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Sample records for intracellular ph compartmentation

  1. Work-Related Pain in Extrinsic Finger Extensor Musculature of Instrumentalists Is Associated with Intracellular pH Compartmentation during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Torres, Angel; Rosset-Llobet, Jaume; Pujol, Jesus; Fàbregas, Sílvia; Gonzalez-de-Suso, Jose-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Although non-specific pain in the upper limb muscles of workers engaged in mild repetitive tasks is a common occupational health problem, much is unknown about the associated structural and biochemical changes. In this study, we compared the muscle energy metabolism of the extrinsic finger extensor musculature in instrumentalists suffering from work-related pain with that of healthy control instrumentalists using non-invasive phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). We hypothesize that the affected muscles will show alterations related with an impaired energy metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 19 volunteer instrumentalists (11 subjects with work-related pain affecting the extrinsic finger extensor musculature and 8 healthy controls). We used 31P-MRS to find deviations from the expected metabolic response to exercise in phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), Pi/PCr ratio and intracellular pH kinetics. We observed a reduced finger extensor exercise tolerance in instrumentalists with myalgia, an intracellular pH compartmentation in the form of neutral and acid compartments, as detected by Pi peak splitting in 31P-MRS spectra, predominantly in myalgic muscles, and a strong association of this pattern with the condition. Conclusions/Significance Work-related pain in the finger extrinsic extensor muscles is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise, non-invasively detectable by 31P-MRS and consistent with the simultaneous energy production by oxidative metabolism and glycolysis. We speculate that a deficit in energy production by oxidative pathways may exist in the affected muscles. Two possible explanations for this would be the partial and/or local reduction of blood supply and the reduction of the muscle oxidative capacity itself. PMID:20161738

  2. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  3. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  4. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  5. Intracellular pH of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbin, E. M.; Davy, S. K.

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) is likely to play a key role in maintaining the functional success of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, yet until now the pHi of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) has never been quantified. Flow cytometry was used in conjunction with the ratiometric fluorescent dye BCECF to monitor changes in pHi over a daily light/dark cycle. The pHi of Symbiodinium type B1 freshly isolated from the model sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella was 7.25 ± 0.01 (mean ± SE) in the light and 7.10 ± 0.02 in the dark. A comparable effect of irradiance was seen across a variety of cultured Symbiodinium genotypes (types A1, B1, E1, E2, F1, and F5) which varied between pHi 7.21-7.39 in the light and 7.06-7.14 in the dark. Of note, there was a significant genotypic difference in pHi, irrespective of irradiance.

  6. Intracellular diffusion, binding, and compartmentalization of the fluorescent calcium indicators indo-1 and fura-2.

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, L. A.; Wier, W. G.

    1990-01-01

    We studied intracellular binding and possible compartmentalization of the fluorescent Ca2+ indicators, indo-1 and fura-2, in single mammalian cardiac ventricular cells that had been loaded with indo-1 and fura-2 by exposure to the acetoxymethylester form of the indicators (indo-1/AM and fura-2/AM). Techniques similar to those used in experiments on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) were used. It was assumed that reversible binding in myoplasm would be evident as slowed recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching, and that irreversible binding of the indicators to immobile myoplasmic sites (or "compartmentalization" in organelles) would be evident as incomplete recovery. Through the use of a mask, one half of a cell was exposed to high-intensity ultraviolet (UV) light to bleach the indo-1 or fura-2 in only that part of the cell. Upon removal of the mask and termination of the high-intensity UV illumination, fluorescence recovered in the bleached half of the cell, indicating diffusion of indo-1 and fura-2. Mathematical modeling of the diffusional redistribution of the indicators indicated that in these cells the apparent diffusion coefficient for indo-1 is 1.57 x 10(-7) cm2 s-1 (SD 0.48 x 10(-7) cm2 s-1; n = 5 cells, 21 degrees C), and for fura-2 is 3.19 x 10(-7) cm2 s-1 (SD 1.85 x 10(-7) cm2 s-1; n = 6 cells, 21 degrees C). These values are approximately 6 and 3, respectively, times smaller than those expected for free diffusion in the myoplasm. In the bleached half of the cell the recovered level of fluorescence never reached the final level in the half not exposed to UV light. The extent of incomplete recovery was variable amongst the cells. Our analysis indicated that, under the conditions we used, approximately one-third of the intracellular dye is not diffusible in the myoplasm. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:2275965

  7. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells. PMID:1781695

  8. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael J.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Teng, Haibing; O’Hear, Meredith R.; Brown, Cortlyn W.; Stokum, Jesse A.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon co-incubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions where characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry, and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 hours, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using 19F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics and nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  9. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael J; Janjic, Jelena M; Teng, Haibing; O'Hear, Meredith R; Brown, Cortlyn W; Stokum, Jesse A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Ahrens, Eric T; Waggoner, Alan S

    2013-12-11

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon coincubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions were characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 h, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using (19)F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH-sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics, nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  10. Intracellular pH Modulates Autophagy and Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Berezhnov, Alexey V; Soutar, Marc P M; Fedotova, Evgeniya I; Frolova, Maria S; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Zinchenko, Valery P; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-04-15

    The specific autophagic elimination of mitochondria (mitophagy) plays the role of quality control for this organelle. Deregulation of mitophagy leads to an increased number of damaged mitochondria and triggers cell death. The deterioration of mitophagy has been hypothesized to underlie the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, most notably Parkinson disease. Although some of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial quality control are described in detail, physiological or pathological triggers of mitophagy are still not fully characterized. Here we show that the induction of mitophagy by the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP is independent of the effect of mitochondrial membrane potential but dependent on acidification of the cytosol by FCCP. The ionophore nigericin also reduces cytosolic pH and induces PINK1/PARKIN-dependent and -independent mitophagy. The increase of intracellular pH with monensin suppresses the effects of FCCP and nigericin on mitochondrial degradation. Thus, a change in intracellular pH is a regulator of mitochondrial quality control. PMID:26893374

  11. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  12. Compartmentation of malic acid in mesophyll cells of Kalanchoee daigremontiana: indications of a intracellular cytosolic vesicle transport mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Balsamo, R.A.; Uribe, E.G.

    1987-04-01

    Leaf tissue was harvested over a 24hr period at one to three hour intervals. The malic acid levels in the tissue were assayed spectrophotometrically and the percent cell volume occupied by cytosolic vesicles in replicate samples was determined. The total volume of the cytosolic vesicles fluctuated throughout the photoperiod concommitantly with malic acid concentrations present in the tissue. An intact leaf tissue section (10.2cm/sup 2/) was radiolabeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ seven hours into the dark period for thirty minutes. Two dimensional thin layer chromatography and electrophoresis of the tissue determined that 96% of the label was incorporated into malic acid. A freeze substitution procedure was initiated followed by microautoradiography (Fisher 1971) which allowed for the tracing of intracellular malic acid migration and compartmentation within the mesophyll cells. The results and interpretation of this experiment will be presented.

  13. pH sensing by intracellular Salmonella induces effector translocation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; McGourty, Kieran; Liu, Mei; Unsworth, Kate E; Holden, David W

    2010-05-21

    Salmonella enterica is an important intracellular bacterial pathogen of humans and animals. It replicates within host-cell vacuoles by delivering virulence (effector) proteins through a vacuolar membrane pore made by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS assembly follows vacuole acidification, but when bacteria are grown at low pH, effector secretion is negligible. We found that effector secretion was activated at low pH from mutant strains lacking a complex of SPI-2-encoded proteins SsaM, SpiC, and SsaL. Exposure of wild-type bacteria to pH 7.2 after growth at pH 5.0 caused dissociation and degradation of SsaM/SpiC/SsaL complexes and effector secretion. In infected cells, loss of the pH 7.2 signal through acidification of host-cell cytosol prevented complex degradation and effector translocation. Thus, intravacuolar Salmonella senses host cytosolic pH, resulting in the degradation of regulatory complex proteins and effector translocation. PMID:20395475

  14. Intracellular compartmentation of isozymes of sugar phosphate metabolism in green leaves.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, C; Herbert, M; Krüger, I

    1983-01-01

    The present paper has summarized evidence for the presence of two isozymes for many enzyme activities of sugar phosphate metabolism in plant leaves. These two isozymes are clearly compartmentalized in the chloroplasts and in the cytosol of plant leaf cells. In C4 plants there exists an additional isozyme in the mesophyll cells of these leaves in addition to the two isozymes in the bundle sheath cells. Such cell-compartment-specific and cell-specific isozymes provide duplicate (and possibly triplicate) enzyme systems for complete or almost complete pathways (ie, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway). They provide a basis for the understanding as to how many isozymes one may expect in plants. They also provide a challenge to determine what their function is particularly in the differential regulation of metabolic pathways in different cell compartments. Based on his genetic analyses Weeden [1981] has recently proposed a model for the evolution of chloroplast-specific isozymes of sugar phosphate metabolism. This model rests on the endosymbiotic theory for the origin of chloroplasts. It still is highly speculative. However, cell-compartment specific isozymes may eventually provide a means of studying plant evolution, especially if we succeed in analyzing their primary structure. PMID:6629713

  15. Preferential intracellular pH regulation: hypotheses and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Baker, Daniel W; Crossley, Dane A; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    The regulation of vertebrate acid-base balance during acute episodes of elevated internal PCO2  is typically characterized by extracellular pH (pHe) regulation. Changes in pHe are associated with qualitatively similar changes in intracellular tissue pH (pHi) as the two are typically coupled, referred to as 'coupled pH regulation'. However, not all vertebrates rely on coupled pH regulation; instead, some preferentially regulate pHi against severe and maintained reductions in pHe Preferential pHi regulation has been identified in several adult fish species and an aquatic amphibian, but never in adult amniotes. Recently, common snapping turtles were observed to preferentially regulate pHi during development; the pattern of acid-base regulation in these species shifts from preferential pHi regulation in embryos to coupled pH regulation in adults. In this Commentary, we discuss the hypothesis that preferential pHi regulation may be a general strategy employed by vertebrate embryos in order to maintain acid-base homeostasis during severe acute acid-base disturbances. In adult vertebrates, the retention or loss of preferential pHi regulation may depend on selection pressures associated with the environment inhabited and/or the severity of acid-base regulatory challenges to which they are exposed. We also consider the idea that the retention of preferential pHi regulation into adulthood may have been a key event in vertebrate evolution, with implications for the invasion of freshwater habitats, the evolution of air breathing and the transition of vertebrates from water to land. PMID:27489212

  16. Live cell imaging of the intracellular compartmentalization of the contaminate benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rizwan; Trump, Saskia; Lehmann, Irina; Hanke, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the cellular response of murine hepatoma cells to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) using two-photon and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The intracellular distribution of B[a]P and the B[a]P/AhR complex was visualized time- and concentration-dependent for up to 48 h of exposure. B[a]P was predominantly found in lipid droplets, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes, where B[a]P is collected and forms large aggregates. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and bleb formation due to high B[a]P concentrations were observed. The imaging data presented in this study provide new insights into the systemic cellular regulation following B[a]P exposure. PMID:24700684

  17. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  18. Measurement of Intracellular pH of Skeletal Muscle with pH-sensitive Glass Microelectrodes*

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Norman W.; Rector, Floyd C.; Campion, David S.; Seldin, Donald W.

    1967-01-01

    We used three methods to examine the relationship among intracellular pH, transmembrane potential, and extracellular pH. Single-barreled electrodes permitted the determination of resting potential and intracellular pH with a minimum of cellular injury. Double-barreled electrodes, which incorporated a reference as well as a pH-sensitive electrode in a single tip, facilitated the direct measurement of intracellular pH without the interposition of the transmembrane potential. Triple-barreled electrodes permitted measurement of intracellular pH during the controlled hyperpolarization or depolarization of the cell membrane. The results of all three methods were in close agreement and disclosed that the H+ activity of intracellular and extracellular fluid is in electrochemical equilibrium at any given transmembrane potential. This implies that the determinants of intracellular pH are the transmembrane potential and the blood pH. The actual pH of the normal resting muscle cell is 5.99, as estimated from the normal transmembrane potential and blood pH, or as determined by direct measurements of intracellular pH. PMID:6026098

  19. Intracellular pH responses in the industrially important fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Valkonen, Mari; Penttilä, Merja; Benčina, Mojca

    2014-09-01

    Preserving an optimal intracellular pH is critical for cell fitness and productivity. The pH homeostasis of the industrially important filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is largely unexplored. We analyzed the impact of growth conditions on regulation of intracellular pH of the strain Rut-C30 and the strain M106 derived from the Rut-C30 that accumulates L-galactonic acid-from provided galacturonic acid-as a consequence of L-galactonate dehydratase deletion. For live-cell measurements of intracellular pH, we used the genetically encoded ratiometric pH-sensitive fluorescent protein RaVC. Glucose and lactose, used as carbon sources, had specific effects on intracellular pH of T. reesei. The growth in lactose-containing medium extensively acidified cytosol, while intracellular pH of hyphae cultured in a medium with glucose remained at a higher level. The strain M106 maintained higher intracellular pH in the presence of D-galacturonic acid than its parental strain Rut-C30. Acidic external pH caused significant acidification of cytosol. Altogether, the pH homeostasis of T. reesei Rut-C30 strain is sensitive to extracellular pH and the degree of acidification depends on carbon source. PMID:25046860

  20. Light adaptation of invertebrate photoreceptors: influence of intracellular pH buffering capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S R; Brown, J E

    1982-01-01

    1. The possible role of pH changes in mediating light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells was studied by intracellular injection of zwitterionic pH buffers. The intracellular concentration of buffer was estimated by inclusion of a radioactive marker in the injection solution. 2. The light-induced increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration was monitored by intracellular aequorin. The light-induced increase of Ca2+ concentration was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 3. The progressive decrease in responsiveness during intracellular ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 4. Photoreceptors of both Limulus and Balanus were impaled with two micropipettes and voltage clamped. Membrane current induced by a prolonged steady illumination declined from an early transient to a plateau. This delayed decline of current indicates a light-induced reduction of sensitivity (i.e. light adaptation). The wave forms were similar before and after injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 5. We conclude that it is unlikely that a light-induced change of cytosolic pH mediates light adaptation in Limulus (and Balanus) photoreceptors. PMID:7175745

  1. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed. PMID:23860924

  2. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  3. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  4. Application of SERS Nanoparticles for Intracellular pH Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T; Talley, C; Colvin, M; Huser, T

    2004-10-21

    We present an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. Here, we present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. Heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which can result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters, are characterized using SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance.

  5. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  6. A two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe enables spatial coordinates determination of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Sun, Yuming; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Yong; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Zhao, Ning

    2014-11-01

    We reported a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe for detecting intracellular pH. When excited with 800 nm laser, an optimal output of laser as the routine equipment of two-photon fluorescence microscopy, the two-photon excited fluorescence of this probe showed distinct emission peak shift as large as 109 nm upon the change of pH values in vitro. Very importantly, the experiment results show that this probe has large two-photon absorption cross-section at pH 4.5 at 800 nm of 354 g, which ranks it as one of the best two-photon ratiometric fluorescent pH probes, and its working pH value is between 4.0 and 8.0 which could fit the intracellular pH range. Moreover, utilizing this probe, the two-photon ratiometric fluorescent images in living cells have been obtained, and the spatial coordinates of intracellular pH can be mapped. At the same time, the probe also exhibited selectivity, photostability and membrane permeability. And the photophysical properties of this probe in various solvents indicated that these photophysical properties variations are due to an intramolecular charge transfer process. At last, the imaging depth of the probe in liver biopsy slices was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated the maximum imaging depth can arrive 66 µm in living rat liver tissues. PMID:25127590

  7. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited. PMID:24256552

  8. Intracellular pH Recovery Rates in Bivalve Hemocytes Following Exposure to Acidic Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxton, A.; Wikfors, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of ocean acidification effects upon carbonate shell-forming species have caused great concern for the future of shellfisheries. Nevertheless, bivalve species inhabiting an estuarine environment have evolved in these environments with fluctuating pH levels. Previous experimental studies conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of oyster hemocytes to maintain intracellular homeostasis under acidic external conditions. However, little information is known of this homeostatic mechanism in other molluscan shellfish species present in these same habitats. In the current study we propose to determine if other bivalve species of aquaculture interest also possess this intracellular regulation by applying an in vitro hemocyte pH-recovery assay, previously developed for oysters, on the northern quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the softshell clam, Mya arenaria. Preliminary results from the determination of initial intracellular pH levels, the initial step in the rate recovery assay, indicated a pH range between 7.0-7.4. This range was comparable to initial values measured in oysters, and consistent with data reported in the current literature. The second step of the hemocyte pH-recovery assay involves exposing oyster hemocytes to acidic external conditions and measuring the ability of the hemocyte intracellular pH to maintain homeostasis (i.e. recovery rate). Results from the recovery rate process will be presented.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular pH and pH homeostasis in the hog carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Grieder, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) is an important determinant of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractility and relaxation. Most NMR measurement of pH have been calculated from the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) in {sup 31}P spectra. An alternative approach is to calculate pH from the difference in chemical shifts of signals in the {sup 19}F spectrum of cells loaded with difluoromethylalanine. This technique has higher sensitivity to pH changes and provides better time resolution than other NMR methods. In this study we report simultaneous measurements of pH{sub i} and the contractile state of single, intact hog carotid arterial segments, closed at both ends and superfused with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-buffered Krebs solution at physiological pressures. At 28{degree}C, resting arteries maintained a pH{sub i} of 7.15 {+-} 0.03 units (n = 16). In a parallel study, helically cut strips studied with {sup 31}P NMR maintained a similar resting pH (7.18 {+-} 0.09).

  10. Effect of altitude on brain intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate levels

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xian-Feng; Carlson, Paul J.; Kim, Tae-Suk; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L.; Fiedler, Kristen K.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Glaeser, Breanna; Wang, Kristina; Zuo, Chun S.; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F.; Kondo, Douglas G.

    2015-01-01

    Normal brain activity is associated with task-related pH changes. Although central nervous system syndromes associated with significant acidosis and alkalosis are well understood, the effects of less dramatic and chronic changes in brain pH are uncertain. One environmental factor known to alter brain pH is the extreme, acute change in altitude encountered by mountaineers. However, the effect of long-term exposure to moderate altitude has not been studied. The aim of this two-site study was to measure brain intracellular pH and phosphate-bearing metabolite levels at two altitudes in healthy volunteers, using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Increased brain pH and reduced inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels were found in healthy subjects who were long-term residents of Salt Lake City, UT (4720 ft/1438 m), compared with residents of Belmont, MA (20 ft/6 m). Brain intracellular pH at the altitude of 4720 ft was more alkaline than that observed near sea level. In addition, the ratio of inorganic phosphate to total phosphate signal also shifted toward lower values in the Salt Lake City region compared with the Belmont area. These results suggest that long-term residence at moderate altitude is associated with brain chemical changes. PMID:24768210

  11. /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, J.R.; Yue, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pH/sub i/) measurements by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pH/sub i/ was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pH/sub i/ = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 20/sup 0/C. Experimentally induced pH/sub i/ changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH/sub 3/Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH/sub 3/ was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers /sup 31/P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol x 1/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ at pH/sub i/ 6.75. The authors results showed that /sup 31/P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe.

