer molecules may have similar phototoxic effects as the huge amounts stored at apparently ineffective sites.

  9. Emerging Technologies and Their Applications in Lipid Compartment Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Heymsfield, Steven B.; Hu, Houchun Harry; Shen, Wei; Carmichael, Owen

    2015-01-01

    Non-Communicable diseases (NCDs), including obesity, are emerging as the major health concern of the 21st century. Excess adiposity and related NCD metabolic disturbances have stimulated development of new lipid compartment measurement technologies to help us understand cellular energy exchange, to refine phenotypes, and to develop predictive markers of adverse clinical outcomes. Recent advances now allow for quantification of multiple intracellular lipid and adipose tissue compartments that can be evaluated across the human lifespan. With magnetic resonance methods leading the way, newer approaches will give molecular structural and metabolic information beyond the laboratory in real-world settings. The union between these new technologies and the growing NCD population is creating an exciting interface advancing our understanding of chronic disease mechanisms. PMID:26596676

  10. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  11. Method and apparatus to assess compartment syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki (Inventor); Hargens, Alan R. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring pressure buildup in a body compartment that encases muscular tissue. The method includes assessing the body compartment configuration and identifying the effect of pulsatile components on at least one compartment dimension. This process is used in preventing tissue necrosis, and in decisions of whether to perform surgery on the body compartment for prevention of Compartment Syndrome. An apparatus is used for measuring excess pressure in the body compartment having components for imparting ultrasonic waves such as a transducer, placing the transducer to impart the ultrasonic waves, capturing the reflected imparted ultrasonic waves, and converting them to electrical signals, a pulsed phase-locked loop device for assessing a body compartment configuration and producing an output signal, and means for mathematically manipulating the output signal to thereby categorize pressure build-up in the body compartment from the mathematical manipulations.

  12. Orbiter Crew Compartment Integration-Stowage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, L. Gary

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Orbiter Crew Compartment Integration (CCI) stowage. The evolution of orbiter crew compartment stowage volume is also described, along with photographs presented of the on-orbit volume stowage capacity.

  13. 36 CFR 1192.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to be... controls, call buttons, electrical outlets, etc.) shall be mounted no more than 48 inches, and no less...

  14. 36 CFR 1192.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to be... controls, call buttons, electrical outlets, etc.) shall be mounted no more than 48 inches, and no less...

  15. Small Peptide Recognition Sequence for Intracellular Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicate that complex arrays of short signals and recognition peptide sequence ensure accurate trafficking and distribution of transmembrane receptors and/or proteins and their ligands into intracellular compartments. Internalization and subsequent trafficking of cell-surface receptors into the cell interior is mediated by specific short-sequence peptide signals within the cytoplasmic domains of these receptor proteins. The short signals usually consist of small linear amino acid sequences, which are recognized by adaptor coat proteins along the endocytic and sorting pathways. In recent years, much has been learned about the function and mechanisms of endocytic pathways responsible for the trafficking and molecular sorting of membrane receptors and their ligands into intracellular compartments, however, the significance and scope of the short sequence motifs in these cellular events is not well understood. Here a particular emphasis has been given to the functions of short-sequence signal motifs responsible for the itinerary and destination of membrane receptors and proteins moving into subcellular compartments. PMID:20817434

  16. 36 CFR 1192.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sleeping compartments. 1192.127 Section 1192.127 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to...

  17. 49 CFR 38.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sleeping compartments. 38.127 Section 38.127... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to be accessible shall be designed so as to allow a person using...

  18. 49 CFR 38.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sleeping compartments. 38.127 Section 38.127... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to be accessible shall be designed so as to allow a person using...

  19. 36 CFR 1192.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sleeping compartments. 1192.127 Section 1192.127 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to...

  20. 49 CFR 38.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sleeping compartments. 38.127 Section 38.127... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to be accessible shall be designed so as to allow a person using...

  1. 36 CFR 1192.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Sleeping compartments. 1192.127 Section 1192.127 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 1192.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to...

  2. 49 CFR 38.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sleeping compartments. 38.127 Section 38.127... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.127 Sleeping compartments. (a) Sleeping compartments required to be accessible shall be designed so as to allow a person using...

  3. Functional Analysis of the Hydrophilic Loop in Intracellular Trafficking of Arabidopsis PIN-FORMED Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anindya; Park, Minho; Kesawat, Mahipal Singh; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2014-04-01

    Different PIN-FORMED proteins (PINs) contribute to intercellular and intracellular auxin transport, depending on their distinctive subcellular localizations. Arabidopsis thaliana PINs with a long hydrophilic loop (HL) (PIN1 to PIN4 and PIN7; long PINs) localize predominantly to the plasma membrane (PM), whereas short PINs (PIN5 and PIN8) localize predominantly to internal compartments. However, the subcellular localization of the short PINs has been observed mostly for PINs ectopically expressed in different cell types, and the role of the HL in PIN trafficking remains unclear. Here, we tested whether a long PIN-HL can provide its original molecular cues to a short PIN by transplanting the HL. The transplanted long PIN2-HL was sufficient for phosphorylation and PM trafficking of the chimeric PIN5:PIN2-HL but failed to provide the characteristic polarity of PIN2. Unlike previous observations, PIN5 showed clear PM localization in diverse cell types where PIN5 is natively or ectopically expressed and even polar PM localization in one cell type. Furthermore, in the root epidermis, the subcellular localization of PIN5 switched from PM to internal compartments according to the developmental stage. Our results suggest that the long PIN-HL is partially modular for the trafficking behavior of PINs and that the intracellular trafficking of PIN is plastic depending on cell type and developmental stage.

  4. Hypothyroid-induced acute compartment syndrome in all extremities

    PubMed Central

    Musielak, Matthew C.; Chae, Jung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is an uncommon complication of uncontrolled hypothyroidism. If unrecognized, this can lead to ischemia, necrosis and potential limb loss. A 49-year-old female presented with the sudden onset of bilateral lower and upper extremity swelling and pain. The lower extremity anterior compartments were painful and tense. The extensor surface of the upper extremities exhibited swelling and pain. Motor function was intact, however, limited due to pain. Bilateral lower extremity fasciotomies were performed. Postoperative Day 1, upper extremity motor function decreased significantly and paresthesias occurred. She therefore underwent bilateral forearm fasciotomies. The pathogenesis of hypothyroidism-induced compartment syndrome is unclear. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-induced fibroblast activation results in increased glycosaminoglycan deposition. The primary glycosaminoglycan in hypothyroid myxedematous changes is hyaluronic acid, which binds water causing edema. This increases vascular permeability, extravasation of proteins and impaired lymphatic drainage. These contribute to increased intra-compartmental pressure and subsequent ACS. PMID:28003319

  5. [Fascia compartment syndrome of the iliac-psoas compartment].

    PubMed

    Klammer, A

    1983-01-01

    The iliacus compression syndrome has a kind of exceptional position--as to genesis, development and therapy--in comparison with the other compartment-compression syndromes of the limbs. Indeed there exist similar pathophysiological, rules, but the special anatomic facts enlarge the etiological, differential-diagnostic and therapeutic spectrum. Thus, concerning the frequency of causes, not the trauma but the spontaneous bleeding in coagulation disturbances takes the first place, and unusual causes, such as rupturing aortic aneurysms, have to be included in the differential diagnostic discussion. The finest diagnostic sign besides pain is the palsy of the Nervus Femoralis. As to the treatment, operative measures are possible. The exact knowledge of the anatomy is important for the understanding of the specialties mentioned above.

  6. RAB24 facilitates clearance of autophagic compartments during basal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Anttila, Päivi; Mikkonen, Elisa; Happonen, Kaisa E; Holland, Petter; Ueno, Takashi; Simonsen, Anne; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    RAB24 belongs to a family of small GTPases and has been implicated to function in autophagy. Here we confirm the intracellular localization of RAB24 to autophagic vacuoles with immuno electron microscopy and cell fractionation, and show that prenylation and guanine nucleotide binding are necessary for the targeting of RAB24 to autophagic compartments. Further, we show that RAB24 plays a role in the maturation and/or clearance of autophagic compartments under nutrient-rich conditions, but not during short amino acid starvation. Quantitative electron microscopy shows an increase in the numbers of late autophagic compartments in cells silenced for RAB24, and mRFP-GFP-LC3 probe and autophagy flux experiments indicate that this is due to a hindrance in their clearance. Formation of autophagosomes is shown to be unaffected by RAB24-silencing with siRNA. A defect in aggregate clearance in the absence of RAB24 is also shown in cells forming polyglutamine aggregates. This study places RAB24 function in the termination of the autophagic process under nutrient-rich conditions. PMID:26325487

  7. Independent Active Contraction of Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscle (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, whereas all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. Mechanical independence between both types of compartments has been demonstrated during passive tensile loading. We examined coupling between EOM compartments during active, ex vivo contraction. Methods. Fresh bovine EOMs were removed, and one compartment of each was coated with hydrophobic petrolatum. Contraction of the uncoated compartment was induced by immersion in a solution of 50 mM CaCl2 at 38°C labeled with sodium fluorescein dye, whereas tensions in both compartments were monitored by strain gauges. Control experiments omitted petrolatum so that the entire EOM contracted. After physiological experiments, EOMs were sectioned transversely to demonstrate specificity of CaCl2 permeation by yellow fluorescence dye excited by blue light. Results. In control experiments without petrolatum, both transverse and GL and OL compartments contracted similarly. Selective compartmental omission of petrolatum caused markedly independent compartmental contraction whether measured at the GL or the OL insertions or for transverse compartments at the scleral insertion. Although some CaCl2 spread occurred, mean (±SD) tension in the coated compartments averaged only 10.5 ± 3.3% and 6.0 ± 1.5% in GL/OL and transverse compartments, respectively relative to uncoated compartments. Fluorescein penetration confirmed selective CaCl2 permeation. Conclusions. These data confirm passive tensile findings of mechanical independence of EOM compartments and extend results to active contraction. EOMs behave actively as if composed of mechanically independent parallel fiber bundles having different insertional targets, consistent with the active pulley and transverse compartmental hypotheses. PMID:25503460

  8. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    K. Intra- abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of ruptured abdomi- nal aortic aneurysm repair. Am Surg 1989;55:396-402. 6. Sugrue M...00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Author’s personal copy Case Report Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After

  9. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; Dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome.

  10. Digital Microscopy Assessment of Angiogenesis in Different Breast Cancer Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Rogojanu, Radu; Croitoru, Camelia; Jitaru, Daniela; Tarniceriu, Cristina; Carasevici, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Tumour angiogenesis defined by microvessel density (MVD) is generally accepted as a prognostic factor in breast cancer. However, due to variability of measurement systems and cutoffs, it is questionable to date whether it contributes to predictive outline. Our study aims to grade vascular heterogeneity by comparing clear-cut compartments: tumour associated stroma (TAS), tumour parenchyma, and tumour invasive front. Material and Methods. Computerized vessel area measurement was performed using a tissue cytometry system (TissueFAXS) on slides originated from 50 patients with breast cancer. Vessels were marked using immunohistochemistry with CD34. Regions of interest were manually defined for each tumour compartment. Results. Tumour invasive front vascular endothelia area was 2.15 times higher than that in tumour parenchyma and 4.61 times higher than that in TAS (P < 0.002). Worth to mention that the lymph node negative subgroup of patients show a slight but constant increase of vessel index in all examined compartments of breast tumour. Conclusion. Whole slide digital examination and region of interest (ROI) analysis are a valuable tool in scoring angiogenesis markers and disclosing their prognostic capacity. Our study reveals compartments' variability of vessel density inside the tumour and highlights the propensity of invasive front to associate an active process of angiogenesis with potential implications in adjuvant therapy. PMID:24073397

  11. Synergism between upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation caused by mycoplasma facilitates intracellular mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Yu, Jie; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Zhaoming; Xia, Yun; Luo, Zhiyong; Wu, Yaqun

    2014-03-01

    Following fusion of a mycoplasma with a host cell membrane, the inserted components of mycoplasma may then be transported through the endocytic pathway. However, the effects of mycoplasmas on the host cell endomembrane system are largely unknown. In this study, mycoplasma‑induced changes in the dynamics of endocytic and autophagic systems were investigated. Endocytosis and autophagy are two major processes involved in the survival of intracellular prokaryotic pathogens. It was found that, immediately following infection, mycoplasmas induce endocytosis in the host cell; however, in the long term the mycoplasmas suppress turnover of the components of the endocytic pathway. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Rab7 and LC3‑II are recruited to the intracellular mycoplasma‑containing compartments. Western blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that mycoplasmas increase expression of Rab7 by upregulating transcription, but increase levels of LC3‑II and p62 by post‑translational regulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that mycoplasma infection causes inhibition of autophagic degradation of LC3‑II and p62. In addition, it was found that upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation synergistically contributes to intracellular mycoplasma accumulation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mycoplasmas may manipulate host cell endosomal and autophagic systems in order to facilitate intracellular infection.

  12. Coupling mechanical forces to electrical signaling: molecular motors and the intracellular transport of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Compartmented mode workstation (CMW) comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Tolliver, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    As the Compartmented Mode Workstation (CMW) market has matured, several vendors have released new versions of their CMW operating systems. These include a new version from SecureWare (CMW + Version 2.4), and Sun`s CMW 1.1 (also known as Trusted Solaris 1.1). EC is now shipping MLS+ 3.0 for DEC Alpha platforms. Relatively new entries in the market include Loral B1/CMW for IBM RS/6000 platforms and a SecureWare-based CMW for HP platforms (HP-UX 10.09). With all these choices it is time for a comparative analysis of the features offered by the various vendors. The authors have three of the above five CMW systems plus HP-UX BLS 9.09, which is a multilevel secure operating system (OS) targeted at the B1 level but not a CMW. Each is unique in sometimes obvious, sometimes subtle ways, a situation that requires knowing and keeping straight a variety of commands to do the same thing on each system. Some vendors offer extensive GUI tools for system administration; some require entering command-line commands for certain system administration tasks. They examine the differences in system installation, system administration, and system operating among the systems. They look at trusted networking among the various systems and differences in the network databases and label encodings files. They examine the user interface on the various systems from logging in to logging out.

  14. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  15. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  16. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla Pareja, Maria Eugenia; Colombo, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance. PMID:24137567

  17. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  18. Description of glucose transport in isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells by a three-compartment model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Quinton, V Margaret; Cant, John P

    2004-04-01

    Initial rates of glucose entry into isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells display moderate degrees of asymmetry and cooperative interactions between export and import sites. The present study examined the hypothesis that these kinetic features are due to compartmentalization of intracellular glucose. Net uptake of 3-O-methyl-d-[1-(3)H]glucose (3-OMG) by isolated bovine mammary epithelial cells was measured at 37 degrees C. The time course of 3-OMG net uptake was better fitted by a double-exponential equation than by a single- or triple-exponential equation. Compartmental analysis of the time course curve suggested that translocated 3-OMG is distributed into two compartments with fractional volumes of 32.6 +/- 5.7% and 67.4 +/- 5.7%, respectively. The results support the view that glucose transport in bovine mammary epithelial cells is a multistep process consisting of two serial steps: fast, carrier-mediated, symmetric translocation of sugar across the cell plasma membrane into a small compartment and subsequent slow exchange of posttranslocated sugar between two intracellular compartments. A three-compartment model of this system successfully simulated the observed time course of 3-OMG net uptake and the observed dependence of unidirectional entry rates on intra- and extracellular 3-OMG concentrations. Simulations indicated that backflux of radiolabeled sugar from the small compartment to extracellular space during 15 s of incubation gives rise to the apparent asymmetry, trans-stimulation, and cooperativity of mammary glucose transport kinetics. The fixed-site carrier model overestimated the rate of glucose accumulation in cells, and its features can be accounted for by the compartmentalization of intracellular sugar.

  19. 49 CFR 38.127 - Sleeping compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.127 Sleeping compartments. (a...., heating and air conditioning controls, lighting controls, call buttons, electrical outlets, etc.) shall...

  20. Compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture☆

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; dos Santos, Thays Fernanda Avelino; dos Santos, Fernanda Thaysa Avelino; da Costa Filho, Edelson Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are relatively rare, representing around 1.2% of all fractures. The tibia, due to its subcutaneous location and poor muscle coverage, is exposed and suffers large numbers of traumas, not only fractures, but also crush injuries and severe bruising, among others, which at any given moment, could lead compartment syndrome in the patient. The case is reported of a 58-year-old patient who, following a tibial plateau fracture, presented compartment syndrome of the leg and was submitted to decompressive fasciotomy of the four right compartments. After osteosynthesis with internal fixation of the tibial plateau using an L-plate, the patient again developed compartment syndrome. PMID:26229779

  1. Aircraft Cargo Compartment Fire Test Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumke, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the test was to assess fire containment and fire extinguishment in the cargo by reducing the ventilation through the cargo compartment. Parameters which were measured included ignition time, burnthrough time, and physical damage to the cargo liner, composition of selected combustible gases, temperature-time histories, heat flux, and detector response. The ignitor load was made of a typical cargo consisting of filled cardboard cartons occupying 50% of the compartment volume.

  2. Independent Passive Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Chaudhuri, Zia; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, while all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. We sought evidence of potential independent action by examining passive mechanical coupling between EOM compartments. Methods. Putative compartments of each of the six whole bovine anatomical EOMs were separately clamped to a physiologically controlled, dual channel microtensile load cell (5-mN force resolution) driven by independent, high-speed, linear motors having 20-nm position resolution. One channel at a time was extended or retracted by 3 to 5 mm, with the other channel stationary. Fiducials distributed on the EOM global surface enabled optical tracking of local deformation. Loading rates of 5 to 100 mm/sec were applied to explore speeds from slow vergence to saccades. Control loadings employed transversely loaded EOM and isotropic latex. Results. All EOM bellies and tendons exhibited substantial compartmental independence when loaded in the physiologic direction, both between OL and GL, and for arbitrary transverse parsings of EOM width ranging from 60%:40% to 80%:20%. Intercompartmental force coupling in the physiologic direction was less than or equal to 10% in all six EOMS even for saccadic loading rates. Coupling was much higher for nonphysiologic transverse EOM loading and isotropic latex. Optical tracking demonstrated independent strain distribution between EOM compartments. Conclusions. Substantial mechanical independence exists among physiologically loaded fiber bundles in bovine EOMs and tendons, providing biomechanical support for the proposal that differential compartmental function in horizontal rectus EOMs contributes to novel torsional and vertical actions. PMID:23188730

  3. Anatomic Landmarks for the First Dorsal Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Hazani, Ron; Engineer, Nitin J.; Cooney, Damon; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment can assist clinicians with management of de Quervain's disease. The radial styloid, the scaphoid tubercle, and Lister's tubercle can be used as superficial landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. Methods: Thirty-two cadaveric wrists were dissected, and measurements were taken from the predetermined landmarks to the extensor retinaculum. The compartments were also inspected for variability of the abductor pollicis longus tendon and intracompartmental septations. Results: The average length of the extensor retinaculum from its proximal to distal extent measured approximately 2.2 cm. The distal aspect of the radial styloid was 0.3 cm distal to the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum, and the distance between the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum and the APL-Lister's-Scaphoid juncture was approximately 0.5 cm. A separate compartment for the extensor pollicis brevis was noted in 35% of the specimens. The abductor pollicis longus tendon demonstrated great variability with 1, 2, 3, or 4 slips in 9%, 30%, 43%, or 26% of the specimens, respectively. Conclusion: The superficial bony prominences of the radial wrist can be used reliably as anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. PMID:19092992

  4. Intracellular Voyeurism: Examining the Modulation of Host Cell Activities bySalmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Jason; Brumell, John H

    2005-11-01

    Salmonella spp. can infect host cells by gaining entry through phagocytosis or by inducing host cell membrane ruffling that facilitates bacterial uptake. With its wide host range, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has proven to be an important model organism for studying intracellular bacterial pathogenesis. Upon entry into host cells, serovar Typhimurium typically resides within a membrane-bound compartment termed the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). From the SCV, serovar Typhimurium can inject several effector proteins that subvert many normal host cell systems, including endocytic trafficking, cytoskeletal rearrangements, lipid signaling and distribution, and innate and adaptive host defenses. The study of these intracellular events has been made possible through the use of various imaging techniques, ranging from classic methods of transmission electron microscopy to advanced livecell fluorescence confocal microscopy. In addition, DNA microarrays have now been used to provide a "snapshot" of global gene expression in serovar Typhimurium residing within the infected host cell. This review describes key aspects of Salmonella-induced subversion of host cell activities, providing examples of imaging that have been used to elucidate these events. Serovar Typhimurium engages specific host cell machinery from initial contact with the host cell to replication within the SCV. This continuous interaction with the host cell has likely contributed to the extensive arsenal that serovar Typhimurium now possesses, including two type III secretion systems, a range of ammunition in the form of TTSS effectors, and a complex genetic regulatory network that coordinates the expression of hundreds of virulence factors.

  5. Intracellular Trafficking of the Pyridoxal Cofactor. Implications for Health and Metabolic Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the vitamin B6-derived pyridoxal cofactor for human health has been established through more than 70 years of intensive biochemical research, revealing its fundamental roles in metabolism. B6 deficiency, resulting from nutritional limitation or impaired uptake from dietary sources, is associated with epilepsy, neuromuscular disease and neurodegeneration. Hereditary disorders of B6 processing are also known, and genetic defects in pathways involved in transport of B6 into the cell and its transformation to the pyridoxal-5′-phosphate enzyme cofactor can contribute to cardiovascular disease by interfering with homocysteine metabolism and the biosynthesis of vasomodulatory polyamines. Compared to the processes involved in cellular uptake and processing of the B6 vitamers, trafficking of the PLP cofactor across intracellular membranes is very poorly understood, even though the availability of PLP within subcellular compartments (particularly the mitochondrion) may have important health implications. The aim of this review is to concisely summarize the state of current knowledge of intracellular trafficking of PLP and to identify key directions for future research. PMID:26619753

  6. [The perichromatin compartment of the cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Bogoliubov, D S

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the data on the structure and composition of the perichromatin compartment, a special border area between the condensed chromatin and the interchromatin space of the cell nucleus, are discussed in the light of the concept of nuclear functions in complex nuclear architectonics. Morphological features, molecular composition and functions of main extrachromosomal structures of the perichromatin compartment, perichromatin fibrils (PFs) and perichromatin granules (PGs) including nuclear stress-bodies (nSBs) that are derivates of the PGs under heat shock, are presented. A special attention was paid to the features of the molecular compositions of PFs and PGs in different cell types and at different physiological conditions.

  7. Anomalous dynamics in intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinner, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    This talk will describe quantitative analyses of particle tracking data for systems with cytoskeletally associated molecular motors to better understand the motions contributing to intracellular transport and, more generally, means for characterizing systems far from equilibrium. In particular, we have studied the motions of insulin-containing vesicles (granules) in a pancreatic beta cell line. We find subdiffusive behavior with correlations in both space and time. These data can be modeled by subordinating an ergodic random walk process to a non-ergodic one. We relate the dynamics to the underlying microtubule structure by imaging in the presence of the drug vinblastine. Our results provide a simple physical mechanism for how diverse pools of insulin granules and, in turn, biphasic secretion could arise. Time permitting, these dynamics will be compared with those of actomyosin assemblies.

  8. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  9. Local intracellular ion measurements with luminescent indicators using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitz, N.; Merten, E.; Acker, H.

    1995-09-01

    Ion sensitive fluoroprobes such as BCECF (pH) and FURA-II (Ca2+) are frequently used indicators for determination of ion activities in single cells and subcellular compartments, e.g. by video enhanced or video intensified microscopy. Moreover, using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with its inherent potential for noninvasive optical sectioning of cells and tissues and subsequent 3D image reconstruction, intracellular ion topographies can be monitored via pseudocolor encoded ratio imaging from pixel to pixel enabling in vivo measurements of dynamic intracellular processes. Regardless of the degree of spatial resolution, reliable qualtitative determinations essentially depend on accurate calibration of the intracellularly entrapped fluoroprobe. Calibration is either established on the basis of a whole cell or within a more or less extended subcellular compartment and the characteristics are displayed as concentration encoded pseudocolor bar within the image frame. This calibration is assumed to be valid for other cellular compartments and, in case of ion imaging, it is even thought to be valid for every single pixel of the complete pixel field. However, the assumption of a topographically invariant intracellular calibration requires a reliable behavior of the intracellularly applied indicator. This intracellular integrity of the dyes often does not seem to exist since intracellular calibration curves considerably deviate from in vitro calibration characteristics. Deviations may be due to intracellular interactions of indicator molecules with cytoplasmic macromolecules, e.g. proteins, resulting in spectral distortions and/or sensitivity deficits as demonstrated by the indicators BCECF and FURA-RED (a FURA-II analogue) or to intracellular redistribution of the indicator as exemplified by pH measurements using carboxy-SNARF-1. Consequences of these investigations as well as further potential interferences are discussed with special respect to ion imaging

  10. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Taype Zamboni, Danilo E. R.; Carabelli, Guido S.; Barla, Jorge D.; Sancineto, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is extremely rare when compared to compartment syndrome in other anatomical regions, such as the forearm or the lower leg. It usually occurs in drug users following prolonged immobilization due to loss of consciousness. Another possible cause is trauma, which is rare and has only few reports in the literature. Physical examination may show tense and swollen buttocks and severe pain caused by passive range of motion. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who developed GCS after prolonged anterior-posterior pelvis compression. The physical examination revealed swelling, scrotal hematoma, and left ankle extension weakness. An unstable pelvic ring injury was diagnosed and the patient was taken to surgery. Measurement of the intracompartmental pressure was measured in the operating room, thereby confirming the diagnosis. Emergent fasciotomy was performed to decompress the three affected compartments. Trauma surgeons must be aware of the possibility of gluteal compartment syndrome in patients who have an acute pelvic trauma with buttock swelling and excessive pain of the gluteal region. Any delay in diagnosis or treatment can be devastating, causing permanent disability, irreversible loss of gluteal muscles, sciatic nerve palsy, kidney failure, or even death. PMID:27579205

  11. New insights into the intracellular distribution pattern of cationic amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Vater, Magdalena; Möckl, Leonhard; Gormanns, Vanessa; Schultz Fademrecht, Carsten; Mallmann, Anna M; Ziegart-Sadowska, Karolina; Zaba, Monika; Frevert, Marie L; Bräuchle, Christoph; Holsboer, Florian; Rein, Theo; Schmidt, Ulrike; Kirmeier, Thomas

    2017-03-10

    Cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) comprise a wide variety of different substance classes such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antiarrhythmics. It is well recognized that CADs accumulate in certain intracellular compartments leading to specific morphological changes of cells. So far, no adequate technique exists allowing for ultrastructural analysis of CAD in intact cells. Azidobupramine, a recently described multifunctional antidepressant analogue, allows for the first time to perform high-resolution studies of CADs on distribution pattern and morphological changes in intact cells. We showed here that the intracellular distribution pattern of azidobupramine strongly depends on drug concentration and exposure time. The mitochondrial compartment (mDsRed) and the late endo-lysosomal compartment (CD63-GFP) were the preferred localization sites at low to intermediate concentrations (i.e. 1 μM, 5 μM). In contrast, the autophagosomal compartment (LC3-GFP) can only be reached at high concentrations (10 μM) and long exposure times (72 hrs). At the morphological level, LC3-clustering became only prominent at high concentrations (10 μM), while changes in CD63 pattern already occurred at intermediate concentrations (5 μM). To our knowledge, this is the first study that establishes a link between intracellular CAD distribution pattern and morphological changes. Therewith, our results allow for gaining deeper understanding of intracellular effects of CADs.

  12. New insights into the intracellular distribution pattern of cationic amphiphilic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Vater, Magdalena; Möckl, Leonhard; Gormanns, Vanessa; Schultz Fademrecht, Carsten; Mallmann, Anna M.; Ziegart-Sadowska, Karolina; Zaba, Monika; Frevert, Marie L.; Bräuchle, Christoph; Holsboer, Florian; Rein, Theo; Schmidt, Ulrike; Kirmeier, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) comprise a wide variety of different substance classes such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antiarrhythmics. It is well recognized that CADs accumulate in certain intracellular compartments leading to specific morphological changes of cells. So far, no adequate technique exists allowing for ultrastructural analysis of CAD in intact cells. Azidobupramine, a recently described multifunctional antidepressant analogue, allows for the first time to perform high-resolution studies of CADs on distribution pattern and morphological changes in intact cells. We showed here that the intracellular distribution pattern of azidobupramine strongly depends on drug concentration and exposure time. The mitochondrial compartment (mDsRed) and the late endo-lysosomal compartment (CD63-GFP) were the preferred localization sites at low to intermediate concentrations (i.e. 1 μM, 5 μM). In contrast, the autophagosomal compartment (LC3-GFP) can only be reached at high concentrations (10 μM) and long exposure times (72 hrs). At the morphological level, LC3-clustering became only prominent at high concentrations (10 μM), while changes in CD63 pattern already occurred at intermediate concentrations (5 μM). To our knowledge, this is the first study that establishes a link between intracellular CAD distribution pattern and morphological changes. Therewith, our results allow for gaining deeper understanding of intracellular effects of CADs. PMID:28281674

  13. Extraocular Muscle Compartments in Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Clark, Robert A.; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate changes in volumes of extraocular muscle (EOM) compartments in unilateral superior oblique (SO) palsy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods High-resolution, surface-coil MRI was obtained in 19 patients with unilateral SO palsy and 19 age-matched orthotropic control subjects. Rectus EOMs and the SO were divided into two anatomic compartments for volume analysis in patients with unilateral SO palsy, allowing comparison of total compartmental volumes versus controls. Medial and lateral compartmental volumes of the SO muscle were compared in patients with isotropic (round shape) versus anisotropic (elongated shape) SO atrophy. Results The medial and lateral compartments of the ipsilesional SO muscles were equally atrophic in isotropic SO palsy, whereas the lateral compartment was significantly smaller than the medial in anisotropic SO palsy (P = 0.01). In contrast to the SO, there were no differential compartmental volume changes in rectus EOMs; however, there was significant total muscle hypertrophy in the ipsilesional inferior rectus (IR) and lateral rectus (LR) muscles and contralesional superior rectus (SR) muscles. Medial rectus (MR) volume was normal both ipsi- and contralesionally. Conclusions A subset of patients with SO palsy exhibit selective atrophy of the lateral, predominantly vertically acting SO compartment. Superior oblique atrophy is associated with whole-muscle volume changes in the ipsilesional IR, ipsilesional LR, and contralesional SR; however, SO muscle atrophy is not associated with compartmentally selective volume changes in the rectus EOMs. Selective compartmental SO pathology may provide an anatomic mechanism that explains some of the variability in clinical presentations of SO palsy. PMID:27768791

  14. The longest telomeres: a general signature of adult stem cell compartments

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ignacio; Canela, Andres; Vera, Elsa; Tejera, Agueda; Cotsarelis, George; Blasco, María A.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of adult stem cells and their location (niches) is of great relevance for regenerative medicine. However, stem cell niches are still poorly defined in most adult tissues. Here, we show that the longest telomeres are a general feature of adult stem cell compartments. Using confocal telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomapping), we find gradients of telomere length within tissues, with the longest telomeres mapping to the known stem cell compartments. In mouse hair follicles, we show that cells with the longest telomeres map to the known stem cell compartments, colocalize with stem cell markers, and behave as stem cells upon treatment with mitogenic stimuli. Using K15-EGFP reporter mice, which mark hair follicle stem cells, we show that GFP-positive cells have the longest telomeres. The stem cell compartments in small intestine, testis, cornea, and brain of the mouse are also enriched in cells with the longest telomeres. This constitutes the description of a novel general property of adult stem cell compartments. Finally, we make the novel finding that telomeres shorten with age in different mouse stem cell compartments, which parallels a decline in stem cell functionality, suggesting that telomere loss may contribute to stem cell dysfunction with age. PMID:18283121

  15. Acute exertional anterior compartment syndrome in an adolescent female.

    PubMed

    Fehlandt, A; Micheli, L

    1995-01-01

    Acute compartment syndromes usually occur as a complication of major trauma. While the chronic exertional anterior tibial compartment syndrome is well described in the sports medicine literature, reports of acute tibial compartment syndromes due to physical exertion, or repetitive microtrauma, are rare. The case of an adolescent female who developed an acute anterior compartment syndrome from running in a soccer game is described in this report. Failure to recognize the onset of an acute exertional compartment syndrome may lead to treatment delay and serious complications. Whereas the chronic exertional anterior compartment syndrome is characterized by pain that diminishes with the cessation of exercise, the onset of the acute exertional anterior compartment syndrome is heralded by pain that continues, or increases, after exercise has stopped. Compartment pressure measurement confirms the clinical diagnosis and helps guide treatment. True compartment syndromes require urgent fasciotomy.

  16. Annexin A6 in the liver: From the endocytic compartment to cellular physiology.

    PubMed

    Enrich, Carlos; Rentero, Carles; Grewal, Thomas

    2016-10-27

    Annexin A6 (AnxA6) belongs to the conserved annexin family - a group of Ca(2+)-dependent membrane binding proteins. AnxA6 is the largest of all annexins and highly expressed in smooth muscle, hepatocytes, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Upon activation, AnxA6 binds to negatively charged phospholipids in a wide range of intracellular localizations, in particular the plasma membrane, late endosomes/pre-lysosomes, but also synaptic vesicles and sarcolemma. In these cellular sites, AnxA6 is believed to contribute to the organization of membrane microdomains, such as cholesterol-rich lipid rafts and confer multiple regulatory functions, ranging from vesicle fusion, endocytosis and exocytosis to programmed cell death and muscle contraction. Growing evidence supports that Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-binding proteins control endocytosis and autophagy. Their regulatory role seems to operate at the level of the signalling pathways that initiate autophagy or at later stages, when autophagosomes fuse with endolysosomal compartments. The convergence of the autophagic and endocytic vesicles to lysosomes shares several features that depend on Ca(2+) originating from lysosomes/late endosomes and seems to depend on proteins that are subsequently activated by this cation. However, the involvement of Ca(2+) and its effector proteins in these autophagic and endocytic stages still remains poorly understood. Although AnxA6 makes up almost 0.25% of total protein in the liver, little is known about its function in hepatocytes. Within the endocytic route, we identified AnxA6 in endosomes and autophagosomes of hepatocytes. Hence, AnxA6 and possibly other annexins might represent new Ca(2+) effectors that regulate converging steps of autophagy and endocytic trafficking in hepatocytes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech.

  17. Overuse injuries: tendinopathies, stress fractures, compartment syndrome, and shin splints.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Robert P; Sethi, Shikha

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 50% of all sports injuries are secondary to overuse and result from repetitive microtrauma that causes local tissue damage. Injuries are most likely with changes in mode, intensity, or duration of training and can accumulate before symptoms appear. Intrinsic factors contributing to injuries are individual bio-mechanical abnormalities such as malalignments, muscle imbalance, inflexibility, weakness, and instability. Contributing extrinsic (avoidable) factors include poor technique, improper equipment, and improper changes in duration or frequency of activity. Injuries are often related to biomechanical abnormalities removed from the specific injury site, requiring evaluation of the entire kinetic chain. This article discusses common overuse injuries of the lower leg, ankle, and foot: tendinopathies, stress fractures, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, and shin splints.

  18. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  19. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  20. A cell-penetrating bispecific antibody for therapeutic regulation of intracellular targets.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Gera, Joseph F; Chan, Grace; Hansen, James E; Li, Erica; Cloninger, Cheri; Levine, Arnold J; Nishimura, Robert N

    2012-10-01

    The therapeutic use of antibodies is restricted by the limited access of antibodies to intracellular compartments. To overcome this limitation, we developed a cell-penetrating monoclonal antibody, mAb 3E10, as an intracellular delivery vehicle for the intracellular and intranuclear delivery of antibodies constructed as bispecific single-chain Fv fragments. Because MDM2 is an important target in cancer therapy, we selected monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3G5 for intracellular transport. mAb 3G5 binds MDM2 and blocks binding of MDM2 to p53. Here, we show that the resulting 3E10-3G5 bispecific antibody retains cell-penetrating and MDM2-binding activity, increases tumor p53 levels, and inhibits growth of MDM2-addicted tumors. The use of cell-penetrating bispecific antibodies in targeted molecular therapy will significantly broaden the spectrum of accessible intracellular targets and may have a profound impact in cancer therapy.

  1. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var.dulce), tomato (Lycopersicon lycopersicum), and sugar snap pea (Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon) from an industrially impacted biosolids-amended soil, a municipal biosolids­ amended soil, and a control soil. Individual concentrations of PFAAs, on a dry weight basis, in mature, edible portions of crops grown in soil amended with PFAA industrially impacted biosolids were highest for perfluorooctanoate (PFOA; 67 ng/g) in radish root, perfluorobutanoate (PFBA;232 ng/g) in celery shoot, and PFBA (150 ng/g) in pea fruit. Comparatively, PFAA concentrations in edible compartments of crops grown in the municipal biosolids-amended soil and in the control soil were less than 25 ng/g. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated for the root, shoot, and fruit compartments (as applicable) of all crops grown in the industrially impacted soil. BAFs were highest for PFBA in the shoots of all crops, as well as in the fruit compartment of pea. Root­ soil concentration factors (RCFs) for tomato and pea were independent of PFAA chain length, while radish and celery RCFs showed a slight decrease with increasing chain length. Shoot-soil concentration factors (SCFs) for all crops showed a decrease with incre

  2. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Is Defined by Targeting to Compartments Lacking Lysosomal Membrane Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Jungnitz, Heidrun; Rohde, Manfred; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the generation of acquired immunity to infections by pathogenic microorganisms. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is known to survive and proliferate intracellularly within macrophages and nonphagocytic cells, but no data exist on how this pathogen interacts with DCs. In this report, we show the capacity of serotype Typhimurium to survive within the established mouse DC line CB1. In contrast to the case for the macrophage model, the compartments of DCs containing serotype Typhimurium are devoid of lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and the PhoPQ two-component regulatory system is not essential for pathogen intracellular survival. PMID:10768999

  3. Are hydrodynamic interactions screened in spherically confined micro-compartments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte-Rivera, Christian; Zia, Roseanna

    2016-11-01

    We study diffusion of hydrodynamically interacting particles confined by a spherical cavity via dynamic simulation, as a model for intracellular transport. Previous models of 3D confined transport typically assume that hydrodynamic interactions are screened and thus can be neglected, but such assumptions lead to qualitative errors in predictive models. Recent studies show that crowding does not screen hydrodynamic entrainment of freely diffusing particles in unbound suspensions, and that diffusing near a planar wall can weaken (but does not screen) hydrodynamic entrainment. Biophysical and other confined suspensions are crowded, watery compartments, suggesting a role of both crowding and confinement in hydrodynamic entrainment. In the present work, we utilize our new computational framework to study the effect of 3D micro-confinement on particle entrainment, and whether such entrainment is algebraically screened. We measure the hydrodynamic entrainment of one particle in the flow induced by another, in suspensions of arbitrary concentration. We find that the strength of entrainment varies spatially in the cavity, changes qualitatively with the size of the confined particles relative to the enclosure, but varies only quantitatively with the concentration of particles.

