Science.gov

Sample records for intracellular ph compartmentation

  1. Work-Related Pain in Extrinsic Finger Extensor Musculature of Instrumentalists Is Associated with Intracellular pH Compartmentation during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Torres, Angel; Rosset-Llobet, Jaume; Pujol, Jesus; Fàbregas, Sílvia; Gonzalez-de-Suso, Jose-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Although non-specific pain in the upper limb muscles of workers engaged in mild repetitive tasks is a common occupational health problem, much is unknown about the associated structural and biochemical changes. In this study, we compared the muscle energy metabolism of the extrinsic finger extensor musculature in instrumentalists suffering from work-related pain with that of healthy control instrumentalists using non-invasive phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). We hypothesize that the affected muscles will show alterations related with an impaired energy metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 19 volunteer instrumentalists (11 subjects with work-related pain affecting the extrinsic finger extensor musculature and 8 healthy controls). We used 31P-MRS to find deviations from the expected metabolic response to exercise in phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), Pi/PCr ratio and intracellular pH kinetics. We observed a reduced finger extensor exercise tolerance in instrumentalists with myalgia, an intracellular pH compartmentation in the form of neutral and acid compartments, as detected by Pi peak splitting in 31P-MRS spectra, predominantly in myalgic muscles, and a strong association of this pattern with the condition. Conclusions/Significance Work-related pain in the finger extrinsic extensor muscles is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise, non-invasively detectable by 31P-MRS and consistent with the simultaneous energy production by oxidative metabolism and glycolysis. We speculate that a deficit in energy production by oxidative pathways may exist in the affected muscles. Two possible explanations for this would be the partial and/or local reduction of blood supply and the reduction of the muscle oxidative capacity itself. PMID:20161738

  2. Intracellular pH modulates quinary structure

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel D; Guseman, Alex J; Pielak, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy can provide information about proteins in living cells. pH is an important characteristic of the intracellular environment because it modulates key protein properties such as net charge and stability. Here, we show that pH modulates quinary interactions, the weak, ubiquitous interactions between proteins and other cellular macromolecules. We use the K10H variant of the B domain of protein G (GB1, 6.2 kDa) as a pH reporter in Escherichia coli cells. By controlling the intracellular pH, we show that quinary interactions influence the quality of in-cell 15N–1H HSQC NMR spectra. At low pH, the quality is degraded because the increase in attractive interactions between E. coli proteins and GB1 slows GB1 tumbling and broadens its crosspeaks. The results demonstrate the importance of quinary interactions for furthering our understanding of protein chemistry in living cells. PMID:26257390

  3. Mapping intracellular diffusion distribution using single quantum dot tracking: compartmentalized diffusion defined by endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-01-14

    The crowded intracellular environment influences the diffusion-mediated cellular processes, such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. The hindered diffusion of macromolecules in heterogeneous cytoplasm has been studied over years, but the detailed diffusion distribution and its origin still remain unclear. Here, we introduce a novel method to map rapidly the diffusion distribution in single cells based on single-particle tracking (SPT) of quantum dots (QDs). The diffusion map reveals the heterogeneous intracellular environment and, more importantly, an unreported compartmentalization of QD diffusions in cytoplasm. Simultaneous observations of QD motion and green fluorescent protein-tagged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dynamics provide direct evidence that the compartmentalization results from micron-scale domains defined by ER tubules, and ER cisternae form perinuclear areas that restrict QDs to enter. The same phenomenon was observed using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans, further confirming the compartmentalized diffusion. These results shed new light on the diffusive movements of macromolecules in the cell, and the mapping of intracellular diffusion distribution may be used to develop strategies for nanoparticle-based drug deliveries and therapeutics.

  4. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  5. The 'pH optimum anomaly' of intracellular enzymes of Ferroplasma acidiphilum.

    PubMed

    Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Timmis, Kenneth N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2006-03-01

    A wide range of microorganisms, the so-called acidophiles, inhabit acidic environments and grow optimally at pH values between 0 and 3. The intracellular pH of these organisms is, however, close to neutrality or slightly acidic. It is to be expected that enzymatic activities dedicated to extracellular functions would be adapted to the prevailing low pH of the environment (0-3), whereas intracellular enzymes would be optimally active at the near-neutral pH of the cytoplasm (4.6-7.0). The genes of several intracellular or cell-bound enzymes, a carboxylesterase and three alpha-glucosidases, from Ferroplasma acidiphilum, a cell wall-lacking acidophilic archaeon with a growth optimum at pH 1.7, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and their products purified and characterized. The Ferroplasmaalpha-glucosidases exhibited no sequence similarity to known glycosyl hydrolases. All enzymes functioned and were stable in vitro in the pH range 1.7-4.0, and had pH optima much lower than the mean intracellular pH of 5.6. This 'pH optimum anomaly' suggests the existence of yet-undetected cellular compartmentalization providing cytoplasmic pH patchiness and low pH environments for the enzymes we have analysed.

  6. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  7. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  8. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  9. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  10. Intracellular pH of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbin, E. M.; Davy, S. K.

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) is likely to play a key role in maintaining the functional success of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, yet until now the pHi of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) has never been quantified. Flow cytometry was used in conjunction with the ratiometric fluorescent dye BCECF to monitor changes in pHi over a daily light/dark cycle. The pHi of Symbiodinium type B1 freshly isolated from the model sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella was 7.25 ± 0.01 (mean ± SE) in the light and 7.10 ± 0.02 in the dark. A comparable effect of irradiance was seen across a variety of cultured Symbiodinium genotypes (types A1, B1, E1, E2, F1, and F5) which varied between pHi 7.21-7.39 in the light and 7.06-7.14 in the dark. Of note, there was a significant genotypic difference in pHi, irrespective of irradiance.

  11. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells. PMID:1781695

  12. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  13. Energy metabolism and intracellular pH in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kamp, G; Büsselmann, G; Jones, N; Wiesner, B; Lauterwein, J

    2003-10-01

    The effect of energy metabolism on intracellular pH was studied in boar spermatozoa using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and confocal microscopy with the pH-sensitive dye seminaphthorhodafluor (SNARF-1). Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa had a high adenylate energy charge (AEC=0.8), which decreased to 0.6 under aerobic conditions and to 0.2 under anaerobic conditions. Correspondingly, no ATP resonances but high AMP resonance were visible in (31)P-NMR-spectra of the spermatozoa. When an artificial oxygen buffer (Fluosol) and a purpose-built air supply system were used during (31)P-NMR data acquisition, ATP resonances reappeared whereas the AMP resonance disappeared. Boar spermatozoa kept under aerobic conditions have intracellular compartments that differ markedly in pH, as demonstrated by both (31)P-NMR spectroscopy and confocal microscopy. Using confocal microscopy, the midpiece of the flagellum in which all mitochondria are located was identified as an acidic compartment (pH(i-mp) 6.7). The intracellular pH of both the head (pH(i-h)) and the long principal piece of the flagellum (pH(i-pp)) were 7.2 and, thus, only slightly below the extracellular pH (pH(e) 7.3). Storage of spermatozoa in a glucose-free medium at 15 degrees C when they are immotile slowly shifted the pH(i-mp) from 6.7 to 6.9 within 20 h, whereas pH(i-h) and pH(i-pp) remained unchanged (pH 7.1-7.2). When glucose was present in the medium, all visible compartments of the spermatozoa as well as the medium were acidified to pH 6.2 within 20 h. Under these conditions a resonance at 4.8 mg kg(-1) appeared representing glycerol 3-phosphate.

  14. Flow cytometric measurement of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chow, S; Hedley, D

    2001-05-01

    A number of fundamentally important biological processes, such as cell signaling and the initiation of mitosis, are accompanied by a change in intracellular pH. Flow cytometric measurement of pH is a generally straightforward procedure that can be done with any instrument equipped with a 488-nm argon laser. The overall approach is similar to that for calcium: generation of a calibration curve by imparting known changes in pH and interpolation of the test sample pH. This unit presents the traditional calibration method using high-potassium buffers and the proton ionophore nigericin and a more recently developed technique, the pseudo null method, which involves resuspension of cells in defined mixtures of weak acids and weak bases. PMID:18770756

  15. Sumoylation of the astroglial glutamate transporter EAAT2 governs its intracellular compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Foran, E.; Rosenblum, L.; Bogush, A.; Pasinelli, P.; Trotti, D.

    2014-01-01

    EAAT2 is a predominantly astroglial glutamate transporter responsible for the majority of synaptic glutamate clearance in the mammalian CNS. Its dysfunction has been linked to many neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Decreases in EAAT2 expression and function have been implicated in causing motor neuron excitotoxic death in ALS. Nevertheless, increasing EAAT2 expression does not significantly improve ALS phenotype in mouse models or in clinical trials. In the SOD1-G93A mouse model of inherited ALS, the cytosolic carboxy-terminal domain is cleaved from EAAT2, conjugated to SUMO1, and accumulated in astrocytes where it triggers astrocyte-mediated neurotoxic effects as disease progresses. However, it is not known whether this fragment is sumoylated after cleavage or if full-length EAAT2 is already sumoylated prior to cleavage as part of physiological regulation. In this study, we show that a fraction of full-length EAAT2 is constitutively sumoylated in primary cultures of astrocytes in vitro and in the CNS in vivo. Furthermore, the extent of sumoylation of EAAT2 does not change during the course of ALS in the SOD1-G93A mouse and is not affected by the expression of ALS-causative mutant SOD1 proteins in astrocytes in vitro, indicating that EAAT2 sumoylation is not driven by pathogenic mechanisms. Most interestingly, sumoylated EAAT2 localizes to intracellular compartments, while non-sumoylated EAAT2 resides on the plasma membrane. In agreement, promoting desumoylation in primary astrocytes causes increased EAAT2–mediated glutamate uptake. These findings could have implications for optimizing therapeutic approaches aimed at increasing EAAT2 activity in the dysfunctional or diseased CNS. PMID:24753081

  16. Preferential intracellular pH regulation: hypotheses and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Baker, Daniel W; Crossley, Dane A; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    The regulation of vertebrate acid-base balance during acute episodes of elevated internal PCO2  is typically characterized by extracellular pH (pHe) regulation. Changes in pHe are associated with qualitatively similar changes in intracellular tissue pH (pHi) as the two are typically coupled, referred to as 'coupled pH regulation'. However, not all vertebrates rely on coupled pH regulation; instead, some preferentially regulate pHi against severe and maintained reductions in pHe Preferential pHi regulation has been identified in several adult fish species and an aquatic amphibian, but never in adult amniotes. Recently, common snapping turtles were observed to preferentially regulate pHi during development; the pattern of acid-base regulation in these species shifts from preferential pHi regulation in embryos to coupled pH regulation in adults. In this Commentary, we discuss the hypothesis that preferential pHi regulation may be a general strategy employed by vertebrate embryos in order to maintain acid-base homeostasis during severe acute acid-base disturbances. In adult vertebrates, the retention or loss of preferential pHi regulation may depend on selection pressures associated with the environment inhabited and/or the severity of acid-base regulatory challenges to which they are exposed. We also consider the idea that the retention of preferential pHi regulation into adulthood may have been a key event in vertebrate evolution, with implications for the invasion of freshwater habitats, the evolution of air breathing and the transition of vertebrates from water to land. PMID:27489212

  17. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  18. Intracellular pH regulation in chicken enterocytes: the importance of extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Peral, M J; Calonge, M L; Ilundáin, A A

    1995-11-01

    The present work reports the effect of pHo on pHi and Na(+)-H+ exchanger activity. Intracellular pH tended to follow pHo, but the proton distribution across the cell membrane is not at electrochemical equilibrium. Removal of external Na+ acidified the cells by both reversing the direction of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger and hyperpolarizing the cell membrane potential. The relationship between pHo and the rate of Na(+)-dependent proton efflux following an acid load suggests that external protons interact with the Na(+)-H+ exchanger at a single site with an apparent pK (-log of the dissociation constant) of 7.22. The results demonstrate that maintenance of pHo in the physiological range is essential for maintenance of normal cell pH and that the activity of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger involved in pHi regulation is affected by external protons. The results also suggest that, at least at low pHo, some intracellular mechanism is involved in pHi regulation. PMID:8962700

  19. Intracellular pH responses in the industrially important fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Valkonen, Mari; Penttilä, Merja; Benčina, Mojca

    2014-09-01

    Preserving an optimal intracellular pH is critical for cell fitness and productivity. The pH homeostasis of the industrially important filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is largely unexplored. We analyzed the impact of growth conditions on regulation of intracellular pH of the strain Rut-C30 and the strain M106 derived from the Rut-C30 that accumulates L-galactonic acid-from provided galacturonic acid-as a consequence of L-galactonate dehydratase deletion. For live-cell measurements of intracellular pH, we used the genetically encoded ratiometric pH-sensitive fluorescent protein RaVC. Glucose and lactose, used as carbon sources, had specific effects on intracellular pH of T. reesei. The growth in lactose-containing medium extensively acidified cytosol, while intracellular pH of hyphae cultured in a medium with glucose remained at a higher level. The strain M106 maintained higher intracellular pH in the presence of D-galacturonic acid than its parental strain Rut-C30. Acidic external pH caused significant acidification of cytosol. Altogether, the pH homeostasis of T. reesei Rut-C30 strain is sensitive to extracellular pH and the degree of acidification depends on carbon source.

  20. Light adaptation of invertebrate photoreceptors: influence of intracellular pH buffering capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S R; Brown, J E

    1982-01-01

    1. The possible role of pH changes in mediating light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells was studied by intracellular injection of zwitterionic pH buffers. The intracellular concentration of buffer was estimated by inclusion of a radioactive marker in the injection solution. 2. The light-induced increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration was monitored by intracellular aequorin. The light-induced increase of Ca2+ concentration was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 3. The progressive decrease in responsiveness during intracellular ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 4. Photoreceptors of both Limulus and Balanus were impaled with two micropipettes and voltage clamped. Membrane current induced by a prolonged steady illumination declined from an early transient to a plateau. This delayed decline of current indicates a light-induced reduction of sensitivity (i.e. light adaptation). The wave forms were similar before and after injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 5. We conclude that it is unlikely that a light-induced change of cytosolic pH mediates light adaptation in Limulus (and Balanus) photoreceptors. PMID:7175745

  1. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed. PMID:23860924

  2. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed.

  3. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  4. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  5. Application of SERS Nanoparticles for Intracellular pH Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T; Talley, C; Colvin, M; Huser, T

    2004-10-21

    We present an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. Here, we present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. Heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which can result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters, are characterized using SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance.

  6. The Intracellular pH of Clostridium paradoxum, an Anaerobic, Alkaliphilic, and Thermophilic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G. M.; Russell, J. B.; Reichert, A.; Wiegel, J.

    1996-01-01

    When the extracellular pH was increased from 7.6 to 9.8, Clostridium paradoxum, a novel alkalithermophile, increased its pH gradient across the cell membrane ((Delta)pH, pH(infin) - pH(infout)) by as much as 1.3 U. At higher pH values (>10.0), the (Delta)pH and membrane potential ((Delta)(psi)) eventually declined, and the intracellular pH increased significantly. Growth ceased when the extracellular pH was greater than 10.2 and the intracellular pH increased to above 9.8. The membrane potential increased to 110 (plusmn) 8.6 mV at pH 9.1, but the total proton motive force ((Delta)p) declined from about 65 mV at pH 7.6 to 25 mV at pH 9.8. Between the extracellular pH of 8.0 and 10.3, the intracellular ATP concentration was around 1 mM and decreased at lower and higher pH values concomitantly with a decrease in growth rate. PMID:16535469

  7. Intracellular pH governs the subcellular distribution of hexokinase in a glioma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Miccoli, L; Oudard, S; Sureau, F; Poirson, F; Dutrillaux, B; Poupon, M F

    1996-01-01

    Hexokinase plays a key role in regulating cell energy metabolism. Hexokinase is mainly particulate, bound to the mitochondrial outer membrane in brain and tumour cells. We hypothesized that the intracellular pH (pH1) controls the intracellular distribution of hexokinase. Using the SNB-19 glioma cell line, pH1 variations were imposed by incubating cells in a high-K+ medium at different pH values containing specific ionophores (nigericin and valinomycin), without affecting cell viability. Subcellular fractions of cell homogenates were analysed for hexokinase activity. Imposed pH1 changes were verified microspectrofluorimetrically by using the pH1-sensitive probe SNARF-1-AM (seminaphtho-rhodafluor-1-acetoxymethyl ester). Imposition of an acidic pH1 for 30 min strongly decreased the particulate/total hexokinase ratio, from 63% in the control sample to 31%. Conversely, when a basic pH1, was imposed, the particulate/total hexokinase ratio increased to 80%. The glycolytic parameters, namely lactate/pyruvate ratio, glucose 6-phosphate and ATP levels, were measured concomitantly. Lactate/pyruvate ratio and ATP level were both markedly decreased by acidic pH1 and increased by basic pH1. Conversely, the glucose 6-phosphate level was increased by acidic pH1 and decreased by basic pH1. To demonstrate that the change of hexokinase distribution was not due to altered metabolite levels of glycolysis, a pH1 was imposed for a 5 min incubation time. Modification of the hexokinase distribution was similar to that noted after a 30 min incubation, whereas metabolite levels of glycolysis were not affected. These results provide evidence that the intracellular distribution of hexokinase is highly sensitive to variations of the pH1, and regulates hexokinase activity. PMID:8611181

  8. Surface adsorption, intracellular accumulation and compartmentalization of Pb(II) in batch-operated lagoons with Salvinia minima as affected by environmental conditions, EDTA and nutrients.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Eugenia J; Sánchez-Galván, Gloria; Pérez-Pérez, Teresa; Pérez-Orozco, Arith

    2005-12-01

    The effects of environmental factors and nutrients on the various possible removal mechanisms (surface adsorption, intracellular accumulation and precipitation to sediments) and partitioning of lead among various compartments (plant biomass, water column and sediments) in Salvinia minima batch-operated lagoons, were evaluated. Surface adsorption was found to be the predominant mechanism for Pb(II) removal under all environmental conditions tested in the absence of nutrients (an average of 54.3%) and in a nutrient medium (modified Hutner 1/10 medium) free of EDTA and phosphates (54.41%) at "high" initial Pb(II) concentrations (in the range of 10.3+/-0.13 to 15.2+/-0.05 mg/L). Under these conditions, the bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were 2,431+/-276 and 2,065+/-35, respectively. Lead removal was very rapid during the first 4 h and reached 70% in the absence of nutrients at the "medium" light intensity and temperature (LIT) tested, 88% in nutrient medium free of EDTA and supplemented with synthetic wastewater (at the "lowest" LIT tested), and 85% in medium free of EDTA and phosphates. It was concluded that the mechanisms of lead removal by S. minima, and the compartmentalization of this metal in the microcosm of batch-operated lagoons, are primarily a function of the presence of certain nutrients and chelants, with secondary dependence on environmental conditions. In addition, the results indicate that the percentage of lead removed is only a gross parameter and that the complementary use of BCF and compartmentalization analysis is required to gain a full insight into the metal removal process.

  9. A two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe enables spatial coordinates determination of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Sun, Yuming; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Yong; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Zhao, Ning

    2014-11-01

    We reported a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe for detecting intracellular pH. When excited with 800 nm laser, an optimal output of laser as the routine equipment of two-photon fluorescence microscopy, the two-photon excited fluorescence of this probe showed distinct emission peak shift as large as 109 nm upon the change of pH values in vitro. Very importantly, the experiment results show that this probe has large two-photon absorption cross-section at pH 4.5 at 800 nm of 354 g, which ranks it as one of the best two-photon ratiometric fluorescent pH probes, and its working pH value is between 4.0 and 8.0 which could fit the intracellular pH range. Moreover, utilizing this probe, the two-photon ratiometric fluorescent images in living cells have been obtained, and the spatial coordinates of intracellular pH can be mapped. At the same time, the probe also exhibited selectivity, photostability and membrane permeability. And the photophysical properties of this probe in various solvents indicated that these photophysical properties variations are due to an intramolecular charge transfer process. At last, the imaging depth of the probe in liver biopsy slices was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated the maximum imaging depth can arrive 66 µm in living rat liver tissues.

  10. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited. PMID:24256552

  11. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited.

  12. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular pH in 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Gillies, R J; Cook, J; Fox, M H; Giuliano, K A

    1987-07-01

    Techniques to determine intracellular pH generally report the average pH of population and do not indicate whether or not there is significant variance among cells within the population. Population variance is important to ascribe pH changes on a per cell basis. The magnitude of the pH change in individual cells is important to ascribe physiological function to changes in pH. To determine the variability of cell responses, we have used dual wavelength fluorescence emission spectroscopy of intracellular dicyanohydroquinone monitored with flow cytometry to determine the pH of normal and transformed 3T3 cells in response to serum or serum components. All cells were mechanically harvested from subconfluent cultures. Large differences in pH were observed between serum-deprived and serum-conditioned normal, but not transformed, cells. Addition of serum caused cytosolic alkalinization, with the serum-deprived cells responding more slowly. Titration of cells with submaximal doses of serum indicate that the response of pH is graded, that all cells respond in similar manner, and that the relative affinity of transformed cells for the serum components causing the pH effect is about twice that of normal cells.

  13. Determination of intracellular pH using sensitive, clickable fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Nazmiye B; Mandalapu, Srinivas Rao; Chew, Teng-Leong; Khuon, Satya; Bi, Lanrong

    2012-04-01

    We synthesized and evaluated a series of acidic fluorescent pH probes exhibiting robust pH dependence, high sensitivity and photostability, and excellent cell membrane permeability. Titration analyses indicated that probe 3 could increase its fluorescence intensity 800-fold between pH 8.0 and 4.1. Additionally, its pK(a) value is optimal for intracellular probing of acidic organelles. Fluorescent imaging of HepG2 and Hela cells further revealed that probe 3 demonstrates outstanding capacity for monitoring of intracellular [H(+)] levels. The easily accessible terminal alkyne/azido function groups of these probes offer the possibility of rapidly constructing sensor molecule libraries using 'click' chemistry.

  14. Quantum dot-fluorescent protein FRET probes for sensing intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Allison M; Rhee, Won Jong; Sotto, David; Dublin, Steven N; Bao, Gang

    2012-04-24

    Intracellular pH (pH(i)) plays a critical role in the physiological and pathophysiological processes of cells, and fluorescence imaging using pH-sensitive indicators provides a powerful tool to assess the pH(i) of intact cells and subcellular compartments. Here we describe a nanoparticle-based ratiometric pH sensor, comprising a bright and photostable semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins (FPs), exhibiting dramatically improved sensitivity and photostability compared to BCECF, the most widely used fluorescent dye for pH imaging. We found that Förster resonance energy transfer between the QD and multiple FPs modulates the FP/QD emission ratio, exhibiting a >12-fold change between pH 6 and 8. The modularity of the probe enables customization to specific biological applications through genetic engineering of the FPs, as illustrated by the altered pH range of the probe through mutagenesis of the fluorescent protein. The QD-FP probes facilitate visualization of the acidification of endosomes in living cells following polyarginine-mediated uptake. These probes have the potential to enjoy a wide range of intracellular pH imaging applications that may not be feasible with fluorescent proteins or organic fluorophores alone.

  15. Intracellular pH measurements made simple by fluorescent protein probes and the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Antonella; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Storti, Barbara; Beltram, Fabio; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2012-05-25

    A versatile pH-dependent fluorescent protein was applied to intracellular pH measurements by means of the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging. By this fit-less method we obtain intracellular pH maps under resting or altered physiological conditions by single-photon confocal or two-photon microscopy.

  16. Photosensory transduction in ciliates. Role of intracellular pH and comparison between Stentor coeruleus and Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, H; Fabczak, S; Song, P S; Checcucci, G; Ghetti, F; Lenci, F

    1993-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that light signal transduction in the unicellular ciliates Stentor coeruleus and Blepharisma japonicum involves a change in intracellular pH as an initial signal following photoexcitation, we studied the dependence of the photophobic responses of the cells to changes in extracellular pH and to reagents that specifically affect intracellular pH. The extracellular pH can modify not only the intracellular pH, but can even reverse the sign of the pH gradient across the cell membrane. Thus, as predicted by the hypothesis, low extracellular pH reversibly inhibited the photophobic response of the ciliates. The intracellular pH-modulating reagents tested included ammonium chloride, a membrane-permeable weak acid that lowers the intracellular pH, and the protonophores carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP) and carbonylcyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenyl-hydrazone (FCCP), which collapse the pH gradient across the cell membrane. The low pH and protonophore treatments caused a gradual inhibition of the photophobic responses in both ciliates. The observed reduction of the responsiveness of the cells to visible light can be attributed to the alteration of the intracellular pH, which is suggested to play a specific role in the photosensory transduction in both Stentor coeruleus and Blepharisma japonicum. PMID:8289111

  17. Photosensory transduction in ciliates. Role of intracellular pH and comparison between Stentor coeruleus and Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, H; Fabczak, S; Song, P S; Checcucci, G; Ghetti, F; Lenci, F

    1993-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that light signal transduction in the unicellular ciliates Stentor coeruleus and Blepharisma japonicum involves a change in intracellular pH as an initial signal following photoexcitation, we studied the dependence of the photophobic responses of the cells to changes in extracellular pH and to reagents that specifically affect intracellular pH. The extracellular pH can modify not only the intracellular pH, but can even reverse the sign of the pH gradient across the cell membrane. Thus, as predicted by the hypothesis, low extracellular pH reversibly inhibited the photophobic response of the ciliates. The intracellular pH-modulating reagents tested included ammonium chloride, a membrane-permeable weak acid that lowers the intracellular pH, and the protonophores carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP) and carbonylcyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenyl-hydrazone (FCCP), which collapse the pH gradient across the cell membrane. The low pH and protonophore treatments caused a gradual inhibition of the photophobic responses in both ciliates. The observed reduction of the responsiveness of the cells to visible light can be attributed to the alteration of the intracellular pH, which is suggested to play a specific role in the photosensory transduction in both Stentor coeruleus and Blepharisma japonicum.

  18. Influence of external pH and Fermentation products on Clostridium acetobutylicum intracellular pH and cellular distribution of fermentation products

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Forsberg, C.W.; Gibbins, L.N.

    1986-06-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells harvested from a phosphate-limited chemostat culture maintained pH 4.5 had intracellular concentrations of acetate, butyrate, and butanol which were 13-, 7-, and 1.3-fold higher, respectively, than the corresponding extracellular concentrations. Cells from a culture grown at pH 6.45 had intracellular concentrations of acetate and butyrate which were only 2.2-fold higher than the respective external concentrations. The highest intracellular concentrations to these acids were attained at ca. pH 5.5. When cells were suspended in anaerobic citrate-phosphate suffer at pH 4.5, exogenous acetate and butyrate caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the intracellular pH, while butanol had relatively little effect until the external concentration reached 150 mM. Acetone had no effect at concentrations up to 200 mM. These data demonstrate that acetate and butyrate are concentrated within the cell under acidic conditions and thus tend to lower the intracellular pH. The high intracellular butyrate concentration presumably leads to induction of solvent production, thereby circumventing a decrease in the intracellular pH great enough to be deleterious to the cell.

  19. Intracellular pH regulation in isolated hepatopancreas cells from the Roman snail (Helix pomatia).

    PubMed

    Manzl, Claudia; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J; Chabicovsky, Monika; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms of intracellular pH (pHi) regulation were studied in isolated hepatopancreas cells from the Roman snail, Helix pomatia. The relationship between intracellular and extracellular pH indicated that pHi is actively regulated in these cells. At least three pHi-regulatory ion transporters were found to be present in these cells and to be responsible for the maintenance of pHi: an amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchanger, a 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid (SITS)-sensitive, presumably Na(+)-dependent, Cl-/HCO3-exchanger, and a bafilomycin-sensitive H(+)-pump. Inhibition of one of these transporters alone did not affect steady state pHi, whereas incubation with amiloride and SITS in combination resulted in a significant intracellular acidification. Following the induction of intracellular acidosis by addition of the weak acid Na+propionate, the Na+/H+ exchanger was immediately activated leading to a rapid recovery of pHi towards the baseline level. Both the SITS-sensitive mechanism and the H(+)-pump responded more slowly, but were of similar importance for pHi recovery. Measurement of pHi recovery from acidification in the three discernible types of hepatopancreas cells with a video fluorescence image system revealed slightly differing response patterns, the physiological significance of which remains to be determined. PMID:14695690

  20. Nanoparticle-based luminescent probes for intracellular sensing and imaging of pH.

    PubMed

    Schäferling, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging microscopy is an essential tool in biomedical research. Meanwhile, various fluorescent probes are available for the staining of cells, cell membranes, and organelles. Though, to monitor intracellular processes and dysfunctions, probes that respond to ubiquitous chemical parameters determining the cellular function such as pH, pO2 , and Ca(2+) are required. This review is focused on the progress in the design, fabrication, and application of photoluminescent nanoprobes for sensing and imaging of pH in living cells. The advantages of using nanoprobes carrying fluorescent pH indicators compared to single molecule probes are discussed as well as their limitations due to the mostly lysosomal uptake by cells. Particular attention is paid to ratiometric dual wavelength nanosensors that enable intrinsic referenced measurements. Referencing and proper calibration procedures are basic prerequisites to carry out reliable quantitative pH determinations in complex samples such as living cells. A variety of examples will be presented that highlight the diverseness of nanocarrier materials (polymers, micelles, silica, quantum dots, carbon dots, gold, photon upconversion nanocrystals, or bacteriophages), fluorescent pH indicators for the weak acidic range, and referenced sensing mechanisms, that have been applied intracellularly up to now. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:378-413. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1366 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. Intracellular and extracellular pH dynamics in the human placenta from diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Silva, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Sáez, Tamara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The placenta is a vital organ whose function in diseases of pregnancy is altered, resulting in an abnormal supply of nutrients to the foetus. The lack of placental vasculature homeostasis regulation causes endothelial dysfunction and altered vascular reactivity. The proper distribution of acid- (protons (H(+))) and base-equivalents through the placenta is essential to achieve physiological homeostasis. Several membrane transport mechanisms that control H(+) distribution between the extracellular and intracellular spaces are expressed in the human placenta vascular endothelium and syncytiotrophoblast, including sodium (Na(+))/H(+) exchangers (NHEs). One member of the NHEs family is NHE isoform 1 (NHE1), whose activity results in an alkaline intracellular pH (high intracellular pH (pHi)) and an acidic extracellular pH (pHo). Increased NHE1 expression, maximal transport activity, and turnover are reported in human syncytiotrophoblasts and lymphocytes from patients with diabetes mellitus type I (DMT1), and a positive correlation between NHEs activity and plasma factors, such as that between thrombin and platelet factor 3, has been reported in diabetes mellitus type II (DMT2). However, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could result in a higher sensitivity of the human placenta to acidic pHo. We summarized the findings on pHi and pHo modulation in the human placenta with an emphasis on pregnancies in which the mother diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. A potential role of NHEs, particularly NHE1, is proposed regarding placental dysfunction in DMT1, DMT2, and GDM.

  2. pH and reduction dual-bioresponsive polymersomes for efficient intracellular protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinchao; Wu, Liangliang; Meng, Fenghua; Wang, Zhongjuan; Deng, Chao; Liu, Haiyan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2012-01-31

    pH and reduction dual-bioresponsive nanosized polymersomes based on poly(ethylene glycol)-SS-poly(2-(diethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) (PEG-SS-PDEA) diblock copolymers were developed for efficient encapsulation and triggered intracellular release of proteins. PEG-SS-PDEA copolymers with PDEA-block molecular weights ranging from 4.7, 6.8, to 9.2 kg/mol were synthesized in a controlled manner via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of 2-(diethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) using PEG-SS-CPADN (CPADN = 4-cyanopentanoic acid dithionaphthalenoate; M(n) PEG = 1.9 kg/mol) as a macro-RAFT agent. These copolymers existed as unimers in water at mildly acidic pH (<7.2) conditions, but readily formed monodisperse nanosized polymersomes (54.5-66.8 nm) when adjusting solution pH to 7.4. These polymersomes were highly sensitive to intracellular pH and reductive environments, which resulted in fast dissociation and aggregation of polymersomes, respectively. Notably, both fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and cytochrome C (FITC-CC) proteins could facilely be encapsulated into polymersomes with excellent protein-loading efficiencies, likely as a result of electrostatic interactions between proteins and PDEA. The in vitro release studies showed that protein release was minimal (<20% in 8 h) at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. The release of proteins was significantly enhanced at pH 6.0 due to collapse of polymersomes. Notably, the fastest protein release was observed under intracellular-mimicking reductive environments (10 mM dithiothreitol, pH 7.4). MTT assays in RAW 264.7 and MCF-7 cells indicated that PEG-SS-PDEA (9.2 k) polymersomes had low cytotoxicity up to a polymer concentration of 300 μg/mL. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) observations revealed that FITC-CC-loaded PEG-SS-PDEA (9.2 k) polymersomes efficiently delivered and released proteins into MCF-7 cells following 6 h of incubation. Importantly

  3. Effects of acute hypoxia/acidosis on intracellular pH in differentiating neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tommy; Jansson, Linda C; Louhivuori, Lauri M; Akerman, Karl E O

    2012-06-21

    The response of differentiating mouse neural progenitor cells, migrating out from neurospheres, to conditions simulating ischemia (hypoxia and extracellular or intracellular acidosis) was studied. We show here, by using BCECF and single cell imaging to monitor intracellular pH (pH(i)), that two main populations can be distinguished by exposing migrating neural progenitor cells to low extracellular pH or by performing an acidifying ammonium prepulse. The cells dominating at the periphery of the neurosphere culture, which were positive for neuron specific markers MAP-2, calbindin and NeuN had lower initial resting pH(i) and could also easily be further acidified by lowering the extracellular pH. Moreover, in this population, a more profound acidification was seen when the cells were acidified using the ammonium prepulse technique. However, when the cell population was exposed to depolarizing potassium concentrations no alterations in pH(i) took place in this population. In contrast, depolarization caused an increase in pH(i) (by 0.5 pH units) in the cell population closer to the neurosphere body, which region was positive for the radial cell marker (GLAST). This cell population, having higher resting pH(i) (pH 6.9-7.1) also responded to acute hypoxia. During hypoxic treatment the resting pH(i) decreased by 0.1 pH units and recovered rapidly after reoxygenation. Our results show that migrating neural progenitor cells are highly sensitive to extracellular acidosis and that irreversible damage becomes evident at pH 6.2. Moreover, our results show that a response to acidosis clearly distinguishes two individual cell populations probably representing neuronal and radial cells.

  4. Scanning electrochemical microscopy at the surface of bone-resorbing osteoclasts: evidence for steady-state disposal and intracellular functional compartmentalization of calcium.

    PubMed

    Berger, C E; Rathod, H; Gillespie, J I; Horrocks, B R; Datta, H K

    2001-11-01

    Osteoclast resorptive activity occurs despite the presence of extremely high levels of ionized calcium ([Ca2+]) within the osteoclast hemivacuole, which is generated as a by-product of its resorptive activity. Previous in vitro observations have shown that increases in extracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]e) in the surrounding medium can inhibit the osteoclast resorptive activity. Therefore, it has been suggested that the osteoclast acts as a "sensor" for [Ca2+]e, and that high [Ca2+]e leads to an increase in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i), thereby inhibiting osteoclasts in a negative feedback manner. In this report we have carried out an experimental and theoretical analysis of calcium disposal during osteoclast activity to evaluate how in vitro models relate to in vivo osteoclast activity, where it is possible that high [Ca2+]e may be present in the hemivacuole but not over the nonresorbing surface of the cell. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) studies of [Ca2+] and superoxide anion (O2.-) generation by bone-resorbing osteoclasts on the surface of a bovine cortical bone slice were compared with microspectofluorometric measurements of the levels of [Ca2+]i in single osteoclasts and the effect of [Ca2+]i on various aspects of osteoclast function. The generation of O2.- by the osteoclasts has been shown to be positively correlated with osteoclast resorptive function and can therefore serve as an index of acute changes in osteoclast activity. The SECM of bone-resorbing osteoclasts at the surface of a bone slice revealed a continuous steady-state release of Ca2+. Even after prolonged incubation lasting 3 h the near-surface [Ca2+]e in the solution above the cell remained <2 mM. The SECM real-time measurement data were consistent with the osteoclast acting as a conduit for continuous Ca2+ disposal from the osteoclast-bone interface. We conclude that the osteoclast distinguishes [Ca2+]e in the hemivacuole and in the extracellular fluid above the cell which we denote [Ca2

  5. Novel pH-sensitive probes with a ratiometric detection for intracellular pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipuy, Martin; Billon, Cyrielle; Micouin, Guillaume; Samarut, Jacques; Andraud, Chantal; Bretonnière, Yann

    2014-08-01

    The development of new pH-sensitive fluorescent probes based on a push-pull architecture is presented with a 2- dicyanomethylene-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofurane as strong electron acceptor group. With a small structural change, it is possible to obtain a large range of phenolic pKa from 4.8 to 8.6 with some close to neutrality, underlining the role of the electron density modulation on the acidic properties. Remarkable changes in the optical properties (both absorption and fluorescence) were observed as a function of the pH. Ratiometric imaging of intracellular pH was carried out with the most promising probes and highlighted the possibility to distinguish near-neutral minor pH fluctuations in cells.

  6. Intracellular pH: Its role in normal development and teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Reduction of intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) leading to reduced cell proliferation has been proposed as a mechanism by which acetazolamide induces its teratogenic postaxial limb reduction defect in rodents. In vivo studies measured pH{sub i} using a weak acid and found that pH{sub i} decreased with increasing gestational age during the period of organogenesis in C57 mouse embryos. This decreasing pH{sub i} had a high correlation with the simultaneously occurring decrease in the rate of proliferation determined by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation. pH{sub i} or pH was measured for the embryo, embryonic plasma, and extraembryonic fluids following a teratogenic dose of acetazolamide in sensitive C57 and resistant SWV mice. Reduced embryonic pH{sub i} was seen only in the sensitive strain while both strains showed decreased pH values for embryo plasma and extraembryonic fluids, with larger reductions found in the C57 strain. The plasma membrane Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter is known to regulate intracellular pH. Treatment with acetazolamide plus amiloride, and inhibitor of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter, resulted in a dramatically increased teratogenic response in C57 embryos and several incidences of the specific limb defect in the resistant SWV embryos. The pH{sub i} and pH effects following the combined drug treatment resulted in larger reductions, the magnitude and duration being greatest in the sensitive strain. The presence of a functional Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter in primary cultures of limb bud mesenchymal cells was documented for both strains of mice using a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Quantitative studies were done to look for functional differences in the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter of limb cells from acetazolamide sensitive and resistant embryos.

  7. Intracellular pH regulates basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances in colonic epithelial cells by modulating Ca2+ activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The role of intracellular pH as a modulator of basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances in epithelial cells was studied using digitonin- permeabilized colonic cell layers so that cytosolic pH could be clamped at specific values, while basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances were activated by stepwise increases in intracellular free Ca2+. Increasing the intracellular pH from 6.6 to 8.0 enhanced the sensitivity of both ionic conductances to intracellular Ca2+, but changing extracellular pH had no effect. Maximal K+ and Cl- currents activated by Ca2+ were not affected by changes in intracellular pH, suggesting that protons do not alter the conduction properties of the channels. Hill analysis of the Ca2+ activation process revealed that raising the cytosolic pH from 6.6 to 8.0 reduced the K1/2 for Ca2+ activation. In the absence of Ca2+, changes in intracellular pH did not have a significant effect on the basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances. These results are consistent with the notion that changes in cytosolic pH can modulate basolateral conductances by modifying the action of calcium, perhaps by acting at or near the activation site to provide a mechanism of variable "gain control." PMID:1719125

  8. Intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate content of heart in vivo: A sup 31 P-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, L.A.; Swain, J.A.; Portman, M.A.; Balaban, R.S. )

    1988-07-01

    Studies were performed to determine the contribution of red blood cells to the {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the canine heart in vivo and the feasibility of measuring myocardial intracellular phosphate and pH. This was accomplished by replacing whole blood with a perfluorochemical perfusion emulsion blood substitute, Oxypherol, and noting the difference in the {sup 31}P-NMR spectrum of the heart. NMR data were collected with a NMR transmitter-receiver coil on the surface of the distal portion of the left ventricle. These studies demonstrated that a small contribution from 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters in the blood could be detected. The magnitude and shift of these blood-borne signals permitted the relative quantification of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) content as well as intracellular pH. Under resting conditions, the intracellular ATP/P{sub i} was 7.0 {plus minus} 0.08. This corresponds to a free intracellular P{sub 1} content of {approx} 0.8 {mu}mol./g wet wt. The intracellular pH was 7.10 {plus minus} 0.01. Acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, with the arterial pH ranging from {approximately}7.0 to 7.7, resulted in only small changes in the intracellular pH. These latter results demonstrate an effective myocardial intracellular proton-buffering mechanism in vivo.

  9. Imaging intracellular pH in a reef coral and symbiotic anemone.

    PubMed

    Venn, A A; Tambutté, E; Lotto, S; Zoccola, D; Allemand, D; Tambutté, S

    2009-09-29

    The challenges corals and symbiotic cnidarians face from global environmental change brings new urgency to understanding fundamental elements of their physiology. Intracellular pH (pHi) influences almost all aspects of cellular physiology but has never been described in anthozoans or symbiotic cnidarians, despite its pivotal role in carbon concentration for photosynthesis and calcification. Using confocal microscopy and the pH sensitive probe carboxy SNARF-1, we mapped pHi in short-term light and dark-incubated cells of the reef coral Stylophora pistillata and the symbiotic anemone Anemonia viridis. In all cells isolated from both species, pHi was markedly lower than the surrounding seawater pH of 8.1. In cells that contained symbiotic algae, mean values of pHi were significantly higher in light treated cells than dark treated cells (7.41 +/- 0.22 versus 7.13 +/- 0.24 for S. pistillata; and 7.29 +/- 0.15 versus 7.01 +/- 0.27 for A. viridis). In contrast, there was no significant difference in pHi in light and dark treated cells without algal symbionts. Close inspection of the interface between host cytoplasm and algal symbionts revealed a distinct area of lower pH adjacent to the symbionts in both light and dark treated cells, possibly associated with the symbiosome membrane complex. These findings are significant developments for the elucidation of models of inorganic carbon transport for photosynthesis and calcification and also provide a cell imaging procedure for future investigations into how pHi and other fundamental intracellular parameters in corals respond to changes in the external environment such as reductions in seawater pH. PMID:19720994

  10. Control of intracellular pH and growth by fibronectin in capillary endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Frangioni, J. V.; Cragoe, E. J. Jr; Lechene, C.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the mechanism by which fibronectin (FN) regulates capillary endothelial cell proliferation. Endothelial cell growth can be controlled in chemically-defined medium by varying the density of FN coated on the substratum (Ingber, D. E., and J. Folkman. J. Cell Biol. 1989. 109:317-330). In this system, DNA synthetic rates are stimulated by FN in direct proportion to its effect on cell extension (projected cell areas) both in the presence and absence of saturating amounts of basic FGF. To investigate direct growth signaling by FN, we carried out microfluorometric measurements of intracellular pH (pHi), a cytoplasmic signal that is commonly influenced by soluble mitogens. pHi increased 0.18 pH units as FN coating densities were raised and cells progressed from round to spread. Intracellular alkalinization induced by attachment to FN was rapid and followed the time course of cell spreading. When measured in the presence and absence of FGF, the effects of FN and FGF on pHi were found to be independent and additive. Furthermore, DNA synthesis correlated with pHi for all combinations of FGF and FN. Ethylisopropylamiloride, a specific inhibitor of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter, completely suppressed the effects of FN on both pHi and DNA synthesis. However, cytoplasmic pH per se did not appear to be a critical determinant of growth since DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited when pHi was lowered over the physiological range by varying the pH of the medium. We conclude that FN and FGF exert their growth-modulating effects in part through activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger, although they appear to trigger this system via separate pathways.

  11. Control of MCT1 function in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Uhernik, Amy L; Tucker, Carrie; Smith, Jeffrey P

    2011-02-28

    Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter 1 (MCT1) is expressed on the plasma membrane of cerebrovascular endothelial cells where it is the only known facilitator of lactic acid transport across the blood brain barrier. During stroke, brain injury, and certain other brain pathologies, anaerobic glycolysis produces severe lactic acidosis of brain tissue leading to brain cell damage. Therefore, a better understanding of factors that control MCT1 function may be the key to better understanding the origins and treatment of pathological lactic acidosis. In this study, we characterized the effects of intracellular pH in controlling MCT1 function and showed that microtubule disruption targeted this mechanism in rat cerebrovascular endothelial cells. Acidic intracellular pH values were shown to strongly inhibit lactic acid transport into the cytoplasmic space, while alkalinization of the cytoplasm significantly enhanced this transport function. These results support a better understanding of how cerebrovascular endothelial MCT1 may contribute to the development of lactic acidosis in brain pathologies, and suggest targeting it as a novel therapy.

  12. Hydroxylated near-infrared BODIPY fluorophores as intracellular pH sensors

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Mohamed M.; Owens, Eric A.; Gao, Tielong; Lee, Jeong Heon; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a series of new, highly sensitive BF2-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethane dyes are synthesized and analyzed to be suitable as on/off photo-induced electron transfer modulated fluorescent sensors for determination of intracellular pH. The ethanolic solutions of the new indicators feature absorption maxima in the range of 696–700 nm and a fluorescence emission maximum at 720 nm. Molar absorptivity and fluorescence quantum yield data were determined for the studied set of aza-BODIPY indicators. These indicators have high molar absorption coefficients of ~80 000 M−1 cm−1 and quantum yields (up to 18%). Corresponding pKa values of indicators are determined from absorbance and fluorescence measurements and range from 9.1 to 10.8, depending on the selective positioning of electron-donating functionalities. The excellent photostability of the aza-BODIPY indicators makes them particularly suitable for long duration measurements. The in vitro cellular staining of living tissues in PC3 cells based on the isosbestic point at pH 7.8 and pH 9.3 has been employed which shows an increase in fluorescence intensity at 800 nm with increase in pH for certain compounds and fluorescence intensity decreases at 700 nm. Therefore, the new indicators are suitable for exploitation and adaptation in a diverse range of analytical applications. PMID:25105177

  13. Acidic pH induced STM1485 gene is essential for intracellular replication of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Allam, Uday Sankar; Krishna, M Gopala; Sen, Minakshi; Thomas, Rony; Lahiri, Amit; Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2012-01-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella has to face several potentially lethal environmental conditions, one such being acidic pH. The ability to sense and respond to the acidic pH is crucial for the survival and replication of Salmonella. The physiological role of one gene (STM1485) involved in this response, which is upregulated inside the host cells (by 90- to 113-fold) is functionally characterized in Salmonella pathogenesis. In vitro, the ΔSTM1485 neither exhibited any growth defect at pH 4.5 nor any difference in the acid tolerance response. The ΔSTM1485 was compromised in its capacity to proliferate inside the host cells and complementation with STM1485 gene restored its virulence. We further demonstrate that the surface translocation of Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) encoded translocon proteins, SseB and SseD were reduced in the ΔSTM1485. The increase in co-localization of this mutant with lysosomes was also observed. In addition, the ΔSTM1485 displayed significantly reduced competitive indices (CI) in spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes in murine typhoid model when infected by intra-gastric route. Based on these results, we conclude that the acidic pH induced STM1485 gene is essential for intracellular replication of Salmonella.

  14. CO2 induced acute respiratory acidosis and brain tissue intracellular pH: a 31P NMR study in swine.

    PubMed

    Martoft, L; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H; Forslid, A; Pedersen, H D; Jørgensen, P F

    2003-07-01

    High concentration carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is used to promote pre-slaughter anaesthesia in swine and poultry, as well as short-lasting surgical anaesthesia and euthanasia in laboratory animals. Questions related to animal welfare have been raised, as CO(2) anaesthesia does not set in momentarily. Carbon dioxide promotes anaesthesia by lowering the intracellular pH in the brain cells, but the dynamics of the changes in response to a high concentration of CO(2) is not known. Based on (31)P NMR spectroscopy, we describe CO(2)-induced changes in intracellular pH in the brains of five pigs inhaling 90% CO(2) in ambient air for a period of 60 s, and compare the results to changes in arterial blood pH, P(CO2), O(2) saturation and HCO(3)(-) concentration. The intracellular pH paralleled the arterial pH and P(CO2) during inhalation of CO(2); and it is suggested that the acute reaction to CO(2) inhalation mainly reflects respiratory acidosis, and not metabolic regulation as for example transmembrane fluxes of H(+)/HCO(3)(-). The intracellular pH decreased to approximately 6.7 within the 60 s inhalation period, and the situation was metabolically reversible after the end of CO(2) inhalation. The fast decrease in intracellular pH supports the conclusion that high concentration CO(2) leads to anaesthesia soon after the start of inhalation. PMID:12869287

  15. Intracellular pH in cold-blooded vertebrates as a function of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Malan, A; Wilson, T L; Reeves, R B

    1976-10-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in vivo in tissue of frogs (Rana catesbeiana) and turtles (Pseudemys scripta) using the DMO technique. Animals were permitted 3-8 days to come to a new steady-state body temperature (Tb) which ranged 5-32 degrees C. Least squares regression equation for pHi data are: frog blood, 8.184-0.0206 Tb; frog striated muscle, 7.275-0.0152 Tb; turtle blood, 8.092-0.0207Tb; turtle muscle, 7.421-0.0186 Tb; turtle heart, 7.452-0.0122 Tb; turtle liver, 7.753-0.0233 Tb; turtle esophageal smooth muscle, 7.513-0.0141 Tb. Only turtle cardiac muscle deltapHi/deltaT was significantly different from deltapH/deltaT of blood. Results have been interpreted in terms of protein charge state alterations; in the physiological pH range, histidine residues of proteins are the principal dissociable groups (HPr+ = H+ + Pr) affected by pHi and Tb changes. Constancy of protein charge state can be assessed by monitoring alpha imidazole, alphaIM = Pr/(HPr+ + Pr). A uniform pKIM of 6.85 (20degreesC) and a deltaHO of 7 kcal/mol are assumed in calculating alphaIM. Intracellular alphaIM is preserved in the tissues studied as body temperature changes. These results indicate that ectotherm acid-base balance, alphastat control, regulates not only extracellular blood proteins, but also intracellular compartment proteins in such a way as to preserve functions dependent upon protein net charge states.

  16. Phasic changes in intracellular pH during action potentials of sheep Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed

    Pressler, M L

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and the relationship between H+ and Ca2+ may vary during activity. Ion-selective microelectrodes were used to record pHi during action potentials of sheep Purkinje fibres prolonged by low temperature (21 degrees C) and elevated CO2 content. Intracellular pH also was measured during changes in extracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]o. Cytosolic alkalinization (peak pHi change, 0.03-0.05) was observed during the long action-potential plateau and transient acidification (0.01-0.02 units) upon repolarization. Potassium-induced depolarization to plateau potentials (i.e. to -15 +/- 2 mV) simulated the peak magnitude of the alkalinization. However, compensation for the alkalinization occurred at a faster rate during the action potential (8.9 +/- 4.3 nM/min) than during K+ depolarization (1.2 +/- 0.5 nM/min). In comparison, the cytoplasm acidified in resting fibres (0.06-0.07 log units) during changes of [Ca2+]o thought to increase intracellular calcium concentration. Alterations of pHi were translated into changes of proton concentration ([H+]i). Ten- to twenty-fold elevation of [Ca2+]o evoked a comparable change in [H+]i (mean increase, 5.7 nM) but oppositely directed from that during the plateau (mean decrease, 8.8 nM). The findings in resting fibres seem consistent with displacement of bound protons by Ca2+. In contrast, the initial change in pHi during the plateau is proposed to be consequent to Ca2+-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or phosphocreatine hydrolysis coupled to ATP regeneration.

  17. Lactate modulates the intracellular pH sensitivity of human TREK1 channels.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Swagata; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Tissue acidosis and high lactate concentrations are associated with cerebral ischaemia. The degree of acidosis is dependent on circulating glucose concentration, hyperglycaemia being associated with increased acidosis. Among other agents, lactate and protons have been shown to activate the leak potassium channel; TREK1 (TWIK related potassium channel 1) from the intracellular side and its increased activity is implicated in tolerance towards ischaemic cell damage. In the present study, we show that ischaemic concentrations of lactate (30 mM) at pH 7.0 and 6.5, commonly observed during ischemia, cause robust potentiation of human TREK1 (hTREK1) activity at single-channel level in cell-free inside-out membrane patches, while 30 mM lactate at pH 6.0 to 5.5, commonly observed during hyperglycaemic ischemia, reduces hTREK1 channel activity significantly. The biphasic effect of 30 mM lactate (ischaemic concentrations) on modulation of hTREK1 by varying pH conditions is specific since basal concentrations of lactate (3 mM) and 30 mM pyruvate at pH 7.0 and 5.5 failed to show similar effect as lactate. Experiments with deletion and point mutants of hTREK1 channel suggest that lactate changes the pH modulation of hTREK1 by interacting differently with the histidine residue at 328th position (H328) above and below its pKa (∼6.0) in the intracellular carboxyl-terminal domain of TREK1. This lactate-induced pH modulation of hTREK1 is absent in C-terminal deletion mutant, CTDΔ100, and is similar in E321A-hTREK1 mutant as in wild-type hTREK1 suggesting that it is independent of pH-sensitive glutamate residue at 321st position. Such a differential pH-dependent effect of lactate on an ion channel function has not been reported earlier and has important implications in different stages of ischaemia.