  12. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J R; Yue, G M

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pHi) measurements by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pHi was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pHi = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 20 degrees C. Experimentally induced pHi changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH4Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH3 was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers 31P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol X l-1 X min-1 at pHi 6.75. Our results showed that 31P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe. PMID:3812665

  13. Different intracellular compartmentalization of TA and DeltaNp73 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Vinci, Angela; Sessa, Fausto; Casciano, Ida; Banelli, Barbara; Franzi, Francesca; Brigati, Claudio; Allemanni, Giorgio; Russo, Patrizia; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Romani, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    The p53 homologue p73 is overexpressed in many tumors, including lung cancer. We have evaluated the differential expression and subcellular localization of the functionally distinct apoptotic (TA) and anti-apoptotic (DeltaN) isoforms of p73 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), their possible association with p53 expression and determined the methylation status of the two p73 gene promoters (P1 and P2) in this tumor type. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both isoforms are expressed in the majority of cases. However, the oncogenic DeltaN variant, derived from the transcripts DeltaN'p73 (from P1) and/or DeltaNp73 (from P2), is localized mainly in the nucleus, while the anti-oncogenic TAp73 isoform (derived from a P1 transcript) is sequestered in the cytoplasm in almost all cases analyzed. Significant correlation was found between p53 and DeltaNp73 expression (p=0.041). Methylation analysis conducted on 41 tumor samples showed that the P1 promoter is almost invariably unmethylated (39/41 cases) whereas P2 was found completely methylated in 17 cases and partially or totally unmethylated in 24 samples. No correlation was found between the methylation status of P1 and P2 and p73 expression. Our results demonstrate that both isoforms contribute to p73 overexpression in NSCLC and suggest that their different intracellular localization may reflect an alteration of the functional p53-p73 network that might contribute to lung cancer development. PMID:19148480

  14. Intracellular pH regulation in isolated hepatopancreas cells from the Roman snail (Helix pomatia).

    PubMed

    Manzl, Claudia; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J; Chabicovsky, Monika; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms of intracellular pH (pHi) regulation were studied in isolated hepatopancreas cells from the Roman snail, Helix pomatia. The relationship between intracellular and extracellular pH indicated that pHi is actively regulated in these cells. At least three pHi-regulatory ion transporters were found to be present in these cells and to be responsible for the maintenance of pHi: an amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchanger, a 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid (SITS)-sensitive, presumably Na(+)-dependent, Cl-/HCO3-exchanger, and a bafilomycin-sensitive H(+)-pump. Inhibition of one of these transporters alone did not affect steady state pHi, whereas incubation with amiloride and SITS in combination resulted in a significant intracellular acidification. Following the induction of intracellular acidosis by addition of the weak acid Na+propionate, the Na+/H+ exchanger was immediately activated leading to a rapid recovery of pHi towards the baseline level. Both the SITS-sensitive mechanism and the H(+)-pump responded more slowly, but were of similar importance for pHi recovery. Measurement of pHi recovery from acidification in the three discernible types of hepatopancreas cells with a video fluorescence image system revealed slightly differing response patterns, the physiological significance of which remains to be determined. PMID:14695690

  15. Nanoparticle-based luminescent probes for intracellular sensing and imaging of pH.

    PubMed

    Schäferling, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging microscopy is an essential tool in biomedical research. Meanwhile, various fluorescent probes are available for the staining of cells, cell membranes, and organelles. Though, to monitor intracellular processes and dysfunctions, probes that respond to ubiquitous chemical parameters determining the cellular function such as pH, pO2 , and Ca(2+) are required. This review is focused on the progress in the design, fabrication, and application of photoluminescent nanoprobes for sensing and imaging of pH in living cells. The advantages of using nanoprobes carrying fluorescent pH indicators compared to single molecule probes are discussed as well as their limitations due to the mostly lysosomal uptake by cells. Particular attention is paid to ratiometric dual wavelength nanosensors that enable intrinsic referenced measurements. Referencing and proper calibration procedures are basic prerequisites to carry out reliable quantitative pH determinations in complex samples such as living cells. A variety of examples will be presented that highlight the diverseness of nanocarrier materials (polymers, micelles, silica, quantum dots, carbon dots, gold, photon upconversion nanocrystals, or bacteriophages), fluorescent pH indicators for the weak acidic range, and referenced sensing mechanisms, that have been applied intracellularly up to now. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:378-413. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1366 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26395962

  16. Intracellular and extracellular pH dynamics in the human placenta from diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Silva, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Sáez, Tamara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The placenta is a vital organ whose function in diseases of pregnancy is altered, resulting in an abnormal supply of nutrients to the foetus. The lack of placental vasculature homeostasis regulation causes endothelial dysfunction and altered vascular reactivity. The proper distribution of acid- (protons (H(+))) and base-equivalents through the placenta is essential to achieve physiological homeostasis. Several membrane transport mechanisms that control H(+) distribution between the extracellular and intracellular spaces are expressed in the human placenta vascular endothelium and syncytiotrophoblast, including sodium (Na(+))/H(+) exchangers (NHEs). One member of the NHEs family is NHE isoform 1 (NHE1), whose activity results in an alkaline intracellular pH (high intracellular pH (pHi)) and an acidic extracellular pH (pHo). Increased NHE1 expression, maximal transport activity, and turnover are reported in human syncytiotrophoblasts and lymphocytes from patients with diabetes mellitus type I (DMT1), and a positive correlation between NHEs activity and plasma factors, such as that between thrombin and platelet factor 3, has been reported in diabetes mellitus type II (DMT2). However, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could result in a higher sensitivity of the human placenta to acidic pHo. We summarized the findings on pHi and pHo modulation in the human placenta with an emphasis on pregnancies in which the mother diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. A potential role of NHEs, particularly NHE1, is proposed regarding placental dysfunction in DMT1, DMT2, and GDM. PMID:27324099

  17. In situ probing of intracellular pH by fluorescence from inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junhong; Xiong, Shijie; Wu, Xinglong; Shen, Jiancang; Chu, Paul K

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) plays a critical role in the physiological processes of cells. Nanoscale sensors based on pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins attached on nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed but inorganic NP-dependent fluorescent nanosensors have not yet been explored. Herein we describe a pH sensitive inorganic semiconductor fluorescent probe based on ultrathin 3C-SiC NPs which can effectively monitor pH in the range of 5.6-7.4 by taking advantage of the linear dependence between the fluorescent intensity ratio of the surface OH(-) and H(+) bonding states to band-to-band recombination and pH. Detection of pHi is demonstrated in living HeLa cells. In particular, pHi measurements during apoptosis confirm the validity and sensitivity of this technique in monitoring real-time changes in the intracellular environment. Toxicity assessment and confocal laser scanning microscopy indicate that the 3C-SiC NPs have low cytotoxicity and are compatible with living cells. PMID:24008041

  18. Synchronous Bioimaging of Intracellular pH and Chloride Based on LSS Fluorescent Protein.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Jose M; Idilli, Aurora I; Mariotti, Letizia; Losi, Gabriele; Arslanbaeva, Lyaysan R; Sato, Sebastian Sulis; Artoni, Pietro; Szczurkowska, Joanna; Cancedda, Laura; Ratto, Gian Michele; Carmignoto, Giorgio; Arosio, Daniele

    2016-06-17

    Ion homeostasis regulates critical physiological processes in the living cell. Intracellular chloride concentration not only contributes in setting the membrane potential of quiescent cells but it also plays a role in modulating the dynamic voltage changes during network activity. Dynamic chloride imaging demands new tools, allowing faster acquisition rates and correct accounting of concomitant pH changes. Joining a long-Stokes-shift red-fluorescent protein to a GFP variant with high sensitivity to pH and chloride, we obtained LSSmClopHensor, a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor optimized for the simultaneous chloride and pH imaging and requiring only two excitation wavelengths (458 and 488 nm). LSSmClopHensor allowed us to monitor the dynamic changes of intracellular pH and chloride concentration during seizure like discharges in neocortical brain slices. Only cells with tightly controlled resting potential revealed a narrow distribution of chloride concentration peaking at about 5 and 8 mM, in neocortical neurons and SK-N-SH cells, respectively. We thus showed that LSSmClopHensor represents a new versatile tool for studying the dynamics of chloride and proton concentration in living systems. PMID:27031242

  19. Intracellular pH of brown adipose tissue increases during norepinephrine stimulation of thermogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, B.A.; Hamilton, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) activation of brown fat (BAT) thermogenesis appears to involve dissociation of purine nucleotides from the mitochondrial uncoupling protein, resulting in release of normal respiratory control and enhanced substrate oxidation. Since the affinity of the uncoupling protein for purine nucleotides decreases significantly with increasing pH, the authors wished to determine if NE administration shifted the intracellular pH of BAT. To examine this question under in vivo conditions, they positioned a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil over the interscapular BAT of anesthetized male Syrian hamsters. The underlying and surrounding musculature was shielded to minimize their contribution to the /sup 31/P spectra. The hamster was placed in a Nicolet 200 Mhz spectrometer, operating in the Fourier Transform mode and tuned to /sup 31/P. Scans taken during infusion of ascorbate buffer (vehicle for NE) were compared to those taken during NE infusion (8 ng/g x min). During this infusion, BAT temperature increased 3.7 +/- 0.5/sup 0/C, confirming that BAT thermogenesis was activated. There also occurred a statistically significant PPM (parts per million) shift, averaging 0.070 +/- 0.022 (n = 22) and corresponding to an increase of approximately 0.07 pH units. This shift in intracellular pH from 7.32 to 7.39, although small, would facilitate the maintenance of loosely coupled brown fat mitochondria.

  20. Novel pH-sensitive probes with a ratiometric detection for intracellular pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipuy, Martin; Billon, Cyrielle; Micouin, Guillaume; Samarut, Jacques; Andraud, Chantal; Bretonnière, Yann

    2014-08-01

    The development of new pH-sensitive fluorescent probes based on a push-pull architecture is presented with a 2- dicyanomethylene-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofurane as strong electron acceptor group. With a small structural change, it is possible to obtain a large range of phenolic pKa from 4.8 to 8.6 with some close to neutrality, underlining the role of the electron density modulation on the acidic properties. Remarkable changes in the optical properties (both absorption and fluorescence) were observed as a function of the pH. Ratiometric imaging of intracellular pH was carried out with the most promising probes and highlighted the possibility to distinguish near-neutral minor pH fluctuations in cells.

  1. Intracellular pH: Its role in normal development and teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Reduction of intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) leading to reduced cell proliferation has been proposed as a mechanism by which acetazolamide induces its teratogenic postaxial limb reduction defect in rodents. In vivo studies measured pH{sub i} using a weak acid and found that pH{sub i} decreased with increasing gestational age during the period of organogenesis in C57 mouse embryos. This decreasing pH{sub i} had a high correlation with the simultaneously occurring decrease in the rate of proliferation determined by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation. pH{sub i} or pH was measured for the embryo, embryonic plasma, and extraembryonic fluids following a teratogenic dose of acetazolamide in sensitive C57 and resistant SWV mice. Reduced embryonic pH{sub i} was seen only in the sensitive strain while both strains showed decreased pH values for embryo plasma and extraembryonic fluids, with larger reductions found in the C57 strain. The plasma membrane Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter is known to regulate intracellular pH. Treatment with acetazolamide plus amiloride, and inhibitor of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter, resulted in a dramatically increased teratogenic response in C57 embryos and several incidences of the specific limb defect in the resistant SWV embryos. The pH{sub i} and pH effects following the combined drug treatment resulted in larger reductions, the magnitude and duration being greatest in the sensitive strain. The presence of a functional Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter in primary cultures of limb bud mesenchymal cells was documented for both strains of mice using a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Quantitative studies were done to look for functional differences in the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiporter of limb cells from acetazolamide sensitive and resistant embryos.

  2. A rapid method for measuring intracellular pH using BCECF-AM.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Pinar; Mutharasan, Raj

    2002-08-15

    A rapid intracellular pH (pH(i)) measurement method based on initial rate of increase of fluorescence ratio of 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein upon dye addition to a cell suspension in growth medium is reported. A dye transport model that describes dye concentration and fluorescence values in intracellular and extracellular spaces provides the mathematical basis for the approach. Experimental results of ammonium chloride challenge response of the two suspension cells, Spodoptera frugiperda and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, successfully compared with results obtained using traditional perfusion method. Since the cell suspension does not require any preparation, measurement of pH(i) can be completed in about 1 min minimizing any potential errors due to dye leakage. PMID:12204343

  3. Control of intracellular pH and growth by fibronectin in capillary endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Frangioni, J. V.; Cragoe, E. J. Jr; Lechene, C.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the mechanism by which fibronectin (FN) regulates capillary endothelial cell proliferation. Endothelial cell growth can be controlled in chemically-defined medium by varying the density of FN coated on the substratum (Ingber, D. E., and J. Folkman. J. Cell Biol. 1989. 109:317-330). In this system, DNA synthetic rates are stimulated by FN in direct proportion to its effect on cell extension (projected cell areas) both in the presence and absence of saturating amounts of basic FGF. To investigate direct growth signaling by FN, we carried out microfluorometric measurements of intracellular pH (pHi), a cytoplasmic signal that is commonly influenced by soluble mitogens. pHi increased 0.18 pH units as FN coating densities were raised and cells progressed from round to spread. Intracellular alkalinization induced by attachment to FN was rapid and followed the time course of cell spreading. When measured in the presence and absence of FGF, the effects of FN and FGF on pHi were found to be independent and additive. Furthermore, DNA synthesis correlated with pHi for all combinations of FGF and FN. Ethylisopropylamiloride, a specific inhibitor of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter, completely suppressed the effects of FN on both pHi and DNA synthesis. However, cytoplasmic pH per se did not appear to be a critical determinant of growth since DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited when pHi was lowered over the physiological range by varying the pH of the medium. We conclude that FN and FGF exert their growth-modulating effects in part through activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger, although they appear to trigger this system via separate pathways.

  4. Voltage-dependent clamp of intracellular pH of identified leech glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitmer, J W; Schneider, H P

    1995-01-01

    1. The intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in voltage-clamped, giant neuropile glial cells in isolated segmental ganglia of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, using double-barrelled, pH-sensitive microelectrodes and a slow, two-electrode voltage-clamp system. The potential sensitivity of the pHi regulation in these glial cells was found to be due to an electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3- cotransporter (Deitmer & Szatkowski, 1990). 2. In the presence of 5% CO2 and 24 mM HCO3- (pH 7.4), pHi shifted by 1 pH unit per 110 mV, corresponding to a stoichiometry of 2HCO3-: 1 Na+ of the cotransporter, while in Hepes-buffered CO2-HCO3(-)-free saline (pH 7.4), pHi changed by 1 pH unit per 274 mV. The potential sensitivity of pHi decreased at lower pHo, being 1 pH unit per 216 mV at external pH (pHo) 7.0. 3. Changing pHo between 7.8 and 6.6 induced pHi shifts with a slope of 0.72 pHi units per pHo unit in non-clamped, and of 0.80 pHi units per pHo unit in voltage-clamped cells, indicating that pHi largely followed pHo. The electrochemical gradient of H(+)-HCO3- across the glial membrane was around 56 mV, and remained almost constant over this pHo range. 4. The membrane potential-dependent and pHo-sensitive shifts of pHi were unaffected by amiloride, an inhibitor of Na(+)-H+ exchange. 5. The intracellular acidification upon lowering pHo could be reversed by depolarizing the membrane as predicted from a cotransporter, whose equilibrium follows the membrane potential by resetting pHi. 6. The results indicate that the pHi of leech glial cells is dominated by the electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3- cotransporter, and is hence a function of the membrane potential, and the Na+ and H(+)-HCO3- gradients, across the cell membrane. PMID:7658370

  5. The control of intracellular pH in cultured avian chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dascalu, A; Nevo, Z; Korenstein, R

    1993-01-01

    1. Mechanical loading of cartilaginous tissue generates an increase in the concentration of cations in the extracellular matrix. This includes a decrease of the extracellular pH (pHo), which is known to affect the intracellular pH (pHi), thereby modifying the intracellular metabolism. Thus, the regulation of pHi is essential for the physiological function of cartilage. The fluorescent pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF AM) was employed in order to assess the mechanisms responsible for control of the pHi in an embryonic avian chondrocyte cell suspension. 2. Steady-state pHi in the absence of physiological HCO3- was 7.15 +/- 0.01 pH units as compared to a pHi of 6.94 +/- 0.02 pH units in its presence (P < 0.01). The intrinsic buffering power of chondrocytes (beta i) was 38.9 mM/pH unit and the total buffering capacity (beta T) was 65.8 mM/pH unit. 3. Cells maintained in a Hepes-buffered solution were exposed to an intracellular acid load by the NH4+ prepulse technique (20 mM NH4Cl). The initial rate of pHi recovery was 0.106 pH units/min (n = 18). Amiloride (0.33 mM), an inhibitor of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger, or replacement of external sodium [Na+]o with choline induced a 60% inhibition of the recovery rate, indicating a predominant involvement of this antiporter in the response to intracellular acidification. 4. H(+)-ATPase inhibitors (oligomycin 20 micrograms/ml; N,N;-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC), 0.5 mM; N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), 0.25 mM) and iodomycin (2 mM), a metabolic cell suppressor, reduced acid extrusion by 25% as measured by the NH4Cl prepulse in Hepes-bathed cells. 5. Chondrocytes transferred from a Hepes-buffered solution to a 5% CO2-25 mM HCO3- medium (HCO3- solution) underwent a pHi decrease of approximately 0.20 pH units, followed by a regulatory alkalinizing response of 0.118 pH units/min. The Na(+)-H+ exchanger was responsible for only 15% of this alkalinization (amiloride, 0.33 mM), in contrast

  6. Hydroxylated near-infrared BODIPY fluorophores as intracellular pH sensors

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Mohamed M.; Owens, Eric A.; Gao, Tielong; Lee, Jeong Heon; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a series of new, highly sensitive BF2-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethane dyes are synthesized and analyzed to be suitable as on/off photo-induced electron transfer modulated fluorescent sensors for determination of intracellular pH. The ethanolic solutions of the new indicators feature absorption maxima in the range of 696–700 nm and a fluorescence emission maximum at 720 nm. Molar absorptivity and fluorescence quantum yield data were determined for the studied set of aza-BODIPY indicators. These indicators have high molar absorption coefficients of ~80 000 M−1 cm−1 and quantum yields (up to 18%). Corresponding pKa values of indicators are determined from absorbance and fluorescence measurements and range from 9.1 to 10.8, depending on the selective positioning of electron-donating functionalities. The excellent photostability of the aza-BODIPY indicators makes them particularly suitable for long duration measurements. The in vitro cellular staining of living tissues in PC3 cells based on the isosbestic point at pH 7.8 and pH 9.3 has been employed which shows an increase in fluorescence intensity at 800 nm with increase in pH for certain compounds and fluorescence intensity decreases at 700 nm. Therefore, the new indicators are suitable for exploitation and adaptation in a diverse range of analytical applications. PMID:25105177

  7. Agonist-mediated changes in intracellular pH: role in vascular smooth muscle cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, B.C.; Canessa, M.; Vallega, G.; Alexander, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in intracellular pH (pHi) are likely to play an important role in regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. In most blood vessels, acidification is associated with decreased contractile tone and alkalinization with increased tone. However, the nature of agonist-mediated alterations in pHi and the role of pHi in other VSMC responses has been little studied. We have used the pH sensitive dye, BCECF, to study pHi in cultured rat aortic VSMC. Basal pHi at 37 degrees C in physiologic saline buffer (pH 7.3) was 7.08 in suspended VSMC and 7.26 in substrate-attached VSMC. An amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchanger mediated pHi recovery following an acid load. Angiotensin II- and platelet-derived growth factor typified one class of VSMC agonists, causing an initial transient (less than 5 min) acidification followed by a sustained (greater than 20 min) alkalinization. The acidification phase was associated with increased Ca2+ mobilization as demonstrated by increases in intracellular Ca2+ and 45Ca2+ efflux. The alkalinization was associated with Na+ influx and H+ efflux consistent with Na+/H+ exchange. Epidermal growth factor and phorbol esters typified another class of agonists which stimulated only a sustained alkalinization. Alterations in regulation of VSMC pHi may play an important role in VSMC hypertrophy and/or proliferation as suggested by the finding of increased cell growth and Na+/H+ exchange in spontaneously hypertensive rat VSMC compared to Wistar-Kyoto VSMC. Although no functional correlate for initial acidification has been identified, cytoplasmic alkalinization appears to be required for the sustained formation of diacylglycerol following angiotensin II stimulation. These findings suggest that alterations in pHi may regulate several VSMC functions such as agonist-mediated signal transduction, excitation-response coupling, and growth.

  8. Intracellular pH Recovery Rates of Hemocytes from Estuarine and Open Ocean Bivalve Species Following In vitro Acid Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxton, A.; Wikfors, G.

    2013-12-01

    Decreasing pH in estuarine systems is a growing concern for researchers studying mollusk species. Debates continue on whether estuarine bivalve species are more or less vulnerable to ocean acidification than marine species because estuaries can present multiple environmental stressors. The aim of this study is to understand the homeostatic mechanisms of bivalve hemocytes following exposure to extracellular acid treatment. Previous measurements using fluorescent SNARF probes and flow-cytometry have determined the intracellular pH of hemocytes from several bivalve species (eastern oyster, bay scallop, northern quahog, soft-shell clam, and blue mussel) to range between 7.0-7.4. In the present study of four bivalve species, recovery rate profiles were determined for intracellular hemocyte pH following addition of acid to hemolymph in vitro. These profiles indicate that soft-shell clams and bay scallops maintained homeostasis with very little change in intracellular pH. In contrast, an initial drop in intracellular pH in northern quahogs was followed by a steady recovery of intracellular pH. Contrasting results between species appear to be unrelated to mineral shell composition (aragonite vs. calcite) or habitat location (infaunal vs. epifaunal). The next phase of this study will be to determine if offshore species (surfclams and sea scallops) will have similar responses. Results from these studies will provide a better understanding of the physiological responses of estuarine and marine species exposed to acidified environments.