  4. 14 CFR 29.787 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.787 Cargo and baggage compartments. (a) Each cargo and baggage compartment must be...

  5. 14 CFR 27.787 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.787 Cargo and baggage compartments. (a) Each cargo and baggage compartment must be...

  6. Dynamic GLUT4 sorting through a syntaxin-6 compartment in muscle cells is derailed by insulin resistance-causing ceramide.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kevin P; Klip, Amira

    2014-04-04

    GLUT4 constitutively recycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular depots. Insulin shifts this dynamic equilibrium towards the plasma membrane by recruiting GLUT4 to the plasma membrane from insulin-responsive vesicles. Muscle is the primary site for dietary glucose deposition; however, how GLUT4 sorts into insulin-responsive vesicles, and if and how insulin resistance affects this process, is unknown. In L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we analyzed the intracellular itinerary of GLUT4 as it internalizes from the cell surface and examined if such sorting is perturbed by C2-ceramide, a lipid metabolite causing insulin resistance. Surface-labeled GLUT4myc that internalized for 30 min accumulated in a Syntaxin-6 (Stx6)- and Stx16-positive perinuclear sub-compartment devoid of furin or internalized transferrin, and displayed insulin-responsive re-exocytosis. C2-ceramide dispersed the Stx6-positive sub-compartment and prevented insulin-responsive re-exocytosis of internalized GLUT4myc, even under conditions not affecting insulin-stimulated signaling towards Akt. Microtubule disruption with nocodazole prevented pre-internalized GLUT4myc from reaching the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment and from undergoing insulin-responsive exocytosis. Removing nocodazole allowed both parameters to recover, suggesting that the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment was required for GLUT4 insulin-responsiveness. Accordingly, Stx6 knockdown inhibited by ∼50% the ability of internalized GLUT4myc to undergo insulin-responsive re-exocytosis without altering its overall perinuclear accumulation. We propose that Stx6 defines the insulin-responsive compartment in muscle cells. Our data are consistent with a model where ceramide could cause insulin resistance by altering intracellular GLUT4 sorting.

  7. Dynamic GLUT4 sorting through a syntaxin-6 compartment in muscle cells is derailed by insulin resistance-causing ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Kevin P.; Klip, Amira

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT GLUT4 constitutively recycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular depots. Insulin shifts this dynamic equilibrium towards the plasma membrane by recruiting GLUT4 to the plasma membrane from insulin-responsive vesicles. Muscle is the primary site for dietary glucose deposition; however, how GLUT4 sorts into insulin-responsive vesicles, and if and how insulin resistance affects this process, is unknown. In L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we analyzed the intracellular itinerary of GLUT4 as it internalizes from the cell surface and examined if such sorting is perturbed by C2-ceramide, a lipid metabolite causing insulin resistance. Surface-labeled GLUT4myc that internalized for 30 min accumulated in a Syntaxin-6 (Stx6)- and Stx16-positive perinuclear sub-compartment devoid of furin or internalized transferrin, and displayed insulin-responsive re-exocytosis. C2-ceramide dispersed the Stx6-positive sub-compartment and prevented insulin-responsive re-exocytosis of internalized GLUT4myc, even under conditions not affecting insulin-stimulated signaling towards Akt. Microtubule disruption with nocodazole prevented pre-internalized GLUT4myc from reaching the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment and from undergoing insulin-responsive exocytosis. Removing nocodazole allowed both parameters to recover, suggesting that the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment was required for GLUT4 insulin-responsiveness. Accordingly, Stx6 knockdown inhibited by ∼50% the ability of internalized GLUT4myc to undergo insulin-responsive re-exocytosis without altering its overall perinuclear accumulation. We propose that Stx6 defines the insulin-responsive compartment in muscle cells. Our data are consistent with a model where ceramide could cause insulin resistance by altering intracellular GLUT4 sorting. PMID:24705014

  8. 14 CFR 25.365 - Pressurized compartment loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressurized compartment loads. 25.365... an engine disintegration; (2) Any opening in any pressurized compartment up to the size Ho in square... small compartment. The size Ho must be computed by the following formula: Ho=PAs where,...

  9. Lower limb compartment syndrome by reperfusion injury after treatment of arterial thrombosis post-laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Jihee; Jung, Ye Won; Yang, Shin Seok; Kang, Byung Hun; Lee, Mina; Ko, Young Bok; Yang, Jung Bo; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a clinical condition associated with decreased blood circulation that can lead to swelling of tissue in limited space. Several factors including lithotomy position, prolonged surgery, intermittent pneumatic compressor, and reperfusion after treatment of arterial thrombosis may contribute to compartment syndrome. However, compartment syndrome rarely occurs after gynecologic surgery. In this case, the patient was diagnosed as compartment syndrome due to reperfusion injury after treatment of arterial thrombosis, which occurred after laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection for cervical cancer. Despite its rarity, prevention and identifying the risk factors of complication should be performed perioperatively; furthermore, gynecologist should be aware of the possibility of complications. PMID:28344966

  10. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  11. Actin: its cumbersome pilgrimage through cellular compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we follow the history of one of the most abundant, most intensely studied proteins of the eukaryotic cells: actin. We report on hallmarks of its discovery, its structural and functional characterization and localization over time, and point to present days’ knowledge on its position as a member of a large family. We focus on the rather puzzling number of diverse functions as proposed for actin as a dual compartment protein. Finally, we venture on some speculations as to its origin. PMID:18438682

  12. [Intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sonne, Morten; Hillingsø, Jens

    2008-02-11

    Intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare conditions with high mortality. IAH is an intraabdominal pressure (IAP) above 12 mmHg and ACS an IAP above 20 mmHg with evidence of organ dysfunction. IAP is measured indirectly via the bladder or stomach. Various medical and surgical conditions increase the intraabdominal volume. When the content exceeds the compliance of the abdominal wall, the IAP rises. Increased IAP affects the functioning of the brain, lungs, circulation, kidneys, and bowel. The treatment of ACS is a reduction of IAP.

  13. Microspectroscopy of the photosynthetic compartment of algae.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Barsanti, Laura; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of algae belonging to different taxonomic divisions and higher plants. The feasibility of microspectroscopy for discriminating among species and/or phylogenetic groups was tested on laboratory cultures. Gaussian bands decompositions and a fitting algorithm, together with fourth-derivative transformation of absorbance spectra, provided a reliable discrimination among chlorophylls a, b and c, phycobiliproteins and carotenoids. Comparative analysis of absorption spectra highlighted the evolutionary grouping of the algae into three main lineages in accordance with the most recent endosymbiotic theories.

  14. Continuous monitoring of plasma, interstitial, and intracellular fluid volumes in dialyzed patients by bioimpedance and hematocrit measurements.

    PubMed

    Jaffrin, Michel Y; Fenech, Marianne; de Fremont, Jean-François; Tolani, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) permits evaluation of extra- and intracellular fluid volumes in patients. We wished to examine whether this technique, used in combination with hematocrit measurement, can reliably monitor fluid transfers during dialysis. Ankle to wrist BIS measurements were collected during 21 dialysis runs while hematocrit was continuously monitored in the blood line by an optical device. Extracellular (ECW) and intracellular (ICW) water volumes were calculated using Hanai's electrical model of suspensions. Plasma volume variations were calculated from hematocrit, and changes in interstitial volume were calculated as the difference between ECW and plasma volume changes. Because accuracy of ICW was too low, changes in ICW were calculated as the difference between ultrafiltered volume and ECW changes. Total body water (TBW) volumes calculated pre- and postdialysis were, respectively, 3.25+/-3.2 and 1.95+/-2.5 liters lower on average than TBW given by Watson et al.'s correlation. Average decreases in fluid compartments expressed as percentage of ultrafiltered volume were as follows: plasma, 18%; interstitial, 28%, and ICW, 54%. When the ultrafiltered volume was increased in a patient in successive runs, the relative contributions of ICW and interstitial fluid were augmented so as to reduce the relative drop in plasma volume.

  15. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Method to Assess Compartment Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Ueno, Toshiaki (Inventor); Hargens, Alan R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A process and apparatus for measuring pressure buildup in a body compartment that encases muscular tissue. The method includes assessing the body compartment configuration and identifying the effect of pulsatible components on compartment dimensions and muscle tissue characteristics. This process is used in preventing tissue necrosis, and in decisions of whether to perform surgery on the body compartment for prevention of Compartment Syndrome. An apparatus is used for measuring pressure build-up in the body compartment having components for imparting ultrasonic waves such as a transducer, placing the transducer to impart the ultrasonic waves, capturing the imparted ultrasonic waves, mathematically manipulating the captured ultrasonic waves and categorizing pressure build-up in the body compartment from the mathematical manipulations.

  16. Nutrient salvaging and metabolism by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Maris V; Swanson, Michele S

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneumophila alternates between at least two distinct forms: a transmissive form equipped to infect host cells and evade lysosomal degradation, and a replicative form that multiplies within a phagosomal compartment that it has retooled to its advantage. The efficient changeover between transmissive and replicative states is fundamental to L. pneumophila's fitness as an intracellular pathogen. The transmission and replication programs of L. pneumophila are governed by a number of metabolic cues that signal whether conditions are favorable for replication or instead trigger escape from a spent host. Several lines of experimental evidence gathered over the past decade establish strong links between metabolism, cellular differentiation, and virulence of L. pneumophila. Herein, we focus on current knowledge of the metabolic components employed by intracellular L. pneumophila for cell differentiation, nutrient salvaging and utilization of host factors. Specifically, we highlight the metabolic cues that are coupled to bacterial differentiation, nutrient acquisition systems, and the strategies utilized by L. pneumophila to exploit host metabolites for intracellular replication.

  17. Intracellular acidosis enhances the excitability of working muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas H; Nielsen, Ole B; Lamb, Graham D; Stephenson, D George

    2004-08-20

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  18. Biodistribution of titanium dioxide from biologic compartments.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R; Guglielmotti, María Beatriz; Cabrini, Rómulo Luis

    2008-09-01

    The layer of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) of the implant is chronically exposed to the internal electrolyte milieu in the peri-implant biological compartment. Corrosion results from electrochemical attack and ensuing gradual degradation of the metallic materials and is thus of biological interest when these biomaterials are employed in clinical implantology. Herein we evaluated and compared the chronic effect and the biodistribution of TiO(2) administered subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. We propose that the compartmentalization of titanium in the area of subcutaneous injection would reproduce the biological compartment of the implant and its microenvironment from which metal ions could be released and migrate systemically. Potential TiO(2) deposits were identified and characterized in skin, liver and lung by histological and EDX analyses. After both treatments, the skin, liver, and lungs exhibited histological evidence of TiO(2) deposits. In order to characterize in situ macrophage-like cells, tissue sections were immunohistochemically stained for CD68. Tissue specimens from all organs assayed showed positive staining for anti-macrophage monoclonal antibody CD68 (PGM1). Despite the compartmentalization of titanium within nodular areas in rats treated subcutaneously, systemic migration occurred. We concluded that systemic migration of TiO(2) occurred regardless of the administration route.

  19. Remote detection of pressure compartments. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Surdam, R.C.; Boyd, N.; Jiao, Z.; Maucione, D.; Kubicheck, S.

    1996-02-01

    A significant portion of the Cretaceous shale section in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) is anomalously pressured and gas saturated. The top of the anomalously pressured zone is identified by marked increases in sonic transit time, hydrocarbon production index (P.I.), clay diagenesis (smectite to illite), and vitrinite reflectance gradients. The driving mechanism of anomalous pressure development and compartmentalization is the generation and storage of liquid hydrocarbons that subsequently partially react to gas, converting the fluid-flow system to a multiphase regime in which capillarity controls permeability; the result is elevated displacement pressure within the shales. Sandstone reservoirs within this anomalously pressured shale section are subdivided stratigraphically and diagenetically into relatively small, isolated pressure or fluid-flow compartments. The saturation of these compartments with hydrocarbons and the subsequent oil-to-gas reaction causes explusion of a significant portion of the free water, resulting in anomalously pressured gas accumulations characterized by depletion drive. The determination of the position and configuration of the pressure boundary between normal and anomalously pressured regimes and the detection and delineation of porosity/permeability `sweet spots` below this boundary are the two most important elements in exploring for basin center gas in the RMLB.

  20. Dynamics of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Compartments during B Cell Receptor–mediated Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lankar, Danielle; Vincent-Schneider, Hélène; Briken, Volker; Yokozeki, Takeaki; Raposo, Graça; Bonnerot, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Antigen recognition by clonotypic B cell receptor (BcR) is the first step of B lymphocytes differentiation into plasmocytes. This B cell function is dependent on efficient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–restricted presentation of BcR-bound antigens. In this work, we analyzed the subcellular mechanisms underlying antigen presentation after BcR engagement on B cells. In quiescent B cells, we found that MHC class II molecules mostly accumulated at the cell surface and in an intracellular pool of tubulovesicular structures, whereas H2-M molecules were mostly detected in distinct lysosomal compartments devoid of MHC class II. BcR stimulation induced the transient intracellular accumulation of MHC class II molecules in newly formed multivesicular bodies (MVBs), to which H2-M was recruited. The reversible downregulation of cathepsin S activity led to the transient accumulation of invariant chain–MHC class II complexes in MVBs. A few hours after BcR engagement, cathepsin S activity increased, the p10 invariant chain disappeared, and MHC class II–peptide complexes arrived at the plasma membrane. Thus, BcR engagement induced the transient formation of antigen-processing compartments, enabling antigen-specific B cells to become effective antigen-presenting cells. PMID:11854359

  1. Emerging intracellular receptors for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Jae, Lucas T; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus and Lassa virus belong to different virus families that can cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening disease in humans with limited treatment options. To infect a target cell, Ebola and Lassa viruses engage receptors at the cell surface and are subsequently shuttled into the endosomal compartment. Upon arrival in late endosomes/lysosomes, the viruses trigger membrane fusion to release their genome into the cytoplasm. Although contact sites at the cell surface were recognized for Ebola virus and Lassa virus, it was postulated that Ebola virus requires a critical receptor inside the cell. Recent screens for host factors identified such internal receptors for both viruses: Niemann-Pick disease type C1 protein (NPC1) for Ebola virus and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) for Lassa virus. A cellular trigger is needed to permit binding of the viral envelope protein to these intracellular receptors. This 'receptor switch' represents a previously unnoticed step in virus entry with implications for host-pathogen interactions and viral tropism.

  2. A novel choline cotransporter sequestration compartment in cholinergic neurons revealed by selective endosomal ablation.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Michael T; Newkirk, Robert F; Wang, Yilun; Townsel, James G

    2010-03-01

    The sodium-dependent, high affinity choline transporter - choline cotransporter - (ChCoT, aka: cho-1, CHT1, CHT) undergoes constitutive and regulated trafficking between the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic compartments. The pathways and regulatory mechanisms of this trafficking are not well understood. We report herein studies involving selective endosomal ablation to further our understanding of the trafficking of the ChCoT. Selective ablation of early sorting and recycling endosomes resulted in a decrease of approximately 75% of [3H]choline uptake and approximately 70% of [3H]hemicholinium-3 binding. Western blot analysis showed that ablation produced a similar decrease in ChCoTs in the plasma membrane subcellular fraction. The time frame for this loss was approximately 2 h which has been shown to be the constitutive cycling time for ChCoTs in this tissue. Ablation appears to be dependent on the intracellular cycling of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase and the selective deposition of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase in early endosomes, both sorting and recycling. Ablated brain slices retained their capacity to recruit via regulated trafficking ChCoTs to the plasma membrane. This recruitment of ChCoTs suggests that the recruitable compartment is distinct from the early endosomes. It will be necessary to do further studies to identify the novel sequestration compartment supportive of the ChCoT regulated trafficking.

  3. Depollution potential of three macrophytes: exudated, wall-bound and intracellular peroxidase activities plus intracellular phenol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Larue, Camille; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Wang, Runying; Mévy, Jean-Philippe

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of three macrophyte species (Iris pseudacorus, Typha latifolia and Phragmites australis) for detoxication of xenobiotics, and to study their variations with seasons or concentrations of sewage sludge from the food industry. For this purpose, some aspects of the green liver concept were explored through peroxidase measurements in three compartments in roots: intracellular, cell wall and extracellular. In addition, phenol concentrations were also measured in order to assess heavy metal detoxication potential. Enzyme activities and phenol concentrations were overall lower in winter according to the phenological stages and some sludge effects occurred. Results show that P. australis roots exuded and contained more peroxidase in all seasons: 17 U/g (1373 U/g protein), 0.8 U/g (613 U/g protein) and 4.8 U/g (1329 U/g protein) in intracellular compartments, cell wall and exudates, respectively. In contrast, the highest phenol concentration was found in I. pseudacorus roots: 3.58 mg eq. [corrected] gallic acid/g. Hence, in constructed wetlands, P. australis is suitable for organic waste water treatment, while I. pseudacorus should be used in the case of waters highly charged with heavy metals.

  4. Determination of Intracellular Vitrification Temperatures for Unicellular Micro Organisms under Conditions Relevant for Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Meneghel, Julie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie; Morris, G. John

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation ice nucleation and crystal growth may occur within cells or the intracellular compartment may vitrify. Whilst previous literature describes intracellular vitrification in a qualitative manner, here we measure the intracellular vitrification temperature of bacteria and yeasts under conditions relevant to cryopreservation, including the addition of high levels of permeating and nonpermeating additives and the application of rapid rates of cooling. The effects of growth conditions that are known to modify cellular freezing resistance on the intracellular vitrification temperature are also examined. For bacteria a plot of the activity on thawing against intracellular glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix (Tg’) shows that cells with the lowest value of intracellular Tg’ survive the freezing process better than cells with a higher intracellular Tg’. This paper demonstrates the role of the physical state of the intracellular environment in determining the response of microbial cells to preservation and could be a powerful tool to be manipulated to allow the optimization of methods for the preservation of microorganisms. PMID:27055246

  5. Insider trading: Extracellular matrix proteins and their non-canonical intracellular roles.

    PubMed

    Hellewell, Andrew L; Adams, Josephine C

    2016-01-01

    In metazoans, the extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a dynamic, heterogeneous microenvironment that has important supportive and instructive roles. Although the primary site of action of ECM proteins is extracellular, evidence is emerging for non-canonical intracellular roles. Examples include osteopontin, thrombospondins, IGF-binding protein 3 and biglycan, and relate to roles in transcription, cell-stress responses, autophagy and cancer. These findings pose conceptual problems on how proteins signalled for secretion can be routed to the cytosol or nucleus, or can function in environments with diverse redox, pH and ionic conditions. We review evidence for intracellular locations and functions of ECM proteins, and current knowledge of the mechanisms by which they may enter intracellular compartments. We evaluate the experimental methods that are appropriate to obtain rigorous evidence for intracellular localisation and function. Better insight into this under-researched topic is needed to decipher the complete spectrum of physiological and pathological roles of ECM proteins.

  6. The Orbital Workshop Waste Management Compartment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This image is a wide-angle view of the Orbital Workshop waste management compartment. The waste management facilities presented a unique challenge to spacecraft designers. In addition to collection of liquid and solid human wastes, there was a medical requirement to dry all solid human waste products and to return the residue to Earth for examination. Liquid human waste (urine) was frozen for return to Earth. Total quantities of each astronaut's liquid and solid wastes were precisely measured. Cabin air was drawn into the toilet, shown on the wall at right in this photograph, and over the waste products to generate a flow of the waste in the desired direction. The air was then filtered for odor control and antiseptic purposes prior to being discharged back into the cabin.

  7. Examination of Listeria monocytogenes intracellular gene expression by using the green fluorescent protein of Aequorea victoria.

    PubMed

    Freitag, N E; Jacobs, K E

    1999-04-01

    The ActA protein of Listeria monocytogenes is an essential virulence factor and is required for intracellular bacterial motility and cell-to-cell spread. plcB, cotranscribed with actA, encodes a broad-specificity phospholipase C that contributes to lysis of host cell vacuoles and cell-to-cell spread. Construction of a transcriptional fusion between actA-plcB and the green fluorescent protein gene of Aequorea victoria has facilitated the detailed examination of patterns of actA/plcB expression within infected tissue culture cells. actA/plcB expression began approximately 30 min postinfection and was dependent upon entry of L. monocytogenes into the host cytosol. L. monocytogenes Deltahly mutants, which are unable to escape from host cell vacuoles, did not express actA/plcB at detectable levels within infected tissue culture cells; however, complementation of the hly defect allowed entry of the bacteria into the host cytoplasm and subsequent actA/plcB expression. These results emphasize the ability of L. monocytogenes to sense the different host cell compartment environments encountered during the course of infection and to regulate virulence gene expression in response.

  8. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  9. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  10. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Peremyslov, Valera V.; Cole, Rex A.; Fowler, John E.; Dolja, Valerian V.

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6–1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development. PMID:26426395

  11. Metallothionein is crucial for safe intracellular copper storage and cell survival at normal and supra-physiological exposure levels.

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Lucía; González-Agüero, Mauricio; Cisternas, Mónica F; Suazo, Miriam; Cambiazo, Verónica; Uauy, Ricardo; González, Mauricio

    2004-01-01

    MTs (metallothioneins) increase the resistance of cells to exposure to high Cu (copper) levels. Characterization of the MT-Cu complex suggests that MT has an important role in the cellular storage and/or delivery of Cu ions to cuproenzymes. In this work we investigate how these properties contribute to Cu homoeostasis by evaluating the uptake, accumulation and efflux of Cu in wild-type and MT I/II null rat fibroblast cell lines. We also assessed changes in the expression of Cu metabolism-related genes in response to Cu exposure. At sub-physiological Cu levels (0.4 microM), the metal content was not dependent on MT; however, when extracellular Cu was increased to physiological levels (10 microM), MTs were required for the cell's ability to accumulate the metal. The subcellular localization of the accumulated metal in the cytoplasm was MT-dependent. Following supra-physiological Cu exposure (>50 microM), MT null cells had a decreased capacity for Cu storage and an elevated sensitivity to a minor increment in intracellular metal levels, suggesting that intracellular Cu toxicity is due not to the metal content but to the interactions of the metal with cellular components. Moreover, MT null cells failed to show increased levels of mRNAs encoding MT I, SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1) and Ccs1 (Cu chaperone for SOD) in response to Cu exposure. These results support a role for MT in the storage of Cu in a safe compartment and in sequestering an intracellular excess of Cu in response to supra-physiological Cu exposure. Gene expression analysis suggests the necessity of having MT as part of the signalling pathway that induces gene expression in response to Cu. PMID:14627437

  12. Vehicle hydraulic system that provides heat for passenger compartment

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-01-01

    A vehicle includes a vehicle housing which defines a passenger compartment. Attached to the vehicle housing is a hydraulic system, that includes a hydraulic fluid which flows through at least one passageway within the hydraulic system. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a passenger compartment heating system. The passenger compartment heating system includes a heat exchanger, wherein a portion of the heat exchanger is a segment of the at least one passageway of the hydraulic system.

  13. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  14. Cancer-Selective Apoptotic Effects of Extracellular and Intracellular Par-4

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Tripti Shrestha; Rangnekar, Vivek M.

    2010-01-01

    Selectivity toward cancer cells is the most desirable element in cancer therapeutics. Par-4 is a cancer cell-selective pro-apoptotic protein that functions intracellularly in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, recent findings indicate that the Par-4 protein is secreted by cells, and extracellular Par-4 induces cancer cell-specific apoptosis by interaction with the cell-surface receptor GRP78. This review describes the mechanisms underlying the apoptotic effects of both extracellular and intracellular Par-4 acting via its effector domain SAC. PMID:20440265

  15. Using targeted variants of aequorin to measure Ca2+ levels in intracellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Granatiero, Veronica; Patron, Maria; Tosatto, Anna; Merli, Giulia; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Aequorin is a Ca(2+)-sensitive photoprotein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. It is an ideal probe for measuring Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) in intracellular organelles because it can be modified to include specific targeting sequences. On the binding of Ca(2+) to three high-affinity sites in aequorin, an irreversible reaction occurs in which the prosthetic group coelenterazine is released and a photon is emitted. This protocol presents procedures for expressing, targeting, and reconstituting aequorin in intact and permeabilized mammalian cells and describes how to use this photoprotein to measure intracellular [Ca(2+)] in various subcellular compartments.

  16. Siglec-1 initiates formation of the virus-containing compartment and enhances macrophage-to-T cell transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Beeman, Neal; Ding, Lingmei; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 particles assemble and bud from the plasma membrane of infected T lymphocytes. Infected macrophages, in contrast, accumulate particles within an apparent intracellular compartment known as the virus-containing compartment or VCC. Many aspects of the formation and function of the VCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that VCC formation does not actually require infection of the macrophage, but can be reproduced through the exogenous addition of non-infectious virus-like particles or infectious virions to macrophage cultures. Particles were captured by Siglec-1, a prominent cell surface lectin that attaches to gangliosides on the lipid envelope of the virus. VCCs formed within infected macrophages were readily targeted by the addition of ganglioside-containing virus-like particles to the extracellular media. Depletion of Siglec-1 from the macrophage or depletion of gangliosides from viral particles prevented particle uptake into the VCC and resulted in substantial reductions of VCC volume. Furthermore, Siglec-1-mediated virion capture and subsequent VCC formation was required for efficient trans-infection of autologous T cells. Our results help to define the nature of this intracellular compartment, arguing that it is a compartment formed by particle uptake from the periphery, and that this compartment can readily transmit virus to target T lymphocytes. Inhibiting or eliminating the VCC may be an important component of strategies to reduce HIV transmission and to eradicate HIV reservoirs. PMID:28129379

  17. Getting across the plasma membrane and beyond: intracellular uses of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Luccardini, Camilla; Yakovlev, Aleksey; Gaillard, Stéphane; van 't Hoff, Marcel; Alberola, Alicia Piera; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Parak, Wolfgang J; Feltz, Anne; Oheim, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are increasingly being used as photoluminescen markers in biological imaging. Their brightness, large Stokes shift, and high photostability compared to organic fluorophores permit the exploration of biological phenomena at the single-molecule scale with superior temporal resolution and spatial precision. NCs have predominantly been used as extracellular markers for tagging and tracking membrane proteins. Successful internalization and intracellular labelling with NCs have been demonstrated for both fixed immunolabelled and live cells. However, the precise localization and subcellular compartment labelled are less clear. Generally, live cell studies are limited by the requirement of fairly invasive protocols for loading NCs and the relatively large size of NCs compared to the cellular machinery, along with the subsequent sequestration of NCs in endosomal/lysosomal compartments. For long-period observation the potential cytotoxicity of cytoplasmically loaded NCs must be evaluated. This review focuses on the challenges of intracellular uses of NCs.

  18. 14 CFR 25.857 - Cargo compartment classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... means to control ventilation and drafts within the compartment so that the extinguishing agent used...

  19. The myofascial compartments of the foot: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Ling, Z X; Kumar, V P

    2008-08-01

    Compartment syndrome of the foot requires urgent surgical treatment. Currently, there is still no agreement on the number and location of the myofascial compartments of the foot. The aim of this cadaver study was to provide an anatomical basis for surgical decompression in the event of compartment syndrome. We found that there were three tough vertical fascial septae that extended from the hindfoot to the midfoot on the plantar aspect of the foot. These septae separated the posterior half of the foot into three compartments. The medial compartment containing the abductor hallucis was surrounded medially by skin and subcutaneous fat and laterally by the medial septum. The intermediate compartment, containing the flexor digitorum brevis and the quadratus plantae more deeply, was surrounded by the medial septum medially, the intermediate septum laterally and the main plantar aponeurosis on its plantar aspect. The lateral compartment containing the abductor digiti minimi was surrounded medially by the intermediate septum, laterally by the lateral septum and on its plantar aspect by the lateral band of the main plantar aponeurosis. No distinct myofascial compartments exist in the forefoot. Based on our findings, in theory, fasciotomy of the hindfoot compartments through a modified medial incision would be sufficient to decompress the foot.

  20. Coping with the diagnostic complexities of the compartment syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Karkal, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This review recognizes that, given the various complexities associated with the condition, no pat answers can be given to fit every patient with the compartment syndrome. The authors first give a definition of the syndrome, together with a brief account of how this self-perpetuating pathologic cycle is triggered. Next, they delineate specific anatomical features of compartments that are likely to be involved, and follow this with an inventory of symptoms and signs to look for in suspected cases. After sorting out the entities that can mimic the compartment syndrome, the authors describe three essential techniques of measuring tissue pressure, which can prove invaluable in diagnosing the compartment syndrome.

  1. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  2. ClC-3 expression enhances etoposide resistance by increasing acidification of the late endocytic compartment.

    PubMed

    Weylandt, Karsten H; Nebrig, Maxim; Jansen-Rosseck, Nils; Amey, Joanna S; Carmena, David; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Higgins, Christopher F; Sardini, Alessandro

    2007-03-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs and consequent failure of chemotherapy is a complex problem severely limiting therapeutic options in metastatic cancer. Many studies have shown a role for drug efflux pumps of the ATP-binding cassette transporters family in the development of drug resistance. ClC-3, a member of the CLC family of chloride channels and transporters, is expressed in intracellular compartments of neuronal cells and involved in vesicular acidification. It has previously been suggested that acidification of intracellular organelles can promote drug resistance by increasing drug sequestration. Therefore, we hypothesized a role for ClC-3 in drug resistance. Here, we show that ClC-3 is expressed in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines, such as BON, LCC-18, and QGP-1, and localized in intracellular vesicles co-labeled with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1. ClC-3 overexpression increased the acidity of intracellular vesicles, as assessed by acridine orange staining, and enhanced resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug etoposide by almost doubling the IC(50) in either BON or HEK293 cell lines. Prevention of organellar acidification, by inhibition of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, reduced etoposide resistance. No expression of common multidrug resistance transporters, such as P-glycoprotein or multidrug-related protein-1, was detected in either the BON parental cell line or the derivative clone overexpressing ClC-3. The probable mechanism of enhanced etoposide resistance can be attributed to the increase of vesicular acidification as consequence of ClC-3 overexpression. This study therefore provides first evidence for a role of intracellular CLC proteins in the modulation of cancer drug resistance.

  3. Intracellular Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Mechanism for Inducing Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Viral nanoparticles as tools for intravital vascular imaging . Nature Medicine, 2006. 12(3): p. 354-360. 16. Speelmans, G., et al., Transport Studies of...hydrodynamic diameter of 25.4 ± 0.4 nm and TEM images showing distinct nanoparticles. Task 2: Coupling of chemotherapeutic molecules to protein...examined. The images indicate cellular uptake and an accumulation of D381C-AF532M within intracellular compartments, but minimal uptake of free AF532M

  4. Simultaneous intracellular chloride and pH measurements using a GFP-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Daniele; Ricci, Fernanda; Marchetti, Laura; Gualdani, Roberta; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Beltram, Fabio

    2010-07-01

    Chloride and protons perform important closely related roles in many cellular responses. Here we developed a ratiometric biosensor, ClopHensor, based on a highly chloride-sensitive Aequorea victoria GFP variant that is suited for the combined real-time optical detection of pH changes and chloride fluxes in live cells. We detected high chloride concentration in large dense-core exocytosis granules by targeting ClopHensor to these intracellular compartments.

  5. Dopamine modulated ionic permeability in mesoporous silica sphere based biomimetic compartment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Xiaohai; He, Dinggeng; He, Leiliang; Li, Li; Liu, Yu; Liu, Jianbo; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-01

    The building of artificial systems with similar structure and function as cellular compartments will expand our understanding of compartmentalization related biological process and facilitate the construction of biomimetic highly functional structures. Herein, surface phenylboronic acid functionalized mesoporous silica sphere was developed as a biomimetic dopamine gated compartment, in which the ionic permeability can be well modulated through the dopamine-binding induced charge reversal. As the phenylboronic acid is negatively charged, the negatively charged 1, 3, 6, 8-pyrenetetrasulfonic acid (TPSA) was hindered from permeation into the biomimetic compartment. However, the presence of dopamine and its binding with phenylboronic acid reversed the gatekeeper shell from negative to positive charged and gated the permeation of TPSA into the interior. The dopamine gated permeation phenomenon resembles that in biological system, and thus the phenylboronic acid functionalized mesoporous silica sphere was taken as a simple model for dopamine gated ion channel decorated biological compartment. It will also contribute to the development of artificial cell and responsive nanoreactor.

  6. A two-compartment population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of digoxin in adults, with implications for dosage.

    PubMed

    Jelliffe, Roger W; Milman, Mark; Schumitzky, Alan; Bayard, David; Van Guilder, Michael

    2014-06-01

    A population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of digoxin in adult subjects was originally developed by Reuning et al in 1973. They clearly described the 2-compartment behavior of digoxin, the lack of correlation of effect with serum concentrations, and the close correlation of the observed inotropic effect of digoxin with the calculated amount of drug present in the peripheral nonserum compartment. Their model seemed most attractive for clinical use. However, to make it more applicable for maximally precise dosage, its model parameter values (means and SD's) were converted into discrete model parameter distributions using a computer program developed especially for this purpose using the method of maximum entropy. In this way, the parameter distributions became discrete rather than continuous, suitable for use in developing maximally precise digoxin dosage regimens, individualized to an adult patient's age, gender, body weight, and renal function, to achieve desired specific target goals either in the central (serum) compartment or in the peripheral (effect) compartment using the method of multiple model dosage design. Some illustrative clinical applications of this model are presented and discussed. This model with a peripheral compartment reflecting clinical effect has contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the clinical behavior of digoxin in patients than is possible with models having only a single compartment, and to the improved management of digoxin therapy for more than 20 years.

  7. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  9. 14 CFR 25.855 - Cargo or baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... attached to) the airplane structure. (c) Ceiling and sidewall liner panels of Class C compartments must.... (d) All other materials used in the construction of the cargo or baggage compartment must meet...

  10. 14 CFR 135.170 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.170 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) No person may operate an airplane... 26, 1984. (c) Thermal/acoustic insulation materials. For transport category airplanes type... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors....

  11. 14 CFR 135.170 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.170 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) No person may operate an airplane... 26, 1984. (c) Thermal/acoustic insulation materials. For transport category airplanes type... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors....

  12. 14 CFR 25.855 - Cargo or baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... attached to) the airplane structure. (c) Ceiling and sidewall liner panels of Class C compartments must.... (d) All other materials used in the construction of the cargo or baggage compartment must meet...

  13. 14 CFR 135.170 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.170 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) No person may operate an airplane... 26, 1984. (c) Thermal/acoustic insulation materials. For transport category airplanes type... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors....

  14. 14 CFR 25.855 - Cargo or baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Fire Protection § 25... attached to) the airplane structure. (c) Ceiling and sidewall liner panels of Class C compartments must.... (d) All other materials used in the construction of the cargo or baggage compartment must meet...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust sytem must be isolated from the...

  17. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh after weight training.

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, J P; Gibbons, C E; Godsiff, S

    1996-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare but serious condition that is normally associated with closed trauma or compressive injury. A case of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh occurred in a 16 year old boy after intensive weight training. There was no evidence of muscle tear or focal haemorrhage during subsequent fasciotomy. PMID:8889126

  18. Spontaneous Compartment Syndrome of the Hand in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tanagho, Andy; Hatab, Sameh; Youssef, Sally; Ansara, Sameh

    2015-09-01

    Compartment syndrome refers to a condition of compromised circulation within a limited space due to increased pressure within that space. The reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced venous drainage, leading to increased interstitial tissue pressure and subsequent compromised arterial flow. Although not as common as compartment syndrome of the leg and forearm, compartment syndrome of the hand is not rare and can lead to devastating sequelae as a result of tissue necrosis. Compartment syndrome of the hand has several etiologies, including trauma, arterial injury, thermal injury, and constrictive bandaging. The cardinal clinical sign is pain that is aggravated by passive stretching of the muscles within the involved compartments. Extremity function is usually restored with expeditious fasciotomy of the involved myofascial compartments, and complications, such as intrinsic muscular dysfunction and Volkmann's ischemic contracture, can usually be prevented. There are no reported cases of compartment syndrome of the hand in patients with systemic sclerosis or Raynaud's phenomenon. Systemic sclerosis is a form of scleroderma that affects the skin and internal organs. The limited cutaneous subset affects the skin of the extremities but is associated with a set of characteristic features that includes calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia. This report describes an unusual case of a patient who had spontaneous compartment syndrome of the hand. The patient's concomitant limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis may have played a role in this unusual occurrence. The diagnosis was based on the clinical picture, and the symptoms resolved after surgical decompression.

  19. 14 CFR 25.772 - Pilot compartment doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot compartment doors. 25.772 Section 25... § 25.772 Pilot compartment doors. For an airplane that has a lockable door installed between the pilot... passengers require use of the flightdeck door in order to reach the emergency exits provided for them; and...

  20. 14 CFR 25.772 - Pilot compartment doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot compartment doors. 25.772 Section 25... § 25.772 Pilot compartment doors. For an airplane that has a lockable door installed between the pilot... passengers require use of the flightdeck door in order to reach the emergency exits provided for them; and...

  1. 49 CFR 179.220-9 - Compartment tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compartment tanks. 179.220-9 Section 179.220-9... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-9 Compartment tanks....

  2. 14 CFR 121.314 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the certificate holder for operation under this part that has at least one Class D compartment that...: (a) Each Class C or Class D compartment, as defined in § 25.857 of this Chapter in effect on June 16... capability of the liner to safely contain a fire. (c) After March 19, 2001, each Class D...