  18. Reduction of intracellular pH by tenidap. Involvement of cellular anion transporters in the pH change.

    PubMed

    McNiff, P; Robinson, R P; Gabel, C A

    1995-10-26

    Tenidap [5-chloro-2,3-dihydro-3-(hydroxy-2-thienylmethylene)-2-oxo-1H- indole-1-carboxamide], a novel antirheumatic agent, produces a rapid and sustained intracellular acidification when applied to cells in culture. To investigate the mechanism by which this change in ionic homeostasis is achieved, the acidification activities of structural analogs of tenidap were determined, and the movements of [14C]tenidap into and out of cells were explored. The acidification activity of tenidap was enhanced by lowering extracellular pH, suggesting that the free acid species was required for this process. Consistent with this requirement, a non-acidic analog of tenidap did not produce a change in intracellular pH (pHi). In contrast, multihalogenated derivatives of tenidap produced greater changes in pHi than did tenidap, and one analog produced a transient acidification from which the cell recovered; this recovery, however, was blocked by an inhibitor of the Na+/H+ antiporter. Fibroblasts incubated with [14C]tenidap achieved within 5 min a level of cell-associated drug that remained constant during longer incubations. Simultaneous addition of the electrogenic ionophore valinomycin or the P-glycoprotein inhibitor 4-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2(1H)-isoquinolinyl)-N-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphe nyl) ethyl]-6,7-dimethoxy-2-quinazolinamine (CP-100,356) caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the level of cell-associated [14C]tenidap; other agents tested did not promote this enhanced cellular accumulation. [14C]Tenidap accumulated by fibroblasts in the presence of CP-100,356 subsequently was released when these cells were placed in a tenidap- and CP-100,356-free medium. Importantly, several agents that are known to inhibit anion transport processes, including alpha-cyano-beta-(1-phenylindol-3-yl) acrylate, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, and meclofenamic acid, inhibited efflux of [14C]tenidap. In contrast, ethacrynic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2

  19. Intracellular Temperature Sensing: An Ultra-bright Luminescent Nanothermometer with Non-sensitivity to pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helin; Fan, Yanyan; Wang, Jianhai; Song, Zhongsen; Shi, Hao; Han, Rongcheng; Sha, Yinlin; Jiang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence thermometry usually suffer from cellular complexity of the biochemical environment (such as pH and ionic strength), and thus the accuracy and reliability of the determined intracellular temperature are directly affected. Herein, a photoluminescent nanothermometer composed of polymer encapsulated quantum dots (P-QD) has been developed. And the prepared nanothermometer exhibits some advantages: such as non-sensitivity to pH and ionic strength, as well as high detection sensitivity and ultrahigh reversibility. The intracellular temperature was accurately determined under physiological conditions with different pH and ionic strength, and direct measurement of thermogenesis in individual cells has been achieved. PMID:26445905

  20. Optical measurements of intracellular pH and magnesium in frog skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S. M.; Chandler, W. K.; Marshall, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    these dyes are sensitive to pH, as well as [Mg2+], the estimate depends on the assumed value of intracellular pH. [List: see text] This variability probably means that at least two, and possibly all three dyes behave differently inside muscle fibres than they do in calibrating solutions. The most likely explanation is that dye, once injected, can bind to cellular contents and that this alters its properties. 6. Changes in absorbance of fibres injected with Arsenazo I, a dye three times more sensitive to Mg2+ than to Ca2+, were used to determine whether changes in free [Mg2+] occur following an action potential. The observed changes were small and could be due to a small increase in pH, of the magnitude measured with Phenol Red, and/or free [Mg2+]. In terms of a change in free [Mg2+], the results set an upper limit of 2%. 7. The conclusion from the action potential experiments is that neither intracellular pH nor free [Mg2+] changes appreciably in highly stretched fibres. Changes in these two quantities can therefore be neglected in analysing the relatively large 650-660 nm Ca2+ signal in fibres injected with the Ca2+ (but also pH and Mg2+) sensitive indicator dye Arsenazo III. PMID:6984069

  1. Action potentials occur spontaneously in squid giant axons with moderately alkaline intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R; Shrier, A

    2001-10-01

    This report demonstrates a novel finding from the classic giant axon preparation of the squid. Namely, the axon can be made to fire autonomously (spontaneously occurring action potentials) when the intracellular pH (pH(i)) was increased to about 7.7, or higher. (Physiological pH(i) is 7.3.) The frequency of firing was 33 Hz (T = 5 degrees ). No changes in frequency or in the voltage waveform itself were observed when pH(i) was increased from 7.7 up to 8.5. In other words, the effect has a threshold at a pH(i) of about 7.7. A mathematical model that is sufficient to mimic these results is provided using a modified version of the Clay (1998) description of the axonal ionic currents.

  2. Temperature dependence of bistability in squid giant axons with alkaline intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R; Shrier, A

    2002-06-01

    Raising the intracellular pH (pHi) above 7.7 in intracellularly perfused squid giant axons causes spontaneous firing of action potentials. The firing frequency ranged from 20 Hz at 0 degrees C to 200 Hz at 23 degrees C. Above 23 degrees C, the axons were quiescent. They were bistable for 13

  3. Intracellular pH in isolated rat renal papillary thin limbs of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Dantzler, W H; Kim, Y K; Abbott, D E; Serrano, O K; Brokl, O H

    2000-05-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in isolated, nonperfused and perfused rat papillary thin limbs of Henle's loops in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethansulfonic acid (HEPES)- or HEPES/bicarbonate-buffered medium at pH 7.4 using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Resting pHi was about 6.7 in descending thin limbs (DTL) and about 6.9 in ascending thin limbs (ATL), even with a medium pH of 7.4. These values appeared to reflect the acid pH of the blood in the neighboring vasa recta found in vivo. The resting pHi did not differ whether or not the medium contained bicarbonate although the total buffering capacity of the tubule cells was increased in the presence of bicarbonate. In nonperfused DTL and ATL, pHi was further acidified following an NH4Cl pulse. The rate of recovery of pHi from this level to the resting pHi was reduced by Na+ removal from the bath in both DTL and ATL and by the addition of ethylisopropylamiloride (EIPA) to the bath in the presence of Na+ in DTL. The rate of recovery was not affected by Cl- removal from the bath or K+ (75 mM) or 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) addition to the bath in either DTL or ATL. These results suggest that the common, amiloride-sensitive, basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger plays a role in the regulation of pHi in rat papillary DTL but that a different basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger or a luminal Na+/H+ exchanger is important in rat papillary ATL.

  4. A volatile inhibitor immobilizes sea urchin sperm in semen by depressing the intracellular pH

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.H.; Clapper, D.L.; Winkler, M.M.; Lee, H.C.; Epel, D.

    1983-08-01

    Sea urchin spermatozoa are normally immotile in semen, but motility can be initiated by increasing gas flow over the semen--for example, by blowing N2 gas over a thin layer of semen. This result indicates that sperm motility is not O2 limited and suggests that seminal fluid contains a volatile inhibitor of motility which is responsible for the paralysis of sperm in semen. This inhibitor might be carbon dioxide, which reversibly immobilizes sperm. /sup 31/P-NMR measurements of pH show that the sperm intracellular pH (pHi) increases by 0.36 pH unit upon dilution of semen into seawater. Since previous studies have shown that this magnitude of pH increase is sufficient to trigger sperm motility, we suggest that the volatile inhibitor is inhibiting sperm motility in semen by depressing the pHi. A simple hypothesis that explains these observations is that the volatile motility inhibitor is CO/sub 2/, which could acidify pHi as a diffusable weak acid. In this regard, sperm diluted into seawater release acid, and this acid release is related to the pHi increase and motility initiation. In fact, nearly half of the acid released by sperm upon dilution is volatile and may therefore be due to CO/sub 2/ efflux. Most of the acid, however, cannot be attributed to CO/sub 2/ release because it is not volatile. Thus, when sperm are diluted into seawater, they raise their pHi by releasing CO/sub 2/ and protons from the cytoplasm into the surrounding seawater.

  5. Intracellular pH regulation in isolated rat bile duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, M; Mennone, A; Boyer, J L

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate ion transport mechanisms in bile duct epithelium (BDE), BDE cells were isolated from bile duct-ligated rats. After short-term culture pHi was measured with a single cell microfluorimetric set-up using the fluorescent pHi indicator BCECF, and calibrated with nigericin in high K+ concentration buffer. Major contaminants were identified using vital markers. In HCO3(-)-free media, baseline pHi (7.03 +/- 0.12) decreased by 0.45 +/- 0.18 pH units after Na+ removal and by 0.12 +/- .04 after amiloride administration (1 mM). After acid loading (20 mM NH4Cl) pHi recovery was inhibited by both Na+ removal and amiloride (JH+ = 0.74 +/- 1.1, and JH+ = 2.28 +/- 0.8, respectively, vs. 5.47 +/- 1.97 and 5.97 +/- 1.76 mM/min, in controls, respectively). In HCO3- containing media baseline pHi was higher (7.16 +/- 0.1, n = 36, P less than 0.05) and was decreased by Na+ substitution but not by amiloride. Na+ removal inhibited pHi recovery after an intracellular acid load (0.27 +/- 0.26, vs. 7.7 +/- 4.1 mM/min, in controls), whereas amiloride reduced JH+ only by 27%. pH recovery was inhibited by DIDS (0.5-1 mM), but not by Cl- depletion. Finally, acute Cl- removal increased pHi by 0.18 pH units in the absence but not presence of DIDS. These data indicate that BDE cells possess mechanisms for Na+/H+ exchange, Na+:HCO3- symport and Cl-/HCO3 exchange. Therefore BDE may be capable of transepithelial H+/HCO3- transport. Images PMID:2022723

  6. Intracellular pH in frog skin: Effects of Na sup + , volume, and cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Civan, M.M.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Peterson-Yantorno, K. Merck Sharp Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA )

    1988-07-01

    Single skins were analyzed by {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy during alternative perfusion with control and experimental solutions. Intracellular (pH{sub c}) and extracellular (pH{sub o}) pH were monitored by measuring the spectral frequencies of intracellular P{sub i} and external methylphosphonate, respectively. Base-line pH{sub c} was 7.20 {plus minus} 0.02 (SE) when pH{sub o} was 6.99 {plus minus} 0.02. A 4-acetamido-4{prime}-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid (SITS)-inhibitable, HCO{sup {minus}}{sub 3}-dependent alkaline shift in pH{sub c} can be elicited by replacing external Cl{sup {minus}} by gluconate or sulfate. The authors now report that this effect is observed even in sodium-free media. The substitution of gluconate for external Cl{sup {minus}} has also been reported to shrink cell volume. This shrinkage can be minimized by replacing Cl{sup {minus}} with gluconate during perfusion with hypotonic, rather than isotonic, media. Conducted in this manner, the anionic substitution produced a much smaller alkaline shift in pH{sub c}. In the presence of the Na-H antiport blocker 5-(N-methyl-N-isobutyl)amiloride (MIA), restoration of external Na{sup +} did not increase pH{sub c}. Adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) also alters pH{sub c}. The data suggest that frog skin regulates pH{sub c} by the parallel operation of Na-H and Na{sup +}-independent Cl-HCO{sub 3} antiports. Cell volume and cAMP may play regulating roles in this epithelium.

  7. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  8. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grow at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). YATP (grams of cells per mole of ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [14C]acetate and [14C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation. PMID:2036013

  9. Intracellular pH during "chemical hypoxia" in cultured rat hepatocytes. Protection by intracellular acidosis against the onset of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Gores, G J; Nieminen, A L; Wray, B E; Herman, B; Lemasters, J J

    1989-01-01

    The relationships between extracellular pH (pHo), intracellular pH (pHi), and loss of cell viability were evaluated in cultured rat hepatocytes after ATP depletion by metabolic inhibition with KCN and iodoacetate (chemical hypoxia). pHi was measured in single cells by ratio imaging of 2',7'-biscarboxy-ethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) fluorescence using multiparameter digitized video microscopy. During chemical hypoxia at pHo of 7.4, pHi decreased from 7.36 to 6.33 within 10 min. pHi remained at 6.1-6.5 for 30-40 min (plateau phase). Thereafter, pHi began to rise and cell death ensued within minutes, as evidenced by nuclear staining with propidium iodide and coincident leakage of BCECF from the cytoplasm. An acidic pHo produced a slightly greater drop in pHi, prolonged the plateau phase of intracellular acidosis, and delayed the onset of cell death. Inhibition of Na+/H+ exchange also prolonged the plateau phase and delayed cell death. In contrast, monensin or substitution of gluconate for Cl- in buffer containing HCO3- abolished the pH gradient across the plasma membrane and shortened cell survival. The results indicate that intracellular acidosis after ATP depletion delays the onset of cell death, whereas reduction of the degree of acidosis accelerates cell killing. We conclude that intracellular acidosis protects against hepatocellular death from ATP depletion, a phenomenon that may represent a protective adaptation against hypoxic and ischemic stress. Images PMID:2536397

  10. Intracellular pH measurement in frog muscle by means of 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, K; Nishikawa, H; Yamada, S; Morimoto, T; Watari, H

    1979-01-01

    The 31P-NMR technique was used for the monitoring of intracellular pH and studying its heterogeneity in the femoral biceps muscle of Rana catesbiana under anaerobic conditions. The value of intracellular pH of fresh muscle calculated from the chemical shift of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P1) was 7.3 on average and the line width of P1 was about 0.2 ppm. As the line width determined by the relaxation mechanism was 0.099 ppm, the P1 signal in fresh muscle was concluded to consist of overlapped narrow components, which indicated the heterogeneity of muscular pH (about 0.2 pH unit). Living muscle showed gradual acidification due to glycolysis and the decrease in heterogeneity. When glycolysis was suppressed by iodoacetic acid, slight alkalization due to the breakdown of creatine phosphate was observed. When the Lohmann reaction was suppressed by 2, 4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene, rapid acidification accompanied by the appearance of a new acidic component was observed with the onset of ATP decrease. This new component was not detected in the muscle pretreated with glycerol to disrupt the transverse tubules. Therefore, it is likely that this new acidic component originates in the intracellular compartment, and not in the cellular difference. PMID:40052

  11. Comparison of the mechanisms controlling intracellular pH and sodium in snail neurones.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R C

    1978-04-01

    Ion-sensitive microelectrodes were used to record intracellular pH, Na+ and Cl- in snail neurones. NaCl or HCl was injected iontophoretically to compare the Na pump with the pHi regulating system. The Na pump was inhibited by ouabain, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone and increasing the membrane potential, whereas the pHi regulating system was relatively unaffected. Activation of the Na pump had no effect on pHi whereas activation of the pHi recovery process increased internal Na+. Activation of the pHi recovery process by CO2 application increased internal Na+ and also decreased internal Cl-. The results show that there is no direct connexion between the Na pump and the pHi recovery process, and that the pHi recovery process is electroneutral, and appears not to require metabolic energy. The results also confirm that the pHi recovery process involves the influx of Na+ ions and the efflux of Cl- ions.

  12. Acidic intracellular pH shift during Caenorhabditis elegans larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, W.G.; Riddle, D.L. )

    1988-11-01

    During recovery from the developmentally arrested, nonfeeding dauer stage of the nemotode Caenorhabditis elegans, metabolic activation is accompanied by a decrease in intracellular pH (pH{sub i}). Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P NMR) analyses of perchloric acid extracts show that inorganic phosphate predominates in dauer larvae, whereas ATP and other high-energy metabolites are abundant within 6 hr after dauer larvae have been placed in food to initiate development. Although metabolic activation has been associated with an alkaline pH{sub i} shift in other organisms, in vivo {sup 31}P NMR analysis of recovering dauer larvae shows a pH{sub i} decrease from {approx} 7.3 to {approx} 6.3 within 3 hr after the animals encounter food. This shift occurs before feeding begins, and it coincides with, or soon follows, the developmental commitment to recover from the dauer stage, suggesting that control of pH{sub i} may be important in the regulation of larval development in nematodes.

  13. Altering Intracellular pH Disrupts Development and Cellular Organization in Preimplantation Hamster Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Squirrell, Jayne M.; Lane, Michelle; Bavister, Barry D.

    2016-01-01

    In early cleavage stage hamster embryos, the inability to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) properly is associated with reduced developmental competence in vitro. The disruption of mitochondrial organization is also correlated with reduced development in vitro. To determine the relationship between pHi and the disruption of cytoplasmic organization, we examined the effects of altering pHi on hamster embryo development, mitochondrial distribution, and cytoskeletal organization. The weak base trimethylamine was used to increase pHi and was found to reduce embryo development and disrupt the perinuclear organization of mitochondria. The weak acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolinedione was used to decrease pHi and was also found to reduce development and disrupt the perinuclear organization of mitochondria. With either treatment, the microfilament organization was perturbed, but the microtubule cytoskeleton was not. However, the temporal progression of the disruption of mitochondrial distribution was more rapid in alkalinized embryos than acidified embryos, as revealed by two-photon imaging of living embryos. Additionally, the disruption of the microfilament network by the two treatments was not identical. The cytoplasmic disruptions observed were not due to acute toxicity of the compounds because embryos recovered developmentally when the treatment compounds were removed. These observations link ionic homeostasis, structural integrity and developmental competence in preimplantation hamster embryos. PMID:11369617

  14. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  15. Fluorescent probes in biology and medicine: measurement of intracellular pH values in individual cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Jan; Cimprich, Petr; Gregor, Martin; Smetana, Karel, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    The application possibilities of fluorescent probes have increased dramatically in the last few years. The main areas are as follows (Slavik, 1994, 1996, 1998). Intracellular ionic cell composition: There are selective ion-sensitive dyes for H+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Fe3+, Cl-, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Ba2+, La3+. Membrane potential: Using the so-called slow (Nernstian dyes) or electrochromic dyes one can assess the value of the transmembrane potential. Membrane fluidity: Fluorescent probes inform about the freedom of rotational and translational movement of membrane proteins and lipids. Selective labeling: Almost any object of interest inside the cell or on its surface can be selectively fluorescently labeled. There are dyes specific for DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides (FISH), Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, vacuoles, cytoskeleton, etc. Using fluorescent dyes specific receptors may be localized, their conformational changes followed and the polarity of corresponding binding sites accessed. The endocytic pathway may be followed, enzymes and their local enzymatic activity localized. For really selective labeling fluorescent labeled antibodies exist. Imaging: One of the main advantages of fluorescence imaging is its versatility. It allow choice among ratio imaging in excitation, ratio imaging in emission and lifetime imaging. These approaches can be applied to both the classical wide-field fluorescence microscopy and to the laser confocal fluorescence microscopy, one day possibly to the scanning near field optical microscopy. Simultaneous application of several fluorescent dyes: The technical progress in both excitation sources and in detectors allows to extend the excitation deeper in the blue and ultraviolet side and the detection further in the NIR and IR. Consequently, up to 6 peaks in excitation and up to 6 peaks in emission can be followed without any substantial difficulties. Application of dyes such with longer fluorescence lifetimes such as rare earth

  16. Diet and carcinogen alter luminal butyrate concentration and intracellular pH in isolated rat colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Zoran, D L; Barhoumi, R; Burghardt, R C; Chapkin, R S; Lupton, J R

    1997-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial experiment was conducted to examine the effects of two different dietary fibers and carcinogen treatment on colonic luminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations and intracellular pH (pHi) in rats. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups, injected with a carcinogen [azoxymethane (AOM)] or normal saline (Sal), and fed one of two diets differing only in the type of dietary fiber [cellulose (Cell) or pectin (Pect)]. After 38 weeks of consuming these diets, the rats were euthanized, luminal contents were collected for analysis of SCFA concentrations, and colonocytes were isolated from the proximal and distal colon for subsequent determination of pHi. Changes in pHi after the addition of exogenous sodium butyrate to the culture medium were also tested. The highest concentrations of SCFAs were produced by the control rats (saline injected) consuming the pectin diet. Luminal butyrate concentrations were reduced in three of four colonic segments of carcinogen-injected groups [proximal and distal cellulose (Prox Cell and Dist Cell) and distal pectin (Dist Pect)] compared with saline controls. The pHi was consistently higher in colonocytes isolated from carcinogen-injected rats (Prox Cell/AOM = 6.95 vs. Prox Cell/Sal = 6.65, Prox Pect/AOM = 6.75 vs. Prox Pect/Sal = 6.65, Dist Cell/AOM = 6.94 vs. Dist Cell/AOM = 6.85, Dist Pect/AOM = 6.92 vs. Dist Pect/Sal = 6.79) than in cells from saline-injected rats. Furthermore, in the majority of rats, pHi was lower in the proximal than in the distal colon. Addition of butyrate to cultured colonocytes consistently lowered pHi, but the effect was more pronounced in the carcinogen-injected animals. These data identify changes that occur intraluminally and intracellularly in colons of rats injected with AOM and suggest that, during tumorigenesis, alterations in butyrate production and basic colonocyte physiology may play an important role in the process.

  17. Participation of intracellular and extracellular pH changes in photosynthetic response development induced by variation potential in pumpkin seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sherstneva, O N; Vodeneev, V A; Katicheva, L A; Surova, L M; Sukhov, V S

    2015-06-01

    Electrical signals presented in plants by action potential and by variation potential (VP) can induce a reversible inactivation of photosynthesis. Changes in the intracellular and extracellular pH during VP generation are a potential mechanism of photosynthetic response induction; however, this hypothesis requires additional experimental investigation. The purpose of the present work was to analyze the influence of pH changes on induction of the photosynthetic response in pumpkin. It was shown that a burning of the cotyledon induced VP propagation into true leaves of pumpkin seedlings inducing a decrease in the photosynthetic CO2 assimilation and an increase in non-photochemical quenching of fluorescence, whereas respiration was activated insignificantly. The photosynthetic response magnitude depended linearly on the VP amplitude. The intracellular and extracellular concentrations of protons were analyzed using pH-sensitive fluorescent probes, and the VP generation was shown to be accompanied by apoplast alkalization (0.4 pH unit) and cytoplasm acidification (0.3 pH unit). The influence of changes in the incubation medium pH on the non-photochemical quenching of fluorescence of isolated chloroplasts was also investigated. It was found that acidification of the medium stimulated the non-photochemical quenching, and the magnitude of this increase depended on the decrease in pH. Our results confirm the contribution of changes in intracellular and extracellular pH to induction of the photosynthetic response caused by VP. Possible mechanisms of the influence of pH changes on photosynthesis are discussed.

  18. Monitoring Intracellular pH Change with a Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor in Yeast and Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Robertson, J Brian; Xie, Qiguang; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2016-01-01

    "pHlash" is a novel bioluminescence-based pH sensor for measuring intracellular pH, which is developed based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET). pHlash is a fusion protein between a mutant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc) and a Venus fluorophore. The spectral emission of purified pHlash protein exhibits pH dependence in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification. In this chapter, we describe an in vitro characterization of pHlash, and also in vivo assays including in yeast cells and in HeLa cells using pHlash as a cytoplasmic pH indicator. PMID:27424899

  19. Illumination of the spatial order of intracellular pH by genetically encoded pH-sensitive sensors.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mojca

    2013-12-05

    Fluorescent proteins have been extensively used for engineering genetically encoded sensors that can monitor levels of ions, enzyme activities, redox potential, and metabolites. Certain fluorescent proteins possess specific pH-dependent spectroscopic features, and thus can be used as indicators of intracellular pH. Moreover, concatenated pH-sensitive proteins with target proteins pin the pH sensors to a definite location within the cell, compartment, or tissue. This study provides an overview of the continually expanding family of pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins that have become essential tools for studies of pH homeostasis and cell physiology. We describe and discuss the design of intensity-based and ratiometric pH sensors, their spectral properties and pH-dependency, as well as their performance. Finally, we illustrate some examples of the applications of pH sensors targeted at different subcellular compartments.

  20. Effects of metabolic acidosis on intracellular pH responses in multiple cell types

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahlam Ibrahim; Ruffin, Vernon A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis (MAc), a decrease in extracellular pH (pHo) caused by a decrease in [HCO3−]o at a fixed [CO2]o, is a common clinical condition and causes intracellular pH (pHi) to fall. Although previous work has suggested that MAc-induced decreases in pHi (ΔpHi) differ among cell types, what is not clear is the extent to which these differences are the result of the wide variety of methodologies employed by various investigators. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of two sequential MAc challenges (MAc1 and MAc2) on pHi in 10 cell types/lines: primary-cultured hippocampal (HCN) neurons and astrocytes (HCA), primary-cultured medullary raphé (MRN) neurons, and astrocytes (MRA), CT26 colon cancer, the C2C12 skeletal muscles, primary-cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and dendritic cells (BMDC), Ink4a/ARF-null melanocytes, and XB-2 keratinocytes. We monitor pHi using ratiometric fluorescence imaging of 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein while imposing MAc: lowering (pHo) from 7.4 to 7.2 by decreasing [HCO3−]o from 22 to 14 mM at 5% CO2 for 7 min. After MAc1, we return cells to the control solution for 10 min and impose MAc2. Using our definition of MAc resistance [(ΔpHi/ΔpHo) ≤ 40%], during MAc1, ∼70% of CT26 and ∼50% of C2C12 are MAc-resistant, whereas the other cell types are predominantly MAc-sensitive. During MAc2, some cells adapt [(ΔpHi/ΔpHo)2 < (ΔpHi/ΔpHo)1], particularly HCA, C2C12, and BMDC. Most maintain consistent responses [(ΔpHi/ΔpHo)2 ≅ (ΔpHi/ΔpHo)1], and a few decompensate [(ΔpHi/ΔpHo)2>(ΔpHi/ΔpHo)1], particularly HCN, C2C12, and XB-2. Thus, responses to twin MAc challenges depend both on the individual cell and cell type. PMID:25209413

  1. Thermally induced changes in intracellular pH and modulators of phosphofructokinase in trout white muscle

    PubMed

    Lehoux; Guderley

    1997-01-01

    The intracellular pH (pHi) and the concentrations of lactate and selected modulators of phosphofructokinase (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11) were measured in white epaxial muscle of 15 °C-acclimated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) maintained at 8, 15 or 22 °C for 48 h and sampled at rest and after 10 min of exhaustive exercise. The lactate accumulation resulting from exercise was 13 % smaller at 22 °C than at 8 and 15 °C. The estimated duration of burst performance was shorter at cold than at warm temperatures, whereas the average rate of lactate accumulation during burst performance was higher at 8 °C than at 15 and 22 °C. pHi rose when temperature decreased, but less than predicted by the imidazole alphastat hypothesis of Reeves. The effects of temperature on the pre-exercise concentrations of PFK modulators [adenylates, fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP)] were generally negligible. In exhausted trout, adenylate concentrations were almost unaffected by temperature. In contrast, post-exercise FBP and F6P concentrations were significantly higher at low than at high temperatures. We interpret the response of F6P to temperature as an indication that the covariation of pHi and temperature is insufficient to prevent a cold-enhancement of PFK inhibition. Since F6P is a potent activator of PFK, we conclude that, in trout white muscle, thermally induced changes in F6P concentration probably help buffer the effects of temperature change on PFK activity. PMID:9318724

  2. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: role of intracellular pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize glass microelectrodes to characterize the intracellular pH (pHi) before and during recovery from fatigue in the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle. A second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pHi and contractile function. The frog ST muscle (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. Peak tetanic force (Po) was reduced to 8.5% of initial force and recovered in a biphasic manner, returning to the resting value by 40 min. Resting pHi was 7.00 +/- 0.02 (n = 37) and declined with fatigue to an average value of 6.42 at 3 min of recovery. During recovery pHi significantly increased and by 25 min had returned to the prefatigue value. The pHi recovery was highly correlated to the slow phase of Po recovery (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001). The mean resting membrane potential was -78 +/- 1.0 mV (n = 42) and at 3 min of recovery was depolarized to -67 +/- 4 mV. Both the peak rate of twitch force development (+dP/dt) (r = 0.99, P less than 0.001) and decline (-dP/dt) (r = 0.94, P less than 0.014) were highly correlated to pHi during the slow phase of recovery. Contraction time (CT) and one-half relaxation time (1/2RT) increased significantly and recovered exponentially. The recovery of CT and 1/2RT were both significantly correlated to pHi (r = -0.93, P less than 0.001 and r = -0.86, P less than 0.001 for CT and 1/2RT, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Modulatory effects of neuropsychopharmaca on intracellular pH of hippocampal neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Udo; Bingmann, Dieter; Wiltfang, Jens; Scherbaum, Norbert; Wiemann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The intracellular pH (pHi) of neurones is tightly regulated by, for example, membrane-bound acid-exchangers and loaders. Nevertheless, excessive bioelectric activity lowers steady-state pHi. In turn, even a moderate acidification can inhibit neuronal activity, a process believed to be part of a negative feedback loop controlling neuronal excitation. As moclobemide, an antidepressant, and also some antiepileptic drugs can reduce neuronal pHi in hippocampus slices in vitro, we screened a panel of currently used neuropsychopharmaca for comparable effects. Experimental approach: BCECF-AM loaded hippocampal slices were superfused with 16 different neuroleptics, antidepressants and antiepileptics under bicarbonate-buffered conditions. Changes in steady-state pHi of CA3 neurones were measured fluorometrically. Key results: The antipsychotics haloperidol, clozapine, ziprasidone, and the antidepressants amitriptyline, doxepin, trimipramine, citalopram, mirtazapine, as well as the anticonvulsive drug tiagabine reversibly reduced the steady-state pHi by up to 0.35 pH-units in concentrations of 5–50 µM. In contrast, venlafaxine, the anticonvulsants carbamazepine, clonazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, zonisamide, and the mood stabilizer lithium had no effect on neuronal pHi. Conclusion and implications: These data substantiate the view that clinically relevant concentrations of neuroleptics and antidepressants can mediate changes in neuronal pHi, which may contribute to their pharmacological mode of action. Effects on pHi should be taken into account when therapeutic or even harmful effects of these drugs are evaluated. PMID:20015293

  4. Altered intracellular pH regulation in neutrophils from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Coakley, R J; Taggart, C; Canny, G; Greally, P; O'Neill, S J; McElvaney, N G

    2000-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a condition characterized by neutrophil-mediated lung damage and bacterial colonization. The physiological basis for reported functional alterations in CF neutrophils, including increased release of neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and oxidants, is unknown. These processes are, however, regulated by intracellular pH (pH(i)). We demonstrate here that pH(i) regulation is altered in neutrophils from CF patients. Although resting pH(i) is similar, pH(i) after acid loading and activation (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) is more acidic in CF cells than in normal cells. Furthermore, patients with non-CF-related bronchiectasis handle acid loading and activation in a fashion similar to subjects with normal neutrophils, suggesting that chronic pulmonary inflammation alone does not explain the difference in pH(i). This is further supported by data showing that normal neutrophils exposed to the CF pulmonary milieu respond by increasing pH(i) as opposed to decreasing pH(i) as seen in activated CF neutrophils. These pH(i) differences in activated or acid-loaded CF neutrophils are abrogated by ZnCl(2) but not by amiloride and bafilomycin A(1), suggesting that passive proton conductance is abnormal in CF. In addition, DIDS, which inhibits HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-) exchange, causes alkalinization of control but not of CF neutrophils, suggesting that anion transport is also abnormal in CF neutrophils. In summary, we have shown that pH(i) regulation in CF neutrophils is intrinsically abnormal, potentially contributing to the pulmonary manifestations of the condition.

  5. Anaerobic phosphate release from activated sludge with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A possible mechanism of intracellular pH control

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, P.L.; Keller, J.; Blackall, L.L.

    1999-06-05

    The biochemical mechanisms of the wastewater treatment process known as enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) are presently described in a metabolic model. The authors investigated details of the EBPR model to determine the nature of the anaerobic phosphate release and how this may be metabolically associated with polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) formation. Iodoacetate, an inhibitor of glycolysis, was found to inhibit the anaerobic formation of PHA and phosphate release, supporting the pathways proposed in the EBPR metabolic model. In the metabolic model, it is proposed that polyphosphate degradation provides energy for the microorganisms in anaerobic regions of these treatment systems. Other investigations have shown that anaerobic phosphate release depends on the extracellular pH. The authors observed that when the intracellular pH of EBPR sludge was raised, substantial anaerobic phosphate release was caused without volatile fatty acid (VFA) uptake. Acidification of the sludge inhibited anaerobic phosphate release even in the presence of VFA. from these observations, the authors postulate that an additional possible role of anaerobic polyphosphate degradation in EBPR is for intracellular pH control. Intracellular pH control may be a metabolic feature of EBPR, not previously considered, that could have some use in the control and optimization of EBPR.

  6. On the maintenance of hepatocyte intracellular pH 7.0 in the in-vitro metabolic stability assay.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M; Wong, Susan; Halladay, Jason S

    2013-12-01

    The account of pH difference between hepatocytes (intracellular pH 7.0) and extracellular water (pH 7.4) leads to the novel equation for hepatic clearance (Berezhkovskiy, J Pharma Sci 100:1167-1683, 2011). The metabolic stability assay using hepatocytes is commonly performed in the incubation buffer of pH 7.4. If hepatocytes retain their physiological pH 7.0 in these conditions, then the assay would mimic the in vivo condition, that is pH 7.4 for plasma and extracellular water, and pH 7.0 in hepatocytes. In this case the rate of drug elimination, taken as proportional to unbound drug concentration in buffer, would correspond to the in vivo rate of drug elimination as proportional to the unbound drug concentration in the extracellular water. Consequently the commonly used PBPK equation for the rate of hepatic elimination, and the equation for hepatic clearance would be valid. However, the experiment designed to determine hepatocyte internal pH indicated that it was not maintained in the in vitro stability assay, so that hepatocytes acquire the same pH as the incubation buffer. Thus, the novel equations for hepatic clearance (that include an ionization factor) should be applied regardless if the intrinsic clearance was obtained either from microsomal or hepatocyte stability assay.

  7. Fluorescent push-pull pH-responsive probes for ratiometric detection of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Ipuy, Martin; Billon, Cyrielle; Micouin, Guillaume; Samarut, Jacques; Andraud, Chantal; Bretonnière, Yann

    2014-06-14

    A family of fluorescent push-pull pH-responsive probes based on 2-dicyanomethylidene-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran as a strong electron acceptor group is described. Small structural variations allow obtaining pK(a) ranging from 4.8 to 8.6, underlining the role of the substituent in modulating the acidic properties. Remarkable changes in the optical properties (in particular the fluorescence intensity ratios) were observed as a function of pH. The most interesting probes with pK(a) close to neutrality were used for ratiometric imaging of intracellular pH.

  8. The influence of temperature on extracellular and intracellular pH in the American eel, Anguilla Rostrata (Le Sueur).

    PubMed

    Walsh, P J; Moon, T W

    1982-11-01

    The effects of ambient temperature (5-20 degrees C) on the pH of the extracellular and intracellular compartments of the Americal eel (Anguilla rostrata) were measured. Venous blood pH was sampled from an indwelling catheter in the caudal vein, and intracellular pH of liver, heart, white muscle, and red muscle was estimated by the distribution ratio of 14C-5,5 dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione (DMO). The absolute value of pH varies in a manner blood greater than liver greater than red muscle greater than heart and white muscle. The values for the change in pH with temperature (delta pH/delta T degrees C) are: blood, -0.0076; liver, -0.0177; heart, -0.0203; white muscle, -0.0090; red muscle, -0.0033. Delta pH/delta T degrees C values for blood, white muscle and red muscle are not statistically different, and are far from the -0.018 value predicted by the alphastat hypothesis. In contrast, delta pH/delta T degrees C values for liver and heart are statistically different from blood and match those expected for alphastat regulation. The results are discussed in the context of the alphastat hypothesis and metabolic 'torpor' in the American eel.

  9. Preferential intracellular pH regulation represents a general pattern of pH homeostasis during acid-base disturbances in the armoured catfish, Pterygoplichthys pardalis.

    PubMed

    Harter, T S; Shartau, R B; Baker, D W; Jackson, D C; Val, A L; Brauner, C J

    2014-08-01

    Preferential intracellular pH (pHi) regulation, where pHi is tightly regulated in the face of a blood acidosis, has been observed in a few species of fish, but only during elevated blood PCO2. To determine whether preferential pHi regulation may represent a general pattern for acid-base regulation during other pH disturbances we challenged the armoured catfish, Pterygoplichthys pardalis, with anoxia and exhaustive exercise, to induce a metabolic acidosis, and bicarbonate injections to induce a metabolic alkalosis. Fish were terminally sampled 2-3 h following the respective treatments and extracellular blood pH, pHi of red blood cells (RBC), brain, heart, liver and white muscle, and plasma lactate and total CO2 were measured. All treatments resulted in significant changes in extracellular pH and RBC pHi that likely cover a large portion of the pH tolerance limits of this species (pH 7.15-7.86). In all tissues other than RBC, pHi remained tightly regulated and did not differ significantly from control values, with the exception of a decrease in white muscle pHi after anoxia and an increase in liver pHi following a metabolic alkalosis. Thus preferential pHi regulation appears to be a general pattern for acid-base homeostasis in the armoured catfish and may be a common response in Amazonian fishes.

  10. Does low intensity He-Ne laser radiation affect the intracellular pH of intact Escherichia coli cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quickenden, Terence I.; Daniels, Lillian L. L.; Byrne, Lyndsay T.

    1995-05-01

    Claims that low levels of He-Ne laser light (cw, (lambda) equals 632.8 nm) can provide clinical benefits and can enhance in vitro cellular growth are still controversial (T.I. Quickenden and L.L. Daniels, 1993, Photochem. Photobiol. 57, 272-278; L.L. Daniels and T.I. Quickenden, 1994, Photochem. Photobiol., 60, 481-485). The present study tests the suggestion (T.I. Karu, 1988, Lasers life Sci. 2, 53-74; H. Friedmann, R. Lubart, I. Laulicht and S. Rochkink, 1991, J. Photochem. Photobiol. B: Biol. 11, 87-91) that red light stimulates mitosis by raising intracellular pH via absorption by chromophores in the respiratory chain. In order to search for photoinduced changes in intracellular pH, the effect of 5 mW He-Ne laser irradiation on cultures of E. coli was examined using a 300 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer. The pH difference between the intracellular and extracellular fluid was monitored in the presence and absence of radiation by determining the difference in chemical shift for 31P resonances arising from the H2PO4- ⇔ HPO42- + H+ equilibrium in the two environments.

  11. A low cytotoxic and ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon-dots for intracellular pH sensing and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangkai; Ming, Yunhao; Zeng, Fang; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH plays a critical role in the function of cells, and its regulation is essential for most cellular processes. In this study, we demonstrate a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ratiometric pH nanosensor with carbon-dot (CD) as the carrier. The sensor was prepared by covalently linking a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC) onto carbon-dot. As the FRET donor, the carbon-dot exhibits bright fluorescence emission as well as λex-dependent photoluminescence emission, and a suitable excitation wavelength for the donor (CD) can be chosen to match the energy acceptor (fluorescein moiety). The fluorescein moieties on a CD undergo structural and spectral conversion as the pH changes, affording the nanoplatform a FRET-based pH sensor. The CD-based system exhibits a significant change in fluorescence intensity ratio between pH 4 and 8 with a pKa value of 5.69. It also displays excellent water dispersibility, good spectral reversibility, satisfactory cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Following the living cell uptake, this nanoplatform with dual-chromatic emissions can facilitate real-time visualization of the pH evolution involved in the endocytic pathway of the nanosensor. This reversible and low cytotoxic fluorescent nanoplatform may be highly valuable in a variety of biological studies, such as endocytic trafficking, endosome/lysosome maturation, and pH regulation in subcellular organelles.

  12. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points. PMID:27020293

  13. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points.

  14. The biophysical and molecular basis of intracellular pH sensing by Na+/H+ exchanger-3

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Victor; Vadnagara, Komal; Di Sole, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial Na+/H+ exchanger-3 (NHE3) transport is fundamental for renal and intestinal sodium reabsorption. Cytoplasmic protons are thought to serve as allosteric modifiers of the exchanger and to trigger its transport through protein conformational change. This effect presupposes an intracellular pH (pHi) dependence of NHE3 activity, although the biophysical and molecular basis of NHE3 pHi sensitivity have not been defined. NHE3, when complexed with the calcineurin homologous protein-1 (CHP1), had a shift in pHi sensitivity (0.4 units) toward the acidic side in comparison with NHE3 alone, as measured by oscillating pH electrodes combined with whole-cell patch clamping. Indeed, CHP1 interaction with NHE3 inhibited NHE3 transport in a pHi -dependent manner. CHP1 binding to NHE3 also affected its acute regulation. Intracellular perfusion of peptide from the CHP1 binding region (or pHi modification to reduce the CHP1 amount bound to NHE3) was permissive and cooperative for dopamine inhibition of NHE3 but reversed that of adenosine. Thus, CHP1 interaction with NHE3 apparently establishes the exchanger set point for pHi, and modification in this set point is effective in the hormonal stimuli–mediated regulation of NHE3. CHP1 may serve as a regulatory cofactor for NHE3 conformational change, dependent on intracellular protonation.—Babich V., Vadnagara K., Di Sole, F. The biophysical and molecular basis of intracellular pH sensing by the Na+/H+ exchanger-3. PMID:23934281

  15. pHlash: A New Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor of Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. Brian; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a genetically encodable and ratiometic pH probe named “pHlash” that utilizes Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) rather than fluorescence excitation. The pHlash sensor–composed of a donor luciferase that is genetically fused to a Venus fluorophore–exhibits pH dependence of its spectral emission in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification in vivo. Its spectral ratio response is H+ specific; neither Ca++, Mg++, Na+, nor K+ changes the spectral form of its luminescence emission. Moreover, it can be used to image pH in single cells. This is the first BRET-based sensor of H+ ions, and it should allow the approximation of pH in cytosolic and organellar compartments in applications where current pH probes are inadequate. PMID:22905204

  16. Rationally Engineering Phototherapy Modules of Eosin-Conjugated Responsive Polymeric Nanocarriers via Intracellular Endocytic pH Gradients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guhuan; Hu, Jinming; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Shiyong

    2015-07-15

    Spatiotemporal switching of respective phototherapy modes at the cellular level with minimum side effects and high therapeutic efficacy is a major challenge for cancer phototherapy. Herein we demonstrate how to address this issue by employing photosensitizer-conjugated pH-responsive block copolymers in combination with intracellular endocytic pH gradients. At neutral pH corresponding to extracellular and cytosol milieu, the copolymers self-assemble into micelles with prominently quenched fluorescence emission and low (1)O2 generation capability, favoring a highly efficient photothermal module. Under mildly acidic pH associated with endolysosomes, protonation-triggered micelle-to-unimer transition results in recovered emission and enhanced photodynamic (1)O2 efficiency, which synergistically actuates release of encapsulated drugs, endosomal escape, and photochemical internalization processes.

  17. Modulation of a sustained calcium current by intracellular pH in horizontal cells of fish retina

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A sustained high voltage-activated (HVA), nifedipine- and cadmium- sensitive calcium current and a sustained calcium action potential (AP) were recorded from horizontal cells isolated from catfish retina. pH indicator dyes showed that superfusion with NH4Cl alkalinized these cells and that washout of NH4Cl or superfusion with Na-acetate acidified them. HVA current was slightly enhanced during superfusion of NH4Cl but was suppressed upon NH4Cl washout or application of Na- acetate. When 25 mM HEPES was added to the patch pipette to increase intracellular pH buffering, the effects of NH4Cl and Na-acetate on HVA current were reduced. These results indicated that intracellular acidification reduces HVA calcium current and alkalinization increases it. Sustained APs, recorded with high resistance, small diameter microelectrodes, were blocked by cobalt and cadmium and their magnitude varied with extracellular calcium concentration. These results provide confirmatory evidence that the HVA current is a major component of the AP and indicate that the AP can be used as a measure of how the HVA current can be modified in intact, undialyzed cells. The duration of APs was increased by superfusion with NH4Cl and reduced by washout of NH4Cl or superfusion with Na-acetate. The Na-acetate and NH4Cl washout- dependent shortening of the APs was observed in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, a calcium chelator, IBMX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and in Na-free or TEA-enriched saline. These findings provide supportive evidence that intracellular acidification may directly suppress the HVA calcium current in intact cells. Intracellular pH changes would thereby be expected to modulate not only the resting membrane potential of these cells in darkness, but calcium- dependent release of neurotransmitter from these cells as well. Furthermore, this acidification-dependent suppression of calcium current could serve a protective role by reducing calcium entry during retinal ischemia, which

  18. Regulation of intracellular pH in neuronal and glial tumour cells, studied by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1994-06-01

    The effect of extracellular pH (pHe) on intracellular pH (pHi) and cellular metabolism was examined by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy of cells in vivo and in vitro. A decrease in pHe from 7.4 to 6.4 led to a significant drop in pHi, in both neuronal and glial tumour cells, as detected by in vivo 31P NMR of cells embedded in basement membrane gel threads. A more than 50% decrease in both the phosphocreatine (PCr) level and derivatives of glycolysis (i.e., glycerol 3-phosphate) was observed, concomitantly to the fall in pHi. A 50% decrease in intracellular lactate levels was seen in in vivo 1H NMR spectra under these conditions. Reperfusion with fresh medium (pHe 7.4) resulted in the full recovery of pHi, simultaneously with an increase in both PCr and intracellular lactate back to their control levels. Perchloric acid and lipid extract measurements confirmed the observations made by in vivo 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy and further showed a decrease both in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and phospholipid synthesis. The data revealed no significant differences between the neuronal and glial tumour cells investigated. pHi measurements in the presence of inhibitors of the various pH regulatory mechanisms showed that the Na+/H+ exchanger, the carbonic anhydrase and at least one of the bicarbonate-transport systems are involved in pH regulation of both cell types. The results suggest that Na+/H+ exchange is the preferred mechanism by which both neuronal and glial cells regulate their pHi after extracellular acidification.

  19. The amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchange antiporter and control of intracellular pH in hippocampal brain slices.

    PubMed

    Lin, C W; Kalaria, R N; Kroon, S N; Bae, J Y; Sayre, L M; LaManna, J C

    1996-08-26

    The intracellular pH, 7.54 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- S.D., n = 15), determined with the Neutral red method, of the hippocampal brain slice preparation under baseline incubation conditions is considerably more alkaline than the bath buffer pH. Neutralization by amiloride suggests that the alkalinity was due to Na+/H+ exchange antiporter activation. To characterize the brain Na+/H+ exchange antiporter we compared the inhibitory effects of MIA, amiloride and other 5-N substituted analogues on proton extrusion after acid loading by transient exposure to ammonium chloride in the isolated hippocampal brain slice preparation. The potencies of amiloride compounds on the initial recovery rate of intracellular pH after acid-loading were DMA > MIA > HMA = MHA > or = IPA-HCI > IPA > MNPA = Amil > Benzamil. The greater potency of the 5-N substituted analogs of amiloride over amiloride and benzamil strongly suggest that Na+/H+ exchange antiporter is the mechanism responsible for alkalinization in the isolated hippocampal brain slice in vitro. PMID:8883860

  20. Embryonic common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) preferentially regulate intracellular tissue pH during acid-base challenges.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Crossley, Dane A; Kohl, Zachary F; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-07-01

    The nests of embryonic turtles naturally experience elevated CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood PCO2  and a respiratory acidosis, resulting in reduced blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)]. Some fishes preferentially regulate tissue pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] against changes in pHe; this has been proposed to be associated with exceptional CO2 tolerance and has never been identified in amniotes. As embryonic turtles may be CO2 tolerant based on nesting strategy, we hypothesized that they preferentially regulate pHi, conferring tolerance to severe acute acid-base challenges. This hypothesis was tested by investigating pH regulation in common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) reared in normoxia then exposed to hypercarbia (13 kPa PCO2 ) for 1 h at three developmental ages: 70% and 90% of incubation, and yearlings. Hypercarbia reduced pHe but not pHi, at all developmental ages. At 70% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.324 pH units while pHi of brain, white muscle and lung increased; heart, liver and kidney pHi remained unchanged. At 90% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.352 pH units but heart pHi increased with no change in pHi of other tissues. Yearlings exhibited a pHe reduction of 0.235 pH units but had no changes in pHi of any tissues. The results indicate common snapping turtles preferentially regulate pHi during development, but the degree of response is reduced throughout development. This is the first time preferential pHi regulation has been identified in an amniote. These findings may provide insight into the evolution of acid-base homeostasis during development of amniotes, and vertebrates in general. PMID:27091863

  1. Embryonic common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) preferentially regulate intracellular tissue pH during acid-base challenges.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Crossley, Dane A; Kohl, Zachary F; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-07-01

    The nests of embryonic turtles naturally experience elevated CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood PCO2  and a respiratory acidosis, resulting in reduced blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)]. Some fishes preferentially regulate tissue pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] against changes in pHe; this has been proposed to be associated with exceptional CO2 tolerance and has never been identified in amniotes. As embryonic turtles may be CO2 tolerant based on nesting strategy, we hypothesized that they preferentially regulate pHi, conferring tolerance to severe acute acid-base challenges. This hypothesis was tested by investigating pH regulation in common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) reared in normoxia then exposed to hypercarbia (13 kPa PCO2 ) for 1 h at three developmental ages: 70% and 90% of incubation, and yearlings. Hypercarbia reduced pHe but not pHi, at all developmental ages. At 70% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.324 pH units while pHi of brain, white muscle and lung increased; heart, liver and kidney pHi remained unchanged. At 90% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.352 pH units but heart pHi increased with no change in pHi of other tissues. Yearlings exhibited a pHe reduction of 0.235 pH units but had no changes in pHi of any tissues. The results indicate common snapping turtles preferentially regulate pHi during development, but the degree of response is reduced throughout development. This is the first time preferential pHi regulation has been identified in an amniote. These findings may provide insight into the evolution of acid-base homeostasis during development of amniotes, and vertebrates in general.

  2. Fiber optic measurement of intracellular pH in intact rat liver using pH-sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felberbauer, Franz; Graf, Juerg

    1991-09-01

    The pH-sensitive fluorescent dye 1,3-dihydroxy-pyrene-6,8-disulfonic acid (DHPDS) was used to measure intracellular pH (pHi) from the surface fluorescence of the isolated perfused rate liver. 1 micrometers of the diacetyl ester of DHPDS was added to the perfusate. The dye readily accumulated in hepatocytes where it was hydrolyzed to form the fluorescent pH indicator. Surface fluorescence was excited by focusing monochromatic light from a spectrofluorometer onto the end of a fiber light guide that illuminated a part of the liver surface. Two excitation wavelengths were used, one where fluorescence intensity was pH sensitive, the other at the isosbestic point. Emitted light was collected by a second fiber optic and returned to the emission side of the spectrometer. A ratio was computed between fluorescence intensities at the pH-sensitive excitation peak wavelength and the isosbestic wavelength, thus yielding measurement insensitive to changes in dye concentration and in excitation light intensity. Intracellular calibration of dye fluorescence was done by clamping pHi to perfusate pH with the use of the cell membrane H+/K+ -ionophore Nigericin. The method was used to monitor changes in pHi caused by addition and removal of NH4Cl. Data obtained in the perfused liver were in good agreement with those reported for isolated liver cells. The technique appears adequate to determine hepatocellular pH in the liver and will allow study of regulatory mechanisms of hepatocyte pHi in the intact organ.

  3. Counteractive Effects of ABA and GA3 on Extracellular and Intracellular pH and Malate in Barley Aleurone.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Heistek, J. C.; Wang, M.

    1994-09-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) aleurone layers are known to constitutively acidify their surroundings, primarily by L-malic acid release (J. Mikola, M. Virtanen [1980] Plant Physiol 66: S-142). Here we demonstrate the antagonistic effects of the plant hormones gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA) on the regulation of extracellular pH (pHe) of barley aleurone layers. We observed a strong correlation between ABA-induced enhancement of extracellular acidification and an ABA-induced increase in L-malic acid release. In addition, ABA caused an increase in intracellular L-malate level. GA3 caused a slight decrease in intracellular L-malate level and was able to inhibit the ABA-induced increase in L-malate intracellular concentration and release. In addition, this ABA-induced L-malate release could be completely inhibited by GA3. The ABA-induced release of L-malic acid could not account for the total ABA-induced pHe decrease, suggesting the existence of an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of pHe. It has been reported that ABA induces an intracellular pH (pHi) increase, possibly due to the activation of plasma membrane proton pumps (R. Van der Veen, S. Heimovaara-Dijkstra, M. Wang [1992] Plant Physiol 100: 699-705). A pHi increase, such as that caused by ABA, might be correlated with the intracellular L-malate increase as suggested by the pH stat model of D.D. Davies ([1986] Physiol Plant 67: 702-706). We studied if the effects of GA3 on L-malate concentration were correlated with changes in pHi and found that GA3 caused a pHi decrease and that GA3 and ABA could interfere in the regulation of pHi. In addition, we were able to mimic the effect of both hormones on L-malate release by bringing about artifical pHi changes with the weak acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione and the weak base methylamine. The physiological meaning of the effects of GA3 and ABA on the regulation of both pHe and pHi during grain germination are discussed.

  4. Counteractive Effects of ABA and GA3 on Extracellular and Intracellular pH and Malate in Barley Aleurone.

    PubMed Central

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Heistek, J. C.; Wang, M.

    1994-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) aleurone layers are known to constitutively acidify their surroundings, primarily by L-malic acid release (J. Mikola, M. Virtanen [1980] Plant Physiol 66: S-142). Here we demonstrate the antagonistic effects of the plant hormones gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA) on the regulation of extracellular pH (pHe) of barley aleurone layers. We observed a strong correlation between ABA-induced enhancement of extracellular acidification and an ABA-induced increase in L-malic acid release. In addition, ABA caused an increase in intracellular L-malate level. GA3 caused a slight decrease in intracellular L-malate level and was able to inhibit the ABA-induced increase in L-malate intracellular concentration and release. In addition, this ABA-induced L-malate release could be completely inhibited by GA3. The ABA-induced release of L-malic acid could not account for the total ABA-induced pHe decrease, suggesting the existence of an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of pHe. It has been reported that ABA induces an intracellular pH (pHi) increase, possibly due to the activation of plasma membrane proton pumps (R. Van der Veen, S. Heimovaara-Dijkstra, M. Wang [1992] Plant Physiol 100: 699-705). A pHi increase, such as that caused by ABA, might be correlated with the intracellular L-malate increase as suggested by the pH stat model of D.D. Davies ([1986] Physiol Plant 67: 702-706). We studied if the effects of GA3 on L-malate concentration were correlated with changes in pHi and found that GA3 caused a pHi decrease and that GA3 and ABA could interfere in the regulation of pHi. In addition, we were able to mimic the effect of both hormones on L-malate release by bringing about artifical pHi changes with the weak acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione and the weak base methylamine. The physiological meaning of the effects of GA3 and ABA on the regulation of both pHe and pHi during grain germination are discussed. PMID:12232334

  5. The synthesis of new fluorescent bichromophoric compounds as ratiometric pH probes for intracellular measurements.

    PubMed

    Saura, A Vanessa; Marín, María J; Burguete, M Isabel; Russell, David A; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-07-28

    Three different bichromophoric compounds (1-3) containing an aminomethyl anthracene moiety linked to a second chromophore (pyrene, 4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD) and dansyl) through a valine-derived pseudopeptidic spacer have been prepared and their fluorescent properties studied. The results obtained show that upon irradiation the photophysical behavior of these probes involves electronic energy transfer from the excited anthracene to the second chromophore and also intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer. The X-ray structure obtained for 3 reveals that the folding associated with the pseudopeptidic spacer favours a close proximity of the two chromophores. The emissive response of 3 is clearly dependent on the pH of the medium, hence this bichromophoric compound was shown to be an excellent ratiometric pH fluorescent sensor. The emission intensity due to the anthracene moiety exhibits a decrease at neutral-basic pH values that is concomitant with an increase in the intensity arising from the dansyl fluorophore. These properties make this compound a good candidate for biological pH sensing as has been confirmed by preliminary studies with RAW 264.7 macrophage cells imaged by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy with an average pH estimation of 5.4-5.8 for acidic organelles.

  6. Effects of fatigue and reduced intracellular pH on segment dynamics in 'isometric' relaxation of frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Curtin, N A; Edman, K A

    1989-06-01

    1. Longitudinal movements of marked segments of single fibres from the anterior tibialis muscle were recorded during tetanus and relaxation under isometric (fixed-end) conditions. 2. During relaxation, shortening and lengthening of different segments occurred simultaneously, starting at about the same time as the end of the linear fall of force (shoulder on the force record). 3. Variations in intracellular pH, measured with pH-sensitive microelectrodes, along the length of fibres were not statistically significant, and are unlikely to be responsible for the non-uniform behaviour of different segments. 4. As expected from earlier studies, both fatigue (produced by increasing tetanus duration or decreasing the time between tetani) and intracellular acidification (produced by raised extracellular CO2), reduced the tetanus force and prolonged the linear phase of force decline in relaxation. Each treatment delayed the start and markedly reduced the amount of segment movement in relaxation. 5. Fatigue and intracellular acidification have a smaller effect on force during stretching than on force produced under isometric conditions. This may contribute to making the segments behave in a more uniform way during relaxation under these conditions. 6. Changes in the Ca2+ uptake mechanisms are also discussed as possible causes for the changes in segment behaviour in relaxation.

  7. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks.