  9. Intracellular Temperature Sensing: An Ultra-bright Luminescent Nanothermometer with Non-sensitivity to pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helin; Fan, Yanyan; Wang, Jianhai; Song, Zhongsen; Shi, Hao; Han, Rongcheng; Sha, Yinlin; Jiang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence thermometry usually suffer from cellular complexity of the biochemical environment (such as pH and ionic strength), and thus the accuracy and reliability of the determined intracellular temperature are directly affected. Herein, a photoluminescent nanothermometer composed of polymer encapsulated quantum dots (P-QD) has been developed. And the prepared nanothermometer exhibits some advantages: such as non-sensitivity to pH and ionic strength, as well as high detection sensitivity and ultrahigh reversibility. The intracellular temperature was accurately determined under physiological conditions with different pH and ionic strength, and direct measurement of thermogenesis in individual cells has been achieved. PMID:26445905

  10. Sodium-dependent control of intracellular pH in Purkinje fibres of sheep heart.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, D; MacLeod, K T

    1985-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) of Purkinje fibres from sheep heart was recorded with pH-sensitive glass micro-electrodes. The cells were acidified by one of three methods: (1) exposure to and subsequent removal of NH4Cl, (2) exposure to solutions containing 5% CO2 or (3) exposure to an acidic Tyrode solution. The pHi recovery from these acidifications was studied. The time constant of recovery from an acidification induced by NH4Cl was almost twice as long as that from one induced by CO2 or acid extracellular pH. Following an acidification induced by exposure to CO2 the time constant of pHi recovery was not changed when the cell was depolarized to -40 mV (by replacement of some Na+ by K+). An intracellular acidification was produced when extracellular Na+ was removed and replaced by quaternary ammonium ions or K+. Such Na+-free solutions also inhibited pHi recovery from an acidification. A 50% inhibition of the rate of recovery was produced by lowering the [Na+]o to 8 mM. When used as a Na+ substitute, Li+ could permit recovery. Tris (22 mM) changed pHi in the alkaline direction. Amiloride (1 mM) or a decrease in temperature slowed the recovery from an acidification (Q10 = 2.65). There was no effect of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid disodium salt; 100 microM) on the recovery. Na+-sensitive glass micro-electrodes were used to measure the intracellular Na+ activity when [Na+]o was lowered to levels used in our pHi recovery experiments. From these data we have calculated the apparent Na+ electrochemical gradient at different values of [Na+]o. If this gradient is responsible for H+ efflux from the cell then, by applying thermodynamic considerations, it can be shown that only low concentrations (1-2mM) of extracellular Na+ are required. Solutions containing a very low [Ca2+]o (less than 10(-8) M, buffered with EGTA) were used to prevent large rises of [Ca2+]i which may occur on removal of external Na+. Under these conditions pHi recovery is

  11. A volatile inhibitor immobilizes sea urchin sperm in semen by depressing the intracellular pH

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.H.; Clapper, D.L.; Winkler, M.M.; Lee, H.C.; Epel, D.

    1983-08-01

    Sea urchin spermatozoa are normally immotile in semen, but motility can be initiated by increasing gas flow over the semen--for example, by blowing N2 gas over a thin layer of semen. This result indicates that sperm motility is not O2 limited and suggests that seminal fluid contains a volatile inhibitor of motility which is responsible for the paralysis of sperm in semen. This inhibitor might be carbon dioxide, which reversibly immobilizes sperm. /sup 31/P-NMR measurements of pH show that the sperm intracellular pH (pHi) increases by 0.36 pH unit upon dilution of semen into seawater. Since previous studies have shown that this magnitude of pH increase is sufficient to trigger sperm motility, we suggest that the volatile inhibitor is inhibiting sperm motility in semen by depressing the pHi. A simple hypothesis that explains these observations is that the volatile motility inhibitor is CO/sub 2/, which could acidify pHi as a diffusable weak acid. In this regard, sperm diluted into seawater release acid, and this acid release is related to the pHi increase and motility initiation. In fact, nearly half of the acid released by sperm upon dilution is volatile and may therefore be due to CO/sub 2/ efflux. Most of the acid, however, cannot be attributed to CO/sub 2/ release because it is not volatile. Thus, when sperm are diluted into seawater, they raise their pHi by releasing CO/sub 2/ and protons from the cytoplasm into the surrounding seawater.

  12. Microelectrode study of intracellular pH in frog skin: dependence on serosal Cl/sup -/

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, M.E.; Kelepouris, E.; Peterson-Yantorno, K.; Civan, M.M.

    1986-03-01

    Replacing external Cl/sup -/ reduces Na/sup +/ transport across frog skin, but the sidedness and mechanisms have been unclear. We have monitored current (l/sub T/), resistance (R/sub T/) and basolateral membrane potential, both with reference micropipettes (psi/sup sc/) and pH-selective microelectrodes (E/sub H//sup sc/), in short-circuited epithelial sheets isolated from frog skins; removal of the dermis facilitates basolateral exchange. Intracellular pH was 7.25 +- 0.03 (mean +- SE) when the pH of the external Cl/sup -/ Ringer's solution was 7.60 +- 0.01, in reasonable agreement with estimates from /sup 31/P and /sup 19/F NMR analyses. Complete mucosal replacement of Cl/sup -/ by gluconate had variable effects on l/sub T/ and R/sub T/. However, serosal Cl/sup -/ substitution uniformly increased R/sub T/ and markedly decreased l/sub T/, absolute value phi/sup sc/ and absolute value E/sub A//sup sc/. The membrane depolarization was usually preceded by a small hyperpolarization (0.5-3.5 mV). The serosal Cl/sup -/ replacement also produced an intracellular alkalinization of 0.4 +- 0.1 U. These data suggest that: (1) serosal Cl/sup -/ substitution alkalinizes the cells by either enhancing HCO/sup -/ entry or blocking HCO/sup -/ loss through a basolateral Cl/HCO antiport, and (2) the fall in absolute value phi/sup sc/ and l/sub T/ may partly reflect inhibition of apical Na/sup +/ entry, produced indirectly by membrane depolarization resulting from altered basolateral ionic conductances.

  13. Intracellular pH regulation in isolated rat bile duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, M; Mennone, A; Boyer, J L

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate ion transport mechanisms in bile duct epithelium (BDE), BDE cells were isolated from bile duct-ligated rats. After short-term culture pHi was measured with a single cell microfluorimetric set-up using the fluorescent pHi indicator BCECF, and calibrated with nigericin in high K+ concentration buffer. Major contaminants were identified using vital markers. In HCO3(-)-free media, baseline pHi (7.03 +/- 0.12) decreased by 0.45 +/- 0.18 pH units after Na+ removal and by 0.12 +/- .04 after amiloride administration (1 mM). After acid loading (20 mM NH4Cl) pHi recovery was inhibited by both Na+ removal and amiloride (JH+ = 0.74 +/- 1.1, and JH+ = 2.28 +/- 0.8, respectively, vs. 5.47 +/- 1.97 and 5.97 +/- 1.76 mM/min, in controls, respectively). In HCO3- containing media baseline pHi was higher (7.16 +/- 0.1, n = 36, P less than 0.05) and was decreased by Na+ substitution but not by amiloride. Na+ removal inhibited pHi recovery after an intracellular acid load (0.27 +/- 0.26, vs. 7.7 +/- 4.1 mM/min, in controls), whereas amiloride reduced JH+ only by 27%. pH recovery was inhibited by DIDS (0.5-1 mM), but not by Cl- depletion. Finally, acute Cl- removal increased pHi by 0.18 pH units in the absence but not presence of DIDS. These data indicate that BDE cells possess mechanisms for Na+/H+ exchange, Na+:HCO3- symport and Cl-/HCO3 exchange. Therefore BDE may be capable of transepithelial H+/HCO3- transport. Images PMID:2022723

  14. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  15. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grow at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). YATP (grams of cells per mole of ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [14C]acetate and [14C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation. PMID:2036013

  16. Regulation of intracellular pH in cancer cell lines under normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Harris, Adrian L; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Swietach, Pawel

    2013-04-01

    Acid-extrusion by active transport is important in metabolically active cancer cells, where it removes excess intracellular acid and sets the intracellular resting pH. Hypoxia is a major trigger of adaptive responses in cancer, but its effect on acid-extrusion remains unclear. We studied pH-regulation under normoxia and hypoxia in eight cancer cell-lines (HCT116, RT112, MDA-MB-468, MCF10A, HT29, HT1080, MiaPaca2, HeLa) using the pH-sensitive fluorophore, cSNARF-1. Hypoxia responses were triggered by pre-incubation in low O(2) or with the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase inhibitor dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). By selective pharmacological inhibition or transport-substrate removal, acid-extrusion flux was dissected into components due to Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE) and Na(+)-dependent HCO(3)(-) transport. In half of the cell-lines (HCT116, RT112, MDA-MB-468, MCF10A), acid-extrusion on NHE was the dominant flux during an acid load, and in all of these, bar one (MDA-MB-468), NHE-flux was reduced following hypoxic incubation. Further studies in HCT116 cells showed that <4-h hypoxic incubation reduced NHE-flux reversibly with a time-constant of 1-2 h. This was not associated with a change in expression of NHE1, the principal NHE isoform. Following 48-h hypoxia, inhibition of NHE-flux persisted but became only slowly reversible and associated with reduced expression of the glycosylated form of NHE1. Acid-extrusion by Na(+)-dependent HCO(3)(-) transport was hypoxia-insensitive and comparable in all cell lines. This constitutive and stable element of pH-regulation was found to be important for setting and stabilizing resting pH at a mildly alkaline level (conducive for growth), irrespective of oxygenation status. In contrast, the more variable flux on NHE underlies cell-specific differences in their dynamic response to larger acid loads. PMID:22949268

  17. Acidic intracellular pH shift during Caenorhabditis elegans larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, W.G.; Riddle, D.L. )

    1988-11-01

    During recovery from the developmentally arrested, nonfeeding dauer stage of the nemotode Caenorhabditis elegans, metabolic activation is accompanied by a decrease in intracellular pH (pH{sub i}). Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P NMR) analyses of perchloric acid extracts show that inorganic phosphate predominates in dauer larvae, whereas ATP and other high-energy metabolites are abundant within 6 hr after dauer larvae have been placed in food to initiate development. Although metabolic activation has been associated with an alkaline pH{sub i} shift in other organisms, in vivo {sup 31}P NMR analysis of recovering dauer larvae shows a pH{sub i} decrease from {approx} 7.3 to {approx} 6.3 within 3 hr after the animals encounter food. This shift occurs before feeding begins, and it coincides with, or soon follows, the developmental commitment to recover from the dauer stage, suggesting that control of pH{sub i} may be important in the regulation of larval development in nematodes.

  18. Intracellular pH and ionic channels in the Loligo vulgaris giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, E; Testa, P L; Wanke, E

    1981-01-01

    Squid giant axons were used to investigate the reversible effects of intracellular pH(pHi) on the kinetic properties of ionic channels. The pharmacologically separated K+ and Na+ currents were measured under: (a) internal perfusion, (b) enzymatic Pronase treatment, and (c) continuous estimate of periaxonal ion accumulation. Variation of internal pH from 4.8 to 11 resulted in: (a) a decrease of steady-state sodium inactivation at positive potentials similar to the effect of the proteolytic enzyme Pronase, (b) a shift of the h infinity (E) curve toward depolarizing voltages, and (c) a decrease of the time constant of inactivation for potentials below -20 mV (an increase above). A plot of the steady-state sodium conductance at E = +40 mV as a function of pHi suggests that two groups with pKa 10.4 and 5.6 affect respectively the inactivation gate and the rate constants for the transition from the inactivated to the second open state (h2) (Chandler and Meves, 1970b). The voltage shifts of the kinetic parameters predicted by the Gouy-Chapman-Stern theory are well satisfied at high pHi and less at low. Once corrected for voltage shifts, the forward rate constants for channel opening were found to be slowed with the acidity of the internal or external solution. PMID:6268214

  19. Axial heterogeneity of intracellular pH in rat proximal convoluted tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Pastoriza-Munoz, E; Harrington, R M; Graber, M L

    1987-01-01

    In the proximal convoluted tubule (PT), the HCO3- reabsorptive rate is higher in early (EPS) compared with late proximal segments (LPS). To examine the mechanism of this HCO3- reabsorption profile, intracellular pH (pHi) was measured along the superficial PT of the rat under free-flow and stationary microperfusion using the pH-sensitive fluorescence of 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU). With 4MU superfusion, pHi was found to decline along the PT. Observation with 365-nm excitation revealed that EPS were brightly fluorescent and always emerged away from their star vessel. Midproximal segments were darker and closer to the star vessel which was surrounded by the darkest LPS. Decreasing luminal HCO3- from 15 to 0 mM lowered pHi in both EPS and LPS, but pHi remained more alkaline in EPS with both perfusates. Thus the axial decline in pHi along the PT is due to both luminal factors and intrinsic differences in luminal H+ extrusion in PT cells. PMID:3036912

  20. Fluorescent probes in biology and medicine: measurement of intracellular pH values in individual cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Jan; Cimprich, Petr; Gregor, Martin; Smetana, Karel, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    The application possibilities of fluorescent probes have increased dramatically in the last few years. The main areas are as follows (Slavik, 1994, 1996, 1998). Intracellular ionic cell composition: There are selective ion-sensitive dyes for H+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Fe3+, Cl-, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Ba2+, La3+. Membrane potential: Using the so-called slow (Nernstian dyes) or electrochromic dyes one can assess the value of the transmembrane potential. Membrane fluidity: Fluorescent probes inform about the freedom of rotational and translational movement of membrane proteins and lipids. Selective labeling: Almost any object of interest inside the cell or on its surface can be selectively fluorescently labeled. There are dyes specific for DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides (FISH), Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, vacuoles, cytoskeleton, etc. Using fluorescent dyes specific receptors may be localized, their conformational changes followed and the polarity of corresponding binding sites accessed. The endocytic pathway may be followed, enzymes and their local enzymatic activity localized. For really selective labeling fluorescent labeled antibodies exist. Imaging: One of the main advantages of fluorescence imaging is its versatility. It allow choice among ratio imaging in excitation, ratio imaging in emission and lifetime imaging. These approaches can be applied to both the classical wide-field fluorescence microscopy and to the laser confocal fluorescence microscopy, one day possibly to the scanning near field optical microscopy. Simultaneous application of several fluorescent dyes: The technical progress in both excitation sources and in detectors allows to extend the excitation deeper in the blue and ultraviolet side and the detection further in the NIR and IR. Consequently, up to 6 peaks in excitation and up to 6 peaks in emission can be followed without any substantial difficulties. Application of dyes such with longer fluorescence lifetimes such as rare earth

  1. Intracellular pH regulation in resting and contracting segments of rat mesenteric resistance vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, C; Cragoe, E J

    1988-01-01

    1. The pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and -6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) was used to measure intracellular pH (pHi) in segments of rat resistance vessels (internal diameter about 200 microns) with the vessels mounted in a myograph for simultaneous measurements of isometric contraction. 2. BCECF loaded slowly into the vessels over 1 h and did not affect the maximal contractility of the vessels. There was a loss of dye with time which, however, was very slow when the segments were only excited for 2 s/min, suggesting that the loss was mainly due to dye bleaching with only a very slow leak. 3. The ratio of the emissions (at 540 nm) with excitation at 495 and 450 nm was calibrated in terms of pH using the K+-H+ ionophore nigericin. This calibration gave a pHi value of 7.15 +/- 0.02 (n = 20), suggesting that hydrogen ions are not in electrochemical equilibrium in these vascular smooth muscles which have a membrane potential of about -60 mV. 4. Addition of 10 mM-NH4Cl caused a transient alkalinization and wash-out of 10 mM-NH4Cl a transient acidification. Increasing CO2 with maintained bicarbonate caused a rapid acidification followed by an incomplete recovery. Removal of CO2 and bicarbonate (HEPES-buffered solution) with constant extracellular pH caused a transient alkalinization but steady-state pHi was not significantly altered. 5. In bicarbonate-free buffer the Na+-H+ exchange blocker 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and sodium-free conditions caused a slow acidification. In bicarbonate buffer (PSS) EIPA had no detectable effect after 10 min but the anion exchange blocker diisothio-cyanatostilbenedisulphonic acid (DIDS) caused a small acidification over that time course. 6. The rate of recovery after an acid load was about 50% lower in HEPES buffer compared to PSS and it was inhibited by EIPA. In PSS amiloride and EIPA each had a small inhibitory effect on the pH recovery after an acid load. DIDS also inhibited the recovery from an acid load

  2. Intracellular pH of perfused single frog skin: combined 19F- and 31P-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Lin, L E; Peterson-Yantorno, K; Taylor, J; Deutsch, C

    1984-11-01

    Intracellular pH (pHc) has been determined in frog skin by applying two different methods of pH measurement, 19F and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, to the same tissues. Results from both NMR approaches confirm an observation by Lin, Shporer, and Civan [Am. J. Physiol. 248 (Cell Physiol. 17): 1985] that acidification of the extracellular medium reverses the sign of the pH gradient present under baseline conditions. The fluorinated probe, alpha-(difluoromethyl)-alanine methyl ester, was introduced into the epithelial cells by preincubating skins for 4.7-10.4 h at room temperature in Ringer solutions containing 1 mM ester. The free amino acid was subsequently released by intracellular esterase activity, thus providing a high enough probe concentration for NMR analysis to be practicable. From measurements of short-circuit current and transepithelial resistance under base-line and experimental conditions and the appearance of phosphocreatine (PCr) in the 31P spectrum of preloaded tissues, the fluorinated probe appears to be nontoxic to frog skin. Measurement of the chemical shift of methylphosphonate relative to PCr permitted calculation of extracellular pH. Estimation of the intracellular pH was performed both by measurement of the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (Pi) relative to PCr and by measurement of the central peak spacing of the 19F spectrum. From four direct comparisons of the two techniques in two experiments, the difference in the estimated pH was only 0.03 +/- 0.07 pH units, supporting the concept that 31P-NMR analysis is a valid method of measuring pH in this tissue. PMID:6496729

  3. Illumination of the Spatial Order of Intracellular pH by Genetically Encoded pH-Sensitive Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Benčina, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been extensively used for engineering genetically encoded sensors that can monitor levels of ions, enzyme activities, redox potential, and metabolites. Certain fluorescent proteins possess specific pH-dependent spectroscopic features, and thus can be used as indicators of intracellular pH. Moreover, concatenated pH-sensitive proteins with target proteins pin the pH sensors to a definite location within the cell, compartment, or tissue. This study provides an overview of the continually expanding family of pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins that have become essential tools for studies of pH homeostasis and cell physiology. We describe and discuss the design of intensity-based and ratiometric pH sensors, their spectral properties and pH-dependency, as well as their performance. Finally, we illustrate some examples of the applications of pH sensors targeted at different subcellular compartments. PMID:24316570

  4. Monitoring Intracellular pH Change with a Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor in Yeast and Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Robertson, J Brian; Xie, Qiguang; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2016-01-01

    "pHlash" is a novel bioluminescence-based pH sensor for measuring intracellular pH, which is developed based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET). pHlash is a fusion protein between a mutant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc) and a Venus fluorophore. The spectral emission of purified pHlash protein exhibits pH dependence in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification. In this chapter, we describe an in vitro characterization of pHlash, and also in vivo assays including in yeast cells and in HeLa cells using pHlash as a cytoplasmic pH indicator. PMID:27424899

  5. Transporters involved in regulation of intracellular pH in primary cultured rat brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Caroline J; Nicola, Pieris A; Wang, Shanshan; Barrand, Margery A; Hladky, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    Fluid secretion across the blood–brain barrier, critical for maintaining the correct fluid balance in the brain, entails net secretion of HCO3−, which is brought about by the combined activities of ion transporters situated in brain microvessels. These same transporters will concomitantly influence intracellular pH (pHi). To analyse the transporters that may be involved in the maintenance of pHi and hence secretion of HCO3−, we have loaded primary cultured endothelial cells derived from rat brain microvessels with the pH indicator BCECF and suspended them in standard NaCl solutions buffered with Hepes or Hepes plus 5% CO2/HCO3−. pHi in the standard solutions showed a slow acidification over at least 30 min, the rate being less in the presence of HCO3− than in its absence. However, after accounting for the difference in buffering, the net rates of acid loading with and without HCO3− were similar. In the nominal absence of HCO3− the rate of acid loading was increased equally by removal of external Na+ or by inhibition of Na+/H+ exchange by ethylisopropylamiloride (EIPA). By contrast, in the presence of HCO3− the increase in the rate of acid loading when Na+ was removed was much larger and the rate was then also significantly greater than the rate observed in the absence of both Na+ and HCO3−. Removal of Cl− in the presence of HCO3− produced an alkalinization followed by a resumption of the slow acid gain. Removal of Na+ following removal of Cl− increased the rate of acid gain. In the presence of HCO3− and initial presence of Na+ and Cl−, DIDS inhibited the changes in pHi produced by removal of either Na+ or Cl−. These are the expected results if these cells possess an AE-like Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, a ‘channel-like’ permeability allowing slow influx of acid (or efflux of HCO3−), a NBC-like Cl−-independent Na+−HCO3− cotransporter, and a NHE-like Na+/H+ exchanger. The in vitro rates of HCO3− loading via the Na+−HCO3