  3. Compartment in vertical flow reactor for ferruginous mine water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Won; Cheong, Young-Wook; Yim, Gil-Jae; Ji, Sang-Woo; Hong, Ji-Hye

    2014-05-01

    Mine effluents contain varying concentrations of ferrous ion along with other metal ions. Fe(II) that quickly oxidizes to form precipitates in the presence of oxygen under net alkaline or neutral conditions. Thus, passive treatment methods are designed for the mine water to reside in an open containment area so as to allow simultaneous oxidation and precipitation of Fe(II), such as in a lagoon or an oxidation pond. A vertical flow reactor (VFR) was also suggested to remediate ferruginous mine drainage passing down through an accreting bed of ochre. However, VFR has a limited operation time until the system begins to overflow. It was also demonstrated that two-compartment VFR has a longer operation time than single compartment VFR of same size. In this study, a mathematical model was developed as a part of efforts to explore the operation of VFR, showing dynamic changes in head differences, ochre depth and Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration in the effluent flow. The analysis shows that Fe(II) oxidation and ochre formation should be balanced with permeability of ochre bed to maximize VFR operation time and minimize residual Fe(II) in the effluent. The model demonstrates that two compartment VFR can have a longer operation time than a single-compartment VFR and that an optimum compartment ratio exists that maximize VFR operation time. Accelerated Fe(II) oxidation significantly affects the optimum ratio of compartment area and reduced residual Fe(II) in the effluent. VFR operation time can be significantly prolonged by increasing the rate of ochre formation not by accelerated Fe(II) oxidation. Taken together, ochre forms largely in the first compartment while overflowed mine water with reduced iron contents is efficiently filtered in the second compartment. These results provide us a better understanding of VFR operation and optimum design criteria for maximum operation time in a two-compartment VFR. Rapid ochre accretion in the first compartment maintains constant hydraulic

  4. Contamination control of the space shuttle Orbiter crew compartment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartelson, Donald W.

    1986-01-01

    Effective contamination control as applied to manned space flight environments is a discipline characterized and controlled by many parameters. An introduction is given to issues involving Orbiter crew compartment contamination control. An effective ground processing contamination control program is an essential building block to a successful shuttle mission. Personnel are required to don cleanroom-grade clothing ensembles before entering the crew compartment and follow cleanroom rules and regulations. Prior to crew compartment entry, materials and equipment must be checked by an orbiter integrity clerk stationed outside the white-room entrance for compliance to program requirements. Analysis and source identification of crew compartment debris studies have been going on for two years. The objective of these studies is to determine and identify particulate generating materials and activities in the crew compartment. Results show a wide spectrum of many different types of materials. When source identification is made, corrective action is implemented to minimize or curtail further contaminate generation.

  5. Superdiffusion dominates intracellular particle motion in the supercrowded cytoplasm of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverey, Julia F.; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Bao, Han; Leippe, Matthias; Metzler, Ralf; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living protists and human pathogens, whose cellular functions and pathogenicity strongly depend on the transport of intracellular vesicles and granules through the cytosol. Using high-speed live cell imaging in combination with single-particle tracking analysis, we show here that the motion of endogenous intracellular particles in the size range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers in Acanthamoeba castellanii is strongly superdiffusive and influenced by cell locomotion, cytoskeletal elements, and myosin II. We demonstrate that cell locomotion significantly contributes to intracellular particle motion, but is clearly not the only origin of superdiffusivity. By analyzing the contribution of microtubules, actin, and myosin II motors we show that myosin II is a major driving force of intracellular motion in A. castellanii. The cytoplasm of A. castellanii is supercrowded with intracellular vesicles and granules, such that significant intracellular motion can only be achieved by actively driven motion, while purely thermally driven diffusion is negligible.

  6. Senescence-inducible cell wall and intracellular purple acid phosphatases: implications for phosphorus remobilization in Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) and Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Shane, Michael W; Stigter, Kyla; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Plaxton, William C

    2014-11-01

    Despite its agronomic importance, the metabolic networks mediating phosphorus (P) remobilization during plant senescence are poorly understood. Highly efficient P remobilization (~85%) from senescing leaves and proteoid roots of harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata), a native 'extremophile' plant of south-western Australia, was linked with striking up-regulation of cell wall-localized and intracellular acid phosphatase (APase) and RNase activities. Non-denaturing PAGE followed by in-gel APase activity staining revealed senescence-inducible 120kDa and 60kDa intracellular APase isoforms, whereas only the 120kDa isoform was detected in corresponding cell wall fractions. Kinetic and immunological properties of the 120kDa and 60kDa APases partially purified from senescing leaves indicated that they are purple acid phosphatases (PAPs). Results obtained with cell wall-targeted hydrolases of harsh hakea were corroborated using Arabidopsis thaliana in which an ~200% increase in cell wall APase activity during leaf senescence was paralleled by accumulation of immunoreactive 55kDa AtPAP26 polypeptides. Senescing leaves of an atpap26 T-DNA insertion mutant displayed a >90% decrease in cell wall APase activity. Previous research established that senescing leaves of atpap26 plants exhibited a similar reduction in intracellular (vacuolar) APase activity, while displaying markedly impaired P remobilization efficiency and delayed senescence. It is hypothesized that up-regulation and dual targeting of PAPs and RNases to the cell wall and vacuolar compartments make a crucial contribution to highly efficient P remobilization that dominates the P metabolism of senescing tissues of harsh hakea and Arabidopsis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the apparent contribution of cell wall-targeted hydrolases to remobilizing key macronutrients such as P during senescence has not been previously suggested.

  7. Senescence-inducible cell wall and intracellular purple acid phosphatases: implications for phosphorus remobilization in Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) and Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Stigter, Kyla; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its agronomic importance, the metabolic networks mediating phosphorus (P) remobilization during plant senescence are poorly understood. Highly efficient P remobilization (~85%) from senescing leaves and proteoid roots of harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata), a native ‘extremophile’ plant of south-western Australia, was linked with striking up-regulation of cell wall-localized and intracellular acid phosphatase (APase) and RNase activities. Non-denaturing PAGE followed by in-gel APase activity staining revealed senescence-inducible 120kDa and 60kDa intracellular APase isoforms, whereas only the 120kDa isoform was detected in corresponding cell wall fractions. Kinetic and immunological properties of the 120kDa and 60kDa APases partially purified from senescing leaves indicated that they are purple acid phosphatases (PAPs). Results obtained with cell wall-targeted hydrolases of harsh hakea were corroborated using Arabidopsis thaliana in which an ~200% increase in cell wall APase activity during leaf senescence was paralleled by accumulation of immunoreactive 55kDa AtPAP26 polypeptides. Senescing leaves of an atpap26 T-DNA insertion mutant displayed a >90% decrease in cell wall APase activity. Previous research established that senescing leaves of atpap26 plants exhibited a similar reduction in intracellular (vacuolar) APase activity, while displaying markedly impaired P remobilization efficiency and delayed senescence. It is hypothesized that up-regulation and dual targeting of PAPs and RNases to the cell wall and vacuolar compartments make a crucial contribution to highly efficient P remobilization that dominates the P metabolism of senescing tissues of harsh hakea and Arabidopsis. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the apparent contribution of cell wall-targeted hydrolases to remobilizing key macronutrients such as P during senescence has not been previously suggested. PMID:25170100

  8. Shigella subverts the host recycling compartment to rupture its vacuole.

    PubMed

    Mellouk, Nora; Weiner, Allon; Aulner, Nathalie; Schmitt, Christine; Elbaum, Michael; Shorte, Spencer L; Danckaert, Anne; Enninga, Jost

    2014-10-08

    Shigella enters epithlial cells via internalization into a vacuole. Subsequent vacuolar membrane rupture allows bacterial escape into the cytosol for replication and cell-to-cell spread. Bacterial effectors such as IpgD, a PI(4,5)P2 phosphatase that generates PI(5)P and alters host actin, facilitate this internalization. Here, we identify host proteins involved in Shigella uptake and vacuolar membrane rupture by high-content siRNA screening and subsequently focus on Rab11, a constituent of the recycling compartment. Rab11-positive vesicles are recruited to the invasion site before vacuolar rupture, and Rab11 knockdown dramatically decreases vacuolar membrane rupture. Additionally, Rab11 recruitment is absent and vacuolar rupture is delayed in the ipgD mutant that does not dephosphorylate PI(4,5)P₂ into PI(5)P. Ultrastructural analyses of Rab11-positive vesicles further reveal that ipgD mutant-containing vacuoles become confined in actin structures that likely contribute to delayed vacular rupture. These findings provide insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of vacuole progression and rupture during Shigella invasion.

  9. Stochastic Turing patterns: analysis of compartment-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Erban, Radek

    2014-12-01

    Turing patterns can be observed in reaction-diffusion systems where chemical species have different diffusion constants. In recent years, several studies investigated the effects of noise on Turing patterns and showed that the parameter regimes, for which stochastic Turing patterns are observed, can be larger than the parameter regimes predicted by deterministic models, which are written in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) for species concentrations. A common stochastic reaction-diffusion approach is written in terms of compartment-based (lattice-based) models, where the domain of interest is divided into artificial compartments and the number of molecules in each compartment is simulated. In this paper, the dependence of stochastic Turing patterns on the compartment size is investigated. It has previously been shown (for relatively simpler systems) that a modeler should not choose compartment sizes which are too small or too large, and that the optimal compartment size depends on the diffusion constant. Taking these results into account, we propose and study a compartment-based model of Turing patterns where each chemical species is described using a different set of compartments. It is shown that the parameter regions where spatial patterns form are different from the regions obtained by classical deterministic PDE-based models, but they are also different from the results obtained for the stochastic reaction-diffusion models which use a single set of compartments for all chemical species. In particular, it is argued that some previously reported results on the effect of noise on Turing patterns in biological systems need to be reinterpreted.

  10. Menin localization in cell membrane compartment

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Yan, Jizhou; Yuan, Chaoxing; Witze, Eric S.; Hua, Xianxin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Menin is encoded by the MEN1 gene, which is mutated in an inherited human syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1(MEN1). Menin is primarily nuclear protein, acting as a tumor suppressor in endocrine organs, but as an oncogenic factor in the mixed lineage leukemia, in a tissue-specific manner. Recently, the crystal structures of menin with different binding partners reveal menin as a key scaffold protein that functionally interacts with various partners to regulate gene transcription in the nucleus. However, outside the nucleus, menin also regulates multiple signaling pathways that traverse the cell surface membrane. The precise nature regarding to how menin associates with the membrane fraction is poorly understood. Here we show that a small fraction of menin associates with the cell membrane fraction likely via serine palmitoylation. Moreover, the majority of the membrane-associated menin may reside inside membrane vesicles, as menin is protected from trypsin-mediated proteolysis, but disruption of the membrane fraction using detergent abolishes the detection. Consistently, cellular staining for menin also reveals the distribution of menin in the cell membrane and the punctate-like cell organelles. Our findings suggest that part of intracellular menin associates with the cell membrane peripherally as well as resides within the membrane vesicles. PMID:26560942

  11. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-03-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants.

  12. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants. PMID:27009902

  13. Compartment Syndrome of the Calf Due to Nicolau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enshaei, Ali; Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Nicolau syndrome in a 15 months old girl following an intramuscular injection of penicillin 6.3.3 in her left buttock. This case is unique because she developed compartment syndrome in her left calf far from her injection site. Her toe’s tips gangrened in the course of her ailment. We hypothesized that the compartment syndrome might be produced by a probable intra-arterial injection that had produced embolic obstruction of the small and medium size arteries in her leg or a probable perineural or periarteial injection had produced secondary sympathetic stimulation, extensive vasospasm, compromised microcirculation and the development of compartment syndrome. PMID:26894227

  14. Compartment Syndrome of the Calf Due to Nicolau Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enshaei, Ali; Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Nicolau syndrome in a 15 months old girl following an intramuscular injection of penicillin 6.3.3 in her left buttock. This case is unique because she developed compartment syndrome in her left calf far from her injection site. Her toe's tips gangrened in the course of her ailment. We hypothesized that the compartment syndrome might be produced by a probable intra-arterial injection that had produced embolic obstruction of the small and medium size arteries in her leg or a probable perineural or periarteial injection had produced secondary sympathetic stimulation, extensive vasospasm, compromised microcirculation and the development of compartment syndrome.

  15. Phosphorylation-mediated RNA/peptide complex coacervation as a model for intracellular liquid organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, William M.; Keating, Christine D.

    2016-02-01

    Biological cells are highly organized, with numerous subcellular compartments. Phosphorylation has been hypothesized as a means to control the assembly/disassembly of liquid-like RNA- and protein-rich intracellular bodies, or liquid organelles, that lack delimiting membranes. Here, we demonstrate that charge-mediated phase separation, or complex coacervation, of RNAs with cationic peptides can generate simple model liquid organelles capable of reversibly compartmentalizing biomolecules. Formation and dissolution of these liquid bodies was controlled by changes in peptide phosphorylation state using a kinase/phosphatase enzyme pair. The droplet-generating phase transition responded to modification of even a single serine residue. Electrostatic interactions between the short cationic peptides and the much longer polyanionic RNAs drove phase separation. Coacervates were also formed on silica beads, a primitive model for localization at specific intracellular sites. This work supports phosphoregulation of complex coacervation as a viable mechanism for dynamic intracellular compartmentalization in membraneless organelles.

  16. New insights on human skeletal muscle tissue compartments revealed by in vivo t2 NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ericky C A; Fromes, Yves; Carlier, Pierre G

    2014-05-20

    The spin-spin (T2) relaxation of (1)H-NMR signals in human skeletal muscle has been previously hypothesized to reveal information about myowater compartmentation. Although experimental support has been provided, no consensus has yet emerged concerning the attribution of specific anatomical compartments to the observed T2 components. Potential application of a noninvasive tool that might offer such information urges the quest for a definitive answer to this question. The purpose of this work was to obtain new information that might help elucidate the mechanism of T2 distribution in muscle. To do so, in vivo T2 relaxation data was acquired from the soleus of eight healthy volunteers using a localized Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill technique. Each acquisition contained 1000 echoes with an interecho spacing of 1 ms. Data were acquired from each subject under different vascular filling preparations expected to change exclusively the extracellular water fraction. Two exponential components were systematically observed: an intermediate component (T2 ~ 32 ms) and a long component (100 < T2 < 210 ms). The relative fraction and T2 value characterizing the long component systematically increased after progressive augmentation of extracellular water volume. Characteristic relaxation behavior for each vascular filling condition was analyzed with a two-site exchange model and a three-site two-exchange model. We show that a two-site exchange model can only predict the observations for small exchange rates, much more representative of transendothelial than transcytolemmal exchange regimes. The three-site two-exchange model representing the intracellular, interstitial, and vascular spaces was capable of precisely predicting the observations for realistic transcytolemmal and transendothelial exchange rates. The estimated intrinsic relative fractions of each of these compartments corroborate with estimations from previous works and strongly suggest that the T2 relaxation from water within

  17. Compartment-dependent mitochondrial alterations in experimental ALS, the effects of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Lenzi, Paola; Lazzeri, Gloria; Falleni, Alessandra; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by massive loss of motor neurons. Data from ALS patients and experimental models indicate that mitochondria are severely damaged within dying or spared motor neurons. Nonetheless, recent data indicate that mitochondrial preservation, although preventing motor neuron loss, fails to prolong lifespan. On the other hand, the damage to motor axons plays a pivotal role in determining both lethality and disease course. Thus, in the present article each motor neuron compartment (cell body, central, and peripheral axons) of G93A SOD-1 mice was studied concerning mitochondrial alterations as well as other intracellular structures. We could confirm the occurrence of ALS-related mitochondrial damage encompassing total swelling, matrix dilution and cristae derangement along with non-pathological variations of mitochondrial size and number. However, these alterations occur to a different extent depending on motor neuron compartment. Lithium, a well-known autophagy inducer, prevents most pathological changes. However, the efficacy of lithium varies depending on which motor neuron compartment is considered. Remarkably, some effects of lithium are also evident in wild type mice. Lithium is effective also in vitro, both in cell lines and primary cell cultures from the ventral spinal cord. In these latter cells autophagy inhibition within motor neurons in vitro reproduced ALS pathology which was reversed by lithium. Muscle and glial cells were analyzed as well. Cell pathology was mostly severe within peripheral axons and muscles of ALS mice. Remarkably, when analyzing motor axons of ALS mice a subtotal clogging of axoplasm was described for the first time, which was modified under the effects of lithium. The effects induced by lithium depend on several mechanisms such as direct mitochondrial protection, induction of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis. In this study, mitochondriogenesis induced by lithium was confirmed in situ by a

  18. Compartment-dependent mitochondrial alterations in experimental ALS, the effects of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Gianfranco; Lenzi, Paola; Lazzeri, Gloria; Falleni, Alessandra; Biagioni, Francesca; Ryskalin, Larisa; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by massive loss of motor neurons. Data from ALS patients and experimental models indicate that mitochondria are severely damaged within dying or spared motor neurons. Nonetheless, recent data indicate that mitochondrial preservation, although preventing motor neuron loss, fails to prolong lifespan. On the other hand, the damage to motor axons plays a pivotal role in determining both lethality and disease course. Thus, in the present article each motor neuron compartment (cell body, central, and peripheral axons) of G93A SOD-1 mice was studied concerning mitochondrial alterations as well as other intracellular structures. We could confirm the occurrence of ALS-related mitochondrial damage encompassing total swelling, matrix dilution and cristae derangement along with non-pathological variations of mitochondrial size and number. However, these alterations occur to a different extent depending on motor neuron compartment. Lithium, a well-known autophagy inducer, prevents most pathological changes. However, the efficacy of lithium varies depending on which motor neuron compartment is considered. Remarkably, some effects of lithium are also evident in wild type mice. Lithium is effective also in vitro, both in cell lines and primary cell cultures from the ventral spinal cord. In these latter cells autophagy inhibition within motor neurons in vitro reproduced ALS pathology which was reversed by lithium. Muscle and glial cells were analyzed as well. Cell pathology was mostly severe within peripheral axons and muscles of ALS mice. Remarkably, when analyzing motor axons of ALS mice a subtotal clogging of axoplasm was described for the first time, which was modified under the effects of lithium. The effects induced by lithium depend on several mechanisms such as direct mitochondrial protection, induction of mitophagy and mitochondriogenesis. In this study, mitochondriogenesis induced by lithium was confirmed in situ by a

  19. Insight into nanoparticle cellular uptake and intracellular targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yameen, Basit; Choi, Won Il; Vilos, Cristian; Swami, Archana; Shi, Jinjun; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative efforts from the fields of biology, materials science, and engineering are leading to exciting progress in the development of nanomedicines. Since the targets of many therapeutic agents are localized in subcellular compartments, modulation of nanoparticle-cell interactions for an efficient cellular uptake through the plasma membrane, and the development of nanomedicines for precise delivery to subcellular compartments remain formidable challenges. The cellular internalization routes have a determining effect on the post-internalization fate and intracellular localization of nanoparticles. This review highlights the cellular uptake routes most relevant to the field of non-targeted nanomedicine, and presents an account of ligand targeted nanoparticles for receptor mediated cellular internalization as a strategy for modulating the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Ligand targeted nanoparticles have been the main impetus behind the progress of nanomedicines towards the clinic. This strategy has even resulted in a remarkable development towards effective oral delivery of nanomedicines that can overcome the intestinal epithelial cellular barrier. A detailed overview of the recent developments towards subcellular targeting that is emerging as a platform for the next generation organelle specific nanomedicines is also provided. Each section of the review includes prospect, potential, and concrete expectations from the field of targeted nanomedicines and strategies to meet those expectations. PMID:24984011

  20. Insight into nanoparticle cellular uptake and intracellular targeting.

    PubMed

    Yameen, Basit; Choi, Won Il; Vilos, Cristian; Swami, Archana; Shi, Jinjun; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2014-09-28

    Collaborative efforts from the fields of biology, materials science, and engineering are leading to exciting progress in the development of nanomedicines. Since the targets of many therapeutic agents are localized in subcellular compartments, modulation of nanoparticle-cell interactions for efficient cellular uptake through the plasma membrane and the development of nanomedicines for precise delivery to subcellular compartments remain formidable challenges. Cellular internalization routes determine the post-internalization fate and intracellular localization of nanoparticles. This review highlights the cellular uptake routes most relevant to the field of non-targeted nanomedicine and presents an account of ligand-targeted nanoparticles for receptor-mediated cellular internalization as a strategy for modulating the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Ligand-targeted nanoparticles have been the main impetus behind the progress of nanomedicines towards the clinic. This strategy has already resulted in remarkable progress towards effective oral delivery of nanomedicines that can overcome the intestinal epithelial barrier. A detailed overview of the recent developments in subcellular targeting as a novel platform for next-generation organelle-specific nanomedicines is also provided. Each section of the review includes prospects, potential, and concrete expectations from the field of targeted nanomedicines and strategies to meet those expectations.

  1. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  2. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-01

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment. PMID:28117323

  3. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-24

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment.

  4. An earthquake instability model based on faults containing high fluid-pressure compartments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas contain water in seal-bounded compartments. Arguments based on heat flow and stress orientation suggest that in most of the compartments, the water pressure is so high that the average shear strength of the fault is less than 20 MPa. We propose a variation of this basic model in which most of the shear stress on the fault is supported by a small number of compartments where the pore pressure is relatively low. As a result, the fault gouge in these compartments is compacted and lithified and has a high undisturbed strength. When one of these locked regions fails, the system made up of the neighboring high and low pressure compartments can become unstable. Material in the high fluid pressure compartments is initially underconsolidated since the low effective confining pressure has retarded compaction. As these compartments are deformed, fluid pressure remains nearly unchanged so that they offer little resistance to shear. The low pore pressure compartments, however, are overconsolidated and dilate as they are sheared. Decompression of the pore fluid in these compartments lowers fluid pressure, increasing effective normal stress and shear strength. While this effect tends to stabilize the fault, it can be shown that this dilatancy hardening can be more than offset by displacement weakening of the fault (i.e., the drop from peak to residual strength). If the surrounding rock mass is sufficiently compliant to produce an instability, slip will propagate along the fault until the shear fracture runs into a low-stress region. Frictional heating and the accompanying increase in fluid pressure that are suggested to occur during shearing of the fault zone will act as additional destabilizers. However, significant heating occurs only after a finite amount of slip and therefore is more likely to contribute to the energetics of rupture propagation than to the initiation of the instability. We present

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin A and an engineered derivate targeted secretion inhibitor (TSI) A enter cells via different vesicular compartments.

    PubMed

    Fonfria, Elena; Donald, Sarah; Cadd, Verity A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent multi-domain proteins, responsible for botulism in animals and humans. The modular structural organization of BoNTs has led to the development of novel engineered bio-therapeutic proteins called targeted secretion inhibitors (TSIs). We report here that botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) and a TSI/A in which the neuronal binding domain of BoNT/A has been substituted by an epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand, named EGFR-targeted TSI/A, exploit different routes to gain entry in the same in vitro neuroblastoma cell system, SiMa cells. We found that the EGF ligand conferred the affinity to the EGFR-targeted TSI/A at the EGF receptor when compared to an untargeted TSI/A and also the ability to internalize into the cells and cleave its cytosolic target protein SNAP-25. Using high content analysis we found that both BoNT/A and the EGFR-targeted TSI/A enter the cell in a concentration-dependent manner and in compartments which are able to translocate the proteins into the cytosol within 4 h. The EGFR-targeted TSI/A internalized into a compartment which gave a punctate staining pattern by immunofluorescence and partially overlapped with structures positive for the early endosomal marker EAA1; whereas BoNT/A did not internalize into a punctate compartment but did so in an acidifying compartment consistent with local synaptic vesicle recycling. These findings show that the BoNT/A translocation domain, common to both BoNT/A and the EGFR-targeted TSI/A, is a versatile tool for cytosolic delivery from distinct intracellular vesicular compartments.

  6. Patterns of intracellular compartmentalization, trafficking and acidification of 5'-fluorescein labeled phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides in HL60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tonkinson, J L; Stein, C A

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the intracellular compartmentalization and trafficking of fluorescein labeled (F) phosphodiester (PO) and phosphorothioate (PS) oligodeoxynucleotides (oligos) in HL60 cells. A series of F-oligos (PO and PS) were incubated for 6 hrs. with HL60 cells and the mean intracellular fluorescence determined by flow cytometry. The F signal was normalized by the addition of the ionophore monensin. An increase in signal intensity following addition of monensin indicated that the oligo was resident in an acidic intracellular environment. F-PS, but not F-PO oligos were found to reside in an acidic environment. An exception was a PO homopolymer of 15 cytidine bases (FOdC15) which was acidified. Using two different methods, the average resident intracellular pH of F-PS oligos and F-OdC15 was shown to be approximately 1 pH unit lower than that of F-PO oligos. Acidification of F-PS oligos could be blocked by the antibiotic bafilomycin, indicating that acidification was occurring in endosomes or vacuoles. F-PO and F-PS oligos were effluxed from HL60 cells from two intracellular compartments. However, approximately 60% of internalized F-PO oligo resided in a 'shallow' compartment that was turned over rapidly (t1/2 = 5-10 min.) whereas only 20% of F-PS oligo resided in this compartment. Conversely, approximately 80% of the internalized F-PS oligo but only 40% of F-PO oligo resided in a 'deep' compartment that turned over with t1/2 = 2-5 hrs. This report is the first quantitative demonstration that PO and PS oligos, and PO oligos of different sequences are trafficked differently by HL60 cells. Images PMID:7937155

  7. Danger signals, inflammasomes, and the intricate intracellular lives of chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Matthew A; Abdul-Sater, Ali; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ojcius, David M

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens, and as such are sensitive to alterations in the cellular physiology of their hosts. Chlamydial infections often cause pathologic consequences due to prolonged localized inflammation. Considerable advances have been made in the last few years regarding our understanding of how two key inflammation-associated signaling pathways influence the biology of Chlamydia infections: inflammation regulating purinergic signaling pathways significantly impact intracellular chlamydial development, and inflammasome activation modulates both chlamydial growth and infection mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We review here elements of both pathways, presenting the latest developments contributing to our understanding of how chlamydial infections are influenced by inflammasomes and purinergic signaling.

  8. Inhibition of hepatocyte apoB secretion by naringenin: enhanced rapid intracellular degradation independent of reduced microsomal cholesteryl esters.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; de Dreu, Linda E; Barrett, P Hugh R; Huff, Murray W

    2002-09-01

    The grapefruit flavonoid, naringenin, is hypocholesterolemic in vivo, and inhibits basal apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion and the expression and activities of both ACAT and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in human hepatoma cells (HepG2). In this report, we examined the effects of naringenin on apoB kinetics in oleate-stimulated HepG2 cells and determined the contribution of microsomal lumen cholesteryl ester (CE) availability to apoB secretion. Pulse-chase studies of apoB secretion and intracellular degradation were analyzed by multicompartmental modeling. The model for apoB metabolism in HepG2 cells includes an intracellular compartment from which apoB can be either secreted or degraded by both rapid and slow pathways. In the presence of 0.1 mM oleic acid, naringenin (200 micro M) reduced the secretion of newly synthesized apoB by 52%, due to a 56% reduction in the rate constant for secretion. Intracellular degradation was significantly increased due to a selective increase in rapid degradation, while slow degradation was unaffected. Incubation with either N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal (ALLN) or lactacystin showed that degradation via the rapid pathway was largely proteasomal. Although these changes in apoB metabolism were accompanied by significant reductions in CE synthesis and mass, subcellular fractionation experiments comparing naringenin to specific ACAT and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors revealed that reduced accumulation of newly synthesized CE in the microsomal lumen is not consistently associated with reduced apoB secretion. However, naringenin, unlike the ACAT and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, significantly reduced lumenal TG accumulation. We conclude that naringenin inhibits apoB secretion in oleate-stimulated HepG2 cells and selectively increases intracellular degradation via a largely proteasomal, rapid kinetic pathway. Although naringenin inhibits ACAT, CE availability in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen does not appear to

  9. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 7 CFR 58.510 - Rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....510 Rooms and compartments. (a) Processing operations with open cheese vats should be separated from... ingredients supplies or finished products are handled, processed, packaged or stored shall be designed...

  11. 11. Interior view of communications compartment. View toward rear of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view of communications compartment. View toward rear of aircraft. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. 10. Interior view of communications compartment. View toward front of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior view of communications compartment. View toward front of aircraft. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. 7 CFR 58.510 - Rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... compartments shall be ventilated to maintain sanitary conditions, preclude the growth of mold and air borne... quality and condition of the products. Coolers shall be kept clean, orderly and free from mold,...

  14. 19 CFR 123.24 - Sealing of conveyances or compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Shipments in Transit Through Canada or Mexico § 123.24 Sealing of conveyances or compartments. (a) Sealing required. Merchandise in...

  15. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and current management of acute compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, James; Haddad, Behrooz; Khan, Wasim S

    2014-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a surgical emergency warranting prompt evaluation and treatment. It can occur with any elevation in interstitial pressure in a closed osseo-fascial compartment. Resultant ischaemic damage may be irreversible within six hours and can result in long-term morbidity and even death. The diagnosis is largely clinical with the classical description of 'pain out of proportion to the injury'. Compartment pressure monitors can be a helpful adjunct where the diagnosis is in doubt. Initial treatment is with the removal of any constricting dressings or casts, avoiding hypotension and optimizing tissue perfusion by keeping the limb at heart level. If symptoms persist, definitive treatment is necessary with timely surgical decompression of all the involved compartments. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis and current management of ACS.

  16. 2. INTERIOR, SOUTHWEST VIEW (STORAGE COMPARTMENTS). Vanadium Corporation of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR, SOUTHWEST VIEW (STORAGE COMPARTMENTS). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Mine Warehouse, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  17. 14 CFR 23.787 - Baggage and cargo compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inertial load factor is 9g and assuming the maximum allowed baggage or cargo weight for the compartment. (b... means to protect the occupants from injury when the baggage or cargo is subjected to the inertial...

  18. 14 CFR 23.787 - Baggage and cargo compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... inertial load factor is 9g and assuming the maximum allowed baggage or cargo weight for the compartment. (b... means to protect the occupants from injury when the baggage or cargo is subjected to the inertial...

  19. 14 CFR 23.787 - Baggage and cargo compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inertial load factor is 9g and assuming the maximum allowed baggage or cargo weight for the compartment. (b... means to protect the occupants from injury when the baggage or cargo is subjected to the inertial...

  20. 14 CFR 23.787 - Baggage and cargo compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... inertial load factor is 9g and assuming the maximum allowed baggage or cargo weight for the compartment. (b... means to protect the occupants from injury when the baggage or cargo is subjected to the inertial...

  1. 14 CFR 23.787 - Baggage and cargo compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... inertial load factor is 9g and assuming the maximum allowed baggage or cargo weight for the compartment. (b... means to protect the occupants from injury when the baggage or cargo is subjected to the inertial...

  2. Compartment pressure monitoring during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Amendola, A; Faber, K; Willits, K; Miniaci, A; Labib, S; Fowler, P

    1999-09-01

    A prospective double blind randomized study was carried out using 20 healthy males with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency undergoing bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL reconstruction. The subjects were randomized into either water or saline irrigation and then underwent identical reconstructive procedures using an arthroscopic pump. Continuous preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative pressures were monitored using the slit catheter technique. Blood pressure and compartment pressure measurements were continuously recorded and noted at all stages of the procedure. Mean preoperative anterior and posterior compartment pressures were similar in both groups. No significant differences were noted between the anterior and posterior compartments of each group. No difference between water and saline irrigation was identified throughout the procedure. In both groups, postoperative pressures were slightly lower in the anterior and posterior compartments compared with preoperative pressures, but not significantly.

  3. 9. Interior view of electronics compartment. View toward rear of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior view of electronics compartment. View toward rear of aircraft. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  4. Dynamics of the Establishment of Multinucleate Compartments in Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Manders, Erik M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics can vary widely between fungal species and between stages of development of fungal colonies. Here we compared nuclear dynamics and mitotic patterns between germlings and mature hyphae in Fusarium oxysporum. Using fluorescently labeled nuclei and live-cell imaging, we show that F. oxysporum is subject to a developmental transition from a uninucleate to a multinucleate state after completion of colony initiation. We observed a special type of hypha that exhibits a higher growth rate, possibly acting as a nutrient scout. The higher growth rate is associated with a higher nuclear count and mitotic waves involving 2 to 6 nuclei in the apical compartment. Further, we found that dormant nuclei of intercalary compartments can reenter the mitotic cycle, resulting in multinucleate compartments with up to 18 nuclei in a single compartment. PMID:25398376

  5. Quantification and characterization of mucosa-associated and intracellular Escherichia coli in inflamatory bowel disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Mucosa-associated E. coli are abundant in Crohn’s disease (CD) but whether these bacteria gain intracellular access within the mucosa is less certain. If E. coli does gain intracellular access in CD, the contribution of bacterial pathogenicity as opposed to a defect in host inna...

  6. Measuring Compartment Size and Gas Solubility in Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    phocids (Fig. 1). Fig. 1: Relative weight of integument (blubber), bones, muscle, internal organs, connective tissue , and the soft tissue of the...status of animals of the same species and similar age. Fig.2: Mean relative body weight of integument, bones, muscle, organs, connective tissue ...a five-compartment model arranging the tissues in the following compartments [10-12]: blood, brain, fat, muscle (muscle, skin, bone, connective

  7. Diagnosis of Compartment Syndrome Based on Tissue Oxygenation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    tissue oxygenation and compartment pressure following tibia fracture, Injury 2013, 44:1076- 1080 8. Cathcart CC, Shuler MS, Freedman BA, Reno LR...Injury, Int. J. Care Injured 44 (2013) 1076– 1080 1077percentage of postoperative CP measurements would meet established warning criteria for compartment...Care Injured 44 (2013) 1076– 1080 1079in one patient. Correlations between PmO2 and CP excluding the first 3 h resulted in Pearson correlation

  8. Contralateral compartment syndrome inoculated by invasive group A streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiwen; Mcphillips, Sean Thomas; Chundi, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but a well-documented complication in patients with trauma-induced group A streptococcus infection. Here, we present a case of a male who developed compartment syndrome on the left lower extremity after an injury inoculated by group A streptococcus on the right lower extremity. The patient was resuscitated with antibiotics, urgent fasciotomy, and immunoglobulin. The patient was eventually transferred to a burn center for further care. PMID:27802865

  9. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  10. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in the Basic Protocol. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM). PMID:24894836

  11. Toward intracellular targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics: progress and clinical outlook for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-08-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells.

  12. Revisiting intracellular calcium signaling semantics.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Audran, Emilie; Fève, Marie; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-12-01

    Cells use intracellular free calcium concentration changes for signaling. Signal encoding occurs through both spatial and temporal modulation of the free calcium concentration. The encoded message is detected by an ensemble of intracellular sensors forming the family of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) which must faithfully translate the message using a new syntax that is recognized by the cell. The cell is home to a significant although limited number of genes coding for proteins involved in the signal encoding and decoding processes. In a cell, only a subset of this ensemble of genes is expressed, leading to a genetic regulation of the calcium signal pathways. Calmodulin (CaM), the most ubiquitous expressed intracellular calcium-binding protein, plays a major role in calcium signal translation. Similar to a hub, it is central to a large and finely tuned network, receiving information, integrating it and dispatching the cognate response. In this review, we examine the different steps starting with an external stimulus up to a cellular response, with special emphasis on CaM and the mechanism by which it decodes calcium signals and translates it into exquisitely coordinated cellular events. By this means, we will revisit the calcium signaling semantics, hoping that we will ease communication between scientists dealing with calcium signals in different biological systems and different domains.

  13. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  14. Glycosaminoglycans: Sorting determinants in intracellular protein traffic.

    PubMed

    Mihov, Deyan; Spiess, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins to their appropriate destinations is crucial for the maintenance of cellular integrity and function. Sorting information is contained either directly in the amino acid sequence or in a protein's post-translational modifications. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are characteristic modifications of proteoglycans. GAGs are long unbranched polysaccharide chains with unique structural and functional properties also contributing to protein sorting in various ways. By deletion or insertion of GAG attachment sites it has been shown that GAGs affect polarized sorting in epithelial cells, targeting to and storage in secretory granules, and endocytosis. Most recently, the role of GAGs as signals for rapid trans-Golgi-to-cell surface transport, dominant over the cytosolic sorting motifs in the core protein, was demonstrated. Here, we provide an overview on existing data on the roles of GAGs on protein and proteoglycan trafficking.

  15. Differential gene expression in anatomical compartments of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Diehn, Jennifer J; Diehn, Maximilian; Marmor, Michael F; Brown, Patrick O

    2005-01-01

    Background The human eye is composed of multiple compartments, diverse in form, function, and embryologic origin, that work in concert to provide us with our sense of sight. We set out to systematically characterize the global gene expression patterns that specify the distinctive characteristics of the various eye compartments. Results We used DNA microarrays representing approximately 30,000 human genes to analyze gene expression in the cornea, lens, iris, ciliary body, retina, and optic nerve. The distinctive patterns of expression in each compartment could be interpreted in relation to the physiology and cellular composition of each tissue. Notably, the sets of genes selectively expressed in the retina and in the lens were particularly large and diverse. Genes with roles in immune defense, particularly complement components, were expressed at especially high levels in the anterior segment tissues. We also found consistent differences between the gene expression patterns of the macula and peripheral retina, paralleling the differences in cell layer densities between these regions. Based on the hypothesis that genes responsible for diseases that affect a particular eye compartment are likely to be selectively expressed in that compartment, we compared our gene expression signatures with genetic mapping studies to identify candidate genes for diseases affecting the cornea, lens, and retina. Conclusion Through genome-scale gene expression profiling, we were able to discover distinct gene expression 'signatures' for each eye compartment and identified candidate disease genes that can serve as a reference database for investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the eye. PMID:16168081

  16. Modulatory compartments in cortex and local regulation of cholinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Ward, Nicholas J; Jadi, Monika P; Disney, Anita A

    2016-09-01

    Neuromodulatory signaling is generally considered broad in its impact across cortex. However, variations in the characteristics of cortical circuits may introduce regionally-specific responses to diffuse modulatory signals. Features such as patterns of axonal innervation, tissue tortuosity and molecular diffusion, effectiveness of degradation pathways, subcellular receptor localization, and patterns of receptor expression can lead to local modification of modulatory inputs. We propose that modulatory compartments exist in cortex and can be defined by variation in structural features of local circuits. Further, we argue that these compartments are responsible for local regulation of neuromodulatory tone. For the cholinergic system, these modulatory compartments are regions of cortical tissue within which signaling conditions for acetylcholine are relatively uniform, but between which signaling can vary profoundly. In the visual system, evidence for the existence of compartments indicates that cholinergic modulation likely differs across the visual pathway. We argue that the existence of these compartments calls for thinking about cholinergic modulation in terms of finer-grained control of local cortical circuits than is implied by the traditional view of this system as a diffuse modulator. Further, an understanding of modulatory compartments provides an opportunity to better understand and perhaps correct signal modifications that lead to pathological states.