  8. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks. PMID:25411952

  9. GABA- and glycine-mediated fall of intracellular pH in rat medullary neurons in situ.

    PubMed

    Lückermann, M; Trapp, S; Ballanyi, K

    1997-04-01

    In the region of the ventral respiratory group in brain stem slices from neonatal rats, intracellular pH (pHi) and membrane currents (I(m)) or potentials were measured in neurons dialyzed with the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis-carboxyethyl-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein. Currents and increases in membrane conductance (g(m)) during bath application of 0.1 or 1 mM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were accompanied by a delayed mean fall of pHi by 0.17 and 0.25 pH units, respectively, from a pHi baseline of 7.33. These effects were reversibly suppressed by 50-100 microM bicuculline. Similar effects on I(m), g(m), and pHi were revealed on administration of 0.1 or 1 mM glycine. These responses were abolished by 10-100 microM strychnine. Dialysis of the cells with 15-30 microM carbonic anhydrase led to an acceleration of the kinetics and a potentiation of the GABA-induced pHi decrease. GABA- and glycine-evoked pHi decreases were very similar during recordings with either high- or low-Cl- patch electrodes, although the reversal potential of the accompanying currents differed by approximately 60 mV. The GABA-induced pHi decrease, but not the accompanying I(m) and g(m) responses, was suppressed in CO2/HCO3(-)-free, N-2-hydroxy-ethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethane sulphonic acid pH-buffered solution. Depolarization from -60 to +30 mV resulted in a sustained fall of pHi by maximally 0.5 pH units. In this situation, the GABA-induced fall of pHi turned into an intracellular alkalosis of 0.09-0.15 pH units. The results confirm and extend previous findings obtained in vivo that GABA- or glycine-induced intracellular acidosis of respiratory neurons is due to efflux of HCO3- via the receptor-coupled Cl- channel.

  10. Effects of intracellular pH on ATP-sensitive K+ channels in mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Proks, P; Takano, M; Ashcroft, F M

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of intracellular pH (pHi) on the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (K+ATP channel) from mouse pancreatic beta-cells were examined in inside-out patches exposed to symmetrical 140 mM K+ solutions. 2. The relationship between channel activity and pHi was described by the Hill equation with half-maximal inhibition (Ki) at pHi 6.25 and a Hill coefficient of 3.7. 3. Following exposure to pHi < 6.8, channel activity did not recover to its original level. Subsequent application of trypsin to the intracellular membrane surface restored channel activity to its initial level or above. 4. At -60 mV the relationship between pHi and the single-channel current amplitude was described by a modified Hill equation with a Hill coefficient of 2.1, half-maximal inhibition at pHi 6.48 and a maximum inhibition of 18.5%. 5. A decrease in pHi reduced the extent of channel inhibition by ATP: Ki was 18 microM at pH 7.2 and 33 microM at pH 6.4. The Hill coefficient was also reduced, being 1.65 at pH 7.2 and 1.17 at pH 6.4. 6. When channel activity was plotted as a function of ATP4- (rather than total ATP) there was no effect of pHi on the relationship. This suggests that ATP4- is the inhibitory ion species and that the effects of reducing pHi are due to the lowered concentration of ATP4-. 7. Changes in external pH had little effect on either single-channel or whole-cell K+ATP currents. 8. The effects of pHi do not support a role for H+ in linking glucose metabolism to K+ATP channel inhibition in pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:8189391

  11. Intracellular pH and its regulation in isolated type I carotid body cells of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buckler, K J; Vaughan-Jones, R D; Peers, C; Nye, P C

    1991-01-01

    1. The dual-emission pH-sensitive fluoroprobe carboxy-SNARF-1 (carboxy-seminaptharhodofluor) was used to measure pHi in type I cells enzymically dispersed from the neonatal rat carotid body. 2. Steady-state pHi in cells bathed in a HEPES-buffered Tyrode solution (pH 7.4) was found to be remarkably alkaline (pHi = 7.77) whereas cells bathed in a CO2-HCO3(-)-buffered Tyrode solution (pH 7.4) had a more 'normal' pHi (pHi = 7.28). These observations were further substantiated by using an independent nullpoint test method to determine pHi. 3. Intracellular intrinsic buffering (beta, determined by acidifying the cell using an NH4Cl pre-pulse) was in the range 7-20 mM per pH unit and appeared to be dependent upon pHi with beta increasing as pHi decreased. 4. In cells bathed in a HEPES-buffered Tyrode solution, pHi recovery from an induced intracellular acid load (10 mM-NH4Cl pre-pulse) was inhibited by the Na(+)-H+ exchange inhibitor ethyl isopropyl amiloride (EIPA; 150 microM) or substitution of Nao+ with N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMG). Both EIPA and Nao+ removal also caused a rapid intracellular acidification, which in the case of Nao+ removal, was readily reversible. The rate of this acidification was similar for both Nao+ removal and EIPA addition. 5. Transferring cells from a HEPES-buffered Tyrode solution to one buffered with 5% CO2-HCO3- resulted in an intracellular acidification which was partially, or wholly, sustained. The rate of acidification upon transfer to CO2-HCO3- was considerably slowed by the membrane permeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, thus indicating the presence of the enzyme in these cells. 6. In CO2-HCO3(-)-buffered Tyrode solution, pHi recovery from an intracellular acidosis (NH4+ pre-pulse) was only partially inhibited by EIPA or amiloride whereas Nao+ removal completely inhibited the recovery. The stilbene DIDS (4,4-diisothiocyanatostilbenedisulphonic acid, 200 microM) also partially inhibited pHi recovery following an induced

  12. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  13. Construction of pH-Sensitive "Submarine" Based on Gold Nanoparticles with Double Insurance for Intracellular pH Mapping, Quantifying of Whole Cells and in Vivo Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kang-Kang; Li, Kun; Qin, Hui-Huan; Zhou, Qian; Qian, Chen-Hui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-09-01

    A series of "submarines", which composed of gold nanoparticles and modified with rhodamine and fluorescein derivatives, were presented. With dual sensitive units for both acidic and basic environment, these "gold nano-submarines" not only allow efficient intracellular pH mapping but also provide more accurate quantitative detection of pH alteration under different stimuli with distinct pH quantification range. Moreover, they even have the ability to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB).

  14. Construction of pH-Sensitive "Submarine" Based on Gold Nanoparticles with Double Insurance for Intracellular pH Mapping, Quantifying of Whole Cells and in Vivo Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kang-Kang; Li, Kun; Qin, Hui-Huan; Zhou, Qian; Qian, Chen-Hui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-09-01

    A series of "submarines", which composed of gold nanoparticles and modified with rhodamine and fluorescein derivatives, were presented. With dual sensitive units for both acidic and basic environment, these "gold nano-submarines" not only allow efficient intracellular pH mapping but also provide more accurate quantitative detection of pH alteration under different stimuli with distinct pH quantification range. Moreover, they even have the ability to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB). PMID:27532147

  15. Novel application of pH-sensitive firefly luciferases as dual reporter genes for simultaneous ratiometric analysis of intracellular pH and gene expression/location.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Gabriele V M; Viviani, Vadim R

    2014-12-01

    Firefly luciferases are widely used as bioluminescent reporter genes for bioimaging and biosensors. Aiming at simultaneous analyses of different gene expression and cellular events, luciferases and GFPs that exhibit distinct bioluminescence and fluorescence colors have been coupled with each promoter, making dual and multicolor reporter systems. Despite their wide use, firefly luciferase bioluminescence spectra are pH-sensitive, resulting in a typical large red shift at acidic pH, a side-effect that may affect some bioanalytical purposes. Although some intracellular pH-indicators employ dual color and fluorescent dyes, none has been considered to benefit from the characteristic spectral pH-sensitivity of firefly luciferases to monitor intracellular pH-associated stress, an important indicator of cell homeostasis. Here we demonstrate a linear relationship between the ratio of intensities in the green and red regions of the bioluminescence spectra and pH using firefly luciferases cloned in our laboratory (Macrolampis sp2 and Cratomorphus distinctus), allowing estimation of E. coli intracellular pH, thus providing a new analytical method for ratiometric intracellular pH-sensing. This is the first dual reporter system that employs a single luciferase gene to simultaneously monitor intracellular pH using spectral changes, and gene expression and/or ATP concentration using the bioluminescence intensity, showing great potential for real time bioanalysis of intracellular processes associated with metabolic changes such as apoptosis, cell death, inflammation and tissue acidification, among the other physiological changes.

  16. Long-term effects of thyroid stimulating hormone and insulin on intracellular pH in FRTL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, A M; Bidey, S P; Soden, J; Robertson, W R

    1992-05-01

    We have studied the chronic effects of TSH (100 microU/ml) and insulin (10 micrograms/ml) on intracellular pH (pH(i)) in FRTL-5 cells using the pH sensitive probe 2'7-bis (2-carboxyethyl-5'-6') carboxyfluorescein. FRTL-5 cells were cultured on Petri dishes either in the presence of 4H, ie. Coons F-12 containing cortisol (10 nM), transferrin (0.5 microgram/ml), glycyl-histidyl lysine acetate (10 ng/ml) and somatostatin (10 micrograms/ml), or with 4H + insulin (5H), 4H + TSH, or 4H + TSH + insulin (6H). pH(i) was measured in small groups of cells by microspectrofluorimetry both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate ions after cells had been deprived of serum for at least a day. In the absence of TSH, insulin and bicarbonate ions, pH(i) was 7.26 +/- 0.18 (mean +/- SD, n = 49) rising to 7.89 +/- 0.09 (n = 59) and 7.43 +/- 0.1 (n = 55) in the presence of TSH (4H + TSH) and insulin (5H) respectively. Addition of both insulin and TSH (6H) resulted in a pH(i) of 7.75 +/- 0.09 (n = 40). In the absence of TSH and insulin, but the presence of bicarbonate ions, pH(i) was 7.29 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD n = 47) rising to 7.72 +/- 0.07 (n = 59) in 4H + TSH and 7.48 +/- 0.08 (n = 60) in 5H. pH(i) in the presence of both TSH and insulin was 7.81 +/- 0.03 (n = 60). In conclusion, both insulin and TSH caused an intracellular alkalinization, TSH markedly so, even in the presence of bicarbonate ions. PMID:1613417

  17. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rebecca C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L.; Go, Aiza C.; Anderson, Steve E.; Cala, Peter M.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings

  18. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rebecca C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L.; Go, Aiza C.; Anderson, Steve E.; Cala, Peter M.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings

  19. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Rebecca C; Hubbard, Neil E; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L; Go, Aiza C; Anderson, Steve E; Cala, Peter M; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings demonstrate

  20. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1.

  1. Effects of micro electric current load during cooling of plant tissues on intracellular ice crystal formation behavior and pH.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Takako; Kawamura, Yukio; Konishi, Tadashi; Narumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Cryopreservation techniques are expected to evolve further to preserve biomaterials and foods in a fresh state for extended periods of time. Long-term cryopreservation of living materials such as food and biological tissue is generally achieved by freezing; thus, intracellular freezing occurs. Intracellular freezing injures the cells and leads to cell death. Therefore, a dream cryopreservation technique would preserve the living materials without internal ice crystal formation at a temperature low enough to prevent bacterial activity. This study was performed to investigate the effect of micro electrical current loading during cooling as a new cryopreservation technique. The behavior of intracellular ice crystal formation in plant tissues with or without an electric current load was evaluated using the degree of supercooling, degree of cell deformation, and grain size and growing rate of intracellular ice crystal. Moreover, the transition of intracellular pH during plant tissue cooling with or without electric current loading was also examined using the fluorescence intensity ratio to comprehend cell activity at lower temperatures. The results indicated that micro electric current load did not only decrease the degree of cell deformation and grain size of intracellular ice crystal but also reduced the decline in intracellular pH due to temperature lowering, compared with tissues subjected to the same cooling rate without an electric current load. Thus, the effect of electric current load on cryopreservation and the potential of a new cryopreservation technique using electric current load were discussed based on these results. PMID:27343137

  2. Effects of micro electric current load during cooling of plant tissues on intracellular ice crystal formation behavior and pH.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Takako; Kawamura, Yukio; Konishi, Tadashi; Narumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Cryopreservation techniques are expected to evolve further to preserve biomaterials and foods in a fresh state for extended periods of time. Long-term cryopreservation of living materials such as food and biological tissue is generally achieved by freezing; thus, intracellular freezing occurs. Intracellular freezing injures the cells and leads to cell death. Therefore, a dream cryopreservation technique would preserve the living materials without internal ice crystal formation at a temperature low enough to prevent bacterial activity. This study was performed to investigate the effect of micro electrical current loading during cooling as a new cryopreservation technique. The behavior of intracellular ice crystal formation in plant tissues with or without an electric current load was evaluated using the degree of supercooling, degree of cell deformation, and grain size and growing rate of intracellular ice crystal. Moreover, the transition of intracellular pH during plant tissue cooling with or without electric current loading was also examined using the fluorescence intensity ratio to comprehend cell activity at lower temperatures. The results indicated that micro electric current load did not only decrease the degree of cell deformation and grain size of intracellular ice crystal but also reduced the decline in intracellular pH due to temperature lowering, compared with tissues subjected to the same cooling rate without an electric current load. Thus, the effect of electric current load on cryopreservation and the potential of a new cryopreservation technique using electric current load were discussed based on these results.

  3. Intracellular release of doxorubicin from core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles triggered by both pH and reduction conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liangliang; Zou, Yan; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-07-01

    Reduction and pH dual-sensitive reversibly core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were developed from lipoic acid (LA) and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid (CCA) decorated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-P(LL-CCA/LA)) block copolymers for active loading and triggered intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) and PEG-P(LL18-CCA8/LA10) (M(n PEG) = 5.0 kg/mol) formed nano-sized micelles that were readily crosslinked in the presence of a catalytic amount of dithiothreitol (DTT) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4, 10 mM). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles displayed an elevated DOX loading over PEG-P(LL14-LA14) controls likely due to presence of ionic interactions between DOX and CCA. These core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles while exhibiting high stability against extensive dilution and high salt concentration were quickly dissociated into unimers in the presence of 10 mM DTT. The in vitro release studies showed that DOX release from PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles at pH 7.4 and 37 °C was significantly inhibited by crosslinking (i.e. less than 20% release in 24 h). The release of DOX was, however, doubled under endosomal pH of 5.0, possibly triggered by cleavage of the acid-labile amide bonds of CCA. In particular, rapid DOX release was observed under a reductive condition containing 10 mm glutathione (GSH), in which 86.0% and 96.7% of DOX were released in 24 h at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, under otherwise the same conditions. MTT assays demonstrated that these core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were practically non-toxic up to a tested concentration of 1.0 mg/mL, while DOX-loaded micelles caused pronounced cytotoxic effects to HeLa and HepG2 tumor cells with IC50 (inhibitory concentration to produce 50% cell death) of ca. 12.5 μg DOX equiv/mL following 48 h incubation. Confocal microscopy observations revealed that DOX-loaded crosslinked PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles more efficiently delivered and released DOX into the nuclei of

  4. Intracellular release of doxorubicin from core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles triggered by both pH and reduction conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liangliang; Zou, Yan; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-07-01

    Reduction and pH dual-sensitive reversibly core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were developed from lipoic acid (LA) and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid (CCA) decorated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-P(LL-CCA/LA)) block copolymers for active loading and triggered intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) and PEG-P(LL18-CCA8/LA10) (M(n PEG) = 5.0 kg/mol) formed nano-sized micelles that were readily crosslinked in the presence of a catalytic amount of dithiothreitol (DTT) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4, 10 mM). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles displayed an elevated DOX loading over PEG-P(LL14-LA14) controls likely due to presence of ionic interactions between DOX and CCA. These core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles while exhibiting high stability against extensive dilution and high salt concentration were quickly dissociated into unimers in the presence of 10 mM DTT. The in vitro release studies showed that DOX release from PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles at pH 7.4 and 37 °C was significantly inhibited by crosslinking (i.e. less than 20% release in 24 h). The release of DOX was, however, doubled under endosomal pH of 5.0, possibly triggered by cleavage of the acid-labile amide bonds of CCA. In particular, rapid DOX release was observed under a reductive condition containing 10 mm glutathione (GSH), in which 86.0% and 96.7% of DOX were released in 24 h at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, under otherwise the same conditions. MTT assays demonstrated that these core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were practically non-toxic up to a tested concentration of 1.0 mg/mL, while DOX-loaded micelles caused pronounced cytotoxic effects to HeLa and HepG2 tumor cells with IC50 (inhibitory concentration to produce 50% cell death) of ca. 12.5 μg DOX equiv/mL following 48 h incubation. Confocal microscopy observations revealed that DOX-loaded crosslinked PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles more efficiently delivered and released DOX into the nuclei of

  5. Inadequacy of high K+/nigericin for calibrating BCECF. I. Estimating steady-state intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Boyarsky, G; Hanssen, C; Clyne, L A

    1996-10-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in single vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells, cultured from rabbit abdominal aorta, using 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) on a microscope-based fluorescence system. Three lines of evidence are presented that using nigericin along with high external K+ to calibrate intracellular BCECF produces systematic errors in pHi. 1) The intrinsic buffering power (beta int), measured using weak bases (e.g., ammonium), was 2.5 times smaller than that measured using weak acids (e.g., propionic acid). This discrepancy became small if pHi had really been approximately 0.2 lower than what was estimated using nigericin-calibrated pHi values. 2) Total cellular buffering power (beta tot) in the presence of CO2/HCO-3 was measured and found to be much smaller than could account for the beta int, together with the contribution of CO2/HCO3 (beta CO2: assumed to be an open system buffer). If the true pHi values were approximately 0.2-0.4 lower than our nigericin-calibrated values, then the sum of beta int and beta CO2 equals beta tot. 3) A null technique was utilized for bracketing steady-state pHi; estimates of steady-state pHi using this null technique were approximately 0.2 lower than the high K+/nigericin-calibrated estimates. Four other cell types were examined: rat hepatocytes, rat corticotrophs, human keratinocytes, and rabbit fibroblasts. These other cells also displayed discrepancies between null and nigericin estimates of steady-state pHi, as well as differences between buffering power assessed using weak bases and acids. Finally, one potential source for these discrepancies is described: selecting an inappropriate external K+ to use with nigericin can produce systematic errors in pHi of approximately 0.1. PMID:8897819

  6. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  7. Phase Separation: Linking Cellular Compartmentalization to Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic cells are complex structures capable of coordinating numerous biochemical reactions in space and time. Key to such coordination is the subdivision of intracellular space into functional compartments. Compartmentalization can be achieved by intracellular membranes, which surround organelles and act as physical barriers. In addition, cells have developed sophisticated mechanisms to partition their inner substance in a tightly regulated manner. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that membraneless compartmentalization can be achieved by liquid demixing, a process culminating in liquid-liquid phase separation and the formation of phase boundaries. We discuss how this emerging concept may help in understanding dynamic reorganization of subcellular space and highlight its potential as a framework to explain pathological protein assembly in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27051975

  8. Compartmentalization of prokaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alicia; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Salas, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    It becomes now apparent that prokaryotic DNA replication takes place at specific intracellular locations. Early studies indicated that chromosomal DNA replication, as well as plasmid and viral DNA replication, occurs in close association with the bacterial membrane. Moreover, over the last several years, it has been shown that some replication proteins and specific DNA sequences are localized to particular subcellular regions in bacteria, supporting the existence of replication compartments. Although the mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of prokaryotic DNA replication are largely unknown, the docking of replication factors to large organizing structures may be important for the assembly of active replication complexes. In this article, we review the current state of this subject in two bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, focusing our attention in both chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA replication. A comparison with eukaryotic systems is also presented.

  9. Role of H(+)-pyrophosphatase activity in the regulation of intracellular pH in a scuticociliate parasite of turbot: Physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; de Felipe, Ana-Paula; Sueiro, Rosa-Ana; Fontenla, Francisco; Leiro, José-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The scuticociliatosis is a very serious disease that affects the cultured turbot, and whose causal agent is the anphizoic and marine euryhaline ciliate Philasterides dicentrarchi. Several protozoans possess acidic organelles that contain high concentrations of pyrophosphate (PPi), Ca(2+) and other elements with essential roles in vesicular trafficking, pH homeostasis and osmoregulation. P. dicentrarchi possesses a pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) that pumps H(+) through the membranes of vacuolar and alveolar sacs. These compartments share common features with the acidocalcisomes described in other parasitic protozoa (e.g. acid content and Ca(2+) storage). We evaluated the effects of Ca(2+) and ATP on H (+)-PPase activity in this ciliate and analyzed their role in maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis and osmoregulation, by the addition of PPi and inorganic molecules that affect osmolarity. Addition of PPi led to acidification of the intracellular compartments, while the addition of ATP, CaCl2 and bisphosphonates analogous of PPi and Ca(2+) metabolism regulators led to alkalinization and a decrease in H(+)-PPase expression in trophozoites. Addition of NaCl led to proton release, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and downregulation of H(+)-PPase expression. We conclude that the regulation of the acidification of intracellular compartments may be essential for maintaining the intracellular pH homeostasis necessary for survival of ciliates and their adaptation to salt stress, which they will presumably face during the endoparasitic phase, in which the salinity levels are lower than in their natural environment.

  10. Role of H(+)-pyrophosphatase activity in the regulation of intracellular pH in a scuticociliate parasite of turbot: Physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; de Felipe, Ana-Paula; Sueiro, Rosa-Ana; Fontenla, Francisco; Leiro, José-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The scuticociliatosis is a very serious disease that affects the cultured turbot, and whose causal agent is the anphizoic and marine euryhaline ciliate Philasterides dicentrarchi. Several protozoans possess acidic organelles that contain high concentrations of pyrophosphate (PPi), Ca(2+) and other elements with essential roles in vesicular trafficking, pH homeostasis and osmoregulation. P. dicentrarchi possesses a pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) that pumps H(+) through the membranes of vacuolar and alveolar sacs. These compartments share common features with the acidocalcisomes described in other parasitic protozoa (e.g. acid content and Ca(2+) storage). We evaluated the effects of Ca(2+) and ATP on H (+)-PPase activity in this ciliate and analyzed their role in maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis and osmoregulation, by the addition of PPi and inorganic molecules that affect osmolarity. Addition of PPi led to acidification of the intracellular compartments, while the addition of ATP, CaCl2 and bisphosphonates analogous of PPi and Ca(2+) metabolism regulators led to alkalinization and a decrease in H(+)-PPase expression in trophozoites. Addition of NaCl led to proton release, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and downregulation of H(+)-PPase expression. We conclude that the regulation of the acidification of intracellular compartments may be essential for maintaining the intracellular pH homeostasis necessary for survival of ciliates and their adaptation to salt stress, which they will presumably face during the endoparasitic phase, in which the salinity levels are lower than in their natural environment. PMID:27480055

  11. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.su; Sud'ina, Galina F.; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na{sup +} and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl{sup -} efflux through chloride channels and Na{sup +} influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  12. Intracellular pH and its relationship to regulation of ion transport in normal and cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Willumsen, N J; Boucher, R C

    1992-09-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) of cultured human airway epithelial cells from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects were measured with double-barrelled pH-sensitive liquid exchanger microelectrodes. The cells, which were grown to confluence on a permeable collagen matrix support, were mounted in a modified miniature Ussing chamber. All studies were conducted under open circuit conditions. Values are given as means +/- S.E.M. and n refers to the number of preparations. 2. Normal preparations (n = 15) were characterized by a transepithelial potential difference (Vt) of -18 +/- 2 mV, an apical membrane potential (Va) of -19 +/- 2 mV, a basolateral membrane potential (Vb) of -37 +/- 2 mV, a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of 253 +/- 15 omega cm2, a fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) of 0.40 +/- 0.04 and an equivalent short circuit current (Ieq) of -73 +/- 7 microA cm-2. 3. CF preparations (n = 13) were characterized by a Vt of -46 +/- 7 mV, a Va of 3 +/- 5 mV, a Vb of -43 +/- 3 mV, Rt of 373 +/- 47 omega cm2, fRa of 0.44 +/- 0.04 and an Ieq of -130 +/- 16 microA cm-2. All parameters except Vb and fRa were significantly different (P < 0.025) from those of normal preparations. 4. Despite large differences in electrochemical driving force for proton flow across the apical cell membranes between normal and CF preparations (-4 +/- 3 mV and 20 +/- 7 mV, respectively), pHi was similar (7.15 +/- 0.02 and 7.11 +/- 0.05, respectively). The driving force across the basolateral membrane was similar in normal and CF preparations (22 +/- 3 and 26 +/- 3 mV, respectively). 5. Intracellular alkalinization achieved by removal of CO2 from the luminal Ringer solution or by luminal ammonium prepulse led to stimulation of Ieq in both normal (from -58 to -70 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.05) and CF (from -144 to -163 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.005) preparations. The increase in Ieq was associated with a reduction of Rt, increase in fRa, and hyperpolarization of Vb. All changes in

  13. Intracellular pH of giant salivary gland cells of the leech Haementeria ghilianii: regulation and effects on secretion.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, W A; Munsch, T; Berry, M S

    1994-04-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) and membrane potential (Em) of giant salivary gland cells of the leech, Haementeria ghilianii, were measured with double-barrelled, neutral-carrier, pH-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. Em was -51 +/- 11.2 mV and pHi was 6.98 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- S.D., N = 41) in Hepes-buffered saline (nominally HCO3(-)-free; extracellular pH, pHe = 7.4). pHi was independent of Em. 3. Amiloride (2 mmol l-1) had no effect on resting pHi or on pHi recovery from an acid load (induced by the NH4+ pre-pulse technique). Removal of external Na+ produced a progressive acidification which was blocked by amiloride, and the drug also slowed the recovery of pHi on reintroduction of Na+. The results indicate the presence of an electroneutral Na+/H+ exchanger whose access to amiloride is competitively blocked by Na+. 4. In certain smaller cells of the gland, which probably form a separate population, removal of external Na+ did not affect pHi, and recovery from an acid load was blocked by amiloride. There may, therefore, be two types of Na+/H+ exchanger, differing in reversibility and sensitivity to amiloride. 5. Recovery of pHi from NH4(+)-induced acid loading was not affected by bicarbonate-buffered saline (2% CO2; 11 mmol l-1 HCO3-) or by addition of the anion-exchange blocker SITS (10(-4) mol l-1). This suggests that there is no significant contribution of a HCO3(-)-dependent transport mechanism to pHi regulation in the gland cells. 6. Removal of external Cl- slowly reduced pHi and there was a transient increase (overshoot) in pHi when Cl- was reintroduced. These effects of Cl- are probably explained by changes in the Na+ gradient. Intracellular Na+ and Cl- activities were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes. 7. Acidification with NH4+ was difficult, probably because of the cells' poor permeability to this ion. Attempts to introduce NH4+ via the Na+ pump or Na+/Cl- transporter were not successful. The H+/K+ ionophore nigericin (1 microgram ml-1), however, produced

  14. Regulation of intracellular pH during H+-coupled oligopeptide absorption in enterocytes from guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisayoshi; Suzuki, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms for regulating the intracellular pH (pHi) level during oligopeptide absorption were investigated in the enterocytes from guinea-pig ileum by identifying the acid-base transporters responsible for extruding H+ that enters the cell through the H+-oligopeptide cotransporter. The pHi level was measured by microfluorometry in an isolated villus tip loaded with the pH-sensitive fluoroprobe 2′7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). The oligopeptide-induced increment in the short-circuit current (Isc) was determined in a mucosal sheet in Ussing chambers. A CO2/HCO3−-buffered solution was used. The superfusion of glycylglycine (Gly-Gly, l0 mM) caused a decrease in pHi level, which returned to the basal level after removing Gly-Gly. This pHi recovery was strongly dependent on extracellular Na+. Amiloride partially inhibited the pHi recovery rate with an IC50 value of 41 μM, the maximum inhibition being approximately 70%. In the presence of amiloride at its maximum concentration (0.3 mM), the addition of 0.6 mM DIDS caused a further decrease, but did not abolish the pHi recovery rate. In the absence of CO2 and HCO3−, the pHi recovery was almost completely abolished by 0.3 mM amiloride. The intracellular H+ accumulation induced by 0.3 mM amiloride or by 0.6 mM DIDS, as estimated from the pHi decrease and buffer capacity, was significantly greater during Gly-Gly superfusion than under resting conditions. The increase in Isc induced by luminal glycylproline was attenuated by either removing serosal Na+ or by adding 0.5 mM amiloride or 0.6 mM DIDS to the serosal side. We conclude that both Na+-dependent, amiloride-sensitive acid extrusion, probably by the Na+-H+ exchanger, and Na+- and HCO3−-dependent, DIDS-sensitive acid extrusion, possibly by the Na+-HCO3− cotransporter, are involved in extruding H+ that enters cells by the H+-oligopeptide cotransport. It is proposed that these acid extrusion (or base loading) mechanisms are present

  15. Noninvasive High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis of the Intracellular pH of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Ratiometric Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, Mari; Mojzita, Dominik; Penttilä, Merja

    2013-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain pH homeostasis in response to environmental changes has elicited interest in basic and applied research and has prompted the development of methods for intracellular pH measurements. Many traditional methods provide information at population level and thus the average values of the studied cell physiological phenomena, excluding the fact that cell cultures are very heterogeneous. Single-cell analysis, on the other hand, offers more detailed insight into population variability, thereby facilitating a considerably deeper understanding of cell physiology. Although microscopy methods can address this issue, they suffer from limitations in terms of the small number of individual cells that can be studied and complicated image processing. We developed a noninvasive high-throughput method that employs flow cytometry to analyze large populations of cells that express pHluorin, a genetically encoded ratiometric fluorescent probe that is sensitive to pH. The method described here enables measurement of the intracellular pH of single cells with high sensitivity and speed, which is a clear improvement compared to previously published methods that either require pretreatment of the cells, measure cell populations, or require complex data analysis. The ratios of fluorescence intensities, which correlate to the intracellular pH, are independent of the expression levels of the pH probe, making the use of transiently or extrachromosomally expressed probes possible. We conducted an experiment on the kinetics of the pH homeostasis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures grown to a stationary phase after ethanol or glucose addition and after exposure to weak acid stress and glucose pulse. Minor populations with pH homeostasis behaving differently upon treatments were identified. PMID:24038689

  16. Direct Sensing of Intracellular pH by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Cl− Channel*♦

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeng-Haur; Cai, Zhiwei; Sheppard, David N.

    2009-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel disrupts epithelial ion transport and perturbs the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi). CFTR modulates pHi through its role as an ion channel and by regulating transport proteins. However, it is unknown how CFTR senses pHi. Here, we investigate the direct effects of pHi on recombinant CFTR using excised membrane patches. By altering channel gating, acidic pHi increased the open probability (Po) of wild-type CFTR, whereas alkaline pHi decreased Po and inhibited Cl− flow through the channel. Acidic pHi potentiated the MgATP dependence of wild-type CFTR by increasing MgATP affinity and enhancing channel activity, whereas alkaline pHi inhibited the MgATP dependence of wild-type CFTR by decreasing channel activity. Because these data suggest that pHi modulates the interaction of MgATP with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR, we examined the pHi dependence of site-directed mutations in the two ATP-binding sites of CFTR that are located at the NBD1:NBD2 dimer interface (site 1: K464A-, D572N-, and G1349D-CFTR; site 2: G551D-, K1250M-, and D1370N-CFTR). Site 2 mutants, but not site 1 mutants, perturbed both potentiation by acidic pHi and inhibition by alkaline pHi, suggesting that site 2 is a critical determinant of the pHi sensitivity of CFTR. The effects of pHi also suggest that site 2 might employ substrate-assisted catalysis to ensure that ATP hydrolysis follows NBD dimerization. We conclude that the CFTR Cl− channel senses directly pHi. The direct regulation of CFTR by pHi has important implications for the regulation of epithelial ion transport. PMID:19837660

  17. Divide Et Impera--cellular auxin compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    The phytohormone auxin is an essential regulator for plant growth and development. Decades of intensive research revealed the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and intercellular cell-to-cell transport for the regulation of spatiotemporal auxin distribution. Just recently, intracellular putative auxin carriers, such as the PIN-FORMED (PIN)5/PIN8 and the PIN-LIKES (PILS)2/PILS5 were discovered at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and seem to limit nuclear auxin signaling via an auxin sequestration mechanism. Moreover, these auxin carriers at the ER might provide a link between auxin compartmentalization and auxin conjugation-based metabolism. Here we review the recent findings on auxin compartmentalization at the ER and discuss its potential contribution to cellular auxin homeostasis and its importance for plant development. PMID:23200033

  18. Metabolic pathway compartmentalization: an underappreciated opportunity?

    PubMed

    Zecchin, Annalisa; Stapor, Peter C; Goveia, Jermaine; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-08-01

    For eukaryotic cells to function properly, they divide their intracellular space in subcellular compartments, each harboring specific metabolic activities. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that compartmentalization of metabolic pathways is a prerequisite for certain cellular functions. This has for instance been documented for cellular migration, which relies on subcellular localization of glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration in a cell type-dependent manner. Although exciting, this field is still in its infancy, partly due to the limited availability of methods to study the directionality of metabolic pathways and to visualize metabolic processes in distinct cellular compartments. Nonetheless, advances in this field may offer opportunities for innovative strategies to target deregulated compartmentalized metabolism in disease.

  19. In vivo intracellular pH measurements in tobacco and Arabidopsis reveal an unexpected pH gradient in the endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Martinière, Alexandre; Bassil, Elias; Jublanc, Elodie; Alcon, Carine; Reguera, Maria; Sentenac, Hervé; Blumwald, Eduardo; Paris, Nadine

    2013-10-01

    The pH homeostasis of endomembranes is essential for cellular functions. In order to provide direct pH measurements in the endomembrane system lumen, we targeted genetically encoded ratiometric pH sensors to the cytosol, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the trans-Golgi, or the compartments labeled by the vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR), which includes the trans-Golgi network and prevacuoles. Using noninvasive live-cell imaging to measure pH, we show that a gradual acidification from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lytic vacuole exists, in both tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) epidermal (ΔpH -1.5) and Arabidopsis thaliana root cells (ΔpH -2.1). The average pH in VSR compartments was intermediate between that of the trans-Golgi and the vacuole. Combining pH measurements with in vivo colocalization experiments, we found that the trans-Golgi network had an acidic pH of 6.1, while the prevacuole and late prevacuole were both more alkaline, with pH of 6.6 and 7.1, respectively. We also showed that endosomal pH, and subsequently vacuolar trafficking of soluble proteins, requires both vacuolar-type H(+) ATPase-dependent acidification as well as proton efflux mediated at least by the activity of endosomal sodium/proton NHX-type antiporters.

  20. Intracellular pH modulates taste receptor cell volume and the phasic part of the chorda tympani response to acids.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Vijay; Pasley, Hampton; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Heck, Gerard L; Vinnikova, Anna K; DeSimone, John A

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between cell volume and the neural response to acidic stimuli was investigated by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell volume in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) in vitro and by rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve recordings in vivo. CT responses to HCl and CO2 were recorded in the presence of 1 M mannitol and specific probes for filamentous (F) actin (phalloidin) and monomeric (G) actin (cytochalasin B) under lingual voltage clamp. Acidic stimuli reversibly decrease TRC pHi and cell volume. In isolated TRCs F-actin and G-actin were labeled with rhodamine phalloidin and bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease-1 conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488, respectively. A decrease in pHi shifted the equilibrium from F-actin to G-actin. Treatment with phalloidin or cytochalasin B attenuated the magnitude of the pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume. The phasic part of the CT response to HCl or CO2 was significantly decreased by preshrinking TRCs with hypertonic mannitol and lingual application of 1.2 mM phalloidin or 20 microM cytochalasin B with no effect on the tonic part of the CT response. In TRCs first treated with cytochalasin B, the decrease in the magnitude of the phasic response to acidic stimuli was reversed by phalloidin treatment. The pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume induced a flufenamic acid-sensitive nonselective basolateral cation conductance. Channel activity was enhanced at positive lingual clamp voltages. Lingual application of flufenamic acid decreased the magnitude of the phasic part of the CT response to HCl and CO2. Flufenamic acid and hypertonic mannitol were additive in inhibiting the phasic response. We conclude that a decrease in pHi induces TRC shrinkage through its effect on the actin cytoskeleton and activates a flufenamic acid-sensitive basolateral cation conductance that is involved in eliciting the phasic part of the CT response to

  1. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E; Szarka, András

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease. PMID:24907663

  2. Novel far-visible and near-infrared pH probes based on styrylcyanine for imaging intracellular pH in live cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Fu, Yue-Jun; Liu, Qiao-Ling; Lu, Dong-Tao; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shao-Min

    2012-11-25

    Two novel vis-NIR pH probes based on styrylcyanine with acidic pH response are easily synthesized, which display large Stokes shift and high sensitivity. The significant colocalizations of two probes with LysoTracker Green DND-26 are achieved in C6 cells, suggesting potential application for imaging acidic organelles in live cells.

  3. 31P NMR analysis of intracellular pH of Swiss Mouse 3T3 cells: effects of extracellular Na+ and K+ and mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Williams, S R; Gadian, D G; Rozengurt, E

    1986-01-01

    Swiss mouse 3T3 cells grown on microcarrier beads were superfused with electrolyte solution during continuous NMR analysis. Conventional 31P and 19F probes of intracellular pH (pHc) were found to be impracticable. Cells were therefore superfused with 1 to 4 mM 2-deoxyglucose, producing a large intracellular, pH-sensitive signal of 2-deoxyglucose phosphate (2DGP). The intracellular incorporation of 2DGP inhibited the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. However, intracellular ATP was at least in part retained and the cellular responsivity to changes in extracellular ionic composition and to the application of growth factors proved intact. Transient replacement of external Na+ with choline or K+ reversibly acidified the intracellular fluids. Quiescent cells and mitogenically stimulated cells displayed the same dependence of shifts in pHc on external Na+ concentration (CoNa). PHc also depended on intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa). Increasing ccNa by withdrawing external K+ (thereby inhibiting the Na,K-pump) caused reversible intracellular acidification; subsequently reducing CoNa produced a larger acid shift in pHc than with external K+ present. Comparison of separate preparations indicated that pHc was higher in stimulated than in quiescent cells. Transient administration of mitogens also reversibly alkalinized quiescent cells studied continuously. This study documents the feasibility of monitoring pHc of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells using 31P NMR analysis of 2DGP. The results support the concept of a Na/H antiport operative in these cells, both in quiescence and after mitogenic stimulation. The data document by an independent technique that cytoplasmic alkalinization is an early event in mitogenesis, and that full activity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is not required for the expression of this event.

  4. Fiber-Optic-Based Micro-Probe Using Hexagonal 1-in-6 Fiber Configuration for Intracellular Single-Cell pH Measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Hanzheng; Chen, Sisi; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa

    2015-07-21

    Single-cell research is essential for understanding cell heterogeneity, cell differentiation, and carcinogenesis, among other important cellular processes. New techniques for intracellular pH monitoring are urgently needed to gain new insights into single-cell responses to external stimuli. In this study, fiber-optic reflection-based pH micro (μ)-probes (tip diameter: 500-3000 nm) were designed and fabricated using a novel hexagonal 1-in-6 fiber configuration. An organic-modified silicate (OrMoSils) sol-gel doped with a pH-sensitive dye, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), were coated onto the probe sensing tip for pH detection. These probes enabled neutral pH monitoring and quasi-real-time data acquisition (response time: 20 ± 5 s). The fluorescence signals of the newly developed probes were found to correlate linearly with pH (R(2) = 0.9869 when coupling laser power was at 8.2 mW) within a biologically relevant pH range (6.18-7.80). The pH resolution was 0.038 pH unit. The miniaturized probes were validated in single human lung cancer A549 cells to demonstrate applicability in single-cell experiments. In summary, novel pH μ-probes with excellent resolution and response times within a biologically relevant pH range were developed, and they can be used for measuring pH changes in single cells.

  5. In vivo measurement of cytosolic and mitochondrial pH using a pH-sensitive GFP derivative in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a relation between intracellular pH and growth.

    PubMed

    Orij, Rick; Postmus, Jarne; Ter Beek, Alex; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2009-01-01

    The specific pH values of cellular compartments affect virtually all biochemical processes, including enzyme activity, protein folding and redox state. Accurate, sensitive and compartment-specific measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) dynamics in living cells are therefore crucial to the understanding of stress response and adaptation. We used the pH-sensitive GFP derivative 'ratiometric pHluorin' expressed in the cytosol and in the mitochondrial matrix of growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae to assess the variation in cytosolic pH (pHcyt) and mitochondrial pH (pHmit) in response to nutrient availability, respiratory chain activity, shifts in environmental pH and stress induced by addition of sorbic acid. The in vivo measurement allowed accurate determination of organelle-specific pH, determining a constant pHcyt of 7.2 and a constant pHmit of 7.5 in cells exponentially growing on glucose. We show that pHcyt and pHmit are differentially regulated by carbon source and respiratory chain inhibitors. Upon glucose starvation or sorbic acid stress, pHi decrease coincided with growth stasis. Additionally, pHi and growth coincided similarly in recovery after addition of glucose to glucose-starved cultures or after recovery from a sorbic acid pulse. We suggest a relation between pHi and cellular energy generation, and therefore a relation between pHi and growth.

  6. DNA Damage–Induced Bcl-xL Deamidation Is Mediated by NHE-1 Antiport Regulated Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Oxley, David; Smith, Trevor S; Follows, George A; Green, Anthony R; Alexander, Denis R

    2007-01-01

    The pro-survival protein Bcl-xL is critical for the resistance of tumour cells to DNA damage. We have previously demonstrated, using a mouse cancer model, that oncogenic tyrosine kinase inhibition of DNA damage–induced Bcl-xL deamidation tightly correlates with T cell transformation in vivo, although the pathway to Bcl-xL deamidation remains unknown and its functional consequences unclear. We show here that rBcl-xL deamidation generates an iso-Asp52/iso-Asp66 species that is unable to sequester pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins such as Bim and Puma. DNA damage in thymocytes results in increased expression of the NHE-1 Na/H antiport, an event both necessary and sufficient for subsequent intracellular alkalinisation, Bcl-xL deamidation, and apoptosis. In murine thymocytes and tumour cells expressing an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, this DNA damage–induced cascade is blocked. Enforced intracellular alkalinisation mimics the effects of DNA damage in murine tumour cells and human B-lineage chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells, thereby causing Bcl-xL deamidation and increased apoptosis. Our results define a signalling pathway leading from DNA damage to up-regulation of the NHE-1 antiport, to intracellular alkalanisation to Bcl-xL deamidation, to apoptosis, representing the first example, to our knowledge, of how deamidation of internal asparagine residues can be regulated in a protein in vivo. Our findings also suggest novel approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:17177603

  7. Quantum-dot/dopamine bioconjugates function as redox coupled assemblies for in vitro and intracellular pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Stewart, Michael H.; Trammell, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B.; Mei, Bing C.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2010-08-01

    The use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for bioimaging and sensing has progressively matured over the past decade. QDs are highly sensitive to charge-transfer processes, which can alter their optical properties. Here, we demonstrate that QD-dopamine-peptide bioconjugates can function as charge-transfer coupled pH sensors. Dopamine is normally characterized by two intrinsic redox properties: a Nernstian dependence of formal potential on pH and oxidation of hydroquinone to quinone by O2 at basic pH. We show that the latter quinone can function as an electron acceptor quenching QD photoluminescence in a manner that depends directly on pH. We characterize the pH-dependent QD quenching using both electrochemistry and spectroscopy. QD-dopamine conjugates were also used as pH sensors that measured changes in cytoplasmic pH as cells underwent drug-induced alkalosis. A detailed mechanism describing the QD quenching processes that is consistent with dopamine's inherent redox chemistry is presented.

  8. The regulation of intracellular pH studied by 31P- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy in superfused guinea-pig cerebral cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Brooks, K J; Bachelard, H S

    1992-10-01

    (1) The intracellular pH (pHi) of superfused slices of guinea-pig cerebral cortex was measured in 31P-NMR spectra using the chemical shifts of intracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi) and of 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate (DOG6P). The pHi was found to be 7.30 +/- 0.04 (SD, n = 15) in bicarbonate-buffered medium and 7.20 +/- 0.05 (n = 10, P < 0.001) in bicarbonate-free HEPES buffer of the same pH (7.4). (2) Decreases in pHe below 7.05 resulted in pHi falling to similar values, with a decrease in the energy state. There was no change in intracellular lactate as assessed by 1H-NMR. (3) The tissues showed an ability to buffer higher pH: increasing pHe to 8.0 had no effect on pHi, PCr or lactate. (4) In order to characterize possible mechanisms of pH regulation in the tissue, the recovery from acid insult was investigated under various conditions. Initially pHi was decreased to 6.44 +/- 0.15 (n = 15) by exposure to media containing 6 mM bicarbonate gassed with O2/CO2, 80:20 (pHe 6.4). When this medium was replaced by normal bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) there was full recovery of pHi to 7.31 +/- 0.05 (n = 15), whereas replacing the buffer with HEPES resulted in incomplete recovery of pHi to 6.88 +/- 0.15 (n = 15, P < 0.001). (5) In the presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide (1 mM), or the sodium/proton exchange inhibitor, amiloride (1 mM), there was an incomplete return of pHi to the control value (pHi 6.90 +/- 0.20, n = 5, P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1303163

  9. Fluorescent and Photostable Silicon Nanoparticles Sensors for Real-Time and Long-Term Intracellular pH Measurement in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Binbin; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2016-09-20

    Fluorescent sensors suitable for dynamic measurement of intracellular pH (pHi) fluctuations should feature the following properties: feeble cytotoxicity, wide-pH range response, and strong fluorescence coupled with good photostability, which are still remaining scanty to date. Herein, by functionalizing fluorescent silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) with pH-sensitive dopamine (DA) and pH-insensitive rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC), we present the first demonstration of fluorescent SiNPs-based sensors, simultaneously exhibiting minimal toxicity (cell viability of treated cells remains above 95% during 24-h treatment), sensitive fluorescent response to a broad pH range (∼4-10), and bright fluorescence coupled with robust photostability (∼9% loss of fluorescence intensity after 40 min continuous excitation; in contrast, fluorescence of Lyso-tracker is rapidly quenched in 5 min under the same experiment conditions). Taking advantage of these merits, we further employ the resultant fluorescent SiNPs sensors for the detection of lysosomal pH change mediated by nigericin in live HeLa and MCF-7 cells in long-term (e.g., 30 min) manners. Interestingly, two consecutive stages, i.e., alkalization lag phase and logarithmic growth phase, are observed based on recording the whole process of pH change, offering important information for understanding the dynamic process of pHi fluctuations.

  10. Reduction and pH dual-bioresponsive crosslinked polymersomes for efficient intracellular delivery of proteins and potent induction of cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huanli; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-05-01

    The clinical applications of protein drugs are restricted because of the absence of viable protein delivery vehicles. Here, we report on reduction- and pH--sensitive crosslinked polymersomes based on the poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(acrylic acid)-poly(2-(diethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) (PEG-PAA-PDEA) triblock copolymer for efficient intracellular delivery of proteins and the potent induction of cancer cell apoptosis. PEG-PAA-PDEA (1.9-0.8-8.2kgmol(-1)) was synthesized by controlled reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and further modified with cysteamine to yield the thiol-containing PEG-PAA(SH)-PDEA copolymer. PEG-PAA(SH)-PDEA was water-soluble at acidic and physiological pH but formed robust and monodisperse polymersomes with an average size of ∼35nm upon increasing the pH to 7.8 or above followed by oxidative crosslinking. These disulfide-crosslinked polymersomes, while exhibiting excellent colloidal stability, were rapidly dissociated in response to 10mM glutathione at neutral or mildly acidic conditions. Notably, these polymersomes could efficiently load proteins like bovine serum albumin and cytochrome C (CC). The in vitro release studies revealed that protein release was fast and nearly quantitative under the intracellular-mimicking reducing environment. Confocal microscopy observations showed that these dual-sensitive polymersomes efficiently released fluorescein isothiocyanate-CC into MCF-7 cells in 6h. Most remarkably, MTT assays showed that CC-loaded dual-sensitive polymersomes induced potent cancer cell apoptosis, in which markedly decreased cell viabilities of 11.3%, 8.1% and 52.7% were observed for MCF-7, HeLa and 293T cells, respectively, at a CC dosage of 160μgml(-1). In contrast, free CC caused no cell death under otherwise the same conditions. These dual-bioresponsive polymersomes have appeared as a multifunctional platform for active intracellular protein release.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase II plays a major role in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by effecting the steady state intracellular pH and Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Lehenkari, P; Hentunen, T A; Laitala-Leinonen, T; Tuukkanen, J; Väänänen, H K

    1998-07-10

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) expression in characteristic for the early stage of osteoclast differentiation. To study how CA II, which is crucial in proton generation in mature osteoclasts, influences the osteoclast differentiation process we performed rat bone marrow cultures. In this model, acetazolamide, a specific CA inhibitor, decreased the 1,25 (OH)2D3-induced formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells, in a dose-dependent manner. We then performed intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ (Cai2+) measurements for cultured osteoclasts and noticed that addition of acetazolamide caused a rapid, transient increase of both parameters. The increase in pHi was dependent neither on the culture substrate nor on the extracellular pH (pHe) but the increase could be diminished by DIDS or by bicarbonate removal. Membrane-impermeable CA inhibitors (benzolamide and pd5000) did not have this effect. Addition of CA II antisense oligonucleotides into the cultures reduced the pHi increase significantly. CA II inhibition was also found to neutralize the intracellular vesicles at extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.4, but at less extent at pHe 7.0. In mouse calvaria cultures, bone resorption was inhibited dose dependently by acetazolamide at pHe 7.4 while inhibition was smaller at pHe 7.0. We conclude that CA II is essential not only in bone resorption but also in osteoclast differentiation. In both processes, however, the crucial role of CA II is at least partially due to the effect on the osteoclast pHi regulation.

  12. Intracellular fate of Mycobacterium avium: use of dual-label spectrofluorometry to investigate the influence of bacterial viability and opsonization on phagosomal pH and phagosome-lysosome interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y K; Straubinger, R M

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can survive and replicate within macrophages. We tested the hypotheses that survival mechanisms may include alteration of phagosomal pH or inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion. M. avium was surface labeled with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl esters of carboxyfluorescein (CF) and rhodamine (Rho) to enable measurement of the pH of individual M. avium-containing phagosomes and the interactions of bacterium-containing phagosomes with labeled secondary lysosomes. CF fluorescence is pH sensitive, whereas Rho is pH insensitive; pH can be calculated from their fluorescence ratios. Surface labeling of M. avium did not affect viability in broth cultures or within J774, a murine macrophage-like cell line. By fluorescence spectroscopy, live M. avium was exposed to an environmental pH of approximately 5.7 at 6 h after phagocytosis, whereas similarly labeled Salmonella typhimurium, zymosan A, or heat-killed M. avium encountered an environmental pH of < 5.0. Video fluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy gave consistent pH results and demonstrated the heterogeneity of intracellular fate early in infection. pH became more homogeneous 6 h after infection. M. avium cells were coated with immunoglobulin G (IgG) or opsonized to investigate whether phagocytosis by the corresponding receptors would alter intracellular fate. Opsonized, unopsonized, and IgG-coated M. avium cells entered compartments of similar pH. Finally, the spatial distribution of intracellular bacteria and secondary lysosomes was compared. Only 18% of live fluorescent M. avium cells colocalized with fluorescent lysosomes, while 98% of heat-killed bacteria colocalized. Thus, both inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion and alteration of phagosomal pH may contribute to the intracellular survival of M. avium. PMID:8557358

  13. Apical membrane Na+/H+ exchange in Necturus gallbladder epithelium. Its dependence on extracellular and intracellular pH and on external Na+ concentration

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode techniques and extracellular pH measurements were used to study the dependence of apical Na+/H+ exchange on mucosal and intracellular pH and on mucosal solution Na+ concentration ([Na+]o). When mucosal solution pH (pHo) was decreased in gallbladders bathed in Na(+)-containing solutions, aNai fell. The effect of pHo is consistent with titration of a single site with an apparent pK of 6.29. In Na(+)-depleted tissues, increasing [Na+]o from 0 to values ranging from 2.5 to 110 mM increased aNai; the relationship was well described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The apparent Km was 15 mM at pHo 7.5 and increased to 134 mM at pHo 6.5, without change in Vmax. In Na(+)-depleted gallbladders, elevating [Na+]o from 0 to 25 mM increased aNai and pHi and caused acidification of a poorly buffered mucosal solution upon stopping the superfusion; lowering pHo inhibited both apical Na+ entry and mucosal solution acidification. Both effects can be ascribed to titration of a single site; the apparent pK's were 7.2 and 7.4, respectively. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC), a histidine- specific reagent, reduced mucosal acidification by 58 +/- 4 or 39 +/- 6% when exposure to the drug was at pHo 7.5 or 6.5, respectively. Amiloride (1 mM) did not protect against the DEPC inhibition, but reduced both apical Na+ entry and mucosal acidification by 63 +/- 5 and 65 +/- 9%, respectively. In the Na(+)-depleted tissues mean pHi was 6.7. Cells were alkalinized by exposure to mucosal solutions containing high concentrations of nicotine or methylamine. Estimates of apical Na+ entry at varying pHi, upon increasing [Na+]o from 0 to 25 mM, indicate that Na+/H+ exchange is active at pHi 7.4. Intracellular H+ stimulated apical Na+ entry by titration of more than one site (apparent pK 7.1, Hill coefficient 1.7). The results suggest that external Na+ and H+ interact with one site of the Na+/H+ exchanger and that cytoplasmic H+ acts on at least two sites. The external titratable group

  14. Effects of gaseous ammonia on intracellular pH values in leaves of C 3- and C 4-plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zu-Hua; Kaiser, Werner; Heber, Ulrich; Raven, John A.

    Responses of cytosolic and vacuolar pH to different concentrations (1.3-5.4 μmol NH 3 mol -1 gas or 0.940-3.825 mg NH 3 m -3 gas) of gaseous NH 3 were studied in experiments of 3 h duration by recording changes in fluorescence of pyranine and esculin in leaves of C 3 and C 4 plants. After a lag phase of 0.5-4 min, the uptake of NH 3 at 50-200 nmol m -2 leaf area s -1 increased pyranine fluorescence, indicating cytosolic alkalinization in leaves of Pelargonium zonale L. (C 3) and Amaranthus caudatus L. (C 4). A smaller increase in esculin fluorescence induced by NH 3 indicated some vacuolar alkalization in a Spinacia oleracea L. leaf. Photosynthesis and transpiration remained unchanged during exposure of illuminated leaves to NH 3 for up to 30 min (the maximum tested). CO 2 concentrations influenced the extent of cytosolic alkalinization. 500 μmol CO 2 mol -1 gas suppressed the NH 3-induced cytosolic alkalinization relative to that found in 16 μmol CO 2 mol -1 gas. The suppressing effect of CO 2 on NH 3-induced alkalization was larger in illuminated leaves of the C 4Amaranthus than the C 3Pelargonium. These results indicate that the alkaline pH shift caused by solution and protonation of NH 3 in aqueous leaf compartments is affected by assimilation of NH 3.

  15. Lactate supply as a determinant of the distribution of intracellular pH within the hepatic lobule.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, S P; Murphy, H C; Iles, R A; Cohen, R D

    2001-01-01

    When isolated livers from starved rats are perfused with lactate at constant perfusate pH and P(co(2)), there is a marked gradient of cell pH (pH(i)) along the length of the lobular radius, with periportal cells being substantially more alkaline than perivenous cells. In the present studies, the perivenous 21% of the lobular volume was destroyed by retrograde digitonin perfusion, and antegrade perfusion restored. pH(i) was determined by (31)P-NMR. The remaining periportal cells, the site of gluconeogenesis from lactate, had a substantially higher mean pH(i) (7.42) than did the intact liver (7.23). When lactate was removed from the perfusate, mean pH(i) decreased to 7.25. The corresponding concentration of cell bicarbonate fell with a half-time of approximately 5 min. When lactate was re-introduced mean pH(i) rose to 7.34. We conclude that a major contributor to periportal alkalinity under these conditions is proton consumption during gluconeogenesis from lactate ions. PMID:11535120

  16. The evolution of Root effect hemoglobins in the absence of intracellular pH protection of the red blood cell: insights from primitive fishes.