  6. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: role of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L V; Balog, E M; Fitts, R H

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize glass microelectrodes to characterize the intracellular pH (pHi) before and during recovery from fatigue in the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle. A second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pHi and contractile function. The frog ST muscle (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. Peak tetanic force (Po) was reduced to 8.5% of initial force and recovered in a biphasic manner, returning to the resting value by 40 min. Resting pHi was 7.00 +/- 0.02 (n = 37) and declined with fatigue to an average value of 6.42 at 3 min of recovery. During recovery pHi significantly increased and by 25 min had returned to the prefatigue value. The pHi recovery was highly correlated to the slow phase of Po recovery (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001). The mean resting membrane potential was -78 +/- 1.0 mV (n = 42) and at 3 min of recovery was depolarized to -67 +/- 4 mV. Both the peak rate of twitch force development (+dP/dt) (r = 0.99, P less than 0.001) and decline (-dP/dt) (r = 0.94, P less than 0.014) were highly correlated to pHi during the slow phase of recovery. Contraction time (CT) and one-half relaxation time (1/2RT) increased significantly and recovered exponentially. The recovery of CT and 1/2RT were both significantly correlated to pHi (r = -0.93, P less than 0.001 and r = -0.86, P less than 0.001 for CT and 1/2RT, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1616012

  7. Effect of glucagon on intracellular pH regulation in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets.

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, D; Della Guardia, P; Bini, A; Gigliozzi, A; Furfaro, S; La Rosa, T; Piat, C; Capocaccia, L

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of glucagon-induced bicarbonate-rich choleresis, we investigated the effect of glucagon on ion transport processes involved in the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets. It was found that glucagon (200 nM), without influencing resting pHi, significantly stimulates the Cl-/HCO3- exchange activity. The effect of glucagon was associated with a sevenfold increase in cAMP levels in rat hepatocytes. The activity of the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger was also stimulated by DBcAMP + forskolin. The effect of glucagon on the Cl-/HCO3- exchange was individually blocked by two specific and selective inhibitors of protein kinase A, Rp-cAMPs (10 microM) and H-89 (30 microM), the latter having no influence on the glucagon-induced cAMP accumulation in isolated rat hepatocytes. The Cl- channel blocker, NPPB (10 microM), showed no effect on either the basal or the glucagon-stimulated Cl-/HCO3 exchange. In contrast, the protein kinase C agonist, PMA (10 microM), completely blocked the glucagon stimulation of the Cl-/HCO3- exchange; however, this effect was achieved through a significant inhibition of the glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation in rat hepatocytes. Colchicine pretreatment inhibited the basal as well as the glucagon-stimulated Cl-/HCO3- exchange activity. The Na+/H+ exchanger was unaffected by glucagon either at basal pHi or at acid pHi values. In contrast, glucagon, at basal pHi, stimulated the Na(+)-HCO3- symport. The main findings of this study indicate that glucagon, through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway, stimulates the activity of the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets, a mechanism which could account for the in vivo induced bicarbonate-rich choleresis. Images PMID:7635959

  8. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: role of intracellular pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize glass microelectrodes to characterize the intracellular pH (pHi) before and during recovery from fatigue in the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle. A second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pHi and contractile function. The frog ST muscle (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. Peak tetanic force (Po) was reduced to 8.5% of initial force and recovered in a biphasic manner, returning to the resting value by 40 min. Resting pHi was 7.00 +/- 0.02 (n = 37) and declined with fatigue to an average value of 6.42 at 3 min of recovery. During recovery pHi significantly increased and by 25 min had returned to the prefatigue value. The pHi recovery was highly correlated to the slow phase of Po recovery (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001). The mean resting membrane potential was -78 +/- 1.0 mV (n = 42) and at 3 min of recovery was depolarized to -67 +/- 4 mV. Both the peak rate of twitch force development (+dP/dt) (r = 0.99, P less than 0.001) and decline (-dP/dt) (r = 0.94, P less than 0.014) were highly correlated to pHi during the slow phase of recovery. Contraction time (CT) and one-half relaxation time (1/2RT) increased significantly and recovered exponentially. The recovery of CT and 1/2RT were both significantly correlated to pHi (r = -0.93, P less than 0.001 and r = -0.86, P less than 0.001 for CT and 1/2RT, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Proliferation and intracellular pH in cultured proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, S.H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koelare, S.A.; Aperia, A. )

    1990-03-01

    Renal proximal tubule (PT) cells from adult rats will maintain much of their functional characteristics in short-term primary culture. This study examines the growth regulation of these highly differentiated cells with particular reference to cell density, intracellular pH (pHi), and the expression of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger. PT cells were obtained from young adult rats and studied after 48 h in culture. The mitotic rate was determined as the labeling index (LI) after (3H)thymidine autoradiography, and pHi was determined by 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein quantitative fluorescence microscopy in single cells. Cells were grown either continuously in serum (S) or were serum deprived after 24 h (D). The cells were nonconfluent and grew in colonies. We defined the two peripheral layers of cells in a colony as peripheral (P) cells and the remaining cells as central (C). In C cells LI/h and pHi were in the range of what has been observed under in vivo conditions. In S condition LI/h was 2.2 +/- 0.3% and in D condition was 0.3 +/- 0.1%. LI was significantly higher in P than in C cells both under S (2.5 +/- 0.4-fold) and D conditions (5.6 +/- 0.8-fold). The rapidly growing P cells had a significantly lower pHi than the growth-retarded C cells both under S (7.25 +/- 0.02 vs. 7.30 +/- 0.01, P less than 0.05) and D conditions (7.21 +/- 0.02 vs. 7.28 +/- 0.01, P less than 0.05).

  10. Thermally induced changes in intracellular pH and modulators of phosphofructokinase in trout white muscle

    PubMed

    Lehoux; Guderley

    1997-01-01

    The intracellular pH (pHi) and the concentrations of lactate and selected modulators of phosphofructokinase (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11) were measured in white epaxial muscle of 15 °C-acclimated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) maintained at 8, 15 or 22 °C for 48 h and sampled at rest and after 10 min of exhaustive exercise. The lactate accumulation resulting from exercise was 13 % smaller at 22 °C than at 8 and 15 °C. The estimated duration of burst performance was shorter at cold than at warm temperatures, whereas the average rate of lactate accumulation during burst performance was higher at 8 °C than at 15 and 22 °C. pHi rose when temperature decreased, but less than predicted by the imidazole alphastat hypothesis of Reeves. The effects of temperature on the pre-exercise concentrations of PFK modulators [adenylates, fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP)] were generally negligible. In exhausted trout, adenylate concentrations were almost unaffected by temperature. In contrast, post-exercise FBP and F6P concentrations were significantly higher at low than at high temperatures. We interpret the response of F6P to temperature as an indication that the covariation of pHi and temperature is insufficient to prevent a cold-enhancement of PFK inhibition. Since F6P is a potent activator of PFK, we conclude that, in trout white muscle, thermally induced changes in F6P concentration probably help buffer the effects of temperature change on PFK activity. PMID:9318724

  11. Anaerobic phosphate release from activated sludge with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A possible mechanism of intracellular pH control

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, P.L.; Keller, J.; Blackall, L.L.

    1999-06-05

    The biochemical mechanisms of the wastewater treatment process known as enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) are presently described in a metabolic model. The authors investigated details of the EBPR model to determine the nature of the anaerobic phosphate release and how this may be metabolically associated with polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) formation. Iodoacetate, an inhibitor of glycolysis, was found to inhibit the anaerobic formation of PHA and phosphate release, supporting the pathways proposed in the EBPR metabolic model. In the metabolic model, it is proposed that polyphosphate degradation provides energy for the microorganisms in anaerobic regions of these treatment systems. Other investigations have shown that anaerobic phosphate release depends on the extracellular pH. The authors observed that when the intracellular pH of EBPR sludge was raised, substantial anaerobic phosphate release was caused without volatile fatty acid (VFA) uptake. Acidification of the sludge inhibited anaerobic phosphate release even in the presence of VFA. from these observations, the authors postulate that an additional possible role of anaerobic polyphosphate degradation in EBPR is for intracellular pH control. Intracellular pH control may be a metabolic feature of EBPR, not previously considered, that could have some use in the control and optimization of EBPR.

  12. Cell-specific intracellular anticancer drug delivery from mesoporous silica nanoparticles with pH sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Beilu; Xu, Dawei

    2012-05-01

    A nanoreservoir for efficient intracellular anticancer drug delivery based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles end-capped with lactobionic acid-grafted bovine serum albumin is fabricated. It demonstrates great potential for both cell-specific endocytosis and intracellular pH-responsive controlled release of drugs. A possible endocytosis pathway/mechanism of the smart controlled drug release system is proposed. PMID:23184747

  13. CatSper and the relationship of hyperactivated motility to intracellular calcium and pH kinetics in equine sperm.

    PubMed

    Loux, Shavahn C; Crawford, Kristin R; Ing, Nancy H; González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Love, Charles C; Varner, Dickson D; Velez, Isabel C; Choi, Young Ho; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-11-01

    In vitro fertilization does not occur readily in the horse. This may be related to failure of equine sperm to initiate hyperactivated motility, as treating with procaine to induce hyperactivation increases fertilization rates. In mice, hyperactivated motility requires a sperm-specific pH-gated calcium channel (CatSper); therefore, we investigated this channel in equine sperm. Motility was assessed by computer-assisted sperm motility analysis and changes in intracellular pH and calcium were assessed using fluorescent probes. Increasing intracellular pH induced a rise in intracellular calcium, which was inhibited by the known CatSper blocker mibefradil, supporting the presence of a pH-gated calcium channel, presumably CatSper. Hyperactivation was associated with moderately increased intracellular pH, but appeared inversely related to increases in intracellular calcium. In calcium-deficient medium, high-pH treatment induced motility loss, consistent with influx of sodium through open CatSper channels in the absence of environmental calcium. However, sperm treated with procaine in calcium-deficient medium both maintained motility and underwent hyperactivation, suggesting that procaine did not act via opening of the CatSper channel. CATSPER1 mRNA was identified in equine sperm by PCR, and CATSPER1 protein was localized to the principal piece on immunocytochemistry. Analysis of the predicted equine CATSPER1 protein revealed species-specific differences in structure in the pH-sensor region. We conclude that the CatSper channel is present in equine sperm but that the relationship of hyperactivated motility to calcium influx is weak. Procaine does not appear to act via CatSper in equine sperm, and its initial hyperactivating action is not dependent upon external calcium influx. PMID:24048572

  14. The Effect of Curcumin on Intracellular pH (pHi), Membrane Hyperpolarization and Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Curcumin has shown to affect sperm motility and function in vitro and fertility in vivo. The molecular mechanism(s) by which curcumin affects sperm motility has not been delineated. Since modulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and plasma membrane polarization is involved in sperm motility, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of curcumin on these sperm (human and murine) parameters. Methods The effect of curcumin on sperm forward motility was examined by counting percentages of forward moving sperm. The effect of curcumin on intracellular pH (pHi) was measured by the fluorescent pH indicator 2,7-bicarboxyethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM). The effect of curcumin on plasma membrane polarization was examined using the fluorescence sensitive dye bis (1,3-dibarbituric acid)-trimethine oxanol [DiBAC4(3)]. Results Curcumin caused a concentration-dependent (p<0.05) decrease in forward motility of both human and mouse sperm. It also caused a concentration-dependent decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) in both human and mouse sperm. Curcumin induced significant (p<0.05) hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane in both human and mouse sperm. Conclusion These findings indicate that curcumin inhibits sperm forward motility by intracellular acidification and hyperpolarization of sperm plasma membrane. This is the first study to our knowledge which examined the effect of curcumin on sperm pHi and membrane polarization that affect sperm forward motility. These exciting findings will have application in deciphering the signal transduction pathway involved in sperm motility and function and in development of a novel non-steroidal contraceptive for infertility. PMID:24918078

  15. Monitoring the intracellular pH of Zygosaccharomyces bailii by green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Dang, T D T; De Maeseneire, S L; Zhang, B Y; De Vos, W H; Rajkovic, A; Vermeulen, A; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2012-06-01

    It is generally known that intracellular pH (pH(i)) plays a vital role in cell physiology and that pH(i) homeostasis is essential for normal cellular functions. Therefore, it is desirable to know the pH(i) during cell life cycle or under various growth conditions. Different methods to measure pH(i) have been developed and among these methods, the use of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a pH(i) indicator is a promising technique. By using this approach, not only can more accurate pH(i) results be obtained but also long-term experiments on pH(i) can be performed. In this study, the wild type Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a notorious food spoilage yeast, was transformed with a plasmid encoding a pH-sensitive GFP (i.e. pHluorin), enabling the pH(i) of the yeast to be determined based on cellular fluorescent signals. After the transformation, growth and pH(i) of the yeast were investigated in four different acidic conditions at 22°C during 26days. From the experimental results, the transformation effectiveness was verified and a good correlation between yeast growth and pH(i) was noticed. Particularly, it was observed that the yeast has an ability to tolerate a significant pH(i) drop during exponential phase and a subsequent pH(i) recovery in stationary phase, which may underlie the exceptional acid resistance of the yeast. This was the first time that a GFP-based approach for pH(i) measurement was applied in Z. bailii and that the pH(i) of the yeast was monitored during such a long period (26days). It can be expected that greater understanding of the physiological properties and mechanisms behind the special acid resistance of the yeast will be obtained from further studies on this new yeast strain. PMID:22538167

  16. Quantitative modelling of the effects of selected intracellular metabolites on pH in fish white muscle

    PubMed

    Arthur; West; Hochachka

    1997-01-01

    A model is presented that provides guidelines to the identification of key experimental variables influencing proton balance and intracellular pH in vertebrate white muscle. We have drawn on data from the literature on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in an attempt to quantify the influence of metabolic, ionic and transport components of proton generation and proton consumption after exercise. Only minor changes in proton balance and in calculated intracellular pH were caused by considering changes in the concentration of bicarbonate or including the acid­base characteristics of purine nucleotides. Intracellular pH, as estimated by the model, was more acidic at some time points in recovery compared with in vivo measurements, and this would appear to result mainly from inaccuracies in quantifying the phosphate component of proton buffering. Nevertheless, the model was able to simulate the typical pattern of muscle acidosis and recovery observed for trout, including the transient post-exercise acidification and the slow recovery rate. As with previous pHi models, comparison of model estimates with experimental observations is essential in this approach in order to identify whether all of the relevant metabolic processes have been considered for accurate quantification of proton balance within the white muscle compartment. PMID:9319037

  17. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of post mortem catabolism and intracellular pH in intact excised rabbit muscle.

    PubMed

    Renou, J P; Canioni, P; Gatelier, P; Valin, C; Cozzone, P J

    1986-04-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to study the post mortem catabolism of high-energy phosphate compounds and the associated intracellular pH variation in pure fast- and slow-twitch rabbit muscles and in rabbit muscle with mixed fiber types. Comparative results from pure fiber types are reported for the first time. Large amounts of glycerophosphorylcholine (14.1 mumol/g fresh tissue) are found in the internal conoidal bundle (ICB), a pure oxidative slow twitch muscle, whereas the m. psoas major (PM), a pure glycolytic fast twitch muscle and the m. gastrocnemius caput medialis (GCM), with mixed fiber types, are devoid of the same metabolite. The total content of phosphorylated metabolites is constant among the three muscle types. The time-dependent post mortem changes in phosphorylated metabolites display the expected rapid drop in phosphocreatine and a simultaneous increase in intracellular inorganic phosphate. However, the ATP level remains constant during more than 2 h. Rate constants for metabolite breakdown and apparent ATPase activity have been determined. The comparative kinetics of intracellular acidosis at 25 degrees C yield rates of 3.3 X 10(-3) pH unit/min for PM, 2.7 X 10(-3) pH unit/min for GCM and 3.0 X 10(-3) pH unit/min for ICB. Initial intracellular pH values are 7.07, 7.20 and 7.02, respectively. Upon aging, the heterogeneity of the Pi signal reflects the existence of cellular compartments with different internal pH. The results suggest that the more intense low-pH Pi signal arises from the sarcoplasmic reticulum while the less intense resonance would reflect the sarcoplasmic higher pH. The temperature effect on post mortem catabolism in the 15-25 degrees C range has been documented. As expected, phosphocreatine and ATP breakdown increase with temperature but at a higher rate for slow-twitch ICB than for fast-twitch PM. PMID:3091088

  18. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points. PMID:27020293

  19. A low cytotoxic and ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon-dots for intracellular pH sensing and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangkai; Ming, Yunhao; Zeng, Fang; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH plays a critical role in the function of cells, and its regulation is essential for most cellular processes. In this study, we demonstrate a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ratiometric pH nanosensor with carbon-dot (CD) as the carrier. The sensor was prepared by covalently linking a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC) onto carbon-dot. As the FRET donor, the carbon-dot exhibits bright fluorescence emission as well as λex-dependent photoluminescence emission, and a suitable excitation wavelength for the donor (CD) can be chosen to match the energy acceptor (fluorescein moiety). The fluorescein moieties on a CD undergo structural and spectral conversion as the pH changes, affording the nanoplatform a FRET-based pH sensor. The CD-based system exhibits a significant change in fluorescence intensity ratio between pH 4 and 8 with a pKa value of 5.69. It also displays excellent water dispersibility, good spectral reversibility, satisfactory cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Following the living cell uptake, this nanoplatform with dual-chromatic emissions can facilitate real-time visualization of the pH evolution involved in the endocytic pathway of the nanosensor. This reversible and low cytotoxic fluorescent nanoplatform may be highly valuable in a variety of biological studies, such as endocytic trafficking, endosome/lysosome maturation, and pH regulation in subcellular organelles.