  17. Regulation of intracellular pH values in higher plant cells. Carbon-13 and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Douce, R

    1992-07-15

    The regulation of the cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH values (pHc and pHv) in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells was analyzed using 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Suspension-cultured cells were compressed in the NMR tube and perfused with the help of an original arrangement enabling a tight control of the pH (external pH, pHe) of the carefully oxygenated circulating nutrient medium. Intracellular pH values were measured from the chemical shifts of: CH2-linked carboxyl groups of citric acid below pH 5.7; orthophosphate between pH 5.7 and 8.0; 13C-enriched bicarbonate over pH 8.0. pHc and pHv were independent of pHe over the range 4.5-7.5. In contrast intracellular pH values decreased rapidly below pHe 4.5 and increased progressively at pHe over 7.5. There was an acceleration in the rate of O2 consumption accompanied with a decrease in cytoplasmic ATP concentration as pHe decreased. When the rate of O2 consumption was approaching the uncoupled O2 uptake rate, a loss of pHc control was observed. It is concluded that as pHe decreased, the plasma membrane ATPase consumed more and more ATP to reject the invading H+ ions in order to maintain pHc at a constant value. Below pHe 4.5 the efficiency of the H+ pump to react to back leakage of H+ ions became insufficient, leading to an acidification of pHc and to an alkalinization of pHe. On the other hand, over pHe 7.5 a passive influx of OH- ions was observed, and pHc increased proportionally to the increase of pHe. Simultaneously appreciable amounts of organic acids (malate and citrate) were synthesized by cells during the course of the alkalinization of the cytoplasmic compartment. The synthesis of organic acids which partially counteract the alkalinization of the cytoplasmic compartment may result from a marked activation of the cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase induced by an increase in cytoplasmic bicarbonate concentration. The fluctuations of pHv followed a similar course to that of p

  18. Inter- and intra-patient clonal and subclonal heterogeneity of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: evidence from circulating and lymph nodal compartments

    PubMed Central

    Bonina, Silvia; Messina, Monica; Chiaretti, Sabina; Ilari, Caterina; Cafforio, Luciana; Raponi, Sara; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Di Maio, Valeria; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Nanni, Mauro; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Guarini, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Whole exome sequencing and copy number aberration (CNA) analysis was performed on cells taken from peripheral blood (PB) and lymph nodes (LN) of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Of 64 non-silent somatic mutations, 54 (84.4%) were clonal in both compartments, 3 (4.7%) were PB-specific and 7 (10.9%) were LN-specific. Most of the LN- or PB-specific mutations were subclonal in the other corresponding compartment (variant frequency 0.5-5.3%). Of 41 CNAs, 27 (65.8%) were shared by both compartments and 7 (17.1%) were LN- or PB-specific. Overall, 6 of 9 cases (66.7%) showed genomic differences between the compartments. At subsequent relapse, Case 10, with 6 LN-specific lesions, and Case 100, with 6 LN-specific and 8 PB-specific lesions, showed, in the PB, the clonal expansion of LN-derived lesions with an adverse impact: SF3B1 mutation, BIRC3 deletion, del8(p23.3-p11.1), del9(p24.3-p13.1) and gain 2(p25.3-p14). CLL shows an intra-patient clonal heterogeneity according to the disease compartment, with both LN and PB-specific mutations/CNAs. The LN microenvironment might contribute to the clonal selection of unfavourable lesions, as LN-derived mutations/CNAs can appear in the PB at relapse. PMID:26597680

  19. Preparation of Reactive Oligo(p-Phenylene Vinylene) Materials for Spatial Profiling of the Chemical Reactivity of Intracellular Compartments.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chenyao; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Libing; Hu, Rong; Chen, Hui; Lv, Fengting; Dai, Zhihui; Wang, Shu

    2016-05-01

    An oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative (OPV-pfp) functionalized with pentafluorophenol active ester is designed and synthesized. The high reactivity of OPV-pfp with biological small molecules or macromolecules containing amino groups under physiological conditions leads to spectral changes of OPV-pfp; thus, spatial reactivity discrimination for different subcellular structures inside cells is realized by triggering and imaging the fluorescence signal change of the OPV-pfp.

  20. Mechanisms of Obligatory Intracellular Infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Anaplasma phagocytophilum persists in nature by cycling between mammals and ticks. Human infection by the bite of an infected tick leads to a potentially fatal emerging disease called human granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. phagocytophilum is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that replicates inside mammalian granulocytes and the salivary gland and midgut cells of ticks. A. phagocytophilum evolved the remarkable ability to hijack the regulatory system of host cells. A. phagocytophilum alters vesicular traffic to create an intracellular membrane-bound compartment that allows replication in seclusion from lysosomes. The bacterium downregulates or actively inhibits a number of innate immune responses of mammalian host cells, and it upregulates cellular cholesterol uptake to acquire cholesterol for survival. It also upregulates several genes critical for the infection of ticks, and it prolongs tick survival at freezing temperatures. Several host factors that exacerbate infection have been identified, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cholesterol. Host factors that overcome infection include IL-12 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Two bacterial type IV secretion effectors and several bacterial proteins that associate with inclusion membranes have been identified. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying A. phagocytophilum infection will foster the development of creative ideas to prevent or treat this emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:21734244

  1. Methods to follow intracellular trafficking of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärnaste, Ly; Arukuusk, Piret; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient vehicles to transport bioactive molecules into the cells. Despite numerous studies the exact mechanism by which CPPs facilitate delivery of cargo to its intracellular target is still debated. The current work presents methods that can be used for tracking CPP/pDNA complexes through endosomal transport and show the role of endosomal transport in the delivery of cargo. Separation of endosomal vesicles by differential centrifugation enables to pinpoint the localization of delivered cargo without labeling it and gives important quantitative information about pDNA trafficing in certain endosomal compartments. Single particle tracking (SPT) allows following individual CPP/cargo complex through endosomal path in live cells, using fluoresently labled cargo and green fluoresent protein expressing cells. These two different methods show similar results about tested NickFect/pDNA complexes intracellular trafficing. NF51 facilitates rapid internalization of complexes into the cells, prolongs their stay in early endosomes and promotes release to cytosol. NF1 is less capable to induce endosomal release and higher amount of complexes are routed to lysosomes for degradation. Our findings offer potential delivery vector for in vivo applications, NF51, where endosomal entrapment has been allayed. Furthermore, these methods are valuable tools to study other CPP-based delivery systems.

  2. Intracellular fates of cell-penetrating block copolypeptide vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Victor Z; Li, Zhibo; Deming, Timothy J; Kamei, Daniel T

    2011-01-10

    The block copolypeptide poly(l-homoarginine)(60)-b-poly(l-leucine)(20) (R(60)L(20)) was previously found to self-assemble into versatile vesicles with controllable size and encapsulate hydrophilic cargo. These R(60)L(20) vesicles also demonstrated the ability to cross the cell membrane and transport encapsulated cargo into different cell lines. To assess the potential for using the R(60)L(20) vesicles as drug delivery vehicles further, we have investigated their endocytosis and intracellular trafficking behavior. Using drugs that inhibit different endocytosis pathways, we identified macropinocytosis to be a major process by which the R(60)L(20) vesicles enter HeLa cells. Subsequent immunostaining experiments demonstrated that the vesicles entered the early endosomes but not the lysosomes, suggesting that they recycle back to the cell surface. Overall, our studies indicate that the R(60)L(20) vesicles are able to enter cells intact with their cargos, and although some manage to escape from early endosomes, most are trapped within these intracellular compartments.

  3. Intracellular calcium signals regulate growth of hepatic stellate cells via specific effects on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Elwy M; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Sheung, Nina; Yu, Jin; Amaya, Maria Jimina; Nathanson, Michael H; Dranoff, Jonathan A

    2009-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are important mediators of liver fibrosis. Hormones linked to downstream intracellular Ca(2+) signals upregulate HSC proliferation, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. Nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) signals may have distinct effects on cell proliferation, so we expressed plasmid and adenoviral constructs containing the Ca(2+) chelator parvalbumin (PV) linked to either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES) to block Ca(2+) signals in distinct compartments within LX-2 immortalized human HSC and primary rat HSC. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs each targeted to the appropriate intracellular compartment and blocked Ca(2+) signals only within that compartment. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs inhibited HSC growth. Furthermore, blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals arrested growth at the G2/mitosis (G2/M) cell-cycle interface and prevented the onset of mitosis. Blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca(2+) signals downregulated phosphorylation of the G2/M checkpoint phosphatase Cdc25C. Inhibition of calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) had identical effects on LX-2 growth and Cdc25C phosphorylation. We propose that nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) are critical signals that regulate HSC growth at the G2/M checkpoint via CaMK II-mediated regulation of Cdc25C phosphorylation. These data provide a new logical target for pharmacological therapy directed against progression of liver fibrosis.

  4. Role of cholesterol in SNARE-mediated trafficking on intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Enrich, Carlos; Rentero, Carles; Hierro, Aitor; Grewal, Thomas

    2015-03-15

    The cell surface delivery of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrins is fundamental for cell migration in wound healing and during cancer cell metastasis. This process is not only driven by several soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE) proteins, which are key players in vesicle transport at the cell surface and intracellular compartments, but is also tightly modulated by cholesterol. Cholesterol-sensitive SNAREs at the cell surface are relatively well characterized, but it is less well understood how altered cholesterol levels in intracellular compartments impact on SNARE localization and function. Recent insights from structural biology, protein chemistry and cell microscopy have suggested that a subset of the SNAREs engaged in exocytic and retrograde pathways dynamically 'sense' cholesterol levels in the Golgi and endosomal membranes. Hence, the transport routes that modulate cellular cholesterol distribution appear to trigger not only a change in the location and functioning of SNAREs at the cell surface but also in endomembranes. In this Commentary, we will discuss how disrupted cholesterol transport through the Golgi and endosomal compartments ultimately controls SNARE-mediated delivery of ECM and integrins to the cell surface and, consequently, cell migration.

  5. High-Content Imaging Reveals Expansion of the Endosomal Compartment during Coxiella burnetii Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human Q fever. Replication of the bacterium within a large parasitophorous vacuole (PV) resembling a host phagolysosome is required for pathogenesis. PV biogenesis is a pathogen driven process that requires engagement of several host cell vesicular trafficking pathways to acquire vacuole components. The goal of this study was to determine if infection by C. burnetii modulates endolysosomal flux to potentially benefit PV formation. HeLa cells, infected with C. burnetii or left uninfected, were incubated with fluorescent transferrin (Tf) for 0–30 min, and the amount of Tf internalized by cells quantitated by high-content imaging. At 3 and 5 days, but not 1 day post-infection, the maximal amounts of fluorescent Tf internalized by infected cells were significantly greater than uninfected cells. The rates of Tf uptake and recycling were the same for infected and uninfected cells; however, residual Tf persisted in EEA.1 positive compartments adjacent to large PV after 30 min of recycling in the absence of labeled Tf. On average, C. burnetii-infected cells contained significantly more CD63-positive endosomes than uninfected cells. In contrast, cells containing large vacuoles generated by Chlamydia trachomatis exhibited increased rates of Tf internalization without increased CD63 expression. Our results suggest that C. burnetii infection expands the endosomal system to increase capacity for endocytic material. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the power of high-content imaging for measurement of cellular responses to infection by intracellular pathogens. PMID:28293541

  6. Evidence for an acidic compartment in sea urchin eggs (Paracentrotus lividus): role at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Payan, P; Girard, J P; Viglietti, F

    1987-04-01

    The characteristics of [14C]methylamine accumulation by isolated cortices were measured in eggs from three species of sea urchins: Paracentrotus lividus, Arbacia lixula and Sphaerechinus granularis. In all cases, the results pointed to the existence of an acidic compartment in the cortical zone. In P. lividus eggs, cortical granules did not participate in proton storage which likely took place in pigment granules. [14C]Methylamine accumulation was dramatically reduced by monovalent cation ionophores (monensin and nigericin) and by NH4Cl, but not by valinomycin. ATP depletion only partially affected the isotope uptake. Simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH and of external titratable acidity during ammonia treatment of eggs, indicate that after fertilization, eggs increased their capacity to concentrate hydrogen ions in an intracellular store. Following insemination, cortices from P. lividus eggs exhibited a 3-fold increase in [14C]methylamine accumulation. It is concluded that the egg cortical area contains acidic organelles sequestering hydrogen ions by means of an electrogenic H+ pump, and that this mechanism, enhanced at fertilization, participates in a local alkalinization. The role of such a mechanism is discussed.

  7. Modelling the extra and intracellular uptake and discharge of heavy metals in Fontinalis antipyretica transplanted along a heavy metal and pH contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Fernández, J A; Vázquez, M D; López, J; Carballeira, A

    2006-01-01

    Samples of the aquatic bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. were transplanted to different sites with the aim of characterizing the kinetics of the uptake and discharge of heavy metals in the extra and intracellular compartments. The accumulation of metals in extracellular compartments, characterized by an initial rapid accumulation, then a gradual slowing down over time, fitted perfectly to a Michaelis-Menten model. The discharge of metals from the same compartment followed an inverse linear model or an inverse Michaelis-Menten model, depending on the metal. In intracellular sites both uptake and discharge occurred more slowly and progressively, following a linear model. We also observed that the acidity of the environment greatly affected metal accumulation in extracellular sites, even when the metals were present at relatively high concentrations, whereas the uptake of metals within cells was much less affected by pH.

  8. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-05-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients (2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-(/sup 125/I) insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin, (/sup 125/I)iodide, or (/sup 125/I)tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients.

  9. Telomere-surrounding regions are transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quina, Ana Sofia; Parreira, Leonor . E-mail: lparreir@igc.gulbenkian.pt

    2005-07-01

    Positioning of genes relative to nuclear heterochromatic compartments is thought to help regulate their transcriptional activity. Given that human subtelomeric regions are rich in highly expressed genes, we asked whether human telomeres are related to transcription-permissive nuclear compartments. To address this question, we investigated in the nuclei of normal human lymphocytes the spatial relations of two constitutively expressed genes (ACTB and RARA) and three nuclear transcripts (ACTB, IL2RA and TCRB) to telomeres and centromeres, as a function of gene activity and transcription levels. We observed that genes and gene transcripts locate close to telomere clusters and away from chromocenters upon activation of transcription. These findings, together with the observation that SC35 domains, which are enriched in pre-mRNA processing factors, are in close proximity to telomeres, indicate that telomere-neighboring regions are permissive to gene expression in human cells. Therefore, the associations of telomeres observed in the interphase nucleus might contribute, as opposed to chromocenters, for the establishment of transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments.

  10. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  11. Legionella pneumophilaRequires Polyamines for Optimal Intracellular Growth ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Riveroll, Angela L.; Chong, Audrey; Murray, Lois E.; Lewis, P. Jeffrey; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophilareplicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), into which it abundantly releases its chaperonin, HtpB. To determine whether HtpB remains within the LCV or reaches the host cell cytoplasm, we infected U937 human macrophages and CHO cells with L. pneumophilaexpressing a translocation reporter consisting of the Bordetella pertussisadenylate cyclase fused to HtpB. These infections led to increased cyclic AMP levels, suggesting that HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm. To identify potential functions of cytoplasmic HtpB, we expressed it in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where HtpB induced pseudohyphal growth. A yeast-two-hybrid screen showed that HtpB interacted with S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), an essential yeast enzyme (encoded by SPE2) that is required for polyamine biosynthesis. Increasing the copy number of SPE2induced pseudohyphal growth in S. cerevisiae; thus, we speculated that (i) HtpB induces pseudohyphal growth by activating polyamine synthesis and (ii) L. pneumophilamay require exogenous polyamines for growth. A pharmacological inhibitor of SAMDC significantly reduced L. pneumophilareplication in L929 mouse cells and U937 macrophages, whereas exogenously added polyamines moderately favored intracellular growth, confirming that polyamines and host SAMDC activity promote L. pneumophilaproliferation. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that most known enzymes required for polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria (including SAMDC) are absent in L. pneumophila, further suggesting a need for exogenous polyamines. We hypothesize that HtpB may function to ensure a supply of polyamines in host cells, which are required for the optimal intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. PMID:21742865

  12. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  13. Glycan modification of antigen alters its intracellular routing in dendritic cells, promoting priming of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Ho, Nataschja I; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Boks, Martine Annemarie; Cornelissen, Lenneke AM; Kaur Singh, Satwinder; Saeland, Eirikur; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Ossendorp, Ferry A; Unger, Wendy WJ; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells and intracellular routing of antigens to specific compartments is regulated by C-type lectin receptors that recognize glycan structures. We show that the modification of Ovalbumin (OVA) with the glycan-structure LewisX (LeX) re-directs OVA to the C-type lectin receptor MGL1. LeX-modification of OVA favored Th1 skewing of CD4+ T cells and enhanced cross-priming of CD8+ T cells. While cross-presentation of native OVA requires high antigen dose and TLR stimuli, LeX modification reduces the required amount 100-fold and obviates its dependence on TLR signaling. The OVA-LeX-induced enhancement of T cell cross-priming is MGL1-dependent as shown by reduced CD8+ effector T cell frequencies in MGL1-deficient mice. Moreover, MGL1-mediated cross-presentation of OVA-LeX neither required TAP-transporters nor Cathepsin-S and was still observed after prolonged intracellular storage of antigen in Rab11+LAMP1+ compartments. We conclude that controlled neo-glycosylation of antigens can crucially influence intracellular routing of antigens, the nature and strength of immune responses and should be considered for optimizing current vaccination strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11765.001 PMID:26999763

  14. Numerical modelling of crural fascia mechanical interaction with muscular compartments.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of the crural fascia with muscular compartments and surrounding tissues can be at the origin of different pathologies, such as compartment syndrome. This pathology consists in the onset of excessive intracompartmental pressure, which can have serious consequences for the patient, compromising blood circulation. The investigation of compartment syndrome etiology also takes into account the alteration of crural fascia mechanical properties as a cause of the syndrome, where the fascial stiffening would result in the rise of intracompartmental pressure. This work presents a computational approach toward evaluating some biomechanical aspects of the problem, within the context of a more global viewpoint. Finite element analyses of the interaction phenomena of the crural fascia with adjacent regions are reported here. This study includes the effects of a fascial stiffness increase along the proximal-distal direction and their possible clinical implications. Furthermore, the relationship between different pre-strain levels of the crural fascia in the proximal-distal direction and the rise of internal pressure in muscular compartments are considered. The numerical analyses can clarify which aspects could be directly implied in the rise of compartment syndrome, leading to greater insight into muscle-fascia mechanical phenomena, as well as promoting experimental investigation and clinical analysis of the syndrome.

  15. Review: Intracardiac intracellular angiotensin system in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Yong, Qian Chen; Thomas, Candice M.

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has mainly been categorized as a circulating and a local tissue RAS. A new component of the local system, known as the intracellular RAS, has recently been described. The intracellular RAS is defined as synthesis and action of ANG II intracellularly. This RAS appears to differ from the circulating and the local RAS, in terms of components and the mechanism of action. These differences may alter treatment strategies that target the RAS in several pathological conditions. Recent work from our laboratory has demonstrated significant upregulation of the cardiac, intracellular RAS in diabetes, which is associated with cardiac dysfunction. Here, we have reviewed evidence supporting an intracellular RAS in different cell types, ANG II's actions in cardiac cells, and its mechanism of action, focusing on the intracellular cardiac RAS in diabetes. We have discussed the significance of an intracellular RAS in cardiac pathophysiology and implications for potential therapies. PMID:22170614

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in the nuclear compartment of neurons and glial cells in aging and stroke.

    PubMed

    Pirici, Daniel; Pirici, Ionica; Mogoanta, Laurentiu; Margaritescu, Otilia; Tudorica, Valerica; Margaritescu, Claudiu; Ion, Daniela A; Simionescu, Cristiana; Coconu, Marieta

    2012-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are well-recognized denominators for extracellular matrix remodeling in the pathology of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Recent data on non-nervous system tissue showed intracellular and even intranuclear localizations for different MMPs, and together with this, a plethora of new functions have been proposed for these intracellular active enzymes, but are mostly related to apoptosis induction and malign transformation. In neurons and glial cells, on human tissue, animal models and cell cultures, different active MMPs have been also proven to be located in the intra-cytoplasmic or intra-nuclear compartments, with no clear-cut function. In the present study we show for the first time on human tissue the nuclear expression of MMP-9, mainly in neurons and to a lesser extent in astrocytes. We have studied ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients, as well as aged control patients. Age and ischemic suffering seemed to be the best predictors for an elevated MMP-9 nuclear expression, and there was no evidence of a clear-cut extracellular proteolytic activity for this compartment, as revealed by intact vascular basement membranes and assessment of vascular densities. More, the majority of the cells expressing MMP-9 in the nuclear compartment also co-expressed activated-caspase 3, indicating a possible link between nuclear MMP-9 localization and apoptosis in neuronal and glial cells following an ischemic or hemorrhagic event. These results, besides showing for the first time the nuclear localization of MMP-9 on a large series of human stroke and aged brain tissues, raise new questions regarding the unknown spectrum of the functions MMPs in human CNS pathology.

  17. Intracellular Phosphate Dynamics in Muscle Measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy during Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Fournier, Thomas; Kocevar, Gabriel; Belloi, Amélie; Normand, Gabrielle; Ibarrola, Danielle; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Juillard, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Of the 600-700 mg inorganic phosphate (Pi) removed during a 4-hour hemodialysis session, a maximum of 10% may be extracted from the extracellular space. The origin of the other 90% of removed phosphate is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that the main source of phosphate removed during hemodialysis is the intracellular compartment. Six binephrectomized pigs each underwent one 3-hour hemodialysis session, during which the extracorporeal circulation blood flow was maintained between 100 and 150 ml/min. To determine in vivo phosphate metabolism, we performed phosphorous ((31)P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a 1.5-Tesla system and a surface coil placed over the gluteal muscle region. (31)P magnetic resonance spectra (repetition time =10 s; echo time =0.35 ms) were acquired every 160 seconds before, during, and after dialysis. During the dialysis sessions, plasma phosphate concentrations decreased rapidly (-30.4 %; P=0.003) and then, plateaued before increasing approximately 30 minutes before the end of the sessions; 16 mmol phosphate was removed in each session. When extracellular phosphate levels plateaued, intracellular Pi content increased significantly (11%; P<0.001). Moreover, βATP decreased significantly (P<0.001); however, calcium levels remained balanced. Results of this study show that intracellular Pi is the source of Pi removed during dialysis. The intracellular Pi increase may reflect cellular stress induced by hemodialysis and/or strong intracellular phosphate regulation.

  18. Evaluation of a novel method for measurement of intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Satoh, Ryosuke; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of metal and metalloid species in each of the cell compartments is termed as "metallome". It is important to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial or toxic effects exerted by a given metal or metalloid on human health. Therefore, we developed a method to measure intracellular metal ion concentration (particularly, intracellular calcium ion) in fission yeast. We evaluated the effects of nitric acid (HNO3), zymolyase, and westase treatment on cytolysis in fission yeast. Moreover, we evaluated the changes in the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast in response to treatment with/without micafungin. The fission yeast undergoes lysis when treated with 60% HNO3, which is simpler and cheaper compared to the other treatments. Additionally, the intracellular calcium ion concentration in 60% HNO3-treated fission yeast was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. This study yields significant information pertaining to measurement of the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast, which is useful for elucidating the physiological or pathological functions of calcium ion in the biological systems. This study is the first step to obtain perspective view on the effect of the metallome in biological systems.

  19. Role of H(+)-pyrophosphatase activity in the regulation of intracellular pH in a scuticociliate parasite of turbot: Physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; de Felipe, Ana-Paula; Sueiro, Rosa-Ana; Fontenla, Francisco; Leiro, José-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The scuticociliatosis is a very serious disease that affects the cultured turbot, and whose causal agent is the anphizoic and marine euryhaline ciliate Philasterides dicentrarchi. Several protozoans possess acidic organelles that contain high concentrations of pyrophosphate (PPi), Ca(2+) and other elements with essential roles in vesicular trafficking, pH homeostasis and osmoregulation. P. dicentrarchi possesses a pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) that pumps H(+) through the membranes of vacuolar and alveolar sacs. These compartments share common features with the acidocalcisomes described in other parasitic protozoa (e.g. acid content and Ca(2+) storage). We evaluated the effects of Ca(2+) and ATP on H (+)-PPase activity in this ciliate and analyzed their role in maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis and osmoregulation, by the addition of PPi and inorganic molecules that affect osmolarity. Addition of PPi led to acidification of the intracellular compartments, while the addition of ATP, CaCl2 and bisphosphonates analogous of PPi and Ca(2+) metabolism regulators led to alkalinization and a decrease in H(+)-PPase expression in trophozoites. Addition of NaCl led to proton release, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and downregulation of H(+)-PPase expression. We conclude that the regulation of the acidification of intracellular compartments may be essential for maintaining the intracellular pH homeostasis necessary for survival of ciliates and their adaptation to salt stress, which they will presumably face during the endoparasitic phase, in which the salinity levels are lower than in their natural environment.

  20. 77 FR 19148 - Special Conditions: Airbus, A350-900 Series Airplane; Crew Rest Compartments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...-900 Series Airplane; Crew Rest Compartments AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... separate Crew Rest Compartments: a Flight Crew Rest Compartment (FCRC) intended to be occupied by flight crew members only, and a Cabin Crew Rest Compartment (CCRC) intended to be occupied by cabin...

  1. Psittacine paranasal sinus--a new definition of compartments.

    PubMed

    Artmann, A; Henninger, W

    2001-12-01

    Documentation of the psittacine paranasal sinuses has been limited. To provide more published detail, spiral computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the cephalic and cervical region from cadavers of 10 psittacine birds (Ara ararauna, Ara chloroptera, Ara macao, and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). Skeletal studies, histologic examinations, and evaluation of deep-frozen sections and anatomic preparations confirmed the results of the CT scans. New morphologic details of the paranasal sinus and some compartments were discovered. The paranasal sinuses of these macaws consist of two unpaired rostral compartments, followed caudally by eight paired compartments. Histologic examinations revealed that the walls of the paranasal sinuses consist of flat or cubic monolayer epithelium with underlying connective tissue. The described method of CT examination of these macaws, especially the positioning, scan orientation and parameters, and documentation of the normal paranasal sinus, provides a basis for future clinical use of CT.

  2. Fire safety evaluation of aircraft lavatory and cargo compartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Hilado, C. J.; Anderson, R. A.; Tustin, E.; Arnold, D. E.; Gaume, J. G.; Binding, A. T.; Mikeska, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Large-scale aircraft lavatory and cargo compartment fire tests are described. Tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of these compartments to contain fire and smoke. Two tests were conducted and are detailed. Test 1 involved a production Boeing 747 lavatory of the latest design installed in an enclosure outside the aircraft, to collect gases and expose animals to these gases. Results indicate that the interior of the lavatory was completely burned, evolving smoke and combustion products in the enclosure. Test 2 involved a simulated Douglas DC-10 cargo compartment retro-fitted with standard fiberglass liner. The fire caused excessive damage to the liner and burned through the ceiling in two areas. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed.

  3. A total and biosafe liquefaction compartment for MELiSSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, W.; Albrecht, T.; Kübe, J.; Dussap, G.; Creuly, C.

    2005-10-01

    Envisaging long-duration space missions and settlements on the Moon or even on more distant planets means considering the production of food and the recycling of scarce, valuable chemical species from waste. ESA's MELiSSA project (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is studying, in which five different compartments degrade waste into basic chemicals and then assimilate them into food, clean water and a breathable atmosphere. Crucial to the success of such a closed system is the absolute efficiency of the first compartment, in which all waste is biologically degraded into easily assimilable basic compounds. In order to ease this strenuous task and to ensure total and biosafe liquefaction of the waste, this MAP project is studying additional technologies that complement MELiSSA's waste degrading compartment.

  4. The Posttranslocation Chaperone PrsA2 Contributes to Multiple Facets of Listeria monocytogenes Pathogenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Francis; Port, Gary C.; Cao, Min; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular bacterial pathogen whose virulence depends on the regulated expression of numerous secreted bacterial factors. As for other gram-positive bacteria, many proteins secreted by L. monocytogenes are translocated across the bacterial membrane in an unfolded state to the compartment existing between the membrane and the cell wall. This compartment presents a challenging environment for protein folding due to its high density of negative charge, high concentrations of cations, and low pH. We recently identified PrsA2 as a gene product required for L. monocytogenes virulence. PrsA2 was identified based on its increased secretion by strains containing a mutationally activated form of prfA, the key regulator of L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression. The prsA2 gene product is one of at least two predicted peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerases encoded by L. monocytogenes; these proteins function as posttranslocation protein chaperones and/or foldases. In this study, we demonstrate that PrsA2 plays a unique and important role in L. monocytogenes pathogenesis by promoting the activity and stability of at least two critical secreted virulence factors: listeriolysin O (LLO) and a broad-specificity phospholipase. Loss of PrsA2 activity severely attenuated virulence in mice and impaired bacterial cell-to-cell spread in host cells. In contrast, mutants lacking prsA1 resembled wild-type bacteria with respect to intracellular growth and cell-to-cell spread as well as virulence in mice. PrsA2 is thus distinct from PrsA1 in its unique requirement for the stability and full activity of L. monocytogenes-secreted factors that contribute to host infection. PMID:19451247

  5. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome with Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Kevin; Day, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) syndrome is a condition in which the duodenum becomes compressed between the SMA and the aorta, resulting in bowel obstruction which subsequently compresses surrounding structures. Pressure on the inferior vena cava (IVC) and aorta decreases cardiac output which compromises distal blood flow, resulting in abdominal compartment syndrome with ischemia and renal failure. A 15-year-old male with SMA syndrome presented with 12 hours of pain, a distended, rigid abdomen, mottled skin below the waist, and decreased motor and sensory function in the lower extremities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed ischemic small bowel and stomach with abdominal compartment syndrome. Despite decompression, the patient arrested from hyperkalemia following reperfusion. PMID:28003918

  6. THE ALTERATION OF INTRACELLULAR ENZYMES

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, J. Gordin

    1954-01-01

    1. The ability of homologous series of alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes to cause alteration of intracellular catalase increases approximately threefold for each methylene group added, thus following Traube's rule. Equiactive concentrations of alcohols (methanol to octanol) varied over a 4,000-fold range, yet the average corresponding surface tension was 42 ± 2 dynes/cm., that for ketones 43 ± 2, and for aldehydes (above C1) 41 ± 3. 2. Above C8 the altering activity of alcohols ceased to follow Traube's rule, and at C18 was nil. Yet the surface activities of alcohols from nonanol to dodecanol did follow Traube's rule. These two facts show that the interface which is being affected by these agents is not the cell surface, for if it were, altering activity should not fall off between C9 and C12 where surface activity is undiminished; they show also that micelle formation by short range association of hydrocarbon "tails," usually invoked to explain decrease in biological activity of compounds above C8, is not responsible for this effect in these experiments, in which permeability of the cell membrane probably is involved. 3. The most soluble alcohols and aldehydes (alcohols C1 to C8; aldehydes C1, C2), but not ketones, cause, above optimal concentration, an irreversible inhibition of yeast catalase. 4. The critical concentration of altering agent (i.e., that concentration just sufficient to cause doubling of the catalase activity of the yeast suspension) was independent of the concentration of the yeast cells. 5. Viability studies show that the number of yeast cells killed by the altering agents was not related to the degree of activation of the catalase produced. While all the cells were invariably killed by concentrations of altering agent which produced complete activation, all the cells had been killed by concentrations which were insufficient to cause more than 50 per cent maximal activation. Further, the evidence suggested that the catalase may be partially

  7. Role of Host Cell-Derived Amino Acids in Nutrition of Intracellular Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Jasmin; Noster, Janina; Busch, Kim; Kehl, Alexander; zur Hellen, Gero

    2015-01-01

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica resides in a specific membrane-bound compartment termed the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). Despite being segregated from access to metabolites in the host cell cytosol, Salmonella is able to efficiently proliferate within the SCV. We set out to unravel the nutritional supply of Salmonella in the SCV with focus on amino acids. We studied the availability of amino acids by the generation of auxotrophic strains for alanine, asparagine, aspartate, glutamine, and proline in a macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) and an epithelial cell line (HeLa) and examined access to extracellular nutrients for nutrition. Auxotrophies for alanine, asparagine, or proline attenuated intracellular replication in HeLa cells, while aspartate, asparagine, or proline auxotrophies attenuated intracellular replication in RAW264.7 macrophages. The different patterns of intracellular attenuation of alanine- or aspartate-auxotrophic strains support distinct nutritional conditions in HeLa cells and RAW264.7 macrophages. Supplementation of medium with individual amino acids restored the intracellular replication of mutant strains auxotrophic for asparagine, proline, or glutamine. Similarly, a mutant strain deficient in succinate dehydrogenase was complemented by the extracellular addition of succinate. Complementation of the intracellular replication of auxotrophic Salmonella by external amino acids was possible if bacteria were proficient in the induction of Salmonella-induced filaments (SIFs) but failed in a SIF-deficient background. We propose that the ability of intracellular Salmonella to redirect host cell vesicular transport provides access of amino acids to auxotrophic strains and, more generally, is essential to continuously supply bacteria within the SCV with nutrients. PMID:26351287

  8. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  9. Targeting of endopeptidase 24.16 to different subcellular compartments by alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Sugiura, N; Saruta, Y; Hosoiri, T; Yasue, H; Hirose, S

    1997-06-13

    Endopeptidase 24.16 or mitochondrial oligopeptidase, abbreviated here as EP 24.16 (MOP), is a thiol- and metal-dependent oligopeptidase that is found in multiple intracellular compartments in mammalian cells. From an analysis of the corresponding gene, we found that the distribution of the enzyme to appropriate subcellular locations is achieved by the use of alternative sites for the initiation of transcription. The pig EP 24.16 (MOP) gene spans over 100 kilobases and is organized into 16 exons. The core protein sequence is encoded by exons 5-16 which match perfectly with exons 2-13 of the gene for endopeptidase 24.15, another member of the thimet oligopeptidase family. These two sets of 11 exons share the same splice sites, suggesting a common ancestor. Multiple species of mRNA for EP 24.16 (MOP) were detected by the 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and they were shown to have been generated from a single gene by alternative choices of sites for the initiation of transcription and splicing. Two types of transcript were prepared, corresponding to transcription from distal and proximal sites. Their expression in vitro in COS-1 cells indicated that they encoded two isoforms (long and short) which differed only at their amino termini: the long form contained a cleavable mitochondrial targeting sequence and was directed to mitochondria; the short form, lacking such a signal sequence, remained in the cytosol. The complex structure of the EP 24.16 (MOP) gene thus allows, by alternative promoter usage, a fine transcriptional regulation of coordinate expression, in the different subcellular compartments, of the two isoforms arising from a single gene.

  10. Comparative study of acetazolamide and spironolactone on body fluid compartments on induction to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Jain, S. C.; Rawal, S. B.; Divekar, H. M.; Parshad, Rajinder; Tyagi, A. K.; Sinha, K. C.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were conducted on 29 male healthy subjects having no previous experience of living at high altitude. These subjects were divided into three groups, i.e., subjects treated with placebo, acetazolamide and spironolactone. These subjects were first studied in Delhi. The drug schedule was started 24 hour prior to the airlift of these subjects to an altitude of 3,500 m and was continued for 48 hour after arrival at high altitude. Total body water, extra cellular water, plasma volume, blood electrolytes, pH, pO2, pCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on 3rd and 12th day of their stay at high altitude. Total body water, extra cellular water intracellular water and plasma volume decreased on high altitude exposure. There was a further slight decrease in these compartments with acetazolamide and spironolactone. It was also observed that spironolactone drives out more water from the extracellular compartment. Loss of plasma water was also confirmed by increased plasma osmolality. Increase in arterial blood pH was noticed on hypoxic exposure but the increase was found less in acetazolamide and spironolactone cases. This decrease in pH is expected to result in better oxygen delivery to the tissues at the low oxygen tension. It was also confirmed because blood pO2 increased in both the groups. No significant change in plasma electrolytes was observed in subjects of various groups. Blood viscosity slightly increased on exposure to high altitude. The degree of rise was found less in the group treated with spironolactone. This study suggests that both the drugs are likely to be beneficial in ameliorating/prevention of AMS syndrome.

  11. Sorting signals in the MHC class II invariant chain cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane region determine trafficking to an endocytic processing compartment

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Targeting of MHC class II molecules to the endocytic compartment where they encounter processed antigen is determined by the invariant chain (Ii). By analysis of Ii-transferrin receptor (TR) chimera trafficking, we have identified sorting signals in the Ii cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane region that mediate this process. Two non-tyrosine-based sorting signals in the Ii cytoplasmic tail were identified that mediate localization to plasma membrane clathrin-coated pits and promote rapid endocytosis. Leu7 and Ile8 were required for the activity of the signal most distal to the cell membrane whereas Pro15 Met16 Leu17 were important for the membrane-proximal signal. The same or overlapping non- tyrosine-based sorting signals are essential for delivery of Ii-TR chimeras, either by an intracellular route or via the plasma membrane, to an endocytic compartment where they are rapidly degraded. The Ii transmembrane region is also required for efficient delivery to this endocytic processing compartment and contains a signal distinct from the Ii cytoplasmic tail. More than 80% of the Ii-TR chimera containing the Ii cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane region is delivered directly to the endocytic pathway by an intracellular route, implying that the Ii sorting signals are efficiently recognized by sorting machinery located in the trans-Golgi. PMID:8034737

  12. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following an Iliac Bone Marrow Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Najera, Carlos; Leal-Contreras, Carlos; Leal-Berumen, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is a condition characterized by a raised hydraulic pressure within a closed and non expandable anatomical space. It leads to a vascular insufficiency that becomes critical once the vascular flow cannot return the fluids back to the venous system. This causes a potential irreversible damage of the contents of the compartment, especially within the muscle tissues. Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) secondary to hematomas is seldom reported. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old patient with history of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent a bone marrow aspiration from the posterior iliac crest that had excessive bleeding at the puncture zone. The patient complained of increasing pain, tenderness, and buttock swelling. Intraoperative pressure validation of the gluteal compartment was performed, and a GCS was diagnosed. The patient was treated with a gluteal region fasciotomy. The patient recovered from pain and swelling and was discharged shortly after from the hospital. We believe clotting and hematologic disorders are a primary risk factor in patients who require bone marrow aspirations or biopsies. It is important to improve awareness of GCS in order to achieve early diagnosis, avoid complications, and have a better prognosis. PMID:24392235

  14. 14 CFR 91.613 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... materials. For transport category airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958: (1) For airplanes... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors. 91.613... and Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.613 Materials...