    PubMed

    Regan, Matthew D; Brauner, Colin J

    2010-06-01

    The Root effect, a reduction in blood oxygen (O(2)) carrying capacity at low pH, is used by many fish species to maximize O(2) delivery to the eye and swimbladder. It is believed to have evolved in the basal actinopterygian lineage of fishes, species that lack the intracellular pH (pH(i)) protection mechanism of more derived species' red blood cells (i.e., adrenergically activated Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; betaNHE). These basal actinopterygians may consequently experience a reduction in blood O(2) carrying capacity, and thus O(2) uptake at the gills, during hypoxia- and exercise-induced generalized blood acidoses. We analyzed the hemoglobins (Hbs) of seven species within this group [American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), bowfin (Amia calva), mooneye (Hiodon tergisus), and pirarucu (Arapaima gigas)] for their Root effect characteristics so as to test the hypothesis of the Root effect onset pH value being lower than those pH values expected during a generalized acidosis in vivo. Analysis of the haemolysates revealed that, although each of the seven species displayed Root effects (ranging from 7.3 to 40.5% desaturation of Hb with O(2), i.e., Hb O(2) desaturation), the Root effect onset pH values of all species are considerably lower (ranging from pH 5.94 to 7.04) than the maximum blood acidoses that would be expected following hypoxia or exercise (pH(i) 7.15-7.3). Thus, although these primitive fishes possess Hbs with large Root effects and lack any significant red blood cell betaNHE activity, it is unlikely that the possession of a Root effect would impair O(2) uptake at the gills following a generalized acidosis of the blood. As well, it was shown that both maximal Root effect and Root effect onset pH values increased significantly in bowfin over those of the more basal species, toward values of similar magnitude to those of most of the more derived

  17. The evolution of Root effect hemoglobins in the absence of intracellular pH protection of the red blood cell: insights from primitive fishes.

    PubMed

    Regan, Matthew D; Brauner, Colin J

    2010-06-01

    The Root effect, a reduction in blood oxygen (O(2)) carrying capacity at low pH, is used by many fish species to maximize O(2) delivery to the eye and swimbladder. It is believed to have evolved in the basal actinopterygian lineage of fishes, species that lack the intracellular pH (pH(i)) protection mechanism of more derived species' red blood cells (i.e., adrenergically activated Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; betaNHE). These basal actinopterygians may consequently experience a reduction in blood O(2) carrying capacity, and thus O(2) uptake at the gills, during hypoxia- and exercise-induced generalized blood acidoses. We analyzed the hemoglobins (Hbs) of seven species within this group [American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), bowfin (Amia calva), mooneye (Hiodon tergisus), and pirarucu (Arapaima gigas)] for their Root effect characteristics so as to test the hypothesis of the Root effect onset pH value being lower than those pH values expected during a generalized acidosis in vivo. Analysis of the haemolysates revealed that, although each of the seven species displayed Root effects (ranging from 7.3 to 40.5% desaturation of Hb with O(2), i.e., Hb O(2) desaturation), the Root effect onset pH values of all species are considerably lower (ranging from pH 5.94 to 7.04) than the maximum blood acidoses that would be expected following hypoxia or exercise (pH(i) 7.15-7.3). Thus, although these primitive fishes possess Hbs with large Root effects and lack any significant red blood cell betaNHE activity, it is unlikely that the possession of a Root effect would impair O(2) uptake at the gills following a generalized acidosis of the blood. As well, it was shown that both maximal Root effect and Root effect onset pH values increased significantly in bowfin over those of the more basal species, toward values of similar magnitude to those of most of the more derived

  18. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  19. A mathematical analysis of second messenger compartmentalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular compartmentalization of second messengers can lead to microdomains of elevated concentration that are thought to be involved in ensuring signaling specificity. Most experimental evidence for this compartmentalization involves the second messenger adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). One possible way of creating these compartments, supported by recent experiments, is to spatially separate the source of cAMP from regions of elevated PDE concentration. To quantify this possibility, we study here a simplified geometry in two dimensions (2D) and in three dimensions (3D), containing a cAMP point source and regions with different degradation constants. Using the symmetry of our geometry, we are able to derive steady state solutions for the cAMP concentration as a function of the system parameters. Furthermore, we show, using analytics as well as direct numerical simulations, that for physiologically relevant time scales the steady state solution has been reached. Our results indicate that elevating the degradation constant throughout the cell, except for a small microdomain surrounding the source, requires an unphysiologically high cellular PDE concentration. On the other hand, a tight spatial relationship of localized PDEs with the cAMP source can result in functional microdomains while maintaining a physiologically plausible cellular PDE concentration.

  20. Cable properties and compartmentation in Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Freudling, C; Gradmann, D

    1979-04-01

    The electrical cable properties of three different compartmentation types of Acetabularia cells have been investigated. These three types were: normal cells, 'stumps' (filled with cytoplasm, no central vacuole) and 'tubes' (cytoplasm depleted vacuoles). The latter two types have been obtained by centrifugation of normal cells. Qualitatively, the characteristic biphasic voltage response upon rectangular current pulses is the same in these three types. Quantitatively, however, the two conductances which can be obtained from the biphasic voltage response as well as the apparent capacity of several F . m-2 which derives from the large time constant of the second phase, are drastically increased in stumps and decreased in tubes compared to normal cells. The resting potential is a few mV more negative in stumps, and more positive in tubes, than in normal cells. Based on the existence of the high resting potential and the apparent large capacity in the non-vacuolated stumps, it is concluded that the electrogenic Cl- pump of Acetabularia is located in the plasmalemma membrane and that the apparent large capacity is not a result of the complicated membraneous organisation of the vacuolar system. Several possibilities are discussed, in relation to the quantitative correlation between intracellular compartmentation and electrical membrane parameters.

  1. Apical Na+/H+ antiporter and glycolysis-dependent H+-ATPase regulate intracellular pH in the rabbit S3 proximal tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, I

    1987-01-01

    The apical transport processes responsible for proton secretion were studied in the isolated perfused rabbit S3 proximal tubule. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured with the pH dye, 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein. Steady state pHi in S3 tubules in nominally HCO3(-)-free solutions was 7.08 +/- 0.03. Removal of Na+ (lumen) caused a decrease in pHi of 0.34 +/- 0.06 pH/min. The decrease in pHi was inhibited 62% by 1 mM amiloride (lumen) and was unaffected by 50 microM 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (lumen) and Cl- removal (lumen, bath). After a brief exposure to 20 mM NH4Cl, pHi fell by approximately 0.7 and recovered at a rate of 0.89 +/- 0.15 pH/min in the nominal absence of Na+, HCO3-, organic anions, and SO4(2-) (lumen, bath). 1 mM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (lumen), 1 mM N-ethylmaleimide (lumen), 0.5 mM colchicine (bath), and 0.5 mM iodoacetic acid (lumen, bath) inhibited the Na+-independent pHi recovery rate by 73%, 55%, 77%, and 86%, respectively, whereas 1 mM KCN (lumen, bath) did not inhibit pHi recovery. Reduction of intracellular, but not extracellular chloride, also decreased the Na+-independent pHi recovery rate. In conclusion, the S3 proximal tubule has an apical Na+/H+ antiporter with a Michaelis constant for Na+ of 29 mM and a maximum velocity of 0.47 pH/min. S3 tubules also possess a plasma membrane H+-ATPase that can regulate pHi, has a requirement for intracellular chloride, and utilizes ATP derived primarily from glycolysis. PMID:2888787

  2. A novel method to visually determine the intracellular pH of xenografted tumor in vivo by utilizing fluorescent protein as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    The alkalization of intracellular pH (pHin) advances together with enhancement of aerobic glycolysis within tumor cells (the Warburg effect), and that is responsible for the progression of tumor malignancy together with hypoxia and angiogenesis. But how they correlate each other during tumor growth is poorly understood, partly due to the lack of suitable imaging methods. In present study, we propose a novel method to visually determine the pHin of tumor xenograft model from fluorescent image ratios. We utilized tandemly-linked two fluorescent proteins as a pH indicator; yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, pH sensitive) as an indicator, and red fluorescent protein (RFP, pH insensitive) as a reference. This method can eliminate the influence of optical factors from tissue as well as of the diverse expression level of pH indicator in the grafted cells. In addition, that can be operated by filter-based fluorescent imagers that are generally used in small animal study. The efficacy of the pH indicator, RFP-YFP, was confirmed by studies using recombinant protein in vitro and HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP in vivo. Furthermore, we prepared nude mice subcutaneously xenografted HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP cells as tumor model. The image ratios (YFP/RFP) of the tumor at the day 5 after surgery clearly showed the heterogeneous distribution of diverse pHin cells in the tumor tissue. Concomitantly acquired angiography using near-infrared fluorescence (680 nm for emission) also indicated that the relative alkaline pHin cells located in the region far from tumor vessels in which tumor aerobic glycolysis would be facilitated by progression of hypoxia and nutrient starvation. Applying the present method for a multi-wavelength imaging concerning pO2 and/or nutrient starvation states in addition to pHin and angiogenesis would provide valuable information about complicated alteration of tumoral cell states during tumorigenesis.

  3. 31P and 1H MRS of DB-1 Melanoma Xenografts: Lonidamine Selectively Decreases Tumor Intracellular pH and Energy Status and Sensitizes Tumors to Melphalan

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Ho, Andrew; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Darpolor, Moses M.; Pickup, Stephen; Zhou, Rong; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo 31P MRS demonstrates that human melanoma xenografts in immunosuppressed mice treated with lonidamine (LND, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibit a decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) from 6.90 ± 0.05 to 6.33 ± 0.10 (p < 0.001), a slight decrease in extracellular pH (pHe) from 7.00 ± 0.04 to 6.80 ± 0.07 (p > 0.05), and a monotonic decline in bioenergetics (NTP/Pi) by 66.8 ± 5.7% (p < 0.001) relative to the baseline level. Both bioenergetics and pHi decreases were sustained for at least 3 hr following LND treatment. Liver exhibited a transient intracellular acidification by 0.2 ± 0.1 pH units (p > 0.05) at 20 min post-LND with no significant change in pHe and a small transient decrease in bioenergetics, 32.9 ± 10.6 % (p > 0.05), at 40 min post-LND. No changes in pHi or ATP/Pi were detected in the brain (pHi, bioenergetics; p > 0.1) or skeletal muscle (pHi, pHe, bioenergetics; p > 0.1) for at least 120 min post-LND. Steady-state tumor lactate monitored by 1H MRS with a selective multiquantum pulse sequence with Hadamard localization increased ~3-fold (p = 0.009). Treatment with LND increased systemic melanoma response to melphalan (LPAM; 7.5 mg/kg, i.v.) producing a growth delay of 19.9 ± 2.0 d (tumor doubling time = 6.15 ± 0.31d, log10 cell-kill = 0.975 ± 0.110, cell-kill = 89.4 ± 2.2%) compared to LND alone of 1.1 ± 0.1 d and LPAM alone of 4.0 ± 0.0 d. The study demonstrates that the effects of LND on tumor pHi and bioenergetics may sensitize melanoma to pH-dependent therapeutics such as chemotherapy with alkylating agents or hyperthermia. PMID:22745015

  4. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  5. The relationship between rumen acidosis resistance and expression of genes involved in regulation of intracellular pH and butyrate metabolism of ruminal epithelial cells in steers.

    PubMed

    Schlau, N; Guan, L L; Oba, M

    2012-10-01

    Past research has focused on the prevention and management of subacute rumen acidosis by manipulating the ration; however, the severity of acidosis varies even among animals fed a common high-grain diet. The objectives of this study were to compare the ruminal volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile and expression of genes involved in the metabolism of butyrate, the VFA most extensively metabolized by the ruminal epithelium, and intracellular pH regulation in ruminal epithelial cells between acidosis-resistant (AR) and acidosis-susceptible (AS) steers. Acidosis indexes (area per day under pH 5.8 divided by dry matter intake) were measured for 17 steers fed a common high-grain diet, and the 3 steers with the lowest (1.4 ± 1.2 pH∙min/kg) and the 3 with the highest values (23.9 ± 7.4 pH∙min/kg) were classified as AR and AS, respectively, and used in the subsequent study. The steers were force-fed a diet containing 85% grain at 60% of the expected daily intake (5.8 ± 0.8 and 5.6 ± 0.6 kg for AR and AS, respectively) within 30 min. Mean ruminal pH over the postprandial 6-h period was higher for AR compared with AS (6.02 vs. 5.55), and mean total VFA concentration was 74% for AR compared with AS (122 vs. 164 mM). Molar proportion of butyrate in the ruminal fluid was 139% higher for AR compared with AS (17.5 vs. 7.33 mol/100 mol of VFA). Expression of monocarboxylate cotransporter isoform 1, sodium hydrogen exchanger isoforms 1 and 2, and anion exchangers (downregulated in adenoma and putative anion exchanger, isoform 1) did not differ between AR and AS steers. However, expression of sodium hydrogen exchanger isoform 3, which imports Na(+) to the epithelial cell and exports H(+) to the rumen, was 176% higher in AR steers than in AS steers. Higher ruminal pH for AR might be partly due to a faster rate of VFA absorption, lower VFA production, or both.

  6. Sarcolemmal localisation of Na+/H+ exchange and Na+-HCO3- co-transport influences the spatial regulation of intracellular pH in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Garciarena, Carolina D; Ma, Yu-ling; Swietach, Pawel; Huc, Laurence; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2013-05-01

    Membrane acid extrusion by Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE1) and Na(+)-HCO3(-) co-transport (NBC) is essential for maintaining a low cytoplasmic [H(+)] (∼60 nm, equivalent to an intracellular pH (pHi) of 7.2). This protects myocardial function from the high chemical reactivity of H(+) ions, universal end-products of metabolism. We show here that, in rat ventricular myocytes, fluorescent antibodies map the NBC isoforms NBCe1 and NBCn1 to lateral sarcolemma, intercalated discs and transverse tubules (t-tubules), while NHE1 is absent from t-tubules. This unexpected difference matches functional measurements of pHi regulation (using AM-loaded SNARF-1, a pH fluorophore). Thus, myocyte detubulation (by transient exposure to 1.5 m formamide) reduces global acid extrusion on NBC by 40%, without affecting NHE1. Similarly, confocal pHi imaging reveals that NBC stimulation induces spatially uniform pHi recovery from acidosis, whereas NHE1 stimulation induces pHi non-uniformity during recovery (of ∼0.1 units, for 2-3 min), particularly at the ends of the cell where intercalated discs are commonly located, and where NHE1 immunostaining is prominent. Mathematical modelling shows that this induction of local pHi microdomains is favoured by low cytoplasmic H(+) mobility and long H(+) diffusion distances, particularly to surface NHE1 transporters mediating high membrane flux. Our results provide the first evidence for a spatial localisation of [H(+)]i regulation in ventricular myocytes, suggesting that, by guarding pHi, NHE1 preferentially protects gap junctional communication at intercalated discs, while NBC locally protects t-tubular excitation-contraction coupling.

  7. The metabolic interaction of cancer cells and fibroblasts - coupling between NAD(P)H and FAD, intracellular pH and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Druzhkova, Irina N; Shirmanova, Marina V; Lukina, Maria M; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Mishina, Nataliya M; Zagaynova, Elena V

    2016-05-01

    Alteration in the cellular energy metabolism is a principal feature of tumors. An important role in modifying cancer cell metabolism belongs to the cancer-associated fibroblasts. However, the regulation of their interaction has been poorly studied to date. In this study we monitored the metabolic status of both cell types by using the optical redox ratio and the fluorescence lifetimes of the metabolic co-factors NAD(P)H and FAD, in addition to the intracellular pH and the hydrogen peroxide levels in the cancer cells, using genetically encoded sensors. In the co-culture of human cervical carcinoma cells HeLa and human fibroblasts we observed a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis toward OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. The metabolic switch was accompanied by hydrogen peroxide production and slight acidification of the cytosol in the cancer cells in comparison with that of the corresponding monoculture. Therefore, our HeLa-huFb system demonstrated metabolic behavior similar to Warburg type tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time that these 3 parameters have been investigated together in a model of tumor-stroma co-evolution. We propose that determination of the start-point of the metabolic alterations and understanding of the mechanisms of their realization can open a new ways for cancer treatment. PMID:26986068

  8. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  9. An in vivo study of the effects of ischaemia on uterine contraction, intracellular pH and metabolites in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, N; Larcombe-McDouall, J B; Earley, L; Wray, S

    1994-01-01

    There are no data concerning the functional or metabolic effects of hypoxia in vivo in smooth muscle. We have therefore used 31P-NMR spectroscopy and intra-uterine pressure measurements to examine simultaneously, in vivo, the effect of ischaemia on uterine metabolites, intracellular pH (pHi) and force. A 1-2 cm portion of uterus from day 1 postpartum anaesthetized rats was exteriorized and an NMR surface coil placed on it. A balloon catheter in the uterine lumen recorded intra-uterine pressure changes from the same area. Reversible occluders were placed around the uterine artery. Occlusion produced a decrease and then abolition of contractions, within 10 min. In four of five animals contraction was abolished within 2 min. Upon reperfusion force was rapidly restored (1 min), in all preparations. The mean level of force was significantly above control (pre-occlusion) 20-30 min after reperfusion. The NMR data showed a significant fall in [ATP] (28%) and [phosphocreatine] (34%) during occlusion. Inorganic phosphate doubled in concentration during this period. Metabolites recovered slowly upon reperfusion, taking 20-30 min to return to pre-occlusion levels. The mean pHi fell from 7.32 to 7.00 upon occlusion and was rapidly reversed upon reperfusion. The changes in pHi closely correlated with the changes in uterine force. Decreases of pHi of a similar magnitude in vitro have previously been shown to abolish contractions; thus it is suggested that during ischaemia in vivo the depression of contraction is caused by the large fall in pHi. Images Figure 1 PMID:8046648

  10. Cycling of intracellular pH during cell division of Xenopus embryos is a cytoplasmic activity depending on protein synthesis and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    In Xenopus embryos, the successive and rapid cell divisions that follow fertilization are accompanied by periodic oscillations of intracellular pH (pHi). Cycling of pHi occurs in phase with several other oscillatory activities, namely nuclear divisions, M phase-promoting factor (MPF) activity, and surface contraction waves (SCWs). We report that treatments that abolish cycling of MPF activity and the SCWs also suppress the pHi oscillations, whereas those that block cell division without affecting neither MPF activity nor the SCWs do not suppress the pHi oscillations. Experiments on enucleated oocytes, matured in vitro and activated, demonstrated that the activity governing the rhythmicity of the pHi oscillations resided in the cytoplasm of the oocyte. In this respect, the activity responsible for the pHi oscillations was different from that which drives the SCWs, which necessitated the presence of the oocyte germinal vesicle (Ohsumi et al., 1986), but more closely resembled MPF activity that did not require the presence of the oocyte germinal vesicle (Dabauvalle et al., 1988). In mature eggs enucleated at the time of egg activation, the pHi oscillations were similar to those in control nucleated eggs, whereas the period between two peaks of SCWs was 35-60 min vs. 20-35 min in nucleated control eggs. Previous studies had shown that the periodicity of SCWs was larger in anucleate egg fragments than in their nucleate counterparts (Sakai and Kubota, 1981), the difference being on the order of 6-15 min (Shinagawa, 1983). However, in these previous studies, enucleation was performed 30-50 min after fertilization. Our results clearly demonstrate that the periodicity of the SCWs is lengthened when the interval between egg activation and enucleation is shortened, thereby providing an easier way to assess the nuclear dependency of the SCWs. Finally, the various possibilities concerning the role of pHi cycling during cell division are discussed. PMID:2116420

  11. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters intracellular pH and ion transport in the outer mantle epithelium of the bivalve Anodonta cygnea.

    PubMed

    Alves, Marco G; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2014-09-01

    Bivalve molluscs, due to their sedentary mode of life and filter-feeding behavior, are very susceptible to pollutant bioaccumulation and used as sentinel organisms in the assessment of environment pollution. Herein we aimed to determine the in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a widely used herbicide, in Anodonta cygnea shell growth mechanisms. For that, we evaluated the effect of 2,4-D (100 μM) exposure on the transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc), potential (Vt) and conductance (Gt), as well as on OME ion transport systems and intracellular pH (pHi). In vivo exposure to 2,4-D caused an increase of 50% on the Isc generated by OME and ex vivo addition of that compound to the apical side of OME also induced an Isc increase. Furthermore, 2,4-D was able to cause a pHi increase in isolated cells of OME. Noteworthy, when 2,4-D was added following the exposure to specific inhibitors of several membrane transporters identified as responsible for pHi maintenance in these cells, no significant effect was observed on pHi except when the V-type ATPase inhibitor was used, indicating an overlap with the effect of 2,4-D. Thus, we concluded that 2,4-D is able of enhancing the activity of the V-ATPases present on the OME of A. cygnea and that this effect seems to be due to a direct stimulation of those H(+) transporters present on the apical portion of the membrane of OME cells, which are vital for shell maintenance and growth. This study allows us to better understand the molecular mechanisms behind 2,4-D toxicity and its deleterious effect in aquatic ecosystems, with particular emphasis on those involved in shell formation of bivalves.

  12. Polyamine/Nucleotide Coacervates Provide Strong Compartmentalization of Mg²⁺, Nucleotides, and RNA.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Erica A; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Keating, Christine D

    2016-03-01

    Phase separation of aqueous solutions containing polyelectrolytes can lead to formation of dense, solute-rich liquid droplets referred to as coacervates, surrounded by a dilute continuous phase of much larger volume. This type of liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to help explain the appearance of polyelectrolyte-rich intracellular droplets in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of extant biological cells and may be relevant to protocellular compartmentalization of nucleic acids on the early Earth. Here we describe complex coacervates formed upon mixing the polycation poly(allylamine) (PAH, 15 kDa) with the anionic nucleotides adenosine 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Droplet formation was observed over a wide range of pH and MgCl2 concentrations. The nucleotides themselves as well as Mg(2+) and RNA oligonucleotides were all extremely concentrated within the coacervates. Nucleotides present at just 2.5 mM in bulk solution had concentrations greater than 1 M inside the coacervate droplets. A solution with a total Mg(2+) concentration of 10 mM had 1-5 M Mg(2+) in the coacervates, and RNA random sequence (N54) partitioned ∼10,000-fold into the coacervates. Coacervate droplets are thus rich in nucleotides, Mg(2+), and RNA, providing a medium favorable for generating functional RNAs. Compartmentalization of nucleotides at high concentrations could have facilitated their polymerization to form oligonucleotides, which preferentially accumulate in the droplets. Locally high Mg(2+) concentrations could have aided folding and catalysis in an RNA world, making coacervate droplets an appealing platform for exploring protocellular environments. PMID:26844692

  13. The influence of intracellular pH on contraction, relaxation and [Ca2+]i in intact single fibres from mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Westerblad, H; Allen, D G

    1993-07-01

    1. The effects of intracellular pH (pHi) on myoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and contractile performance were studied in intact single fibres dissected from mouse skeletal muscle. Indo-1 was used to measure [Ca2+]i and pHi was altered by changing perfusate CO2. 2. Tetanic tension was decreased at acidic pHi and increased at alkaline pHi whereas the rate of mechanical relaxation was showed at both acidic and alkaline pHi. Resting and tetanic [Ca2+]i were increased at acidic pHi and decreased at alkaline pHi while the final rate of decline of [Ca2+]i after a tetanus was markedly slowed at acid pHi but only marginally accelerated at alkaline pHi. 3. Steady-state [Ca2+]i-tension curves were constructed from measurements of tetani at different stimulus frequencies. The curves at acid pHi showed a reduced maximum Ca(2+)-activated tension and a reduced Ca2+ sensitivity, and curves at alkaline pHi showed the opposite changes. 4. Two methods were devised to determine the contribution of [Ca2+]i to the rate of relaxation. In one method the instantaneous tension was plotted as a function of instantaneous [Ca2+]i throughout a tetanus and compared with the steady-state [Ca2+]i-tension relation. In a second method the [Ca2+]i signal during a tetanus was converted to a Ca(2+)-derived tension record by means of the steady-state [Ca2+]i-tension relation and this Ca(2+)-derived tension was then compared to the true tension. 5. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) pump function was analysed by plotting -d[Ca2+]i/dt against [Ca2+]i during the final slow decline of [Ca2+]i after a tetanus. This analysis shows that the Ca2+ uptake by the SR is a third- or fourth-power function of [Ca2+]i and that acidosis substantially slows the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping. 6. In conclusion, the slowing of relaxation at acidic pHi could be attributed to a slowing of cross-bridge detachment rather than the observed slowing of the rate of uptake of Ca2+. Conversely the slowing of relaxation in

  14. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stable isotope tracers are used to assess metabolic flux profiles in living cells. The existing methods of measurement average out the isotopic isomer distribution in metabolites throughout the cell, whereas the knowledge of compartmental organization of analyzed pathways is crucial for the evaluation of true fluxes. That is why we accepted a challenge to create a software tool that allows deciphering the compartmentation of metabolites based on the analysis of average isotopic isomer distribution. Results The software Isodyn, which simulates the dynamics of isotopic isomer distribution in central metabolic pathways, was supplemented by algorithms facilitating the transition between various analyzed metabolic schemes, and by the tools for model discrimination. It simulated 13C isotope distributions in glucose, lactate, glutamate and glycogen, measured by mass spectrometry after incubation of hepatocytes in the presence of only labeled glucose or glucose and lactate together (with label either in glucose or lactate). The simulations assumed either a single intracellular hexose phosphate pool, or also channeling of hexose phosphates resulting in a different isotopic composition of glycogen. Model discrimination test was applied to check the consistency of both models with experimental data. Metabolic flux profiles, evaluated with the accepted model that assumes channeling, revealed the range of changes in metabolic fluxes in liver cells. Conclusions The analysis of compartmentation of metabolic networks based on the measured 13C distribution was included in Isodyn as a routine procedure. The advantage of this implementation is that, being a part of evaluation of metabolic fluxes, it does not require additional experiments to study metabolic compartmentation. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the distribution of measured 13C-labeled glucose metabolites is inconsistent with the idea of perfect mixing of hexose phosphates in cytosol. In contrast

  15. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Walde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell’s interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as “protocells”. Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized. PMID:25867709

  16. Nuclear compartmentalization of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kalousi, Alkmini; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-04-01

    The continuous threats on genome integrity by endogenous and exogenous sources have rendered cells competent to overcome these challenges by activating DNA repair pathways. A complex network of proteins and their modifications participate in orchestrated signaling cascades, which are induced in response to DNA damage and may determine the choice of repair pathway. In this review, we summarize recent findings in the field of DNA Double Strand Break repair with regard to the positioning of the break in the highly compartmentalized nucleus. We aim to highlight the importance of chromatin state along with the nuclear position of the DNA lesions on the choice of DNA repair pathway and maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:27266837

  17. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Walde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell's interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as "protocells". Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized. PMID:25867709

  18. Protocell design through modular compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Miller, David; Booth, Paula J; Seddon, John M; Templer, Richard H; Law, Robert V; Woscholski, Rudiger; Ces, Oscar; Barter, Laura M C

    2013-10-01

    De novo synthetic biological design has the potential to significantly impact upon applications such as energy generation and nanofabrication. Current designs for constructing organisms from component parts are typically limited in scope, as they utilize a cut-and-paste ideology to create simple stepwise engineered protein-signalling pathways. We propose the addition of a new design element that segregates components into lipid-bound 'proto-organelles', which are interfaced with response elements and housed within a synthetic protocell. This design is inspired by living cells, which utilize multiple types of signalling molecules to facilitate communication between isolated compartments. This paper presents our design and validation of the components required for a simple multi-compartment protocell machine, for coupling a light transducer to a gene expression system. This represents a general design concept for the compartmentalization of different types of artificial cellular machinery and the utilization of non-protein signal molecules for signal transduction. PMID:23925982

  19. Protocell design through modular compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David; Booth, Paula J.; Seddon, John M.; Templer, Richard H.; Law, Robert V.; Woscholski, Rudiger; Ces, Oscar; Barter, Laura M. C.

    2013-01-01

    De novo synthetic biological design has the potential to significantly impact upon applications such as energy generation and nanofabrication. Current designs for constructing organisms from component parts are typically limited in scope, as they utilize a cut-and-paste ideology to create simple stepwise engineered protein-signalling pathways. We propose the addition of a new design element that segregates components into lipid-bound ‘proto-organelles’, which are interfaced with response elements and housed within a synthetic protocell. This design is inspired by living cells, which utilize multiple types of signalling molecules to facilitate communication between isolated compartments. This paper presents our design and validation of the components required for a simple multi-compartment protocell machine, for coupling a light transducer to a gene expression system. This represents a general design concept for the compartmentalization of different types of artificial cellular machinery and the utilization of non-protein signal molecules for signal transduction. PMID:23925982

  20. Splice cassette II of Na+,HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) interacts with calcineurin A: implications for transporter activity and intracellular pH control during rat artery contractions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Andreas A; Parker, Mark D; Lee, Soojung; Boron, Walter F; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2013-03-22

    Activation of Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to intracellular pH (pH(i)) control during artery contraction, but the signaling pathways involved have been unknown. We investigated whether physical and functional interactions between the Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin exist and play a role for pHi control in VSMCs. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that splice cassette II from the N terminus of NBCn1 interacts with calcineurin Aβ. When cassette II was truncated or mutated to disrupt the putative calcineurin binding motif PTVVIH, the interaction was abolished. Native NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ co-immunoprecipitated from A7r5 rat VSMCs. A peptide (acetyl-DDIPTVVIH-amide), which mimics the putative calcineurin binding motif, inhibited the co-immunoprecipitation whereas a mutated peptide (acetyl-DDIATAVAA-amide) did not. Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was investigated in VSMCs of mesenteric arteries after an NH4(+) prepulse. During depolarization with 50 mM extracellular K(+) to raise intracellular [Ca(2+)], Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was inhibited 20-30% by calcineurin inhibitors (FK506 and cyclosporine A). FK506 did not affect Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs when cytosolic [Ca(2+)] was lowered by buffering, nor did it disrupt binding between NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ. FK506 augmented the intracellular acidification of VSMCs during norepinephrine-induced artery contractions. No physical or functional interactions between calcineurin Aβ and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 were observed in VSMCs. In conclusion, we demonstrate a physical interaction between calcineurin Aβ and cassette II of NBCn1. Intracellular Ca(2+) activates Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs in a calcineurin-dependent manner which is important for protection against intracellular acidification.

  1. Redox compartmentalization in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse functions of eukaryotic cells are optimized by organization of compatible chemistries into distinct compartments defined by the structures of lipid-containing membranes, multiprotein complexes and oligomeric structures of saccharides and nucleic acids. This structural and chemical organization is coordinated, in part, through cysteine residues of proteins which undergo reversible oxidation-reduction and serve as chemical/structural transducing elements. The central thiol/disulfide redox couples, thioredoxin-1, thioredoxin-2, GSH/GSSG and cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS), are not in equilibrium with each other and are maintained at distinct, non-equilibrium potentials in mitochondria, nuclei, the secretory pathway and the extracellular space. Mitochondria contain the most reducing compartment, have the highest rates of electron transfer and are highly sensitive to oxidation. Nuclei also have more reduced redox potentials but are relatively resistant to oxidation. The secretory pathway contains oxidative systems which introduce disulfides into proteins for export. The cytoplasm contains few metabolic oxidases and this maintains an environment for redox signaling dependent upon NADPH oxidases and NO synthases. Extracellular compartments are maintained at stable oxidizing potentials. Controlled changes in cytoplasmic GSH/GSSG redox potential are associated with functional state, varying with proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Variation in extracellular Cys/CySS redox potential is also associated with proliferation, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, cellular redox biology is inseparable from redox compartmentalization. Further elucidation of the redox control networks within compartments will improve the mechanistic understanding of cell functions and their disruption in disease. PMID:18267127

  2. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  3. Modeling the effects of sodium chloride, acetic acid and intracellular pH on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbiological safety has been a critical issue for acid and acidified foods since it became clear that acid-tolerant pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 can survive (even though they are unable to grow) in a pH range of 3 to 4, which is typical for these classes of food products. The primar...

  4. Simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH in the leech giant glial cell using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein and ion-sensitive microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Nett, W; Deitmer, J W

    1996-07-01

    We have employed two independent techniques to measure the intracellular pH (pHi) in giant glial cells of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, using the fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and double-barreled neutral-carrier, pH-sensitive microelectrodes, which also record the membrane potential. We have compared two procedures for calibrating the ratio of the BCECF signal, excited at 440 nm and 495 nm: 1) the cell membrane was H(+)-permeabilized with nigericin in high-K+ saline at different external pH (pHo) values, and 2) the pHi of intact cells was perturbed in CO2/HCO3(-) -buffered saline of different pH, and the BCECF ratio was calibrated according to a simultaneous microelectrode pH reading. As indicated by the microelectrode measurements, the pHi did not fully equilibrate to the pHo values in nigericin-containing, high-K+ saline, but deviated by -0.12 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SEM, n = 37) pH units. In intact cells, the microelectrode readings yielded up to 0.15 pH unit lower values than the calibrated BCECF signal. In addition, larger dye injections into the cells (> 100 microM) caused an irreversible membrane potential loss indicative of some damage to the cells. The amplitude and kinetics of slow pHi changes were equally followed by both sensors, and the dye ratio recorded slightly higher amplitudes during faster pHi shifts as induced by the addition and removal of NH4+.

  5. Simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH in the leech giant glial cell using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein and ion-sensitive microelectrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Nett, W; Deitmer, J W

    1996-01-01

    We have employed two independent techniques to measure the intracellular pH (pHi) in giant glial cells of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, using the fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and double-barreled neutral-carrier, pH-sensitive microelectrodes, which also record the membrane potential. We have compared two procedures for calibrating the ratio of the BCECF signal, excited at 440 nm and 495 nm: 1) the cell membrane was H(+)-permeabilized with nigericin in high-K+ saline at different external pH (pHo) values, and 2) the pHi of intact cells was perturbed in CO2/HCO3(-) -buffered saline of different pH, and the BCECF ratio was calibrated according to a simultaneous microelectrode pH reading. As indicated by the microelectrode measurements, the pHi did not fully equilibrate to the pHo values in nigericin-containing, high-K+ saline, but deviated by -0.12 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SEM, n = 37) pH units. In intact cells, the microelectrode readings yielded up to 0.15 pH unit lower values than the calibrated BCECF signal. In addition, larger dye injections into the cells (> 100 microM) caused an irreversible membrane potential loss indicative of some damage to the cells. The amplitude and kinetics of slow pHi changes were equally followed by both sensors, and the dye ratio recorded slightly higher amplitudes during faster pHi shifts as induced by the addition and removal of NH4+. PMID:8804622

  6. Intracellular pH in human arterial smooth muscle. Regulation by Na+/H+ exchange and a novel 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride-sensitive Na(+)- and HCO3(-)-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Neylon, C.B.; Little, P.J.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Bobik, A. )

    1990-10-01

    We investigated in a physiological salt solution (PSS) containing HCO3- the intracellular pH (pHi) regulating mechanisms in smooth muscle cells cultured from human internal mammary arteries, using the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and 22Na+ influx rates. The recovery of pHi from an equivalent intracellular acidosis was more rapid when the cells were incubated in CO2/HCO3(-)-buffered PSS than in HEPES-buffered PSS. Recovery of pHi was dependent on extracellular Na+ (Km, 13.1 mM); however, it was not attenuated by 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS), indicating the absence of SITS-sensitive HCO3(-)-dependent mechanisms. Recovery instead appeared mostly dependent on processes sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA), indicating the involvement of Na+/H+ exchange and a previously undescribed EIPA-sensitive Na(+)- and HCO3(-)-dependent mechanism. Differentiation between this HCO3(-)-dependent mechanism and Na+/H+ exchange was achieved after depletion of cellular ATP. Under these conditions, the NH4Cl-induced 22Na+ influx rate stimulated by intracellular acidosis was markedly attenuated in HEPES-buffered PSS but not in CO2/HCO3(-)-buffered PSS. EIPA also appeared to inhibit the two mechanisms differentially. In HEPES-buffered PSS containing 20 mM Na+, the EIPA inhibition curve for the intracellular acidosis-induced 22Na+ influx was monophasic (IC50, 39 nM), whereas in an identical CO2/HCO3(-)-buffered PSS, the inhibition curve exhibited biphasic characteristics (IC50, 37.3 nM and 312 microM). Taken together, the results indicate that Na+/H+ exchange and a previously undescribed EIPA-sensitive Na(+)- and HCO3(-)-dependent mechanism play an important role in regulating the pHi of human vascular smooth muscle.

  7. Intracellular-free magnesium in the smooth muscle of guinea pig taenia caeci: a concomitant analysis for magnesium and pH upon sodium removal

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    This study is concerned with the regulation of intracellular-free Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) in the smooth muscle of guinea pig taenia caeci. To assess an interaction of Ca2+ on the Na(+)-dependent Mg(2+)- extrusion mechanism (Na(+)-Mg2+ exchange), effects of Na+ removal (N- methyl-D-glucamine substitution) were examined in Ca(2+)-containing solutions. As changes in pHi in Na(+)-free solutions perturb estimation of [Mg2+]i using the single chemical shift only of the beta-ATP peak in 31P NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra, [Mg2+]i and pHi were concomitantly estimated from the chemical shifts of the gamma- and beta- peaks. When extracellular Na+ was substituted with N-methyl-D- glucamine, [Mg2+]i was reversibly increased. This increase in [Mg2+]i was eliminated in Mg(2+)-free solutions and enhanced in excess Mg2+ solutions. ATP content fluctuated little during removal and readmission of Na+, indicating that [Mg2+]i changes were not induced by Mg2+ release from ATP, and that Mg(2+)-extruding system would not be inhibited by fuel restriction. A slow acidification in Na(+)-free solutions and transient alkalosis by a readmission of Na+ were observed regardless of the extracellular Mg2+ concentration. When the extracellular Ca2+ concentration was increased from normal (2.4 mM) to 12 mM, only a marginal increase in [Mg2+]i was caused by Na+ removal, whereas a similar slow acidosis was observed, indicating that extracellular Ca2+ inhibits Mg2+ entry, and that the increase in [Mg2+]i is negligible through competition between Mg2+ and Ca2+ in intracellular sites. These results imply that Na(+)-Mg2+ exchange is the main mechanism to maintain low [Mg2+]i even under physiological conditions. PMID:8035164

  8. Rapid assessment of Oenococcus oeni activity by measuring intracellular pH and membrane potential by flow cytometry, and its application to the more effective control of malolactic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bouix, M; Ghorbal, S

    2015-01-16

    The aim of this study is to highlight the changes in the physiological cellular state of Oenococcus oeni during malolactic fermentation (MLF), and to use its cellular parameters to improve existing knowledge of O. oeni behaviour and to more effectively control the performance of the bacteria during MLF in wine. To do this, measurements of intracellular pH, transmembrane potential and vitality were performed using flow cytometry with different fluorescent probes: CFDA-SE and CDCF, DiBAC and CFDA, respectively. The kinetics of the cellular changes in these parameters were determined during MLF in FT80 synthetic medium and in white wine, as were the kinetics of malic acid consumption. pHin measurement throughout the entire growth shows that the pH was equal to the pH of the culture medium during the early stage, increased to pH6 in the exponential phase, and then decreased to equilibrate with the pH of the medium in the late stationary phase. Membrane potential increased in early MLF and then decreased. The decrease in pHin and membrane potential occurred when all of the malic acid was consumed. Finally, we showed that the higher the ΔpH (pHin-pHex) in O. oeni cells was, the shorter the lag phase of the MLF was. To better manage the initiation of MLF in wines, the physiological state of O. oeni cells must be taken into account. These results allow us to understand the sometimes random initiation of MLF in wines inoculated with O. oeni and to suggest ways to improve this control. PMID:25462933

  9. Mycothiol protects Corynebacterium glutamicum against acid stress via maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis, scavenging ROS, and S-mycothiolating MetE.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingbao; Yang, Xiaobing; Yin, Yajie; Lin, Jinshui; Chen, Can; Pan, Junfeng; Si, Meiru; Shen, Xihui

    2016-07-14

    Mycothiol (MSH) plays a major role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and detoxification from a broad range of exogenous toxic agents. In the present study, we reveal that intracellular MSH contributes significantly to the adaptation to acidic conditions in the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. We present evidence that MSH confers C. glutamicum with the ability to adapt to acidic conditions by maintaining pHi homeostasis, scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protecting methionine synthesis by the S-mycothiolation modification of methionine synthase (MetE). The role of MSH in acid adaptation was further confirmed by improving the acid tolerance of C. glutamicum by overexpressing the key MSH synthesis gene mshA. Hence, our work provides insights into a previously unknown, but important, aspect of the C. glutamicum cellular response to acid stress. The results reported here may help to understand acid tolerance mechanisms in acid sensitive bacteria and may open a new avenue for improving acid resistance in industry strains for the production of bio-based chemicals from renewable biomass. PMID:27250661

  10. Compartmentalization of bacteria in microcapsules.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Judith; Heunis, Tiaan; Harmzen, Elrika; Dicks, Leon M T; Meuldijk, Jan; Klumperman, Bert

    2014-12-18

    Lactobacillus plantarum strain 423 was encapsulated in hollow poly(organosiloxane) microcapsules by templating water-in-oil Pickering emulsion droplets via the interfacial reaction of alkylchlorosilanes. The bacteria were suspended in growth medium or buffer to protect the cells against pH changes during the interfacial reactions with alkylchlorosilanes. The results of this work open up novel avenues for the encapsulation of microbial cells.

  11. Characterisation of neurotransmitter-induced electrolyte transport in cockroach salivary glands by intracellular Ca2+, Na+ and pH measurements in duct cells.

    PubMed

    Hille, Carsten; Walz, Bernd

    2008-02-01

    Ion-transporting acinar peripheral cells in cockroach salivary glands are innervated by dopaminergic and serotonergic fibres, but saliva-modifying duct cells are innervated only by dopaminergic fibres. We used microfluorometry to record intracellular Na+, Ca2+ and H+ concentrations ([Na+]i, [Ca2+]i and pHi) in duct cells of two types of preparation, viz ;lobes' consisting of acini with their duct system and ;isolated ducts' without acini, in order to obtain information about the transporters involved in saliva secretion and/or modification. Our results indicate that (1) stimulation of lobes by dopamine (DA) causes a strong drop of pHi and increases in [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i in duct cells; (2) in contrast, DA stimulation of isolated ducts produces only a small pHi drop and no changes in [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i; (3) pHi and [Ca2+]i changes are also induced in duct cells by serotonin (5-HT) stimulation of lobes, but not isolated ducts; (4) in the absence of CO2/HCO3(-), the DA-induced pH(i) drop is strongly reduced by removal of extracellular Cl(-) or inhibition of the Na+-K+-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC); (5) in the presence of CO2/HCO3(-), the DA-induced pHi drop is not reduced by NKCC inhibition, but rather by inhibition of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger (AE), Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) or carbonic anhydrase. We suggest that DA and 5-HT act predominantly on acinar peripheral cells. Their activity (secretion of primary saliva) seems to cause changes in ion concentrations in duct cells. NKCC and/or AE/NHE activities are necessary for pHi changes in duct cells; we consider that these transporters are involved in the secretion of the NaCl-rich primary saliva.

  12. Effect of prior exercise in Pi/PC ratio and intracellular pH during a standardized exercise. A study on human muscle using [31P]NMR.

    PubMed

    Laurent, D; Authier, B; Lebas, J F; Rossi, A

    1992-01-01

    Seven subjects underwent a standard localized exercise of calf muscles in order to investigate whether the metabolic exercise-induced steady-state, as revealed by the evaluation of inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine ratio, depends on the conditioning of the muscle just prior to the exercise. The experimental protocols consisted of two separate experiments using first [31P]nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and second (on 3 subjects) infrared oxyphotometry to respectively follow variation of energy metabolism and tissular deoxygenation. The exercise consisted of 240 successive plantar flexions (0.5 Hz frequency) against a high load equivalent to 80% of the maximal voluntary contraction. This exercise was accomplished before cold exercise and after warm exercise, a warming-up period bringing to approximately 50% of VO2max. The results showed that: (1) steady-state level of phosphate/phosphocreatine and intracellular acidosis was significantly lowered by warming-up; (2) cold and warm exercise steady-state of calculated adenosine diphosphate values were not significantly different; (3) cold exercise rapidly induced a high tissular deoxygenation that is not observed during warm exercise; and (4) time-constant of phosphocreatine resynthesis is lowered after warm exercise but the initial slope of time-evolution is not modified. Parallel experiments also showed that phosphate/phosphocreatine steady-state was not modified in comparison with warm exercise when the same power of exercise was reached by stepwise incrementation of the charge. From these results we postulate that a better tissue oxygenation due to a global or localized warming-up allows to reach the same mechanical performance with a lower decrease of PCr content, owing to a faster adjustment of oxidative metabolism during the transitional period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. H⁺-activated Na⁺ influx in the ventricular myocyte couples Ca²⁺-signalling to intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Garciarena, Carolina D; Youm, Jae Boum; Swietach, Pawel; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2013-08-01

    Acid extrusion on Na(+)-coupled pH-regulatory proteins (pH-transporters), Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE1) and Na(+)-HCO3(-) co-transport (NBC), drives Na(+) influx into the ventricular myocyte. This H(+)-activated Na(+)-influx is acutely up-regulated at pHi<7.2, greatly exceeding Na(+)-efflux on the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. It is spatially heterogeneous, due to the co-localisation of NHE1 protein (the dominant pH-transporter) with gap-junctions at intercalated discs. Overall Na(+)-influx via NBC is considerably lower, but much is co-localised with L-type Ca(2+)-channels in transverse-tubules. Through a functional coupling with Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (NCX), H(+)-activated Na(+)-influx increases sarcoplasmic-reticular Ca(2+)-loading and release during intracellular acidosis. This raises Ca(2+)-transient amplitude, rescuing it from direct H(+)-inhibition. Functional coupling is biochemically regulated and linked to membrane receptors, through effects on NHE1 and NBC. It requires adequate cytoplasmic Na(+)-mobility, as NHE1 and NCX are spatially separated (up to 60μm). The relevant functional NCX activity must be close to dyads, as it exerts no effect on bulk diastolic Ca(2+). H(+)-activated Na(+)-influx is up-regulated during ischaemia-reperfusion and some forms of maladaptive hypertrophy and heart failure. It is thus an attractive system for therapeutic manipulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes".

  14. The effect of intracellular pH on the regulation of the Rab 16A and the alpha-amylase 1/6-4 promoter by abscisic acid and gibberellia.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Mundy, J; Wang, M

    1995-02-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) of barley aleurone cells is known to be affected by hormones and plant growth conditions. The possible mechanisms by which these pHi shifts influence the actions of abscisic acid (ABA) or gibberellin (GA) is being investigated. Here we report an attempt to study the effect of pHi on hormone-induced gene expression. We used weak acids and weak bases to artificially mimic the pHi changes brought about by ABA and GA and found that chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression controlled by the Rab promoter was affected while the alpha-amylase promoter seemed insensitive. CAT fused to the 35S promoter was used as a control which is not inducible by ABA or GA3. The expression of this construct was not significantly affected by artificial pHi changes.

  15. Compartmentalized storage tank for electrochemical cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin Michael (Inventor); Dalton, Luke Thomas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A compartmentalized storage tank is disclosed. The compartmentalized storage tank includes a housing, a first fluid storage section disposed within the housing, a second fluid storage section disposed within the housing, the first and second fluid storage sections being separated by a movable divider, and a constant force spring. The constant force spring is disposed between the housing and the movable divider to exert a constant force on the movable divider to cause a pressure P1 in the first fluid storage section to be greater than a pressure P2 in the second fluid storage section, thereby defining a pressure differential.

  16. Simultaneous pH measurement in endocytic and cytosolic compartments in living cells using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported(1). Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases(2). Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells(3). This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis(3,4). Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can

  17. Simultaneous pH Measurement in Endocytic and Cytosolic Compartments in Living Cells using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported1. Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases2. Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells3. This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis3,4. Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can be used

  18. Pado, a fluorescent protein with proton channel activity can optically monitor membrane potential, intracellular pH, and map gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bok Eum; Baker, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    An in silico search strategy was developed to identify potential voltage-sensing domains (VSD) for the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). Using a conserved charge distribution in the S2 α-helix, a single in silico search yielded most voltage-sensing proteins including voltage-gated potassium channels, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-gated sodium channels, voltage-gated proton channels, and voltage-sensing phosphatases from organisms ranging from mammals to bacteria and plants. A GEVI utilizing the VSD from a voltage-gated proton channel identified from that search was able to optically report changes in membrane potential. In addition this sensor was capable of manipulating the internal pH while simultaneously reporting that change optically since it maintains the voltage-gated proton channel activity of the VSD. Biophysical characterization of this GEVI, Pado, demonstrated that the voltage-dependent signal was distinct from the pH-dependent signal and was dependent on the movement of the S4 α-helix. Further investigation into the mechanism of the voltage-dependent optical signal revealed that inhibiting the dimerization of the fluorescent protein greatly reduced the optical signal. Dimerization of the FP thereby enabled the movement of the S4 α-helix to mediate a fluorescent response. PMID:27040905

  19. Activity of the Na,K-ATPase alpha4 isoform is important for membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+, and pH to maintain motility in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Tamara; Sánchez, Gladis; Wertheimer, Eva; Blanco, Gustavo

    2010-05-01

    While the function of the ubiquitous Na,K-ATPase alpha1 subunit has been well documented, the role of the sperm-specific alpha4 isoform of this ion transporter is less known. We have explored the importance of alpha4 in rat sperm physiology by taking advantage of the high sensitivity of this isoform for the inhibitor ouabain. Using concentrations that selectively block alpha4 activity, we found ouabain to reduce not only sperm total motility, but also multiple parameters of sperm movement, including progressive motility, straight line, curvilinear, and average path velocities, lateral head displacement, beat cross frequency, and linearity. According to a direct role of alpha4 in Na(+) transport, ouabain inhibition of alpha4 increased [Na(+)](i) in the male gametes. In addition, interference of alpha4 activity with ouabain produced cell membrane depolarization, diminished pH, and increased [Ca(2)(+)](i) in spermatozoa. Inhibition of alpha4 was sufficient to cause all these effects and additional blockage of alpha1, the other Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform expressed in sperm, and higher doses of ouabain did not result in further changes in the cell parameters studied. These results show that alpha4 is the Na,K-ATPase isoform primarily involved in controlling the transmembrane Na(+) gradient in sperm, and that alpha4 activity is necessary for maintaining membrane potential, [Ca(2)(+)](i), and [H(+)](i) in the cells. The high dependence of sperm motility on membrane excitability, [Ca(2)(+)](i), and acid-base balance suggests that their regulation is the mechanism by which alpha4 maintains motility of the male gametes.

  20. Compartmentalized Platforms for Neuro-pharmacological Research

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Amol D.; Wei, Li; Shi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Dissociated primary neuronal cell culture remains an indispensable approach for neurobiology research in order to investigate basic mechanisms underlying diverse neuronal functions, drug screening and pharmacological investigation. Compartmentalization, a widely adopted technique since its emergence in 1970s enables spatial segregation of neuronal segments and detailed investigation that is otherwise limited with traditional culture methods. Although these compartmental chambers (e.g. Campenot chamber) have been proven valuable for the investigation of Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) neurons and to some extent within Central Nervous System (CNS) neurons, their utility has remained limited given the arduous manufacturing process, incompatibility with high-resolution optical imaging and limited throughput. The development in the area of microfabrication and microfluidics has enabled creation of next generation compartmentalized devices that are cheap, easy to manufacture, require reduced sample volumes, enable precise control over the cellular microenvironment both spatially as well as temporally, and permit highthroughput testing. In this review we briefly evaluate the various compartmentalization tools used for neurobiological research, and highlight application of the emerging microfluidic platforms towards in vitro single cell neurobiology. PMID:26813122

  1. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Alexis A.; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized “mitochondrial RNA granules,” mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  2. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  3. [Dependence of the intracellular concentrations of univalent ions and hydrogenase activity on the salt composition and pH of the medium in the haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans].

    PubMed

    Soboleva, G S; Dulov, L E; Pusheva, M A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that the intracellular concentrations of Na+, K+, and Cl- ions in Desulfonatronum thiodismutans depend on the extracellular concentration of Na' ions. An increase in the extracellular concentration of Na+ results in the accumulation of K+ ions in cells, which points to the possibility that these ions perform an osmoprotective function. When the concentration of the NaCI added to the medium was increased to 4%, the concentration gradient of Cl- ions changed insignificantly. It was found that D. thiodismutans contains two forms of hydrogenase--periplasmic and cytoplasmic. Both enzymes are capable of functioning in solutions with high ionic force; however they exhibit different sensitivities to Na+, K+, and Li+ salts and pH. The enzymes were found to be resistant to high concentrations of Na+ and K+ chlorides and Na+ bicarbonate. The cytoplasmic hydrogenase differed significantly from the periplasmic one in having much higher salt tolerance and lower pH optimum. The activity of these enzymes depended on the nature of both the cationic and anionic components of the salts. For instance, the inhibitory effect of NaCl was less pronounced than that of LiCl, whereas Na+ and Li+ sulfates inhibited the activity of both hydrogenase types to an equal degree. The highest activity of these enzymes was observed at low Na+ concentrations, close to those typical of cells growing at optimal salt concentrations. PMID:17410870

  4. Compartmentation of sucrose during radial transfer in mature sorghum culm

    PubMed Central

    Tarpley, Lee; Vietor, Donald M

    2007-01-01

    Background The sucrose that accumulates in the culm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and other large tropical andropogonoid grasses can be of commercial value, and can buffer assimilate supply during development. Previous study conducted with intact plants showed that sucrose can be radially transferred to the intracellular compartment of mature ripening sorghum internode without being hydrolysed. In this study, culm-infused radiolabelled sucrose was traced between cellular compartments and among related metabolites to determine if the compartmental path of sucrose during radial transfer in culm tissue was symplasmic or included an apoplasmic step. This transfer path was evaluated for elongating and ripening culm tissue of intact plants of two semidwarf grain sorghums. The metabolic path in elongating internode tissue was also evaluated. Results On the day after culm infusion of the tracer sucrose, the specific radioactivity of sucrose recovered from the intracellular compartment of growing axillary-branch tissue was greater (nearly twice) than that in the free space, indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through symplasmic routes. In contrast, the sucrose specific radioactivity in the intracellular compartment of the mature (ripening) culm tissue was probably less (about 3/4's) than that in free space indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through routes that included an apoplasmic step. In growing internodes of the axillary branch of sorghum, the tritium label initially provided in the fructose moiety of sucrose molecules was largely (81%) recovered in the fructose moiety, indicating that a large portion of sucrose molecules is not hydrolysed and resynthesized during radial transfer. Conclusion During radial transfer of sucrose in ripening internodes of intact sorghum plants, much of the sucrose is transferred intact (without hydrolysis and resynthesis) and primarily through a path that includes an apoplasmic step. In

  5. Photoacoustic "nanobombs" fight against undesirable vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Xu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Diancheng; Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Kang, Bin; Chen, Hongyuan; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable intracellular vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs in cancer cells is a common cause of chemoresistance. Strategies aimed at circumventing this problem may improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. We report a novel photophysical strategy for controlled-disruption of vesicular sequestration of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), modified with folate, were trapped in acidic vesicles after entering lung cancer cells. Upon irradiation by near-infrared pulsed laser, these vesicles were massively broken by the resulting photoacoustic shockwave, and the vesicle-sequestered contents were released, leading to redistribution of DOX from cytoplasm to the target-containing nucleus. Redistribution resulted in 12-fold decrease of the EC50 of DOX in lung cancer cells, and enhanced antitumor efficacy of low-dose DOX in tumor-bearing mice. Side effects were not observed. These findings provide insights of using nanotechnology to improve cancer chemotherapy, i.e. not only for drug delivery, but also for overcoming intracellular drug-transport hurdles.