  20. The biophysical and molecular basis of intracellular pH sensing by Na+/H+ exchanger-3

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Victor; Vadnagara, Komal; Di Sole, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial Na+/H+ exchanger-3 (NHE3) transport is fundamental for renal and intestinal sodium reabsorption. Cytoplasmic protons are thought to serve as allosteric modifiers of the exchanger and to trigger its transport through protein conformational change. This effect presupposes an intracellular pH (pHi) dependence of NHE3 activity, although the biophysical and molecular basis of NHE3 pHi sensitivity have not been defined. NHE3, when complexed with the calcineurin homologous protein-1 (CHP1), had a shift in pHi sensitivity (0.4 units) toward the acidic side in comparison with NHE3 alone, as measured by oscillating pH electrodes combined with whole-cell patch clamping. Indeed, CHP1 interaction with NHE3 inhibited NHE3 transport in a pHi -dependent manner. CHP1 binding to NHE3 also affected its acute regulation. Intracellular perfusion of peptide from the CHP1 binding region (or pHi modification to reduce the CHP1 amount bound to NHE3) was permissive and cooperative for dopamine inhibition of NHE3 but reversed that of adenosine. Thus, CHP1 interaction with NHE3 apparently establishes the exchanger set point for pHi, and modification in this set point is effective in the hormonal stimuli–mediated regulation of NHE3. CHP1 may serve as a regulatory cofactor for NHE3 conformational change, dependent on intracellular protonation.—Babich V., Vadnagara K., Di Sole, F. The biophysical and molecular basis of intracellular pH sensing by the Na+/H+ exchanger-3. PMID:23934281

  1. The temperature dependence of intracellular pH in isolated frog skeletal muscle: lessons concerning the Na(+)-H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, M; Elliott, A C; Dawson, M J

    1998-02-01

    We used 31P NMR to investigate the temperature-dependence of intracellular pH (pHi) in isolated frog skeletal muscles. We found that Ln[H+i] is a linear function of 1/Tabs paralleling those of neutral water (i.e., H+ = OH-) and of a solution containing the fixed pH buffers of frog muscle cytosol. This classical van't Hoff relationship was unaffected by inhibition of glycolysis and was not dependent upon the pH or [Na+] in the bathing solution. Insulin stimulation of Na(+)-H+ exchange shifted the intercept in the alkaline direction but had not effect on the slope. Acid loading followed by washout resulted in an amiloride-sensitive return to the (temperature dependent) basal pHi. These results show that the temperature dependence of activation of Na(+)-H+ exchange is similar to that of the intracellular buffers, and suggest that constancy of [H+]/ [OH-] with changing temperature is achieved in the short term by intracellular buffering and in the long term by the set-point of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger. Proton activation of the exchanger has an apparent standard enthalpy change (delta H degree) under both control and insulin-stimulated conditions that is similar to the delta H degree of the intracellular buffers and approximately half of the delta H degree for the dissociation of water. Thus, the temperature-dependent component of the standard free-energy change (delta F degree) is unaffected by insulin stimulation, suggesting that changes in Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) may not be a part of the mechanism of hormone stimulation. PMID:9493127

  2. Rationally Engineering Phototherapy Modules of Eosin-Conjugated Responsive Polymeric Nanocarriers via Intracellular Endocytic pH Gradients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guhuan; Hu, Jinming; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Shiyong

    2015-07-15

    Spatiotemporal switching of respective phototherapy modes at the cellular level with minimum side effects and high therapeutic efficacy is a major challenge for cancer phototherapy. Herein we demonstrate how to address this issue by employing photosensitizer-conjugated pH-responsive block copolymers in combination with intracellular endocytic pH gradients. At neutral pH corresponding to extracellular and cytosol milieu, the copolymers self-assemble into micelles with prominently quenched fluorescence emission and low (1)O2 generation capability, favoring a highly efficient photothermal module. Under mildly acidic pH associated with endolysosomes, protonation-triggered micelle-to-unimer transition results in recovered emission and enhanced photodynamic (1)O2 efficiency, which synergistically actuates release of encapsulated drugs, endosomal escape, and photochemical internalization processes. PMID:25514473

  3. pHlash: A New Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor of Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. Brian; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a genetically encodable and ratiometic pH probe named “pHlash” that utilizes Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) rather than fluorescence excitation. The pHlash sensor–composed of a donor luciferase that is genetically fused to a Venus fluorophore–exhibits pH dependence of its spectral emission in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification in vivo. Its spectral ratio response is H+ specific; neither Ca++, Mg++, Na+, nor K+ changes the spectral form of its luminescence emission. Moreover, it can be used to image pH in single cells. This is the first BRET-based sensor of H+ ions, and it should allow the approximation of pH in cytosolic and organellar compartments in applications where current pH probes are inadequate. PMID:22905204

  4. Effect of cationic side-chains on intracellular delivery and cytotoxicity of pH sensitive polymer-doxorubicin nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chen; Kievit, Forrest M.; Cho, Yong-Chan; Mok, Hyejung; Press, Oliver W.; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-10-01

    Fine-tuning the design of polymer-doxorubicin conjugates permits optimization of an efficient nanocarrier to greatly increase intracellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Here, we report synthesis of a family of self-assembled polymer-doxorubicin nanoparticles and an evaluation of the effects of various types of side-chains on intracellular uptake and cytotoxicity of the nanocarriers for lymphoma cells. Monomers with three different cationic side-chains (CA) and pKa's, i.e., a guanidinium group (Ag), an imidazole group (Im), and a tertiary amine group (Dm), were comparatively investigated. The cationic monomer, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and doxorubicin (Dox) were reacted with 1,4-(butanediol) diacrylate (BUDA) to prepare a poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer via Michael addition. All three polymer-Dox conjugates spontaneously formed nanoparticles (NP) through hydrophobic interactions between doxorubicin in aqueous solution, resulting in NP-Im/Dox, NP-Ag/Dox, and NP-Dm/Dox, with hydrodynamic sizes below 80 nm. Doxorubicin was linked to all 3 types of NPs with a hydrazone bond to assure selective release of doxorubicin only at acidic pH, as it occurs in the tumor microenvironment. Both NP-Im/Dox and NP-Ag/Dox exhibited much higher intracellular uptake by Ramos cells (Burkitt's lymphoma) than NP-Dm/Dox, suggesting that the type of side chain in the NPs determines the extent of intracellular uptake. As a result, NP-Im/Dox and NP-Ag/Dox showed cytotoxicity that was comparable to free Dox in vitro. Our findings suggest that the nature of surface cationic group on nanocarriers may profoundly influence their intracellular trafficking and resulting therapeutic efficacy. Thus, it is a crucial factor to be considered in the design of novel carriers for intracellular drug delivery.

  5. The amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchange antiporter and control of intracellular pH in hippocampal brain slices.

    PubMed

    Lin, C W; Kalaria, R N; Kroon, S N; Bae, J Y; Sayre, L M; LaManna, J C

    1996-08-26

    The intracellular pH, 7.54 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- S.D., n = 15), determined with the Neutral red method, of the hippocampal brain slice preparation under baseline incubation conditions is considerably more alkaline than the bath buffer pH. Neutralization by amiloride suggests that the alkalinity was due to Na+/H+ exchange antiporter activation. To characterize the brain Na+/H+ exchange antiporter we compared the inhibitory effects of MIA, amiloride and other 5-N substituted analogues on proton extrusion after acid loading by transient exposure to ammonium chloride in the isolated hippocampal brain slice preparation. The potencies of amiloride compounds on the initial recovery rate of intracellular pH after acid-loading were DMA > MIA > HMA = MHA > or = IPA-HCI > IPA > MNPA = Amil > Benzamil. The greater potency of the 5-N substituted analogs of amiloride over amiloride and benzamil strongly suggest that Na+/H+ exchange antiporter is the mechanism responsible for alkalinization in the isolated hippocampal brain slice in vitro. PMID:8883860

  6. Embryonic common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) preferentially regulate intracellular tissue pH during acid-base challenges.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Crossley, Dane A; Kohl, Zachary F; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-07-01

    The nests of embryonic turtles naturally experience elevated CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood PCO2  and a respiratory acidosis, resulting in reduced blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)]. Some fishes preferentially regulate tissue pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] against changes in pHe; this has been proposed to be associated with exceptional CO2 tolerance and has never been identified in amniotes. As embryonic turtles may be CO2 tolerant based on nesting strategy, we hypothesized that they preferentially regulate pHi, conferring tolerance to severe acute acid-base challenges. This hypothesis was tested by investigating pH regulation in common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) reared in normoxia then exposed to hypercarbia (13 kPa PCO2 ) for 1 h at three developmental ages: 70% and 90% of incubation, and yearlings. Hypercarbia reduced pHe but not pHi, at all developmental ages. At 70% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.324 pH units while pHi of brain, white muscle and lung increased; heart, liver and kidney pHi remained unchanged. At 90% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.352 pH units but heart pHi increased with no change in pHi of other tissues. Yearlings exhibited a pHe reduction of 0.235 pH units but had no changes in pHi of any tissues. The results indicate common snapping turtles preferentially regulate pHi during development, but the degree of response is reduced throughout development. This is the first time preferential pHi regulation has been identified in an amniote. These findings may provide insight into the evolution of acid-base homeostasis during development of amniotes, and vertebrates in general. PMID:27091863

  7. Regulation of intracellular pH in cardiac muscle during cell shrinkage and swelling in anisosmolar solutions.

    PubMed

    Whalley, D W; Hemsworth, P D; Rasmussen, H H

    1994-02-01

    The effect on intracellular pH (pHi) of exposure to solutions of progressively increasing osmolarity from 418 to 620 mosM and to hyposmolar solutions (240 mosM) was examined in guinea pig ventricular muscle using ion-selective microelectrodes. Exposure of tissue to 418 mosM Tyrode solution (100 mM sucrose added) produced an intracellular alkalosis of approximately 0.1 U, whereas exposure to 620 mosM solution (300 mM sucrose added) caused an intracellular acidosis of approximately 0.1 U. The maximal rate of recovery of pHi from acidosis induced by an NH4Cl prepulse increased progressively as extracellular osmolarity was raised from 310 to 620 mosM. This suggests that the acidosis observed at steady state in 620 mosM solution is not due to inhibition of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger. In the presence of 10 microM ryanodine, exposure to 620 mosM solution produced a sustained intracellular alkalosis. We suggest that the decrease in pHi during exposure to 620 mosM solution is due, at least in part, to the acidifying influence of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This decrease in pHi is expected to contribute to the negative inotrop reported in studies of cardiac contractility in markedly hyperosmolar solutions. There was no change in pHi when tissue was exposed to hyposmolar solution. However, the maximal rate of recovery of pHi from acidosis was slower in hyposmolar than in isosmolar solution, despite a concomitant decrease in the intracellular buffer capacity. This suggests that osmotic cell swelling results in inhibition of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-H+ exchanger. PMID:8141367

  8. Effects of 2-methoxyethanol on fetal development, postnatal behavior, and embryonic intracellular pH of rats.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B K; Vorhees, C V; Scott, W J; Hastings, L

    1989-01-01

    The industrial solvent 2-methoxyethanol (2ME) is a reproductive and developmental toxicant when administered by inhalation, gavage, and IP injection. The present research established that this solvent can produce teratogenicity in rats when administered in liquid diet. Groups of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats were given various percentages of 2ME in liquid diet on gestation days 7-18. Day 20 fetuses were examined for visceral or skeletal malformations. Concentrations above 0.025% 2ME (approximately 73 mg/kg/day) produced total embryo-mortality. Cardiovascular malformations were produced at lower levels. The teratogenic no-effect level was 0.006% 2ME (16 mg/kg). In a second experiment, groups of 12 Sprague-Dawley rats were given 0, 0.006 and 0.012% of 2ME as above. Litters were culled to 8 pups, and tested for auditory and tactile startle and conditioned lick suppression, and for performance in figure-8 activity and the Cincinnati water maze on postnatal days 48-65. The high dose of 2ME produced approximately 50% mortality in the offspring and increased the number of errors in the Cincinnati maze. No other behavioral effects were observed at either dose. An interaction study was conducted to determine if simultaneous exposure to 2ME and ethanol would reduce the teratogenicity of 2ME, but no reduction was observed. The hypothesis that 2ME acts by altering embryonic intracellular pH was tested by injecting 0.33 ml/kg of 2ME into rats on gestation day 13, and determining embryonic intracellular pH at 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours thereafter. There was an increase in pH at 4 hours, but not at later time points. Another group of rats was given 2ME along with amiloride, which blocks the sodium/hydrogen antiporter. The combined 2ME-amiloride exposure produced an incidence of cardiovascular malformations in fetuses twice that of 2ME alone. These studies confirmed the structural teratogenicity of 2ME even when given in liquid diet, as it was given for the first time in the present study. At

  9. The sensitivity of a malignant cell line to hyperthermia (42 degrees C) at low intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Dickson, J A; Oswald, B E

    1976-09-01

    The postulate that low intracellular pH acts as a preconditioner for the destructuve effects of hyperthermia (42 degrees C) was examined, using a heat-sensitive line of malignant cells derived from rat mammary gland (SDB). Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured indirectly, from the distribution of the weak, non-metabolizable organic acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione (DMO) between intra- and extra-cellular water. Respiration, aerobic and anaerobic and anaerobic glycolysis of the cells were studied at normal pHi (pH 7-0-7-4) or at low pHi (pH 6-2-6-6) and at 38 degrees C or 42 degrees C over 6 h in Warburg manometers; the ability of the cells to replicate in culture was examined after 3 h or 6 h incubation in the flasks. The relationship between pHi and extracellular pH (pHe) depended upon the buffer system used and the exact pH in question; no assumption regarding pHi based only on pHe measurement could be made. At 38 degrees C and low pHi, the Pasteur effect became negative due to a relatively greater inhibition of anaerobic than aerobic glycolysis. Respiration was unaffected and cell replicative ability unimpaired. At 42 degrees C and normal pHi, respiration was totally inhibited after 4 h and the Pasteur effect was decreased, in this case due to a compensatory increase in aerobic glycolysis without alteration in anaerobic CO2 production. Low pHi in the presence of hyperthermia enabled cell respiration to continue at a reduced level with no further change in glycolysis. There was delayed cell replication after 3 h at 42 degrees C and inability to multiply following 6 h hyperthermia: low pHi did not influence these results. It is concluded that with these cancer cells, pHi values maintained in the region of 1-0 pH unit below normal for 6 h had no deleterious effect on the cells. No sensitizing effect of the low pHi for the destructive effect of hyperthermia on the cells was observed. PMID:9969

  10. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks. PMID:25411952

  11. Proton/l-Glutamate Symport and the Regulation of Intracellular pH in Isolated Mesophyll Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Snedden, Wayne A.; Chung, Induk; Pauls, Randy H.; Bown, Alan W.

    1992-01-01

    Addition of l-[U-14C]glutamate to a suspension of mechanically isolated asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri Regel) mesophyll cells results in (a) alkalinization of the medium, (b) uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate, and (c) efflux of [14C]4-aminobutyrate, a product of glutamate decarboxylation. All three phenomena were eliminated by treatment with 1 millimolar aminooxyacetate. In vitro glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) assays showed that (a) 2 millimolar aminooxyacetate eliminated enzyme activity, (b) activity was pyridoxal phosphate-dependent, and (c) activity exhibited a sharp pH optimum at 6.0 that decreased to 20% of optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 7.0. Addition of 1.5 millimolar sodium butyrate or sodium acetate to cell suspensions caused immediate alkalinization of the medium followed by a resumption of acidification of the medium at a rate approximately double the initial rate. The data indicate that (a) continued H+/l-glutamate contransport is dependent upon GAD activity, (b) the pH-dependent properties of GAD are consistent with a role in a metabolic pH-stat, and (c) the regulation of intracellular pH during H+/l-Glu symport may involve both H+ consumption during 4-aminobutyrate production and ATP-driven H+ efflux. PMID:16668938

  12. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  13. Construction of pH-Sensitive "Submarine" Based on Gold Nanoparticles with Double Insurance for Intracellular pH Mapping, Quantifying of Whole Cells and in Vivo Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kang-Kang; Li, Kun; Qin, Hui-Huan; Zhou, Qian; Qian, Chen-Hui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-09-01

    A series of "submarines", which composed of gold nanoparticles and modified with rhodamine and fluorescein derivatives, were presented. With dual sensitive units for both acidic and basic environment, these "gold nano-submarines" not only allow efficient intracellular pH mapping but also provide more accurate quantitative detection of pH alteration under different stimuli with distinct pH quantification range. Moreover, they even have the ability to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB). PMID:27532147

  14. Effects of chronic pH 6.6 on growth, intracellular pH, and response to 42.0 degrees C hyperthermia of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Fox, M H

    1988-05-01

    Culturing Chinese hamster ovary cells in low pH (6.6) medium for several months altered the reproductive survival of these cells to combined low pH treatments and 42.0 degrees C heating. We isolated new pH-resistant cells (identified as pHV-2) with enhanced ability to grow and divide under a low pH (6.6) environment. Their growth characteristics include (a) a plating efficiency of 70%, (b) a doubling time of 16 to 17 h, and (c) a steady state intracellular pH 0.12 pH units higher than for cells grown at a normal pH of 7.3. The pHV-2 cells had 100- to 200-fold increases in survival after 5 h of heating compared to cells incubated at low pH (6.6) for 4 h prior to and during the heat treatments. In addition, they developed a significant degree of thermotolerance. We measured a progressive decline in the intracellular pH as a function of time at 42.0 degrees C. However, the decrease in the intracellular pH did not seem to be correlated with the increased heat sensitivity. The ability to select for low pH variants may have important implications in the extrapolation of in vitro hyperthermic data to the in vivo situation. PMID:3356006

  15. Regulation of the glutamine transporter SN1 by extracellular pH and intracellular sodium ions

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, Angelika; Albers, Alexandra; Setiawan, Iwan; Edwards, Robert H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Lang, Florian; Wagner, Carsten A; Bröer, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The glutamine transporter SN1 has recently been identified as one of the major glutamine transporters in hepatocytes and brain astrocytes. It appears to be the molecular correlate of system N amino acid transport. Two different transport mechanisms have been proposed for this transporter. These are an electroneutral mechanism, in which glutamine uptake is coupled to an exchange of 1Na+ and 1H+, or an electrogenic mechanism coupled to the exchange of 2Na+ against 1H+. This study was performed to solve these discrepancies and to investigate the reversibility of the transporter. When SN1 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, glutamine uptake was accompanied by a cotransport of 2–3 Na+ ions as determined by 22Na+ fluxes. However, at the same time a rapid release of intracellular Na+ was observed indicating an active exchange of Na+ ions. The driving force of the proton electrochemical gradient was equivalent to that of the sodium electrochemical gradient. Acidification of the extracellular medium caused the transporter to run in reverse and to release glutamine. Determination of accumulation ratios at different driving forces were in agreement with an electroneutral 1Na+-glutamine cotransport-1H+ antiport. Inward currents that were observed during glutamine uptake were much smaller than expected for a stoichiometric cotransport of charges. A slippage mode in the transporter mechanism and pH-regulated endogenous oocyte cation channels are likely to contribute to the observed currents. PMID:11850497

  16. Intracellular pH transients in squid giant axons caused by CO2, NH3, and metabolic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boron, W F; De Weer, P

    1976-01-01

    The intracellular pH (pHi) of squid giant axons has been measured using glass pH microelectrodes. Resting pHi in artificial seawater (ASW) (pH 7.6-7.8) at 23 degrees C was 7.32 +/- 0.02 (7.28 if corrected for liquid junction potential). Exposure of the axon to 5% CO2 at constant external pH caused a sharp decrease in pHi, while the subsequent removal of the gas caused pHi to overshoot its initial value. If the exposure to CO2 was prolonged, two additional effects were noted: (a) during the exposure, the rapid initial fall in pHi was followed by a slow rise, and (b) after the exposure, the overshoot was greatly exaggerated. Application of external NH4Cl caused pHi to rise sharply; return to normal ASW caused pHi to return to a value below its initial one. If the exposure to NH4Cl was prolonged, two additional effects were noted: (a) during the exposure, the rapid initial rise in pHi was followed by a slow fall, and (b) after the exposure, the undershoot was greatly exaggerated. Exposure to several weak acid metabolic inhibitors caused a fall in pHi whose reversibility depended upon length of exposure. Inverting the electrochemical gradient for H+ with 100 mM K-ASW had no effect on pHi changes resulting from short-term exposure to azide. A mathematical model explains the pHi changes caused by NH4Cl on the basis of passive movements of both NH3 and NH4+. The simultaneous passive movements of CO2 and HCO3-cannot explain the results of the CO2 experiments; these data require the postulation of an active proton extrusion and/or sequestration mechanism. PMID:1460

  17. Long-term effects of thyroid stimulating hormone and insulin on intracellular pH in FRTL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, A M; Bidey, S P; Soden, J; Robertson, W R

    1992-05-01

    We have studied the chronic effects of TSH (100 microU/ml) and insulin (10 micrograms/ml) on intracellular pH (pH(i)) in FRTL-5 cells using the pH sensitive probe 2'7-bis (2-carboxyethyl-5'-6') carboxyfluorescein. FRTL-5 cells were cultured on Petri dishes either in the presence of 4H, ie. Coons F-12 containing cortisol (10 nM), transferrin (0.5 microgram/ml), glycyl-histidyl lysine acetate (10 ng/ml) and somatostatin (10 micrograms/ml), or with 4H + insulin (5H), 4H + TSH, or 4H + TSH + insulin (6H). pH(i) was measured in small groups of cells by microspectrofluorimetry both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate ions after cells had been deprived of serum for at least a day. In the absence of TSH, insulin and bicarbonate ions, pH(i) was 7.26 +/- 0.18 (mean +/- SD, n = 49) rising to 7.89 +/- 0.09 (n = 59) and 7.43 +/- 0.1 (n = 55) in the presence of TSH (4H + TSH) and insulin (5H) respectively. Addition of both insulin and TSH (6H) resulted in a pH(i) of 7.75 +/- 0.09 (n = 40). In the absence of TSH and insulin, but the presence of bicarbonate ions, pH(i) was 7.29 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD n = 47) rising to 7.72 +/- 0.07 (n = 59) in 4H + TSH and 7.48 +/- 0.08 (n = 60) in 5H. pH(i) in the presence of both TSH and insulin was 7.81 +/- 0.03 (n = 60). In conclusion, both insulin and TSH caused an intracellular alkalinization, TSH markedly so, even in the presence of bicarbonate ions. PMID:1613417

  18. Asterosap-induced elevation in intracellular pH is indispensable for ARIS-induced sustained increase in intracellular Ca2+ and following acrosome reaction in starfish spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Osamu; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Hoshi, Motonori; Matsumoto, Midori