  15. 14 CFR 23.853 - Passenger and crew compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... breakage or failure of such an item would not create a hazard. (f) Airplane materials located on the cabin... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES... compartment to be used by the crew or passengers: (a) The materials must be at least flame-resistant; (b)...

  16. 14 CFR 91.613 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... materials. For transport category airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958: (1) For airplanes... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors. 91.613... and Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.613 Materials...

  17. 14 CFR 121.314 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and baggage compartments. For each transport category airplane type certificated after January 1, 1958... sidewall liner panels which are constructed of: (1) Glass fiber reinforced resin; (2) Materials which meet... number of each airplane listed in the operations specifications issued to the certificate holder...

  18. 14 CFR 121.312 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 121.312 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) All interior materials; transport category airplanes and nontransport category airplanes type certificated before January 1, 1965. Except for the materials..., must comply with the material requirements under which the airplane was type certificated,...

  19. 14 CFR 91.613 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... materials. For transport category airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958: (1) For airplanes... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors. 91.613... and Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.613 Materials...

  20. 14 CFR 23.853 - Passenger and crew compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... breakage or failure of such an item would not create a hazard. (f) Airplane materials located on the cabin... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES... compartment to be used by the crew or passengers: (a) The materials must be at least flame-resistant; (b)...

  1. 14 CFR 121.312 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 121.312 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) All interior materials; transport category airplanes and nontransport category airplanes type certificated before January 1, 1965. Except for the materials..., must comply with the material requirements under which the airplane was type certificated,...

  2. 14 CFR 121.314 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and baggage compartments. For each transport category airplane type certificated after January 1, 1958... sidewall liner panels which are constructed of: (1) Glass fiber reinforced resin; (2) Materials which meet... number of each airplane listed in the operations specifications issued to the certificate holder...

  3. 14 CFR 91.613 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... materials. For transport category airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958: (1) For airplanes... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors. 91.613... and Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.613 Materials...

  4. 14 CFR 91.613 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... materials. For transport category airplanes type certificated after January 1, 1958: (1) For airplanes... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Materials for compartment interiors. 91.613... and Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.613 Materials...

  5. 14 CFR 121.312 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 121.312 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) All interior materials; transport category airplanes and nontransport category airplanes type certificated before January 1, 1965. Except for the materials..., must comply with the material requirements under which the airplane was type certificated,...

  6. 14 CFR 23.853 - Passenger and crew compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... breakage or failure of such an item would not create a hazard. (f) Airplane materials located on the cabin... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES... compartment to be used by the crew or passengers: (a) The materials must be at least flame-resistant; (b)...

  7. 14 CFR 121.312 - Materials for compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 121.312 Materials for compartment interiors. (a) All interior materials; transport category airplanes and nontransport category airplanes type certificated before January 1, 1965. Except for the materials..., must comply with the material requirements under which the airplane was type certificated,...

  8. 14 CFR 23.853 - Passenger and crew compartment interiors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... breakage or failure of such an item would not create a hazard. (f) Airplane materials located on the cabin... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES... compartment to be used by the crew or passengers: (a) The materials must be at least flame-resistant; (b)...

  9. Does oedema following lower limb revascularisation cause compartment syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D. J.; Allen, M. J.; Bell, P. R.; McShane, M.; Barnes, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    Oedema of the leg, particularly the calf, is a well-recognised complication following lower limb reconstructive vascular surgery, but its effect on the limb is unknown. In this study, anterior compartment pressures and calf circumference were measured in both the operated and non-operated limbs following femoropopliteal bypass in 15 patients. All the patients developed lower limb swelling, which was significantly greater than the non-operated limb, P less than 0.05 paired t test (day 2-5). There was a significant difference in the mean anterior compartment pressures between the operated and non-operated limbs on the third and fourth postoperative days for the overall and below knee group, P less than 0.05 (paired t test). However, none of the patients developed signs, symptoms or pressures indicative of a compartment syndrome. These results suggest that the oedema following reconstructive vascular surgery is subcutaneous rather than compartmental in origin and that compartment pressure measurements should only be undertaken if a fasciotomy is being contemplated. Images fig. 2 PMID:3207329

  10. 12. Interior view of battle staff compartment showing the general's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view of battle staff compartment showing the general's chair. View toward front of aircraft. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  11. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  12. 38. Port side of engine compartment at salon deck level, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Port side of engine compartment at salon deck level, with salon wall panels removed to show engine frame. Main connecting rod from crank to walking beam appears at extreme right of view, top of cylinder and piston rod appear at extreme left. - Ferry TICONDEROGA, Route 7, Shelburne, Chittenden County, VT

  13. 14 CFR 125.167 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... temperature. 125.167 Section 125.167 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 125.167 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to ensure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures...

  14. 14 CFR 125.167 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... temperature. 125.167 Section 125.167 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 125.167 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to ensure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures...

  15. 14 CFR 121.269 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... temperature. 121.269 Section 121.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....269 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to insure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures can...

  16. 14 CFR 125.167 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... temperature. 125.167 Section 125.167 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 125.167 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to ensure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures...

  17. 14 CFR 121.269 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... temperature. 121.269 Section 121.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....269 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to insure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures can...

  18. 14 CFR 121.269 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... temperature. 121.269 Section 121.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....269 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to insure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures can...

  19. 14 CFR 121.269 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... temperature. 121.269 Section 121.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....269 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to insure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures can...

  20. 14 CFR 121.269 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... temperature. 121.269 Section 121.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....269 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to insure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures can...

  1. 14 CFR 125.167 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... temperature. 125.167 Section 125.167 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 125.167 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to ensure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures...

  2. 14 CFR 125.167 - Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... temperature. 125.167 Section 125.167 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 125.167 Extinguishing agent container compartment temperature. Precautions must be taken to ensure that the extinguishing agent containers are installed in places where reasonable temperatures...

  3. 14 CFR 29.855 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accessories whose damage or failure would affect safe operation, unless those items are protected so that— (1... endangering the safety of a rotorcraft or its occupants must be designed, or must have a device, to ensure... area may be considered a cargo compartment and, in addition to paragraphs (a) through (d) of...

  4. Test strips detect different CO2 concentrations in closed compartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Four different test strips, using crystal violet for one pair of strips and basic fuchsin as a dye for the second pair, give unambiguous colorimetric indications of four different concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of a closed compartment. Tetraethylene pentamine is used as a dye decoloring agent.

  5. 46 CFR 174.075 - Compartments assumed flooded: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compartments assumed flooded: general. 174.075 Section 174.075 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore...

  6. 46 CFR 174.075 - Compartments assumed flooded: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compartments assumed flooded: general. 174.075 Section 174.075 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore...

  7. 19 CFR 123.24 - Sealing of conveyances or compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sealing of conveyances or compartments. 123.24 Section 123.24 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CBP RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Shipments in Transit Through Canada or...

  8. 9 CFR 354.241 - Cleaning of rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cleaning of rooms and compartments... Sanitary Conditions and Precautions Against Contamination of Products § 354.241 Cleaning of rooms and... rooms shall be of such construction as readily to permit their thorough cleaning, and such docks...

  9. 14 CFR 27.855 - Cargo and baggage compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cargo and baggage compartments. 27.855 Section 27.855 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection §...

  10. Compartment syndrome of the foot in a child.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K; Sharaf, I; Ajay, S

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of a 12-year-old boy with acute compartment syndrome of the foot following a road-traffic accident. Due to the rarity of the injury, there was a delay in diagnosing the injury. An emergency fasciotomy was performed 19 hours after the injury. The foot healed with a mild extension contracture of the second toe.

  11. 49 CFR 179.220-9 - Compartment tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compartment tanks. 179.220-9 Section 179.220-9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for...

  12. 49 CFR 179.200-9 - Compartment tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compartment tanks. 179.200-9 Section 179.200-9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for...

  13. 49 CFR 179.200-9 - Compartment tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compartment tanks. 179.200-9 Section 179.200-9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for...

  14. 49 CFR 179.200-9 - Compartment tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compartment tanks. 179.200-9 Section 179.200-9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for...

  15. 9 CFR 354.221 - Rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rooms and compartments. 354.221 Section 354.221 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... needs of the inspection in the plant may require. They shall be equipped with locks and keys and...

  16. 9 CFR 354.221 - Rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rooms and compartments. 354.221 Section 354.221 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... needs of the inspection in the plant may require. They shall be equipped with locks and keys and...

  17. 9 CFR 354.221 - Rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rooms and compartments. 354.221 Section 354.221 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... needs of the inspection in the plant may require. They shall be equipped with locks and keys and...

  18. 9 CFR 354.221 - Rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rooms and compartments. 354.221 Section 354.221 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... needs of the inspection in the plant may require. They shall be equipped with locks and keys and...

  19. An intracellular replication niche for Vibrio cholerae in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Van der Henst, Charles; Scrignari, Tiziana; Maclachlan, Catherine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogen and the causative agent of cholera. The persistence of this bacterium in aquatic environments is a key epidemiological concern, as cholera is transmitted through contaminated water. Predatory protists, such as amoebae, are major regulators of bacterial populations in such environments. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between V. cholerae and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at the single-cell level. We observed that V. cholerae can resist intracellular killing. The non-digested bacteria were either released or, alternatively, established a replication niche within the contractile vacuole of A. castellanii. V. cholerae was maintained within this compartment even upon encystment. The pathogen ultimately returned to its aquatic habitat through lysis of A. castellanii, a process that was dependent on the production of extracellular polysaccharide by the pathogen. This study reinforces the concept that V. cholerae is a facultative intracellular bacterium and describes a new host–pathogen interaction. PMID:26394005

  20. Multimodal delivery of irinotecan from microparticles with two distinct compartments.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Sahar; Park, Tae-Hong; Dishman, Acacia Frances; Lahann, Joerg

    2013-11-28

    In the last several decades, research in the field of drug delivery has been challenged with the fabrication of carrier systems engineered to deliver therapeutics to the target site with sustained and controlled release kinetics. Herein, we report the fabrication of microparticles composed of two distinct compartments: i) one compartment containing a pH responsive polymer, acetal-modified dextran, and PLGA (polylactide-co-glycolide), and ii) one compartment composed entirely of PLGA. We demonstrate the complete release of dextran from the microparticles during a 10-hour period in an acidic pH environment and the complete degradation of one compartment in less than 24h. This is in congruence with the stability of the same microparticles in neutral pH over the 24-hour period. Such microparticles can be used as pH responsive carrier systems for drug delivery applications where their cargo will only be released when the optimum pH window is reached. The feasibility of the microparticle system for such an application was confirmed by encapsulating a cancer therapeutic, irinotecan, in the compartment containing the acetal-modified dextran polymer and the pH dependent release over a 5-day period was studied. It was found that upon pH change to an acidic environment, over 50% of the drug was first released at a rapid rate for 10h, similar to that observed for the dextran release, before continuing at a more controlled rate for 4 days. As such, these microparticles can play an important role in the fabrication of novel drug delivery systems due to the selective, controlled, and pH responsive release of their encapsulated therapeutics.

  1. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  2. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  3. Sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation induced by a brief BDNF application in rat visual cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Yoshito; Nabekura, Junichi

    2003-08-06

    A 1-2 min application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; 20 ng/ml) induced sustained elevation of intracellular Ca2+ lasting > 90 min, using the fura-2 imaging of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, in visual cortical pyramidal neurons isolated from rats. BDNF increased intracellular Ca2+ through the PLC-gamma phosphorylation after the TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Either K252a or U73122 suppressed intracellular Ca2+ in the absence of BDNF. We suggest that sustained activation of Trk B receptor tyrosine kinase and PLC-gamma occurs after a brief BDNF application and contributes to the short-term maintenance (< 30 min) of the sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation.

  4. Curcumin Mitigates the Intracellular Lipid Deposit Induced by Antipsychotics In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Pastor, Oscar; Reina, Manuel; Lerma, Milagros; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.

    2015-01-01

    Scope First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), both inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and impair the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, leading to lipid accumulation in the late endosome/lysosome compartment. In this study we examined if curcumin, a plant polyphenol that stimulates exosome release, can alleviate antipsychotic-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. Methods HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells were treated with antipsychotics or placebo and DiI-labelled LDL for 18 h and then exposed to curcumin for the last 2 h. Cells and media were collected separately and used for biochemical analyses, electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Exosomes were isolated from the incubation medium by ultracentrifugation. Results Curcumin treatment reduced the number of heterolysosomes and shifted their subcellular localization to the periphery, as revealed by electron microscopy, and stimulated the release of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase and exosome markers flotillin-2 and CD63 into the media. The presence of DiI in exosomes released by cells preloaded with DiI-LDL demonstrated the endolysosomal origin of the microvesicles. Furthermore, curcumin increased the secretion of cholesterol as well as LDL-derived DiI and [3H]-cholesterol, in association with a decrease of intracellular lipids. Thus, the disruption of lipid trafficking induced by FGAs or SGAs can be relieved by curcumin treatment. This polyphenol, however, did not mitigate the reduction of cholesterol esterification induced by antipsychotics. Conclusion Curcumin stimulates exosome release to remove cholesterol (and presumably other lipids) accumulated within the endolysosomal compartment, thereby normalizing intracellular lipid homeostasis. This action may help minimize the adverse metabolic effects of antipsychotic treatment, which should now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26517556

  5. Anatomic variation of the 5th extensor tendon compartment and extensor digiti minimi tendon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    Anatomic variation within the 5th extensor compartment may contribute to the development of tenosynovitis and limit the usefulness of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) for tendon transfer. The purpose of this study was to assess the anatomic variation of the EDM tendon and its surrounding retinaculum, with particular attention to anatomical variation between specimens. Forty-one fresh cadaver hands were dissected. The length of the 5th compartment retinaculum was noted. The incidence of an intercompartmental septum was noted in each specimen as well as the type of tendinous attachments present between the EDM and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendons. The presence and length of any accessory retinacular bands distal to the edge of proper extensor retinaculum was also noted. Only one specimen contained a single EDM tendon, while 71% (n = 29) of specimens contained two slips and 23% (n = 9) had three slips; 24% (n = 10) of EDC tendons had no slip to the small finger, while 61% (n = 25) of specimens had a single slip to the small finger. The EDC's contribution to the small finger was found to be an independent tendon in 42% of cases (n = 17), while 34% (n = 14) of specimens were found to have a common EDC slip, which branched to both the ring and small finger. Three EDM tendons divided distal to the extensor retinaculum, while the remaining EDM tendons divided beneath or proximal to the extensor retinaculum. Seventy-three percent (n = 30) of the specimens had an accessory retinacular band surrounding the EDM tendon identified at the base of the 5th metacarpal. Eighty-eight percent (n = 36) of hands had a septum between the EDM slips. The surgeon should be aware of variability within the 5th dorsal compartment in cases of trauma and in cases of tendon transfer. In our series 30 of 41 specimens were noted to contain an accessory dorsal retinacular band surrounding the EDM and 36 specimens were noted to contain a septum within the 5th compartment. The presence of an

  6. Intracellular Organisms as Placental Invaders

    PubMed Central

    Vigliani, Marguerite B.; Bakardjiev, Anna I.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present a novel model for how the human placenta might get infected via the hematogenous route. We present a list of diverse placental pathogens, like Listeria monocytogenes or Cytomegalovirus, which are familiar to most obstetricians, but others, like Salmonella typhi, have only been reported in case studies or small case series. Remarkably, all of these organisms on this list are either obligate or facultative intracellular organisms. These pathogens are able to enter and survive inside host immune cells for at least a portion of their life cycle. We suggest that many blood-borne pathogens might arrive at the placenta via transportation inside of maternal leukocytes that enter the decidua in early pregnancy. We discuss mechanisms by which extravillous trophoblasts could get infected in the decidua and spread infection to other layers in the placenta. We hope to raise awareness among OB/GYN clinicians that organisms not typically associated with the TORCH list might cause placental infections and pregnancy complications. PMID:27695204

  7. Secretome of obligate intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Kaur, Simran J.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen; Sears, Khandra T.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae) is comprised of obligate intracellular parasites, with virulent species of interest both as causes of emerging infectious diseases and for their potential deployment as bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no effective commercially available vaccines, with treatment limited primarily to tetracycline antibiotics, although others (e.g. josamycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin) are also effective. Much of the recent research geared toward understanding mechanisms underlying rickettsial pathogenicity has centered on characterization of secreted proteins that directly engage eukaryotic cells. Herein, we review all aspects of the Rickettsia secretome, including six secretion systems, 19 characterized secretory proteins, and potential moonlighting proteins identified on surfaces of multiple Rickettsia species. Employing bioinformatics and phylogenomics, we present novel structural and functional insight on each secretion system. Unexpectedly, our investigation revealed that the majority of characterized secretory proteins have not been assigned to their cognate secretion pathways. Furthermore, for most secretion pathways, the requisite signal sequences mediating translocation are poorly understood. As a blueprint for all known routes of protein translocation into host cells, this resource will assist research aimed at uniting characterized secreted proteins with their apposite secretion pathways. Furthermore, our work will help in the identification of novel secreted proteins involved in rickettsial ‘life on the inside’. PMID:25168200

  8. Cardiac alternans and intracellular calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Joshua N.; Blatter, Lothar A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac alternans refers to a condition in which there is a periodic beat-to-beat oscillation in electrical activity and the strength of cardiac muscle contraction at a constant heart rate. Clinically, cardiac alternans occurs in settings that are typical for cardiac arrhythmias and has been causally linked to these conditions. At the cellular level, alternans is defined as beat-to-beat alternations in contraction amplitude (mechanical alternans), action potential duration (APD; electrical or APD alternans), and Ca2+ transient amplitude (Ca2+ alternans). The cause of alternans is multifactorial, however alternans always originate from disturbances of the bi-directional coupling between membrane voltage (Vm) and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Bi-directional coupling refers to the fact that in cardiac cells, Vm depolarization and the generation of action potentials cause the elevation of [Ca2+]i that is required for contraction (a process referred to as excitation-contraction coupling), the changes of [Ca2+]i on the other hand control Vm because important membrane currents are Ca2+-dependent. Evidence is mounting that alternans is ultimately caused by disturbances of cellular Ca2+ signaling. Here we review how two key factors of cardiac cellular Ca2+ cycling - the release of Ca2+ from internal stores and the capability of clearing the cytosol from Ca2+ after each beat - determine the conditions under which alternans occurs. The contributions from key Ca2+ handling proteins - surface membrane channels, ion pumps and transporters, and internal Ca2+ release channels - are discussed. PMID:25040398

  9. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  10. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    PubMed

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-04

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  11. Angiotensin II and FCCP mobilizes calcium from different intracellular pools in adrenal glomerulosa cells; analysis of calcium fluxes.

    PubMed

    Balla, T; Szebeny, M; Kanyar, B; Spät, A

    1985-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of angiotensin II on the different pools of exchangeable Ca2+ in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. On the basis of steady state analysis of 45Ca exchange curves at least three kinetically distinct Ca2+ compartments are present in these cells. The most rapidly exchangeable compartment was regarded as Ca2+ loosely bound to the glycocalyx and the other compartments were considered to be intracellular Ca2+ pools. The effect of angiotensin II on different intracellular compartments was examined by adding the hormone at different phases of Ca2+ washout. Angiotensin increased the rate of 45Ca efflux within 1.5 min when added at the beginning of the washout. This effect, however, could not be detected when the hormone was added at the 30th min of washout, indicating that at least one hormone sensitive pool had lost most of its radioactivity by this time. In contrast to angiotensin II, the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP mobilized almost the same quantity of 45Ca irrespective of the time of its addition during the washout. This latter finding suggests that this presumably mitochondrial Ca2+ pool has a slow rate of exchange and thus differs from the pool initially mobilized by angiotensin II. The initial Ca2+ mobilizing effect of angiotensin II was also observed in a Ca2+-free media which contained EGTA, indicating that this effect is not triggered by increased Ca2+ influx. In the present study we demonstrate in the intact glomerulosa cell that angiotensin II mobilizes Ca2+ from an intracellular Ca2+ store which appears to be distinct from the FCCP-sensitive store.

  12. The Brucella suis virB operon is induced intracellularly in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Foulongne, Vincent; Michaux-Charachon, Sylvie; Bourg, Gisele; Allardet-Servent, Annick; Cazevieille, Chantal; Liautard, Jean Pierre; Ramuz, Michel; O'Callaghan, David

    2002-01-01

    A type IV secretion system similar to the VirB system of the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens is essential for the intracellular survival and multiplication of the mammalian pathogen Brucella. Reverse transcriptase–PCR showed that the 12 genes encoding the Brucella suis VirB system form an operon. Semiquantitative measurements of virB mRNA levels by slot blotting showed that transcription of the virB operon, but not the flanking genes, is regulated by environmental factors in vitro. Flow cytometry used to measure green fluorescent protein expression from the virB promoter confirmed the data from slot blots. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and fluorescence microscopy showed that the virB promoter is induced in macrophages within 3 h after infection. Induction only occurred once the bacteria were inside the cells, and phagosome acidification was shown to be the major signal inducing intracellular expression. Because phagosome acidification is essential for the intracellular multiplication of Brucella, we suggest that it is the signal that triggers the secretion of unknown effector molecules. These effector molecules play a role in the remodeling of the phagosome to create the unique intracellular compartment in which Brucella replicates. PMID:11830669

  13. Pinocytosis and intracellular degradation of exogenous protein: modulation by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular degradation of exogenous (serum) proteins provides a source of amino acids for cellular protein synthesis. Pinocytosis serves as the mechanism for delivering exogenous protein to the lysosomes, the major site of intracellular degradation of exogenous protein. To determine whether the availability of extracellular free amino acids altered pinocytic function, we incubated monolayers of pulmonary alveolar macrophages with the fluid-phase marker, [14C]sucrose, and we dissected the pinocytic process by kinetic analysis. Additionally, intracellular degradation of endogenous and exogenous protein was monitored by measuring phenylalanine released from the cell monolayers in the presence of cycloheximide. Results revealed that in response to a subphysiological level of essential amino acids or to amino acid deprivation, (a) the rate of fluid-phase pinocytosis increased in such a manner as to preferentially increase both delivery to and size of an intracellular compartment believed to be the lysosomes, (b) the degradation of exogenously supplied albumin increased, and (c) the fraction of phenylalanine derived from degradation of exogenous albumin and reutilized for de novo protein synthesis increased. Thus, modulation of the pinosome-lysosome pathway may represent a homeostatic mechanism sensitive to the availability of extracellular free amino acids. PMID:6853596

  14. Striatal patch compartment lesions alter methamphetamine-induced behavior and immediate early gene expression in the striatum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Gilbert, Yamiece E; Logan, Anna S; Hebbard, John C; Horner, Kristen A

    2014-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) induces stereotypy, which is characterized as inflexible, repetitive behavior. Enhanced activation of the patch compartment of the striatum has been correlated with stereotypy, suggesting that stereotypy may be related to preferential activation of this region. However, the specific contribution of the patch compartment to METH-induced stereotypy is not clear. To elucidate the involvement of the patch compartment to the development of METH-induced stereotypy, we determined if destruction of this sub-region altered METH-induced behaviors. Animals were bilaterally infused in the striatum with the neurotoxin dermorphin-saporin (DERM-SAP; 17 ng/μl) to specifically ablate the neurons of the patch compartment. Eight days later, animals were treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg), placed in activity chambers, observed for 2 h and killed. DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the number and total area of mu-labeled patches in the striatum. DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the intensity of METH-induced stereotypy and the spatial immobility typically observed with METH-induced stereotypy. In support of this observation, DERM-SAP pretreatment also significantly increased locomotor activity in METH-treated animals. In the striatum, DERM-SAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced c-Fos expression in the patch compartment, while enhancing METH-induced c-Fos expression in the matrix compartment. DERM-SAP pretreatment followed by METH administration augmented c-Fos expression in the SNpc and reduced METH-induced c-Fos expression in the SNpr. In the medial prefrontal, but not sensorimotor cortex, c-Fos and zif/268 expression was increased following METH treatment in animals pre-treated with DERM-SAP. These data indicate that the patch compartment is necessary for the expression of repetitive behaviors and suggests that alterations in activity in the basal ganglia may contribute to this phenomenon.

  15. Quantification of different classical swine fever virus transmission routes within a single compartment.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Backer, Jantien; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-12-05

    During outbreaks of classical swine fever (CSF), CSF virus (CSFV) can be transmitted via different routes. Understanding these transmission routes is crucial in preventing the unlimited spread of the virus in a naïve population, and the subsequent eradication of the virus from that population. The objectives of the present study were to quantify virus transmission within a compartment, differentiating between transmission within a pen, transmission between pens via contact through (open) pen partitions, and transmission via the air. Furthermore, the possible contribution of each of these routes to infection of individual pigs was quantified. A CSFV outbreak was mimicked in a compartment housing 24 pigs in six different pens. Two pigs in one pen were inoculated with the moderately virulent Paderborn strain, and virus transmission to other pigs was followed in time. Virus transmission rates for transmission via the air (β of 0.33 (0.14-0.64) per day) and transmission between adjacent pens (β of 0.30 (0-0.88) per day) were comparable, but significantly lower than for virus transmission within a pen (β of 6.1 (0.86-18) per day). The route via the air created new focal points of infection, from which virus transmission continued through other routes. This shows that, at least within a compartment, transmission via the air is expected to play a relevant role in the fast spread of the virus after an initial slow start. This will have consequences for efficacy of intervention measures, including vaccination during an outbreak.

  16. GPR18 is required for a normal CD8αα intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Sumida, Hayakazu

    2014-01-01

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) play an important role in maintaining the physiology of the small intestine. The majority of mouse IELs express CD8αα and are either γδ or αβ T cells. Although the development and homing of CD8αα IELs have been studied in some detail, the factors controlling their homeostasis and positioning are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that G protein–coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) is abundantly expressed in CD8αα IELs and that mice lacking this orphan receptor have reduced numbers of γδT IELs. Mixed bone marrow chimera experiments reveal a markedly reduced contribution of GPR18-deficient cells to the CD8αα IEL compartment and a reduction in the CD8αβ T cell subset. These defects could be rescued by transduction with a GPR18-expressing retrovirus. The GPR18-deficient γδT IELs that remained in mixed chimeras had elevated Thy1, and there were less granzyme B+ and Vγ7+ cells, indicating a greater reduction in effector-type cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated GPR18 deficiency more strongly affected the CD8αα cells in the intraepithelial compared with the adjacent lamina propria compartment. These findings establish a requirement for GPR18 in CD8αα and CD8αβ IELs, and we suggest the receptor has a role in augmenting the accumulation of CD8 T cells in the intraepithelial versus lamina propria compartment. PMID:25348153

  17. Sphingosine kinase 2 (Sphk2) regulates platelet biogenesis by providing intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Urtz, Nicole; Gaertner, Florian; Legate, Kyle R; Petzold, Tobias; Lorenz, Michael; Mazharian, Alexandra; Watson, Steve P; Massberg, Steffen

    2013-08-01

    Human megakaryocytes (MKs) release trillions of platelets each day into the circulation to maintain normal homeostatic platelet levels. We have previously shown that extracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays a key role in thrombopoiesis via its receptor S1pr1. In addition to its role as an extracellular mediator, S1P can also function as a second messenger in the intracellular compartment. Although signaling via intracellular S1P is involved in various cellular processes, a role in thrombopoiesis has not been examined. Sphingosine kinases are the key enzymes that produce intracellular S1P. Here we report that sphingosine kinase 2 (Sphk2) is the major messenger RNA species present in MKs. Sphk2 predominantly localizes to the nucleus and is the major source of intracellular S1P in MKs. Loss of Sphk2 significantly reduced intracellular S1P in MKs and downregulated the expression and activity of Src family kinases (SFKs). Loss of Sphk2 and inhibition of SFK activity resulted in defective intravascular proplatelet shedding, the final stage of thrombopoiesis. Correspondingly, mice lacking Sphk2 in the hematopoietic system display thrombocytopenia. Together, our data suggest that Sphk2 provides the source of intracellular S1P that controls thrombopoiesis, which is associated with SFK expression and activity in MKs.

  18. Single point mutations result in the miss-sorting of Glut4 to a novel membrane compartment associated with stress granule proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, XiaoMei; Lichti, Cheryl F; Townsend, R Reid; Mueckler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Insulin increases cellular glucose uptake and metabolism in the postprandial state by acutely stimulating the translocation of the Glut4 glucose transporter from intracellular membrane compartments to the cell surface in muscle and fat cells. The intracellular targeting of Glut4 is dictated by specific structural motifs within cytoplasmic domains of the transporter. We demonstrate that two leucine residues at the extreme C-terminus of Glut4 are critical components of a motif (IRM, insulin responsive motif) involved in the sorting of the transporter to insulin responsive vesicles in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, subcellular fractionation, and sedimentation analysis indicate that mutations in the IRM cause the aberrant targeting of Glut4 to large dispersed membrane vesicles that are not insulin responsive. Proteomic characterization of rapidly and slowly sedimenting membrane vesicles (RSVs and SSVs) that were highly enriched by immunoadsorption for either wild-type Glut4 or an IRM mutant revealed that the major vesicle fraction containing the mutant transporter (IRM-RSVs) possessed a relatively small and highly distinct protein population that was enriched for proteins associated with stress granules. We suggest that the IRM is critical for an early step in the sorting of Glut4 to insulin-responsive subcellular membrane compartments and that IRM mutants are miss-targeted to relatively large, amorphous membrane vesicles that may be involved in a degradation pathway for miss-targeted or miss-folded proteins or represent a transitional membrane compartment that Glut4 traverses en route to insulin responsive storage compartments.

  19. Single Point Mutations Result in the Miss-Sorting of Glut4 to a Novel Membrane Compartment Associated with Stress Granule Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Song, XiaoMei; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Townsend, R. Reid; Mueckler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Insulin increases cellular glucose uptake and metabolism in the postprandial state by acutely stimulating the translocation of the Glut4 glucose transporter from intracellular membrane compartments to the cell surface in muscle and fat cells. The intracellular targeting of Glut4 is dictated by specific structural motifs within cytoplasmic domains of the transporter. We demonstrate that two leucine residues at the extreme C-terminus of Glut4 are critical components of a motif (IRM, insulin responsive motif) involved in the sorting of the transporter to insulin responsive vesicles in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, subcellular fractionation, and sedimentation analysis indicate that mutations in the IRM cause the aberrant targeting of Glut4 to large dispersed membrane vesicles that are not insulin responsive. Proteomic characterization of rapidly and slowly sedimenting membrane vesicles (RSVs and SSVs) that were highly enriched by immunoadsorption for either wild-type Glut4 or an IRM mutant revealed that the major vesicle fraction containing the mutant transporter (IRM-RSVs) possessed a relatively small and highly distinct protein population that was enriched for proteins associated with stress granules. We suggest that the IRM is critical for an early step in the sorting of Glut4 to insulin-responsive subcellular membrane compartments and that IRM mutants are miss-targeted to relatively large, amorphous membrane vesicles that may be involved in a degradation pathway for miss-targeted or miss-folded proteins or represent a transitional membrane compartment that Glut4 traverses en route to insulin responsive storage compartments. PMID:23874650

  20. Endoscopic Thermal Fasciotomy for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Voleti, Pramod B.; Lebrun, Drake G.; Roth, Cameron A.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is an activity-induced condition that occurs when intracompartmental pressures within an osteofascial envelope increase during exercise, leading to reversible ischemic symptoms such as pain, cramping, numbness, or weakness. Nonoperative treatment options for this condition have shown limited success and are often undesirable for the patient given the requirement for activity modification. Traditional surgical treatment options involving open or subcutaneous fasciotomies have more favorable results, but these techniques are associated with significant morbidity. Endoscopically assisted fasciotomy techniques afford the advantages of being minimally invasive, providing excellent visualization, and allowing accelerated rehabilitation. The purpose of this article is to describe a technique for performing endoscopically assisted fasciotomies for chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg using an entirely endoscopic thermal ablating device. The endoscopic thermal fasciotomy technique is associated with minimal morbidity, ensures excellent hemostasis, and affords an early return to sports. PMID:26900549

  1. p73-induced apoptosis: A question of compartments and cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Strano, Sabrina; Roth, Judith; Blandino, Giovanni . E-mail: blandino@ifo.it

    2005-06-10

    The transcriptionally active forms of p73 are capable of inducing apoptosis, and the isoforms termed TAp73 are important players when E2F and its oncogenic activators induce programmed cell death. However, the conditions under that TAp73 can kill a cell remain to be clarified. Recently, it has been found that p73 proteins are not merely floating in the nucleoplasm but rather can associate with specific compartments in the cell. Examples of intranuclear compartments associated with p73 proteins include the PML oncogenic domains and the nuclear matrix. In addition, p73 is found in the cytoplasm. It remains to be seen whether p73 might also associate with mitochondria, in analogy with p53. The relocalization of p73 is expected to be mediated by specific binding partners, mostly other proteins. Here, we discuss the possibility that the compartmentalization of p73, and the cooperation with the corresponding binding partners, might decide about its apoptosis-inducing activity.

  2. Head and neck fascia and compartments: no space for spaces.

    PubMed

    Guidera, Alice K; Dawes, Patrick J D; Fong, Amy; Stringer, Mark D

    2014-07-01

    An accurate understanding of the arrangement of cervical fascia and its associated compartments is essential for differential diagnosis, predicting the spread of disease, and surgical management. The purpose of this detailed review is to summarize the anatomic, clinical, and radiological literature to determine what is known about the arrangement of cervical fascia and to highlight controversies and consensus. The current terminology used to describe cervical fascia and compartments is replete with confusing synonyms and inconsistencies, creating important interdisciplinary differences in understanding. The term "spaces" is inappropriate. A modified nomenclature underpinned by evidence-based anatomic and radiologic findings is proposed. This should not only enhance our understanding of cervical anatomy but also facilitate clearer interdisciplinary communication.

  3. Understanding tumor heterogeneity as functional compartments--superorganisms revisited.

    PubMed

    Grunewald, Thomas G P; Herbst, Saskia M; Heinze, Jürgen; Burdach, Stefan

    2011-05-27

    Compelling evidence broadens our understanding of tumors as highly heterogeneous populations derived from one common progenitor. In this review we portray various stages of tumorigenesis, tumor progression, self-seeding and metastasis in analogy to the superorganisms of insect societies to exemplify the highly complex architecture of a neoplasm as a system of functional "castes."Accordingly, we propose a model in which clonal expansion and cumulative acquisition of genetic alterations produce tumor compartments each equipped with distinct traits and thus distinct functions that cooperate to establish clinically apparent tumors. This functional compartment model also suggests mechanisms for the self-construction of tumor stem cell niches. Thus, thinking of a tumor as a superorganism will provide systemic insight into its functional compartmentalization and may even have clinical implications.

  4. Measuring Compartment Size and Gas Solubility in Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    dissection data were collected from one spotted dolphin , one bottlenose dolphin , three common dolphins , one elephant seal, three californian sea lions and...deviation for body compartments of three common dolphins of similar age (subadults and adults) but with different body condition. Muscle was the most...AL, Dennison SE, Early G, Garner MM, Hayward BA, Lentell BJ, Rotstein DS (2009) Gas Bubbles in Seals, Dolphins , and Porpoises Entangled and Drowned

  5. Closeup view if the starboard side of the crew compartment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view if the starboard side of the crew compartment mid-deck of the Orbiter Discovery. This is a close up view of the galley for meal preparations. In the center right of the image is stowage lockers that are designated to store meals for the mission. This photograph was taken at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Diagnosis of Compartment Syndrome Based on Tissue Oxygenation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    measured with microprobes has been shown to be highly correlated with tissue oxygenation and the extent of ischemia reperfusion injury .3 Near-infrared...Tissue Oxygenation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hubert Kim, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Northern California Institute for...SUBTITLE Diagnosis of Compartment Syndrome based on Tissue Oxygenation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-1024 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  7. Shaped Charge Jet/Propellant Interactions in a Vented Compartment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    the vented ammunition compartment. One of these was the Susquehanna Instruments Model ST-4 tourmaline transducer, a nonresonant transducer capable of...S1-4 tourmaline gauges and those at positons 3 and 4 were Kistler Model 617A tourmaline gauges. Thin strips of metal were welded over the trans- ducers...two different types of piezoelectric transducers. One was a fast almost totally non- resonant though somewhat temperature sensitive Tourmaline bar gauge

  8. Bacterial assemblages differ between compartments within the coral holobiont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, M. J.; Croquer, A.; Bythell, J. C.

    2011-03-01

    It is widely accepted that corals are associated with a diverse and host species-specific microbiota, but how they are organized within their hosts remains poorly understood. Previous sampling techniques (blasted coral tissues, coral swabs and milked mucus) may preferentially sample from different compartments such as mucus, tissue and skeleton, or amalgamate them, making comparisons and generalizations between studies difficult. This study characterized bacterial communities of corals with minimal mechanical disruption and contamination from water, air and sediments from three compartments: surface mucus layer (SML), coral tissue and coral skeleton. A novel apparatus (the `snot sucker') was used to separate the SML from tissues and skeleton, and these three compartments were compared to swab samples and milked mucus along with adjacent environmental samples (water column and sediments). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity was significantly different between the various coral compartments and environmental samples (PERMANOVA, F = 6.9, df = 8, P = 0.001), the only exceptions being the complete crushed coral samples and the coral skeleton, which were similar, because the skeleton represents a proportionally large volume and supports a relatively rich microflora. Milked mucus differed significantly from the SML collected with the `snot sucker' and was contaminated with zooxanthellae, suggesting that it may originate at least partially from the gastrovascular cavity rather than the tissue surface. A common method of sampling the SML, surface swabs, produced a bacterial community profile distinct from the SML sampled using our novel apparatus and also showed contamination from coral tissues. Our results indicate that microbial communities are spatially structured within the coral holobiont, and methods used to describe these need to be standardized to allow comparisons between studies.