  6. Photoacoustic "nanobombs" fight against undesirable vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Xu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Diancheng; Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Kang, Bin; Chen, Hongyuan; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable intracellular vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs in cancer cells is a common cause of chemoresistance. Strategies aimed at circumventing this problem may improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. We report a novel photophysical strategy for controlled-disruption of vesicular sequestration of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), modified with folate, were trapped in acidic vesicles after entering lung cancer cells. Upon irradiation by near-infrared pulsed laser, these vesicles were massively broken by the resulting photoacoustic shockwave, and the vesicle-sequestered contents were released, leading to redistribution of DOX from cytoplasm to the target-containing nucleus. Redistribution resulted in 12-fold decrease of the EC50 of DOX in lung cancer cells, and enhanced antitumor efficacy of low-dose DOX in tumor-bearing mice. Side effects were not observed. These findings provide insights of using nanotechnology to improve cancer chemotherapy, i.e. not only for drug delivery, but also for overcoming intracellular drug-transport hurdles. PMID:26483341

  7. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  8. Surface interactions with compartmentalized cellular phosphates explain rare earth oxide nanoparticle hazard and provide opportunities for safer design.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dunphy, Darren R; Cai, Xiaoming; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Haiyuan; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, Andre; Xia, Tian

    2014-02-25

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use.

  9. Surface Interactions with Compartmentalized Cellular Phosphates Explain Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticle Hazard and Provide Opportunities for Safer Design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use. PMID:24417322

  10. Approximating the stabilization of cellular metabolism by compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Fürtauer, Lisa; Nägele, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical regulation in compartmentalized metabolic networks is highly complex and non-intuitive. This is particularly true for cells of higher plants showing one of the most compartmentalized cellular structures across all kingdoms of life. The interpretation and testable hypothesis generation from experimental data on such complex systems is a challenging step in biological research and biotechnological applications. While it is known that subcellular compartments provide defined reaction spaces within a cell allowing for the tight coordination of complex biochemical reaction sequences, its role in the coordination of metabolic signals during metabolic reprogramming due to environmental fluctuations is less clear. In the present study, we numerically analysed the effects of environmental fluctuations in a subcellular metabolic network with regard to the stability of an experimentally observed steady state in the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Applying a method for kinetic parameter normalization, several millions of probable enzyme kinetic parameter constellations were simulated and evaluated with regard to the stability information of the metabolic homeostasis. Information about the stability of the metabolic steady state was derived from real parts of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrices. Our results provide evidence for a differential stabilizing contribution of different subcellular compartments. We could identify stabilizing and destabilizing network components which we could classify according to their subcellular localization. The findings prove that a highly dynamic interplay between intracellular compartments is preliminary for an efficient stabilization of a metabolic homeostasis after environmental perturbation. Further, our results provide evidence that feedback-inhibition originating from the cytosol and plastid seem to stabilize the sucrose homeostasis more efficiently than vacuolar control. In summary, our results indicate stabilizing and

  11. Intracellular delivery and trafficking dynamics of a lymphoma-targeting antibody-polymer conjugate.

    PubMed

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Shi, Julie; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Duvall, Craig L; Pun, Suzie H; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2012-12-01

    Ratiometric fluorescence and cellular fractionation studies were employed to characterize the intracellular trafficking dynamics of antibody-poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) conjugates in CD22+ RAMOS-AW cells. The HD39 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directs CD22-dependent, receptor-mediated uptake in human B-cell lymphoma cells, where it is rapidly trafficked to the lysosomal compartment. To characterize the intracellular-release dynamics of the polymer-mAb conjugates, HD39-streptavidin (HD39/SA) was dual-labeled with pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 488 and pH-sensitive pHrodo fluorophores. The subcellular pH distribution of the HD39/SA-polymer conjugates was quantified as a function of time by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and the average intracellular pH value experienced by the conjugates was also characterized as a function of time by flow cytometry. PPAA was shown to alter the intracellular trafficking kinetics strongly relative to HD39/SA alone or HD39/SA conjugates with a control polymer, poly(methacryclic acid) (PMAA). Subcellular trafficking studies revealed that after 6 h, only 11% of the HD39/SA-PPAA conjugates had been trafficked to acidic lysosomal compartments with values at or below pH 5.6. In contrast, the average intracellular pH of HD39/SA alone dropped from 6.7 ± 0.2 at 1 h to 5.6 ± 0.5 after 3 h and 4.7 ± 0.6 after 6 h. Conjugation of the control polymer PMAA to HD39/SA showed an average pH drop similar to that of HD39/SA. Subcellular fractionation studies with tritium-labeled HD39/SA demonstrated that after 6 h, 89% of HD39/SA was associated with endosomes (Rab5+) and lysosomes (Lamp2+), while 45% of HD39/SA-PPAA was translocated to the cytosol (lactate dehydrogenase+). These results demonstrate the endosomal-releasing properties of PPAA with antibody-polymer conjugates and detail their intracellular trafficking dynamics and subcellular compartmental distributions over time.

  12. Unchanged mitochondrial organization and compartmentation of high-energy phosphates in creatine-deficient GAMT−/− mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Branovets, Jelena; Sepp, Mervi; Kotlyarova, Svetlana; Jepihhina, Natalja; Sokolova, Niina; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Lygate, Craig A.; Neubauer, Stefan; Birkedal, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the creatine kinase (CK) system in hearts of CK-deficient mice leads to changes in the ultrastructure and regulation of mitochondrial respiration. We expected to see similar changes in creatine-deficient mice, which lack the enzyme guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) to produce creatine. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial organization, regulation of respiration, and intracellular compartmentation associated with GAMT deficiency. Three-dimensional mitochondrial organization was assessed by confocal microscopy. On populations of permeabilized cardiomyocytes, we recorded ADP and ATP kinetics of respiration, competition between mitochondria and pyruvate kinase for ADP produced by ATPases, ADP kinetics of endogenous pyruvate kinase, and ATP kinetics of ATPases. These data were analyzed by mathematical models to estimate intracellular compartmentation. Quantitative analysis of morphological and kinetic data as well as derived model fits showed no difference between GAMT-deficient and wild-type mice. We conclude that inactivation of the CK system by GAMT deficiency does not alter mitochondrial organization and intracellular compartmentation in relaxed cardiomyocytes. Thus, our results suggest that the healthy heart is able to preserve cardiac function at a basal level in the absence of CK-facilitated energy transfer without compromising intracellular organization and the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis. This raises questions on the importance of the CK system as a spatial energy buffer in unstressed cardiomyocytes. PMID:23792673

  13. Unchanged mitochondrial organization and compartmentation of high-energy phosphates in creatine-deficient GAMT-/- mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Branovets, Jelena; Sepp, Mervi; Kotlyarova, Svetlana; Jepihhina, Natalja; Sokolova, Niina; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Lygate, Craig A; Neubauer, Stefan; Vendelin, Marko; Birkedal, Rikke

    2013-08-15

    Disruption of the creatine kinase (CK) system in hearts of CK-deficient mice leads to changes in the ultrastructure and regulation of mitochondrial respiration. We expected to see similar changes in creatine-deficient mice, which lack the enzyme guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) to produce creatine. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial organization, regulation of respiration, and intracellular compartmentation associated with GAMT deficiency. Three-dimensional mitochondrial organization was assessed by confocal microscopy. On populations of permeabilized cardiomyocytes, we recorded ADP and ATP kinetics of respiration, competition between mitochondria and pyruvate kinase for ADP produced by ATPases, ADP kinetics of endogenous pyruvate kinase, and ATP kinetics of ATPases. These data were analyzed by mathematical models to estimate intracellular compartmentation. Quantitative analysis of morphological and kinetic data as well as derived model fits showed no difference between GAMT-deficient and wild-type mice. We conclude that inactivation of the CK system by GAMT deficiency does not alter mitochondrial organization and intracellular compartmentation in relaxed cardiomyocytes. Thus, our results suggest that the healthy heart is able to preserve cardiac function at a basal level in the absence of CK-facilitated energy transfer without compromising intracellular organization and the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis. This raises questions on the importance of the CK system as a spatial energy buffer in unstressed cardiomyocytes. PMID:23792673

  14. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases.

  15. Compartmentation of cellular tetrahydrofolate pools in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barlowe, C.K.; Appling, D.R.

    1987-05-01

    Folate coenzymes are essential in shuttling one carbon units between a number of cellular processes. Serine, glycine, histidine and formate may serve as one-carbon sources by donation of their one-carbon unit to tetrahydrofolate (THF) which may then be utilized in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids and amino acids or oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) via formyl-THF dehydrogenase. Nitrous Oxide (N/sub 2/O) has been observed to inactivate methionine synthase causing an increase in the cellular concentration of methyl-THF at the expense of other folate forms, specifically THF. They are interested in determining if THF dependent pathways that utilize serine, formate and histidine are equally effected by N/sub 2/O. Radiometric methods indicate that oxidation of the ..beta..-carbon of serine to CO/sub 2/ is uneffected by N/sub 2/O exposure, but oxidation of formate and the 2-ring carbon of histidine to CO/sub 2/ are reduced by about 50% and 95% of control levels, respectively. In contrast, the use of these one carbon sources for purine biosynthesis are all reduced roughly 50% upon exposure to N/sub 2/O. These data suggest an intracellular compartmentation of THF pools available to different sources of one-carbon units.

  16. Demonstration of nuclear compartmentalization of glutathione in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, G; Vairetti, M; Stivala, L; Mirabelli, F; Richelmi, P; Orrenius, S

    1992-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of glutathione (GSH) in cultured hepatocytes has been investigated by using the compound monochlorobimane (BmCl), which interacts specifically with GSH to form a highly fluorescent adduct. Image analysis of BmCl-labeled hepatocytes predominantly localized the fluorescence in the nucleus; the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration gradient was approximately three. This concentration gradient was collapsed by treatment of the cells with ATP-depleting agents. The uneven distribution of BmCl fluorescence was not attributable to (i) nonspecific interaction of BmCl with protein sulfhydryl groups, (ii) any selective nuclear localization of the GSH transferase(s) catalyzing formation of the GSH-BmCl conjugate, or (iii) any apparent alterations in cell morphology from culture conditions, suggesting that this distribution did, indeed, reflect a nuclear compartmentalization of GSH. That the nuclear pool of GSH was found more resistant to depletion by several agents than the cytoplasmic pool supports the assumption that GSH is essential in protecting DNA and other nuclear structures from chemical injury. Images PMID:1584774

  17. Compartmentalization of the Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Direct in vivo investigation of human metabolism is complicated by the distinct metabolic functions of various sub-cellular organelles. Diverse micro-environments in different organelles may lead to distinct functions of the same protein and the use of different enzymes for the same metabolic reaction. To better understand the complexity in the human metabolism, a compartmentalized human metabolic network with integrated sub-cellular location information is required. Results We extended the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN) [Ma, et al. Molecular Systems Biology, 3:135, 2007] by integrating the sub-cellular location information for the reactions, adding transport reactions and refining the protein-reaction relationships based on the location information. Firstly, protein location information was obtained from Gene Ontology and complemented by a Swiss-Prot location keywords search. Then all the reactions in EHMN were assigned to a location based on the protein-reaction relationships to get a preliminary compartmentalized network. We investigated the localized sub-networks in each pathway to identify gaps and isolated reactions by connectivity analysis and refined the location information based on information from literature. As a result, location information for hundreds of reactions was revised and hundreds of incorrect protein-reaction relationships were corrected. Over 1400 transport reactions were added to link the location specific metabolic network. To validate the network, we have done pathway analysis to examine the capability of the network to synthesize or degrade certain key metabolites. Compared with a previously published human metabolic network (Human Recon 1), our network contains over 1000 more reactions assigned to clear cellular compartments. Conclusions By combining protein location information, network connectivity analysis and manual literature search, we have reconstructed a more complete

  18. Compartmentalized ATP synthesis in skeletal muscle triads.

    PubMed

    Han, J W; Thieleczek, R; Varsányi, M; Heilmeyer, L M

    1992-01-21

    Isolated skeletal muscle triads contain a compartmentalized glycolytic reaction sequence catalyzed by aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. These enzymes express activity in the structure-associated state leading to synthesis of ATP in the triadic junction upon supply of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. ATP formation occurs transiently and appears to be kinetically compartmentalized, i.e., the synthesized ATP is not in equilibrium with the bulk ATP. The apparent rate constants of the aldolase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase reaction are significantly increased when fructose 1,6-bisphosphate instead of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is employed as substrate. The observations suggest that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is especially effectively channelled into the junctional gap. The amplitude of the ATP transient is decreasing with increasing free [Ca2+] in the range of 1 nM to 30 microM. In the presence of fluoride, the ATP transient is significantly enhanced and its declining phase is substantially retarded. This observation suggests utilization of endogenously synthesized ATP in part by structure associated protein kinases and phosphatases which is confirmed by the detection of phosphorylated triadic proteins after gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Endogenous protein kinases phosphorylate proteins of apparent Mr 450,000, 180,000, 160,000, 145,000, 135,000, 90,000, 54,000, 51,000, and 20,000, respectively. Some of these phosphorylated polypeptides are in the Mr range of known phosphoproteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, which might give a first hint at the functional importance of the sequential glycolytic reactions compartmentalized in triads. PMID:1731894

  19. Self-Assembly and Compartmentalization of Nanozymes in Mesoporous Silica-Based Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Lin, Youhui; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-04-11

    Herein, to mimic complex natural system, polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM)-coated mesoporous silica nanoreactors were used to compartmentalize two different artificial enzymes. PEMs coated on the surface of mesoporous silica could serve as a permeable membrane to control the flow of molecules. When assembling hemin on the surface of mesoporous silica, the hemin-based mesoporous silica system possessed remarkable peroxidase-like activity, especially at physiological pH, and could be recycled more easily than traditional graphene-hemin nanocompounds. The hope is that these new findings may pave the way for exploring novel nanoreactors to achieve compartmentalization of nanozymes and applying artificial cascade catalytic systems to mimic cell organelles or important biochemical transformations.

  20. Evidence for compartmentalization of mammalian carotenoid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Amengual, Jaume; Hoppel, Charles L.; von Lintig, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The critical role of retinoids (vitamin A and its derivatives) for vision, reproduction, and survival has been well established. Vitamin A is produced from dietary carotenoids such as β-carotene by centric cleavage via the enzyme BCO1. The biochemical and molecular identification of a second structurally related β-carotene metabolizing enzyme, BCO2, has led to a prolonged debate about its relevance in vitamin A biology. While BCO1 cleaves provitamin A carotenoids, BCO2 is more promiscuous and also metabolizes nonprovitamin A carotenoids such as zeaxanthin into long-chain apo-carotenoids. Herein we demonstrate, in cell lines, that human BCO2 is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Different human BCO2 isoforms possess cleavable N-terminal leader sequences critical for mitochondrial import. Subfractionation of murine hepatic mitochondria confirmed the localization of BCO2 to the inner mitochondrial membrane. Studies in BCO2-knockout mice revealed that zeaxanthin accumulates in the inner mitochondrial membrane; in contrast, β-carotene is retained predominantly in the cytoplasm. Thus, we provide evidence for a compartmentalization of carotenoid metabolism that prevents competition between BCO1 and BCO2 for the provitamin and the production of noncanonical β-carotene metabolites.—Palczewski, G., Amengual, J., Hoppel, C. L., von Lintig, J. Evidence for compartmentalization of mammalian carotenoid metabolism. PMID:25002123

  1. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  2. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca2+ or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases. PMID:25161621

  3. Regulatory T-cell compartmentalization and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuang; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (CD4+ Treg cells) are thought to differentiate in the thymus and immigrate from the thymus to the periphery. Treg cells can regulate both acquired and innate immunity through multiple modes of suppression. The cross-talk between Treg cells and targeted cells, such as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells, is crucial for ensuring suppression by Treg cells in the appropriate microenvironment. Emerging evidence suggests that Treg compartmentalization and trafficking may be tissue or/and organ specific and that distinct chemokine receptor and integrin expression may contribute to selective retention and trafficking of Treg cells at sites where regulation is required. In this review, the cellular and molecular signals that control specialized migration and retention of Treg cells are discussed. PMID:16537800

  4. Fractional kinetics in multi-compartmental systems.

    PubMed

    Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Magin, Richard; Macheras, Panos

    2010-10-01

    Fractional calculus, the branch of calculus dealing with derivatives of non-integer order (e.g., the half-derivative) allows the formulation of fractional differential equations (FDEs), which have recently been applied to pharmacokinetics (PK) for one-compartment models. In this work we extend that theory to multi-compartmental models. Unlike systems defined by a single ordinary differential equation (ODE), considering fractional multi-compartmental models is not as simple as changing the order of the ordinary derivatives of the left-hand side of the ODEs to fractional orders. The latter may produce inconsistent systems which violate mass balance. We present a rationale for fractionalization of ODEs, which produces consistent systems and allows processes of different fractional orders in the same system. We also apply a method of solving such systems based on a numerical inverse Laplace transform algorithm, which we demonstrate that is consistent with analytical solutions when these are available. As examples of our approach, we consider two cases of a basic two-compartment PK model with a single IV dose and multiple oral dosing, where the transfer from the peripheral to the central compartment is of fractional order α < 1, accounting for anomalous kinetics and deep tissue trapping, while all other processes are of the usual order 1. Simulations with the studied systems are performed using the numerical inverse Laplace transform method. It is shown that the presence of a transfer rate of fractional order produces a non-exponential terminal phase, while multiple dose and constant infusion systems never reach steady state and drug accumulation carries on indefinitely. The IV fractional system is also fitted to PK data and parameter values are estimated. In conclusion, our approach allows the formulation of systems of FDEs, mixing different fractional orders, in a consistent manner and also provides a method for the numerical solution of these systems. PMID

  5. The compartmentation of phosphorylated thiamine derivatives in cultured neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L

    1994-05-26

    Thiamine transport in cultured neuroblastoma cells is mediated by a high-affinity carrier (KM = 40 nM). In contrast, the uptake of the more hydrophobic sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) is unsaturable and its initial transport rate is 20-times faster than for thiamine. In the cytoplasm, sulbutiamine is rapidly hydrolyzed and reduced to free thiamine, the overall process resulting in a rapid and concentrative thiamine accumulation. Incorporation of radioactivity from [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine into intracellular thiamine diphosphate is slow in both cases. Despite the fact that the diphosphate is probably the direct precursor for both thiamine monophosphate and triphosphate, the specific radioactivity increased much faster for the latter two compounds than for thiamine diphosphate. This suggests the existence of two pools of thiamine diphosphate, the larger one having a very slow turnover (about 17 h); a much smaller, rapidly turning over pool would be the precursor of thiamine mono- and triphosphate. The turnover time for thiamine triphosphate could be estimated to be 1-2 h. When preloading the cells with [14C]sulbutiamine was followed by a chase with the same concentration of the unlabeled compound, the specific radioactivities of thiamine and thiamine monophosphate decreased exponentially as expected, but labeling of the diphosphate continued to increase slowly. Specific radioactivity of thiamine triphosphate increased first, but after 30 min it began to slowly decrease. These results show for the first time the existence of distinct thiamine diphosphate pools in the same homogeneous cell population. They also suggest a complex compartmentation of thiamine metabolism. PMID:8186267

  6. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  7. Calcium dynamics and compartmentalization in leech neurons.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Torre, Vincent

    2005-12-01

    Calcium dynamics in leech neurons were studied using a fast CCD camera. Fluorescence changes (DeltaF/F) of the membrane impermeable calcium indicator Oregon Green were measured. The dye was pressure injected into the soma of neurons under investigation. DeltaF/F caused by a single action potential (AP) in mechanosensory neurons had approximately the same amplitude and time course in the soma and in distal processes. By contrast, in other neurons such as the Anterior Pagoda neuron, the Annulus Erector motoneuron, the L motoneuron, and other motoneurons, APs evoked by passing depolarizing current in the soma produced much larger fluorescence changes in distal processes than in the soma. When APs were evoked by stimulating one distal axon through the root, DeltaF/F was large in all distal processes but very small in the soma. Our results show a clear compartmentalization of calcium dynamics in most leech neurons in which the soma does not give propagating action potentials. In such cells, the soma, while not excitable, can affect information processing by modulating the sites of origin and conduction of AP propagation in distal excitable processes.

  8. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  9. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  10. Evolutionary origins of metabolic compartmentalization in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, William

    2010-01-01

    Many genes in eukaryotes are acquisitions from the free-living antecedents of chloroplasts and mitochondria. But there is no evolutionary ‘homing device’ that automatically directs the protein product of a transferred gene back to the organelle of its provenance. Instead, the products of genes acquired from endosymbionts can explore all targeting possibilities within the cell. They often replace pre-existing host genes, or even whole pathways. But the transfer of an enzymatic pathway from one compartment to another poses severe problems: over evolutionary time, the enzymes of the pathway acquire their targeting signals for the new compartment individually, not in unison. Until the whole pathway is established in the new compartment, newly routed individual enzymes are useless, and their genes will be lost through mutation. Here it is suggested that pathways attain novel compartmentation variants via a ‘minor mistargeting’ mechanism. If protein targeting in eukaryotic cells possesses enough imperfection such that small amounts of entire pathways continuously enter novel compartments, selectable units of biochemical function would exist in new compartments, and the genes could become selected. Dual-targeting of proteins is indeed very common within eukaryotic cells, suggesting that targeting variation required for this minor mistargeting mechanism to operate exists in nature. PMID:20124349

  11. Determination of intracellular nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J M; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of intracellular nitrate. The method includes: (i) preparation of cell lysates in 2 M-H3PO4 after separation of cells from the outer medium by rapid centrifugation through a layer of silicone oil, and (ii) subsequent nitrate analysis by ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, as mobile phase, a solution containing 50 mM-H3PO4 and 2% (v/v) tetrahydrofuran, adjusted to pH 1.9 with NaOH. The determination of nitrate is subjected to interference by chloride and sulphate when present in the samples at high concentrations. Nitrite also interferes, but it is easily eliminated by treatment of the samples with sulphamic acid. The method has been successfully applied to the study of nitrate transport in the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. PMID:2497740

  12. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  13. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  14. A computational model of adipose tissue metabolism: Evidence for intracellular compartmentation and differential activation of lipases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Kalhan, Satish C.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of lipolysis in adipose tissue is critical to whole body fuel homeostasis and to the development of insulin resistance. Due to the challenging nature of laboratory investigations of regulatory mechanisms in adipose tissue, mathematical models could provide a valuable adjunct to such experimental work. We have developed a computational model to analyze key components of adipose tissue metabolism in vivo in human in the fasting state. The various key components included triglyceride-fatty acid cycling, regulation of lipolytic reactions, and glyceroneogenesis. The model, consisting of spatially lumped blood and cellular compartments, included essential transport processes and biochemical reactions. Concentration dynamics for major substrates were described by mass balance equations. Model equations were solved numerically to simulate dynamic responses to intravenous epinephrine infusion. Model simulations were compared with the corresponding experimental measurements of the arteriovenous difference across the abdominal subcutaneous fat bed in humans. The model can simulate physiological responses arising from the different expression levels of lipases. Key findings of this study are as follows: (1) Distinguishing the active metabolic subdomain (~3% of total tissue volume) is critical for simulating data. (2) During epinephrine infusion, lipases are differentially activated such that diglyceride breakdown is ~4 times faster than triglyceride breakdown. (3) Glyceroneogenesis contributes more to glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis during epinephrine infusion when pyruvate oxidation is inhibited by a high acetyl-CoA/free-CoA ratio. PMID:18234232

  15. Compartmentalization of prostaglandins in the canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan-Boyd, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The kidney has been shown to synthesize all of the naturally occurring major prostaglandins which may be restricted to a discrete part of the kidney where their actions are physiologically important, such as the vascular compartment and the tubular compartment. In order to examine this concept of compartmentalization, the authors conducted a series of experiments to determine whether PGl/sub 2/, measured as 6-keto-pGF/sub 1..cap alpha../, produced in the kidney is restricted to the renal vascular compartment or whether it also has access to the tubular compartment. Experiments were performed in the pentobarbital-anesthetized dog. Increasing pre-glomerular levels of 6-keto-PFG/sub 1..cap alpha../ caused marked increases in both the urinary excretion and the renal venous outflow to 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. When /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was co-infused with inulin into the renal artery, 33% of the radioactivity and 23% of the inulin was recovered on first pass. With infusion of /sup 3/H-PGl/sub 2/ and inulin, 20% of the radioactivity and 28% of the inulin reached the urine on first pass. Radioactive PGl/sub 2/ appeared to be less filterable at the glomeruli than either /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ or inulin. In the final set of experiments, in which dogs were prepared for a ureteral stopped-flow study, the PGE/sub 2//U/P/sub In/ ratio a peak was observed proximal to the Na/sup +/ plateau but distal to the Na+ nadir. In light of the results from the stopped-flow study and the intrarenal infusion studies, they conclude that PGE/sub 2/ synthesized in the kidney enters both the renal and tubular compartments. In contrast, they find that 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ of renal origin enters only the renal origin enters only the renal vascular compartment and not the tubular compartment.

  16. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways

    DOE PAGES

    DeLoache, William C.; Russ, Zachary N.; Dueber, John E.

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzymemore » pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. Lastly, this work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.« less

  17. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    DeLoache, William C; Russ, Zachary N; Dueber, John E

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzyme pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. This work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.

  18. Phosphorylation-mediated RNA/peptide complex coacervation as a model for intracellular liquid organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, William M.; Keating, Christine D.

    2016-02-01

    Biological cells are highly organized, with numerous subcellular compartments. Phosphorylation has been hypothesized as a means to control the assembly/disassembly of liquid-like RNA- and protein-rich intracellular bodies, or liquid organelles, that lack delimiting membranes. Here, we demonstrate that charge-mediated phase separation, or complex coacervation, of RNAs with cationic peptides can generate simple model liquid organelles capable of reversibly compartmentalizing biomolecules. Formation and dissolution of these liquid bodies was controlled by changes in peptide phosphorylation state using a kinase/phosphatase enzyme pair. The droplet-generating phase transition responded to modification of even a single serine residue. Electrostatic interactions between the short cationic peptides and the much longer polyanionic RNAs drove phase separation. Coacervates were also formed on silica beads, a primitive model for localization at specific intracellular sites. This work supports phosphoregulation of complex coacervation as a viable mechanism for dynamic intracellular compartmentalization in membraneless organelles.

  19. The role of carbon dioxide (and intracellular pH) in the pathomechanism of several mental disorders. Are the diseases of civilization caused by learnt behaviour, not the stress itself?

    PubMed

    Sikter, András; Faludi, Gábor; Rihmer, Zoltán

    2009-09-01

    The role of carbon dioxide (CO2) is underestimated in the pathomechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders, though it is an important link between psyche and corpus. The actual spiritual status also influences respiration (we start breathing rarely, frequently, irregularly, etc.) causing pH alteration in the organism; on the other hand the actual cytosolic pH of neurons is one of the main modifiers of Ca2+-conductance, hence breathing directly, quickly, and effectively influences the second messenger system through Ca2+-currents. (Decreasing pCO2 turns pH into alkalic direction, augments psychic arousal, while increasing pCO2 turns pH acidic, diminishes arousal.) One of the most important homeostatic function is to maintain or restore the permanence of H+-concentration, hence the alteration of CO2 level starts cascades of contraregulation. However it can be proved that there is no perfect compensation, therefore compensational mechanisms may generate psychosomatic disorders causing secondary alterations in the "milieu interieur". Authors discuss the special physico-chemical features of CO2, the laws of interweaving alterations of pCO2 and catecholamine levels (their feedback mechanism), the role of acute and chronic hypocapnia in several hyperarousal disorders (delirium, panic disorder, hyperventilation syndrome, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder), the role of "locus minoris resistentiae" in the pathomechanism of psychosomatic disorders. It is supposed that the diseases of civilization are caused not by the stress itself but the lack of human instinctive reaction to it, and this would cause long-lasting CO2 alteration. Increased brain-pCO2, acidic cytosol pH and/or increased basal cytosolic Ca2+ level diminish inward Ca2+-current into cytosol, decrease arousal--they may cause dysthymia or depression. This state usually co-exists with ATP-deficiency and decreased cytosolic Mg2+ content. This energetical- and ion-constellation is also typical of ageing

  20. Analysis of intracellular pH (pHcyt) in mouse models of angiogenesis and carcinogenesis by spectral imaging microscopy, real-time confocal imaging microscopy, and multiphoton spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennoune, Souad; Maiti, Debasish; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2003-07-01

    We have shown that a specific cytosolic pH (pHcyt) regulatory mechanism, i.e., vacuolar type H+-ATPases at the plasma membrane (pmV-ATPases), allows angiogenic and metastatic cells to survive in an acidic and hostile environment. However, a functional evaluation of this pump's activity in situ (i.e., in living animal models) has not been attempted. We developed a mouse model of angiogenesis and metastasis based on the dorsal skin fold chamber, and implanted highly metastatic human tumor cells that have been engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP can be used as a pH reporter because its fluorescence is pH sensitive. Our studies in isolated single cells indicated that there are distinct pHcyt gradients in the invadipodia versus the lamellipodia due to the preferential expression of pmV-ATPases at the leading edge. We hypothesize that in vivo, these pH gradients also exist. We employed spectral imaging and real time confocal imaging microscopy, since these approaches are complementary and exhibited unsurpassed temporal and spectral resolution, thus allowing us to study pHcyt in discrete subcellular regions of the cells expressing GFP. We can acquire a full frame (i.e., 512 x 512 pixels) in real time confocal imaging at ca. 25-50 msec, whereas spectral imaging allow us to obtain spectral information from discrete domains of ca. 10 μm in the x-y plane and every 10 μm from leading to lagging edge within a time frame of 5 msec at 0.4 nm spectral resolution. This is possible because we employ frame transfer cooled CCD cameras and spectrographs. Studies are under way to evaluate proton gradients using multiphoton approaches since this will allow us to evaluate pH deeper into the tissue (i.e., 300-600 μm), and should allow us to follow pHcyt and the progression of tumor metastasis.

  1. The role of carbon dioxide (and intracellular pH) in the pathomechanism of several mental disorders. Are the diseases of civilization caused by learnt behaviour, not the stress itself?

    PubMed

    Sikter, András; Faludi, Gábor; Rihmer, Zoltán

    2009-09-01

    The role of carbon dioxide (CO2) is underestimated in the pathomechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders, though it is an important link between psyche and corpus. The actual spiritual status also influences respiration (we start breathing rarely, frequently, irregularly, etc.) causing pH alteration in the organism; on the other hand the actual cytosolic pH of neurons is one of the main modifiers of Ca2+-conductance, hence breathing directly, quickly, and effectively influences the second messenger system through Ca2+-currents. (Decreasing pCO2 turns pH into alkalic direction, augments psychic arousal, while increasing pCO2 turns pH acidic, diminishes arousal.) One of the most important homeostatic function is to maintain or restore the permanence of H+-concentration, hence the alteration of CO2 level starts cascades of contraregulation. However it can be proved that there is no perfect compensation, therefore compensational mechanisms may generate psychosomatic disorders causing secondary alterations in the "milieu interieur". Authors discuss the special physico-chemical features of CO2, the laws of interweaving alterations of pCO2 and catecholamine levels (their feedback mechanism), the role of acute and chronic hypocapnia in several hyperarousal disorders (delirium, panic disorder, hyperventilation syndrome, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder), the role of "locus minoris resistentiae" in the pathomechanism of psychosomatic disorders. It is supposed that the diseases of civilization are caused not by the stress itself but the lack of human instinctive reaction to it, and this would cause long-lasting CO2 alteration. Increased brain-pCO2, acidic cytosol pH and/or increased basal cytosolic Ca2+ level diminish inward Ca2+-current into cytosol, decrease arousal--they may cause dysthymia or depression. This state usually co-exists with ATP-deficiency and decreased cytosolic Mg2+ content. This energetical- and ion-constellation is also typical of ageing

  2. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  3. Barriers in the brain: resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J.; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kapitein, Lukas C.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50–400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and electric signals within the spine compartment. Such compartmentalization could minimize interspinal crosstalk and thereby support spine-specific synapse plasticity. However, to what extent compartmentalization is governed by spine morphology, and in particular the diameter of the spine neck, has remained unresolved. Here, we review recent advances in tool development – both experimental and theoretical – that facilitate studying the role of the spine neck in compartmentalization. Special emphasis is given to recent advances in microscopy methods and quantitative modeling applications as we discuss compartmentalization of biochemical signals, membrane receptors and electrical signals in spines. Multidisciplinary approaches should help to answer how dendritic spine architecture affects the cellular and molecular processes required for synapse maintenance and modulation. PMID:25538570

  4. Shared and Distinct Mechanisms of Compartmentalized and Cytosolic Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Leroux, Michel R

    2015-12-01

    Most motile and all non-motile (also known as primary) eukaryotic cilia possess microtubule-based axonemes that are assembled at the cell surface to form hair-like or more elaborate compartments endowed with motility and/or signaling functions. Such compartmentalized ciliogenesis depends on the core intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery and the associated Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) for dynamic delivery of ciliary components. The transition zone (TZ), an ultrastructurally complex barrier or 'gate' at the base of cilia, also contributes to the formation of compartmentalized cilia. Yet, some ciliated protists do not have IFT components and, like some metazoan spermatozoa, use IFT-independent mechanisms to build axonemes exposed to the cytosol. Moreover, various ciliated protists lack TZ components, whereas Drosophila sperm surprisingly requires the activity of dynamically localized TZ proteins for cytosolic ciliogenesis. Here, we discuss the various ways eukaryotes use IFT and/or TZ proteins to generate the wide assortment of compartmentalized and cytosolic cilia observed in nature. Consideration of the different ciliogenesis pathways allows us to propose how three types of cytosol-exposed cilia (primary, secondary and tertiary), including cilia found in the human sperm proximal segment, are likely generated by evolutionary derivations of compartmentalized ciliogenesis.

  5. Photoacoustic “nanobombs” fight against undesirable vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiping; Xu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Diancheng; Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Kang, Bin; Chen, Hongyuan; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable intracellular vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs in cancer cells is a common cause of chemoresistance. Strategies aimed at circumventing this problem may improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. We report a novel photophysical strategy for controlled-disruption of vesicular sequestration of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), modified with folate, were trapped in acidic vesicles after entering lung cancer cells. Upon irradiation by near-infrared pulsed laser, these vesicles were massively broken by the resulting photoacoustic shockwave, and the vesicle-sequestered contents were released, leading to redistribution of DOX from cytoplasm to the target-containing nucleus. Redistribution resulted in 12-fold decrease of the EC50 of DOX in lung cancer cells, and enhanced antitumor efficacy of low-dose DOX in tumor-bearing mice. Side effects were not observed. These findings provide insights of using nanotechnology to improve cancer chemotherapy, i.e. not only for drug delivery, but also for overcoming intracellular drug-transport hurdles. PMID:26483341

  6. Compartmentalization of Gd liposomes: the quenching effect explained.

    PubMed

    Guenoun, Jamal; Doeswijk, Gabriela N; Krestin, Gabriel P; Bernsen, Monique R

    2016-01-01

    Cationic liposomes carrying high [Gd] can be used as efficient cell-labeling agents. In a compartmentalized state, Gd can cause signal loss (relaxivity quenching). The contributions of liposomal [Gd], size and compartmentalization state to relaxivity quenching were assessed. The dependency of signal intensity (SI) on intraliposomal [Gd] was assessed comparing three different [Gd] (0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 M Gd) in both small (80 nm) and large (120 nm) cationic liposomes. In addition, five compartmentalization states were compared: free Gd, intact Gd liposomes, ruptured Gd liposomes, Gd liposomes in intact cells and Gd liposomes in ruptured cells (simulating cell death). Gd also causes R2 effects, which is often overlooked. Therefore, both R1 and R2 relaxation rates of a dilution range were measured by T1 and T2 mapping on a 7 T clinical scanner. Less is more. As the unidirectional water efflux rate (outbound across the liposome membrane, κle) is proportional to the surface:volume ratio, smaller liposomes yielded a consistently higher R1 than larger liposomes. For equal voxel [Gd] less concentrated liposomes (0.3 M Gd) yielded higher R1/R2 ratio because of the higher extraliposomal water fraction (vl ). Gd exhibits a dualistic behavior: from hypointensity to hyperintensity to hypointensity, with decreasing [Gd]. Regarding compartmentalization, fewer membrane barriers means a higher R1 /R2 ratio. Gd liposomes exhibit a versatile contrast behavior, dependent on the compartmentalization state, liposomal size, intraliposomal [Gd] and liposome number. Both R1 and R2 effects contribute to this. The versatility allows one to tailor the optimal liposomal formulation to desired goals in cell labeling and tracking.

  7. Compartmentalized PDE4A5 Signaling Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Long-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Park, Alan J.; Tolentino, Rosa E.; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Lee, Yool; Hansen, Rolf T.; Guercio, Leonardo A.; Linton, Edward; Neves-Zaph, Susana R.; Meerlo, Peter; Baillie, George S.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in cAMP signaling are thought to contribute to neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Members of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) family, which contains >25 different isoforms, play a key role in determining spatial cAMP degradation so as to orchestrate compartmentalized cAMP signaling in cells. Each isoform binds to a different set of protein complexes through its unique N-terminal domain, thereby leading to targeted degradation of cAMP in specific intracellular compartments. However, the functional role of specific compartmentalized PDE4 isoforms has not been examined in vivo. Here, we show that increasing protein levels of the PDE4A5 isoform in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons impairs a long-lasting form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and attenuates hippocampus-dependent long-term memories without affecting anxiety. In contrast, viral expression of a truncated version of PDE4A5, which lacks the unique N-terminal targeting domain, does not affect long-term memory. Further, overexpression of the PDE4A1 isoform, which targets a different subset of signalosomes, leaves memory undisturbed. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor-based cAMP measurements reveal that the full-length PDE4A5, in contrast to the truncated form, hampers forskolin-mediated increases in neuronal cAMP levels. Our study indicates that the unique N-terminal localization domain of PDE4A5 is essential for the targeting of specific cAMP-dependent signaling underlying synaptic plasticity and memory. The development of compounds to disrupt the compartmentalization of individual PDE4 isoforms by targeting their unique N-terminal domains may provide a fruitful approach to prevent cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders that are associated with alterations in cAMP signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons exhibit localized signaling processes that enable biochemical cascades to be activated selectively in specific subcellular

  8. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  9. Quasi-steady state reduction for compartmental systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeke, Alexandra; Lax, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to determine an asymptotic reduction (in the sense of Tikhonov and Fenichel) for singularly perturbed compartmental systems in the presence of slow transport. It turns out that the reduction can be derived from the individual interaction terms alone. We apply the result to spatially discretized reaction-diffusion systems and obtain (based on the reduced discretized systems) a heuristic to reduce reaction-diffusion systems in presence of slow diffusion.

  10. Fractional two-compartmental model for articaine serum levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronijevic, Branislava; Sarcev, Ivan; Zorica, Dusan; Janev, Marko; Atanackovic, Teodor M.

    2016-06-01

    Two fractional two-compartmental models are applied to the pharmacokinetics of articaine. Integer order derivatives are replaced by fractional derivatives, either of different, or of same orders. Models are formulated so that the mass balance is preserved. Explicit forms of the solutions are obtained in terms of the Mittag-Leffler functions. Pharmacokinetic parameters are determined by the use of the evolutionary algorithm and trust regions optimization to recover the experimental data.

  11. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  12. Cross-membranes orchestrate compartmentalization and morphogenesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Celler, Katherine; Koning, Roman I.; Willemse, Joost; Koster, Abraham J.; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2016-01-01

    Far from being simple unicellular entities, bacteria have complex social behaviour and organization, living in large populations, and some even as coherent, multicellular entities. The filamentous streptomycetes epitomize such multicellularity, growing as a syncytial mycelium with physiologically distinct hyphal compartments separated by infrequent cross-walls. The viability of mutants devoid of cell division, which can be propagated from fragments, suggests the presence of a different form of compartmentalization in the mycelium. Here we show that complex membranes, visualized by cryo-correlative light microscopy and electron tomography, fulfil this role. Membranes form small assemblies between the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, or, as evidenced by FRAP experiments, large protein-impermeable cross-membrane structures, which compartmentalize the multinucleoid mycelium. All areas containing cross-membrane structures are nucleoid-restricted zones, suggesting that the membrane assemblies may also act to protect nucleoids from cell-wall restructuring events. Our work reveals a novel mechanism of controlling compartmentalization and development in multicellular bacteria. PMID:27291257

  13. Cross-membranes orchestrate compartmentalization and morphogenesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Celler, Katherine; Koning, Roman I; Willemse, Joost; Koster, Abraham J; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-01-01

    Far from being simple unicellular entities, bacteria have complex social behaviour and organization, living in large populations, and some even as coherent, multicellular entities. The filamentous streptomycetes epitomize such multicellularity, growing as a syncytial mycelium with physiologically distinct hyphal compartments separated by infrequent cross-walls. The viability of mutants devoid of cell division, which can be propagated from fragments, suggests the presence of a different form of compartmentalization in the mycelium. Here we show that complex membranes, visualized by cryo-correlative light microscopy and electron tomography, fulfil this role. Membranes form small assemblies between the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, or, as evidenced by FRAP experiments, large protein-impermeable cross-membrane structures, which compartmentalize the multinucleoid mycelium. All areas containing cross-membrane structures are nucleoid-restricted zones, suggesting that the membrane assemblies may also act to protect nucleoids from cell-wall restructuring events. Our work reveals a novel mechanism of controlling compartmentalization and development in multicellular bacteria. PMID:27291257

  14. Digital PCR on an integrated self-priming compartmentalization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Qiu, Lin; Yu, Bingwen; Xu, Yanan; Gao, Yibo; Pan, Tingting; Tian, Qingchang; Song, Qi; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2014-03-21

    An integrated on-chip valve-free and power-free microfluidic digital PCR device is for the first time developed by making use of a novel self-priming compartmentalization and simple dehydration control to realize 'divide and conquer' for single DNA molecule detection. The high gas solubility of PDMS is exploited to provide the built-in power of self-priming so that the sample and oil are sequentially sucked into the device to realize sample self-compartmentalization based on surface tension. The lifespan of its self-priming capability was about two weeks tested using an air-tight packaging bottle sealed with a small amount of petroleum jelly, which is significant for a practical platform. The SPC chip contains 5120 independent 5 nL microchambers, allowing the samples to be compartmentalized completely. Using this platform, three different abundances of lung cancer related genes are detected to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the microchip for amplifying a single nucleic acid molecule. For maximal accuracy, within less than 5% of the measurement deviation, the optimal number of positive chambers is between 400 and 1250 evaluated by the Poisson distribution, which means one panel can detect an average of 480 to 4804 template molecules. This device without world-to-chip connections eliminates the constraint of the complex pipeline control, and is an integrated on-chip platform, which would be a significant improvement to digital PCR automation and more user-friendly.

  15. Rewiring and regulation of cross-compartmentalized metabolism in protists.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Michels, Paul A M

    2010-03-12

    Plastid acquisition, endosymbiotic associations, lateral gene transfer, organelle degeneracy or even organelle loss influence metabolic capabilities in many different protists. Thus, metabolic diversity is sculpted through the gain of new metabolic functions and moderation or loss of pathways that are often essential in the majority of eukaryotes. What is perhaps less apparent to the casual observer is that the sub-compartmentalization of ubiquitous pathways has been repeatedly remodelled during eukaryotic evolution, and the textbook pictures of intermediary metabolism established for animals, yeast and plants are not conserved in many protists. Moreover, metabolic remodelling can strongly influence the regulatory mechanisms that control carbon flux through the major metabolic pathways. Here, we provide an overview of how core metabolism has been reorganized in various unicellular eukaryotes, focusing in particular on one near universal catabolic pathway (glycolysis) and one ancient anabolic pathway (isoprenoid biosynthesis). For the example of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the compartmentalization of this process in protists often appears to have been influenced by plastid acquisition and loss, whereas for glycolysis several unexpected modes of compartmentalization have emerged. Significantly, the example of trypanosomatid glycolysis illustrates nicely how mathematical modelling and systems biology can be used to uncover or understand novel modes of pathway regulation.

  16. Compartmentalized Droplets for Continuous Flow Liquid-Liquid Interface Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Huan; Du, Zhiping; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2016-08-17

    To address the limitations of batch organic-aqueous biphasic catalysis, we develop a conceptually novel method termed Flow Pickering Emulsion, or FPE, to process biphasic reactions in a continuous flow fashion. This method involves the compartmentalization of bulk water into micron-sized droplets based on a water-in-oil Pickering emulsion, which are packed into a column reactor. The compartmentalized water droplets can confine water-soluble catalysts, thus "immobilizing" the catalyst in the column reactor, while the interstices between the droplets allow the organic (oil) phase to flow. Key fundamental principles underpinning this method such as the oil phase flow behavior, the stability of compartmentalized droplets and the confinement capability of these droplets toward water-soluble catalysts are experimentally and theoretically investigated. As a proof of this concept, case studies including a sulfuric acid-catalyzed addition reaction, a heteropolyacid-catalyzed ring opening reaction and an enzyme-catalyzed chiral reaction demonstrate the generality and versatility of the FPE method. Impressively, in addition to the excellent durability, the developed FPE reactions exhibit up to 10-fold reaction efficiency enhancement in comparison to the existing batch reactions, indicating a unique flow interface catalysis effect. This study opens up a new avenue to allow conventional biphasic catalysis reactions to access more sustainable and efficient flow chemistry using an innovative liquid-liquid interface protocol. PMID:27429173

  17. A novel putative auxin carrier family regulates intracellular auxin homeostasis in plants.

    PubMed

    Barbez, Elke; Kubeš, Martin; Rolčík, Jakub; Béziat, Chloé; Pěnčík, Aleš; Wang, Bangjun; Rosquete, Michel Ruiz; Zhu, Jinsheng; Dobrev, Petre I; Lee, Yuree; Zažímalovà, Eva; Petrášek, Jan; Geisler, Markus; Friml, Jiří; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    The phytohormone auxin acts as a prominent signal, providing, by its local accumulation or depletion in selected cells, a spatial and temporal reference for changes in the developmental program. The distribution of auxin depends on both auxin metabolism (biosynthesis, conjugation and degradation) and cellular auxin transport. We identified in silico a novel putative auxin transport facilitator family, called PIN-LIKES (PILS). Here we illustrate that PILS proteins are required for auxin-dependent regulation of plant growth by determining the cellular sensitivity to auxin. PILS proteins regulate intracellular auxin accumulation at the endoplasmic reticulum and thus auxin availability for nuclear auxin signalling. PILS activity affects the level of endogenous auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), presumably via intracellular accumulation and metabolism. Our findings reveal that the transport machinery to compartmentalize auxin within the cell is of an unexpected molecular complexity and demonstrate this compartmentalization to be functionally important for a number of developmental processes. PMID:22504182

  18. Compartmental microfluidic system for studying muscle-neuron communication and neuromuscular junction maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Ariel; Zahavi, Eitan Erez; Gradus, Tal; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Perlson, Eran

    2016-02-01

    Molecular communication between the motoneuron and the muscle is vital for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation and maintenance. Disruption in the structure and function of NMJs is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative processes during both development and pathological events. Still due to the complexity of this process, it is very difficult to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying it, generating a keen interest for developing better tools for investigating it. Here we describe a simplified method to study mechanisms of NMJs formation, maintenance and disruption. A spinal cord explant from mice expressing the Hb9::GFP motoneuron marker is plated on one side of a compartmental chamber, and myotubes derived from muscle satellite progenitor cells are plated on the other. The GFP labeled motoneurons extend their axons via microgrooves in the chamber to innervate the muscle cells and to form functional in-vitro NMJs. Next we provide procedures to measure axon growth and to reliably quantify NMJ activity using imaging of both muscle contractions and fast intracellular calcium changes. This platform allows precise control, monitoring and manipulation of subcellular microenvironments. Specifically, it enables to distinguish local from retrograde signaling mechanisms and allows restricted experimental intervention in local compartments along the muscle-neuron route. PMID:26689471

  19. Nuclear Compartmentalization of α1-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Adult Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Although convention dictates that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at the plasma membrane, accumulating evidence suggests that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at intracellular membranes, most notably the nucleus. In fact, there is now significant evidence indicating that endogenous alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) localize to and signal at the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes. Cumulatively, the data suggest that α1-ARs localize to the inner nuclear membrane, activate intranuclear signaling, and regulate physiologic function in adult cardiac myocytes. Although α1-ARs signal through Gαq, unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, α1-ARs mediate important cardioprotective functions including adaptive/physiologic hypertrophy, protection from cell death (survival signaling), positive inotropy, and preconditioning. Also unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, most, if not all, functional α1-ARs localize to the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes, as opposed to the sarcolemma. Together, α1-AR nuclear localization and cardioprotection might suggest a novel model for compartmentalization of Gq-coupled receptor signaling in which nuclear Gq-coupled receptor signaling is cardioprotective. PMID:25264754

  20. Functional compartmentalization of the human superficial masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A; Biotti Picand, Jorge L; de la Rosa, Francisco J Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle's motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20-60% MVBF). PMID:25692977

  1. Functional Compartmentalization of the Human Superficial Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A.; Biotti Picand, Jorge L.; de la Rosa, Francisco J. Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle’s motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20–60% MVBF). PMID:25692977

  2. Functional compartmentalization of the human superficial masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A; Biotti Picand, Jorge L; de la Rosa, Francisco J Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle's motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20-60% MVBF).

  3. Compartmental Innervation of the Superior Oblique Muscle in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Le, Alan; Poukens, Vadims; Ying, Howard; Rootman, Daniel; Goldberg, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular innervation of mammalian horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is compartmental. We sought evidence of similar compartmental innervation of the superior oblique (SO) muscle. Methods Three fresh bovine orbits and one human orbit were dissected to trace continuity of SO muscle and tendon fibers to the scleral insertions. Whole orbits were also obtained from four humans (two adults, a 17-month-old child, and a 33-week stillborn fetus), two rhesus monkeys, one rabbit, and one cow. Orbits were formalin fixed, embedded whole in paraffin, serially sectioned in the coronal plane at 10-μm thickness, and stained with Masson trichrome. Extraocular muscle fibers and branches of the trochlear nerve (CN4) were traced in serial sections and reconstructed in three dimensions. Results In the human, the lateral SO belly is in continuity with tendon fibers inserting more posteriorly on the sclera for infraducting mechanical advantage, while the medial belly is continuous with anteriorly inserting fibers having mechanical advantage for incycloduction. Fibers in the monkey superior SO insert more posteriorly on the sclera to favor infraduction, while the inferior portion inserts more anteriorly to favor incycloduction. In all species, CN4 bifurcates prior to penetrating the SO belly. Each branch innervates a nonoverlapping compartment of EOM fibers, consisting of medial and lateral compartments in humans and monkeys, and superior and inferior compartments in cows and rabbits. Conclusions The SO muscle of humans and other mammals is compartmentally innervated in a manner that could permit separate CN4 branches to selectively influence vertical versus torsional action. PMID:26426404

  4. Analytical properties of a three-compartmental dynamical demographic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    The three-compartmental demographic model by Korotaeyv-Malkov-Khaltourina, connecting population size, economic surplus, and education level, is considered from the point of view of dynamical systems theory. It is shown that there exist two integrals of motion, which enables the system to be reduced to one nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The study of its structure provides analytical criteria for the dominance ranges of the dynamics of Malthus and Kremer. Additionally, the particular ranges of parameters enable the derived general ordinary differential equations to be reduced to the models of Gompertz and Thoularis-Wallace.

  5. Rab Proteins and the Compartmentalization of the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Zerial, Marino

    2014-01-01

    Of the approximately 70 human Rab GTPases, nearly three-quarters are involved in endocytic trafficking. Significant plasticity in endosomal membrane transport pathways is closely coupled to receptor signaling and Rab GTPase-regulated scaffolds. Here we review current literature pertaining to endocytic Rab GTPase localizations, functions, and coordination with regulatory proteins and effectors. The roles of Rab GTPases in (1) compartmentalization of the endocytic pathway into early, recycling, late, and lysosomal routes; (2) coordination of individual transport steps from vesicle budding to fusion; (3) effector interactomes; and (4) integration of GTPase and signaling cascades are discussed. PMID:25341920

  6. An Intracellular Nanotrap Redirects Proteins and Organelles in Live Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Sarah; Popp, Felix; Hofmann, Julia; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Owing to their small size and enhanced stability, nanobodies derived from camelids have previously been used for the construction of intracellular “nanotraps,” which enable redirection and manipulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged targets within living plant and animal cells. By taking advantage of intracellular compartmentalization in the magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, we demonstrate that proteins and even entire organelles can be retargeted also within prokaryotic cells by versatile nanotrap technology. Expression of multivalent GFP-binding nanobodies on magnetosomes ectopically recruited the chemotaxis protein CheW1-GFP from polar chemoreceptor clusters to the midcell, resulting in a gradual knockdown of aerotaxis. Conversely, entire magnetosome chains could be redirected from the midcell and tethered to one of the cell poles. Similar approaches could potentially be used for building synthetic cellular structures and targeted protein knockdowns in other bacteria. Importance   Intrabodies are commonly used in eukaryotic systems for intracellular analysis and manipulation of proteins within distinct subcellular compartments. In particular, so-called nanobodies have great potential for synthetic biology approaches because they can be expressed easily in heterologous hosts and actively interact with intracellular targets, for instance, by the construction of intracellular “nanotraps” in living animal and plant cells. Although prokaryotic cells also exhibit a considerable degree of intracellular organization, there are few tools available equivalent to the well-established methods used in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate the ectopic retargeting and depletion of polar membrane proteins and entire organelles to distinct compartments in a magnetotactic bacterium, resulting in a gradual knockdown of magneto-aerotaxis. This intracellular nanotrap approach has the potential to be applied in other bacteria for

  7. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication

    PubMed Central

    Ghadessy, Farid J.; Ong, Jennifer L.; Holliger, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  8. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  9. EFFECT OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN T-DOMAIN ON ENDOSOMAL pH.

    PubMed

    Labyntsev, A J; Korotkevych, N V; Kolybo, D V; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT) is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd) from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td), but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demonstrated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol. PMID:26547959

  10. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes†

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution. PMID:27708772

  11. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes†

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  12. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  13. Intracellular chromium reduction.

    PubMed

    Arslan, P; Beltrame, M; Tomasi, A

    1987-10-22

    Two steps are involved in the uptake of Cr(VI): (1) the diffusion of the anion CrO4(2-) through a facilitated transport system, presumably the non-specific anion carrier and (2) the intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI), keeping the cytoplasmic concentration of Cr(VI) low, facilitates accumulation of chromate from extracellular medium into the cell. In the present paper, a direct demonstration of intracellular chromium reduction is provided by means of electron paramagnetic (spin) resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Incubation of metabolically active rat thymocytes with chromate originates a signal which can be attributed to a paramagnetic species of chromium, Cr(V) or Cr(III). The EPR signal is originated by intracellular reduction of chromium since: (1) it is observed only when cells are incubated with chromate, (2) it is present even after extensive washings of the cells in a chromium-free medium; (3) it is abolished when cells are incubated with drugs able to reduce the glutathione pool, i.e., diethylmaleate or phorone; and (4) it is abolished when cells are incubated in the presence of a specific inhibitor of the anion carrier, 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid. PMID:2820507

  14. Physiological Consequences of Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the complex physiological demands of mammalian life requires strict control of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs because of the multiplicity of their cellular functions. Acyl-CoAs are substrates for energy production; stored within lipid droplets as triacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, and retinol esters; esterified to form membrane phospholipids; or used to activate transcriptional and signaling pathways. Indirect evidence suggests that acyl-CoAs do not wander freely within cells, but instead, are channeled into specific pathways. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for acyl-CoA compartmentalization, highlight the key modes of acyl-CoA regulation, and diagram potential mechanisms for controlling acyl-CoA partitioning. PMID:26124277

  15. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Harrington, C.