    2005-02-01

    In the starfish, Asterias amurensis, the cooperation of three components of the egg jelly, namely ARIS (acrosome reaction-inducing substance), Co-ARIS and asterosap, is responsible for the induction of acrosome reaction. For the induction, ARIS alone is enough in high-Ca2+ or high-pH seawater, but, besides ARIS, the addition of either Co-ARIS or asterosap is required in normal seawater. Asterosap transiently increased both the intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), while ARIS slightly elevated the basal level of [Ca2+]i. However, a sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i and acrosome reaction occurred if sperm were simultaneously treated with ARIS and asterosap. EGTA inhibited the sustained [Ca2+]i elevation and acrosome reaction. The sustained [Ca2+]i elevation and acrosome reaction were highly susceptible to SKF96365 and Ni2+, specific blockers of the store-operated Ca2+ channel (SOC). These results suggest that sustained [Ca2+]i elevation, mediated by the SOC-like channel, is a prerequisite for the acrosome reaction. In high-pH seawater, ARIS alone induced a prominent [Ca2+]i increase and acrosome reaction, which were similarly sensitive to SKF96365. The acrosome reaction was effectively induced by ARIS alone when pHi was artificially increased to more than 7.7. Asterosap increased pHi from 7.6 +/- 0.1 to 7.7 +/- 0.1. Furthermore, the sustained [Ca2+]i elevation and acrosome reaction, induced by a combination of ARIS and asterosap, were drastically inhibited by a slight reduction in pHi. Taking these results into account, we suggest that an asterosap-induced pHi elevation is required for triggering the ARIS-induced sustained [Ca2+]i elevation and consequent acrosome reaction. PMID:15984164

  19. The effect of carbon dioxide on the intracellular pH and buffering power of snail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R C

    1976-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using pH-sensitive glass micro-electrodes. The effects on pHi of CO2 applied externally and HCO3-, H+ and NH4+ injected iontophoretically, were investigated. 2. The transport numbers for iontophoretic injection into aqueous micro-droples were found by potentiometric titration to be 0-3 for HCO3- and 0-94 for H+. 3. Exposure to Ringer, pH 7-5, equilibrated with 2-2% CO2 caused a rapid, but only transient, fall in pHi. Within 1 or 2 min pHi began to return exponentially to normal, with a time constant of about 5 min. 4. When external CO2 was removed, pHi rapidly increased, and then slowly returned to normal. The pHi changes with CO2 application or removal gave a calculated intracellular buffer value of about 30 m-equiv H+/pH unit per litre. 5. Injection of HCO3- caused a rise in pHi very similar to that seen on removal of external CO2. 6. The pHi responses to CO2 application, CO2 removal and HCO3- injection were slowed by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide. 7. H+ injection caused a transient fall in pHi. In CO2 Ringer pHi fell less and recovered faster than in CO2-free Ringer. Calculation of the internal buffer value from the pHi responses to H+ and HCO3- injection gave very similar values. 8. The internal buffer value (measured by H+ injection) was greatly increased by exposure to CO2 Ringer. Acetazolamide reduced this effect of CO2, suggesting that the function of intracellular carbonic anhydrase may be to maximize the internal buffering power in CO2. 9. It was concluded that the internal HCO3- was determined primarily by the CO2 level and pHi, that internal HCO3- made a large contribution to the buffering power, and that after internal acidfication pHi was restored to normal by active transport of H+, OH- or HCO3- across the cell membrane. The active transport was much faster in CO2 than in CO2-free Ringer. PMID:4614

  20. Genetic interactions among the Arl1 GTPase and intracellular Na(+) /H(+) antiporters in pH homeostasis and cation detoxification.

    PubMed

    Marešová, Lydie; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-11-01

    The roles of intracellular GTPase Arl1 and organellar cation/H(+) antiporters (Kha1 and Nhx1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to various stress factors were investigated and interesting new phenotypes of strains devoid of these proteins were found. The role of Arl1 GTPase in their tolerance to various cations is not caused by an altered plasma-membrane potential. Besides the known sensitivity of arl1 mutants to high temperature, we discovered their sensitivity to low temperature. We found for the first time that in the absence of Arl1p, Kha1p increases potassium, sodium and lithium tolerance, and can thus be categorized as an antiporter with broad substrate specificity. Kha1p also participates in the detoxification of undesired chemical compounds, pH regulation and growth at nonoptimal temperatures. Cells with the combined deletions of all three genes have considerable difficulty growing under nonoptimal conditions. We conclude that Arl1p, Kha1p and Nhx1p collaborate in survival strategies at nonoptimal pH, temperatures and cation concentrations, but work independent of each other. PMID:20659170

  1. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rebecca C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L.; Go, Aiza C.; Anderson, Steve E.; Cala, Peter M.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings

  2. Effects of micro electric current load during cooling of plant tissues on intracellular ice crystal formation behavior and pH.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Takako; Kawamura, Yukio; Konishi, Tadashi; Narumi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Cryopreservation techniques are expected to evolve further to preserve biomaterials and foods in a fresh state for extended periods of time. Long-term cryopreservation of living materials such as food and biological tissue is generally achieved by freezing; thus, intracellular freezing occurs. Intracellular freezing injures the cells and leads to cell death. Therefore, a dream cryopreservation technique would preserve the living materials without internal ice crystal formation at a temperature low enough to prevent bacterial activity. This study was performed to investigate the effect of micro electrical current loading during cooling as a new cryopreservation technique. The behavior of intracellular ice crystal formation in plant tissues with or without an electric current load was evaluated using the degree of supercooling, degree of cell deformation, and grain size and growing rate of intracellular ice crystal. Moreover, the transition of intracellular pH during plant tissue cooling with or without electric current loading was also examined using the fluorescence intensity ratio to comprehend cell activity at lower temperatures. The results indicated that micro electric current load did not only decrease the degree of cell deformation and grain size of intracellular ice crystal but also reduced the decline in intracellular pH due to temperature lowering, compared with tissues subjected to the same cooling rate without an electric current load. Thus, the effect of electric current load on cryopreservation and the potential of a new cryopreservation technique using electric current load were discussed based on these results. PMID:27343137

  3. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1. PMID:26375462

  4. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1. PMID:26375462

  5. Intracellular release of doxorubicin from core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles triggered by both pH and reduction conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liangliang; Zou, Yan; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-07-01

    Reduction and pH dual-sensitive reversibly core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were developed from lipoic acid (LA) and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid (CCA) decorated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-P(LL-CCA/LA)) block copolymers for active loading and triggered intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) and PEG-P(LL18-CCA8/LA10) (M(n PEG) = 5.0 kg/mol) formed nano-sized micelles that were readily crosslinked in the presence of a catalytic amount of dithiothreitol (DTT) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4, 10 mM). PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles displayed an elevated DOX loading over PEG-P(LL14-LA14) controls likely due to presence of ionic interactions between DOX and CCA. These core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles while exhibiting high stability against extensive dilution and high salt concentration were quickly dissociated into unimers in the presence of 10 mM DTT. The in vitro release studies showed that DOX release from PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles at pH 7.4 and 37 °C was significantly inhibited by crosslinking (i.e. less than 20% release in 24 h). The release of DOX was, however, doubled under endosomal pH of 5.0, possibly triggered by cleavage of the acid-labile amide bonds of CCA. In particular, rapid DOX release was observed under a reductive condition containing 10 mm glutathione (GSH), in which 86.0% and 96.7% of DOX were released in 24 h at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, under otherwise the same conditions. MTT assays demonstrated that these core-crosslinked polypeptide micelles were practically non-toxic up to a tested concentration of 1.0 mg/mL, while DOX-loaded micelles caused pronounced cytotoxic effects to HeLa and HepG2 tumor cells with IC50 (inhibitory concentration to produce 50% cell death) of ca. 12.5 μg DOX equiv/mL following 48 h incubation. Confocal microscopy observations revealed that DOX-loaded crosslinked PEG-P(LL18-CCA4/LA14) micelles more efficiently delivered and released DOX into the nuclei of

  6. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  7. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Louisse, Jochem; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-06-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH{sub i}in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH{sub i} of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +}-antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH{sub i} in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH{sub i} may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  8. Role of H(+)-pyrophosphatase activity in the regulation of intracellular pH in a scuticociliate parasite of turbot: Physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; de Felipe, Ana-Paula; Sueiro, Rosa-Ana; Fontenla, Francisco; Leiro, José-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The scuticociliatosis is a very serious disease that affects the cultured turbot, and whose causal agent is the anphizoic and marine euryhaline ciliate Philasterides dicentrarchi. Several protozoans possess acidic organelles that contain high concentrations of pyrophosphate (PPi), Ca(2+) and other elements with essential roles in vesicular trafficking, pH homeostasis and osmoregulation. P. dicentrarchi possesses a pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) that pumps H(+) through the membranes of vacuolar and alveolar sacs. These compartments share common features with the acidocalcisomes described in other parasitic protozoa (e.g. acid content and Ca(2+) storage). We evaluated the effects of Ca(2+) and ATP on H (+)-PPase activity in this ciliate and analyzed their role in maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis and osmoregulation, by the addition of PPi and inorganic molecules that affect osmolarity. Addition of PPi led to acidification of the intracellular compartments, while the addition of ATP, CaCl2 and bisphosphonates analogous of PPi and Ca(2+) metabolism regulators led to alkalinization and a decrease in H(+)-PPase expression in trophozoites. Addition of NaCl led to proton release, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and downregulation of H(+)-PPase expression. We conclude that the regulation of the acidification of intracellular compartments may be essential for maintaining the intracellular pH homeostasis necessary for survival of ciliates and their adaptation to salt stress, which they will presumably face during the endoparasitic phase, in which the salinity levels are lower than in their natural environment. PMID:27480055

  9. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.su; Sud'ina, Galina F.; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na{sup +} and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl{sup -} efflux through chloride channels and Na{sup +} influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  10. Effect of potassium depletion of Hep 2 cells on intracellular pH and on chloride uptake by anion antiport

    SciTech Connect

    Madshus, I.H.; Tonnessen, T.I.; Olsnes, S.; Sandvig, K.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of K+ depletion of Hep 2 cells on ion fluxes, internal pH, cell volume, and membrane potential was studied. The cells were depleted of K+ by incubation in K+-free buffer with or without a preceding exposure to hypotonic medium. Efflux of K+ in cells not exposed to hypotonic medium was inhibited by furosemide or by incubation in Na+-free medium, indicating that in this case at least part of the K+ efflux occurs by Na+/K+/Cl- cotransport. After exposure to hypotonic medium, K+ efflux was not inhibited by furosemide, whereas it was partly inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene-disulfonic acid (DIDS). Exposure to hypotonic medium induced acidification of the cytosol, apparently because of efflux of protons from intracellular acidic vesicles. When isotonicity was restored, a rebound alkalinization of the cytosol was induced, because of activation of the Na+/H+ antiporter. While hypotonic shock and a subsequent incubation in K+-free buffer rapidly depolarized the cells, depolarization occurred much more slowly when the K+ depletion was carried out by incubation in K+-free buffer alone. The cell volume was reduced in both cases. K+ depletion by either method strongly reduced the ability of the cells to accumulate /sup 36/Cl- by anion antiport, and K+-depleted cells were unable to increase the rate of /sup 36/Cl- uptake in response to alkalinization of the cytosol.

  11. Intracellular pH and its relationship to regulation of ion transport in normal and cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Willumsen, N J; Boucher, R C

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) of cultured human airway epithelial cells from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects were measured with double-barrelled pH-sensitive liquid exchanger microelectrodes. The cells, which were grown to confluence on a permeable collagen matrix support, were mounted in a modified miniature Ussing chamber. All studies were conducted under open circuit conditions. Values are given as means +/- S.E.M. and n refers to the number of preparations. 2. Normal preparations (n = 15) were characterized by a transepithelial potential difference (Vt) of -18 +/- 2 mV, an apical membrane potential (Va) of -19 +/- 2 mV, a basolateral membrane potential (Vb) of -37 +/- 2 mV, a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of 253 +/- 15 omega cm2, a fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) of 0.40 +/- 0.04 and an equivalent short circuit current (Ieq) of -73 +/- 7 microA cm-2. 3. CF preparations (n = 13) were characterized by a Vt of -46 +/- 7 mV, a Va of 3 +/- 5 mV, a Vb of -43 +/- 3 mV, Rt of 373 +/- 47 omega cm2, fRa of 0.44 +/- 0.04 and an Ieq of -130 +/- 16 microA cm-2. All parameters except Vb and fRa were significantly different (P < 0.025) from those of normal preparations. 4. Despite large differences in electrochemical driving force for proton flow across the apical cell membranes between normal and CF preparations (-4 +/- 3 mV and 20 +/- 7 mV, respectively), pHi was similar (7.15 +/- 0.02 and 7.11 +/- 0.05, respectively). The driving force across the basolateral membrane was similar in normal and CF preparations (22 +/- 3 and 26 +/- 3 mV, respectively). 5. Intracellular alkalinization achieved by removal of CO2 from the luminal Ringer solution or by luminal ammonium prepulse led to stimulation of Ieq in both normal (from -58 to -70 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.05) and CF (from -144 to -163 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.005) preparations. The increase in Ieq was associated with a reduction of Rt, increase in fRa, and hyperpolarization of Vb. All changes in

  12. Phase Separation: Linking Cellular Compartmentalization to Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic cells are complex structures capable of coordinating numerous biochemical reactions in space and time. Key to such coordination is the subdivision of intracellular space into functional compartments. Compartmentalization can be achieved by intracellular membranes, which surround organelles and act as physical barriers. In addition, cells have developed sophisticated mechanisms to partition their inner substance in a tightly regulated manner. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that membraneless compartmentalization can be achieved by liquid demixing, a process culminating in liquid-liquid phase separation and the formation of phase boundaries. We discuss how this emerging concept may help in understanding dynamic reorganization of subcellular space and highlight its potential as a framework to explain pathological protein assembly in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27051975

  13. Glycoprotein B of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Has More than One Intracellular Conformation and Is Altered by Low pH

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of herpes simplex virus (HSV) gB identifies it as a class III fusion protein, and comparison with other such proteins suggests this is the postfusion rather than prefusion conformation, although this is not proven. Other class III proteins undergo a pH-dependent switch between pre- and postfusion conformations, and a low pH requirement for HSV entry into some cell types suggests that this may also be true for gB. Both gB and gH undergo structural changes at low pH, but there is debate about the extent and significance of the changes in gB, possibly due to the use of different soluble forms of the protein and different assays for antigenic changes. In this study, a complementary approach was taken, examining the conformations of full-length intracellular gB by quantitative confocal microscopy with a panel of 26 antibodies. Three conformations were distinguished, and low pH was found to be a major influence. Comparison with previous studies indicates that the intracellular conformation in low-pH environments may be the same as that of the soluble form known as s-gB at low pH. Interestingly, the antibodies whose binding was most affected by low pH both have neutralizing activity and consequently must block either the function of a neutral pH conformation or its switch from an inactive form to an activated form. If one of the intracellular conformations is the fusion-active form, another factor required for fusion is presumably absent from wherever that conformation is present in infected cells so that inappropriate fusion is avoided. PMID:22514344

  14. Cytotoxic effect of RB 6145 in human tumour cell lines: dependence on hypoxia, extra- and intracellular pH and drug uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Skarsgard, L. D.; Acheson, D. K.; Vinczan, A.; Wouters, B. G.; Heinrichs, B. E.; Loblaw, D. A.; Minchinton, A. I.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Low pH and hypoxia are a common feature of many solid tumours. This study examined the effect of these two conditions on the cytotoxic properties of the bifunctional agent RB 6145, the prodrug of RSU 1069. The effect of acidic pH on RB 6145 toxicity was examined in six human tumour cell lines under hypoxic conditions and was found to have little effect in HT 29, A549, U373 and HT 144 cells. Treatment was for 1 h at 37 degrees C, pH 6.4 or 7.4. Significant potentiation of RB 6145 toxicity was observed in SiHa cells (enhancement ratio; ERpH approximately 1.6) and in U1 cells (ERpH approximately 1.4). In these two cell lines the potentiation of RB 6145 toxicity arising from hypoxia was large, with ERHyp approximately 11 and 15 in SiHa and U1 cells respectively. SiHa cells, which show a pH effect and HT 29 cells, which do not, were chosen for further comparative studies of drug uptake )nd regulation of intracellular pH. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) determinations of the uptake of RB 6145 and its dervatives showed that in SiHa cells, intracellular to extracellular drug concentration ratio (Ci/Ce) at 1 h was approximately 40% higher at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4, whereas in HT 29 cells Ci/Ce was approximately 25% lower. Under conditions of acidic extracellular pH, regulation of pH was somewhat less effective in SiHa cells, where pHi dropped to within 0.2 pH units of the extracellular pH over a 2.5 h treatment at pH 6.4. It seems likely that increased drug uptake was at least part of the basis for the observed potentiation of RB 6145 toxicity in SiHa cells. A model which would better explain the results for both cell lines might also include the possibility that low pH per se potentiates cytotoxic damage to a modest extent and that it is offset or augmented by altered uptake in HT 29 and SiHa cells respectively. PMID:8519663

  15. 31P NMR analysis of intracellular pH of Swiss Mouse 3T3 cells: effects of extracellular Na+ and K+ and mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Williams, S R; Gadian, D G; Rozengurt, E

    1986-01-01

    Swiss mouse 3T3 cells grown on microcarrier beads were superfused with electrolyte solution during continuous NMR analysis. Conventional 31P and 19F probes of intracellular pH (pHc) were found to be impracticable. Cells were therefore superfused with 1 to 4 mM 2-deoxyglucose, producing a large intracellular, pH-sensitive signal of 2-deoxyglucose phosphate (2DGP). The intracellular incorporation of 2DGP inhibited the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. However, intracellular ATP was at least in part retained and the cellular responsivity to changes in extracellular ionic composition and to the application of growth factors proved intact. Transient replacement of external Na+ with choline or K+ reversibly acidified the intracellular fluids. Quiescent cells and mitogenically stimulated cells displayed the same dependence of shifts in pHc on external Na+ concentration (CoNa). PHc also depended on intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa). Increasing ccNa by withdrawing external K+ (thereby inhibiting the Na,K-pump) caused reversible intracellular acidification; subsequently reducing CoNa produced a larger acid shift in pHc than with external K+ present. Comparison of separate preparations indicated that pHc was higher in stimulated than in quiescent cells. Transient administration of mitogens also reversibly alkalinized quiescent cells studied continuously. This study documents the feasibility of monitoring pHc of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells using 31P NMR analysis of 2DGP. The results support the concept of a Na/H antiport operative in these cells, both in quiescence and after mitogenic stimulation. The data document by an independent technique that cytoplasmic alkalinization is an early event in mitogenesis, and that full activity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is not required for the expression of this event. PMID:3543375

  16. Intracellular pH measurements of the whole head and the basal ganglia in chronic liver disease: a phosphorus-31 MR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Patel, N; Forton, D M; Coutts, G A; Thomas, H C; Taylor-Robinson, S D

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the intracellular pH of the whole head and in voxels localized to the basal ganglia in patients with chronic liver disease using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). The study group compromised 82 patients with biopsy-proven cirrhosis (43 Child's grade A, 25 Child's grade B and 14 Child's grade C). Eleven subjects showed no evidence of neuropsychiatric impairment on clinical, psychometric and electrophysiological testing, 37 showed evidence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy and 34 had overt hepatic encephalopathy. Unlocalized 31P MRS of the whole head was performed in 48 patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Localized 31P MRS of the basal ganglia was performed in the 34 patients and in 20 healthy volunteers. The intracellular pH values were calculated from the chemical shift difference between the inorganic phosphate (P) and phosphocreatine (PCr) resonances. The percentage inorganic phosphate (%Pi), phosphocreatine (%PCr) and betaNTP signals, relative to the total 31P signal, and peak area ratios of inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine, relative to betaNTP were also measured. There were no differences between patients and volunteers in intracellular pH in 31P MR spectra measured from the whole head or the basal ganglia. There was no correlation between the severity of encephalopathy (West Haven criteria) or liver dysfunction (Child score) and intracellular pH values. There was also no significant change in the inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatine or betaNTP resonances in spectra acquired from the whole head. However, in spectra localized to the basal ganglia, there was a significant increase in mean P/NTP (p=0.02) and PCr/NTP (p=0.009). The mean %Pi and mean %PCr were also increased (p=0.06; p=0.05, respectively), but there was no significant change in mean %betaNTP. When the patient population was classified according to the severity of encephalopathy, those with overt disease had a higher mean P

  17. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E; Szarka, András

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease. PMID:24907663

  18. In vivo measurement of cytosolic and mitochondrial pH using a pH-sensitive GFP derivative in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a relation between intracellular pH and growth.