  9. Closeup view of the reflective insulation protecting the Crew Compartment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the reflective insulation protecting the Crew Compartment bulkhead, orbiter structure and landing gear housing in the void created by the removal of the Forward Reaction Control System Module from the forward section of the Orbiter Discovery. This image was taken from the service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  10. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26401507

  11. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Lesson Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated. PMID:27186379

  12. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-12-20

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome.

  13. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  14. The pseudo-compartment method for coupling partial differential equation and compartment-based models of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Flegg, Mark B

    2015-05-06

    Spatial reaction-diffusion models have been employed to describe many emergent phenomena in biological systems. The modelling technique most commonly adopted in the literature implements systems of partial differential equations (PDEs), which assumes there are sufficient densities of particles that a continuum approximation is valid. However, owing to recent advances in computational power, the simulation and therefore postulation, of computationally intensive individual-based models has become a popular way to investigate the effects of noise in reaction-diffusion systems in which regions of low copy numbers exist. The specific stochastic models with which we shall be concerned in this manuscript are referred to as 'compartment-based' or 'on-lattice'. These models are characterized by a discretization of the computational domain into a grid/lattice of 'compartments'. Within each compartment, particles are assumed to be well mixed and are permitted to react with other particles within their compartment or to transfer between neighbouring compartments. Stochastic models provide accuracy, but at the cost of significant computational resources. For models that have regions of both low and high concentrations, it is often desirable, for reasons of efficiency, to employ coupled multi-scale modelling paradigms. In this work, we develop two hybrid algorithms in which a PDE in one region of the domain is coupled to a compartment-based model in the other. Rather than attempting to balance average fluxes, our algorithms answer a more fundamental question: 'how are individual particles transported between the vastly different model descriptions?' First, we present an algorithm derived by carefully redefining the continuous PDE concentration as a probability distribution. While this first algorithm shows very strong convergence to analytical solutions of test problems, it can be cumbersome to simulate. Our second algorithm is a simplified and more efficient implementation of

  15. Stimulation of macrophage protease secretion via liposomal delivery of muramyl dipeptide derivatives to intracellular sites.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, K; Juliano, R L; Lopez-Berestein, G

    1984-01-01

    We have observed that murine macrophages can be activated for enhanced neutral protease secretion by exposing the cells to muramyl dipeptides (MDPs). A lipophilic derivative of nor-MDP is more efficacious than the parent hydrophilic nor-MDP. The efficacy and potency of the lipophilic and more prominently the hydrophilic drugs can be increased (10-10(3) fold) by encapsulating them in lipid vesicles (liposomes); however the encapsulation of drug causes a delay in the onset of activation. The enhanced effectiveness of liposomal MDPs seems in part, to be due to increased uptake, slow release and thus potentiated action of the drug at intracellular sites as emphasized by studies with [3H]-MDP. Appropriate distribution of the drug to intracellular compartments of the cell also seems to be an important factor in the activation process. The internalization of a relatively large amounts (greater than 5 ng/10(6) cells) of nor-MDP results in 'down regulation', that is reduced protease secretion, as compared to effects produced by internalization of lesser amounts of the drug. The macrophage activating effects of liposomal MDPs do not seem to require the processing of liposomes in the lysosomal compartment; thus lysosome-blocking agents, such as chloroquine and dextran sulphate, do not affect the induction of protease secretion. PMID:6365745

  16. Intracellular shuttling and mitochondrial function of thioredoxin-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Geetu; Chen, Junqin; Shalev, Anath

    2010-02-05

    The thioredoxin-interacting protein TXNIP is a ubiquitously expressed redox protein that promotes apoptosis. Recently, we found that TXNIP deficiency protects against type 1 and 2 diabetes by inhibiting beta cell apoptosis and maintaining pancreatic beta cell mass, indicating that TXNIP plays a key role in beta cell biology. However, very little is known about the intracellular localization and function of TXNIP, and although TXNIP has been thought to be a cytoplasmic protein, our immunohistochemistry studies in beta cells surprisingly revealed a nuclear TXNIP localization, suggesting that TXNIP may shuttle within the cell. Using immunohistochemistry/confocal imaging and cell fractionation/co-immunoprecipitation, we found that, under physiological conditions, TXNIP is localized primarily in the nucleus of pancreatic beta cells, whereas oxidative stress leads to TXNIP shuttling into the mitochondria. In mitochondria, TXNIP binds to and oxidizes Trx2, thereby reducing Trx2 binding to ASK1 and allowing for ASK1 phosphorylation/activation, resulting in induction of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis with cytochrome c release and caspase-3 cleavage. TXNIP overexpression and Trx2 (but not cytosolic Trx1) silencing mimic these effects. Thus, we discovered that TXNIP shuttles between subcellular compartments in response to oxidative stress and identified a novel redox-sensitive mitochondrial TXNIP-Trx2-ASK1 signaling cascade.

  17. Sequestration of host metabolism by an intracellular pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Gehre, Lena; Gorgette, Olivier; Perrinet, Stéphanie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Ducatez, Mathieu; Giebel, Amanda M; Nelson, David E; Ball, Steven G; Subtil, Agathe

    2016-01-01

    For intracellular pathogens, residence in a vacuole provides a shelter against cytosolic host defense to the cost of limited access to nutrients. The human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis grows in a glycogen-rich vacuole. How this large polymer accumulates there is unknown. We reveal that host glycogen stores shift to the vacuole through two pathways: bulk uptake from the cytoplasmic pool, and de novo synthesis. We provide evidence that bacterial glycogen metabolism enzymes are secreted into the vacuole lumen through type 3 secretion. Our data bring strong support to the following scenario: bacteria co-opt the host transporter SLC35D2 to import UDP-glucose into the vacuole, where it serves as substrate for de novo glycogen synthesis, through a remarkable adaptation of the bacterial glycogen synthase. Based on these findings we propose that parasitophorous vacuoles not only offer protection but also provide a microorganism-controlled metabolically active compartment essential for redirecting host resources to the pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12552.001 PMID:26981769

  18. Intracellular phthalocyanine localization: confocal laser scanning microscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaeva, Elena B.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Leeuwen, A. G.

    1994-02-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) are promising second-generation photosensitizers for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. We report on the tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS4) localization in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In these cells AlPcS4 was found in granules surrounding Golgi apparatus and in the peripheral cytoplasmic region. Peripheral Pc-containing granules partially coincided with the acidic cellular compartments. The effect of irradiation with light on Pc intracellular distribution was also studied. In the Pc-free medium disruption of some Pc- containing granules was observed followed by appearance of Pc fluorescence in the cell plasma membrane, the nuclear envelope, and the near-nuclear region. When cells were irradiated in the presence of Pc in external medium a drastic increase of membrane permeability to Pc was observed, followed by Pc binding the cell plasma membrane, nuclear envelope, and some structures in the cytoplasm. Diffusive Pc fluorescence in the nucleus was also observed. The implication of observed Pc redistribution caused by irradiation with light for the PDT protocol is discussed.

  19. Intracellular Microreactors as Artificial Organelles to Conduct Multiple Enzymatic Reactions Simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, María; Labay, Cédric; Jansman, Michelle M T; Ek, Pramod K; Hosta-Rigau, Leticia

    2017-02-01

    The creation of artificial organelles is a new paradigm in medical therapy that aims to substitute for missing cellular function by replenishing a specific cellular task. Artificial organelles tackle the challenge of mimicking metabolism, which is the set of chemical reactions that occur within a cell, mainly catalyzed by enzymes. So far, the few reported carriers able to conduct enzymatic reactions intracellularly are based on single-compartment carriers. However, cell organelles outperform by conducting multiple reactions simultaneously within confined sub-compartments. Here, the field of artificial organelles is advanced by reporting the assembly of a microreactor consisting of polymer capsules entrapping gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and liposomes as sub-compartments. The fluorescence properties of AuNCs are employed to monitor the microreactors uptake by macrophages. Encapsulation is demonstrated and functionality of microreactors with trypsin (TRP) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-loaded liposomes is preserved. Multiple enzymatic reactions taking place simultaneously is demonstrated by exposing macrophages with the internalized microreactors to bis-(benzyloxycarbonyl-Ile-Pro-Arg)-Rho-110 and Amplex Red substrates, which are specific for TRP and HRP, respectively. Conversion of the substrates into the respective fluorescent products is observed. This report on the first microreactor conducting multiple enzymatic reactions simultaneously inside a cell is a considerable step in the field of artificial organelles.

  20. Deltoid Compartment Syndrome: A Rare Complication after Humeral Intraosseous Access

    PubMed Central

    Thadikonda, Kishan M.; Ma, Irene; Spiess, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a 65-year-old woman who developed a delayed deltoid compartment syndrome after resuscitation via humeral intraosseous access. Initially she was treated conservatively but then was taken emergently for a fasciotomy. After confirming the diagnosis with compartment pressures, a 2-incision approach was employed and a large hematoma was evacuated from the inferior margin of the anterior deltoid. The rest of the deltoid was inspected and debrided to healthy bleeding tissue. Her fasciotomy wounds were left open to heal on their own due to her tenuous clinical condition. At most recent follow-up, she had full range of motion in her shoulder and no residual pain. Our unique case study is the first documented incidence of upper extremity compartment syndrome after intraosseous access. Additionally, our case supports using humeral access only as a second-line option if lower extremity access is not available and prolonged vigilant monitoring after discontinuing intraosseous access to prevent disastrous late complications. PMID:28203508

  1. Design/Development of Spacecraft and Module Crew Compartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the design and development of crew compartments for spacecraft and for modules. The Crew Compartment or Crew Station is defined as the spacecraft interior and all other areas the crewman interfaces inside the cabin, or may potentially interface.It uses examples from all of the human rated spacecraft. It includes information about the process, significant drivers for the design, habitability, definitions of models, mockups, prototypes and trainers, including pictures of each stage in the development from Apollo, pictures of the space shuttle trainers, and International Space Station trainers. It further reviews the size and shape of the Space Shuttle orbiter crew compartment, and the Apollo command module and the lunar module. It also has a chart which reviews the International Space Station (ISS) internal volume by stage. The placement and use of windows is also discussed. Interestingly according to the table presented, the number 1 rated piece of equipment for recreation was viewing windows. The design of crew positions and restraints, crew translation aids and hardware restraints is shown with views of the restraints and handholds used from the Apollo program through the ISS.

  2. Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by a Stochastically Gated Gap Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze a one-dimensional PDE-ODE system representing the diffusion of signaling molecules between two cells coupled by a stochastically gated gap junction. We assume that signaling molecules diffuse within the cytoplasm of each cell and then either bind to some active region of the cell's membrane (treated as a well-mixed compartment) or pass through the gap junction to the interior of the other cell. We treat the gap junction as a randomly fluctuating gate that switches between an open and a closed state according to a two-state Markov process. This means that the resulting PDE-ODE is stochastic due to the presence of a randomly switching boundary in the interior of the domain. It is assumed that each membrane compartment acts as a conditional oscillator, that is, it sits below a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. In the ungated case (gap junction always open), the system supports diffusion-induced oscillations, in which the concentration of signaling molecules within the two compartments is either in-phase or anti-phase. The presence of a reflection symmetry (for identical cells) means that the stochastic gate only affects the existence of anti-phase oscillations. In particular, there exist parameter choices where the gated system supports oscillations, but the ungated system does not, and vice versa. The existence of oscillations is investigated by solving a spectral problem obtained by averaging over realizations of the stochastic gate.

  3. The statolith compartment in Chara rhizoids contains carbohydrate and protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang-Cahill, F.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, the alga Chara has rhizoids with single membrane-bound compartments that function as statoliths in gravity perception. Previous work has demonstrated that these statoliths contain barium sulfate crystals. In this study, we show that statoliths in Chara rhizoids react with a Coomassie Brilliant Blue cytochemical stain for proteins. While statoliths did not react with silver methenamine carbohydrate cytochemistry, the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M2, which is against a carbohydrate (sycamore-maple rhamnogalacturonan I), labeled the statolith compartment. These results demonstrate that in addition to barium sulfate, statoliths in Chara rhizoids have an organic matrix that consists of protein and carbohydrate moieties. Since the statoliths were silver methenamine negative, the carbohydrate in this compartment could be a 3-linked polysaccharide. CCRC-M2 also labeled Golgi cisternae, Golgi-associated vesicles, apical vesicles, and cell walls in the rhizoids. The specificity of CCRC-M2 immunolabeling was verified by several control experiments, including the demonstration that labeling was abolished when the antibody was preabsorbed with its antigen. Since in this and a previous study (John Z. Kiss and L. Andrew Staehelin, American Journal of Botany 80: 273-282, 1993) antibodies against higher plant carbohydrates crossreacted with cell walls of Chara in a specific manner, Characean algae may be a useful model system in biochemical and molecular studies of cell walls.

  4. The biogenesis of the MHC class II compartment in human I-cell disease B lymphoblasts

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The localization and intracellular transport of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules nd lysosomal hydrolases were studied in I-Cell Disease (ICD) B lymphoblasts, which possess a mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-independent targeting pathway for lysosomal enzymes. In the trans-Golgi network (TGN), MHC class II- invariant chain complexes colocalized with the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D in buds and vesicles that lacked markers of clathrin-coated vesicle-mediated transport. These vesicles fused with the endocytic pathway leading to the formation of "early" MHC class II-rich compartments (MIICs). Similar structures were observed in the TGN of normal beta lymphoblasts although they were less abundant. Metabolic labeling and subcellular fractionation experiments indicated that newly synthesized cathepsin D and MHC class II-invariant chain complexes enter a non-clathrin-coated vesicular structure after their passage through the TGN and segregation from the secretory pathway. These vesicles were also devoid of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptor, a marker of early and late endosomes. These findings suggest that in ICD B lymphoblasts the majority of MHC class II molecules are transported directly from the TGN to "early" MIICs and that acid hydrolases cam be incorporated into MIICs simultaneously by a Man-6-P-independant process. PMID:8603911

  5. Proteomic analysis of dendritic cell-derived exosomes: a secreted subcellular compartment distinct from apoptotic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Théry, C; Boussac, M; Véron, P; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Raposo, G; Garin, J; Amigorena, S

    2001-06-15

    Dendritic cells constitutively secrete a population of small (50-90 nm diameter) Ag-presenting vesicles called exosomes. When sensitized with tumor antigenic peptides, dendritic cells produce exosomes, which stimulate anti-tumor immune responses and the rejection of established tumors in mice. Using a systematic proteomic approach, we establish the first extensive protein map of a particular exosome population; 21 new exosomal proteins were thus identified. Most proteins present in exosomes are related to endocytic compartments. New exosomal residents include cytosolic proteins most likely involved in exosome biogenesis and function, mainly cytoskeleton-related (cofilin, profilin I, and elongation factor 1alpha) and intracellular membrane transport and signaling factors (such as several annexins, rab 7 and 11, rap1B, and syntenin). Importantly, we also identified a novel category of exosomal proteins related to apoptosis: thioredoxin peroxidase II, Alix, 14-3-3, and galectin-3. These findings led us to analyze possible structural relationships between exosomes and microvesicles released by apoptotic cells. We show that although they both represent secreted populations of membrane vesicles relevant to immune responses, exosomes and apoptotic vesicles are biochemically and morphologically distinct. Therefore, in addition to cytokines, dendritic cells produce a specific population of membrane vesicles, exosomes, with unique molecular composition and strong immunostimulating properties.

  6. Recycling of proteins from the Golgi compartment to the ER in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the carboxyl terminal sequence His-Asp-Glu-Leu (HDEL) has been shown to function as an ER retention sequence (Pelham, H. R. B., K. G. Hardwick, and M. J. Lewis. 1988. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 7:1757-1762). To examine the mechanism of retention of soluble ER proteins in yeast, we have analyzed the expression of a preproalpha factor fusion protein, tagged at the carboxyl terminus with the HDEL sequence. We demonstrate that this fusion protein, expressed in vivo, accumulates intracellularly as a precursor containing both ER and Golgi-specific oligosaccharide modifications. The Golgi-specific carbohydrate modification, which occurs in a SEC18-dependent manner, consists of alpha 1-6 mannose linkages, with no detectable alpha 1-3 mannose additions, indicating that the transit of the HDEL-tagged fusion protein is confined to an early Golgi compartment. Results obtained from the fractionation of subcellular organelles from yeast expressing HDEL-tagged fusion proteins suggest that the Golgi-modified species are present in the ER. Overexpression of HDEL-tagged preproalpha factor results in the secretion of an endogenous HDEL-containing protein, demonstrating that the HDEL recognition system can be saturated. These results support the model in which the retention of these proteins in the ER is dependent on their receptor-mediated recycling from the Golgi complex back to the ER. PMID:2199456

  7. Biocompatible click chemistry enabled compartment-specific pH measurement inside E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maiyun; Jalloh, Abubakar S; Wei, Wei; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Peng; Chen, Peng R

    2014-09-19

    Bioorthogonal reactions, especially the Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, have revolutionized our ability to label and manipulate biomolecules under living conditions. The cytotoxicity of Cu(I) ions, however, has hindered the application of this reaction in the internal space of living cells. By systematically surveying a panel of Cu(I)-stabilizing ligands in promoting protein labelling within the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, we identify a highly efficient and biocompatible catalyst for intracellular modification of proteins by azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This reaction permits us to conjugate an environment-sensitive fluorophore site specifically onto HdeA, an acid-stress chaperone that adopts pH-dependent conformational changes, in both the periplasm and cytoplasm of E. coli. The resulting protein-fluorophore hybrid pH indicators enable compartment-specific pH measurement to determine the pH gradient across the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. This construct also allows the measurement of E. coli transmembrane potential, and the determination of the proton motive force across its inner membrane under normal and acid-stress conditions.

  8. Neuroprotection by estrogen in the brain: the mitochondrial compartment as presumed therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Susanne; Beyer, Cordian

    2009-07-01

    Neuroprotection by estrogen in the CNS is well-documented and comprises the intricate regulation of cell-cell communication between neurons and supportive non-neuronal glial cells. It is assumed that these interactions are essential for cell survival under pathological and toxic conditions by regulating the allocation of trophic molecules, e.g., growth factors, controlling relevant intracellular anti-apoptotic and death cascades, and attenuating inflammatory processes. Malfunction and disturbance of mitochondria are doubtlessly associated with brain cell degeneration during neurotoxic and neurodegenerative processes. Estrogen has been documented as protective agent in the brain by stimulating growth factor supply and cell-intrinsic pro-/anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. In recent years, an additional estrogen-dependent safe-guarding strategy comes into the focus of neuronal protection. The mitochondrial compartment appears to be regulated by estrogen at the level of ATP and reactive oxygen species production as well as under a structural-functional viewpoint. In the present article, we would like to highlight recent data which demonstrate that sex steroids can directly and indirectly interfere with mitochondrial properties via non-nuclear, presumably mitochondria-intrinsic and nuclear signaling mechanisms. This enables mitochondria to cope with pathological processes and provide stabile local energy homeostasis and an anti-apoptotic base setting in the brain which, in turn, is a prerequisite for neuronal survival.

  9. The role of the cell wall compartment in mutualistic symbioses of plants

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Mélanie K.; Schorderet, Martine; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plants engage in mutualistic interactions with microbes that improve their mineral nutrient supply. The most wide-spread symbiotic association is arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), in which fungi of the order Glomeromycota invade roots and colonize the cellular lumen of cortical cells. The establishment of this interaction requires a dedicated molecular-genetic program and a cellular machinery of the plant host. This program is partially shared with the root nodule symbiosis (RNS), which involves prokaryotic partners collectively referred to as rhizobia. Both, AM and RNS are endosymbioses that involve intracellular accommodation of the microbial partner in the cells of the plant host. Since plant cells are surrounded by sturdy cell walls, root penetration and cell invasion requires mechanisms to overcome this barrier while maintaining the cytoplasm of the two partners separate during development of the symbiotic association. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of the cell wall compartment in establishment and functioning of plant symbioses with the emphasis on AM and RNS, and we describe the stages of the AM association between the model organisms Petunia hybrida and Rhizophagus irregularis. PMID:24917869

  10. Dynamic regulation of the cancer stem cell compartment by Cripto-1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francescangeli, F; Contavalli, P; De Angelis, M L; Baiocchi, M; Gambara, G; Pagliuca, A; Fiorenzano, A; Prezioso, C; Boe, A; Todaro, M; Stassi, G; Castro, N P; Watanabe, K; Salomon, D S; De Maria, R; Minchiotti, G; Zeuner, A

    2015-01-01

    Stemness was recently depicted as a dynamic condition in normal and tumor cells. We found that the embryonic protein Cripto-1 (CR1) was expressed by normal stem cells at the bottom of colonic crypts and by cancer stem cells (CSCs) in colorectal tumor tissues. CR1-positive populations isolated from patient-derived tumor spheroids exhibited increased clonogenic capacity and expression of stem-cell-related genes. CR1 expression in tumor spheroids was variable over time, being subject to a complex regulation of the intracellular, surface and secreted protein, which was related to changes of the clonogenic capacity at the population level. CR1 silencing induced CSC growth arrest in vitro with a concomitant decrease of Src/Akt signaling, while in vivo it inhibited the growth of CSC-derived tumor xenografts and reduced CSC numbers. Importantly, CR1 silencing in established xenografts through an inducible expression system decreased CSC growth in both primary and metastatic tumors, indicating an essential role of CR1 in the regulation the CSC compartment. These results point to CR1 as a novel and dynamically regulated effector of stem cell functions in colorectal cancer. PMID:26343543

  11. Changes in cell, matrix compartment, and fibrillar collagen volumes between growth-plate zones.

    PubMed

    Noonan, K J; Hunziker, E B; Nessler, J; Buckwalter, J A

    1998-07-01

    To define the contributions of changes in cell, matrix compartment, and fibrillar collagen volumes to longitudinal bone growth, we measured the differences in cell, pericellular/territorial matrix and interterritorial matrix volumes, and fibrillar collagen concentrations between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones of the proximal tibial physes of six miniature pigs. The mean numerical density of cells decreased from 110,000 cells/mm3 in the upper proliferative zone to 59,900 cells/mm3 in the lower hypertrophic zone. The mean cell volume increased nearly 5-fold (from 1,174 to 5,530 microm3), and the total matrix volume per cell increased 46% (from 8,040 to 11,760 microm3/cell) between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones. Both the pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell and the interterritorial matrix volume per cell increased between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones; the pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell increased 61% (from 4,580 to 7,390 microm3/cell), whereas the interterritorial matrix volume per cell increased 26% (from 3,460 to 4,370 microm3/cell). The total increase in mean cell volume of 4,356 microm3 exceeded the total increase in mean matrix volume per cell of 3,720 microm3; the total mean pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell increased more than the total mean interterritorial matrix volume per cell (2,810 compared with 910 microm3/cell). Fibrillar collagen concentration was greater in the interterritorial matrix than in the pericellular/territorial matrix in both zones and increased in both matrix compartments between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones. The amount of fibrillar collagen per cell also increased in both matrix compartments between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones (from 1,720 to 3,100 microm3/cell in the pericellular/territorial matrix and from 1,490 to 2,230 microm3/cell in the interterritorial matrix; thus, the total

  12. View of bulkhead mounted steam powered windlass in compartment B126 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of bulkhead mounted steam powered windlass in compartment B-126 used for servicng boiler room compartments B-3 and B-4. (052A) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Intracellular delivery and trafficking dynamics of a lymphoma-targeting antibody-polymer conjugate.

    PubMed

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Shi, Julie; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Duvall, Craig L; Pun, Suzie H; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2012-12-03

    Ratiometric fluorescence and cellular fractionation studies were employed to characterize the intracellular trafficking dynamics of antibody-poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) conjugates in CD22+ RAMOS-AW cells. The HD39 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directs CD22-dependent, receptor-mediated uptake in human B-cell lymphoma cells, where it is rapidly trafficked to the lysosomal compartment. To characterize the intracellular-release dynamics of the polymer-mAb conjugates, HD39-streptavidin (HD39/SA) was dual-labeled with pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 488 and pH-sensitive pHrodo fluorophores. The subcellular pH distribution of the HD39/SA-polymer conjugates was quantified as a function of time by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and the average intracellular pH value experienced by the conjugates was also characterized as a function of time by flow cytometry. PPAA was shown to alter the intracellular trafficking kinetics strongly relative to HD39/SA alone or HD39/SA conjugates with a control polymer, poly(methacryclic acid) (PMAA). Subcellular trafficking studies revealed that after 6 h, only 11% of the HD39/SA-PPAA conjugates had been trafficked to acidic lysosomal compartments with values at or below pH 5.6. In contrast, the average intracellular pH of HD39/SA alone dropped from 6.7 ± 0.2 at 1 h to 5.6 ± 0.5 after 3 h and 4.7 ± 0.6 after 6 h. Conjugation of the control polymer PMAA to HD39/SA showed an average pH drop similar to that of HD39/SA. Subcellular fractionation studies with tritium-labeled HD39/SA demonstrated that after 6 h, 89% of HD39/SA was associated with endosomes (Rab5+) and lysosomes (Lamp2+), while 45% of HD39/SA-PPAA was translocated to the cytosol (lactate dehydrogenase+). These results demonstrate the endosomal-releasing properties of PPAA with antibody-polymer conjugates and detail their intracellular trafficking dynamics and subcellular compartmental distributions over time.

  14. Community structure at two compartments of a disturbed mangrove forests at Pulau Langkawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norilani, W. I. Wan; Juliana, W. A. Wan; Salam, Muhamad Razali; Latiff, A.

    2014-09-01

    A study on floristic composition and estimation of above ground biomass of trees was carried out in two areas of disturbed mangroves at Kisap Forest Reserve, Pulau Langkawi. Two compartments that were selected was based on the different types of disturbances, i.e. compartment 5 (C5) was disrupted by human harvesting activities of mangrove trees for charcoal production, while compartment 7 (C7) was naturally disturbed from lightning strikes. In C5, a total of 1,217 trees measuring 1 cm DBH and above were enumerated in the plots of 0.25 ha which included 7 species and 5 genera in 3 families, i.e. Rhizophoraceae, Meliaceae and Avicenniaceae. In C7, a total of 390 individual trees of 8 species, 5 genera and 3 families were recorded. The three families recorded in C7 were also common in C5. Rhizophoraceae was recorded as the family with highest density in both compartments. Ceriops tagal had the highest density in C5, while Rhizophora apiculata was the most prominent species in the C7. Total basal area that represents tree coverage showed C5 had a value of 7.767 m2/ha with C. tagal as the major contributor at 5.022m2/ha. Total coverage in C7 was 18.184 m2/ha that was mostly contributed by R. apiculata at 11.135 m2/ha. Ceriops tagal (22.41 t/ha) and R. apiculata (111.75 t/ha), were the main contributors to the total biomass in C5 (37.34 t/ha) and C7 (162.29 t/ha), respectively. The distribution of individuals of six tree size classes in C7 was homogenous compared to that of C5, which had more saplings. In this study, the total biomass indicated that anthropogenic activities resulted in lower productivity of forest compared to natural disturbance. Therefore, conservation efforts of mangrove forest should be enhance in the management of mangrove forest in Pulau Langkawi.

  15. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  16. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-associated VAPB-P56S inclusions represent an ER quality control compartment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein aggregation and the formation of intracellular inclusions are a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders, but precise knowledge about their pathogenic role is lacking in most instances. Here we have characterized inclusions formed in transgenic mice carrying the P56S mutant form of VAPB that causes various motor neuron syndromes including ALS8. Results Inclusions in motor neurons of VAPB-P56S transgenic mice are characterized by the presence of smooth ER-like tubular profiles, and are immunoreactive for factors that operate in the ER associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, including p97/VCP, Derlin-1, and the ER membrane chaperone BAP31. The presence of these inclusions does not correlate with signs of axonal and neuronal degeneration, and axotomy leads to their gradual disappearance, indicating that they represent reversible structures. Inhibition of the proteasome and knockdown of the ER membrane chaperone BAP31 increased the size of mutant VAPB inclusions in primary neuron cultures, while knockdown of TEB4, an ERAD ubiquitin-protein ligase, reduced their size. Mutant VAPB did not codistribute with mutant forms of seipin that are associated with an autosomal dominant motor neuron disease, and accumulate in a protective ER derived compartment termed ERPO (ER protective organelle) in neurons. Conclusions The data indicate that the VAPB-P56S inclusions represent a novel reversible ER quality control compartment that is formed when the amount of mutant VAPB exceeds the capacity of the ERAD pathway and that isolates misfolded and aggregated VAPB from the rest of the ER. The presence of this quality control compartment reveals an additional level of flexibility of neurons to cope with misfolded protein stress in the ER. PMID:24252306

  17. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Fanea, Laura; David, Leontin I.; Lebovici, Andrei; Carbone, Francesca; Sfrangeu, Silviu A.

    2012-01-01

    Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM) of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy. PMID:22666304

  18. 75 FR 81 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Flightcrew Rest Compartment Occupiable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... wishes to use an OFCR compartment as ``sleeping quarters,'' the compartment must undergo an additional... suitability'' evaluation or a ``sleeping quarters'' evaluation of its OFCR compartment. The results of these... berths and must be compatible with the sleeping position during cruise conditions. There must be...

  19. 75 FR 75 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Overhead Crew Rest Compartment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... operator wishes to use an OCR compartment as ``sleeping quarters,'' the compartment must undergo an... request a ``basic suitability'' evaluation or a ``sleeping quarters'' evaluation of its OCR compartment... provided for berths and must be compatible for the sleeping attitude during cruise conditions. There...

  20. 46 CFR 58.16-20 - Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming... and Heating § 58.16-20 Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances. (a... and the other extending to the overhead of the compartment. Powered ventilation may be used...

  1. 46 CFR 58.16-20 - Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming... and Heating § 58.16-20 Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances. (a... and the other extending to the overhead of the compartment. Powered ventilation may be used...

  2. 46 CFR 58.16-20 - Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming... and Heating § 58.16-20 Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances. (a... and the other extending to the overhead of the compartment. Powered ventilation may be used...

  3. 46 CFR 58.16-20 - Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming... and Heating § 58.16-20 Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances. (a... and the other extending to the overhead of the compartment. Powered ventilation may be used...

  4. 46 CFR 58.16-20 - Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming... and Heating § 58.16-20 Ventilation of compartments containing gas-consuming appliances. (a... and the other extending to the overhead of the compartment. Powered ventilation may be used...

  5. Compartment A126 port side. Note ash hoist for boiler room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Compartment A-126 port side. Note ash hoist for boiler room compartment B-1 and compartment B-2. Scuttlebutt (drinking water fountain) is at right center of photograph. Manikin wearing WWII wave uniform is in display case at left center. (045) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Acute compartment syndrome after muscle rupture in a non-athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Thennavan, A S; Funk, L; Volans, A P

    1999-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome after muscle rupture, although rare, is a limb threatening condition, which warrants emergency treatment. The case of acute compartment syndrome secondary to a gastrocnemius muscle tear of the right lower leg, in a non-athlete is reported. To our knowledge, this is the only description of acute compartment syndrome due to muscle rupture in a non-athlete. PMID:10505928

  7. 14 CFR 121.587 - Closing and locking of flightcrew compartment door.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... compartment door. 121.587 Section 121.587 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... locking of flightcrew compartment door. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a pilot in command of an airplane that has a lockable flightcrew compartment door in accordance with §...

  8. 14 CFR 121.587 - Closing and locking of flightcrew compartment door.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... compartment door. 121.587 Section 121.587 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... locking of flightcrew compartment door. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a pilot in command of an airplane that has a lockable flightcrew compartment door in accordance with §...

  9. View forward to aft of compartment B126. Note steam powered ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View forward to aft of compartment B-126. Note steam powered windlass for ash hoist that services boiler room compartment B-3 and compartment B-4. Ash hoist conveyor rail is at top left. Diving suit and helmet dating from 1950's is displayed in case at center of photograph. (049) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. 46 CFR 58.25-40 - Arrangement of the steering-gear compartment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Arrangement of the steering-gear compartment. 58.25-40... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-40 Arrangement of the steering-gear compartment. (a) The steering-gear compartment must— (1) Be readily accessible and, as far as...

  11. 14 CFR 25.858 - Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire... Construction Fire Protection § 25.858 Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection systems. If certification with cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection provisions is requested, the...

  12. 14 CFR 25.858 - Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire... Construction Fire Protection § 25.858 Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection systems. If certification with cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection provisions is requested, the...

  13. 14 CFR 25.858 - Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire... Construction Fire Protection § 25.858 Cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection systems. If certification with cargo or baggage compartment smoke or fire detection provisions is requested, the...

  14. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

    PubMed

    Garayoa, Santiago Amillo; Romero-Muñoz, Luis M; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm requires immediate treatment to avoid damage of the soft tissues and a poor functional outcome for the forearm. Muscular and bone lesions are the main causes of acute compartment syndromes. We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by a calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

  15. 14 CFR 121.576 - Retention of items of mass in passenger and crew compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... crew compartments. 121.576 Section 121.576 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 121.576 Retention of items of mass in passenger and crew compartments. The certificate holder must... each item of crew baggage, which is carried in a passenger or crew compartment from becoming a...

  16. Intracellular minerals and metal deposits in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Bazylinski, D A

    2008-06-01

    Thanks to the work of Terrance J. Beveridge and other pioneers in the field of metal-microbe interactions, prokaryotes are well known to sequester metals and other ions intracellularly in various forms. These forms range from poorly ordered deposits of metals to well-ordered mineral crystals. Studies on well-ordered crystalline structures have generally focused on intracellular organelles produced by magnetotactic bacteria that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and marine environments that precipitate Fe(3)O(4) or Fe(3)S(4), Fe-bearing minerals that have magnetic properties and are enclosed in intracellular membranes. In contrast, studies on less-well ordered minerals have focused on Fe-, As-, Mn-, Au-, Se- and Cd-precipitates that occur intracellularly. The biological and environmental function of these particles remains a matter of debate.

  17. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  18. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    nanocapsules with specific cancer cell targeting ligands; Task 3. Preparing and testing of MMP activatable cell penetrating peptides (ACCPs)-coupled...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0371 TITLE: Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...SUBTITLE Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0371 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  19. Chlamydia causes fragmentation of the Golgi compartment to ensure reproduction.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Dagmar; Rejman Lipinski, Anette; Machuy, Nikolaus; Karlas, Alexander; Wehrens, Andrea; Siedler, Frank; Brinkmann, Volker; Meyer, Thomas F

    2009-02-05

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis survives and replicates within a membrane-bound vacuole, termed the inclusion, which intercepts host exocytic pathways to obtain nutrients. Like many other intracellular pathogens, C. trachomatis has a marked requirement for host cell lipids, such as sphingolipids and cholesterol, produced in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. However, the mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens acquire host cell lipids are not well understood. In particular, no host cell protein responsible for transporting Golgi-derived lipids to the chlamydial inclusions has yet been identified. Here we show that Chlamydia infection in human epithelial cells induces Golgi fragmentation to generate Golgi ministacks surrounding the bacterial inclusion. Ministack formation is triggered by the proteolytic cleavage of the Golgi matrix protein golgin-84. Inhibition of golgin-84 truncation prevents Golgi fragmentation, causing a block in lipid acquisition and maturation of C. trachomatis. Golgi fragmentation by means of RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of distinct Golgi matrix proteins before infection enhances bacterial maturation. Our data functionally connect bacteria-induced golgin-84 cleavage, Golgi ministack formation, lipid acquisition and intracellular pathogen growth. We show that C. trachomatis subverts the structure and function of an entire host cell organelle for its own advantage.

  20. Human Sirtuin 2 Localization, Transient Interactions, and Impact on the Proteome Point to Its Role in Intracellular Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Budayeva, Hanna G; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-10-01

    previously unrecognized involvement in intracellular trafficking pathways, which may contribute to its roles in cellular homeostasis and human diseases.

  1. Umami changes intracellular Ca2+ levels using intracellular and extracellular sources in mouse taste receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Mori, Tomohiko; Hayashi, Yukako

    2006-11-01

    Recently, candidates for umami receptors have been identified in taste cells, but the precise transduction mechanisms of the downstream receptor remain unknown. To investigate how intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the umami transduction pathway, we measured changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels in response to umami stimuli monosodium glutamate (MSG), IMP, and MSG + IMP in mouse taste receptor cells (TRCs) by Ca(2+) imaging. Even when extracellular Ca(2+) was absent, 1/3 of umami-responsive TRCs exhibited increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels. When intracellular Ca(2+) was depleted, half of the TRCs retained their response to umami. These results suggest that umami-responsive TRCs increase their intracellular Ca(2+) levels through two pathways: by releasing Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and by an influx of Ca(2+) from extracellular sources. We conclude that the Ca(2+) influx from extracellular source might play an important role in the synergistic effect between MSG and IMP.

  2. Limited fetal metabolism of rosiglitazone: Elimination via the maternal compartment in the pregnant ewe.

    PubMed

    Bazargan, Maryam; Foster, David Jr; Muhlhausler, Beverly S; Morrison, Janna L; McMillen, ICaroline; Davey, Andrew K

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that fetal drug exposure is common, the disposition of drugs in the fetus is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate fetal placental and non-placental disposition of rosiglitazone in the pregnant ewe. Steady state was reached after day 5 of fetal infusion, and were ∼1.8 fold higher than maternal concentrations (P<0.001). The AUC for fetal rosiglitazone concentration throughout the infusion was inversely correlated with placental and fetal weight. Metabolic activity of the fetal liver microsomes were ∼25 fold lower than maternal microsomes (P<0.001). The findings suggest that trans-placental transfer is the major route through which rosiglitazone is cleared from the fetal compartment, while non-placental hepatic elimination makes only a minor contribution. This supports a limited capacity of the fetus for eliminating this class of drugs, and highlights the potential for drug toxicity when administering pharmacotherapy to the mother/fetus in human pregnancy.

  3. Exercise-induced Pediatric Lumbar Paravertebral Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Verena M; Ward, W Timothy

    2015-09-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is described as an elevation of interstitial pressure in a closed fascial compartment that can lead to damage of the microvasculature with subsequent tissue necrosis. Although paravertebral compartment syndrome has been described there is no case of paravertebral compartment syndrome that has been described in the pediatric population. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who presented at our institution with severe, acute-onset low back pain that started shortly after a rigorous 4-hour workout. He was diagnosed with acute lumbar paravertebral compartment syndrome and underwent emergent fasciotomy with 2 more debridements.