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  16. Hydrological Compartmentalization: A Grand Challenge in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Orlowski, N.; Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    Current terrestrial biosphere models assume that plant transpiration, groundwater and streamflow are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed soil reservoir. Recent stable water isotope data from Oregon and Mexico and now global meta-analysis and remote sensing measurements have all shown evidence of hydrological compartmentalization: a mobile compartment that forms groundwater and streamflow and a poorly mobile compartment that supplies plant transpiration. The way we now measure and model this poorly mobile water is a grand challenge for understanding subsurface mixing, water residence time, and its interaction and feedback to ecosystem processes. Here we review the latest results from this work and outline some of the future research challenges for understanding soil-plant-atmospheric interactions between the bedrock and the boundary layer.

  17. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchwalow, Igor B. . E-mail: buchwalo@uni-muenster.de; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2005-05-06

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma.

  18. Compartmentation of enzymes interconverting aclacinomycins in Streptomyces species AM 33352.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, U; Dornberger, K; Fleck, W F; Freysoldt, C

    1988-01-01

    The enzymatic interconversion of the aclacinomycins A (I), Y (II), and B (III) by Streptomyces spec. AM 33352/S 182 producing these aklavinone glycosides was investigated. The enzymes converting I to II and III, as well as vice versa, are located within different compartments separated by the cytoplasmic membrane. Aclacinomycin A (I) is biotransformed to II and III by the cell-free mycelium extract while the entire mycelium carries out the same type of conversion towards the opposite direction. Changes of enzyme activity are correlated to alterations in the ratio of aklavinone glycosides throughout the fermentation. A hypothesis is developed concerning the role of compartmentized oxidoreductase(s) in the passive flux of I from inside the cells to outside.

  19. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Compartmentalization and Biomineralization in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are remarkable organisms with the ability to exploit the earth’s magnetic field for navigational purposes. To do this, they build specialized compartments called magnetosomes that consist of a lipid membrane and a crystalline magnetic mineral. These organisms have the potential to serve as models for the study of compartmentalization as well as biomineralization in bacteria. Additionally, they offer the opportunity to design applications that take advantage of the particular properties of magnetosomes. In recent years, a sustained effort to identify the molecular basis of this process has resulted in a clearer understanding of the magnetosome formation and biomineralization. Here, I present an overview of magnetotactic bacteria and explore the possible molecular mechanisms of membrane remodeling, protein sorting, cytoskeletal organization, iron transport and biomineralization that lead to the formation of a functional magnetosome organelle. PMID:22092030

  1. Hydrological Compartmentalization: A Grand Challenge in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Orlowski, N.; Jasechko, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current terrestrial biosphere models assume that plant transpiration, groundwater and streamflow are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed soil reservoir. Recent stable water isotope data from Oregon and Mexico and now global meta-analysis and remote sensing measurements have all shown evidence of hydrological compartmentalization: a mobile compartment that forms groundwater and streamflow and a poorly mobile compartment that supplies plant transpiration. The way we now measure and model this poorly mobile water is a grand challenge for understanding subsurface mixing, water residence time, and its interaction and feedback to ecosystem processes. Here we review the latest results from this work and outline some of the future research challenges for understanding soil-plant-atmospheric interactions between the bedrock and the boundary layer.

  2. Compartmentation of Metabolites in Regulating Epigenomes of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Li; Di, Li-jun

    2016-01-01

    Covalent modifications of DNA and histones are important epigenetic events and the genomewide reshaping of epigenetic markers is common in cancer. Epigenetic markers are produced by enzymatic reactions, and some of these reactions require the presence of metabolites, specifically Epigenetic Enzyme Required Metabolites (EERMs), as cofactors. Recent studies found that the abundance of these EERMs correlates with epigenetic enzyme activities. Also, the subcellular compartmentation, especially the nuclear localization of these EERMs, may play a role in regulating the activities of epigenetic enzymes. Moreover, gene-specific recruitment of enzymes that produce the EERMs in the proximity of the epigenetic modification events accompanying the regulation of gene expression, were proposed. Therefore, it is important to summarize findings of EERMs in regulating epigenetic modifications at both the DNA and histone levels, and to understand how EERMs contribute to cancer development by addressing their global versus local distribution. PMID:27258652

  3. Sharpness of Spike Initiation in Neurons Explained by Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2013-01-01

    In cortical neurons, spikes are initiated in the axon initial segment. Seen at the soma, they appear surprisingly sharp. A standard explanation is that the current coming from the axon becomes sharp as the spike is actively backpropagated to the soma. However, sharp initiation of spikes is also seen in the input–output properties of neurons, and not only in the somatic shape of spikes; for example, cortical neurons can transmit high frequency signals. An alternative hypothesis is that Na channels cooperate, but it is not currently supported by direct experimental evidence. I propose a simple explanation based on the compartmentalization of spike initiation. When Na channels are placed in the axon, the soma acts as a current sink for the Na current. I show that there is a critical distance to the soma above which an instability occurs, so that Na channels open abruptly rather than gradually as a function of somatic voltage. PMID:24339755

  4. Linear systems, compartmental modeling, and estimability issues in IAQ studies

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W.C.

    1996-12-31

    Many IAQ models are expressed as coupled systems of linear, ordinary differential equations. In this paper, the linear-systems or state-variable format for these systems will be reviewed, and some useful information will be presented which can be obtained from this formulation without explicitly solving the differential equation system. Much information concerning linear systems analysis is available in the literature of various disciplines, particularly biomathematics, wherein there is a specialization called compartmental modeling. It is important to recognize that there exists a great deal of directly usable mathematical information which can immediately be applied to IAQ modeling problems. In compartmental modeling, an issue called identifiability has long been recognized as a potential problem with experiments that are intended to extract information about a linear system`s parameters from observations of that system`s response to a forcing function. It can happen that the system`s parameters cannot be uniquely estimated from an experiment, no matter how good (noise-free) the measurements are. With a linear-systems formulation of the experimental configuration, this condition can be detected before the experiment is conducted. A related issue is termed redundancy, which refers to the inability to obtain unique parameter estimates from the data, even if the experiment is identifiable. This problem occurs for sums-of-exponentials models, fitted via nonlinear estimation to the observations. Taken together, identifiability and redundancy can be termed estimability. These difficulties can affect chamber testing in particular, since this is the context where they are attempting to estimate system parameters from observations. This paper will present an overview of these issues, with selected examples.

  5. Compartmentalization role of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) in mediating protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rababa'h, Abeer; Singh, Sonal; Suryavanshi, Santosh V; Altarabsheh, Salah Eldien; Deo, Salil V; McConnell, Bradley K

    2014-12-24

    The Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) stimulation enhances contractility through protein kinase-A (PKA) substrate phosphorylation. This PKA signaling is conferred in part by PKA binding to A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs coordinate multi-protein signaling networks that are targeted to specific intracellular locations, resulting in the localization of enzyme activity and transmitting intracellular actions of neurotransmitters and hormones to its target substrates. In particular, mAKAP (muscle-selective AKAP) has been shown to be present on the nuclear envelope of cardiomyocytes with various proteins including: PKA-regulatory subunit (RIIα), phosphodiesterase-4D3, protein phosphatase-2A, and ryanodine receptor (RyR2). Therefore, through the coordination of spatial-temporal signaling of proteins and enzymes, mAKAP controls cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels very tightly and functions as a regulator of PKA-mediated substrate phosphorylation leading to changes in calcium availability and myofilament calcium sensitivity. The goal of this review is to elucidate the critical compartmentalization role of mAKAP in mediating PKA signaling and regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by acting as a scaffolding protein. Based on our literature search and studying the structure-function relationship between AKAP scaffolding protein and its binding partners, we propose possible explanations for the mechanism by which mAKAP promotes cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Tissue Level Compartmentation of (R)-Amygdalin and Amygdalin Hydrolase Prevents Large-Scale Cyanogenesis in Undamaged Prunus Seeds.

    PubMed

    Poulton, J. E.; Li, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    Plum (Prunus domestica) seeds, which contain the cyanogenic diglucoside (R)-amygdalin and lesser amounts of the corresponding monoglucoside (R)-prunasin, release the respiratory toxin HCN upon tissue disruption. Amygdalin hydrolase (AH) and prunasin hydrolase (PH), two specific [beta]-glucosidases responsible for hydrolysis of these glucosides, were purified to near homogeneity by concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B and carboxymethyl-cellulose chromatography. Both proteins appear as polypeptides with molecular masses of 60 kD upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but they exhibit different isoelectric points (PH, 5.6-6.0; AH, 7.8-8.2). AH and PH were localized within mature plum seeds by tissue printing, histochemistry, and silver-enhanced immunogold labeling. As was previously shown in black cherry (Prunus serotina) seeds (E.Swain, C.P. Li, J.E. Poulton [1992] Plant Physiol 100: 291-300), AH and PH are restricted to protein bodies of specific procambial cells and are absent from the cotyledonary parenchyma, bundle sheath, and endosperm cells. In contrast, the cyanogenic glycosides in both plum and black cherry seeds, which were detected by tissue printing, occur solely in the cotyledonary parenchyma and are absent from the procambium and endosperm. It is concluded that tissue level compartmentation prevents large-scale cyanoglycoside hydrolysis in intact Prunus seeds. PMID:12232058

  7. Endosomal escape: a bottleneck in intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic science, apart from drugs, newer bioactive moieties like oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides, enzymes and antibodies are constantly being introduced for the betterment of therapeutic efficacy. These moieties have intracellular components of the cells like cytoplasm and nucleus as one of their pharmacological sites for exhibiting therapeutic activity. Despite their promising efficacy, their intracellular bioavailability has been critically hampered leading to failure in the treatment of numerous diseases and disorders. The endosomal uptake pathway is known to be a rate-limiting barrier for such systems. Bioactive molecules get trapped in the endosomal vesicles and degraded in the lysosomal compartment, necessitating the need for effective strategies that facilitate the endosomal escape and enhance the cytosolic bioavailability of bioactives. Microbes like viruses and bacteria have developed their innate mechanistic tactics to translocate their genome and toxins by efficiently penetrating the host cell membrane. Understanding this mechanism and exploring it further for intracellular delivery has opened new avenues to surmount the endosomal barrier. These strategies include membrane fusion, pore formation and proton sponge effects. On the other hand, progress in designing a novel smart polymeric carrier system that triggers endosomal escape by undergoing modulations in the intracellular milieu has further led to an improvement in intracellular delivery. These comprise pH, enzyme and temperature-induced modulators, synthetic cationic lipids and photo-induced physical disruption. Each of the aforementioned strategies has its own unique mechanism to escape the endosome. This review recapitulates the numerous strategies designed to surmount the bottleneck of endosomal escape and thereby achieve successful intracellular uptake of bioactives. PMID:24730275

  8. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Galván, E J; Pérez-Rosello, T; Gómez-Lira, G; Lara, E; Gutiérrez, R; Barrionuevo, G

    2015-04-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosum-molecular (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RCs), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI-AMPARs) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10s), with intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20mM), and with the NMDAR antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX (50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synapse-specific Ca(2+) signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation. PMID:25637803

  9. Compartmentalization of Distinct cAMP Signaling Pathways in Mammalian Sperm*♦

    PubMed Central

    Wertheimer, Eva; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltran, José L.; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Douglas; Escoffier, Jessica; Salicioni, Ana M.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Mager, Jesse; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization competence is acquired in the female tract in a process known as capacitation. Capacitation is needed for the activation of motility (e.g. hyperactivation) and to prepare the sperm for an exocytotic process known as acrosome reaction. Although the HCO3−-dependent soluble adenylyl cyclase Adcy10 plays a role in motility, less is known about the source of cAMP in the sperm head. Transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs) are another possible source of cAMP. These enzymes are regulated by stimulatory heterotrimeric Gs proteins; however, the presence of Gs or tmACs in mammalian sperm has been controversial. In this study, we used Western blotting and cholera toxin-dependent ADP-ribosylation to show the Gs presence in the sperm head. Also, we showed that forskolin, a tmAC-specific activator, induces cAMP accumulation in sperm from both WT and Adcy10-null mice. This increase is blocked by the tmAC inhibitor SQ22536 but not by the Adcy10 inhibitor KH7. Although Gs immunoreactivity and tmAC activity are detected in the sperm head, PKA is only found in the tail, where Adcy10 was previously shown to reside. Consistent with an acrosomal localization, Gs reactivity is lost in acrosome-reacted sperm, and forskolin is able to increase intracellular Ca2+ and induce the acrosome reaction. Altogether, these data suggest that cAMP pathways are compartmentalized in sperm, with Gs and tmAC in the head and Adcy10 and PKA in the flagellum. PMID:24129574

  10. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J; Pérez-Rosello, Tamara; Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Lara, Erika; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosun-moleculare (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RC), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI- AMPARs) and NMDARs. RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10 s), with intracellular injections of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (20 mM), and with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX(50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synaptic-specific Ca2+ signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation. PMID:25637803

  11. Intracellular localization of membrane-bound ATPases in the compartmentalized anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’

    PubMed Central

    van Niftrik, Laura; van Helden, Mary; Kirchen, Silke; van Donselaar, Elly G; Harhangi, Harry R; Webb, Richard I; Fuerst, John A; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are divided into three compartments by bilayer membranes (from out- to inside): paryphoplasm, riboplasm and anammoxosome. It is proposed that the anammox reaction is performed by proteins located in the anammoxosome and on its membrane giving rise to a proton-motive-force and subsequent ATP synthesis by membrane-bound ATPases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the location of membrane-bound ATPases in the anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’. Four ATPase gene clusters were identified in the K. stuttgartiensis genome: one typical F-ATPase, two atypical F-ATPases and a prokaryotic V-ATPase. K. stuttgartiensis transcriptomic and proteomic analysis and immunoblotting using antisera directed at catalytic subunits of the ATPase gene clusters indicated that only the typical F-ATPase gene cluster most likely encoded a functional ATPase under these cultivation conditions. Immunogold localization showed that the typical F-ATPase was predominantly located on both the outermost and anammoxosome membrane and to a lesser extent on the middle membrane. This is consistent with the anammox physiology model, and confirms the status of the outermost cell membrane as cytoplasmic membrane. The occurrence of ATPase in the anammoxosome membrane suggests that anammox bacteria have evolved a prokaryotic organelle; a membrane-bounded compartment with a specific cellular function: energy metabolism. PMID:20545867

  12. Processing and presentation of antigens derived from intracellular protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Goldszmid, Romina S.; Sher, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Control of parasitic protozoan infections requires the generation of efficient innate and adaptive immune responses, and in most cases both CD8 and CD4 T cells are necessary for host survival. Since intracellular protozoa remodel the vacuolar compartments in which they reside, it is not obvious how their antigens enter the MHC class I and class II pathways. Studies using genetically engineered parasites have shown that host cell targeting, intracellular compartmentalization, subcellular localization of antigen within the parasite and mechanism of invasion are important factors determining the presentation pathway utilized. The recent identification of endogenous parasite-derived CD8 T cell epitopes have helped confirm these concepts as well as provided new information on the processing pathways and the impact of parasite-stage specific antigen expression on the repertoire of responding T cells stimulated by infection. Elucidating the mechanisms governing antigen processing and presentation of intracellular protozoa may provide important insights needed for the rational design of effective vaccines. PMID:20153156

  13. Twenty years of fluorescence imaging of intracellular chloride

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Daniele; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloride homeostasis has a pivotal role in controlling neuronal excitability in the adult brain and during development. The intracellular concentration of chloride is regulated by the dynamic equilibrium between passive fluxes through membrane conductances and the active transport mediated by importers and exporters. In cortical neurons, chloride fluxes are coupled to network activity by the opening of the ionotropic GABAA receptors that provides a direct link between the activity of interneurons and chloride fluxes. These molecular mechanisms are not evenly distributed and regulated over the neuron surface and this fact can lead to a compartmentalized control of the intracellular concentration of chloride. The inhibitory drive provided by the activity of the GABAA receptors depends on the direction and strength of the associated currents, which are ultimately dictated by the gradient of chloride, the main charge carrier flowing through the GABAA channel. Thus, the intracellular distribution of chloride determines the local strength of ionotropic inhibition and influences the interaction between converging excitation and inhibition. The importance of chloride regulation is also underlined by its involvement in several brain pathologies, including epilepsy and disorders of the autistic spectra. The full comprehension of the physiological meaning of GABAergic activity on neurons requires the measurement of the spatiotemporal dynamics of chloride fluxes across the membrane. Nowadays, there are several available tools for the task, and both synthetic and genetically encoded indicators have been successfully used for chloride imaging. Here, we will review the available sensors analyzing their properties and outlining desirable future developments. PMID:25221475

  14. The Subcellular Compartmentalization of Arginine Metabolizing Enzymes and Their Role in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Lucas, Rudolf; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through the conversion of its substrate, l-arginine to l-citrulline. Reduced access to l-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2) metabolize l-arginine to generate l-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of l-arginine. Indeed, supplemental l-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, this simple relationship is complicated by observations that l-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis. Accordingly, the subcellular compartmentalization of intracellular l-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of pools or pockets of l-arginine. In agreement with this, there is considerable evidence supporting the importance of the subcellular localization of l-arginine metabolizing enzymes. In endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localization inside the cell. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, arginosuccinate lyase, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. Herein, we

  15. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. In this paper we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to directly compare compartments of the larval and adult brain. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain where they form a “protomap” of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms. PMID:20533357

  16. Compartmentalized nitric oxide signaling in the resistance vasculature.

    PubMed

    Mutchler, Stephanie M; Straub, Adam C

    2015-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) was first described as a bioactive molecule through its ability to stimulate soluble guanylate cyclase, but the revelation that NO was the endothelium derived relaxation factor drove the field to its modern state. The wealth of research conducted over the past 30 years has provided us with a picture of how diverse NO signaling can be within the vascular wall, going beyond simple vasodilation to include such roles as signaling through protein S-nitrosation. This expanded view of NO's actions requires highly regulated and compartmentalized production. Importantly, resistance arteries house multiple proteins involved in the production and transduction of NO allowing for efficient movement of the molecule to regulate vascular tone and reactivity. In this review, we focus on the many mechanisms regulating NO production and signaling action in the vascular wall, with a focus on the control of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme responsible for synthesizing most of the NO within these confines. We also explore how cross talk between the endothelium and smooth muscle in the microcirculation can modulate NO signaling, illustrating that this one small molecule has the capability to produce a plethora of responses.

  17. An integrated compartmental model for prediction of indoor radon concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ahmady, K.K.; Hintenlang, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    A carefully selected, heavily instrumented, and fully controlled experimental facility dedicated to research was used to investigate the interaction and effects of key parameters related to the indoor radon problem. Mechanistic and empirical models have been developed in which they return pressure differentials in response to indoor radon driving forces inputs. A semi-diurnal natural pumping model of radon-rich soil gas was based on an exponentially damped response of the sub-slab air volume pressure to changes in atmospheric pressure. A wind-induced pressure differentials model was based on the conservation of energy of the wind speed between the main stream and the structure shell corrected to the effect of wind fluctuation and direction. A temperature-induced pressure differential model was based on the linear approximation of the weakly exponentially-dependent pressures between two temperature zones under hydrostatic equilibrium. Mathematical frameworks were developed to incorporate driving force models into an integrated compartmental model allowed predictions of time-integrated and time-dependent indoor radon concentrations. The integrated predictions are in good agreement with the observed concentrations at the research site.

  18. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  19. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  20. MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL DISTRIBUTION OF TOXICS (MEND-TOX): PART I, HYBRID COMPARTMENTAL-SPATIAL MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated hybrid spatial-compartmental modeling approach is presented for analyzing the dynamic distribution of chemicals in the multimedia environment. Information obtained from such analysis, which includes temporal chemical concentration profiles in various media, mass ...

  1. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGES

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; et al

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  2. Compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum in the early C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zuo Yen; Prouteau, Manoël; Gotta, Monica; Barral, Yves

    2016-09-12

    The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is polarized to partition fate determinants between the cell lineages generated during its first division. Using fluorescence loss in photobleaching, we find that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the C. elegans embryo is physically continuous throughout the cell, but its membrane is compartmentalized shortly before nuclear envelope breakdown into an anterior and a posterior domain, indicating that a diffusion barrier forms in the ER membrane between these two domains. Using mutants with disorganized ER, we show that ER compartmentalization is independent of the morphological transition that the ER undergoes in mitosis. In contrast, compartmentalization takes place at the position of the future cleavage plane in a par-3-dependent manner. Together, our data indicate that the ER membrane is compartmentalized in cells as diverse as budding yeast, mouse neural stem cells, and the early C. elegans embryo. PMID:27597753

  3. Bidirectionality and compartmentation of metabolic fluxes are revealed in the dynamics of isotopomer networks.

    PubMed

    Schryer, David W; Peterson, Pearu; Paalme, Toomas; Vendelin, Marko

    2009-04-01

    Isotope labeling is one of the few methods of revealing the in vivo bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes within metabolic networks. We argue that a shift from steady state to dynamic isotopomer analysis is required to deal with these cellular complexities and provide a review of dynamic studies of compartmentalized energy fluxes in eukaryotic cells including cardiac muscle, plants, and astrocytes. Knowledge of complex metabolic behaviour on a molecular level is prerequisite for the intelligent design of genetically modified organisms able to realize their potential of revolutionizing food, energy, and pharmaceutical production. We describe techniques to explore the bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes using information contained in the isotopic transient, and discuss the integration of kinetic models with MFA. The flux parameters of an example metabolic network were optimized to examine the compartmentalization of metabolites and and the bidirectionality of fluxes in the TCA cycle of Saccharomyces uvarum for steady-state respiratory growth. PMID:19468334

  4. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  5. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  6. Multiple sampling and discriminatory fingerprinting reveals clonally complex and compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Yurena; Romero, Beatriz; Copano, María Francisca; Bouza, Emilio; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2015-01-30

    The combination of new genotyping tools and a more exhaustive sampling policy in the analysis of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has shown that infection by this pathogen is more complex than initially expected. Mixed infections, coexistence of clonal variants from a parental strain, and compartmentalized infections are all different modalities of this clonal complexity. Until recently, genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis in animal populations was based on spoligotyping and analysis of a single isolate per infection; therefore, clonal complexity is probably underdetected. We used multiple sampling combined with highly discriminatory MIRU-VNTR to study compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in a low-tuberculosis prevalence setting. We spoligotyped the M. bovis isolates from two or more anatomic locations sampled from 55 animals on 39 independent farms. Compartmentalized infections, with two different strains infecting independent lymph nodes in the same animal, were found in six cases (10.9%). MIRU-VNTR analysis confirmed that the compartmentalization was strict and that only one strain was present in each infected node. MIRU-VNTR analysis of additional infected animals on one of the farms confirmed that the compartmentalized infection was a consequence of superinfection, since the two strains were independently infecting other animals. This same analysis revealed the emergence of a microevolved clonal variant in one of the lymph nodes of the compartmentalized animal. Clonal complexity must also be taken into consideration in M. bovis infection, even in low-prevalence settings, and analyses must be adapted to detect it and increase the accuracy of molecular epidemiology studies.

  7. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  8. In vivo compartmental analysis of leukocytes in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijesh V; Tatham, Kate C; Wilson, Michael R; O'Dea, Kieran P; Takata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The lung has a unique structure consisting of three functionally different compartments (alveolar, interstitial, and vascular) situated in an extreme proximity. Current methods to localize lung leukocytes using bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung perfusion have significant limitations for determination of location and phenotype of leukocytes. Here we present a novel method using in vivo antibody labeling to enable accurate compartmental localization/quantification and phenotyping of mouse lung leukocytes. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal labeling with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CD45 antibodies, and lung single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry. The combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal CD45 labeling enabled robust separation of the alveolar, interstitial, and vascular compartments of the lung. In naive mice, the alveolar compartment consisted predominantly of resident alveolar macrophages. The interstitial compartment, gated by events negative for both intratracheal and intravenous CD45 staining, showed two conventional dendritic cell populations, as well as a Ly6C(lo) monocyte population. Expression levels of MHCII on these interstitial monocytes were much higher than on the vascular Ly6C(lo) monocyte populations. In mice exposed to acid aspiration-induced lung injury, this protocol also clearly distinguished the three lung compartments showing the dynamic trafficking of neutrophils and exudative monocytes across the lung compartments during inflammation and resolution. This simple in vivo dual-labeling technique substantially increases the accuracy and depth of lung flow cytometric analysis, facilitates a more comprehensive examination of lung leukocyte pools, and enables the investigation of previously poorly defined "interstitial" leukocyte populations during models of inflammatory lung diseases.

  9. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    PubMed Central

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their “strange” behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs. PMID:24065978

  10. Compartmental intrathecal radioimmunotherapy: results for treatment for metastatic CNS neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Kim; Kushner, Brian H; Modak, Shakeel; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Smith-Jones, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John L; Xu, Hong; Wolden, Suzanne L; Souweidane, Mark M; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2010-05-01

    Innovation in the management of brain metastases is needed. We evaluated the addition of compartmental intrathecal antibody-based radioimmunotherapy (cRIT) in patients with recurrent metastatic central nervous system (CNS) neuroblastoma following surgery, craniospinal irradiation, and chemotherapy. Twenty one patients treated for recurrent neuroblastoma metastatic to the CNS, received a cRIT-containing salvage regimen incorporating intrathecal (131)I-monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) targeting GD2 or B7H3 following surgery and radiation. Most patients also received outpatient craniospinal irradiation, 3F8/GMCSF immunotherapy, 13-cis-retinoic acid and oral temozolomide for systemic control. Seventeen of 21 cRIT-salvage patients are alive 7-74 months (median 33 months) since CNS relapse, with all 17 remaining free of CNS neuroblastoma. One patient died of infection at 22 months with no evidence of disease at autopsy, and one of lung and bone marrow metastases at 15 months, and one of progressive bone marrow disease at 30 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen was well tolerated, notable for myelosuppression minimized by stem cell support (n = 5), and biochemical hypothyroidism (n = 5). One patient with a 7-year history of metastatic neuroblastoma is in remission from MLL-associated secondary leukemia. This is significantly improved to published results with non-cRIT based where relapsed CNS NB has a median time to death of approximately 6 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen for CNS metastases was well tolerated by young patients, despite their prior history of intensive cytotoxic therapies. It has the potential to increase survival with better than expected quality of life.

  11. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiwen; Liu, Jiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xianjun; Wang, Daxing; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious šC recovered) model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V), which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk) for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics. PMID:27233015

  12. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwen; Liu, Jiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xianjun; Wang, Daxing; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible—exposed—infectious šC recovered) model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V), which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk) for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics. PMID:27233015

  13. Mechanisms of salt tolerance in habanero pepper plants (Capsicum chinense Jacq.): Proline accumulation, ions dynamics and sodium root-shoot partition and compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bojórquez-Quintal, Emanuel; Velarde-Buendía, Ana; Ku-González, Ángela; Carillo-Pech, Mildred; Ortega-Camacho, Daniela; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana; Pottosin, Igor; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Despite its economic relevance, little is known about salt tolerance mechanisms in pepper plants. To address this question, we compared differences in responses to NaCl in two Capsicum chinense varieties: Rex (tolerant) and Chichen-Itza (sensitive). Under salt stress (150 mM NaCl over 7 days) roots of Rex variety accumulated 50 times more compatible solutes such as proline compared to Chichen-Itza. Mineral analysis indicated that Na+ is restricted to roots by preventing its transport to leaves. Fluorescence analysis suggested an efficient Na+ compartmentalization in vacuole-like structures and in small intracellular compartments in roots of Rex variety. At the same time, Na+ in Chichen-Itza plants was compartmentalized in the apoplast, suggesting substantial Na+ extrusion. Rex variety was found to retain more K+ in its roots under salt stress according to a mineral analysis and microelectrode ion flux estimation (MIFE). Vanadate-sensitive H+ efflux was higher in Chichen-Itza variety plants, suggesting a higher activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, which fuels the extrusion of Na+, and, possibly, also the re-uptake of K+. Our results suggest a combination of stress tolerance mechanisms, in order to alleviate the salt-induced injury. Furthermore, Na+ extrusion to apoplast does not appear to be an efficient strategy for salt tolerance in pepper plants. PMID:25429292

  14. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  15. Dual responsive nanogels for intracellular doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Hamed; Khoee, Sepideh

    2016-09-10

    Nanosized polymeric delivery systems that encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific intracellular stimulus are of promising interest for cancer therapy. Here, we demonstrated a simple and fast synthetic protocol of redox-responsive nanogels with high drug encapsulation efficiency and stability. The prepared nanogels displayed narrow size distributions and versatility of surface modification. The polymer precursor of these nanogels is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. The nanogels were prepared through a lock-in strategy in aqueous media via self cross-linking of PDS groups. By changing polymer concentration, we could control the size of nanogels in range of 80-115nm. The formed nanogels presented high doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulation efficiency (70% (w/w)) and displayed pH and redox-controlled drug release triggered by conditions mimicking the reducible intracellular environment. The nanogels displayed an excellent cytocompatibility and were effectively endocytosed by A2780CP ovarian cancer cells, which make them promising nanomaterials for the efficient intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27444549

  16. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  17. The role of extracellular conductivity profiles in compartmental models for neurons: particulars for layer 5 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Riera, Jorge; Enjieu-Kadji, Herve; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-07-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of technologies aimed at observing electric activity inside the brain, scientists have felt the urge to create proper links between intracellular- and extracellular-based experimental approaches. Biophysical models at both physical scales have been formalized under assumptions that impede the creation of such links. In this work, we address this issue by proposing a multicompartment model that allows the introduction of complex extracellular and intracellular resistivity profiles. This model accounts for the geometrical and electrotonic properties of any type of neuron through the combination of four devices: the integrator, the propagator, the 3D connector, and the collector. In particular, we applied this framework to model the tufted pyramidal cells of layer 5 (PCL5) in the neocortex. Our model was able to reproduce the decay and delay curves of backpropagating action potentials (APs) in this type of cell with better agreement with experimental data. We used the voltage drops of the extracellular resistances at each compartment to approximate the local field potentials generated by a PCL5 located in close proximity to linear microelectrode arrays. Based on the voltage drops produced by backpropagating APs, we were able to estimate the current multipolar moments generated by a PCL5. By adding external current sources in parallel to the extracellular resistances, we were able to create a sensitivity profile of PCL5 to electric current injections from nearby microelectrodes. In our model for PCL5, the kinetics and spatial profile of each ionic current were determined based on a literature survey, and the geometrical properties of these cells were evaluated experimentally. We concluded that the inclusion of the extracellular space in the compartmental models of neurons as an extra electrotonic medium is crucial for the accurate simulation of both the propagation of the electric potentials along the neuronal dendrites and the

  18. The role of extracellular conductivity profiles in compartmental models for neurons: particulars for layer 5 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Riera, Jorge; Enjieu-Kadji, Herve; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-07-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of technologies aimed at observing electric activity inside the brain, scientists have felt the urge to create proper links between intracellular- and extracellular-based experimental approaches. Biophysical models at both physical scales have been formalized under assumptions that impede the creation of such links. In this work, we address this issue by proposing a multicompartment model that allows the introduction of complex extracellular and intracellular resistivity profiles. This model accounts for the geometrical and electrotonic properties of any type of neuron through the combination of four devices: the integrator, the propagator, the 3D connector, and the collector. In particular, we applied this framework to model the tufted pyramidal cells of layer 5 (PCL5) in the neocortex. Our model was able to reproduce the decay and delay curves of backpropagating action potentials (APs) in this type of cell with better agreement with experimental data. We used the voltage drops of the extracellular resistances at each compartment to approximate the local field potentials generated by a PCL5 located in close proximity to linear microelectrode arrays. Based on the voltage drops produced by backpropagating APs, we were able to estimate the current multipolar moments generated by a PCL5. By adding external current sources in parallel to the extracellular resistances, we were able to create a sensitivity profile of PCL5 to electric current injections from nearby microelectrodes. In our model for PCL5, the kinetics and spatial profile of each ionic current were determined based on a literature survey, and the geometrical properties of these cells were evaluated experimentally. We concluded that the inclusion of the extracellular space in the compartmental models of neurons as an extra electrotonic medium is crucial for the accurate simulation of both the propagation of the electric potentials along the neuronal dendrites and the

  19. Na+ compartmentalization related to salinity stress tolerance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhen; He, Shoupu; Sun, Junling; Pan, Zhaoe; Gong, Wenfang; Lu, Yanli; Du, Xiongming

    2016-01-01

    The capacity for ion compartmentalization among different tissues and cells is the key mechanism regulating salt tolerance in plants. In this study, we investigated the ion compartmentalization capacity of two upland cotton genotypes with different salt tolerances under salt shock at the tissue, cell and molecular levels. We found that the leaf glandular trichome could secrete more salt ions in the salt-tolerant genotype than in the sensitive genotype, demonstrating the excretion of ions from tissue may be a new mechanism to respond to short-term salt shock. Furthermore, an investigation of the ion distribution demonstrated that the ion content was significantly lower in critical tissues and cells of the salt-tolerant genotype, indicating the salt-tolerant genotype had a greater capacity for ion compartmentalization in the shoot. By comparing the membrane H+-ATPase activity and the expression of ion transportation-related genes, we found that the H+-ATPase activity and Na+/H+ antiporter are the key factors determining the capacity for ion compartmentalization in leaves, which might further determine the salt tolerance of cotton. The novel function of the glandular trichome and the comparison of Na+ compartmentalization between two cotton genotypes with contrasting salt tolerances provide a new understanding of the salt tolerance mechanism in cotton. PMID:27698468

  20. Mechanisms of intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrew, K; McGann, L E

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of intracellular freezing in cells was investigated by designing experiments with cultured mouse fibroblasts on a cryomicroscope to critically assess the current hypotheses describing the genesis of intracellular ice: (a) intracellular freezing is a result of critical undercooling; (b) the cytoplasm is nucleated through aqueous pores in the plasma membrane; and (c) intracellular freezing is a result of membrane damage caused by electrical transients at the ice interface. The experimental data did not support any of these theories, but was consistent with the hypothesis that the plasma membrane is damaged at a critical gradient in osmotic pressure across the membrane, and intracellular freezing occurs as a result of this damage. An implication of this hypothesis is that mathematical models can be used to design protocols to avoid damaging gradients in osmotic pressure, allowing new approaches to the preservation of cells, tissues, and organs by rapid cooling. PMID:2306499

  1. Compartmentalization of incompatible reagents within Pickering emulsion droplets for one-pot cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengquan; Fu, Luman; Wei, Lijuan; Liang, Jifen; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-01-28

    It is a dream that future synthetic chemistry can mimic living systems to process multistep cascade reactions in a one-pot fashion. One of the key challenges is the mutual destruction of incompatible or opposing reagents, for example, acid and base, oxidants and reductants. A conceptually novel strategy is developed here to address this challenge. This strategy is based on a layered Pickering emulsion system, which is obtained through lamination of Pickering emulsions. In this working Pickering emulsion, the dispersed phase can separately compartmentalize the incompatible reagents to avoid their mutual destruction, while the continuous phase allows other reagent molecules to diffuse freely to access the compartmentalized reagents for chemical reactions. The compartmentalization effects and molecular transport ability of the Pickering emulsion were investigated. The deacetalization-reduction, deacetalization-Knoevenagel, deacetalization-Henry and diazotization-iodization cascade reactions demonstrate well the versatility and flexibility of our strategy in processing the one-pot cascade reactions involving mutually destructive reagents.

  2. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  3. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan.

  4. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  5. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  6. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... across-the-joint. This generic type of device is designed to achieve biological fixation to bone without... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... across-the-joint. This generic type of device is designed to achieve biological fixation to bone without... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  11. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm.

  12. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  13. Proton Fall or Bicarbonate Rise: GLYCOLYTIC RATE IN MOUSE ASTROCYTES IS PAVED BY INTRACELLULAR ALKALINIZATION.

    PubMed

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Weber, Tobias; Schmälzle, Jana; Ruminot, Ivàn; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-09-01

    Glycolysis is the primary step for major energy production in the cell. There is strong evidence suggesting that glucose consumption and rate of glycolysis are highly modulated by cytosolic pH/[H(+)], but those can also be stimulated by an increase in the intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Because proton and bicarbonate shift concomitantly, it remained unclear whether enhanced glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were mediated by the changes in intracellular [H(+)] or [HCO3 (-)]. We have asked whether glucose metabolism is enhanced by either a fall in intracellular [H(+)] or a rise in intracellular [HCO3 (-)], or by both, in mammalian astrocytes. We have recorded intracellular glucose in mouse astrocytes using a FRET-based nanosensor, while imposing different intracellular [H(+)] and [CO2]/[HCO3 (-)]. Glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were augmented by a fall in intracellular [H(+)], irrespective of a concomitant rise or fall in intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Transport of HCO3 (-) into and out of astrocytes by the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) played a crucial role in causing changes in intracellular pH and [HCO3 (-)], but was not obligatory for the pH-dependent changes in glucose metabolism. Our results clearly show that it is the cytosolic pH that modulates glucose metabolism in cortical astrocytes, and possibly also in other cell types. PMID:27422823

  14. Proton Fall or Bicarbonate Rise: GLYCOLYTIC RATE IN MOUSE ASTROCYTES IS PAVED BY INTRACELLULAR ALKALINIZATION.

    PubMed

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Weber, Tobias; Schmälzle, Jana; Ruminot, Ivàn; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-09-01

    Glycolysis is the primary step for major energy production in the cell. There is strong evidence suggesting that glucose consumption and rate of glycolysis are highly modulated by cytosolic pH/[H(+)], but those can also be stimulated by an increase in the intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Because proton and bicarbonate shift concomitantly, it remained unclear whether enhanced glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were mediated by the changes in intracellular [H(+)] or [HCO3 (-)]. We have asked whether glucose metabolism is enhanced by either a fall in intracellular [H(+)] or a rise in intracellular [HCO3 (-)], or by both, in mammalian astrocytes. We have recorded intracellular glucose in mouse astrocytes using a FRET-based nanosensor, while imposing different intracellular [H(+)] and [CO2]/[HCO3 (-)]. Glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were augmented by a fall in intracellular [H(+)], irrespective of a concomitant rise or fall in intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Transport of HCO3 (-) into and out of astrocytes by the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) played a crucial role in causing changes in intracellular pH and [HCO3 (-)], but was not obligatory for the pH-dependent changes in glucose metabolism. Our results clearly show that it is the cytosolic pH that modulates glucose metabolism in cortical astrocytes, and possibly also in other cell types.

  15. Water Diffusion, T2, and Compartmentation in Frog Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Sharon; Cory, David G.; Raymond, Stephen A.; Kirschner, Daniel A.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2010-01-01

    A potential relationship between structural compartments in neural tissue and NMR parameters may increase the specificity of MRI in diagnosing diseases. Nevertheless, our understanding of MR of nerves and white matter is limited, particularly the influence of various water compartments on the MR signal is not known. In this study, components of the 1H transverse relaxation decay curve in frog peripheral nerve were correlated with the diffusion characteristics of the water in the nerve. Three T2 values were identified with nerve. Water mobility was found to be unrestricted on the timescale of 100 msec in the component of the signal with the intermediate T2 time, suggesting some contribution from the interstitial space to this T2 component. Restricted diffusion was observed in the component with the longest T2 time, supporting the assignment of at least part of the spins contributing to this component to an intracellular compartment. The observed nonexponential behavior of the diffusion attenuation curves was investigated and shown to be potentially caused by the wide range of axon sizes in the nerve. PMID:10542350

  16. Ratiometric imaging of pH probes.

    PubMed

    Grillo-Hill, Bree K; Webb, Bradley A; Barber, Diane L

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular pH can be readily accomplished using tools and methods described in this chapter. We present a discussion of technical considerations of various ratiometric pH-sensitive probes including dyes and genetically encoded sensors. These probes can be used to measure pH across physical scales from macroscopic whole-mount tissues down to organelles and subcellular domains. We describe protocols for loading pH-sensitive probes into single cells or tissues and discuss ratiometric image acquisition and analysis.

  17. A-kinase anchoring proteins: cAMP compartmentalization in neurodegenerative and obstructive pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, W J; Muñoz-Llancao, P; González-Billault, C; Schmidt, M

    2014-01-01

    The universal second messenger cAMP is generated upon stimulation of Gs protein-coupled receptors, such as the β2-adreneoceptor, and leads to the activation of PKA, the major cAMP effector protein. PKA oscillates between an on and off state and thereby regulates a plethora of distinct biological responses. The broad activation pattern of PKA and its contribution to several distinct cellular functions lead to the introduction of the concept of compartmentalization of cAMP. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are of central importance due to their unique ability to directly and/or indirectly interact with proteins that either determine the cellular content of cAMP, such as β2-adrenoceptors, ACs and PDEs, or are regulated by cAMP such as the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. We report on lessons learned from neurons indicating that maintenance of cAMP compartmentalization by AKAP5 is linked to neurotransmission, learning and memory. Disturbance of cAMP compartments seem to be linked to neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease. We translate this knowledge to compartmentalized cAMP signalling in the lung. Next to AKAP5, we focus here on AKAP12 and Ezrin (AKAP78). These topics will be highlighted in the context of the development of novel pharmacological interventions to tackle AKAP-dependent compartmentalization. PMID:25132049

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    Fire-resistance rated (or area separation) wall assemblies present a great difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. To address this challenge, Building Science Corporation partnered with builder K. Hovnanian Homes to determine whether taping exterior sheathing details improves air sealing in townhouse and multifamily construction, and to better understand air leakage pathways.

  19. Beyond Compartmentalization: A Relational Approach towards Agency and Vulnerability of Young Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huijsmans, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Based on fieldwork material from Lao People's Democratic Republic, this paper introduces an analytical framework that transcends compartmentalized approaches towards migration involving young people. The notions of fluid and institutionalized forms of migration illuminate key differences and commonalities in the relational fabric underpinning…

  20. Origin of reservoir compartmentalization in Lower Ordovician Karstic Dolostones, Ellenburger Group, West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerans, C.

    1988-01-01

    Ellenburger Group reservoirs constitute a major play in the Permian basin of west Texas, with over 1.4 billion bbl cumulative production through 1985. These reservoirs typically have been developed by assuming homogeneous fracture-related pore system. Examination of core, log, and production data demonstrates that most Ellenburger reservoirs are characterized by pronounced vertical and lateral heterogeneities created by post-Ellenburger karst development. Vertical reservoir compartmentalization in the Ellenburger evolved from development of a laterally extensive cave system between 100 and 300 ft beneath the original land surface. Caves were filled by relatively impermeable siliciclastics from the overlying Simpson Group, effectively isolating permeable cave-roof breccias (uppermost Ellenburger) from collapse breccias deposited on cave floors prior to shale infill. Lateral compartmentalization of Ellenburger reservoirs originated by localized collapse of the cave system both during karst formation and after burial. In the Shafter Lake field, lateral compartmentalization is the result of a 200-ft vertical collapse during deposition of Simpson Group sands. Abrupt lateral discontinuities in the Big Lake and Glasco fields may represent similar collapse-related features, such as are spectacularly displayed in Ellenburger-equivalent outcrops of the Franklin Mountains. An estimated 750 million bbl of remaining mobile oil, in addition to conventional reserves, occurs in this mature but complexly compartmentalized play. Considering this paleokarst model will aid in further exploitation of Ellenburger reservoirs.

  1. Krebs cycle metabolon formation: metabolite concentration gradient enhanced compartmentation of sequential enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Pelster, Lindsey N; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-01-25

    Dynamics of metabolon formation in mitochondria was probed by studying diffusional motion of two sequential Krebs cycle enzymes in a microfluidic channel. Enhanced directional co-diffusion of both enzymes against a substrate concentration gradient was observed in the presence of intermediate generation. This reveals a metabolite directed compartmentation of metabolic pathways.

  2. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  3. Crystal structure of an intracellular protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii at 2-Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xinlin; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Wang, Weiru; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PH1704) and PfpI from Pyrococcus furiosus are members of a class of intracellular proteases that have no sequence homology to any other known protease family. We report the crystal structure of PH1704 at 2.0-Å resolution. The protease is tentatively identified as a cysteine protease based on the presence of cysteine (residue 100) in a nucleophile elbow motif. In the crystal, PH1704 forms a hexameric ring structure, and the active sites are formed at the interfaces between three pairs of monomers. PMID:11114201

  4. The paraveinal mesophyll of soybean leaves in relation to assimilate transfer and compartmentation : I. Ultrastructure and histochemistry during vegetative development.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, V R; Giaquinta, R T

    1983-04-01

    The paraveinal mesophyll (PVM) is a unique and specialized, one-cell-thick tissue spanning the vascular bundles at the level of the phloem in soybean (Glycine max) (L.) Merr.) leaves. Its position within the leaf dictates that all photosynthate produced in the palisade and spongy mesophyll must pass through this specialized layer enroute to the phloem. Symplastic continuity, via plasmodesmata, exists between the PVM and bundle sheath, palisade parenchyma and spongy mesophyll. During leaf ontogeny the PVM is the first tissue to differentiate and at maturity these cells are six to eight times larger than other mesophyll cells, are highly vacuolate, and are interconnected by tubular arms. The PVM undergoes several unique structural and metabolic modifications during leaf development. The PVM cytoplasm, in vegetative plants, is dense, enriched in rough endoplasmic reticulum and dictyosomes, but contains few, small starch-free chloroplasts and few microbodies. Unlike the tonoplast of mesophyll cells, the tonoplast of the PVM is unusually thick and dense-staining. During leaf development the vacuoles of PVM cells accumulate a glycoprotein derived from the dictyosomes which reacts with the protein staining reagents, mercuric bromophenol blue and sulfaflavine, and is degraded by Pronase. Both the vacuolar material and tonoplast are also stained by phosphotungstic acid, which at low pH is relatively selective for glycoprotein. A unique role of the PVM in the transport and compartmentation of nitrogen reserves in soybeans is discussed.

  5. Compartmentalization of the deep cerebellar nuclei based on afferent projections and aldolase C expression.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Izumi

    2011-09-01

    The distribution of aldolase C (zebrin II)-positive and -negative Purkinje cells (PCs) can be used to define about 20 longitudinally extended compartments in the cerebellar cortex of the rat, which may correspond to certain aspects of cerebellar functional localization. An equivalent compartmental organization may exist in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). This DCN compartmentalization is primarily represented by the afferent projection pattern in the DCN. PC projections and collateral nuclear projections of olivocerebellar climbing fiber axons have a relatively localized terminal arbor in the DCN. Projections of these axons make a closed olivo-cortico-nuclear circuit to connect a longitudinal stripe-shaped cortical compartment to a small subarea in the DCN, which can be defined as a DCN compartment. The actual DCN compartmentalization, which has been revealed by systematically mapping these projections, is quite different from the cortical compartmentalization. The stripe-shaped alternation of aldolase C-positive and -negative narrow longitudinal compartments in the cerebellar cortex is transformed to the separate clustering of positive and negative compartments in the caudoventral and rostrodorsal DCN, respectively. The distinctive projection of aldolase C-positive and -negative PCs to the caudoventral and rostrodorsal DCN underlies this transformation. Accordingly, the medial cerebellar nucleus is divided into the rostrodorsal aldolase C-negative and caudoventral aldolase C-positive parts. The anterior and posterior interposed nuclei generally correspond to the aldolase C-negative and -positive parts, respectively. DCN compartmentalization is important for understanding functional localization in the DCN since it is speculated that aldolase C-positive and -negative compartments are generally associated with somatosensory and other functions, respectively. PMID:20981512

  6. Elevated compartmentalization of Na+ into vacuoles improves salt and cold stress tolerance in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Fan, Weijuan; Deng, Gaifang; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Salinity and low temperature are the main limiting factors for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) growth and agricultural productivity. Various studies have shown that plant NHX-type antiporter plays a crucial role in regulating plant tolerance to salt stress by intracellular Na(+) compartmentalization. The Arabidopsis thaliana AtNHX1 gene that encodes a vacuolar Na(+) /H(+) antiporter was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Xushu-22 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to confer abiotic stress tolerance. Stable insertion of AtNHX1 into the sweet potato genome and its expression was confirmed by Southern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A remarkably higher Na(+) /H(+) exchange activity of tonoplast membrane from transgenic sweet potato lines (NOE) in comparison with wild-type (WT) plants confirmed the vacuolar antiporter function in mediating Na(+) /H(+) exchange. Under salt stress, NOE plants accumulated higher Na(+) and K(+) levels in their tissues compared with WT plants, maintaining high K(+) /Na(+) ratios. Consequently, NOE plants showed enhanced protection against cell damage due to the increased proline accumulation, preserved cell membrane integrity, enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging (e.g. increased superoxide dismutase activity), and reduced H2 O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Moreover, the transgenic plants showed improved cold tolerance through multiple mechanisms of action, revealing the first molecular evidence for NHX1 function in cold response. The transgenic plants showed better biomass production and root yield under stressful conditions. These findings demonstrate that overexpressing AtNHX1 in sweet potato renders the crop tolerant to both salt and cold stresses, providing a greater capacity for the use of AtNHX1 in improving crop performance under combined abiotic stress conditions.

  7. Development of In Vitro-In Vivo Correlation/Relationship Modeling Approaches for Immediate Release Formulations Using Compartmental Dynamic Dissolution Data from “Golem”: A Novel Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Čulen, Martin; Tuszyński, Paweł K.; Polak, Sebastian; Jachowicz, Renata; Mendyk, Aleksander; Dohnal, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Different batches of atorvastatin, represented by two immediate release formulation designs, were studied using a novel dynamic dissolution apparatus, simulating stomach and small intestine. A universal dissolution method was employed which simulated the physiology of human gastrointestinal tract, including the precise chyme transit behavior and biorelevant conditions. The multicompartmental dissolution data allowed direct observation and qualitative discrimination of the differences resulting from highly pH dependent dissolution behavior of the tested batches. Further evaluation of results was performed using IVIVC/IVIVR development. While satisfactory correlation could not be achieved using a conventional deconvolution based-model, promising results were obtained through the use of a nonconventional approach exploiting the complex compartmental dissolution data. PMID:26120580

  8. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  9. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  10. Hybrid stochastic simulations of intracellular reaction-diffusion systems

    PubMed Central

    Kalantzis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    With the observation that stochasticity is important in biological systems, chemical kinetics have begun to receive wider interest. While the use of Monte Carlo discrete event simulations most accurately capture the variability of molecular species, they become computationally costly for complex reaction-diffusion systems with large populations of molecules. On the other hand, continuous time models are computationally efficient but they fail to capture any variability in the molecular species. In this study a novel hybrid stochastic approach is introduced for simulating reaction-diffusion systems. We developed a dynamic partitioning strategy using fractional propensities. In that way processes with high frequency are simulated mostly with deterministic rate-based equations, and those with low frequency mostly with the exact stochastic algorithm of Gillespie. In this way we preserve the stochastic behavior of cellular pathways while being able to apply it to large populations of molecules. In this article we describe this hybrid algorithmic approach, and we demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency compared with the Gillespie algorithm for two different systems. First, a model of intracellular viral kinetics with two steady states and second, a compartmental model of the postsynaptic spine head for studying the dynamics of Ca+2 and NMDA receptors. PMID:19414282

  11. Intracellular Energetic Units regulate metabolism in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Saks, Valdur; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Gonzalez-Granillo, Marcela; Tepp, Kersti; Timohhina, Natalja; Karu-Varikmaa, Minna; Kaambre, Tuuli; Dos Santos, Pierre; Boucher, François; Guzun, Rita

    2012-02-01

    This review describes developments in historical perspective as well as recent results of investigations of cellular mechanisms of regulation of energy fluxes and mitochondrial respiration by cardiac work - the metabolic aspect of the Frank-Starling law of the heart. A Systems Biology solution to this problem needs the integration of physiological and biochemical mechanisms that take into account intracellular interactions of mitochondria with other cellular systems, in particular with cytoskeleton components. Recent data show that different tubulin isotypes are involved in the regular arrangement exhibited by mitochondria and ATP-consuming systems into Intracellular Energetic Units (ICEUs). Beta II tubulin association with the mitochondrial outer membrane, when co-expressed with mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) specifically limits the permeability of voltage-dependent anion channel for adenine nucleotides. In the MtCK reaction this interaction changes the regulatory kinetics of respiration through a decrease in the affinity for adenine nucleotides and an increase in the affinity for creatine. Metabolic Control Analysis of the coupled MtCK-ATP Synthasome in permeabilized cardiomyocytes showed a significant increase in flux control by steps involved in ADP recycling. Mathematical modeling of compartmentalized energy transfer represented by ICEUs shows that cyclic changes in local ADP, Pi, phosphocreatine and creatine concentrations during contraction cycle represent effective metabolic feedback signals when amplified in the coupled non-equilibrium MtCK-ATP Synthasome reactions in mitochondria. This mechanism explains the regulation of respiration on beat to beat basis during workload changes under conditions of metabolic stability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes." PMID:21816155

  12. Intracellular sources of ornithine for polyamine synthesis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Meininger, Cynthia J; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-10-01

    Polyamines are essential for proliferation of endothelial cells (EC) and angiogenesis. This study was conducted to identify the metabolic source(s) of ornithine for polyamine synthesis in EC, using N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (Nor-NOHA, an inhibitor of arginase) and gabaculine (an inhibitor of ornithine aminotransferase; OAT). Nor-NOHA inhibited arginase with an IC50 value of 10 µM for intact EC. Nor-NOHA (0.5 mM) alone inhibited arginase activity in EC by 98 %, increased total cellular concentrations of arginine by 14 %, and decreased total cellular concentrations of ornithine, putrescine and spermidine by 17, 65 and 74 %, respectively. Arginine and glutamine contributed to 73 and 26 % of the ornithine produced by EC, respectively. Gabaculine (1 mM) alone decreased the total cellular concentrations of arginine, ornithine, putrescine, and spermidine by 14, 96, 32, and 42 %, respectively. A combination of both Nor-NOHA and gabaculine completely blocked ornithine production in EC, resulting in no detectable cellular ornithine and almost complete depletion of cellular putrescine and spermidine. Addition of 0.5 mM ornithine restored the intracellular concentrations of polyamines in EC treated with Nor-NOHA plus gabaculine, indicating that Nor-NOHA and gabaculine did not inhibit ornithine decarboxylase activity. Our results suggest that the arginase and OAT pathways are the exclusive sources of ornithine in EC when there is little extracellular ornithine and that there is intracellular compartmentalization of arginine and ornithine for endothelial synthesis of polyamines.  These novel findings may have important implications for improving placental vascular growth, wound healing, and cancer therapy.

  13. The effect of simultaneous internal tamponade on fluid compartmentalization and its relationship to cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    De Molfetta, V; Bottoni, F; Arpa, P; Vinciguerra, P; Zenoni, S

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether the residual free spaces within the vitreous chamber that result after vitreoretinal surgery and internal tamponade may be avoided, and to verify whether such compartmentalization is of real importance in the recurrence of postoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the use of simultaneous double filling with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosilicone (FSiO) in the repair of complicated retinal detachment is evaluated in 12 selected cases. Initial retinal reattachment was achieved in all cases. PVR recurred in 10 patients (83%), 6 of whom showed partial retinal detachment. Inferior and superior postoperative residual free spaces were abolished by this procedure, but a new residual fluid space was created, lying horizontally between the bubbles and expanding in a triangular shape nasal to the optic disc and temporal to the macula. Overall, 9 of 10 eyes with PVR after surgery had proliferation involving these areas. These findings support the concept that compartmentalization is of major importance in determining postoperative cell proliferation.