    PubMed

    Orij, Rick; Postmus, Jarne; Ter Beek, Alex; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2009-01-01

    The specific pH values of cellular compartments affect virtually all biochemical processes, including enzyme activity, protein folding and redox state. Accurate, sensitive and compartment-specific measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) dynamics in living cells are therefore crucial to the understanding of stress response and adaptation. We used the pH-sensitive GFP derivative 'ratiometric pHluorin' expressed in the cytosol and in the mitochondrial matrix of growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae to assess the variation in cytosolic pH (pHcyt) and mitochondrial pH (pHmit) in response to nutrient availability, respiratory chain activity, shifts in environmental pH and stress induced by addition of sorbic acid. The in vivo measurement allowed accurate determination of organelle-specific pH, determining a constant pHcyt of 7.2 and a constant pHmit of 7.5 in cells exponentially growing on glucose. We show that pHcyt and pHmit are differentially regulated by carbon source and respiratory chain inhibitors. Upon glucose starvation or sorbic acid stress, pHi decrease coincided with growth stasis. Additionally, pHi and growth coincided similarly in recovery after addition of glucose to glucose-starved cultures or after recovery from a sorbic acid pulse. We suggest a relation between pHi and cellular energy generation, and therefore a relation between pHi and growth. PMID:19118367

  19. Listeria monocytogenes varies among strains to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis under stresses by different acids as analyzed by a high-throughput microplate-based fluorometry

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changyong; Yang, Yongchun; Dong, Zhimei; Wang, Xiaowen; Fang, Chun; Yang, Menghua; Sun, Jing; Xiao, Liya; Fang, Weihuan; Song, Houhui

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne pathogen, has the capacity to maintain intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis in acidic environments, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report a simple microplate-based fluorescent method to determine pHi of listerial cells that were prelabeled with the fluorescent dye carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester and subjected to acid stress. We found that L. monocytogenes responds differently among strains toward organic and inorganic acids to maintain pHi homeostasis. The capacity of L. monocytogenes to maintain pHi at extracellular pH 4.5 (pHex) was compromised in the presence of acetic acid and lactic acid, but not by hydrochloric acid and citric acid. Organic acids exhibited more inhibitory effects than hydrochloric acid at certain pH conditions. Furthermore, the virulent stains L. monocytogenes EGDe, 850658 and 10403S was more resistant to acidic stress than the avirulent M7 which showed a defect in maintaining pHi homeostasis. Deletion of sigB, a stress-responsive alternative sigma factor from 10403S, markedly altered intracellular pHi homeostasis, and showed a significant growth and survival defect under acidic conditions. Thus, this work provides new insights into bacterial survival mechanism to acidic stresses. PMID:25667585

  20. Quantum-dot/dopamine bioconjugates function as redox coupled assemblies for in vitro and intracellular pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Stewart, Michael H.; Trammell, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B.; Mei, Bing C.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2010-08-01

    The use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for bioimaging and sensing has progressively matured over the past decade. QDs are highly sensitive to charge-transfer processes, which can alter their optical properties. Here, we demonstrate that QD-dopamine-peptide bioconjugates can function as charge-transfer coupled pH sensors. Dopamine is normally characterized by two intrinsic redox properties: a Nernstian dependence of formal potential on pH and oxidation of hydroquinone to quinone by O2 at basic pH. We show that the latter quinone can function as an electron acceptor quenching QD photoluminescence in a manner that depends directly on pH. We characterize the pH-dependent QD quenching using both electrochemistry and spectroscopy. QD-dopamine conjugates were also used as pH sensors that measured changes in cytoplasmic pH as cells underwent drug-induced alkalosis. A detailed mechanism describing the QD quenching processes that is consistent with dopamine's inherent redox chemistry is presented.

  1. Control of Gastric H,K-ATPase Activity by Cations, Voltage and Intracellular pH Analyzed by Voltage Clamp Fluorometry in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Katharina L.; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Friedrich, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Whereas electrogenic partial reactions of the Na,K-ATPase have been studied in depth, much less is known about the influence of the membrane potential on the electroneutrally operating gastric H,K-ATPase. In this work, we investigated site-specifically fluorescence-labeled H,K-ATPase expressed in Xenopus oocytes by voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor the voltage-dependent distribution between E1P and E2P states and measured Rb+ uptake under various ionic and pH conditions. The steady-state E1P/E2P distribution, as indicated by the voltage-dependent fluorescence amplitudes and the Rb+ uptake activity were highly sensitive to small changes in intracellular pH, whereas even large extracellular pH changes affected neither the E1P/E2P distribution nor transport activity. Notably, intracellular acidification by approximately 0.5 pH units shifted V0.5, the voltage, at which the E1P/E2P ratio is 50∶50, by −100 mV. This was paralleled by an approximately two-fold acceleration of the forward rate constant of the E1P→E2P transition and a similar increase in the rate of steady-state cation transport. The temperature dependence of Rb+ uptake yielded an activation energy of ∼90 kJ/mol, suggesting that ion transport is rate-limited by a major conformational transition. The pronounced sensitivity towards intracellular pH suggests that proton uptake from the cytoplasmic side controls the level of phosphoenzyme entering the E1P→E2P conformational transition, thus limiting ion transport of the gastric H,K-ATPase. These findings highlight the significance of cellular mechanisms contributing to increased proton availability in the cytoplasm of gastric parietal cells. Furthermore, we show that extracellular Na+ profoundly alters the voltage-dependent E1P/E2P distribution indicating that Na+ ions can act as surrogates for protons regarding the E2P→E1P transition. The complexity of the intra- and extracellular cation effects can be rationalized by a kinetic model suggesting

  2. Compartmentalization of Decay in Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigo, Alex L.

    1985-01-01

    Unlike animals, which heal, trees compartmentalize by setting boundaries that resist the spread of invading microorganisms. Discusses the creation of new walls by anatomical and chemical means in response to death of a branch or pruning. Points out that genetic control of compartmentalization has resulted from evolution of resistant species. (DH)

  3. Effects of gaseous ammonia on intracellular pH values in leaves of C 3- and C 4-plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zu-Hua; Kaiser, Werner; Heber, Ulrich; Raven, John A.

    Responses of cytosolic and vacuolar pH to different concentrations (1.3-5.4 μmol NH 3 mol -1 gas or 0.940-3.825 mg NH 3 m -3 gas) of gaseous NH 3 were studied in experiments of 3 h duration by recording changes in fluorescence of pyranine and esculin in leaves of C 3 and C 4 plants. After a lag phase of 0.5-4 min, the uptake of NH 3 at 50-200 nmol m -2 leaf area s -1 increased pyranine fluorescence, indicating cytosolic alkalinization in leaves of Pelargonium zonale L. (C 3) and Amaranthus caudatus L. (C 4). A smaller increase in esculin fluorescence induced by NH 3 indicated some vacuolar alkalization in a Spinacia oleracea L. leaf. Photosynthesis and transpiration remained unchanged during exposure of illuminated leaves to NH 3 for up to 30 min (the maximum tested). CO 2 concentrations influenced the extent of cytosolic alkalinization. 500 μmol CO 2 mol -1 gas suppressed the NH 3-induced cytosolic alkalinization relative to that found in 16 μmol CO 2 mol -1 gas. The suppressing effect of CO 2 on NH 3-induced alkalization was larger in illuminated leaves of the C 4Amaranthus than the C 3Pelargonium. These results indicate that the alkaline pH shift caused by solution and protonation of NH 3 in aqueous leaf compartments is affected by assimilation of NH 3.

  4. Extra- and Intracellular pH and Membrane Potential Changes Induced by K+, Cl−, H2PO4−, and NO3− Uptake and Fusicoccin in Root Hairs of Limnobium stoloniferum1

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Cornelia I.; Novacky, Anton J.

    1990-01-01

    Short-term ion uptake into roots of Limnobium stoloniferum was followed extracellularly with ion selective macroelectrodes. Cytosolic or vacuolar pH, together with the electrical membrane potential, was recorded with microelectrodes both located in the same young root hair. At the onset of chloride, phosphate, and nitrate uptake the membrane potential transiently decreased by 50 to 100 millivolts. During Cl− and H2PO4− uptake cytosolic pH decreased by 0.2 to 0.3 pH units. Nitrate induced cytosolic alkalinization by 0.19 pH units, indicating rapid reduction. The extracellular medium alkalinized when anion uptake exceeded K+ uptake. During fusicoccin-dependent plasmalemma hyperpolarization, extracellular and cytosolic pH remained rather constant. Upon K+ absorption, FC intensified extracellular acidification and intracellular alkalinization (from 0.31 to 0.4 pH units). In the presence of Cl− FC induced intracellular acidification. Since H+ fluxes per se do not change the pH, recorded pH changes only result from fluxes of the stronger ions. The extra- and intracellular pH changes, together with membrane depolarization, exclude mechanisms as K+/A− symport or HCO3−/A− antiport for anion uptake. Though not suitable to reveal the actual H+/A− stoichiometry, the results are consistent with an H+/A− cotransport mechanism. PMID:16667890

  5. The evolution of Root effect hemoglobins in the absence of intracellular pH protection of the red blood cell: insights from primitive fishes.

    PubMed

    Regan, Matthew D; Brauner, Colin J

    2010-06-01

    The Root effect, a reduction in blood oxygen (O(2)) carrying capacity at low pH, is used by many fish species to maximize O(2) delivery to the eye and swimbladder. It is believed to have evolved in the basal actinopterygian lineage of fishes, species that lack the intracellular pH (pH(i)) protection mechanism of more derived species' red blood cells (i.e., adrenergically activated Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; betaNHE). These basal actinopterygians may consequently experience a reduction in blood O(2) carrying capacity, and thus O(2) uptake at the gills, during hypoxia- and exercise-induced generalized blood acidoses. We analyzed the hemoglobins (Hbs) of seven species within this group [American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), bowfin (Amia calva), mooneye (Hiodon tergisus), and pirarucu (Arapaima gigas)] for their Root effect characteristics so as to test the hypothesis of the Root effect onset pH value being lower than those pH values expected during a generalized acidosis in vivo. Analysis of the haemolysates revealed that, although each of the seven species displayed Root effects (ranging from 7.3 to 40.5% desaturation of Hb with O(2), i.e., Hb O(2) desaturation), the Root effect onset pH values of all species are considerably lower (ranging from pH 5.94 to 7.04) than the maximum blood acidoses that would be expected following hypoxia or exercise (pH(i) 7.15-7.3). Thus, although these primitive fishes possess Hbs with large Root effects and lack any significant red blood cell betaNHE activity, it is unlikely that the possession of a Root effect would impair O(2) uptake at the gills following a generalized acidosis of the blood. As well, it was shown that both maximal Root effect and Root effect onset pH values increased significantly in bowfin over those of the more basal species, toward values of similar magnitude to those of most of the more derived

  6. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  7. Large changes in intracellular pH and calcium observed during heat shock are not responsible for the induction of heat shock proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, I A; McClure, S A; Poenie, M; Tsien, R Y; Steinhardt, R A

    1986-01-01

    Heat shock caused significant changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and intracellular free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) which occurred rapidly after temperature elevation. pHi fell from a resting level value at 25 degrees C of 7.38 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- standard error of the mean, n = 15) to 6.91 +/- 0.11 (n = 7) at 35 degrees C. The resting level value of [Ca2+]i in single Drosophila melanogaster larval salivary gland cells was 198 +/- 31 nM (n = 4). It increased approximately 10-fold, to 1,870 +/- 770 nM (n = 4), during a heat shock. When salivary glands were incubated in calcium-free, ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)-buffered medium, the resting level value of [Ca2+]i was reduced to 80 +/- 7 nM (n = 3), and heat shock resulted in a fourfold increase in [Ca2+]i to 353 +/- 90 nM (n = 3). The intracellular free-ion concentrations of Na+, K+, Cl-, and Mg2+ were 9.6 +/- 0.8, 101.9 +/- 1.7, 36 +/- 1.5, and 2.4 +/- 0.2 mM, respectively, and remained essentially unchanged during a heat shock. Procedures were devised to mimic or block the effects of heat shock on pHi and [Ca2+]i and to assess their role in the induction of heat shock proteins. We report here that the changes in [Ca2+]i and pHi which occur during heat shock are not sufficient, nor are they required, for a complete induction of the heat shock response. Images PMID:3097504

  8. Bicarbonate-dependent and -independent intracellular pH regulatory mechanisms in rat hepatocytes. Evidence for Na+-HCO3- cotransport.

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, D; Smith, N D; Boyer, J L

    1989-01-01

    Using the pH-sensitive dye 2,7-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxy-fluorescein and a continuously perfused subconfluent hepatocyte monolayer cell culture system, we studied rat hepatocyte intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the presence (+HCO3-) and absence (-HCO3-) of bicarbonate. Baseline pHi was higher (7.28 +/- 09) in +HCO3- than in -HCO3- (7.16 +/- 0.14). Blocking Na+/H+ exchange with amiloride had no effect on pHi in +HCO3- but caused reversible 0.1-0.2-U acidification in -HCO3- or in +HCO3- after preincubation in the anion transport inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonic acid stilbene (DIDS). Acute Na+ replacement in +HCO3- alos caused acidification which was amiloride independent but DIDS inhibitible. The recovery of pHi from an intracellular acid load (maximum H+ efflux rate) was 50% higher in +HCO3- than in -HCO3-. Amiloride inhibited H+ effluxmax by 75% in -HCO3- but by only 27% in +HCO3-. The amiloride-independent pHi recovery in +HCO3- was inhibited 50-63% by DIDS and 79% by Na+ replacement but was unaffected by depletion of intracellular Cl-, suggesting that Cl-/HCO3- exchange is not involved. Depolarization of hepatocytes (raising external K+ from 5 to 25 mM) caused reversible 0.05-0.1-U alkalinization, which, however, was neither Na+ nor HCO3- dependent, nor DIDS inhibitible, findings consistent with electroneutral HCO3- transport. We conclude that Na+-HCO3- cotransport, in addition to Na+/H+ exchange, is an important regulator of pHi in rat hepatocytes. PMID:2544626

  9. Zn2+ induces hyperpolarization by activation of a K+ channel and increases intracellular Ca2+ and pH in sea urchin spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Granados-González, Gisela; de De la Torre, Lucia García; Nishigaki, Takuya; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn2+) has been recently recognized as a crucial element for male gamete function in many species although its detailed mechanism of action is poorly understood. In sea urchin spermatozoa, Zn2+ was reported as an essential trace ion for efficient sperm motility initiation and the acrosome reaction by modulating intracellular pH (pHi). In this study we found that submicromolar concentrations of free Zn2+ change membrane potential (Em) and increase the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and cAMP in Lytechinus pictus sperm. Our results indicate that the Zn2+ response in sperm of this species mainly involves an Em hyperpolarization caused by K+ channel activation. The pharmacological profile of the Zn2+-induced hyperpolarization indicates that the cGMP-gated K+ selective channel (tetraKCNG/CNGK), which is crucial for speract signaling, is likely a main target for Zn2+. Considering that Zn2+ also induces [Ca2+]i fluctuations, our observations suggest that Zn2+ activates the signaling cascade of speract, except for an increase in cGMP, and facilitates sperm motility initiation upon spawning. These findings provide new insights about the role of Zn2+ in male gamete function. PMID:25092071

  10. Effect of inhibitors of Na+/H+-exchange and gastric H+/K+ ATPase on cell volume, intracellular pH and migration of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, M; Schratzberger, P; Rossmann, H; Wöll, E; Seiler, K; Seidler, U; Reinisch, N; Kähler, C M; Zwierzina, H; Lang, H J; Lang, F; Paulmichl, M; Wiedermann, C J

    1998-01-01

    Stimulation of chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) with the chemoattractive peptide fMLP (N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe) is paralleled by profound morphological and metabolic alterations like changes of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell shape. The present study was performed to investigate the interrelation of cell volume (CV) regulatory ion transport, pHi and migration of fMLP stimulated PMNs.Addition of fMLP to PMNs stimulated directed migration in Boyden chamber assays and was accompanied by rapid initial intracellular acidification and cell swelling.Inhibition of the Na+/H+ exchanger suppressed fMLP stimulated cell migration, accelerated the intracellular acidification and inhibited the fMLP-induced cell swelling.Step omission of extracellular Na+ caused intracellular acidification, which was accelerated by subsequent addition of gastric H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor SCH 28080, or by omission of extracellular K+ ions. In addition Na+ removal caused cell swelling, which was further enhanced by fMLP.H+/K+ATPase inhibitors omeprazole and SCH 28080 inhibited stimulated migration and blunted the fMLP-induced increase in CV.Increasing extracellular osmolarity by addition of mannitol to the extracellular solution caused cell shrinkage followed by regulatory volume increase, partially due to activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger. In fMLP-stimulated cells the CV increase was counteracted by simultaneous addition of mannitol. Under these conditions the fMLP stimulated migration was inhibited.The antibacterial activity of PMNs was not modified by Hoe 694 or omeprazole.Western analysis with a monoclonal anti gastric H+/K+ATPase β-subunit antibody detected a glycosylated 35 kD core protein in lysates of mouse and human gastric mucosa as well as in human PMNs.The results indicate that fMLP leads to cell swelling of PMNs due to activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger and a K+-dependent H+-extruding mechanism, presumably an H+/K+ ATPase. Inhibition of these ion transporters

  11. Influence of isolation media on synaptosomal properties: Intracellular pH, pCa, and Ca sup 2+ uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Bandeira-Duarte, C.; Carvalho, C.A.; Cragoe Junior, E.J.; Carvalho, A.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Preparations of synaptosomes isolated in sucrose or in Na(+)-rich media were compared with respect to internal pH (pHi), internal Ca{sup 2+} concentration ((Ca{sup 2+})i), membrane potential and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake due to K+ depolarization and Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. We found that synaptosomes isolated in sucrose media have a pHi of 6.77 +/- 0.04 and a (Ca{sup 2+})i of about 260 nM, whereas synaptosomes isolated in Na(+)-rich ionic media have a pHi of 6.96 +/- 0.07 and a (Ca{sup 2+})i of 463 nM, but both types of preparations have similar membrane potentials of about -50 mV when placed in choline media. The sucrose preparation takes up Ca{sup 2+} only by voltage sensitive calcium channels (VSCC'S) when K(+)-depolarized, while the Na(+)-rich synaptosomes take up {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} both by VSCC'S and by Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. The amiloride derivative 2',4'-dimethylbenzamil (DMB), at 30 microM, inhibits both mechanisms of Ca{sup 2+} influx, but 5-(N-4-chlorobenzyl)-2',4' dimethylbenzamil (CBZ-DMB), at 30 microM, inhibits the Ca{sup 2+} uptake by VSCC'S, but not by Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Thus, DMB and CBZ-DMB permit distinguishing between Ca{sup 2+} flux through channels and through Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. We point out that the different properties of the two types of synaptosomes studied account for some of the discrepancies in results reported in the literature for studies of Ca{sup 2+} fluxes and neurotransmitter release by different types of preparations of synaptosomes.

  12. 31P and 1H MRS of DB-1 Melanoma Xenografts: Lonidamine Selectively Decreases Tumor Intracellular pH and Energy Status and Sensitizes Tumors to Melphalan

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Ho, Andrew; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Darpolor, Moses M.; Pickup, Stephen; Zhou, Rong; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo 31P MRS demonstrates that human melanoma xenografts in immunosuppressed mice treated with lonidamine (LND, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibit a decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) from 6.90 ± 0.05 to 6.33 ± 0.10 (p < 0.001), a slight decrease in extracellular pH (pHe) from 7.00 ± 0.04 to 6.80 ± 0.07 (p > 0.05), and a monotonic decline in bioenergetics (NTP/Pi) by 66.8 ± 5.7% (p < 0.001) relative to the baseline level. Both bioenergetics and pHi decreases were sustained for at least 3 hr following LND treatment. Liver exhibited a transient intracellular acidification by 0.2 ± 0.1 pH units (p > 0.05) at 20 min post-LND with no significant change in pHe and a small transient decrease in bioenergetics, 32.9 ± 10.6 % (p > 0.05), at 40 min post-LND. No changes in pHi or ATP/Pi were detected in the brain (pHi, bioenergetics; p > 0.1) or skeletal muscle (pHi, pHe, bioenergetics; p > 0.1) for at least 120 min post-LND. Steady-state tumor lactate monitored by 1H MRS with a selective multiquantum pulse sequence with Hadamard localization increased ~3-fold (p = 0.009). Treatment with LND increased systemic melanoma response to melphalan (LPAM; 7.5 mg/kg, i.v.) producing a growth delay of 19.9 ± 2.0 d (tumor doubling time = 6.15 ± 0.31d, log10 cell-kill = 0.975 ± 0.110, cell-kill = 89.4 ± 2.2%) compared to LND alone of 1.1 ± 0.1 d and LPAM alone of 4.0 ± 0.0 d. The study demonstrates that the effects of LND on tumor pHi and bioenergetics may sensitize melanoma to pH-dependent therapeutics such as chemotherapy with alkylating agents or hyperthermia. PMID:22745015

  13. A mathematical analysis of second messenger compartmentalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular compartmentalization of second messengers can lead to microdomains of elevated concentration that are thought to be involved in ensuring signaling specificity. Most experimental evidence for this compartmentalization involves the second messenger adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). One possible way of creating these compartments, supported by recent experiments, is to spatially separate the source of cAMP from regions of elevated PDE concentration. To quantify this possibility, we study here a simplified geometry in two dimensions (2D) and in three dimensions (3D), containing a cAMP point source and regions with different degradation constants. Using the symmetry of our geometry, we are able to derive steady state solutions for the cAMP concentration as a function of the system parameters. Furthermore, we show, using analytics as well as direct numerical simulations, that for physiologically relevant time scales the steady state solution has been reached. Our results indicate that elevating the degradation constant throughout the cell, except for a small microdomain surrounding the source, requires an unphysiologically high cellular PDE concentration. On the other hand, a tight spatial relationship of localized PDEs with the cAMP source can result in functional microdomains while maintaining a physiologically plausible cellular PDE concentration.