  4. Renal compartment segmentation in DCE-MRI images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Le Minh, Hung; Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting; Sung, Kyung Hyun; Liu, Wenyu

    2016-08-01

    Renal compartment segmentation from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) images is an important task for functional kidney evaluation. Despite advancement in segmentation methods, most of them focus on segmenting an entire kidney on CT images, there still lacks effective and automatic solutions for accurate segmentation of internal renal structures (i.e. cortex, medulla and renal pelvis) from DCE-MRI images. In this paper, we introduce a method for renal compartment segmentation which can robustly achieve high segmentation accuracy for a wide range of DCE-MRI data, and meanwhile requires little manual operations and parameter settings. The proposed method consists of five main steps. First, we pre-process the image time series to reduce the motion artifacts caused by the movement of the patients during the scans and enhance the kidney regions. Second, the kidney is segmented as a whole based on the concept of Maximally Stable Temporal Volume (MSTV). The proposed MSTV detects anatomical structures that are homogeneous in the spatial domain and stable in terms of temporal dynamics. MSTV-based kidney segmentation is robust to noises and does not require a training phase. It can well adapt to kidney shape variations caused by renal dysfunction. Third, voxels in the segmented kidney are described by principal components (PCs) to remove temporal redundancy and noises. And then k-means clustering of PCs is applied to separate voxels into multiple clusters. Fourth, the clusters are automatically labeled as cortex, medulla and pelvis based on voxels' geometric locations and intensity distribution. Finally, an iterative refinement method is introduced to further remove noises in each segmented compartment. Experiments on 14 real clinical kidney datasets and 12 synthetic dataset demonstrate that results produced by our method match very well with those segmented manually and the performance of our method is superior to the other five existing methods.

  5. Amoebae-Based Screening Reveals a Novel Family of Compounds Restricting Intracellular Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher F; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Finsel, Ivo; Manske, Christian; Hoffmann, Christine; Steiner, Bernhard; Kranjc, Agata; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophelie; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Soldati, Thierry; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-10

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, Legionella pneumophila, grows in environmental amoebae and mammalian macrophages within a distinct compartment, the 'Legionella-containing vacuole' (LCV). Intracellular bacteria are protected from many antibiotics, and thus are notoriously difficult to eradicate. To identify novel compounds that restrict intracellular bacterial replication, we previously developed an assay based on a coculture of amoebae and GFP-producing L. pneumophila. This assay was used to screen a pathway-based, highly diverse chemical library, referred to as the Sinergia library. In this work, we chose to focus on a group of 11 hit compounds, the majority of which originated from the query molecule CN585, a compound that targets the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Further studies on 78 related compound variants revealed crucial structural attributes, namely a triple-ring scaffold with a central triazine moiety, substituted in positions 3 and 5 by two piperidine or pyrrolidine rings, and in position 1 by an amine group bearing a single aliphatic chain moiety. The most effective compound, ZINC00615682, inhibited intracellular replication of L. pneumophila with an IC50 of approximately 20 nM in Acanthamoeba castellanii and slightly less efficiently in Dictyostelium discoideum or macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic attempts to implicate calcineurin in the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila failed. Taken together, these results show that the amoebae-based screen and structure-activity relationship analysis is suitable for the identification of novel inhibitors of the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. The most potent compound identified in this study targets (an) as yet unidentified host factor(s).

  6. Dual Readout BRET/FRET Sensors for Measuring Intracellular Zinc

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded FRET-based sensor proteins have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the intracellular functions of Zn2+. However, the external excitation required for these fluorescent sensors can give rise to photobleaching and phototoxicity during long-term imaging, limits applications that suffer from autofluorescence and light scattering, and is not compatible with light-sensitive cells. For these applications, sensor proteins based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) would provide an attractive alternative. In this work, we used the bright and stable luciferase NanoLuc to create the first genetically encoded BRET sensors for measuring intracellular Zn2+. Using a new sensor approach, the NanoLuc domain was fused to the Cerulean donor domain of two previously developed FRET sensors, eCALWY and eZinCh-2. In addition to preserving the excellent Zn2+ affinity and specificity of their predecessors, these newly developed sensors enable both BRET- and FRET-based detection. While the dynamic range of the BRET signal for the eCALWY-based BLCALWY-1 sensor was limited by the presence of two competing BRET pathways, BRET/FRET sensors based on the eZinCh-2 scaffold (BLZinCh-1 and -2) yielded robust 25–30% changes in BRET ratio. In addition, introduction of a chromophore-silencing mutation resulted in a BRET-only sensor (BLZinCh-3) with increased BRET response (50%) and an unexpected 10-fold increase in Zn2+ affinity. The combination of robust ratiometric response, physiologically relevant Zn2+ affinities, and stable and bright luminescence signal offered by the BLZinCh sensors allowed monitoring of intracellular Zn2+ in plate-based assays as well as intracellular BRET-based imaging in single living cells in real time. PMID:27547982

  7. Vinyl acetate induces intracellular acidification in mouse oral buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Wagner, Mark; Melvin, James E; Bogdanffy, Matthew S

    2005-08-14

    Vinyl acetate exposure in drinking water has been associated with tumor formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract of rats and mice. One potential mechanism for inducing carcinogenesis involves acidification of the intracellular environment due to the metabolism of vinyl acetate to acetic acid. Prolonged intracellular acidification is thought to produce cytotoxic and/or mitogenic responses that are the sentinel pharmacodynamic steps toward cancer. To determine whether exposure to vinyl acetate affects the intracellular pH of intact oral cavity tissue, isolated mouse oral buccal epithelium was loaded with the pH-sensitive dye BCECF, and then exposed to vinyl acetate concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 microM for up to 4 min. Extracellular vinyl acetate exposure induced a progressive intracellular acidification that was reversible upon removal of the vinyl acetate. The rate of the acidification was concentration-dependent and increased exponentially within the concentration range tested. The magnitude of the vinyl acetate-induced acidification was inhibited by pretreatment with the carboxylesterase inhibitor bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that vinyl acetate contributes to the generation and progression of oral cavity tumors via a process of intracellular acidification. Such a process has been proposed to have practical dose-response thresholds below which the intracellular environment can be maintained within homeostatic bounds and the contribution of exposure to carcinogenic risk is negligible.

  8. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation packages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on tile US Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama.

  9. Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Poa, D.S.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Johnson, G.K.

    1991-12-31

    An electrolytic process and apparatus for reducing calcium oxide in a molten electrolyte of CaCl{sub 2}-CaF{sub 2} with a graphite anode in which particles or other contamination from the anode is restricted by the use of a porous barrier in the form of a basket surrounding the anode which may be removed from the electrolyte to burn the graphite particles, and wherein the calcium oxide feed is introduced to the anode compartment to increase the oxygen ion concentration at the anode.

  10. Acute Compartment Syndrome in Orthopedics: Causes, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Hasnain; Mahapatra, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Almost all orthopaedic surgeons come across acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in their clinical practice. Diagnosis of ACS mostly relies on clinical findings. If the diagnosis is missed and left untreated, it can lead to serious consequences which can endanger limb and life of the patient and also risk the clinician to face lawsuits. This review article highlights the characteristic features of ACS which will help an orthopaedic surgeon to understand the pathophysiology, natural history, high risk patients, diagnosis, and surgical management of the condition. PMID:25688303

  11. Relevance of mangled extremity severity score to compartment syndromes.

    PubMed

    Uslu, M M; Altun, N S; Cila, E; Atik, O S

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relevance of a mangled extremity severity score (MESS) to the evaluation of intracompartmental pressure in injured patients. We measured intracompartmental pressures with a modification of the Whitesides method and compared these values with MESS in 27 patients after trauma. For 5 of them fasciotomy was necessary to relieve high intracompartmental pressures. In our series MESS seemed to correlate with intracompartmental pressure values (r = 0.733, P < 0.05). We conclude that the MESS system provides objective criteria in determining the risk of a compartment syndrome.

  12. Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Poa, Davis S.; Pierce, R. Dean; Mulcahey, Thomas P.; Johnson, Gerald K.

    1993-01-01

    An electrolytic process and apparatus for reducing calcium oxide in a molten electrolyte of CaCl.sub.2 -CaF.sub.2 with a graphite anode in which particles or other contamination from the anode is restricted by the use of a porous barrier in the form of a basket surrounding the anode which may be removed from the electrolyte to burn the graphite particles, and wherein the calcium oxide feed is introduced to the anode compartment to increase the oxygen ion concentration at the anode.

  13. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Thigh in Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mechanisms such as motor vehicle trauma (1), femur fracture (2, 3), blunt vascular injury (4), and contusion (5, 6); (b) compressive mechanisms of injury...anesthesia (12); (c) internal hemorrhage or fluid extravasation such as coagulopathy and intramuscular hematoma (13, 14), false aneurysm (15), hamstring...Ipsilateral Femur Fracture Bilateral Compartment Syndromes ISS ½ 25 Nonsurvivors (n D 7) 42.4 š 8.6 70.1 š 5.6 0% (0/7) 86% (6/7) 100% (7/7

  14. Surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome; indications and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Leppäniemi, Ari

    2009-01-01

    The indications for surgical decompression of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are not clearly defined, but undoubtedly some patients benefit from it. In patients without recent abdominal incisions, it can be achieved with full-thickness laparostomy (either midline, or transverse subcostal) or through a subcutaneous linea alba fasciotomy. In spite of the improvement in physiological variables and significant decrease in IAP, however, the effects of surgical decompression on organ function and outcome are less clear. Because of the significant morbidity associated with surgical decompression and the management of the ensuing open abdomen, more research is needed to better define the appropriate indications and techniques for surgical intervention. PMID:19366442

  15. A Toxoplasma gondii protein with homology to intracellular type Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers is important for osmoregulation and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Francia, Maria E.; Wicher, Sarah; Pace, Douglas A.; Sullivan, Jack; Moreno, Silvia N.J.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2011-06-10

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is exposed to a variety of physiological conditions while propagating in an infected organism. The mechanisms by which Toxoplasma overcomes these dramatic changes in its environment are not known. In yeast and plants, ion detoxification and osmotic regulation are controlled by vacuolar compartments. A novel compartment named the plant-like vacuole or vacuolar compartment (PLV/VAC) has recently been described in T.gondii, which could potentially protect extracellular tachyzoites against salt and other ionic stresses. Here, we report the molecular characterization of the vacuolar type Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in T. gondii, TgNHE3, and its co-localization with the PLV/VAC proton-pyrophosphatase (TgVP1). We have created a TgNHE3 knockout strain, which is more sensitive to hyperosmotic shock and toxic levels of sodium, possesses a higher intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, and exhibits a reduced host invasion efficiency. The defect in invasion correlates with a measurable reduction in the secretion of the adhesin TgMIC2. Overall, our results suggest that the PLV/VAC has functions analogous to those of the vacuolar compartments of plants and yeasts, providing the parasite with a mechanism to resist ionic fluctuations and, potentially, regulate protein trafficking.

  16. Compartment Syndrome as a Result of Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    D'Egidio, Gianni; Wan, Cynthia; Baxter, Alan; Rosenberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe a single case of Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) with a rare complication of compartment syndrome. Patient. Our patient is a 57-year-old male, referred to our hospital due to polycythemia (hemoglobin (Hgb) of 220 g/L), hypotension, acute renal failure, and bilateral calf pain. Measurements and Main Results. The patient required bilateral forearm, thigh, and calf fasciotomies during his ICU stay and continuous renal replacement therapy was instituted following onset of acute renal failure and oliguria. Ongoing hemodynamic (Norepinephrine and Milrinone infusion) and respiratory (ventilator) support in the ICU was provided until resolution of intravascular fluid extravasation. Conclusions. SCLS is an extremely rare disorder characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability, which causes shift of volume and protein from the intravascular space to the interstitial space. Patients present with significant hypotension, hemoconcentration, hypovolemia, and oliguria. Severe edema results from leakage of fluid and proteins into tissue. The most important part of treatment is maintaining stable hemodynamics, ruling out other causes of shock and diligent monitoring for complications. Awareness of the clinical syndrome with the rare complication of compartment syndrome may help guide investigations and diagnoses of these critically ill patients. PMID:27688917

  17. Fire safety evaluation of aircraft lavatory and cargo compartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Hilado, C. J.; Anderson, R. A.; Tustin, E.; Arnold, D. B.; Gaume, J. G.; Binding, A. T.; Mikeska, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A program of experimental fires has been carried out to assess fire containment and other fire hazards in lavatory and cargo compartments of wide-body jet aircraft by evaluation of ignition time, burn-through time, fire spread rate, smoke density, evolution of selected combustible and toxic gases, heat flux, and detector response. Two tests were conducted: one involving a standard Boeing 747 lavatory and one involving a simulated DC-10 cargo compartment. A production lavatory module was furnished with conventional materials and was installed in an enclosure. The ignition load was four polyethylene bags containing paper and plastic waste materials representive of a maximum flight cabin waste load. Standard aircraft ventilation conditions were utilized and the lavatory door was closed during the test. Lavatory wall and ceiling panels contained the fire spread during the 30-minute test. Smoke was driven into the enclosure primarily through the ventilation grille in the door and through the gaps between the bifold door and the jamb where the door distorted from the heat earlier in the test. The interior of the lavatory was almost completely destroyed by the fire.

  18. [Compartment analysis of 123I-IMP brain SPECT].

    PubMed

    Higano, S; Shishido, F; Aizawa, Y; Miura, S; Murakami, M; Inugami, A; Kanno, I; Fujita, H; Uemura, K

    1990-01-01

    To clarify the kinetics of N-isopropyl [123I]p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in the brain, 2-compartment analysis was applied for brain SPECT with 57-minute dynamic scan in 9 subjects. The model consisted of blood component and brain tissue component. Two transfer rate constants were defined; k1 showed the rate from the blood to the brain tissue, and k2 was that of back diffusion. The late scan was performed 210 minutes after the tracer injection. Suitable k values best fitting to the dynamic data were determined for all regions of interest. Predicted regional cerebral activity at 210 minutes using 57-minute dynamic data was well agreed with measured activity. These showed the kinetics of IMP in the brain was well described by the 2-compartment model. The partition coefficient (k1/k2 ratio) was as large as about 35, and almost constant in the various brain structures including hypoperfused areas. These findings indicated that the initial IMP images reflected the reasonable CBF distribution, which gave relatively reliable CBF values even if using microsphere model.

  19. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology.

  20. Delayed Presentation of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome: The Argument for Fasciotomy

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, John E.; Cundall-Curry, Duncan J.; Stohr, Kuldeep K.

    2016-01-01

    A male patient in his fifties presented to his local hospital with numbness and weakness of the right leg which left him unable to mobilise. He reported injecting heroin the previous morning. Following an initial diagnosis of acute limb ischaemia the patient was transferred to a tertiary centre where Computed Tomography Angiography was reported as normal. Detailed neurological examination revealed weakness in hip flexion and extension (1/5 on the Medical Research Council scale) with complete paralysis of muscle groups distal to this. Sensation to pinprick and light touch was globally reduced. Blood tests revealed acute kidney injury with raised creatinine kinase and the patient was treated for rhabdomyolysis. Orthopaedic referral was made the following day and a diagnosis of gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) was made. Emergency fasciotomy was performed 56 hours after the onset of symptoms. There was immediate neurological improvement following decompression and the patient was rehabilitated with complete nerve recovery and function at eight-week follow-up. This is the first documented case of full functional recovery following a delayed presentation of GCS with sciatic nerve palsy. We discuss the arguments for and against fasciotomy in cases of compartment syndrome with significant delay in presentation or diagnosis. PMID:27073707

  1. Involvement of the mitochondrial compartment in human NCL fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzini, Francesco; Gismondi, Floriana; Tessa, Alessandra; Tonin, Paola; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Mole, Sara E.; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Simonati, Alessandro

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial reticulum fragmentation occurs in human CLN1 and CLN6 fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Likewise mitochondrial shift-to periphery and decreased mitochondrial density are seen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced caspase-mediated apoptosis occurs following STS treatment in CLN1 fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders of childhood, characterized by the endo-lysosomal storage of autofluorescent material. Impaired mitochondrial function is often associated with neurodegeneration, possibly related to the apoptotic cascade. In this study we investigated the possible effects of lysosomal accumulation on the mitochondrial compartment in the fibroblasts of two NCL forms, CLN1 and CLN6. Fragmented mitochondrial reticulum was observed in all cells by using the intravital fluorescent marker Mitotracker, mainly in the perinuclear region. This was also associated with intense signal from the lysosomal markers Lysotracker and LAMP2. Likewise, mitochondria appeared to be reduced in number and shifted to the cell periphery by electron microscopy; moreover the mitochondrial markers VDCA and COX IV were reduced following quantitative Western blot analysis. Whilst there was no evidence of increased cell death under basal condition, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic nuclei following Staurosporine treatment in CLN1 cells only. In conclusion, the mitochondrial compartment is affected in NCL fibroblasts invitro, and CLN1 cells seem to be more vulnerable to the negative effects of stressed mitochondrial membrane than CLN6 cells.

  2. Medulloblastoma subgroups remain stable across primary and metastatic compartments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mack, Stephen; Gendoo, Deena M A; Remke, Marc; Wu, Xiaochong; Garzia, Livia; Luu, Betty; Cavalli, Florence; Peacock, John; López, Borja; Skowron, Patryk; Zagzag, David; Lyden, David; Hoffman, Caitlin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Eberhart, Charles; MacDonald, Tobey; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Northcott, Paul A; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Hawkins, Cynthia; Rutka, James T; Bouffet, Eric; Pfister, Stefan M; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular variants with distinct genetics, transcriptomes, and outcomes. Subgroup affiliation has been previously shown to remain stable at the time of recurrence, which likely reflects their distinct cells of origin. However, a therapeutically relevant question that remains unanswered is subgroup stability in the metastatic compartment. We assembled a cohort of 12-paired primary-metastatic tumors collected in the MAGIC consortium, and established their molecular subgroup affiliation by performing integrative gene expression and DNA methylation analysis. Frozen tissues were collected and profiled using Affymetrix gene expression arrays and Illumina methylation arrays. Class prediction and hierarchical clustering were performed using existing published datasets. Our molecular analysis, using consensus integrative genomic data, establishes the unequivocal maintenance of molecular subgroup affiliation in metastatic medulloblastoma. We further validated these findings by interrogating a non-overlapping cohort of 19 pairs of primary-metastatic tumors from the Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute using an orthogonal technique of immunohistochemical staining. This investigation represents the largest reported primary-metastatic paired cohort profiled to date and provides a unique opportunity to evaluate subgroup-specific molecular aberrations within the metastatic compartment. Our findings further support the hypothesis that medulloblastoma subgroups arise from distinct cells of origin, which are carried forward from ontogeny to oncology.

  3. Characterization of a Novel Prevacuolar Compartment in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Draskovic, Marija; Schnittker, Robert R.; El-Mellouki, Tarik; Plamann, Michael D.; Sánchez-León, Eddy; Riquelme, Meritxell; Bowman, Emma Jean

    2015-01-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we observed ring-like organelles, similar in size to nuclei, in the hyphal tip of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. These organelles contained a subset of vacuolar proteins. We hypothesize that they are novel prevacuolar compartments (PVCs). We examined the locations of several vacuolar enzymes and of fluorescent compounds that target the vacuole. Vacuolar membrane proteins, such as the vacuolar ATPase (VMA-1) and the polyphosphate polymerase (VTC-4), were observed in the PVCs. A pigment produced by adenine auxotrophs, used to visualize vacuoles, also accumulated in PVCs. Soluble enzymes of the vacuolar lumen, alkaline phosphatase and carboxypeptidase Y, were not observed in PVCs. The fluorescent molecule Oregon Green 488 carboxylic acid diacetate, succinimidyl ester (carboxy-DFFDA) accumulated in vacuoles and in a subset of PVCs, suggesting maturation of PVCs from the tip to distal regions. Three of the nine Rab GTPases in N. crassa, RAB-2, RAB-4, and RAB-7, localized to the PVCs. RAB-2 and RAB-4, which have similar amino acid sequences, are present in filamentous fungi but not in yeasts, and no function has previously been reported for these Rab GTPases in fungi. PVCs are highly pleomorphic, producing tubular projections that subsequently become detached. Dynein and dynactin formed globular clusters enclosed inside the lumen of PVCs. The size, structure, dynamic behavior, and protein composition of the PVCs appear to be significantly different from those of the well-studied prevacuolar compartment of yeasts. PMID:26453652

  4. Compartment specific response of antioxidants to drought stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Nora; Stabentheiner, Edith; Müller, Maria; Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Compartment specific changes in ascorbate and glutathione contents were studied during drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and in ascorbate and glutathione deficient mutants vtc2-1 and pad2-1, respectively, over a time period of 10 days. The results of this study revealed a strong decrease of glutathione contents in both mutants (up to 52% in mitochondria of pad2-1 and 40% in nuclei of vtc2-1) at early time points when drought stress was not yet measurable in leaves even though the soil showed a drop in relative water contents. These results indicate that glutathione is used at early time points to signal drought stress from roots to leaves. Such roles could not be confirmed for ascorbate which remained unchanged in most cell compartments until very late stages of drought. During advanced drought stress the strong depletion of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts (up to 50% in Col-0 and vtc2-1) and peroxisomes (up to 56% in Col-0) could be correlated with a strong accumulation of H2O2. The strong increase of H2O2 and ascorbate in vacuoles (up to 111%) in wildtype plants indicates that ascorbate plays an important role for the detoxification of ROS in vacuoles during drought stress. PMID:25219315

  5. Intracellular Calcium Decreases Upon Hyper Gravity-Treatment of Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, Maren; Denn, Tamara; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    Cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana ( A. t.) respond to changes in the gravitational field strength with fluctuations of the amount of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+). In parabolic flight experiments, where hyper- and μg phases follow each other, μg clearly increased Ca2+, while hyper-g caused a slight reduction. Since the latter observation had not been reported before, we studied this effect in more detail. Using a special centrifuge for heavy items (ZARM, Bremen, Germany), we determined the hyper-g-dependent intracellular Ca2+ level with transgenic cell lines expressing the Ca2+ sensor, cameleon. This sensor exhibits a shift in fluorescence from 480 to 530 nm in response to Ca2+ binding. The data show a drop in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration with a threshold gravity of around 3 g. This is above hypergravity levels achieved during parabolic flights (1.8 g). The use of mutants with different sub-cellular targets of cameleon expression (nucleus, tonoplast, plasma membrane) gave the same results, i.e. Ca2+ is obviously exported from several intracellular compartments.

  6. The intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine-based transfection reagents and its implication for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Francesco; Digiacomo, Luca; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Salomone, Fabrizio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Rossetta, Alessandro; Gratton, Enrico; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2016-05-11

    Lipofectamine reagents are widely accepted as "gold-standard" for the safe delivery of exogenous DNA or RNA into cells. Despite this, a satisfactory mechanism-based explanation of their superior efficacy has remained mostly elusive thus far. Here we apply a straightforward combination of live cell imaging, single-particle tracking microscopy, and quantitative transfection-efficiency assays on live cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine/DNA complexes. We find that Lipofectamine, contrary to alternative formulations, is able to efficiently avoid active intracellular transport along microtubules, and the subsequent entrapment and degradation of the payload within acidic/digestive lysosomal compartments. This result is achieved by random Brownian motion of Lipofectamine-containing vesicles within the cytoplasm. We demonstrate here that Brownian diffusion is an efficient route for Lipofectamine/DNA complexes to avoid metabolic degradation, thus leading to optimal transfection. By contrast, active transport along microtubules results in DNA degradation and subsequent poor transfection. Intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and lysosomal degradation appear therefore as highly interdependent phenomena, in such a way that they should be viewed as a single barrier on the route for efficient transfection. As a matter of fact, they should be evaluated in their entirety for the development of optimized non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  7. The intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine-based transfection reagents and its implication for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Francesco; Digiacomo, Luca; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Salomone, Fabrizio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Rossetta, Alessandro; Gratton, Enrico; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Lipofectamine reagents are widely accepted as “gold-standard” for the safe delivery of exogenous DNA or RNA into cells. Despite this, a satisfactory mechanism-based explanation of their superior efficacy has remained mostly elusive thus far. Here we apply a straightforward combination of live cell imaging, single-particle tracking microscopy, and quantitative transfection-efficiency assays on live cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine/DNA complexes. We find that Lipofectamine, contrary to alternative formulations, is able to efficiently avoid active intracellular transport along microtubules, and the subsequent entrapment and degradation of the payload within acidic/digestive lysosomal compartments. This result is achieved by random Brownian motion of Lipofectamine-containing vesicles within the cytoplasm. We demonstrate here that Brownian diffusion is an efficient route for Lipofectamine/DNA complexes to avoid metabolic degradation, thus leading to optimal transfection. By contrast, active transport along microtubules results in DNA degradation and subsequent poor transfection. Intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and lysosomal degradation appear therefore as highly interdependent phenomena, in such a way that they should be viewed as a single barrier on the route for efficient transfection. As a matter of fact, they should be evaluated in their entirety for the development of optimized non-viral gene delivery vectors. PMID:27165510

  8. Intracellular trafficking of Gag and Env proteins and their interactions modulate pseudotyping of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Muriaux, Delphine; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-07-01

    Glycoproteins derived from most retroviruses and from several families of enveloped viruses can form infectious pseudotypes with murine leukemia virus (MLV) and lentiviral core particles, like the MLV envelope glycoproteins (Env) that are incorporated on either virus type. However, coexpression of a given glycoprotein with heterologous core proteins does not always give rise to highly infectious viral particles, and restrictions on pseudotype formation have been reported. To understand the mechanisms that control the recruitment of viral surface glycoproteins on lentiviral and retroviral cores, we exploited the fact that the feline endogenous retrovirus RD114 glycoprotein does not efficiently pseudotype lentiviral cores derived from simian immunodeficiency virus, whereas it is readily incorporated onto MLV particles. Our results indicate that recruitment of glycoproteins by the MLV and lentiviral core proteins occurs in intracellular compartments and not at the cell surface. We found that Env and core protein colocalization in intracytoplasmic vesicles is required for pseudotype formation. By investigating MLV/RD114 Env chimeras, we show that signals in the cytoplasmic tail of either glycoprotein differentially influenced their intracellular localization; that of MLV allows endosomal localization and hence recruitment by both lentiviral and MLV cores. Furthermore, we found that upon membrane binding, MLV core proteins could relocalize Env glycoproteins in late endosomes and allow their incorporation on viral particles. Thus, intracellular colocalization, as well as interactions between Env and core proteins, may influence the recruitment of the glycoprotein onto viral particles and generate infectious pseudotyped viruses.

  9. Silencing of GRA10 protein expression inhibits Toxoplasma gondii intracellular growth and development.

    PubMed

    Witola, William H; Bauman, Bretta; McHugh, Mark; Matthews, Kwame

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii dense granule proteins (GRAs) are secreted abundantly in both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages of the parasite and are known to localize to various compartments of the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that interfaces with the host cell milieu. Thus, GRAs may play significant roles in the biogenesis of the PV that is important for survival of intracellular T. gondii. GRA10 is a dense granule protein whose role in T. gondii has not yet been characterized. Therefore, in this study, we endeavored to determine the role of GRA10 in the growth and survival of intracellular T. gondii by using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) antisense knockdown approach to disrupt the translation of GRA10 mRNA in the parasites. We expressed and purified a truncated recombinant GRA10 protein to generate anti-GRA10 polyclonal antibodies that we used to characterize GRA10 in T. gondii. We found that GRA10 is a soluble, dense granule-associated protein that is secreted into the parasite cytosol and the parasitophorous vacuole milieu. Using in vitro cultures, we found that knockdown of GRA10 results in severe inhibition of T. gondii growth in human fibroblasts and in ovine monocytic cells. Together, our findings define GRA10 as a dense granule protein that plays a significant role in the growth and propagation of intracellular T. gondii in human fibroblasts and in ovine monocytic cells.

  10. Non-degradative Intracellular Trafficking of Highly Compacted Polymeric DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Anthony J.; Boylan, Nicholas J.; Suk, Jung Soo; Lai, Samuel K.; Hanes, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Highly compacted DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) composed of polyethylene glycol linked to a 30-mer of poly-L-lysine via a single cysteine residue (CK30PEG) have previously been shown to provide efficient gene delivery to the brain, eyes and lungs. In this study, we used a combination of flow cytometry, high-resolution live-cell confocal microscopy, and multiple particle tracking (MPT) to investigate the intracellular trafficking of highly compacted CK30PEG DNPs made using two different molecular weights of PEG, CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k. We found that PEG MW did not have a major effect on particle morphology nor nanoparticle intracellular transport. CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k DNPs both entered human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells via a caveolae-mediated pathway, bypassing degradative endolysosomal trafficking. Both nanoparticle formulations were found to rapidly accumulate in the perinuclear region of cells within 2 h, 37 ± 19 % and 47 ± 8 % for CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k, respectively. CK30PEG10k and CK30PEG5k DNPs moved within live cells at average velocities of 0.09 ± 0.04 µm/s and 0.11 ± 0.04 µm/s, respectively, in good agreement with reported values for caveolae. These findings show that highly compacted DNPs employ highly regulated trafficking mechanisms similar to biological pathogens to target specific intracellular compartments. PMID:22079809

  11. Proteomes of Host Cell Membranes Modified by Intracellular Activities of Salmonella enterica*

    PubMed Central

    Vorwerk, Stephanie; Krieger, Viktoria; Deiwick, Jörg; Hensel, Michael; Hansmeier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens need to establish a growth-stimulating host niche for survival and replication. A unique feature of the gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the creation of extensive membrane networks within its host. An understanding of the origin and function of these membranes is crucial for the development of new treatment strategies. However, the characterization of this compartment is very challenging, and only fragmentary knowledge of its composition and biogenesis exists. Here, we describe a new proteome-based approach to enrich and characterize Salmonella-modified membranes. Using a Salmonella mutant strain that does not form this unique membrane network as a reference, we identified a high-confidence set of host proteins associated with Salmonella-modified membranes. This comprehensive analysis allowed us to reconstruct the interactions of Salmonella with host membranes. For example, we noted that Salmonella redirects endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane trafficking to its intracellular niche, a finding that has not been described for Salmonella previously. Our system-wide approach therefore has the potential to rapidly close gaps in our knowledge of the infection process of intracellular pathogens and demonstrates a hitherto unrecognized complexity in the formation of Salmonella host niches. PMID:25348832

  12. Vsx1 Transiently Defines an Early Intermediate V2 Interneuron Precursor Compartment in the Mouse Developing Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Francius, Cédric; Hidalgo-Figueroa, María; Debrulle, Stéphanie; Pelosi, Barbara; Rucchin, Vincent; Ronellenfitch, Kara; Panayiotou, Elena; Makrides, Neoklis; Misra, Kamana; Harris, Audrey; Hassani, Hessameh; Schakman, Olivier; Parras, Carlos; Xiang, Mengqing; Malas, Stavros; Chow, Robert L.; Clotman, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Spinal ventral interneurons regulate the activity of motor neurons, thereby controlling motor activities. Interneurons arise during embryonic development from distinct progenitor domains distributed orderly along the dorso-ventral axis of the neural tube. A single ventral progenitor population named p2 generates at least five V2 interneuron subsets. Whether the diversification of V2 precursors into multiple subsets occurs within the p2 progenitor domain or involves a later compartment of early-born V2 interneurons remains unsolved. Here, we provide evidence that the p2 domain produces an intermediate V2 precursor compartment characterized by the transient expression of the transcriptional repressor Vsx1. These cells display an original repertoire of cellular markers distinct from that of any V2 interneuron population. They have exited the cell cycle but have not initiated neuronal differentiation. They coexpress Vsx1 and Foxn4, suggesting that they can generate the known V2 interneuron populations as well as possible additional V2 subsets. Unlike V2 interneurons, the generation of Vsx1-positive precursors does not depend on the Notch signaling pathway but expression of Vsx1 in these cells requires Pax6. Hence, the p2 progenitor domain generates an intermediate V2 precursor compartment, characterized by the presence of the transcriptional repressor Vsx1, that contributes to V2 interneuron development. PMID:28082864

  13. Promotion of testa rupture during garden cress germination involves seed compartment-specific expression and activity of pectin methylesterases.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Claudia; Weitbrecht, Karin; Pearce, Simon P; Hampstead, Anthony; Büttner-Mainik, Annette; Lee, Kieran J D; Voegele, Antje; Oracz, Krystyna; Dekkers, Bas J W; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wood, Andrew T A; Bentsink, Leónie; King, John R; Knox, J Paul; Holdsworth, Michael J; Müller, Kerstin; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) controls the methylesterification status of pectins and thereby determines the biophysical properties of plant cell walls, which are important for tissue growth and weakening processes. We demonstrate here that tissue-specific and spatiotemporal alterations in cell wall pectin methylesterification occur during the germination of garden cress (Lepidium sativum). These cell wall changes are associated with characteristic expression patterns of PME genes and resultant enzyme activities in the key seed compartments CAP (micropylar endosperm) and RAD (radicle plus lower hypocotyl). Transcriptome and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis as well as PME enzyme activity measurements of separated seed compartments, including CAP and RAD, revealed distinct phases during germination. These were associated with hormonal and compartment-specific regulation of PME group 1, PME group 2, and PME inhibitor transcript expression and total PME activity. The regulatory patterns indicated a role for PME activity in testa rupture (TR). Consistent with a role for cell wall pectin methylesterification in TR, treatment of seeds with PME resulted in enhanced testa permeability and promoted TR. Mathematical modeling of transcript expression changes in germinating garden cress and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds suggested that group 2 PMEs make a major contribution to the overall PME activity rather than acting as PME inhibitors. It is concluded that regulated changes in the degree of pectin methylesterification through CAP- and RAD-specific PME and PME inhibitor expression play a crucial role during Brassicaceae seed germination.

  14. Internal affairs: investigating the Brucella intracellular lifestyle.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Kristine; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Salcedo, Suzana P

    2012-05-01

    Bacteria of the genus Brucella are Gram-negative pathogens of several animal species that cause a zoonotic disease in humans known as brucellosis or Malta fever. Within their hosts, brucellae reside within different cell types where they establish a replicative niche and remain protected from the immune response. The aim of this article is to discuss recent advances in the field in the specific context of the Brucella intracellular 'lifestyle'. We initially discuss the different host cell targets and their relevance during infection. As it represents the key to intracellular replication, the focus is then set on the maturation of the Brucella phagosome, with particular emphasis on the Brucella factors that are directly implicated in intracellular trafficking and modulation of host cell signalling pathways. Recent data on the role of the type IV secretion system are discussed, novel effector molecules identified and how some of them impact on trafficking events. Current knowledge on Brucella gene regulation and control of host cell death are summarized, as they directly affect intracellular persistence. Understanding how Brucella molecules interplay with their host cell targets to modulate cellular functions and establish the intracellular niche will help unravel how this pathogen causes disease.

  15. Targeting of Salmonella typhimurium to vesicles containing lysosomal membrane glycoproteins bypasses compartments with mannose 6-phosphate receptors

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains enclosed in vacuoles (SCV) upon entry into the host cell. In this study we have examined the intracellular trafficking route of S. typhimurium within epithelial cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that bacteria initiated fusion with lysosomal membrane glycoprotein (lgp)-containing compartments approximately 15 min after bacterial internalization. This process was completed approximately 75 min later and did not require microtubules. Cation-independent (CI)- or cation-dependent (CD)-mannose 6-phosphate receptors (M6PRs) were not observed at detectable levels in SCV. Lysosomal enzymes showed a different distribution in SCV: lysosomal-acid phosphatase (LAP) was incorporated into these vacuoles with the same kinetics as lgps, while cathepsin D was present in a low proportion (approximately 30%) of SCV. Uptake experiments with fluid endocytic tracers such as fluorescein- dextran sulphate (F-DX) or horseradish-peroxidase (HRP) showed that after 2 h of uptake, F-DX was present in approximately 75% of lgp- containing vesicles in uninfected cells, while only approximately 15% of SCV contained small amounts of the tracer during the same uptake period. SCV also showed only partial fusion with HRP-preloaded secondary lysosomes, with approximately 30% of SCV having detectable amounts of HRP at 6 h after infection. These results indicate that SCV show limited accessibility to fluid endocytic tracers and mature lysosomes, and are therefore functionally separated from the endocytic route. Moreover, the unusual intracellular trafficking route of S. typhimurium inside epithelial cells has allowed us to establish the existence of two different lgp-containing vesicles in Salmonella- infected cells: one population is separated from the endocytic route, fusogenic with incoming SCV and may arise from a secretory pathway, while the second involves the classical secondary or mature lysosomes. PMID

  16. Phosphorylation of Golgi Peripheral Membrane Protein Grasp65 Is an Integral Step in the Formation of the Human Cytomegalovirus Cytoplasmic Assembly Compartment.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, G Michael; Grabski, Robert; Sanchez, Veronica; Britt, William J

    2016-10-04

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the largest member of the Herpesviridae and represents a significant cause of disease. During virus replication, HCMV alters cellular functions to facilitate its replication, including significant reorganization of the secretory and endocytic pathways of the infected cell. A defining morphologic change of the infected cell is the formation of a membranous structure in the cytoplasm that is designated the virion assembly compartment (AC), which consists of virion structural proteins surrounded by cellular membranes. The loss of normal Golgi compartment morphology and its relocalization from a juxtanuclear ribbonlike structure to a series of concentric rings on the periphery of the AC represents a readily recognized reorganization of cellular membranes in the HCMV-infected cell. Although trafficking of viral proteins to this compartment is required for the assembly of infectious virions, the functional significance of the reorganization of intracellular membranes like the Golgi membranes into the AC in the assembly of infectious virus remains understudied. In this study, we determined that Golgi membrane ribbon fragmentation increased during the early cytoplasmic phase of virion assembly and that Golgi membrane fragmentation in infected cells was dependent on the phosphorylation of an integral cis-Golgi protein, Grasp65. Inhibition of Golgi membrane fragmentation and of its reorganization into the AC resulted in decreased production of infectious particles and alteration of the incorporation of an essential protein into the envelope of the mature virion. These results demonstrated the complexity of the virus-host cell interactions required for efficient assembly of this large DNA virus.