  14. The MATCHIT Automaton: Exploiting Compartmentalization for the Synthesis of Branched Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Weyland, Mathias S.; Fellermann, Harold; Hadorn, Maik; Sorek, Daniel; Lancet, Doron; Rasmussen, Steen; Füchslin, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an automaton, a theoretical framework that demonstrates how to improve the yield of the synthesis of branched chemical polymer reactions. This is achieved by separating substeps of the path of synthesis into compartments. We use chemical containers (chemtainers) to carry the substances through a sequence of fixed successive compartments. We describe the automaton in mathematical terms and show how it can be configured automatically in order to synthesize a given branched polymer target. The algorithm we present finds an optimal path of synthesis in linear time. We discuss how the automaton models compartmentalized structures found in cells, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, and we show how this compartmentalization can be exploited for the synthesis of branched polymers such as oligosaccharides. Lastly, we show examples of artificial branched polymers and discuss how the automaton can be configured to synthesize them with maximal yield. PMID:24489601

  15. Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.D.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Recurrent basement faulting is the primary controlling mechanism for aligning and compartmentalizing upper Cretaceous aged tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan and Piceance Basins. Northwest trending structural lineaments that formed in conjunction with the Uncompahgre Highlands have profoundly influenced sedimentation trends and created boundaries for gas migration; sealing and compartmentalizing sedimentary packages in both basins. Fractures which formed over the structural lineaments provide permeability pathways which allowing gas recovery from otherwise tight gas reservoirs. Structural alignments and associated reservoir compartments have been accurately targeted by integrating advanced remote sensing imagery, high resolution aeromagnetics, seismic interpretation, stratigraphic mapping and dynamic structural modelling. This unifying methodology is a powerful tool for exploration geologists and is also a systematic approach to tight gas resource assessment in frontier basins.

  16. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  17. Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages: mimicking cellular compartmentalization for the engineering of functional proteins

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Liisa D.; Colin, Pierre-Yves; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The idea of compartmentalization of genotype and phenotype in cells is key for enabling Darwinian evolution. This contribution describes bioinspired systems that use in vitro compartments—water-in-oil droplets and gel-shell beads—for the directed evolution of functional proteins. Technologies based on these principles promise to provide easier access to protein-based therapeutics, reagents for processes involving enzyme catalysis, parts for synthetic biology and materials with biological components. PMID:26464791

  18. The effect of body position on compartmental intra-abdominal pressure following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Current assumptions rely on intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) being uniform across the abdominal cavity. The abdominal contents are, however, a heterogeneous mix of solid, liquid and gas, and pressure transmission may not be uniform. The current study examines the upper and lower IAP following liver transplantation. Methods IAP was measured directly via intra-peritoneal catheters placed at the liver and outside the bladder. Compartmental pressure data were recorded at 10-min intervals for up to 72 h following surgery, and the effect of intermittent posture change on compartmental pressures was also studied. Pelvic intra-peritoneal pressure was compared to intra-bladder pressure measured via a FoleyManometer. Results A significant variation in upper and lower IAP of 18% was observed with a range of differences of 0 to 16 mmHg. A sustained difference in inter-compartmental pressure of 4 mmHg or more was present for 23% of the study time. Head-up positioning at 30° provided a protective effect on upper intra-abdominal pressure, resulting in a significant reduction in all patients. There was excellent agreement between intra-bladder and pelvic pressure. Conclusions A clinically significant variation in inter-compartmental pressure exists following liver transplantation, which can be manipulated by changes to body position. The existence of regional pressure differences suggests that IAP monitoring at the bladder alone may under-diagnose intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in these patients. The upper and lower abdomen may need to be considered as separate entities in certain conditions. PMID:22873413

  19. Combined Noninvasive Imaging and Modeling Approaches Reveal Metabolic Compartmentation in the Barley Endosperm[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rolletschek, Hardy; Melkus, Gerd; Grafahrend-Belau, Eva; Fuchs, Johannes; Heinzel, Nicolas; Schreiber, Falk; Jakob, Peter M.; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    The starchy endosperm of cereals is a priori taken as a metabolically uniform tissue. By applying a noninvasive assay based on 13C/1H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains, we uncovered metabolic compartmentation in the endosperm. 13C-Suc feeding during grain filling showed that the primary site of Ala synthesis was the central region of the endosperm, the part of the caryopsis experiencing the highest level of hypoxia. Region-specific metabolism in the endosperm was characterized by flux balance analysis (FBA) and metabolite profiling. FBA predicts that in the central region of the endosperm, the tricarboxylic acid cycle shifts to a noncyclic mode, accompanied by elevated glycolytic flux and the accumulation of Ala. The metabolic compartmentation within the endosperm is advantageous for the grain's carbon and energy economy, with a prominent role being played by Ala aminotransferase. An investigation of caryopses with a genetically perturbed tissue pattern demonstrated that Ala accumulation is a consequence of oxygen status, rather than being either tissue specific or dependent on the supply of Suc. Hence the 13C-Ala gradient can be used as an in vivo marker for hypoxia. The combination of MRI and metabolic modeling offers opportunities for the noninvasive analysis of metabolic compartmentation in plants. PMID:21856793

  20. The mechanics of cellular compartmentalization as a model for tumor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Pawlizak, Steve; Zink, Mareike; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Based on a recently developed surgical method of Michael H"ockel, which makes use of cellular confinement to compartments in the human body, we study the mechanics of the process of cell segregation. Compartmentalization is a fundamental process of cellular organization and occurs during embryonic development. A simple model system can demonstrate the process of compartmentalization: When two populations of suspended cells are mixed, this mixture will eventually segregate into two phases, whereas mixtures of the same cell type will not. In the 1960s, Malcolm S. Steinberg formulated the so-called differential adhesion hypothesis which explains the segregation in the model system and the process of compartmentalization by differences in surface tension and adhesiveness of the interacting cells. We are interested in to which extend the same physical principles affect tumor growth and spreading between compartments. For our studies, we use healthy and cancerous breast cell lines of different malignancy as well as primary cells from human cervix carcinoma. We apply a set of techniques to study their mechanical properties and interactions. The Optical Stretcher is used for whole cell rheology, while Cell-cell-adhesion forces are directly measured with a modified AFM. In combination with 3D segregation experiments in droplet cultures we try to clarify the role of surface tension in tumor spreading.

  1. Verification of Compartmental Epidemiological Models using Metamorphic Testing, Model Checking and Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Steed, Chad A; Pullum, Laura L

    2012-01-01

    Compartmental models in epidemiology are widely used as a means to model disease spread mechanisms and understand how one can best control the disease in case an outbreak of a widespread epidemic occurs. However, a significant challenge within the community is in the development of approaches that can be used to rigorously verify and validate these models. In this paper, we present an approach to rigorously examine and verify the behavioral properties of compartmen- tal epidemiological models under several common modeling scenarios including birth/death rates and multi-host/pathogen species. Using metamorphic testing, a novel visualization tool and model checking, we build a workflow that provides insights into the functionality of compartmental epidemiological models. Our initial results indicate that metamorphic testing can be used to verify the implementation of these models and provide insights into special conditions where these mathematical models may fail. The visualization front-end allows the end-user to scan through a variety of parameters commonly used in these models to elucidate the conditions under which an epidemic can occur. Further, specifying these models using a process algebra allows one to automatically construct behavioral properties that can be rigorously verified using model checking. Taken together, our approach allows for detecting implementation errors as well as handling conditions under which compartmental epidemiological models may fail to provide insights into disease spread dynamics.

  2. Diminished viral replication and compartmentalization of hepatitis C virus in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Harouaka, Djamila; Engle, Ronald E.; Wollenberg, Kurt; Diaz, Giacomo; Tice, Ashley B.; Zamboni, Fausto; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Alter, Harvey; Kleiner, David E.; Farci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and quasispecies distribution within the tumor of patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can provide insight into the role of HCV in hepatocarcinogenesis and, conversely, the effect of HCC on the HCV lifecycle. In a comprehensive study of serum and multiple liver specimens from patients with HCC who underwent liver transplantation, we found a sharp and significant decrease in HCV RNA in the tumor compared with surrounding nontumorous tissues, but found no differences in multiple areas of control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Diminished HCV replication was not associated with changes in miR-122 expression. HCV genetic diversity was significantly higher in livers containing HCC compared with control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Tracking of individual variants demonstrated changes in the viral population between tumorous and nontumorous areas, the extent of which correlated with the decline in HCV RNA, suggesting HCV compartmentalization within the tumor. In contrast, compartmentalization was not observed between nontumorous areas and serum, or in controls between different areas of the cirrhotic liver or between liver and serum. Our findings indicate that HCV replication within the tumor is restricted and compartmentalized, suggesting segregation of specific viral variants in malignant hepatocytes. PMID:26787866

  3. Intracellular mechanisms of lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is associated with the appearance of an intracellular factor (ADR) that can induce DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR plays a role in the sequence of intracellular events leading to activation for IL-2-mediated proliferation. Because of the nature of the defining assay, the locus of ADR action appears to be near the terminal end of the transduction pathway. Interestingly, although lymphocytes from aged individuals respond poorly to proliferative stimuli, they appear to produce normal to above-normal levels of ADR. In contrast, their nuclei are only poorly responsive to stimulation by ADR. Preparations rich in ADR activity have proteolytic activity as well. In addition, aprotinin, as well as a variety of other protease inhibitors, suppresses ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by absorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads, and can be removed from the beads by elution at pH 5.0. This latter suggests that ADR itself is a protease. However, its endogenous substrate is not yet known. We have also detected an inhibitor of ADR activity in the cytoplasm of resting lymphocytes. This is a heat-stable protein of approximately 60,000 Da. In addition to suppressing the interaction of ADR with quiescent nuclei, the inhibitor can suppress DNA synthetic activity of replicative nuclei isolated from mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Interestingly, these preparations had little or no activity on replicative nuclei derived from several neoplastic cell lines. The resistance of tumor cell nuclei to spontaneously occurring cytoplasmic inhibitory factors such as the one described here may provide one explanation for the loss of growth control in neoplastic cells. PMID:2642767

  4. Magnetic tweezers for intracellular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosu, Basarab G.; Jakab, Károly; Bánki, Péter; Tóth, Ferenc I.; Forgacs, Gabor

    2003-09-01

    We have designed and constructed a versatile magnetic tweezer primarily for intracellular investigations. The micromanipulator uses only two coils to simultaneously magnetize to saturation micron-size superparamagnetic particles and generate high magnitude constant field gradients over cellular dimensions. The apparatus resembles a miniaturized Faraday balance, an industrial device used to measure magnetic susceptibility. The device operates in both continuous and pulse modes. Due to its compact size, the tweezers can conveniently be mounted on the stage of an inverted microscope and used for intracellular manipulations. A built-in temperature control unit maintains the sample at physiological temperatures. The operation of the tweezers was tested by moving 1.28 μm diameter magnetic beads inside macrophages with forces near 500 pN.

  5. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in the Basic Protocol. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM). PMID:24894836

  6. G protein coupled receptor signaled apoptosis is associated with activation of a cation insensitive acidic endonuclease and intracellular acidification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Srikant, C B

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis associated oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA can result from the activation of endonucleases that exhibit different pH optima and are either sensitive or insensitive to divalent cations. DNA fragmentation due to activation of cation sensitive endonucleases occurs in the absence of a change in intracellular pH whereas intracellular acidification is a feature of apoptosis characterized by activation of cation insensitive acidic endonuclease. We have reported earlier that somatostatin (SST) induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis is signaled in a receptor subtype selective manner uniquely via human somatostatin receptor subtype 3 (hSSTR3). In the present study we investigated the pH dependence and cation sensitivity of endonuclease induced in hSSTR3 expressing CHO-K1 cells by the SST agonist octreotide (OCT) and its effect on intracellular pH. We show that OCT induced apoptosis is associated with selective stimulation of a divalent cation insensitive acidic endonuclease. The intracellular pH of of cells undergoing OCT induced apoptosis was 0.9 pH units lower than that of control cells. The effect of OCT on endonuclease and pH was inhibited by orthovanadate as well as by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, suggesting that hSSTR3 initiated cytotoxic signaling is protein tyrosine phosphatase mediated and is G protein dependent. These findings suggest that intracellular acidification and activation of acidic endonuclease mediate wild type p53 associated apoptosis signaled by hormones acting via G protein coupled receptors.

  7. Intracellular calcium channels in protozoa.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N J; Plattner, Helmut

    2014-09-15

    Ca(2+)-signaling pathways and intracellular Ca(2+) channels are present in protozoa. Ancient origin of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and other intracellular channels predates the divergence of animals and fungi as evidenced by their presence in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, the closest known relative to metazoans. The first protozoan IP3R cloned, from the ciliate Paramecium, displays strong sequence similarity to the rat type 3 IP3R. This ciliate has a large number of IP3- and ryanodine(Ry)-like receptors in six subfamilies suggesting the evolutionary adaptation to local requirements for an expanding diversification of vesicle trafficking. IP3Rs have also been functionally characterized in trypanosomatids, where they are essential for growth, differentiation, and establishment of infection. The presence of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in a number of protozoa indicates that mitochondrial regulation of Ca(2+) signaling is also an early appearance in evolution, and contributed to the discovery of the molecular nature of this channel in mammalian cells. There is only sequence evidence for the occurrence of two-pore channels (TPCs), transient receptor potential Ca(2+) channels (TRPCs) and intracellular mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-channels in Paramecium and in parasitic protozoa.

  8. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  9. Intracellular Calcium Channels in Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N.J.; Plattner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-signaling pathways and intracellular Ca2+ channels are present in protozoa. Ancient origin of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and other intracellular channels predates the divergence of animals and fungi as evidenced by their presence in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, the closest known relative to metazoans. The first protozoan IP3R cloned, from the ciliate Paramecium, displays strong sequence similarity to the rat type 3 IP3R. This ciliate has a large number of IP3- and ryanodine(Ry)-like receptors in 6 subfamilies suggesting the evolutionary adaptation to local requirements for an expanding diversification of vesicle trafficking. IP3Rs have also been functionally characterized in trypanosomatids, where they are essential for growth, differentiation, and establishment of infection. The presence of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in a number of protozoa indicates that mitochondrial regulation of Ca2+ signaling is also an early appearance in evolution, and contributed to the discovery of the molecular nature of this channel in mammalian cells. There is only sequence evidence for the occurrence of two-pore channels (TPCs), transient receptor potential Ca2+ channels (TRPCs) and intracellular mechanosensitive Ca2+-channels in Paramecium and in parasitic protozoa. PMID:24291099

  10. Lipidomics Analyses Reveal Temporal and Spatial Lipid Organization and Uncover Daily Oscillations in Intracellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Kopelman, Naama; Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Zwighaft, Ziv; Elimelech, Meytar; Adamovich, Yaarit; Golik, Marina; Wang, Chunyan; Han, Xianlin; Asher, Gad

    2016-05-19

    Cells have evolved mechanisms to handle incompatible processes through temporal organization by circadian clocks and by spatial compartmentalization within organelles defined by lipid bilayers. Recent advances in lipidomics have led to identification of plentiful lipid species, yet our knowledge regarding their spatiotemporal organization is lagging behind. In this study, we quantitatively characterized the nuclear and mitochondrial lipidome in mouse liver throughout the day, upon different feeding regimens, and in clock-disrupted mice. Our analyses revealed potential connections between lipid species within and between lipid classes. Remarkably, we uncovered diurnal oscillations in lipid accumulation in the nucleus and mitochondria. These oscillations exhibited opposite phases and readily responded to feeding time. Furthermore, we found that the circadian clock coordinates the phase relation between the organelles. In summary, our study provides temporal and spatial depiction of lipid organization and reveals the presence and coordination of diurnal rhythmicity in intracellular organelles. PMID:27161994

  11. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  12. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  13. Intracellular Unbound Atorvastatin Concentrations in the Presence of Metabolism and Transport.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Priyanka; Korzekwa, Kenneth; Nagar, Swati

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of drug target activity and rational dosing regimen design require knowledge of drug concentrations at the target. It is important to understand the impact of processes such as membrane permeability, partitioning, and active transport on intracellular drug concentrations. The present study aimed to predict intracellular unbound atorvastatin concentrations and characterize the effect of enzyme-transporter interplay on these concentrations. Single-pass liver perfusion studies were conducted in rats using atorvastatin (ATV, 1 µM) alone at 4°C and at 37°C in presence of rifampin (RIF, 20 µM) and 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, 1 mM), separately and in combination. The unbound intracellular ATV concentration was predicted with a five-compartment explicit membrane model using the parameterized diffusional influx clearance, active basolateral uptake clearance, and metabolic clearance. Chemical inhibition of uptake and metabolism at 37°C proved to be better controls relative to studies at 4°C. The predicted unbound intracellular concentration at the end of the 50-minute perfusion in the +ABT , +ABT+RIF, and the ATV-only groups was 6.5 µM, 0.58 µM, and 5.14 µM, respectively. The predicted total liver concentrations and amount recovered in bile were within 0.94-1.3 fold of the observed value in all groups. The fold difference in total liver concentration did not always extrapolate to the fold difference in predicted unbound concentration across groups. Together, these results support the use of compartmental modeling to predict intracellular concentrations in dynamic organ-based systems. These predictions can provide insight into the role of uptake transporters and metabolizing enzymes in determining drug tissue concentrations. PMID:27451408

  14. An extension to the compartmental model of type 1 diabetic patients to reproduce exercise periods with glycogen depletion and replenishment.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ordoñez, M; Campos-Delgado, D U

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present the main interactions promoted by exercise and synthesize them into mathematical equations. It is intended to extend the ability of the compartmental glucose-insulin model introduced by Sorensen [1985. A physiologic model of glucose metabolism in man and its use to design and assess improved insulin therapies for diabetes. Ph.D. Dissertation, Chemical Engineering Department, MIT, Cambridge] to reproduce variations in the blood glucose concentration induced by exercise in diabetic patients and to complement the previous work by Lenart and Parker [2002. Modeling exercise effects in type I diabetic patients. In: Proceedings of the 15th Triennial World Congress, Barcelona, Spain] and Lenart, DiMascio and Parker [2002. Modeling glycogen-exercise interactions in type I diabetic patients. In: Proceedings of the A.I.Ch.E. Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN]. The immediate consequences of exercise are incorporated in this research: redistribution of blood flows, increments in peripheral glucose and insulin uptakes, and increment in hepatic glucose production. The extended model was verified with experimental data for light and moderate intensity exercise. In addition, data extrapolation was introduced to simulate heavy intensity exercise. The hepatic glycogen reservoir limits the peripheral glucose uptake for prolonged exercise. Therefore, the depletion and replenishment of hepatic glycogen were modeled, looking to reproduce the blood glucose levels for a type 1 diabetic patient during a normal day, with meal intakes, insulin infusions and/or boluses, and a predefined exercise regime. From the extensive simulation evaluation, it is found that the new exercise model provides a good approximation to the available experimental data from literature.

  15. Mechanisms of pH regulation in lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nikinmaa, M; Kunnamo-Ojala, T; Railo, E

    1986-05-01

    Mechanisms regulating the red cell pH in lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) were studied using the ammonium chloride prepulse technique. The cells were initially incubated in a physiological saline containing 20 mmol l-1 ammonium chloride, and intracellular pH measured with the DMO technique. Ammonium chloride was then rapidly removed by centrifugation, and the changes in the intracellular pH followed. The intraerythrocytic pH is primarily regulated by an amiloride-sensitive sodium/proton exchange. When sodium is present in the incubation medium, the intracellular pH rapidly recovers from the acidification associated with the removal of ammonium chloride from the incubation. When sodium is removed from the incubation medium, intracellular pH does not recover, and when the cells are treated with 10(-3) mol l-1 amiloride in the presence of sodium, carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, the intracellular pH recovery is drastically reduced. The movements of carbon dioxide, its consecutive catalysed hydration and dissociation to protons and bicarbonate and, possibly, movements of bicarbonate out of the cell acidify the cell contents. This is shown by the observation that the steady-state intracellular pH is higher in a HEPES-buffered medium than in a CO2/HCO3(-)-buffered medium at the same extracellular pH. The acidification is dependent on cellular carbonic anhydrase activity, present in lamprey red cells, which speeds up the hydration reaction. When the action of carbonic anhydrase is inhibited by acetazolamide, removal of ammonium chloride from the incubation medium does not cause intracellular acidification. PMID:3088194

  16. The Role of Cell Compartmentalization and Cell Differentiation in Cyanobacterial Excavation of Miineral Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Guida, B. S.; Couradeau, E.

    2015-12-01

    The bioerosion of coastal limestones and biogenic carbonates by boring filamentous or pseudo-filamentous cyanobacteria is not only a geomicrobial phenomenon of global proportions, but also plays an important role in the demise of coral reefs, and affects significantly human enterprises like bivalve fisheries. In spite of its importance, the mechanism by which cyanobacteria excavate carbonates constitutes an apparent paradox, in that their metabolism will tend to precipitate carbonates, not dissolved them. We have previously advanced, and obtained evidence for, a mechanism of excavation that relies on the uptake of Ca2+ by cells at the boring front, its trans-cellular transport along the filaments, and its eventual active excretion at the solid/liquid interface. It was postulated that the mechanism involved the strategically organized deployment of Ca2+ transport enzymes like P-type Ca2+ ATPases and Ca2+ channels. Here we present evidence that confirms this basic mechanism, but also reveals that it is based on an unexpected level of cellular complexity. The model organism Mastigocoleus testarum BC008, transports Ca2+ from the mineral to the external medium using a repetitive, polar arrangement of Ca2+ ATPases, localized preferentially on one cellular pole, in a ring conformation on the cell membrane adjacent to the trans-cellular septum, pumping Ca2+ locally towards the periplasmic space, from which it passively enters the next cell. This strain also develops specialized groups of cells, which we named calcicytes, often but not exclusively located at the ends of filaments, that accumulate large concentrations of Ca2+, some 40-fold higher than typical in microbes, and seem to act as sinks or capacitors in the trans-cellular Ca2+ transport. Calcicytes are also characterized by a lack of photosynthetic pigments, and a very high intracellular pH. These cellular adaptations can also be found in evolutionary distant euendoliths such as the pseudofilamentous Hyella sp.

  17. Intracellular parcel service: current issues in intracellular membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Johannes M; Spang, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a multitude of membrane structures that are connected through a highly dynamic and complex exchange of their constituents. The vibrant instability of these structures challenges the classical view of defined, static compartments that are connected by different types of vesicles. Despite this astonishing complexity, proteins and lipids are accurately transported into the different intracellular membrane systems. Over the past few decades many factors have been identified that either mediate or regulate intracellular membrane trafficking. Like in a modern parcel sorting system of a logistics center, the cargo typically passes through several sequential sorting stations until it finally reaches the location that is specified by its individual address label. While each membrane system employs specific sets of factors, the transport processes typically operate on common principles. With the advent of genome- and proteome-wide screens, the availability of mutant collections, exciting new developments in microscope technology and sophisticated methods to study their dynamics, the future promises a broad and comprehensive picture of the processes by which eukaryotic cells sort their proteins.

  18. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2016-01-01

    The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a K m of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a K m of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose. PMID:27190649

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2016-01-01

    The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a K m of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a K m of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose. PMID:27190649

  20. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action.

  1. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  2. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  3. Development and testing of a compartmentalized reaction network model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, R.H.; Loague, K.; Kent, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The work reported here is the first part of a larger effort focused on efficient numerical simulation of redox zone development in contaminated aquifers. The sequential use of various electron acceptors, which is governed by the energy yield of each reaction, gives rise to redox zones. The large difference in energy yields between the various redox reactions leads to systems of equations that are extremely ill-conditioned. These equations are very difficult to solve, especially in the context of coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical simulations. We have developed a general, rational method to solve such systems where we focus on the dominant reactions, compartmentalizing them in a manner that is analogous to the redox zones that are often observed in the field. The compartmentalized approach allows us to easily solve a complex geochemical system as a function of time and energy yield, laying the foundation for our ongoing work in which we couple the reaction network, for the development of redox zones, to a model of subsurface fluid flow and solute transport. Our method (1) solves the numerical system without evoking a redox parameter, (2) improves the numerical stability of redox systems by choosing which compartment and thus which reaction network to use based upon the concentration ratios of key constituents, (3) simulates the development of redox zones as a function of time without the use of inhibition factors or switching functions, and (4) can reduce the number of transport equations that need to be solved in space and time. We show through the use of various model performance evaluation statistics that the appropriate compartment choice under different geochemical conditions leads to numerical solutions without significant error. The compartmentalized approach described here facilitates the next phase of this effort where we couple the redox zone reaction network to models of fluid flow and solute transport.

  4. Nuclear matrix and structural and functional compartmentalization of the eucaryotic cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Razin, S V; Borunova, V V; Iarovaia, O V; Vassetzky, Y S

    2014-07-01

    Becoming popular at the end of the 20th century, the concept of the nuclear matrix implies the existence of a nuclear skeleton that organizes functional elements in the cell nucleus. This review presents a critical analysis of the results obtained in the study of nuclear matrix in the light of current views on the organization of the cell nucleus. Numerous studies of nuclear matrix have failed to provide evidence of the existence of such a structure. Moreover, the existence of a filamentous structure that supports the nuclear compartmentalization appears to be unnecessary, since this function is performed by the folded genome itself.

  5. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Jurgen R; Bakker, Barbara M; Michels, Paul A M

    2014-11-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming activities in glycosomal membrane preparations and extensions of the trypanosome glycolysis computer model with size-selective pores sparked again an old debate on the extent of (im)permeability of the glycosomal membrane and whether glycosomally located glycolytic enzymes could and should also be present with some activity in the cytosol. This review presents a critical discussion of the experimental and theoretical evidence for and against the different hypotheses. PMID:25476771

  6. Intracellular trafficking of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Geiger, R Christopher; Dean, David A

    2004-11-01

    Until recently, the attention of most researchers has focused on the first and last steps of gene transfer, namely delivery to the cell and transcription, in order to optimise transfection and gene therapy. However, over the past few years, researchers have realised that the intracellular trafficking of plasmids is more than just a "black box" and is actually one of the major barriers to effective gene delivery. After entering the cytoplasm, following direct delivery or endocytosis, plasmids or other vectors must travel relatively long distances through the mesh of cytoskeletal networks before reaching the nuclear envelope. Once at the nuclear envelope, the DNA must either wait until cell division, or be specifically transported through the nuclear pore complex, in order to reach the nucleoplasm where it can be transcribed. This review focuses on recent developments in the understanding of these intracellular trafficking events as they relate to gene delivery. Hopefully, by continuing to unravel the mechanisms by which plasmids and other gene delivery vectors move throughout the cell, and by understanding the cell biology of gene transfer, superior methods of transfection and gene therapy can be developed.

  7. A comparison of science achievement of fifth grade students in semi-departmentalized and compartmentalized instructional formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Gregorio

    The purpose of the proposed study was to examine the difference between semidepartmentalized instruction and compartmentalized instruction on the achievement of fifth grade students as measured by the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Fifth Grade Science test. The study utilized a Causal Comparative research design with six elementary schools that were comparable as defined by the Texas Education Agency. The independent variable was the type of organizational structure, semi-departmentalized instruction versus compartmentalized instruction. The dependent variable was the science achievement of fifth grade students as measured by the TAKS Fifth Grade Science test from spring 2004. A t-test for unpaired samples was used to analyze the data obtained from the semi-departmentalized group and the comparison group (compartmentalized). The ninety-five percent confidence level (p < 0.05) was used as the criterion level for determining statistical significance of the means. An effect size, Cohen's d, of 0.33 was used to determine educational significance between the means of the two groups. The results of the t-tests indicate that the semi-departmentalized schools had a mean scale score of 2026.52, while the compartmentalized schools had a mean scale score of 2041.22 that was not statistically significant ( p = .337). The effect size between the semi-departmentalized group and the compartmentalized comparison group yielded a Cohen's d = 0.08 that was not educationally significant.

  8. Regulation of acetylcholine release by intracellular acidification of developing motoneurons in Xenopus cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hwa; Wu, Mei-Lin; Fu, Wen-Mei

    1998-01-01

    The effects of intracellular pH changes on the acetylcholine (ACh) release and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration at developing neuromuscular synapses were studied in Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures. Spontaneous and evoked ACh release of motoneurons was monitored by using whole-cell voltage-clamped myocytes. Intracellular alkalinization with 15 mm NH4Cl slightly reduced the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs). However, cytosolic acidification following withdrawal of extracellular NH4Cl caused a marked and transient increase in spontaneous ACh release. Another method of cytosolic acidification was used in which NaCl in Ringer solution was replaced with weak organic acids. The increase in spontaneous ACh release paralleled the level of intracellular acidification resulting from addition of these organic acids. Acetate and propionate but not isethionate, methylsulphate and glucuronate, caused an increase in intracellular pH and a marked increase in spontaneous ACh release. Impulse-evoked ACh release was slightly augmented by intracellular alkalinization and inhibited by cytosolic acidification. Cytosolic acidification was accompanied by an elevation in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), resulting from both external Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. In contrast, the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by high K+ was inhibited by cytosolic acidification. We conclude that cytosolic acidification regulates spontaneous and evoked ACh release differentially in Xenopus motoneurons, increasing spontaneous ACh release but inhibiting evoked ACh release. PMID:9490814

  9. Synthesis of Photo- and pH Dual-Sensitive Amphiphilic Copolymer PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) and Its Micellization as Leakage-Free Drug Delivery System for UV-Triggered Intracellular Delivery of Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xubo; Qi, Mingzhu; Liang, Shuo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Jia, Xu; Li, Jiagen; Liu, Peng

    2016-08-31

    Novel photo- and pH dual-sensitive amphiphilic copolymers containing photolabile o-nitrobenzyl (NB) groups were designed via combination of ATRP, hydrolyzation, and simple esterification reaction and self-assembled into stimuli-regulated amphiphilic micelles in aqueous solution. On the basis of the optimization of the morphology and particle size of the micelles via modulating the number of the photocleavable o-nitrobenzyl acrylate (NBA) units, the unique ones assembled from PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) with an average hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of 163 nm was selected as a potential drug delivery system (DDS) for UV-triggered delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). The micelles possessed a favorable drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 27.5%, with the hydrodynamic diameter of 213 nm after DOX-loading. Most importantly, the DOX-loaded PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) micelles exhibited a cumulative DOX release ratio of only 3.69% in the simulated physiological medium within 6 days without UV-irradiation, indicating their potential as leakage-free DDS. As in the acidic media mimicking the tumor microenvironment, a high cumulative DOX release ratio of 74.70% was achieved within 6 days after UV-irradiation for 20 min, showing a sustained release behavior. Under UV-irradiation, the photolabile o-nitrobenzyl moieties were cleaved off, the amphiphilic copolymer transformed into a water-soluble polymer, favoring the metabolism of drug carriers, and the micelles were demicellized to accelerate the drug release in a triggered or on-demand manner.

  10. Synthesis of Photo- and pH Dual-Sensitive Amphiphilic Copolymer PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) and Its Micellization as Leakage-Free Drug Delivery System for UV-Triggered Intracellular Delivery of Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xubo; Qi, Mingzhu; Liang, Shuo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Jia, Xu; Li, Jiagen; Liu, Peng

    2016-08-31

    Novel photo- and pH dual-sensitive amphiphilic copolymers containing photolabile o-nitrobenzyl (NB) groups were designed via combination of ATRP, hydrolyzation, and simple esterification reaction and self-assembled into stimuli-regulated amphiphilic micelles in aqueous solution. On the basis of the optimization of the morphology and particle size of the micelles via modulating the number of the photocleavable o-nitrobenzyl acrylate (NBA) units, the unique ones assembled from PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) with an average hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of 163 nm was selected as a potential drug delivery system (DDS) for UV-triggered delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). The micelles possessed a favorable drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 27.5%, with the hydrodynamic diameter of 213 nm after DOX-loading. Most importantly, the DOX-loaded PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) micelles exhibited a cumulative DOX release ratio of only 3.69% in the simulated physiological medium within 6 days without UV-irradiation, indicating their potential as leakage-free DDS. As in the acidic media mimicking the tumor microenvironment, a high cumulative DOX release ratio of 74.70% was achieved within 6 days after UV-irradiation for 20 min, showing a sustained release behavior. Under UV-irradiation, the photolabile o-nitrobenzyl moieties were cleaved off, the amphiphilic copolymer transformed into a water-soluble polymer, favoring the metabolism of drug carriers, and the micelles were demicellized to accelerate the drug release in a triggered or on-demand manner. PMID:27513439

  11. Resolution of intracellular calcium metabolism in intact segments of rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, R.D.; Hai, C.M.

    1986-07-01

    A new method, based on computer-assisted kinetic analysis of /sup 45/Ca efflux data, was used to measure calcium contents and fluxes for extracellular and intracellular compartments in intact segments of rabbit aorta. After a 1-hour loading period, efflux data were collected for 8 hours using a flow-through tissue chamber. These long-term effluxes were necessary because information on intracellular calcium metabolism was concentrated in the slow components of the efflux curves while earlier components appeared to be dominated by washout of extracellular calcium. Intracellular compartments were identified as those whose calcium contents were altered by 10 microM phenylephrine. This method complements previous approaches by providing simultaneous estimates of compartmental calcium contents and fluxes without requiring the assumption of isotopic equilibrium and without recourse to standard wash techniques for removal of extracellular calcium. In normal, calcium-containing, bicarbonate-buffered physiological salt solution these compartments contained a total of approximately 300 nmol Ca/g wet aorta. Of this total, 55 nmol/g were associated with the slowest resolvable compartment whose turnover time was 170 minutes and whose exchange flux was 0.32 nmol min-1g-1. Two other intracellular compartments had turnover times of 30 minutes. One of these was phenylephrine releasable and contained 145 nmol/g; it exchanged calcium at 4.9 nmol min-1g-1. In normal physiological salt solution the plasma membrane was, surprisingly, not rate limiting for Ca efflux; and in 10 microM phenylephrine the membrane Ca flux was even greater, increasing 3.5-fold compared to control.

  12. Inhibition of Glutathione Biosynthesis Alters Compartmental Redox Status and the Thiol Proteome in Organogenesis-Stage Rat Conceptuses

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Craig; Shuster, Daniel Z.; Gomez, Rosaicela Roman; Sant, Karilyn E.; Reed, Matthew S.; Pohl, Jan; Hansen, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    significant net oxidation was seen in the BSO-treated AF compartment after 6 hr. Biotinylated iodoacetamide (BIAM) labeling of proteins revealed the significant thiol-oxidation of many EMB proteins following BSO treatment. Quantitative changes in the thiol proteome, associated with developmentally-relevant pathways, were detected using isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling and mass spectroscopy. Adaptive pathways were selectively enriched with increased concentrations of proteins involved in mRNA processing (splicesome) and mRNA stabilization (glycolysis, GAPDH), as well as, protein synthesis (aminoacyl-tRNA) and protein folding (antigen processing, Hsp70, protein disulfide isomerase). These results show the ability of chemical and environmental modulators to selectively alter compartmental intracellular and extracellular GSH and Cys concentrations and change their corresponding Eh within the intact viable conceptus. The altered Eh were also of sufficient magnitude to alter the redox proteome and change relative protein concentrations suggesting that the mechanistic links through which environmental factors inform and regulate developmental signaling pathways may be discovered using systems developmental biology techniques. PMID:23736079

  13. Detecting compartmental non-Gaussian diffusion with symmetrized double-PFG MRI.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Özarslan, Evren; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion in tissue and porous media is known to be non-Gaussian and has been used for clinical indications of stroke and other tissue pathologies. However, when conventional NMR techniques are applied to biological tissues and other heterogeneous materials, the presence of multiple compartments (pores) with different Gaussian diffusivities will also contribute to the measurement of non-Gaussian behavior. Here we present symmetrized double PFG (sd-PFG), which can separate these two contributions to non-Gaussian signal decay as having distinct angular modulation frequencies. In contrast to prior angular d-PFG methods, sd-PFG can unambiguously extract kurtosis as an oscillation from samples with isotropic or uniformly oriented anisotropic pores, and can generally extract a combination of compartmental anisotropy and kurtosis. The method further fixes its sensitivity with respect to the time dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient. We experimentally demonstrate the measurement of the fourth cumulant (kurtosis) of diffusion and find it consistent with theoretical predictions. By enabling the unambiguous identification of contributions of compartmental kurtosis to the signal, sd-PFG has the potential to help identify the underlying micro-structural changes corresponding to current kurtosis based diagnostics, and act as a novel source of contrast to better resolve tissue micro-structure.

  14. Metabolism of monoterpenes: evidence for compartmentation of l-menthone metabolism in peppermint (Mentha piperita) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Martinkus, C.; Croteau, R.

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the monoterpene ketone l-(G-/sup 3/H)-menthone is reduced to the epimeric alcohols l-menthol and d-neomenthol in leaf discs of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), and that a portion of the menthol is converted to menthyl acetate while the bulk of the neomenthol is transformed to neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside. When l-(3-/sup 3/H)menthol and d-(3-/sup 3/H)neomenthol are separately administered to leaf discs, both menthyl and neomenthyl acetates and menthyl and neomenthyl glucosides are formed with nearly equal facility, suggesting that the metabolic specificity observed with the ketone precursor was not a function of the specificity of the transglucosylase or transacetylase but rather a result of compartmentation of each stereospecific dehydrogenase with the appropriate transferase. Co-purification of the acceptor-mediated activities, and differential activation and inhibition studies, provided strong evidence that the same UDP-glucose-dependent enzyme could transfer glucose to either l-menthol or d-neometnthol. These results demonstrate that the specific in vivo conversion of l-menthone to l-menthyl acetate and d-neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside cannot be attributed to the selectivity of the transferases, and they clearly indicate that the metabolic specificity observed is a result of compartmentation effects.

  15. [Compartmentalization of the cell nucleus and spatial organization of the genome].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, A A; Razin, S V

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus is one of the most complex cell organelles. Despite the absence of membranes, the nuclear space is divided into numerous compartments where different processes in- volved in the genome activity take place. The most important nuclear compartments include nucleoli, nuclear speckles, PML bodies, Cajal bodies, histone locus bodies, Polycomb bodies, insulator bodies, transcription and replication factories. The structural basis for the nuclear compartmentalization is provided by genomic DNA that occupies most of the nuclear volume. Nuclear compartments, in turn, guide the chromosome folding by providing a platform for the spatial interaction of individual genomic loci. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of higher order genome organization with a focus on chromosome territories and chromosome domains, as well as consider the structure and function of the key nuclear compartments. We show that the func- tional compartmentalization of the cell nucleus and genome spatial organization are tightly interconnected, and that this form of organization is highly dynamic and is based on stochastic processes.

  16. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    PubMed Central

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  17. Detecting compartmental non-Gaussian diffusion with symmetrized double-PFG MRI.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Özarslan, Evren; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion in tissue and porous media is known to be non-Gaussian and has been used for clinical indications of stroke and other tissue pathologies. However, when conventional NMR techniques are applied to biological tissues and other heterogeneous materials, the presence of multiple compartments (pores) with different Gaussian diffusivities will also contribute to the measurement of non-Gaussian behavior. Here we present symmetrized double PFG (sd-PFG), which can separate these two contributions to non-Gaussian signal decay as having distinct angular modulation frequencies. In contrast to prior angular d-PFG methods, sd-PFG can unambiguously extract kurtosis as an oscillation from samples with isotropic or uniformly oriented anisotropic pores, and can generally extract a combination of compartmental anisotropy and kurtosis. The method further fixes its sensitivity with respect to the time dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient. We experimentally demonstrate the measurement of the fourth cumulant (kurtosis) of diffusion and find it consistent with theoretical predictions. By enabling the unambiguous identification of contributions of compartmental kurtosis to the signal, sd-PFG has the potential to help identify the underlying micro-structural changes corresponding to current kurtosis based diagnostics, and act as a novel source of contrast to better resolve tissue micro-structure. PMID:26434812

  18. Determination of Polycomb Group of Protein Compartmentalization Through Chromatin Fractionation Procedure.

    PubMed

    Marasca, Federica; Marullo, Fabrizia; Lanzuolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms modulate and maintain the transcriptional state of the genome acting at various levels on chromatin. Emerging findings suggest that the position in the nuclear space and the cross talk between components of the nuclear architecture play a role in the regulation of epigenetic signatures. We recently described a cross talk between the Polycomb group of proteins (PcG) epigenetic repressors and the nuclear lamina. This interplay is important for the maintenance of transcriptional repression at muscle-specific genes and for the correct timing of muscle differentiation. To investigate the synergism between PcG factors and nuclear architecture we improved a chromatin fractionation protocol with the aim to analyze the PcG nuclear compartmentalization. We thus separated PcG proteins in different fractions depending on their solubility. We surprisingly found a consistent amount of PcG proteins in the matrix-associated fraction. In this chapter we describe the chromatin fractionation procedure, a method that can be used to study the nuclear compartmentalization of Polycomb group of proteins and/or PcG targets in murine and Drosophila cells. PMID:27659984

  19. Modeling the Kinetics of a Memory-Associated Immediate Early Gene's Compartmental Expression After Sensory Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willats, Adam; Ivanova, Tamara; Prinz, Astrid; Liu, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Immediate Early Genes (IEGs) are rapidly and transiently transcribed in neurons after a sensory experience. Some of these genes act as effector IEGs, which mediate specific effects on cellular function. Arc is one such effector IEG that is essential for synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation in hippocampus and cortex. The expression of Arc in neurons has previously been examined using an imaging method known as Compartmental Analysis of Temporal Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization. Previous work found that the time course of Arc expression within the nuclear and perinuclear cytoplasmic compartments of a neuron is altered by prior sensory experience. We explore a simple model of the kinetics of IEG transcription and nuclear export, with the aim of eventually uncovering possible mechanisms for how experience alters expression kinetics. Thus far, we characterize our compartmental model using phase-plane analysis and validate it against several IEG expression data sets, including one where prior experience with vocalizing mice alters the time course of call-induced Arc expression in the auditory cortex of a listening mouse. Our model provides a framework to explore why Arc expression may change depending on a receiver's past sound experience and internal state. Adam Willats was supported by NIH Training Grant 5T90DA032466. This research was also supported by NIDCD R01 DC8343.

  20. Compartmentalized Fluid Flow In The Nevado Del Ruiz Volcano Hydrothermal System(S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, C. A.; Mejia, E.

    2011-12-01

    Combination of several extensive and compressive fault/fracture systems with different lithologic units compartmentalized the hydrothermal system(s) in the vicinity of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano. Three main fault/fracture systems are observed in the Ruiz volcano area, a N10°-20°E system (San Jerónimo and Palestina faults), a N40°-60°W system (Villamaría-Termales, San Ramón, Nereidas, Río Claro, San Eugenio and Campoalegrito faults), and a N60°-80°E system (Santa Rosa fault). The NW trend system act as the main path for fluid circulation, location of faults and fractures belonging to this system and their intersections with other fault systems and/or with lithologic contacts control hot springs location. The observed fault location and hot spring location pattern allow to subdivide the hydrothermal system(s) in at least five blocks. In the southernmost block, hot springs are mostly located in one of the four quadrants originated by fault intersections suggesting that there is a compartmentalization into higher and lower permeability quadrants. It is still unknown if all blocks belong to the same hydrothermal system or if there is more than one hydrothermal system.

  1. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    PubMed

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications.

  2. Vacuolar compartmentalization as indispensable component of heavy metal detoxification in plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shanti S; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2016-05-01

    Plant cells orchestrate an array of molecular mechanisms for maintaining plasmatic concentrations of essential heavy metal (HM) ions, for example, iron, zinc and copper, within the optimal functional range. In parallel, concentrations of non-essential HMs and metalloids, for example, cadmium, mercury and arsenic, should be kept below their toxicity threshold levels. Vacuolar compartmentalization is central to HM homeostasis. It depends on two vacuolar pumps (V-ATPase and V-PPase) and a set of tonoplast transporters, which are directly driven by proton motive force, and primary ATP-dependent pumps. While HM non-hyperaccumulator plants largely sequester toxic HMs in root vacuoles, HM hyperaccumulators usually sequester them in leaf cell vacuoles following efficient long-distance translocation. The distinct strategies evolved as a consequence of organ-specific differences particularly in vacuolar transporters and in addition to distinct features in long-distance transport. Recent molecular and functional characterization of tonoplast HM transporters has advanced our understanding of their contribution to HM homeostasis, tolerance and hyperaccumulation. Another important part of the dynamic vacuolar sequestration syndrome involves enhanced vacuolation. It involves vesicular trafficking in HM detoxification. The present review provides an updated account of molecular aspects that contribute to the vacuolar compartmentalization of HMs. PMID:26729300

  3. Structure of the Archaeal Pab87 Peptidase Reveals a Novel Self-Compartmentalizing Protease Family

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Girard, Eric; Birck, Catherine; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Delarue, Marc; Poch, Olivier; Schultz, Patrick; Mayer, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    Self-compartmentalizing proteases orchestrate protein turnover through an original architecture characterized by a central catalytic chamber. Here we report the first structure of an archaeal member of a new self-compartmentalizing protease family forming a cubic-shaped octamer with D4 symmetry and referred to as CubicO. We solved the structure of the Pyrococcus abyssi Pab87 protein at 2.2 Å resolution using the anomalous signal of the high-phasing-power lanthanide derivative Lu-HPDO3A. A 20 Å wide channel runs through this supramolecular assembly of 0.4 MDa, giving access to a 60 Å wide central chamber holding the eight active sites. Surprisingly, activity assays revealed that Pab87 degrades specifically d-amino acid containing peptides, which have never been observed in archaea. Genomic context of the Pab87 gene showed that it is surrounded by genes involved in the amino acid/peptide transport or metabolism. We propose that CubicO proteases are involved in the processing of d-peptides from environmental origins. PMID:19266066

  4. Estimation of guinea pig tracheobronchial transport rates using a compartmental model

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, D.J.; Morrow, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance in the tracheobronchial tree of guinea pigs was examined using monodisperse 7.9 ..mu..m MMAD polystyrene particles. Animals were exposed for approximately 1 h by inhalation via an intratracheal tube to aerosols tagged with gold-198 and fluorescent dyes. Following exposure, animals were radioactively monitored and sacrificed at predetermined times. The lungs were removed, freeze-dried, sectioned completely, and examined with a fluorescent microscope. Measurements were made of airway diameters where particles were found. An anatomic model for guinea pig lung morphology was used to assign ranges of airway diameters to five zones, which were incorporated into a compartmental model for lung clearance. Kinetic analysis of particle distributions in the zones led to development of first-order equations describing the compartmental clearance. Rate constants obtained from the kinetic analysis were used to estimate mucociliary transport rates in specific bronchial generations, which ranged from approximately 0.001 mm/min in the distal bronchioles to approximately 8 mm/min in the trachea, and resulted in a calculated 24-h clearance time for tracheobronchial clearance in the guinea pig. No evidence for either bronchial penetration by particles or relatively prolonged bronchial retention of particles was found in this study. 22 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  6. Pseudomonas toxin binds triton X-114 at low pH.

    PubMed

    Sandvig, K; Moskaug, J O

    1987-08-01

    Pseudomonas toxin was found to bind Triton X-114 at pH values below pH 5.0, whereas much less binding was observed at higher pH values. The toxin bound Triton X-114 at a higher pH value in the presence of 0.14 M-NaCl, -KCl or -NaNO3 than at low salt concentrations. The results suggest that low pH in an intracellular compartment facilitates the transport of Pseudomonas toxin across the membrane and into the cytosol by inducing a conformational change in the molecule.

  7. Intracellular Organisms as Placental Invaders

    PubMed Central

    Vigliani, Marguerite B.; Bakardjiev, Anna I.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present a novel model for how the human placenta might get infected via the hematogenous route. We present a list of diverse placental pathogens, like Listeria monocytogenes or Cytomegalovirus, which are familiar to most obstetricians, but others, like Salmonella typhi, have only been reported in case studies or small case series. Remarkably, all of these organisms on this list are either obligate or facultative intracellular organisms. These pathogens are able to enter and survive inside host immune cells for at least a portion of their life cycle. We suggest that many blood-borne pathogens might arrive at the placenta via transportation inside of maternal leukocytes that enter the decidua in early pregnancy. We discuss mechanisms by which extravillous trophoblasts could get infected in the decidua and spread infection to other layers in the placenta. We hope to raise awareness among OB/GYN clinicians that organisms not typically associated with the TORCH list might cause placental infections and pregnancy complications.

  8. Secretome of obligate intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Kaur, Simran J.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen; Sears, Khandra T.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae) is comprised of obligate intracellular parasites, with virulent species of interest both as causes of emerging infectious diseases and for their potential deployment as bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no effective commercially available vaccines, with treatment limited primarily to tetracycline antibiotics, although others (e.g. josamycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin) are also effective. Much of the recent research geared toward understanding mechanisms underlying rickettsial pathogenicity has centered on characterization of secreted proteins that directly engage eukaryotic cells. Herein, we review all aspects of the Rickettsia secretome, including six secretion systems, 19 characterized secretory proteins, and potential moonlighting proteins identified on surfaces of multiple Rickettsia species. Employing bioinformatics and phylogenomics, we present novel structural and functional insight on each secretion system. Unexpectedly, our investigation revealed that the majority of characterized secretory proteins have not been assigned to their cognate secretion pathways. Furthermore, for most secretion pathways, the requisite signal sequences mediating translocation are poorly understood. As a blueprint for all known routes of protein translocation into host cells, this resource will assist research aimed at uniting characterized secreted proteins with their apposite secretion pathways. Furthermore, our work will help in the identification of novel secreted proteins involved in rickettsial ‘life on the inside’. PMID:25168200

  9. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  10. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    PubMed

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-01

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  11. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  12. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  13. Differential interhemispheric cooling and ICP compartmentalization in a patient with left ICA occlusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, D; Lanzino, G; Elkins, W; Olivero, W

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old white female who presented with a large left internal carotid artery occlusive stroke from a cardiogenic embolus. She was enrolled in an institutional study using a specially designed cooling helmet. Bilateral intracranial pressure (ICP) and temperature probes were placed to determine if there was any differential cooling and ICP compartmentalization between the two hemispheres. We demonstrated a significant temperature gradient between the infarcted and the non-infarcted hemisphere. A significant inter-hemispheric ICP gradient was also observed. We believe that this is the first demonstration of preferential cooling of the infarcted hemisphere over the non-infarcted hemisphere with regional surface hypothermia. PMID:16502336

  14. Information Processing in Single Cells and Small Networks: Insights from Compartmental Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirazi, Panayiota

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a set of predictions generated by detailed compartmental models regarding the ways in which information may be processed, encoded and propagated by single cells and neural assemblies. Towards this goal, I will review a number of modelling studies from our lab that investigate how single pyramidal neurons and small neural networks in different brain regions process incoming signals that are associated with learning and memory. I will first discuss the computational capabilities of individual pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus [1-3] and how these properties may allow a single cell to discriminate between different memories [4]. I will then present biophysical models of prefrontal layer V neurons and small networks that exhibit sustained activity under realistic synaptic stimulation and discuss their potential role in working memory [5].

  15. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves production of branched chain alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, José L.; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeted expression of metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production levels compared with expression of the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalisation of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overexpressing only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains reveals that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves higher local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion, and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  16. Quantitation of renal function based on two-compartmental modeling of renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Kah Meng, Loh; Ng, David; Ghista, Dhanjoo; Rudolph, Heiko

    2005-01-01

    The primary functions of the kidney are: (i) to get rid of the body waste materials that are either ingested or produced by metabolism, and (ii) to control the volume and composition of the body fluids. Herein, we provide a noninvasive methodology to assess physiological function of the kidneys. For this purpose, we analyze the renograms with 2-compartmental modelling of the kidney-renal outflow system, and therefrom compute the amount of flow of renal radionuclide into and out of the renal pelvis compartment. The derived information of uptake (k/A) and washout (e(beta/2V2)t sinhAt) rates can be of considerable use. The paper provides a number of case studies for the verification of the derived system governing equations against clinical renograms.

  17. Compartmentalization, Viral Evolution, and Viral Latency of HIV in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Maria M; Sturdevant, Christa Buckheit; Tompkins, Lauren A; Arrildt, Kathryn Twigg; Dukhovlinova, Elena; Kincer, Laura P; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection occurs throughout the body and can have dramatic physical effects, such as neurocognitive impairment in the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, examining the virus that resides in the CNS is challenging due to its location and can only be done using samples collected either at autopsy, indirectly form the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), or through the use of animal models. The unique milieu of the CNS fosters viral compartmentalization as well as evolution of viral sequences, allowing for new cell types, such as macrophages and microglia, to be infected. Treatment must also cross the blood-brain barrier adding additional obstacles in eliminating viral populations in the CNS. These long-lived infected cell types and treatment barriers may affect functional cure strategies in people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). PMID:25914150

  18. Ultrasensitive quantification of TAP-dependent antigen compartmentalization in scarce primary immune cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Hanna; Döring, Marius; Nikles, Daphne; Lehnert, Elisa; Baldauf, Christoph; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) is essential for the establishment and maintenance of self-tolerance, priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and the exertion of several T-cell effector functions. Cytosolic proteasomes continuously degrade proteins into peptides, which are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER lumen antigenic peptides are loaded onto MHC I, which is displayed on the cell surface. Here we describe an innovative flow cytometric approach to monitor time-resolved ER compartmentalization of antigenic peptides. This assay allows the analysis of distinct primary human immune cell subsets at reporter peptide concentrations of 1 nM. Thus, this ultrasensitive method for the first time permits quantification of TAP activity under close to physiological conditions in scarce primary cell subsets such as antigen cross-presenting dendritic cells. PMID:25656091

  19. The planar cell polarity protein Vangl2 is involved in postsynaptic compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Kishi, Masashi

    2016-01-26

    The excitatory postsynaptic region of the vertebrate hippocampus is usually compartmentalized into the postsynaptic density (PSD) and N-cadherin-rich domain, which is important for synaptic adhesion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the compartment formation are unknown. In the present report, we show that the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) plays a role in this regionalization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons that were subjected to Vangl2 expression silencing, the formed clusters of PSD-95, one of the major scaffolding proteins in PSD, tended to overlap with those of N-cadherin. Further, in the dendrites of these neurons, the immunofluorescence of PSD-95 was to some extent diffused, without a significant change in the total signal. Because Vangl2 physically interacts with both PSD-95 and N-cadherin in vivo, these results suggest that a PCP-related direct molecular mechanism underlies the horizontal polarization of the postsynaptic regions. PMID:26683906

  20. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation. PMID:25987563

  1. Compartmentalization of gypsum and halite associated with cyanobacteria in saline soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Canfora, Loredana; Vendramin, Elisa; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Jungblut, Anne D; Pinzari, Flavia

    2016-06-01

    The interface between biological and geochemical components in the surface crust of a saline soil was investigated using X-ray diffraction, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Mineral compounds such as halite and gypsum were identified crystallized around filaments of cyanobacteria. A total of 92 genera were identified from the bacterial community based on 16S gene pyrosequencing analysis. The occurrence of the gypsum crystals, their shapes and compartmentalization suggested that they separated NaCl from the immediate microenvironment of the cyanobacteria, and that some cyanobacteria and communities of sulfur bacteria may had a physical control over the distinctive halite and gypsum structures produced. This suggests that cyanobacteria might directly or indirectly promote the formation of a protective envelope made of calcium and sulfur-based compounds. PMID:27090760

  2. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  3. Substrate-induced Nuclear Export and Peripheral Compartmentalization of Hepatic Glucokinase Correlates with Glycogen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Masa; Knobel, Susan M.; Piston, David W.; Cherrington, Alan D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic glucokinase (GK) is acutely regulated by binding to its nuclear-anchored regulatory protein (GKRP). Although GK release by GKRP is tightly coupled to the rate of glycogen synthesis, the nature of this association is obscure. To gain insight into this coupling mechanism under physiological stimulating conditions in primary rat hepatocytes, we analyzed the subcellular distribution of GK and GKRP with immunofluorescence, and glycogen deposition with glycogen cytochemical fluorescence, using confocal microscopyand quantitative image analysis. Following stimulation, a fraction of the GK signal translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The reduction in the nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of GK, an index of nuclear export, correlated with a >50% increase in glycogen cytochemical fluorescence over a 60min stimulation period. Furthermore, glycogen accumulation was initially deposited in a peripheral pattern in hepatocytes similar to that of GK. These data suggest that a compartmentalization exists of both active GK and the initial sites of glycogen deposition at the hepatocyte surface. PMID:12369705

  4. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-07-10

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation. PMID:25987563

  5. Ultrasensitive quantification of TAP-dependent antigen compartmentalization in scarce primary immune cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Hanna; Döring, Marius; Nikles, Daphne; Lehnert, Elisa; Baldauf, Christoph; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) is essential for the establishment and maintenance of self-tolerance, priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and the exertion of several T-cell effector functions. Cytosolic proteasomes continuously degrade proteins into peptides, which are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER lumen antigenic peptides are loaded onto MHC I, which is displayed on the cell surface. Here we describe an innovative flow cytometric approach to monitor time-resolved ER compartmentalization of antigenic peptides. This assay allows the analysis of distinct primary human immune cell subsets at reporter peptide concentrations of 1 nM. Thus, this ultrasensitive method for the first time permits quantification of TAP activity under close to physiological conditions in scarce primary cell subsets such as antigen cross-presenting dendritic cells. PMID:25656091

  6. Further studies on the nature of fluid compartmentalization in chick calvaria.

    PubMed

    Neuman, W F; Bareham, B J

    1975-06-01

    Labeled mannitol and polyethylene glycol (mol. wt. 4000), PEG, were used as space markers to estimate the fluid compartmentalization of calvaria taken from 3-5-day-old chicks. The mannitol results indicated that about 80% of the water in these bones is extracellular. Only a small fraction of this extracellular space was available to the diffusion of polyehtylene glycol. Adsorption studies in vitro and prior incubation of the tissues with hydrolytic enzymes indicated that the phenomenon of exclusion of PEG was primarily physical in nature. The polyethylene polymer is excluded from the water of hydration of the mineral phase. Apparently much of the extracellular water (two-thirds) of bone is in the form of crystal hydration.