  17. Intracellular signaling by phospholipase D as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Steed, P M; Chow, A H

    2001-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has recently focused on intracellular signaling as a means to integrate the multiple facets of complex disease states, such as inflammation, because these pathways respond to numerous extracellular signals and coordinate a collection of cell responses contributing to pathology. One critical aspect of intracellular signaling is regulation of key cell functions by lipid mediators, in particular the generation of a key mediator, phosphatidic acid (PA) via the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by phospholipase D (PLD). Research in this field has intensified, due in part to the recent cloning and partial characterization of the two PLD isoforms in mammalian cells, and this work has contributed significantly to our understanding of events downstream of PA generation. It is these effector functions of PLD activity that make this pathway attractive as a therapeutic target while the biochemical properties of the PLD isozymes make them amenable to small molecule intervention. Recent studies indicate that PA, and its immediate metabolites diacylglycerol and lyso-PA, affect numerous cellular pathways including ligand-mediated secretion, cytoskeletal reorganisations, respiratory burst, prostaglandin release, cell migration, cytokine release, and mitogenesis. This review summarises the data implicating signaling via PLD in these cell functions, obtained from: (i) molecular analyses of PLD/effector interactions, (ii) correlation between PA production and cell responses, (iii) experimental manipulation of PA levels, (iv) inhibition of PLD regulators, and (v) direct inhibition of PA production. The utility of targeting PLD signaling for the treatment of acute/chronic inflammation and other indications is discussed in light of these data.

  18. Activated Pancreatic Stellate Cells Sequester CD8+ T-Cells to Reduce Their Infiltration of the Juxtatumoral Compartment of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ene-Obong, Abasi; Clear, Andrew J.; Watt, Jennifer; Wang, Jun; Fatah, Rewas; Riches, John C.; Marshall, John F.; Chin-Aleong, Joanne; Chelala, Claude; Gribben, John G.; Ramsay, Alan G.; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a prominent desmoplastic microenvironment that contains many different immune cells. Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) contribute to the desmoplasia. We investigated whether distinct stromal compartments are differentially infiltrated by different types of immune cells. Method We used tissue microarray analysis to compare immune cell infiltration of different pancreatico-biliary diseased tissues (PDAC, ampullary carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, mucinous cystic neoplasm, chronic inflammation, and chronic pancreatitis), and juxtatumoral stromal (<100 μm from tumor) and panstromal compartments. We investigated the association between immune infiltrate and patient survival times. We analyzed T-cell migration and tumor infiltration in LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H/+; Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice, and the effects of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on these processes. Results Juxtatumoral compartments in PDAC samples from 2 independent groups of patients contained increased numbers of myeloperoxidase+ and CD68+ cells, compared with panstromal compartments. However, juxtatumoral compartments of PDACs contained fewer CD8+, FoxP3+, CD56+, or CD20+ cells than panstromal compartments, a distinction absent in ampullary carcinomas and cholangiocarcinomas. Patients with PDACs that had high densities of CD8+ T-cells in the juxtatumoral compartment had longer survival times than patients with lower densities. In KPC mice, administration of ATRA, which renders PSCs quiescent, increased numbers of CD8+ T-cells in juxtatumoral compartments. We found that activated PSCs express cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules that regulate T-cell migration. In vitro migration assays showed that CD8+ T-cells from PDAC patients had increased chemotaxis towards activated PSCs, which secrete CXCL12, compared with quiescent PSC or tumor cells. These effects could be reversed by knockdown of CXCL12 or treatment of

  19. Efficient intracellular delivery and improved biocompatibility of colloidal silver nanoparticles towards intracellular SERS immuno-sensing.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Vinay; Srinivasan, Supriya; McGoron, Anthony J

    2015-06-21

    High throughput intracellular delivery strategies, electroporation, passive and TATHA2 facilitated diffusion of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are investigated for cellular toxicity and uptake using state-of-art analytical techniques. The TATHA2 facilitated approach efficiently delivered high payload with no toxicity, pre-requisites for intracellular applications of plasmonic metal nanoparticles (PMNPs) in sensing and therapeutics.

  20. Intracellular Dialysis Disrupts Zn2+ Dynamics and Enables Selective Detection of Zn2+ Influx in Brain Slice Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; West, Adrian K; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2013-01-01

    We examined the impact of intracellular dialysis on fluorescence detection of neuronal intracellular Zn2+ accumulation. Comparison between two dialysis conditions (standard; 20minutes, brief; 2minutes) by standard whole-cell clamp revealed a high vulnerability of intracellular Zn2+ buffers to intracellular dialysis. Thus low concentrations of zinc-pyrithione generated robust responses in neurons with standard dialysis, but signals were smaller in neurons with short dialysis. Release from oxidation-sensitive Zn2+ pools were reduced by standard dialysis, when compared with responses in neurons with brief dialysis. The dialysis effects were partly reversed by inclusion of recombinant metallothionein-3 in the dialysis solution. These findings suggested that extensive dialysis could be exploited for selective detection of transmembrane Zn2+ influx. Different dialysis conditions were then used to probe responses to synaptic stimulation. Under standard dialysis conditions, synaptic stimuli generated significant FluoZin-3 signals in wild-type (WT) preparations, but responses were almost absent in preparations lacking vesicular Zn2+ (ZnT3-KO). In contrast, under brief dialysis conditions, intracellular Zn2+ transients were very similar in WT and ZnT3-KO preparations. This suggests that both intracellular release and transmembrane flux can contribute to intracellular Zn2+ accumulation after synaptic stimulation. These results demonstrate significant confounds and potential use of intracellular dialysis to investigate intracellular Zn2+ accumulation mechanisms. PMID:23517525

  1. BDI-modelling of complex intracellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jonker, C M; Snoep, J L; Treur, J; Westerhoff, H V; Wijngaards, W C A

    2008-03-07

    A BDI-based continuous-time modelling approach for intracellular dynamics is presented. It is shown how temporalized BDI-models make it possible to model intracellular biochemical processes as decision processes. By abstracting from some of the details of the biochemical pathways, the model achieves understanding in nearly intuitive terms, without losing veracity: classical intentional state properties such as beliefs, desires and intentions are founded in reality through precise biochemical relations. In an extensive example, the complex regulation of Escherichia coli vis-à-vis lactose, glucose and oxygen is simulated as a discrete-state, continuous-time temporal decision manager. Thus a bridge is introduced between two different scientific areas: the area of BDI-modelling and the area of intracellular dynamics.

  2. Estimation of adipose compartment volumes in CT images of a mastectomy specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Abdullah-Al-Zubaer; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been utilized for preclinical quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Efficacy of the simulation-based validation depends on the realism of phantom images. Anatomical measurements of the breast tissue, such as the size and distribution of adipose compartments or the thickness of Cooper's ligaments, are essential for the realistic simulation of breast anatomy. Such measurements are, however, not readily available in the literature. In this study, we assessed the statistics of adipose compartments as visualized in CT images of a total mastectomy specimen. The specimen was preserved in formalin, and imaged using a standard body CT protocol and high X-ray dose. A human operator manually segmented adipose compartments in reconstructed CT images using ITK-SNAP software, and calculated the volume of each compartment. In addition, the time needed for the manual segmentation and the operator's confidence were recorded. The average volume, standard deviation, and the probability distribution of compartment volumes were estimated from 205 segmented adipose compartments. We also estimated the potential correlation between the segmentation time, operator's confidence, and compartment volume. The statistical tests indicated that the estimated compartment volumes do not follow the normal distribution. The compartment volumes are found to be correlated with the segmentation time; no significant correlation between the volume and the operator confidence. The performed study is limited by the mastectomy specimen position. The analysis of compartment volumes will better inform development of more realistic breast anatomy simulation.

  3. Development of viral nanoparticles for efficient intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhuojun; Chen, Kevin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Dirksen, Anouk; Fischer, Rainer; Dawson, Philip E.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2012-05-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) based on plant viruses such as Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be used for a broad range of biomedical applications because they present a robust scaffold that allows functionalization by chemical conjugation and genetic modification, thereby offering an efficient drug delivery platform that can target specific cells and tissues. VNPs such as CPMV show natural affinity to cells; however, cellular uptake is inefficient. Here we show that chemical modification of the CPMV surface with a highly reactive, specific and UV-traceable hydrazone linker allows bioconjugation of polyarginine (R5) cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can overcome these limitations. The resulting CPMV-R5 particles were taken up into a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) more efficiently than native particles. Uptake efficiency was dependent on the density of R5 peptides on the surface of the VNP; particles displaying 40 R5 peptides per CPMV (denoted as CPMV-R5H) interact strongly with the plasma membrane and are taken up into the cells via an energy-dependent mechanism whereas particles displaying 10 R5 peptides per CPMV (CPMV-R5L) are only slowly taken up. The fate of CPMV-R5 versus native CPMV particles within cells was evaluated in a co-localization time course study. It was indicated that the intracellular localization of CPMV-R5 and CPMV differs; CPMV remains trapped in Lamp-1 positive endolysosomes over long time frames; in contrast, 30-50% of the CPMV-R5 particles transitioned from the endosome into other cellular vesicles or compartments. Our data provide the groundwork for the development of efficient drug delivery formulations based on CPMV-R5.Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) based on plant viruses such as Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be used for a broad range of biomedical applications because they present a robust scaffold that allows functionalization by chemical conjugation and genetic modification, thereby offering an efficient drug delivery platform

  4. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics.

  5. Aging of microstructural compartments in human compact bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkus, Ozan; Polyakova-Akkus, Anna; Adar, Fran; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2003-01-01

    Composition of microstructural compartments in compact bone of aging male subjects was assessed using Raman microscopy. Secondary mineralization of unremodeled fragments persisted for two decades. Replacement of these tissue fragments with secondary osteons kept mean composition constant over age, but at a fully mineralized limit. Slowing of remodeling may increase fracture susceptibility through an increase in proportion of highly mineralized tissue. In this study, the aging process in the microstructural compartments of human femoral cortical bone was investigated and related to changes in the overall tissue composition within the age range of 17-73 years. Raman microprobe analysis was used to assess the mineral content, mineral crystallinity, and carbonate substitution in fragments of primary lamellar bone that survived remodeling for decades. Tissue composition of the secondary osteonal population was investigated to determine the composition of turned over tissue volume. Finally, Raman spectral analysis of homogenized tissue was performed to evaluate the effects of unremodeled and newly formed tissue on the overall tissue composition. The chemical composition of the primary lamellar bone exhibited two chronological stages. Organic matrix became more mineralized and the crystallinity of the mineral improved during the first stage, which lasted for two decades. The mineral content and the mineral crystallinity did not vary during the second stage. The results for the primary lamellar bone demonstrated that physiological mineralization, as evidenced by crystal growth and maturation, is a continuous process that may persist as long as two decades, and the growth and maturation process stops after the organic matrix becomes "fully mineralized." The average mineral content and the average mineral crystallinity of the homogenized tissue did not change with age. It was also observed that the mineral content of the homogenized tissue was consistently greater than the

  6. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  7. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    PubMed

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  8. Development of viral nanoparticles for efficient intracellular delivery†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhuojun; Chen, Kevin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Dirksen, Anouk; Fischer, Rainer; Dawson, Philip E.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2013-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) based on plant viruses such as Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be used for a broad range of biomedical applications because they present a robust scaffold that allows functionalization by chemical conjugation and genetic modification, thereby offering an efficient drug delivery platform that can target specific cells and tissues. VNPs such as CPMV show natural affinity to cells; however, cellular uptake is inefficient. Here we show that chemical modification of the CPMV surface with a highly reactive, specific and UV-traceable hydrazone linker allows bioconjugation of polyarginine (R5) cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can overcome these limitations. The resulting CPMV–R5 particles were taken up into a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) more efficiently than native particles. Uptake efficiency was dependent on the density of R5 peptides on the surface of the VNP; particles displaying 40 R5 peptides per CPMV (denoted as CPMV–R5H) interact strongly with the plasma membrane and are taken up into the cells via an energy-dependent mechanism while particles displaying 10 R5 peptides per CPMV (CPMV–R5L) are only slowly taken up. The fate of CPMV–R5 versus native CPMV particles within cells was evaluated in a co-localization time course study. It was indicated that the intracellular localization of CPMV–R5 and CPMV differs; CPMV remains trapped in Lamp-1 positive endolysosomes over long time frames; in contrast, 30–50% of the CPMV–R5 particles transitioned from the endosome into other cellular vesicles or compartments. Our data provide the groundwork for the development of efficient drug delivery formulations based on CPMV–R5. PMID:22508503

  9. Blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors in the striatum attenuates methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and reduces activation of the patch compartment.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Logan, Mary Caroline; Fisher, Trevor J; Logue, Jordan B

    2017-02-05

    The behavioral effects of methamphetamine (METH) are mediated by the striatum, which is divided into the patch compartment, which mediates limbic and reward functions, and the matrix compartment, which mediates sensorimotor tasks. METH treatment results in repetitive behavior that is related to enhanced relative activation of the patch versus the matrix compartment. The patch, but not the matrix compartment contains a high density of μ opioid receptors, and localized blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors attenuates METH-induced patch-enhanced activity and repetitive behaviors. Numerous studies have examined patch-enhanced activity and the contribution of patch-associated μ opioid receptors to METH-induced repetitive behavior, but it is not known whether patch-enhanced activity occurs during METH-mediated reward, nor is it known if patch-based μ opioid receptors contribute to METH reward. The goals of this study were to determine if blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors alters METH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), as well activation of the patch and matrix compartments following METH-mediated CPP. A biased conditioning paradigm was used to assess CPP, and conditioning occurred over an 8-d period. Animals were bilaterally infused in the striatum with the μ-specific antagonist CTAP or vehicle prior to conditioning. Animals were tested for preference 24h after the last day of conditioning, sacrificed and the brains processed for immunohistochemistry. Blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors reduced METH-induced CPP, and reduced patch-enhanced c-Fos expression in the striatum following METH-mediated CPP. These data indicate that patch-enhanced activity is associated with METH-mediated reward and patch-based μ opioid receptors contribute to this phenomenon.

  10. Spatial organization of chromatin domains and compartments in single chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Beliveau, Brian J; Bintu, Bogdan; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Wu, Chao-ting; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-08-05

    The spatial organization of chromatin critically affects genome function. Recent chromosome-conformation-capture studies have revealed topologically associating domains (TADs) as a conserved feature of chromatin organization, but how TADs are spatially organized in individual chromosomes remains unknown. Here, we developed an imaging method for mapping the spatial positions of numerous genomic regions along individual chromosomes and traced the positions of TADs in human interphase autosomes and X chromosomes. We observed that chromosome folding deviates from the ideal fractal-globule model at large length scales and that TADs are largely organized into two compartments spatially arranged in a polarized manner in individual chromosomes. Active and inactive X chromosomes adopt different folding and compartmentalization configurations. These results suggest that the spatial organization of chromatin domains can change in response to regulation.

  11. Facile synthesis of dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doermbach, Karla; Pich, Andrij

    2015-05-28

    In this article we report on the controlled synthesis of asymmetric lemon-shaped and dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles (MCPs) with a reactive surface and interesting morphology. In our approach we utilize partial coating of hematite ellipsoids with a hydrophobic polymer layer followed by selective silica deposition on the non-coated surface. Ellipsoidal hematite particles provide a non-centric asymmetry, which is strongly enhanced during the seeded emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric growth of polymers on the hematite particle surface is driven by phase separation phenomena, which lead to a reduction of the interfacial tension. We found the tips of the hematite ellipsoids to be uncovered after polymerization. A selective deposition of silica onto the free tips leads to dumbbell-shaped particles with hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts.

  12. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Arash; Izadpanah, Ali; Karunanayake, Mihiran; Petropolis, Christian; Deckelbaum, Dan L.; Luc, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery. PMID:25190927

  13. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Izadpanah, Arash; Izadpanah, Ali; Karunanayake, Mihiran; Petropolis, Christian; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Luc, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery.

  14. Anterior elbow dislocation with potential compartment syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Queipo-de-Llano Temboury, Alfonso; Lara, Jorge Mariscal; Fernadez-de-Rota, Antonio; Queipo-de-Llano, Enrique

    2007-03-01

    Anterior elbow dislocation is an infrequent lesion, usually produced by direct trauma to the proximal ulna after a fall on the elbow in flexion, and is often associated with soft tissue injuries. The authors report a case of a complex injury produced by a high-energy trauma in the right arm of a 65-year-old patient. His limb was trapped inside an industrial spin-dryer, resulting in a closed anterior elbow dislocation, diaphyseal ulnar shaft, radial styloid process fractures, and an associated compartment syndrome. The injury mechanism and its treatment are described to better manage the soft tissue injury and early elbow mobilization using the FEARM hinged external fixator. A good result was achieved, with almost complete restoration of the patient's arm functions, and he has returned to his previous working activities.

  15. Microbial diversity in different compartments of an aquaponics system.

    PubMed

    Schmautz, Zala; Graber, Andreas; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Goesmann, Alexander; Junge, Ranka; Smits, Theo H M

    2017-01-10

    Aquaponics is a solution for sustainable production of fish and plants in a single semi-closed system, where nutrient-rich water from the aquaculture provides nutrients for plant growth. We examined the microbial communities within an experimental aquaponics system. Whereas the fish feces contained a separate community dominated by bacteria of the genus Cetobacterium, the samples from plant roots, biofilter, and periphyton were more similar to each other, while the communities were more diverse. Detailed examination of the data gave the first indications to functional groups of organisms in the different compartments of the aquaponic system. As other nitrifiers other than members of the genus Nitrospira were only present at low numbers, it was anticipated that Nitrospirae may perform the nitrification process in the biofilm.

  16. Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell compartment in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis occurs throughout the adult lifetime of males and is supported by a robust stem cell system. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the stem cells of postnatal male germ cells, and not only self-renew but also produce differentiated progeny continuously. Recent report revealed that differentiating spermatogonia could revert into an undifferentiated state, although it was believed that SSCs were homogeneous and that differentiating spermatogonia was not reversible. Although several molecules, which regulate SSC, have been identified so far, molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of SSCs as well as the reversible developmental lineage of SSCs remain to be elucidated. In this review, we describe a brief overview of spermatogenesis and summarize the molecular regulation of SSC compartment.

  17. Native tissue repair for central compartment prolapse: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Paz-Levy, Dorit; Yohay, David; Neymeyer, Joerg; Hizkiyahu, Ranit; Weintraub, Adi Y

    2017-02-01

    Central descent due to a level 1 defect is a main component in pelvic organ prolapse (POP) reconstructive surgery, whether for symptomatic apical prolapse or for the prolapse repair of other compartments. A recent growth in the rate of native tissue repair procedures for POP, following the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warnings regarding the safety and efficacy of synthetic meshes, requires a re-evaluation of these procedures. The safety, efficacy, and determination of the optimal surgical approach should be the center of attention. Functional outcome measures and patient-centered results have lately gained importance and received focus. A comprehensive literature review was performed to evaluate objective and subjective outcomes of apical prolapse native tissue repair, with a special focus on studies reporting impact on patients' functional outcomes, quality of life, and satisfaction. We performed a MEDLINE search for articles in the English language by using the following key words: apical prolapse, sacrospinous ligament fixation, uterosacral ligament suspension, sacral colpopexy, McCall culdoplasty, iliococcygeus vaginal fixation, and functional outcomes. We reviewed references as well. Despite a prominent shortage of studies reporting standardized prospective outcomes for native tissue repair interventions, we noted a high rate of safety and efficacy, with a low complication rate for most procedures and low recurrence or re-treatment rates. The objective and subjective results of different procedures are reviewed. Functional outcomes of native tissue repair procedures have not been studied sufficiently, though existing data present those procedures as favorable and not categorically inferior to sacrocolpopexy. Apical compartment prolapse repair using native tissue is not a compromise. Functional outcomes of native tissue repair procedures are favorable, have a high rate of success, improve women's quality of life (QoL), and result in high rates of

  18. Evolution of trochlear compartment geometry in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Demey, Guillaume; Nover, Luca; Dejour, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to compare trochlear profiles in recent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and to determine whether they feature improvements compared to their predecessors. The hypothesis was that recent TKA models have more anatomic trochlear compartments and would display no signs of trochlear dysplasia. Methods The authors analyzed the geometry of the 6 following TKA models using engineering software: PFC and Attune (DePuy), NexGen and Persona (Zimmer), Noetos and KneeTec (Tornier). The mediolateral trochlear profiles were plotted at various flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) to deduce the sulcus angle. Results Analysis of sulcus angles reveals general convergence of recent designs towards anatomic values. At 0° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent implant models were between 156.0–157.4°, while those of previous generation models between 154.5–165.5°. At 30° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent models also lie within 145.7–148.6°, but those of previous models are between 149.5–152.0°. All three manufacturers deepened their trochlear profile at 30° of flexion in recent models compared to earlier designs. Sulcus angles converge towards anatomic values but still exceed radiologic signs of dysplasia by 2–5°. Conclusions Recent TKA designs have more anatomic trochlear geometries than earlier TKA models by the same manufacturers, but trochlear compartments still exceed radiologic signs of trochlear dysplasia by 2° to 5°. The hypothesis that recent TKA models display no signs of trochlear dysplasia is therefore refuted. Surgeons should be aware of design limitations to optimize choice of implant and extensor mechanisms alignment. Level of evidence: IV geometric implant analysis. PMID:26855943

  19. Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25 mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case.

  20. [Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case.

  1. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomarasca, Marta; F C Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens.

  2. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. Activities of Antimicrobial Agents against Intracellular Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Gerald L.; Coleman, Elizabeth J.

    2000-01-01

    Pneumococci can enter and survive inside human lung alveolar carcinoma cells. We examined the activity of azithromycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, penicillin G, rifampin, telithromycin, and trovafloxacin against pneumococci inside and outside cells. We found that moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin, and telithromycin were the most active, but only telithromycin killed all intracellular organisms. PMID:10952618

  4. Histoplasma capsulatum surmounts obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Garfoot, Andrew L.; Rappleye, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and disseminated disease, even in immunocompetent hosts. In contrast to opportunistic pathogens, which are readily controlled by phagocytic cells, H. capsulatum yeasts are able to infect macrophages, survive antimicrobial defenses, and proliferate as an intracellular pathogen. In this review, we discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that enable H. capsulatum yeasts to overcome obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis. H. capsulatum yeasts gain refuge from extracellular obstacles such as antimicrobial lung surfactant proteins by engaging the β-integrin family of phagocytic receptors to promote entry into macrophages. In addition, H. capsulatum yeasts conceal immunostimulatory β-glucans to avoid triggering signaling receptors such as the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1. H. capsulatum yeasts counteract phagocyte-produced reactive oxygen species by expression of oxidative stress defense enzymes including an extracellular superoxide dismutase and an extracellular catalase. Within the phagosome, H. capsulatum yeasts block phagosome acidification, acquire essential metals such as iron and zinc, and utilize de novo biosynthesis pathways to overcome nutritional limitations. These mechanisms explain how H. capsulatum yeasts avoid and negate macrophage defense strategies and establish a hospitable intracellular niche, making H. capsulatum a successful intracellular pathogen of macrophages. PMID:26235362

  5. How much does decompressive laparotomy reduce the mortality rate in primary abdominal compartment syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Muresan, Mircea; Muresan, Simona; Brinzaniuc, Klara; Voidazan, Septimiu; Sala, Daniela; Jimborean, Ovidiu; Hussam, Al Husseim; Bara, Tivadar; Popescu, Gabriel; Borz, Cristian; Neagoe, Radu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Contribution of decompressive laparotomy within the framework of the complex therapeutic algorithm of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is cited with an extremely heterogeneous percentage in terms of survival. The purpose of this study was to present new data regarding contribution of each therapeutic step toward decreasing the mortality of this syndrome. This is a longitudinal prospective study including 134 patients with risk factors for ACS. The intra-abdominal pressure was measured every hour indirectly based on transvesical approach and the appearance of organ dysfunction. Specific therapy for ACS was based on the 2013 World Society of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome guidelines, which include laparotomy decompression. Management of the temporarily open abdomen included an assisted vacuum wound therapy. Of 134 patients, 66 developed ACS. The average intra-abdominal pressure significantly decreased after therapy and decompression surgery. The overall rate of mortality was 27.3% with statistical significance in necrotizing infected pancreatitis. Surgical decompression performed within the first 24 hours after the onset of ACS had a protective role against mortality (odds ratio <1). The average time after which laparotomy decompression was performed was 16.23 hours. The complications occurred during TAC were 2 wound suppurations and 1 intestinal obstruction. Wound suppurations evolved favorably by using vacuum wound-assisted therapy associated with the general treatment, whereas for occlusion, resurgery was performed after which adhesions dissolved. The final closure of the abdomen was performed at a mean of 11.7 days (min. = 9, max. = 14). The closure type was primary suture of the musculoaponeurotic edges in 4 cases, and the use of dual mesh in the other 11 cases. The highest mortality rate in the study group was registered in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and the lowest in trauma group. Surgical decompression within the framework

  6. Lateral compartment translation predicts the grade of pivot shift: a cadaveric and clinical analysis.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Musahl, Volker; Lane, Clayton; Citak, Musa; Warren, Russell F; Pearle, Andrew D

    2010-09-01

    Anterior translation of the lateral compartment was hypothesized to correlate with the clinical grade of a pivot shift maneuver. Using a computer-assisted navigation system, this hypothesis was tested by recording the maximum anterior tibial translation in the medial and lateral compartment as well as the arc of rotation during the pivot shift maneuver. One hundred and fifty-four pivot shift examinations were performed on cadavers with various degrees of instability, and 24 pivot shift exams were performed on patients under anesthesia before and after ACL reconstruction. In all positive pivot shift exams, anterior tibial translations were found to be higher on in the lateral compartment compared to the medial compartment. In addition, an excellent correlation was found between the amount of lateral compartment translation and the clinical grade of the pivot shift; medial compartment translations and amount of knee rotation could not distinguish between clinical grades. Finally, a threshold of 6-7 mm of anterior tibial translation in the lateral compartment was necessary to produce a positive pivot shift. Taken together, these data suggest that monitoring lateral compartment translations during a pivot shift exam may be a convenient means to evaluate the outcomes of ACL surgery and that requisite increases in anterior translation of the lateral compartment are necessary for each progressive clinical grade of the pivot shift examination.

  7. Anomalous supratendinous course of the fifth extensor compartment artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tracy, C Alan

    2007-12-01

    Vascularized bone grafts have been successfully used in the treatment of carpal bone nonunion and avascular necrosis. The 4 + 5 extensor compartmental vascularized bone graft based on the fourth extensor compartment artery with retrograde blood flow through the fifth extensor compartment artery is the pedicle of choice for vascularized bone grafting of the lunate. This case report describes an anomalous supratendinous course of the fifth extensor compartment artery. The recognition of this anatomic variant is important for the safe dissection of the fifth extensor compartment artery.

  8. EXERTIONAL COMPARTMENT SYNDROME: REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE AND PROPOSED REHABILITATION GUIDELINES FOLLOWING SURGICAL RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little published information regarding postoperative management of patients with Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS). Reports of recurrence of symptoms following surgical decompression exist, and are not uncommon depending on the specific technique used. Recurrence suggests that more time and effort may need to be spent on implementing strategic post-operative rehabilitation management in order to avoid repeat surgical intervention or prolonged symptoms. Objective: To summarize relevant literature regarding CECS and propose scientifically-based guidelines for rehab following compartment release with the rationale based on tissue healing, muscle loading, and scar tissue formation and consideration of all tissues contained in the involved compartment. Literature review: A literature search was performed in PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, PEDRO, and Google Scholar using the phrase: “chronic exertional compartment syndrome.” Results: No specific rehabilitation guidelines following surgical compartment release for lower extremity CECS were found in the literature search performed for this clinical commentary. Discussion: The development of the proposed post-operative guidelines may allow for improved long-term outcomes following anterior compartment release. Summary: Adequate description of long-term follow-up of outcomes following compartment release for CECS is lacking in current literature. The proposed guidelines for rehab following compartment release include consideration of tissue healing, muscle loading, scar tissue formation, and consideration of soft tissues contained in the involved compartment. Utilization of the proposed guidelines may allow for future research to be performed in order to assess outcomes following surgical intervention for CECS. PMID:21713230

  9. Compartment Syndrome of the Hand: A Rare Sequela of Transradial Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Jue, Jennifer; Karam, Joseph A.; Mejia, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    A 64-year-old man who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention via right radial artery access reported right-hand pain and swelling 2 hours after the procedure. He had developed compartment syndrome of the hand, specifically with muscular compromise of the thenar compartment but with no involvement of the forearm. He underwent emergency right-hand compartment release and carpal tunnel release, followed by an uneventful postoperative course. In addition to our patient's case, we discuss compartment syndrome of the hand and related issues. PMID:28265219

  10. Acute thigh compartment syndrome post femoral vein catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    This case report presents a previously unreported etiology of acute thigh compartment syndrome following ipsilateral femoral vein catheterization, including clinical results and a brief review of the literature.

  11. A swollen hand with blisters: a case of compartment syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Rios-Alba, Tonatiuh; Ahn, James

    2015-06-01

    The accurate identification of compartment syndrome in the emergency department is essential to timely treatment and prevention of long-term sequela. Recognizing compartment syndrome is not straightforward, especially in the pediatric population. In addition to communication barriers that exist with children, the classic signs of pain, pallor, paresthesia, paralysis, and pulselessness are not always present, making its diagnosis a challenge. We report a case of a child with compartment syndrome to the left hand due to compression from an ACE wrap. The existing literature on compartment syndrome in children is reviewed.

  12. Intracellular hydrolysis of short chain glycerides by rat small intestine in vitro and transfer of glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Howard, J.; Jackson, M. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. When triacetin, tripropionin and tributyrin are incubated with sacs of rat everted intestine, they enter the epithelial cells and are completely hydrolysed to free fatty acids and glycerol. 2. The distribution between the mucosal and serosal fluids of the glycerol released is very different from that of the fatty acid. Although both hydrolytic products are accumulated in the serosal fluid, a much higher fraction of the fatty acid appears in this compartment. 3. When glycerol is initially present in the mucosal fluid there is no evidence of its movement against a concentration gradient. 4. The results confirm the existence of a transport mechanism for fatty acids released intracellularly but do not require the hypothesis of a special mechanism for glycerol transfer. PMID:5500736

  13. Phthalocyanine interaction with cells: kinetics of the photodynamic damage and intracellular localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaeva, Elena B.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Leeuwen, A. G.; Poroshina, Marina Y.; Zhorina, L. V.

    1993-06-01

    Phthalocyanine interaction with cultured cells was studied by means of flow-cytometry, laser scanning confocal microscopy, fluorescent and transmission pH-microphotometry. Irradiation of Pc-loaded cells caused the following order of events: increase of Pc intracellular fluorescenceyieldsmitochondria damageyieldschanges of cell surface and/or volumeyields-plasma membrane potential disintegrationyields-severe damage of the cell plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. For all these processes it takes a few hours to reach a stationary value. Pc inside the cells is found in granules surrounding the Golgi apparatus and in the peripheral cytoplasmic region, last ones partially coinciding with the acidic cellular compartments. A temporary decrease of cytoplasmic and lysosomal pH is caused by Pc uptake and irradiation. Artificial acidation of the cytoplasm of Pc-loaded cells resulted in the enhancement of the efficiency of the photodynamic inactivation.

  14. Intracellular trafficking of guanylate-binding proteins is regulated by heterodimerization in a hierarchical manner.

    PubMed

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Bauer, Michael; Berton, Valeria; Fischer, Nicole; Syguda, Adrian; Reipschläger, Simone; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Herrmann, Christian; Stürzl, Michael

    2010-12-07

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) belong to the dynamin family of large GTPases and represent the major IFN-γ-induced proteins. Here we systematically investigated the mechanisms regulating the subcellular localization of GBPs. Three GBPs (GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5) carry a C-terminal CaaX-prenylation signal, which is typical for small GTPases of the Ras family, and increases the membrane affinity of proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5 are prenylated in vivo and that prenylation is required for the membrane association of GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5. Using co-immunoprecipitation, yeast-two-hybrid analysis and fluorescence complementation assays, we showed for the first time that GBPs are able to homodimerize in vivo and that the membrane association of GBPs is regulated by dimerization similarly to dynamin. Interestingly, GBPs could also heterodimerize. This resulted in hierarchical positioning effects on the intracellular localization of the proteins. Specifically, GBP-1 recruited GBP-5 and GBP-2 into its own cellular compartment and GBP-5 repositioned GBP-2. In addition, GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5 were able to redirect non-prenylated GBPs to their compartment in a prenylation-dependent manner. Overall, these findings prove in vivo the ability of GBPs to dimerize, indicate that heterodimerization regulates sub-cellular localization of GBPs and underscore putative membrane-associated functions of this family of proteins.

  15. Lysosomes can fuse with a late endosomal compartment in a cell-free system from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The passage of pulse doses of asialoglycoproteins through the endosomal compartments of rat liver hepatocytes was studied by subcellular fractionation and EM. The kinetics of disappearance of radiolabeled asialofetuin from light endosomes prepared on Ficoll gradients were the same as the kinetics of disappearance of asialoorosomucoid-horse radish peroxidase reaction products from intracellular membrane-bound structures in the blood sinusoidal regions of hepatocytes. The light endosomes were therefore identifiable as being derived from the peripheral early endosome compartment. In contrast, the labeling of dense endosomes from the middle of the Ficoll gradient correlated with EM showing large numbers of reaction product-containing structures in the nonsinusoidal parts of the hepatocyte. In cell-free, postmitochondrial supernatants, we have previously observed that dense endosomes, but not light endosomes, interact with lysosomes. Cell-free interaction between isolated dense endosomes and lysosomes has now been reconstituted and analyzed in three ways: by transfer of radiolabeled ligand from endosomal to lysosomal densities, by a fluorescence dequenching assay which can indicate membrane fusion, and by measurement of content mixing. Maximum transfer of radiolabel to lysosomal densities required ATP and GTP plus cytosolic components, including N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor(s). Dense endosomes incubated in the absence of added lysosomes did not mature into vesicles of lysosomal density. Content mixing, and hence fusion, between endosomes and lysosomes was maximal in the presence of cytosol and ATP and also showed inhibition by N-ethyl-maleimide. Thus, we have demonstrated that a fusion step is involved in the transfer of radiolabeled ligand from an isolated endosome fraction derived from the nonsinusoidal regions of the hepatocyte to preexisting lysosomes in a cell-free system. PMID:7520447

  16. Intracellular iron concentration of neurons with and without perineuronal nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Morawski, Markus; Brückner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease are characterized by abnormally high concentrations of iron in the affected brain areas. Iron is believed to contribute to oxidative stress by catalysing radical generation and subsequently causing neuronal death. Interestingly, subpopulations of neurons are less vulnerable against degeneration. One of these subpopulations possesses a specialized extracellular matrix arranged as a perineuronal net (PN), a structure with poorly understood functions. In order to differentiate between neurons with and without PN according to their iron concentrations we have performed a μPIXE study at the Leipzig LIPSION laboratory. PN-ensheathed neurons in selected brain areas were detected by lectin-histochemical staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). The staining was intensified by DAB- nickel by an established method enabling the visualisation of the PNs by nuclear microscopy. The cellular concentration of iron in the rat brain was about 1 mmol/l (ca. 30 μg/g dw). First results of subcellular analysis showed that the intracellular iron concentration of PN-ensheathed neurons tends to be slightly increased in comparison to neurons without PNs. The difference in intracellular iron concentrations could be an effect of the PNs.

  17. Impact of intracellular ion channels on cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Roberta; Biasutto, Lucia; Szabò, Ildikò; Leanza, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Cancer research is nowadays focused on the identification of possible new targets in order to try to develop new drugs for curing untreatable tumors. Ion channels have emerged as "oncogenic" proteins, since they have an aberrant expression in cancers compared to normal tissues and contribute to several hallmarks of cancer, such as metabolic re-programming, limitless proliferative potential, apoptosis-resistance, stimulation of neo-angiogenesis as well as cell migration and invasiveness. In recent years, not only the plasma membrane but also intracellular channels and transporters have arisen as oncological targets and were proposed to be associated with tumorigenesis. Therefore, the research is currently focusing on understanding the possible role of intracellular ion channels in cancer development and progression on one hand and, on the other, on developing new possible drugs able to modulate the expression and/or activity of these channels. In a few cases, the efficacy of channel-targeting drugs in reducing tumors has already been demonstrated in vivo in preclinical mouse models.

  18. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications. PMID:22110866

  19. Facile synthesis of dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doermbach, Karla; Pich, Andrij

    2015-05-01

    In this article we report on the controlled synthesis of asymmetric lemon-shaped and dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles (MCPs) with a reactive surface and interesting morphology. In our approach we utilize partial coating of hematite ellipsoids with a hydrophobic polymer layer followed by selective silica deposition on the non-coated surface. Ellipsoidal hematite particles provide a non-centric asymmetry, which is strongly enhanced during the seeded emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric growth of polymers on the hematite particle surface is driven by phase separation phenomena, which lead to a reduction of the interfacial tension. We found the tips of the hematite ellipsoids to be uncovered after polymerization. A selective deposition of silica onto the free tips leads to dumbbell-shaped particles with hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts.In this article we report on the controlled synthesis of asymmetric lemon-shaped and dumbbell-shaped multi-compartment nanoparticles (MCPs) with a reactive surface and interesting morphology. In our approach we utilize partial coating of hematite ellipsoids with a hydrophobic polymer layer followed by selective silica deposition on the non-coated surface. Ellipsoidal hematite particles provide a non-centric asymmetry, which is strongly enhanced during the seeded emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric growth of polymers on the hematite particle surface is driven by phase separation phenomena, which lead to a reduction of the interfacial tension. We found the tips of the hematite ellipsoids to be uncovered after polymerization. A selective deposition of silica onto the free tips leads to dumbbell-shaped particles with hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of silica coating without a polymer layer, experiments for removal of the polymer by solvent extraction, TEM images of spherical α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an asymmetric PSGD coating, and additional FESEM

  20. Infrared Power Generation: Study in an Insulated Compartment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-17

    and convective and conductive heat transfer, on the other. Some possible consequences of such an equivalence or lack thereof in the fields of device...characterize the entropic contribution, related to convective and conductive heat transfer, we also performed measurements by activating the PG device...attributed to convective and conductive heat transfer, i.e. to an entropic contribution. Instead, we found that also an electric contribution is involved