  7. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-07-10

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation.

  8. Engineering of customized meganucleases via in vitro compartmentalization and in cellulo optimization

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Choi, Michael; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (also referred to as ‘meganucleases’) are compact DNA cleaving enzymes that specifically recognize long target sequences (approximately 20 base pairs), and thus serve as useful tools for therapeutic genome engineering. While stand-alone meganucleases are sufficiently active to introduce targeted genome modification, they can be fused to additional sequence-specific DNA binding domains in order to improve their performance in target cells. In this chapter, we describe an approach to retarget meganucleases to DNA targets of interest (such as sequences found in genes and cis regulatory regions), which is feasible in an academic laboratory environment. A combination of two selection systems, in vitro compartmentalization and two-plasmid cleavage assay in bacteria, allow for efficient engineering of meganucleases that specifically cleave a wide variety of DNA sequences. PMID:25408403

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid HIV-1 compartmentalization in a patient with AIDS and acute varicella-zoster virus meningomyeloradiculitis.

    PubMed

    Falcone, E Liana; Adegbulugbe, Ademiposi A; Sheikh, Virginia; Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L; Hammoud, Dima A; Sereti, Irini; Lane, H Clifford

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of AIDS presenting as varicella-zoster virus (VZV) meningomyeloradiculitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quasispecies compartmentalization within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and a CSF viral load that was 1 log higher than in peripheral blood. Prolonged antiviral therapy for both VZV and HIV type 1 was associated with partial resolution.

  10. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are required for the dynamic regulation of neutral lipid compartmentation in plant cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols (TAGs) in seeds, their biogenesis and function in non-seed tissues is poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-sp...

  11. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  12. DETECTING EVOLUTIONARY TRANSFER OF GENES USING PhIGs(1).

    PubMed

    Boore, Jeffrey L

    2008-02-01

    Organisms have acquired plastids by convoluted paths that have provided multiple opportunities for gene transfer into a host nucleus from intracellular organisms, including the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids, the proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria, and both green and red algae whose engulfment has led to secondary acquisition of plastids. These gene movements are most accurately demonstrated by building phylogenetic trees that identify the evolutionary origin of each gene, and one effective tool for this is "PhIGs" (Phylogenetically Inferred Groups; http://PhIGs.org), a set of databases and computer tools with a Web interface for whole-genome evolutionary analysis. PhIGs takes as input gene sets of completely sequenced genomes, builds clusters of genes using a novel, graph-based approach, and reconstructs the evolutionary relationships among all gene families. The user can view and download the sequence alignments, compare intron-exon structures, and follow links to functional genomic databases. Currently, PhIGs contains 652,756 genes from 45 genomes grouped into 61,059 gene families. Graphical displays show the relative positions of these genes among genomes. PhIGs has been used to detect the evolutionary transfer of hundreds of genes from cyanobacteria and red algae into oömycete nuclear genomes, revealing that even though they have no plastids, their ancestors did, having secondarily acquired them from an intracellular red alga. A great number of genomes are soon to become available that are relevant to our broader understanding of the movement of genes among intracellular compartments after engulfing other organisms, and PhIGs will be an effective tool to interpret these gene movements.

  13. Cellular compartmentation of cadmium and zinc in relation to other elements in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Küpper, H; Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2000-12-01

    The cellular compartmentation of elements was analysed in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (=Cardaminopsis halleri) using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated tissues. Quantitative data were obtained using oxygen as an internal standard in the analyses of vacuoles, whereas a peak/background ratio method was used for quantification of elements in pollen and dehydrated trichomes. Arabidopsis halleri was found to hyperaccumulate not only Zn but also Cd in the shoot biomass. While large concentrations of Zn and Cd were found in the leaves and roots, flowers contained very little. In roots grown hydroponically, Zn and Cd accumulated in the cell wall of the rhizodermis (root epidermis), mainly due to precipitation of Zn/Cd phosphates. In leaves, the trichomes had by far the largest concentrations of Zn and Cd. Inside the trichomes there was a striking sub-cellular compartmentation, with almost all the Zn and Cd being accumulated in a narrow ring in the trichome base. This distribution pattern was very different from that for Ca and P. The epidermal cells other than trichomes were very small and contained lower concentrations of Zn and Cd than mesophyll cells. In particular, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in the mesophyll cells increased markedly in response to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations in the nutrient solution. This indicates that the mesophyll cells in the leaves of A. halleri are the major storage site for Zn and Cd, and play an important role in their hyperaccumulation. PMID:11219586

  14. The role of the bi-compartmental stem cell niche in delaying cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriyari, Leili; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, by using modern imaging techniques, scientists have found evidence of collaboration between different types of stem cells (SCs), and proposed a bi-compartmental organization of the SC niche. Here we create a class of stochastic models to simulate the dynamics of such a heterogeneous SC niche. We consider two SC groups: the border compartment, S1, is in direct contact with transit-amplifying (TA) cells, and the central compartment, S2, is hierarchically upstream from S1. The S1 SCs differentiate or divide asymmetrically when the tissue needs TA cells. Both groups proliferate when the tissue requires SCs (thus maintaining homeostasis). There is an influx of S2 cells into the border compartment, either by migration, or by proliferation. We examine this model in the context of double-hit mutant generation, which is a rate-limiting step in the development of many cancers. We discover that this type of a cooperative pattern in the stem niche with two compartments leads to a significantly smaller rate of double-hit mutant production compared with a homogeneous, one-compartmental SC niche. Furthermore, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs, consistent with the literature. Finally, the optimal architecture (which minimizes the rate of double-hit mutant production) requires a large proliferation rate of S1 cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of S2 cells. This result is remarkably similar to the niche structure described recently by several authors, where one of the two SC compartments was found more actively engaged in tissue homeostasis and turnover, while the other was characterized by higher levels of quiescence (but contributed strongly to injury recovery). Both numerical and analytical results are presented.

  15. Consequences of plant invasions on compartmentalization and species' roles in plant-pollinator networks.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Matthias; Padrón, Benigno; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Traveset, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Compartmentalization-the organization of ecological interaction networks into subsets of species that do not interact with other subsets (true compartments) or interact more frequently among themselves than with other species (modules)-has been identified as a key property for the functioning, stability and evolution of ecological communities. Invasions by entomophilous invasive plants may profoundly alter the way interaction networks are compartmentalized. We analysed a comprehensive dataset of 40 paired plant-pollinator networks (invaded versus uninvaded) to test this hypothesis. We show that invasive plants have higher generalization levels with respect to their pollinators than natives. The consequences for network topology are that-rather than displacing native species from the network-plant invaders attracting pollinators into invaded modules tend to play new important topological roles (i.e. network hubs, module hubs and connectors) and cause role shifts in native species, creating larger modules that are more connected among each other. While the number of true compartments was lower in invaded compared with uninvaded networks, the effect of invasion on modularity was contingent on the study system. Interestingly, the generalization level of the invasive plants partially explains this pattern, with more generalized invaders contributing to a lower modularity. Our findings indicate that the altered interaction structure of invaded networks makes them more robust against simulated random secondary species extinctions, but more vulnerable when the typically highly connected invasive plants go extinct first. The consequences and pathways by which biological invasions alter the interaction structure of plant-pollinator communities highlighted in this study may have important dynamical and functional implications, for example, by influencing multi-species reciprocal selection regimes and coevolutionary processes.

  16. Tissue-specific compartmental analysis for dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of complex tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Choyke, Peter L; Chan, Tsung-Han; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yue

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provides a noninvasive method for evaluating tumor vasculature patterns based on contrast accumulation and washout. However, due to limited imaging resolution and tumor tissue heterogeneity, tracer concentrations at many pixels often represent a mixture of more than one distinct compartment. This pixel-wise partial volume effect (PVE) would have profound impact on the accuracy of pharmacokinetics studies using existing compartmental modeling (CM) methods. We, therefore, propose a convex analysis of mixtures (CAM) algorithm to explicitly mitigate PVE by expressing the kinetics in each pixel as a nonnegative combination of underlying compartments and subsequently identifying pure volume pixels at the corners of the clustered pixel time series scatter plot simplex. The algorithm is supported theoretically by a well-grounded mathematical framework and practically by plug-in noise filtering and normalization preprocessing. We demonstrate the principle and feasibility of the CAM-CM approach on realistic synthetic data involving two functional tissue compartments, and compare the accuracy of parameter estimates obtained with and without PVE elimination using CAM or other relevant techniques. Experimental results show that CAM-CM achieves a significant improvement in the accuracy of kinetic parameter estimation. We apply the algorithm to real DCE-MRI breast cancer data and observe improved pharmacokinetic parameter estimation, separating tumor tissue into regions with differential tracer kinetics on a pixel-by-pixel basis and revealing biologically plausible tumor tissue heterogeneity patterns. This method combines the advantages of multivariate clustering, convex geometry analysis, and compartmental modeling approaches. The open-source MATLAB software of CAM-CM is publicly available from the Web. PMID:21708498

  17. Probabilistic geomechanical analysis of compartmentalization at the Snøhvit CO2 sequestration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaramonte, Laura; White, Joshua A.; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2015-02-01

    Pressure buildup caused by large-scale CO2 injection is a key concern during a carbon sequestration project. Large overpressures can compromise seal integrity, reactivate faults, and induce seismicity. Furthermore, pressure buildup is directly related with storage capacity. In this work we study the geomechanical response to CO2 injection at Snøhvit, to understand the potential for fault reactivation, leakage, and contamination of the producing interval through bounding faults. Furthermore, we evaluate the potential contribution of a structural component to reservoir compartmentalization. We combine simplified analytical models, based on critically stressed fracture theory and a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, with a rigorous sensitivity analysis. Large stress uncertainties are present and reflected in the modeling results. It was found that under the most likely stress state the faults are fairly stable and caprock hydrofracturing would be expected before fault reactivation. In most of the analyzed cases, the critical pressure perturbation needed for reactivation is above 13 MPa, which was the limiting pressure increase before reaching the fracture pressure. Faults were found to be ~ 20% less stable when considering variations in SHmax orientation. In those cases, fault reactivation could be expected before caprock failure if injection continued. However, if the pressure increase did reach the critical values for seal failure estimated under the worst case (and least likely) stress state, no indication of such failure can be observed in the measured pressure response. Finally, the potential role of a structural component in the compartmentalization and fluid migration is difficult to assess due to the stress state uncertainty.

  18. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6-C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 &C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27230732

  19. Cellular compartmentation of cadmium and zinc in relation to other elements in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Küpper, H; Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2000-12-01

    The cellular compartmentation of elements was analysed in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (=Cardaminopsis halleri) using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated tissues. Quantitative data were obtained using oxygen as an internal standard in the analyses of vacuoles, whereas a peak/background ratio method was used for quantification of elements in pollen and dehydrated trichomes. Arabidopsis halleri was found to hyperaccumulate not only Zn but also Cd in the shoot biomass. While large concentrations of Zn and Cd were found in the leaves and roots, flowers contained very little. In roots grown hydroponically, Zn and Cd accumulated in the cell wall of the rhizodermis (root epidermis), mainly due to precipitation of Zn/Cd phosphates. In leaves, the trichomes had by far the largest concentrations of Zn and Cd. Inside the trichomes there was a striking sub-cellular compartmentation, with almost all the Zn and Cd being accumulated in a narrow ring in the trichome base. This distribution pattern was very different from that for Ca and P. The epidermal cells other than trichomes were very small and contained lower concentrations of Zn and Cd than mesophyll cells. In particular, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in the mesophyll cells increased markedly in response to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations in the nutrient solution. This indicates that the mesophyll cells in the leaves of A. halleri are the major storage site for Zn and Cd, and play an important role in their hyperaccumulation.

  20. Compartmentalization of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the larval gut of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Natraj; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2006-09-01

    Allelochemicals play important roles in the plant defense against herbivorous insects. They act as feeding deterrents, interfere with digestion and nutrient absorption, and cause production of potentially dangerous oxidative radicals. This study demonstrates that the distributions of oxidative radicals and of the antioxidant enzymes that eliminate them are compartmentalized in the digestive tract of Spodoptera littoralis larvae. Feeding on diets supplemented with the tannic acid (TA), alpha-solanine, and demissidine, respectively, did not affect the rate of food passage through the digestive tract of larvae but 1.25, 2.5, and 5% TA evoked a strong oxidative response. The amount of the superoxide anion in the foregut tissue and content increased up to 70-fold and the titer of total peroxides in the foregut content about 3-fold. This oxidative stress was associated with enhanced carbonyl content in the foregut tissue proteins, indicative of certain tissue deterioration. Extensive foregut damage was probably prevented by elevated activity of the glutathione S-transferase peroxidase. A complex antioxidant response was elicited in the midgut. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase increased significantly in the midgut tissue and content, and the activity of ascorbate peroxidase rose in the midgut tissue. The enzymes apparently eliminated oxidative radicals passing to midgut from the foregut with the food bolus and thereby prevented carbonylation of the midgut proteins. We postulate that the generation of oxidative radicals in the foregut and the induction of antioxidant defense in the midgut are controlled processes and that their compartmentalization is an important functional feature of the digestive tract. The glycoalkaloid alpha-solanine and the aglycone demissidine applied at 0.05 and 0.1% concentrations had no effect on any of the examined parameters.

  1. The construction of next-generation matrices for compartmental epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, O; Heesterbeek, J A P; Roberts, M G

    2010-06-01

    The basic reproduction number (0) is arguably the most important quantity in infectious disease epidemiology. The next-generation matrix (NGM) is the natural basis for the definition and calculation of (0) where finitely many different categories of individuals are recognized. We clear up confusion that has been around in the literature concerning the construction of this matrix, specifically for the most frequently used so-called compartmental models. We present a detailed easy recipe for the construction of the NGM from basic ingredients derived directly from the specifications of the model. We show that two related matrices exist which we define to be the NGM with large domain and the NGM with small domain. The three matrices together reflect the range of possibilities encountered in the literature for the characterization of (0). We show how they are connected and how their construction follows from the basic model ingredients, and establish that they have the same non-zero eigenvalues, the largest of which is the basic reproduction number (0). Although we present formal recipes based on linear algebra, we encourage the construction of the NGM by way of direct epidemiological reasoning, using the clear interpretation of the elements of the NGM and of the model ingredients. We present a selection of examples as a practical guide to our methods. In the appendix we present an elementary but complete proof that (0) defined as the dominant eigenvalue of the NGM for compartmental systems and the Malthusian parameter r, the real-time exponential growth rate in the early phase of an outbreak, are connected by the properties that (0) > 1 if and only if r > 0, and (0) = 1 if and only if r = 0. PMID:19892718

  2. Subcellular Compartmentation of the Diterpene Carnosic Acid and Its Derivatives in the Leaves of Rosemary1

    PubMed Central

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Alegre, Leonor

    2001-01-01

    The potent antioxidant properties of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extracts have been attributed to its major diterpene, carnosic acid. Carnosic acid has received considerable attention in food science and biomedicine, but little is known about its function in the plant in vivo. We recently found that highly oxidized diterpenes increase in rosemary plants exposed to drought and high light stress as a result of the antioxidant activity of carnosic acid (S. Munné-Bosch, K. Schwarz, L. Alegre [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1047–1052). To elucidate the significance of the antioxidant function of carnosic acid in vivo we measured the relative amounts of carnosic acid and its metabolites in different compartments of rosemary leaves. Subcellular localization studies show that carnosic acid protects chloroplasts from oxidative stress in vivo by following a highly regulated compartmentation of oxidation products. Carnosic acid scavenges free radicals within the chloroplasts, giving rise to diterpene alcohols, mainly isorosmanol. This oxidation product is O-methylated within the chloroplasts, and the resulting form, 11,12-di-O-methylisorosmanol, is transferred to the plasma membrane. This appears to represent a mechanism of a way out for free radicals from chloroplasts. Carnosic acid also undergoes direct O-methylation within the chloroplasts, and its derived product, 12-O-methylcarnosic acid, accumulates in the plasma membrane. O-methylated diterpenes do not display antioxidant activity, but they may influence the stability of the plasma membrane. This study shows the relevance of the compartmentation of carnosic acid metabolism to the protection of rosemary plants from oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:11161064

  3. Plant B vitamin pathways and their compartmentation: a guide for the perplexed.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Svetlana; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Frelin, Océane; Seaver, Samuel M D; Henry, Christopher S; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D

    2012-09-01

    The B vitamins and the cofactors derived from them are essential for life. B vitamin synthesis in plants is consequently as crucial to plants themselves as it is to humans and animals, whose B vitamin nutrition depends largely on plants. The synthesis and salvage pathways for the seven plant B vitamins are now broadly known, but certain enzymes and many transporters have yet to be identified, and the subcellular locations of various reactions are unclear. Although very substantial, what is not known about plant B vitamin pathways is regrettably difficult to discern from the literature or from biochemical pathway databases. Nor do databases accurately represent all that is known about B vitamin pathways-above all their compartmentation-because the facts are scattered throughout the literature, and thus hard to piece together. These problems (i) deter discoveries because newcomers to B vitamins cannot see which mysteries still need solving; and (ii) impede metabolic reconstruction and modelling of B vitamin pathways because genes for reactions or transport steps are missing. This review therefore takes a fresh approach to capture current knowledge of B vitamin pathways in plants. The synthesis pathways, key salvage routes, and their subcellular compartmentation are surveyed in depth, and encoded in the SEED database (http://pubseed.theseed.org/seedviewer.cgi?page=PlantGateway) for Arabidopsis and maize. The review itself and the encoded pathways specifically identify enigmatic or missing reactions, enzymes, and transporters. The SEED-encoded B vitamin pathway collection is a publicly available, expertly curated, one-stop resource for metabolic reconstruction and modeling.

  4. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6–C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 & C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27230732

  5. Interaction of copper(II) complex of compartmental Schiff base ligand N, N'-bis(3-hydroxysalicylidene)ethylenediamine with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghaei, Davar M.; Farvid, Shokouh S.; Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz

    2007-03-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to investigate the interaction between copper(II) complex of compartmental Schiff base ligand (L), N, N'-bis(3-hydroxysalicylidene)ethylenediamine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in 0.1 mol dm -3 phosphate buffer solution adjusted to physiological pH 7.0 containing 20% (w/w) dimethylsulfoxide at room temperature. CD spectra show that the interaction of the copper(II) complex with BSA leads to changes in the α-helical content of BSA and therefore changes in secondary structure of the protein with the slight red shift (2 nm) in CD spectra. From the voltammetric data, i.e. changes in limiting current with addition of BSA, the binding constant ( K) of the interaction of copper(II) complex with BSA was found to be 1.96 × 10 4 dm 3 mol -1. From the shifts in potential with the addition of BSA, the equilibrium constant ratio ( K2/ K1) for the binding of the oxidized Cu IIL ( K1) and reduced Cu IL ( K2) species to BSA was found to be 3.77, which shows that the reduced form Cu IL is bound more strongly to BSA than the oxidized form Cu IIL.

  6. Compartmentalized and contrasted response of ectomycorrhizal and soil fungal communities of Scots pine forests along elevation gradients in France and Spain.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Ana; Santamaría-Pérez, Blanca; Rabasa, Sonia G; Coince, Aurore; Marçais, Benoit; Buée, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Fungi are principal actors of forest soils implied in many ecosystem services and the mediation of tree's responses. Forecasting fungal responses to environmental changes is necessary for maintaining forest productivity, although our partial understanding of how abiotic and biotic factors affect fungal communities is restricting the predictions. We examined fungal communities of Pinus sylvestris along elevation gradients to check potential responses to climate change-associated factors. Fungi of roots and soils were analysed at a regional scale, by using a high-throughput sequencing approach. Overall soil fungal richness increased with pH, whereas it did not vary with climate. However, when representative sub-assemblages, i.e. Ascomycetes/Basidiomycetes, and families were analysed, they differentially answered to climatic and edaphic variables. This response was dependent on where they settled, i.e. soil versus roots, and/or on their lifestyle, i.e. mycorrhizal or not, suggesting different potential functional weights within the community. Our results revealed a highly compartmentalized and contrasted response of fungal communities in forest soils. The different response of fungal sub-assemblages indicated a range of possible selective direct and indirect (i.e. via host) impacts of climatic variations on these communities, of unknown functional consequences, that helps in understanding potential fungal responses under future global change scenarios. PMID:25953485

  7. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm. PMID:26235337

  8. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  9. Intracellular calcium puffs in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Radding, W; Jordan, S E; Hester, R B; Blair, H C

    1999-12-15

    We studied intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in acid-secreting bone-attached osteoclasts, which produce a high-calcium acidic extracellular compartment. Acid secretion and [Ca(2+)](i) were followed using H(+)-restricted dyes and fura-2 or fluo-3. Whole cell calcium of acid-secreting osteoclasts was approximately 100 nM, similar to cells on inert substrate that do not secrete acid. However, measurements in restricted areas of the cell showed [Ca(2+)](i) transients to 500-1000 nM consistent with calcium puffs, transient (millisecond) localized calcium elevations reported in other cells. Spot measurements at 50-ms intervals indicated that puffs were typically less than 400 ms. Transients did not propagate in waves across the cell in scanning confocal measurements. Calcium puffs occurred mainly over regions of acid secretion as determined using lysotracker red DND99 and occurred at irregular periods averaging 5-15 s in acid secreting cells, but were rare in lysotracker-negative nonsecretory cells. The calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, cell-surface calcium transport inhibitors lanthanum or barium, and the endoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin had variable acute effects on the mean [Ca(2+)](i) and puff frequency. However, none of these agents prevented calcium puff activity, suggesting that the mechanism producing the puffs is independent of these processes. We conclude that [Ca(2+)](i) transients in osteoclasts are increased in acid-secreting osteoclasts, and that the puffs occur mainly near the acid-transporting membrane. Cell membrane acid transport requires calcium, suggesting that calcium puffs function to maintain acid secretion. However, membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was insensitive to calcium in the 100 nM-1 microM range. Thus, any effects of calcium puffs on osteoclastic acid transport must be indirect.

  10. Intracellular structure and nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular movement of any solute or particle accords with one of two general schemes: either it takes place predominantly in the solution phase or it occurs by dynamic interactions with solid-state structures. If nucleocytoplasmic exchanges of macromolecules and complexes are predominantly solution-phase processes, i.e., if the former ("diffusionist") perspective applies, then the only significant structures in nucleocytoplasmic transport are the pore complexes. However, if such exchanges accord with the latter ("solid-state") perspective, then the roles of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton in nucleocytoplasmic transport are potentially, at least, as important as that of the pore complexes. The role of the nucleoskeleton in mRNA transport is more difficult to evaluate than that of the cytoskeleton because it is less well characterized, and current evidence does not exclude either perspective. However, the balance of evidence favors a solid-state scheme. It is argued that ribosomal subunits are also more likely to migrate by a solid-state rather than a diffusionist mechanism, though the opposite is true of proteins and tRNAs. Moreover, recent data on the effects of viral proteins on intranuclear RNA processing and migration accord with the solid-state perspective. In view of this balance of evidence, three possible solid-state mechanisms for nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport are described and evaluated. The explanatory advantage of solid-state models is contrasted with the heuristic advantage of diffusion theory, but it is argued that diffusion theory itself, even aided by modern computational techniques and numerical and graphical approaches, cannot account for data describing the movements of materials within the cell. Therefore, the mechanisms envisaged in a diffusionist perspective cannot be confined to diffusion alone, but must include other processes such as bulk fluid flow.

  11. HIV-1 Nef sequence and functional compartmentalization in the gut is not due to differential cytotoxic T lymphocyte selective pressure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Martha J; Frohnen, Patricia; Ibarrondo, F Javier; Reed, Diane; Iyer, Varun; Ng, Hwee L; Elliott, Julie; Yang, Otto O; Anton, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The gut is the largest lymphoid organ in the body and a site of active HIV-1 replication and immune surveillance. The gut is a reservoir of persistent infection in some individuals with fully suppressed plasma viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) although the cause of this persistence is unknown. The HIV-1 accessory protein Nef contributes to persistence through multiple functions including immune evasion and increasing infectivity. Previous studies showed that Nef's function is shaped by cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and that there are distinct populations of Nef within tissue compartments. We asked whether Nef's sequence and/or function are compartmentalized in the gut and how compartmentalization relates to local CTL immune responses. Primary nef quasispecies from paired plasma and sigmoid colon biopsies from chronically infected subjects not on therapy were sequenced and cloned into Env(-) Vpu(-) pseudotyped reporter viruses. CTL responses were mapped by IFN-γ ELISpot using expanded CD8+ cells from blood and gut with pools of overlapping peptides covering the entire HIV proteome. CD4 and MHC Class I Nef-mediated downregulation was measured by flow cytometry. Multiple tests indicated compartmentalization of nef sequences in 5 of 8 subjects. There was also compartmentalization of function with MHC Class I downregulation relatively well preserved, but significant loss of CD4 downregulation specifically by gut quasispecies in 5 of 7 subjects. There was no compartmentalization of CTL responses in 6 of 8 subjects, and the selective pressure on quasispecies correlated with the magnitude CTL response regardless of location. These results demonstrate that Nef adapts via diverse pathways to local selective pressures within gut mucosa, which may be predominated by factors other than CTL responses such as target cell availability. The finding of a functionally distinct population within gut mucosa offers some insight into how HIV-1 may persist in

  12. A hybrid input-output approach to model metabolic systems: an application to intracellular thiamine kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, R; Guglielmann, R; Ironi, L; Patrini, C

    2001-08-01

    Models of the dynamics of complex metabolic systems offer potential benefits to the deep comprehension of the system under study as well as for the performance of certain tasks. Unfortunately, dynamic modeling of a great deal of metabolic systems may be problematic due to the incompleteness of the available knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and to the lack of an adequate observational data set. In theory, a valid alternative to classical structural modeling through ordinary differential equations could be represented by input-output approaches. But, in practice, such methods, which learn the nonlinear dynamics of the system from input-output data, fail when the experimental data set is poor either in size or in quality. Such a situation is not rare in the case of metabolic systems. This paper deals with a hybrid approach which aims at overcoming the problems addressed above. More specifically, it allows us to solve the identification problems of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The method, which is half way between the structural and input-output approach, uses the outcomes of the simulation of a qualitative structural model to build a good initialization of a fuzzy system identifier. Such an initialization allows us to efficiently cope with both the incompleteness of knowledge and the inadequacy of the available data set, and to derive an input-output model of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The comparison of the predictions of the intracellular thiamine kinetics obtained by the application of such a model with those obtained by traditional approaches, namely compartmental models, neural networks, and fuzzy systems, highlighted a better performance of our model. As the structural assumptions are relaxed, we obtained a model slightly less informative than a purely structural one but robust enough to be used as a simulator. The paper also discusses the interpretative potential offered by such a model

  13. Detection of intracellular lactate with localized diffusion { 1H- 13C}-spectroscopy in rat glioma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Lin, Joseph C.; DelaBarre, Lance; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diffusion characteristic of lactate and alanine in a brain tumor model to that of normal brain metabolites known to be mainly intracellular such as N-acetylaspartate or creatine. The diffusion of 13C-labeled metabolites was measured in vivo with localized NMR spectroscopy at 9.4 T (400 MHz) using a previously described localization and editing pulse sequence known as ACED-STEAM ('adiabatic carbon editing and decoupling'). 13C-labeled glucose was administered and the apparent diffusion coefficients of the glycolytic products, { 1H- 13C}-lactate and { 1H- 13C}-alanine, were determined in rat intracerebral 9L glioma. To obtain insights into { 1H- 13C}-lactate compartmentation (intra- versus extracellular), the pulse sequence used very large diffusion weighting (50 ms/μm 2). Multi-exponential diffusion attenuation of the lactate metabolite signals was observed. The persistence of a lactate signal at very large diffusion weighting provided direct experimental evidence of significant intracellular lactate concentration. To investigate the spatial distribution of lactate and other metabolites, 1H spectroscopic images were also acquired. Lactate and choline-containing compounds were consistently elevated in tumor tissue, but not in necrotic regions and surrounding normal-appearing brain. Overall, these findings suggest that lactate is mainly associated with tumor tissue and that within the time-frame of these experiments at least some of the glycolytic product ([ 13C] lactate) originates from an intracellular compartment.

  14. Microspectroscopic imaging tracks the intracellular processing of a signal transduction protein: fluorescent-labeled protein kinase C beta I.

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaens, P I; Jovin, T M

    1996-01-01

    We have devised a microspectroscopic strategy for assessing the intracellular (re)distribution and the integrity of the primary structure of proteins involved in signal transduction. The purified proteins are fluorescent-labeled in vitro and reintroduced into the living cell. The localization and molecular state of fluorescent-labeled protein kinase C beta I isozyme were assessed by a combination of quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, and novel determinations of fluorescence resonance energy transfer based on photobleaching digital imaging microscopy. The intensity and fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency images demonstrate the rapid nuclear translocation and ensuing fragmentation of protein kinase C beta I in BALB/c3T3 fibroblasts upon phorbol ester stimulation, and suggest distinct, compartmentalized roles for the regulatory and catalytic fragments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8710884

  15. Resolving the Compartmentation and Function of C4 Photosynthesis in the Single-Cell C4 Species Bienertia sinuspersici1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Offermann, Sascha; Okita, Thomas W.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Bienertia sinuspersici is a land plant known to perform C4 photosynthesis through the location of dimorphic chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic domains within a single photosynthetic cell. A protocol was developed with isolated protoplasts to obtain peripheral chloroplasts (P-CP), a central compartment (CC), and chloroplasts from the CC (C-CP) to study the subcellular localization of photosynthetic functions. Analyses of these preparations established intracellular compartmentation of processes to support a NAD-malic enzyme (ME)-type C4 cycle. Western-blot analyses indicated that the CC has Rubisco from the C3 cycle, the C4 decarboxylase NAD-ME, a mitochondrial isoform of aspartate aminotransferase, and photorespiratory markers, while the C-CP and P-CP have high levels of Rubisco and pyruvate, Pidikinase, respectively. Other enzymes for supporting a NAD-ME cycle via an aspartate-alanine shuttle, carbonic anhydrase, phosophoenolpyruvate carboxylase, alanine, and an isoform of aspartate aminotransferase are localized in the cytosol. Functional characterization by photosynthetic oxygen evolution revealed that only the C-CP have a fully operational C3 cycle, while both chloroplast types have the capacity to photoreduce 3-phosphoglycerate. The P-CP were enriched in a putative pyruvate transporter and showed light-dependent conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate. There is a larger investment in chloroplasts in the central domain than in the peripheral domain (6-fold more chloroplasts and 4-fold more chlorophyll). The implications of this uneven distribution for the energetics of the C4 and C3 cycles are discussed. The results indicate that peripheral and central compartment chloroplasts in the single-cell C4 species B. sinuspersici function analogous to mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type C4 species. PMID:21263039

  16. Intracellularly induced cyclophilins play an important role in stress adaptation and virulence of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Roset, Mara S; García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-02-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells.

  17. Intracellularly Induced Cyclophilins Play an Important Role in Stress Adaptation and Virulence of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells. PMID:23230297

  18. High-resolution analysis of gut environment and bacterial microbiota reveals functional compartmentation of the gut in wood-feeding higher termites (Nasutitermes spp.).

    PubMed

    Köhler, Tim; Dietrich, Carsten; Scheffrahn, Rudolf H; Brune, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Higher termites are characterized by a purely prokaryotic gut microbiota and an increased compartmentation of their intestinal tract. In soil-feeding species, each gut compartment has different physicochemical conditions and is colonized by a specific microbial community. Although considerable information has accumulated also for wood-feeding species of the genus Nasutitermes, including cellulase activities and metagenomic data, a comprehensive study linking physicochemical gut conditions with the structure of the microbial communities in the different gut compartments is lacking. In this study, we measured high-resolution profiles of H(2), O(2), pH, and redox potential in the gut of Nasutitermes corniger termites, determined the fermentation products accumulating in the individual gut compartments, and analyzed the bacterial communities in detail by pyrotag sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA genes. The dilated hindgut paunch (P3 compartment) was the only anoxic gut region, showed the highest density of bacteria, and accumulated H(2) to high partial pressures (up to 12 kPa). Molecular hydrogen is apparently produced by a dense community of Spirochaetes and Fibrobacteres, which also dominate the gut of other Nasutitermes species. All other compartments, such as the alkaline P1 compartment (average pH, 10.0), showed high redox potentials and comprised small but distinct populations characteristic for each gut region. In the crop and the posterior hindgut compartments, the community was even more diverse than in the paunch. Similarities in the communities of the posterior hindgut and crop suggested that proctodeal trophallaxis or coprophagy also occurs in higher termites. The large sampling depths of pyrotag sequencing in combination with the determination of important physicochemical parameters allow cautious conclusions concerning the functions of particular bacterial lineages in the respective gut sections to be drawn. PMID:22544239

  19. High-Resolution Analysis of Gut Environment and Bacterial Microbiota Reveals Functional Compartmentation of the Gut in Wood-Feeding Higher Termites (Nasutitermes spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Tim; Dietrich, Carsten; Scheffrahn, Rudolf H.

    2012-01-01

    Higher termites are characterized by a purely prokaryotic gut microbiota and an increased compartmentation of their intestinal tract. In soil-feeding species, each gut compartment has different physicochemical conditions and is colonized by a specific microbial community. Although considerable information has accumulated also for wood-feeding species of the genus Nasutitermes, including cellulase activities and metagenomic data, a comprehensive study linking physicochemical gut conditions with the structure of the microbial communities in the different gut compartments is lacking. In this study, we measured high-resolution profiles of H2, O2, pH, and redox potential in the gut of Nasutitermes corniger termites, determined the fermentation products accumulating in the individual gut compartments, and analyzed the bacterial communities in detail by pyrotag sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA genes. The dilated hindgut paunch (P3 compartment) was the only anoxic gut region, showed the highest density of bacteria, and accumulated H2 to high partial pressures (up to 12 kPa). Molecular hydrogen is apparently produced by a dense community of Spirochaetes and Fibrobacteres, which also dominate the gut of other Nasutitermes species. All other compartments, such as the alkaline P1 compartment (average pH, 10.0), showed high redox potentials and comprised small but distinct populations characteristic for each gut region. In the crop and the posterior hindgut compartments, the community was even more diverse than in the paunch. Similarities in the communities of the posterior hindgut and crop suggested that proctodeal trophallaxis or coprophagy also occurs in higher termites. The large sampling depths of pyrotag sequencing in combination with the determination of important physicochemical parameters allow cautious conclusions concerning the functions of particular bacterial lineages in the respective gut sections to be drawn. PMID:22544239

  20. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity.

  1. Visualization of Intracellular Tyrosinase Activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes produce the melanin pigments in melanosomes and these organelles protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Tyrosinase is the key cuproenzyme which initiates the pigment synthesis using its substrate amino acid tyrosine or L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Moreover, the activity of tyrosinase directly correlates to the cellular pigmentation. Defects in tyrosinase transport to melanosomes or mutations in the enzyme or reduced intracellular copper levels results in loss of tyrosinase activity in melanosomes, commonly observed in albinism. Here, we described a method to detect the intracellular activity of tyrosinase in mouse melanocytes. This protocol will visualize the active tyrosinase present in the intracellular vesicles or organelles including melanosomes. PMID:27231711

  2. Spatial aspects of intracellular information processing.

    PubMed

    Kinkhabwala, Ali; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2010-02-01

    The computational properties of intracellular biochemical networks, for which the cell is assumed to be a 'well-mixed' reactor, have already been widely characterized. What has so far not received systematic treatment is the important role of space in many intracellular computations. Spatial network computations can be divided into two broad categories: those required for essential spatial processes (e.g. polarization, chemotaxis, division, and development) and those for which space is simply used as an extra dimension to expand the computational power of the network. Several pertinent recent examples of each category are discussed that illustrate the often conceptually subtle role of space in the processing of intracellular information. PMID:20096560

  3. A mesoporous silica nanoparticle with charge-convertible pore walls for efficient intracellular protein delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Sung; Kim, Chan Woo; Lee, Hong Jae; Hye Choi, Ji; Lee, Se Geun; Yun, Young-Pil; Kwon, Ick Chan; Lee, Seung Jin; Jeong, Seo Young; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2010-06-01

    We report a smart mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) with a pore surface designed to undergo charge conversion in intracellular endosomal condition. The surface of mesopores in the silica nanoparticles was engineered to have pH-hydrolyzable citraconic amide. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses confirmed the successful modification of the pore surfaces. MSNs (MSN-Cit) with citraconic amide functionality on the pore surfaces exhibited a negative zeta potential (-10 mV) at pH 7.4 because of the presence of carboxylate end groups. At cellular endosomal pH (~5.0), MSN-Cit have a positive zeta potential (16 mV) indicating the dramatic charge conversion from negative to positive by hydrolysis of surface citraconic amide. Cytochrome c (Cyt c) of positive charges could be incorporated into the pores of MSN-Cit by electrostatic interactions. The release of Cyt c can be controlled by adjusting the pH of the release media. At pH 7.4, the Cyt c release was retarded, whereas, at pH 5.0, MSN-Cit facilitated the release of Cyt c. The released Cyt c maintained the enzymatic activity of native Cyt c. Hemolytic activity of MSN-Cit over red blood cells (RBCs) was more pronounced at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.0, indicating the capability of intracellular endosomal escape of MSN carriers. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that MSN-Cit effectively released Cyt c in endosomal compartments after uptake by cancer cells. The MSN developed in this work may serve as efficient intracellular carriers of many cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins.

  4. Effects of pH on contraction of rabbit fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P B; Kushmerick, M J

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated (a) effects of varying proton concentration on force and shortening velocity of glycerinated muscle fibers, (b) differences between these effects on fibers from psoas (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles, possibly due to differences in the actomyosin ATPase kinetic cycles, and (c) whether changes in intracellular pH explain altered contractility typically associated with prolonged excitation of fast, glycolytic muscle. The pH range was chosen to cover the physiological pH range (6.0-7.5) as well as pH 8.0, which has often been used for in vitro measurements of myosin ATPase activity. Steady-state isometric force increased monotonically (by about threefold) as pH was increased from pH 6.0; force in soleus (slow) fibers was less affected by pH than in psoas (fast) fibers. For both fiber types, the velocity of unloaded shortening was maximum near resting intracellular pH in vivo and was decreased at acid pH (by about one-half). At pH 6.0, force increased when the pH buffer concentration was decreased from 100 mM, as predicted by inadequate pH buffering and pH heterogeneity in the fiber. This heterogeneity was modeled by net proton consumption within the fiber, due to production by the actomyosin ATPase coupled to consumption by the creatine kinase reaction, with replenishment by diffusion of protons in equilibrium with a mobile buffer. Lactate anion had little mechanical effect. Inorganic phosphate (15 mM total) had an additive effect of depressing force that was similar at pH 7.1 and 6.0. By directly affecting the actomyosin interaction, decreased pH is at least partly responsible for the observed decreases in force and velocity in stimulated muscle with sufficient glycolytic capacity to decrease pH. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2969265

  5. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na+/K+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na+/K+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. PMID:26173069

  6. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  7. The paraveinal mesophyll of soybean leaves in relation to assimilate transfer and compartmentation : II. Structural, metabolic and compartmental changes during reproductive growth.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, V R; Giaquinta, R T

    1983-04-01

    Nitrogen and carbohydrate assimilates were temporally and spatially compartmented among various cell types in soybean (Glycine max L., Merr.) leaves during seed filling. The paraveinal mesophyll (PVM), a unique cell layer found in soybean, was demonstrated to function in the synthesis, compartmentation and remobilization of nitrogen reserves prior to and during the seed-filling stages. At anthesis, the PVM vacuoles contain substantial protein which completely disappears by two weeks into the seed filling. Distinct changes in the PVM cytoplasm, tonoplast and organelles were correlated with the presence or absence of the vacuolar material. Microautoradiography following the accumulation of several radiolabeled sugars and amino acids demonstrated the glycoprotein nature of the vacuolar material. Incorporation of methionine, leucine, glucose, and glucosamine resulted in heavy labelling of the PVM vacuole, in contrast to galactose, proline, and mannose which resulted in a much reduced labelling pattern. In addition, starch is unequally compartmented and degraded among the various leaf cells during seed filling. At the end of the photoperiod at the flowering stage, the highest starch accumulation was in the second palisade layer followed by the spongy mesophyll and the first (uppermost) palisade layer. Starch in the first palisade layer was completely degraded during the dark whereas the starch in the second palisade and spongy mesophyll was not remobilized to any appreciable extent. By mid-podfilling (approximately five weeks postanthesis) starch was absent in the first palisade layer at the end of the photoperiod while the second palisade and spongy mesophyll layers contained substantial starch. Starch was remobilized from these latter cells during the remainder of seed filling when current photosynthetic production is low. Structural changes associated with cell senescence first appear in the upper palisade layer and then progress (excluding the PVM) to the second

  8. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  9. The distribution of intracellular ions in the avian salt gland

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of salt secretion in the avian salt gland, we used quantitative electron probe microanalysis to measure the intracellular elemental concentrations in dry cryosections of unspecialized and partially specialized secretory epithelial cells from fresh water- and salt water-adapted ducklings, respectively. In conjunction with this, human and duckling erythrocytes were also analyzed, since these provided the experimental basis for using in situ erythrocytes as standards for determining the local water content of epithelia from the analysis of dried cryosections. The microprobe results from both types of erythrocytes compared favorably with chemical determinations of elemental concentrations. The nucleated avian erythrocytes, whose wet-weight elemental concentrations were determined by a compartmental analysis that required neither a peripheral standard nor a measure of the local mass, revealed a marked accumulation of P and K in the nucleus (388 and 190 mmol/kg wet wt, respectively) relative to the cytoplasm (67 and 85 mmol/kg wet wt). In both developmental states of the epithelial cells, the nucleus and apical cytoplasm had essentially similar and unremarkable concentrations of Na (76 and 83 mmol/kg dry wt, respectively, in the adapted cells vs. 72 and 81 mmol/kg dry wt in the control cells) and K (602 and 423 mmol/kg dry wt vs. 451 and 442 mmol/kg dry wt). Chloride, however, which was in general rather high, was significantly depressed in the apical cytoplasm of adapted cells only (164 and 124 mmol/kg dry wt in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively, of adapted cells (P less than 0.05) vs. 138 and 157 mmol/kg dry wt for control cells (P less than 0.05). Cation concentrations (Na + K) were elevated approximately 15% in the basal regions of adapted cells as compared with apical cytoplasm. When tissue water variations are accounted for, the results suggest that: (a) an active, energy-requiring process is responsible for chloride accumulation

  10. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  11. Three-Dimensional Compartmentalization of Subsurface Ground Water Flow in Eastern North American Mesozoic Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. P.; Sutphin, D. M.; Daniels, D. L.; Pierce, H. A.; Smoot, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    An extensive network of diabase intrusions occurs in several of the largest Mesozoic basins of Eastern North America, including the Culpeper, Gettysburg, Newark, and Hartford basins. Within each, great dikes, inclined sheets, and lopoliths cut through the surrounding sandstones, siltstones, and conglomerates in ways that subdivide the regional subsurface flow field, and thus compartmentalize the basin. In the Culpeper basin, for example, the scale- and direction-dependent permeability of diabase spans the range 10-17 to 10-21 m2, whereas the permeability of the heavily fractured sediments is in the range 10-12 to 10-14 m2. Thus there is at least three, and upwards of nine, orders of magnitude difference in permeability between the diabase and the surrounding sediments. This great permeability contrast is at the heart of basin compartmentalization and the related subsurface hydrologic phenomena. In the Culpeper basin, our understanding of compartmentalization is guided by the following geological, geophysical, and hydrologic measurements and observations: (1) Short wavelength aeromagnetic anomalies constrain the geometry of the up-turned margins of diabase lopoliths. These lopoliths bound compartments horizontally and vertically; (2) Deep compartment structure has been resolved to 800 meters by in-situ AudioMagnetotelluric experiments; (3) Alignments of hornfels-hosted springs parallel to the diabase-hornfels contact along a compartment wall. We posit that eastward-migrating ground water is forced up and out to the surface when it comes into contact with the low permeability diabase at depth; (4) Direct observations of high fluid flow from bedding plane fractures within hornfels in the diabase-hornfels contact ``no-flow boundary condition'' region of a compartment's walls; (5) Direct drilling into and through a compartment's margins. Pumping yields within diabase are ~2 gal./min., whereas penetration of the compartment margins (drilling from diabase into the

  12. Engineering nanostructured polymer blends with controlled nanoparticle location for excellent microwave absorption: a compartmentalized approach.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Kar, Goutam Prasanna; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-07-14

    In order to obtain better materials, control over the precise location of nanoparticles is indispensable. It is shown here that ordered arrangements of nanoparticles, possessing different characteristics (electrical/magnetic dipoles), in the blend structure can result in excellent microwave absorption. This is manifested from a high reflection loss of ca. -67 dB for the best blend structure designed here. To attenuate electromagnetic radiation, the key parameters of high electrical conductivity and large dielectric/magnetic loss are targeted here by including a conductive material [multiwall carbon nanotubes, MWNTs], ferroelectric nanostructured material with associated relaxations in the GHz frequency [barium titanate, BT] and lossy ferromagnetic nanoparticles [nickel ferrite, NF]. In this study, bi-continuous structures were designed using 50/50 (by wt) blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). The MWNTs were modified using an electron acceptor molecule, a derivative of perylenediimide, which facilitates π-π stacking with the nanotubes and stimulates efficient charge transport in the blends. The nanoscopic materials have specific affinity towards the PVDF phase. Hence, by introducing surface-active groups, an ordered arrangement can be tailored. To accomplish this, both BT and NF were first hydroxylated followed by the introduction of amine-terminal groups on the surface. The latter facilitated nucleophilic substitution reactions with PC and resulted in their precise location. In this study, we have shown for the first time that by a compartmentalized approach, superior EM attenuation can be achieved. For instance, when the nanoparticles were localized exclusively in the PVDF phase or in both the phases, the minimum reflection losses were ca. -18 dB (for the MWNT/BT mixture) and -29 dB (for the MWNT/NF mixture), and the shielding occurred primarily through reflection. Interestingly, by adopting the compartmentalized approach wherein the

  13. Compartmental modeling of PAH transport in soil column experiments under variably-saturated flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, F.; Sericano, J. L.; Wade, T. L.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from PAH-laden soils or sediments is important to understand their bioavailability, and ultimately assess the environmental risk of PAH transport from surface soils into the groundwater. The transport and kinetics of three PAH from a spiked soil layer (2-3 cm soil depth), Phenanthrene-d10 (1900 ng/g), Naphthalene-d8 (1500 ng/g), and Pyrene-d10 (1800 ng/g), were investigated by performing a series of 8 rainfall events during 25 days in two large, replicate soil columns (length: 35 cm; diameter: 14.5 cm; 1 Pore Volume [PV]=2.29 L) under variably-saturated flow conditions. The water-methanol displacing solutions were at volumetric fractions of 0.3 and 0.6 during day 1 (E1) through E8 and E12-E22, respectively. Soil matric potential (h) was monitored at 5-cm and 20-cm depth and volumetric water content (θ) at 12.5-cm and 27.5-cm depth. Soil solution was sampled at 5 cm- (n=46) and 27.5-cm depth (n=46), and the effluent at the bottom of the column (n=163). HYDRUS-1D was used for inverse modeling of h and θ data and to predict θ at specific times and soil depth increments. First-order kinetics, compartmental models describing the transfer of PAH from the soil compartment to the soil solution compartment (desorption) and vice versa (sorption), were used to estimate mass transfer rates (φs, sorption; φd, desorption; φe, elimination), PAH mass in each compartment, and partition coefficients (Kd). Phenanthrene breakthrough curve could be interpreted through a two-parameter, two-compartment model corresponding to the common two-site sorption model, whose parameter estimates (and 95% confidence intervals) were φd=2.72 (2.31, 3.19) PV-1 and φe=4.67 (3.82, 5.7 ) PV-1. Naphthalene breakthrough curve followed a simple one-compartment elimination model, φe=2.0 (1.9, 2.1) PV-1, and that of Pyrene a three-parameter, two-compartment model, φs=0.0454 (0.00853, 0.0603) PV-1, φd=0.165 (0.0319, 0.855) PV

  14. Engineering nanostructured polymer blends with controlled nanoparticle location for excellent microwave absorption: a compartmentalized approach.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Kar, Goutam Prasanna; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-07-14

    In order to obtain better materials, control over the precise location of nanoparticles is indispensable. It is shown here that ordered arrangements of nanoparticles, possessing different characteristics (electrical/magnetic dipoles), in the blend structure can result in excellent microwave absorption. This is manifested from a high reflection loss of ca. -67 dB for the best blend structure designed here. To attenuate electromagnetic radiation, the key parameters of high electrical conductivity and large dielectric/magnetic loss are targeted here by including a conductive material [multiwall carbon nanotubes, MWNTs], ferroelectric nanostructured material with associated relaxations in the GHz frequency [barium titanate, BT] and lossy ferromagnetic nanoparticles [nickel ferrite, NF]. In this study, bi-continuous structures were designed using 50/50 (by wt) blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). The MWNTs were modified using an electron acceptor molecule, a derivative of perylenediimide, which facilitates π-π stacking with the nanotubes and stimulates efficient charge transport in the blends. The nanoscopic materials have specific affinity towards the PVDF phase. Hence, by introducing surface-active groups, an ordered arrangement can be tailored. To accomplish this, both BT and NF were first hydroxylated followed by the introduction of amine-terminal groups on the surface. The latter facilitated nucleophilic substitution reactions with PC and resulted in their precise location. In this study, we have shown for the first time that by a compartmentalized approach, superior EM attenuation can be achieved. For instance, when the nanoparticles were localized exclusively in the PVDF phase or in both the phases, the minimum reflection losses were ca. -18 dB (for the MWNT/BT mixture) and -29 dB (for the MWNT/NF mixture), and the shielding occurred primarily through reflection. Interestingly, by adopting the compartmentalized approach wherein the

  15. Silica nanoparticles for cell imaging and intracellular sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniowska, B.; Nooney, R.; Wencel, D.; McDonagh, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications. In particular, nanobiophotonic approaches using fluorescence offers the potential of high sensitivity and selectivity in applications such as cell imaging and intracellular sensing. In this review, we focus primarily on the use of fluorescent silica NPs for these applications and, in so doing, aim to enhance and complement the key recent review articles on these topics. We summarize the main synthetic approaches, namely the Stöber and microemulsion processes, and, in this context, we deal with issues in relation to both covalent and physical incorporation of different types of dyes in the particles. The important issue of NP functionalization for conjugation to biomolecules is discussed and strategies published in the recent literature are highlighted and evaluated. We cite recent examples of the use of fluorescent silica NPs for cell imaging in the areas of cancer, stem cell and infectious disease research, and we review the current literature on the use of silica NPs for intracellular sensing of oxygen, pH and ionic species. We include a short final section which seeks to identify the main challenges and obstacles in relation to the potential widespread use of these particles for in vivo diagnostics and therapeutics.

  16. Fluorescent nanosensors for intracellular measurements: synthesis, characterization, calibration, and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arpan S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Esler, Tim; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular acidification is important for understanding fundamental biological pathways as well as developing effective therapeutic strategies. Fluorescent pH nanosensors are an enabling technology for real-time monitoring of intracellular acidification. The physicochemical characteristics of nanosensors can be engineered to target specific cellular compartments and respond to external stimuli. Therefore, nanosensors represent a versatile approach for probing biological pathways inside cells. The fundamental components of nanosensors comprise a pH-sensitive fluorophore (signal transducer) and a pH-insensitive reference fluorophore (internal standard) immobilized in an inert non-toxic matrix. The inert matrix prevents interference of cellular components with the sensing elements as well as minimizing potentially harmful effects of some fluorophores on cell function. Fluorescent nanosensors are synthesized using standard laboratory equipment and are detectable by non-invasive widely accessible imaging techniques. The outcomes of studies employing this technology are dependent on reliable methodology for performing measurements. In particular, special consideration must be given to conditions for sensor calibration, uptake conditions and parameters for image analysis. We describe procedures for: (1) synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide and silica based nanosensors, (2) nanosensor calibration and (3) performing measurements using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24474936

  17. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications. PMID:22110866

  18. Optimization of intracellular product release from Neisseria denitrificans using microfluidizer.

    PubMed

    Stupak, Robert; Makauskas, Nerijus; Radzevičius, Kostas; Valančius, Zenonas

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of Neisseria denitrificans cells by microfluidizer was optimized using a factorial experiments design. The pH, pretreatment time, cell concentration, NaCl, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Triton X-100 concentrations showed significant impact on disruption process and the process was optimized using central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM). Investigation revealed optimum conditions: 90 min pretreatment at pH 9.0 containing 110 g L(-1) cells (dry cell weight), 50 mM NaCl, 10 mM EDTA, and 0.2% Triton X-100. At optimized conditions, the disruption rate increased twofold, up to 5.62 ± 0.27 × 10(-3) MPa(-a); meanwhile, yield of intracellular content was increased by 26%, with 1 g of cells resulting in 113.2 ± 8.2 mg proteins, 12.1 ± 0.7 mg nucleic acids, 21.0 ± 1.2 mg polysaccharides, 0.99 ± 0.08 kU glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and 10,100 ± 110 kU restriction endonuclease NdeI endonuclease. Particle size distribution analysis revealed nearly twofold larger cell lysate particles with diameter of 120 nm. For optimal release of intracellular content, 9200 J/g of energy was needed (95% confidence), yielding 6900 J/g energy savings. Model equations generated from RSM on cell disruption of N. denitrificans were found adequate to determine significant factors and its interaction. The results showed that optimized combination of known pretreatment and disruption methods could considerably improve cell disruption efficiency.

  19. Controlling composition and color characteristics of Monascus pigments by pH and nitrogen sources in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Shi, K