  14. Effects of angiotensin II on intracellular Ca2+ and pH in isolated beating rabbit hearts and myocytes loaded with the indicator indo-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ikenouchi, H; Barry, W H; Bridge, J H; Weinberg, E O; Apstein, C S; Lorell, B H

    1994-01-01

    1. Angiotensin II increases myocardial contractility in several species, including the rabbit and man. However, it is controversial whether the predominant mechanism is an increase in free cytosolic [Ca2+]i or a change in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. To address this question, we infused angiotensin II in isolated perfused rabbit hearts loaded with the Ca2+ indicator indo-1 AM and measured changes in beat-to-beat surface transients of the Ca2+i-sensitive 400:500 nm ratio and left ventricular contractility. The effects of angiotensin II were compared with the response to a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in the inotropic state produced by a change in the perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 nM. 2. In the isolated beating heart, an increase in perfusate [Ca2+] caused an increase in left ventricular pressure +dP/dt in association with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. Angiotensin II perfusion caused a similar increase in left ventricular +dP/dt in the absence of any increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. 3. To exclude any contribution of non-myocyte sources of Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescence which may be present in the intact heart, we also compared the effects of angiotensin II and a change in superfusate [Ca2+] in collagenase-dissociated paced adult rabbit ventricular myocytes loaded with indo-1 AM. In the isolated rabbit myocytes a change in perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 mM caused an increase in peak systolic cell shortening coincident with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. In contrast, angiotensin II caused a similar increase in peak systolic cell shortening whereas there was no increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. There was also no change in inward Ca2+ current (ICa) in response to angiotensin II. 4. To investigate further the mechanism of the positive inotropic action of angiotensin II, its effects on intracellular pH were studied in isolated rabbit myocytes loaded with the fluorescent H+ probe SNARF 1. These experiments demonstrated that angiotensin II induced a 0.2 pH

  15. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae induce alterations in the intracellular pH, membrane permeability and culturability of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii cells.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Viana, Tiago; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-16

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) during alcoholic fermentation that are active against several wine-related yeasts (e.g. Hanseniaspora guilliermondii) and bacteria (e.g. Oenococcus oeni). In the present study, the physiological changes induced by those AMPs on sensitive H. guilliermondii cells were evaluated in terms of intracellular pH (pHi), membrane permeability and culturability. Membrane permeability was evaluated by staining cells with propidium iodide (PI), pHi was determined by a fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM) technique and culturability by a classical plating method. Results showed that the average pHi of H. guilliermondii cells dropped from 6.5 (healthy cells) to 5.4 (damaged cells) after 20 min of exposure to inhibitory concentrations of AMPs, and after 24 h 77.0% of the cells completely lost their pH gradient (∆pH=pHi-pHext). After 24h of exposure to AMPs, PI-stained (dead) cells increased from 0% to 77.7% and the number of viable cells fell from 1×10(5) to 10 CFU/ml. This means that virtually all cells (99.99%) became unculturable but that a sub-population of 22.3% of the cells remained viable (as determined by PI staining). Besides, pHi results showed that after 24h, 23% of the AMP-treated cells were sub-lethally injured (with 0<∆pH<3). Taken together, these results indicated that this subpopulation was under a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state, which was further confirmed by recuperation assays. In summary, our study reveals that these AMPs compromise the plasma membrane integrity (and possibly also the vacuole membrane) of H. guilliermondii cells, disturbing the pHi homeostasis and inducing a loss of culturability. PMID:25897995

  16. Skeletal muscle intracellular pH and levels of high energy phosphates during hypercapnia in intact lizards by /sup 31/P NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.C.; Hitzig, B.M.; Elmden, K.; McFarland, E.; Koutcher, J.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-03-05

    Lizards have been shown to reduce ventilation during CO/sub 2/ breathing. This is thought to be detrimental to the maintenance of intracellular pH (pHi) and levels of high energy phosphates. The authors subjected chameleons (n=4) to 5% CO/sub 2/ breathing and made serial measurements of tail (skeletal) muscle pHi, levels of phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP utilizing high resolution /sup 31/P NMR. pHi was unchanged from controls (7.27 +/- 0.06 units) (mean +/- SE) during 30 minutes of hypercapnia (7.19 +/- 0.09 units) (p>.2) demonstrating effective regulation of skeletal muscle pHi; however, there were significant decreases in the PCr/ATP ratios to 65% +/- 5% (p<.05) of control. The reduced PCr/ATP ratio does not appear due to decreased O/sub 2/ availability because there were no increases in the levels of glycolytic intermediates and inorganic phosphate which would indicate tissue hypoxia. It is possible that an active process requiring ATP is required for the maintenance of pHi in the presence of hypercapnia and that the reduction of PCr/ATP ratio is a reflection of an increased utilization of ATP.

  17. Overexpression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in NIH 3T3 cells lowers membrane potential and intracellular pH and confers a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L Y; Stutts, M J; Hoffman, M M; Roepe, P D

    1995-01-01

    Because of the similarities between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, recent observations of decreased plasma membrane electrical potential (delta psi) in cells overexpressing either MDR protein or the CFTR, and the effects of delta psi on passive diffusion of chemotherapeutic drugs, we have analyzed chemotherapeutic drug resistance for NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing different levels of functional CFTR. Three separate clones not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs exhibit resistance to doxorubicin, vincristine, and colchicine that is similar to MDR transfectants not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs. Two other clones expressing lower levels of CFTR are less resistant. As shown previously these clones exhibit decreased plasma membrane delta psi similar to MDR transfectants, but four of five exhibit mildly acidified intracellular pH in contrast to MDR transfectants, which are in general alkaline. Thus the MDR protein and CFTR-mediated MDR phenotypes are distinctly different. Selection of two separate CFTR clones on either doxorubicin or vincristine substantially increases the observed MDR and leads to increased CFTR (but not measurable MDR or MRP) mRNA expression. CFTR overexpressors also exhibit a decreased rate of 3H -vinblastine uptake. These data reveal a new and previously unrecognized consequence of CFTR expression, and are consistent with the hypothesis that membrane depolarization is an important determinant of tumor cell MDR. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:8519988

  18. The metabolic interaction of cancer cells and fibroblasts - coupling between NAD(P)H and FAD, intracellular pH and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Druzhkova, Irina N; Shirmanova, Marina V; Lukina, Maria M; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Mishina, Nataliya M; Zagaynova, Elena V

    2016-05-01

    Alteration in the cellular energy metabolism is a principal feature of tumors. An important role in modifying cancer cell metabolism belongs to the cancer-associated fibroblasts. However, the regulation of their interaction has been poorly studied to date. In this study we monitored the metabolic status of both cell types by using the optical redox ratio and the fluorescence lifetimes of the metabolic co-factors NAD(P)H and FAD, in addition to the intracellular pH and the hydrogen peroxide levels in the cancer cells, using genetically encoded sensors. In the co-culture of human cervical carcinoma cells HeLa and human fibroblasts we observed a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis toward OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. The metabolic switch was accompanied by hydrogen peroxide production and slight acidification of the cytosol in the cancer cells in comparison with that of the corresponding monoculture. Therefore, our HeLa-huFb system demonstrated metabolic behavior similar to Warburg type tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time that these 3 parameters have been investigated together in a model of tumor-stroma co-evolution. We propose that determination of the start-point of the metabolic alterations and understanding of the mechanisms of their realization can open a new ways for cancer treatment. PMID:26986068

  19. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  20. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  1. Identifying compartmentalization in gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Junkin, J.; Cooper, K.; Sippel, M.

    1997-01-01

    Compartmentalization as a function of depositional systems is now recognized as a common type of reservoir heterogeneity that limits recovery from oil and gas reservoirs. US Department of Energy (DOE) estimates indicate that substantial quantities of gas resources will not be recovered from presently identified reservoirs under historic development practices. The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), state of Texas and DOE quantified compartmentalization over intervals as large as 2,000 feet in several different fluvial deltaic reservoirs. Early recognition of compartmentalized behavior can be used to pursue a more rapid development plan including efficient well spacing and elimination of redundant wells. Three classes of reservoir compartment sizes were delineated in the SGR project using methods discussed in this article. Forward stochastic modeling of gas recovery from these compartment-size classes established well spacing requirements that would yield maximum gas contact efficiency. The presence of reservoir compartmentalization was also shown to correlate with reserve growth. Also, those reservoirs classified as having smaller compartment sizes exhibited the greatest reserve growth potential. Utilization of tools, such as personal computer-based methods discussed, enables better engineering interpretation of actual field behavior. Some of these tools require minimal production data, which is readily available on CD-ROM or via modem at very low cost.

  2. Therapeutic potential of analogues of amiloride: inhibition of the regulation of intracellular pH as a possible mechanism of tumour selective therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Maidorn, R. P.; Cragoe, E. J.; Tannock, I. F.

    1993-01-01

    The extracellular pH (pHe) in solid tumours is frequently lower than the pHe in normal tissues. Cells within an acidic environment depend on mechanisms which regulate intracellular pH (pHi) for their survival, including the Na+/H+ antiport which exports protons in exchange for Na+ ions. Amiloride and its analogues DMA (5-(N,N-dimethyl)amiloride), MIBA (5-(N-methyl-N-isobutyl)amiloride) and EIPA (5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride) are known to inhibit the Na+/H+ antiport and therefore decrease the cells ability to regulate pHi. All three analogues were found to be potent inhibitors of the antiport in human MGH-U1 and murine EMT-6 cells, with DMA being approximately 20, MIBA 100 and EIPA 200-fold as potent as amiloride; EIPA also gave more complete suppression of the Na+/H+ antiport. These agents were not toxic to cells when used alone; however, in combination with nigericin, an agent which acidifies cells, all three analogues were toxic to cells at pHe < 7.0, and markedly enhanced the toxicity of nigericin alone. Cell killing was greatest for nigericin used with EIPA or MIBA. None of the agents were toxic to cells at pHe 7.0 or above. When used against variant cells lacking the Na+/H+ antiport (PS-120 cells) EIPA did not enhance the cytotoxicity of nigericin alone, suggesting that the observed effect was due to inhibition of Na+/H+ exchange, rather than due to non-specific effects. The combination of EIPA and nigericin gave similar cell killing in previously dissociated and intact MGH-U1 spheroids, suggesting that the agents have good penetration of solid tissue. Preliminary experiments using EMT-6 tumours in mice suggested that EIPA and nigericin were able to enhance the toxicity of radiation in vivo, presumably through selective effects against the hypoxic (and probably acidic) subpopulation of cells that is resistant to radiation. PMID:8381657

  3. Polyamine/Nucleotide Coacervates Provide Strong Compartmentalization of Mg²⁺, Nucleotides, and RNA.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Erica A; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Keating, Christine D

    2016-03-01

    Phase separation of aqueous solutions containing polyelectrolytes can lead to formation of dense, solute-rich liquid droplets referred to as coacervates, surrounded by a dilute continuous phase of much larger volume. This type of liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to help explain the appearance of polyelectrolyte-rich intracellular droplets in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of extant biological cells and may be relevant to protocellular compartmentalization of nucleic acids on the early Earth. Here we describe complex coacervates formed upon mixing the polycation poly(allylamine) (PAH, 15 kDa) with the anionic nucleotides adenosine 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Droplet formation was observed over a wide range of pH and MgCl2 concentrations. The nucleotides themselves as well as Mg(2+) and RNA oligonucleotides were all extremely concentrated within the coacervates. Nucleotides present at just 2.5 mM in bulk solution had concentrations greater than 1 M inside the coacervate droplets. A solution with a total Mg(2+) concentration of 10 mM had 1-5 M Mg(2+) in the coacervates, and RNA random sequence (N54) partitioned ∼10,000-fold into the coacervates. Coacervate droplets are thus rich in nucleotides, Mg(2+), and RNA, providing a medium favorable for generating functional RNAs. Compartmentalization of nucleotides at high concentrations could have facilitated their polymerization to form oligonucleotides, which preferentially accumulate in the droplets. Locally high Mg(2+) concentrations could have aided folding and catalysis in an RNA world, making coacervate droplets an appealing platform for exploring protocellular environments. PMID:26844692

  4. Myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms of the pH sensor protein hisactophilin II: intracellular shuttling to plasma membrane and nucleus monitored in real time by a fusion with green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hanakam, F; Albrecht, R; Eckerskorn, C; Matzner, M; Gerisch, G

    1996-01-01

    Hisactophilins are myristoylated proteins that are rich in histidine residues and known to exist in Dictyostelium cells in a plasma membrane-bound and a soluble cytoplasmic state. Intracellular translocation of these proteins in response to pH changes was monitored using hisactophilin fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both the normal and a mutated non-myristoylated fusion protein shuffled within the cells in a pH-dependent manner. After lowering the pH, these proteins translocated within minutes between the cytoplasm, the plasma membrane and the nucleus. The role of histidine clusters on the surface of hisactophilin molecules in binding of the proteins to the plasma membrane and in their transfer to the nucleus is discussed on the basis of a pH switch mechanism. Images PMID:8670794

  5. Compartmental Modeling in Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic principles of compartmental modeling as it is being applied to the quantitative analysis of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Measurement of blood flow (perfusion) is used as an example of a single tissue compartment model and receptor studies are discussed in relation to a two tissue compartment model. Emphasis is placed on the accurate measurement of both arterial whole blood and metabolite-corrected plasma input functions. Reference tissue models are introduced as a noninvasive tool to investigate neuroreceptor studies. Finally, parametric methods are introduced in which calculations are performed at a voxel level.

  6. Compartmental model of leucine kinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Cobelli, C; Saccomani, M P; Tessari, P; Biolo, G; Luzi, L; Matthews, D E

    1991-10-01

    The complexity of amino acid and protein metabolism has limited the development of comprehensive, accurate whole body kinetic models. For leucine, simplified approaches are in use to measure in vivo leucine fluxes, but their domain of validity is uncertain. We propose here a comprehensive compartmental model of the kinetics of leucine and alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC) in humans. Data from a multiple-tracer administration were generated with a two-stage (I and II) experiment. Six normal subjects were studied. In experiment I, labeled leucine and KIC were simultaneously injected into plasma. Four plasma leucine and KIC tracer concentration curves and label in the expired CO2 were measured. In experiment II, labeled bicarbonate was injected into plasma, and labeled CO2 in the expired air was measured. Radioactive (L-[1-14C]leucine, [4,5-3H]KIC, [14C]bicarbonate) and stable isotope (L-[1-13C]leucine, [5,5,5-2H3]KIC, [13C]bicarbonate) tracers were employed. The input format was a bolus (impulse) dose in the radioactive case and a constant infusion in the stable isotope case. A number of physiologically based, linear time-invariant compartmental models were proposed and tested against the data. The model finally chosen for leucine-KIC kinetics has 10 compartments: 4 for leucine, 3 for KIC, and 3 for bicarbonate. The model is a priori uniquely identifiable, and its parameters were estimated with precision from the five curves of experiment I. The separate assessment of bicarbonate kinetics (experiment II) was shown to be unnecessary. The model defines masses and fluxes of leucine in the organism, in particular its intracellular appearance from protein breakdown, its oxidation, and its incorporation into proteins. An important feature of the model is its ability to estimate leucine oxidation by resolving the bicarbonate model in each individual subject. Finally, the model allows the assessment of the domain of validity of the simpler commonly used models. PMID:1928344

  7. A polymer-Triton X-100 conjugate capable of PH-dependent red blood cell lysis: a model system illustrating the possibility of drug delivery within acidic intracellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Ferruti, P; Sgouras, D; Tuboku-Metzger, A; Ranucci, E; Bignotti, F

    1994-01-01

    Poly(amidoamines) are soluble polymers containing tertiary amino and amido groups regularly arranged along the macromolecular chain, and their net average charge alters considerably as pH changes from neutral to acidic leading to a change in conformation. This property provides the possibility to design polymer-drug conjugates that are, following intravenous administration, relatively compacted and thus protect a drug payload in the circulation, but following pinocytic internalisation into acidic intracellular compartments unfold permitting pH-triggered intracellular drug delivery. To study the feasibility of this approach, a covalent conjugate of a poly(amidoamine) (MBI) was prepared to contain the membrane lytic non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (as a model), and its ability to lyse red blood cells in vitro was used as an indicator of conjugate conformation at at different pHs. Although Triton X-100 was highly lytic at pH 5.5, 7.4 and 8.0, and the parent polymer MBI was not lytic under any conditions, the conjugate only showed concentration-dependent red blood cell lysis at pH 5.5. Moreover, incubation of human leukaemic cells (CCRF) with these substrates showed conjugate to be more toxic than MBI (IC50 values of 100 micrograms/ml and 650 micrograms/ml respectively) and less toxic than Triton X-100 (IC50 of 1 microgram/ml). PMID:7858959

  8. Splice cassette II of Na+,HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) interacts with calcineurin A: implications for transporter activity and intracellular pH control during rat artery contractions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Andreas A; Parker, Mark D; Lee, Soojung; Boron, Walter F; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2013-03-22

    Activation of Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to intracellular pH (pH(i)) control during artery contraction, but the signaling pathways involved have been unknown. We investigated whether physical and functional interactions between the Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin exist and play a role for pHi control in VSMCs. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that splice cassette II from the N terminus of NBCn1 interacts with calcineurin Aβ. When cassette II was truncated or mutated to disrupt the putative calcineurin binding motif PTVVIH, the interaction was abolished. Native NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ co-immunoprecipitated from A7r5 rat VSMCs. A peptide (acetyl-DDIPTVVIH-amide), which mimics the putative calcineurin binding motif, inhibited the co-immunoprecipitation whereas a mutated peptide (acetyl-DDIATAVAA-amide) did not. Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was investigated in VSMCs of mesenteric arteries after an NH4(+) prepulse. During depolarization with 50 mM extracellular K(+) to raise intracellular [Ca(2+)], Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was inhibited 20-30% by calcineurin inhibitors (FK506 and cyclosporine A). FK506 did not affect Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs when cytosolic [Ca(2+)] was lowered by buffering, nor did it disrupt binding between NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ. FK506 augmented the intracellular acidification of VSMCs during norepinephrine-induced artery contractions. No physical or functional interactions between calcineurin Aβ and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 were observed in VSMCs. In conclusion, we demonstrate a physical interaction between calcineurin Aβ and cassette II of NBCn1. Intracellular Ca(2+) activates Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs in a calcineurin-dependent manner which is important for protection against intracellular acidification. PMID:23382378

  9. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Walde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell’s interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as “protocells”. Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized. PMID:25867709

  10. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Walde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell's interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as "protocells". Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized. PMID:25867709

  11. Protocell design through modular compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Miller, David; Booth, Paula J; Seddon, John M; Templer, Richard H; Law, Robert V; Woscholski, Rudiger; Ces, Oscar; Barter, Laura M C

    2013-10-01

    De novo synthetic biological design has the potential to significantly impact upon applications such as energy generation and nanofabrication. Current designs for constructing organisms from component parts are typically limited in scope, as they utilize a cut-and-paste ideology to create simple stepwise engineered protein-signalling pathways. We propose the addition of a new design element that segregates components into lipid-bound 'proto-organelles', which are interfaced with response elements and housed within a synthetic protocell. This design is inspired by living cells, which utilize multiple types of signalling molecules to facilitate communication between isolated compartments. This paper presents our design and validation of the components required for a simple multi-compartment protocell machine, for coupling a light transducer to a gene expression system. This represents a general design concept for the compartmentalization of different types of artificial cellular machinery and the utilization of non-protein signal molecules for signal transduction. PMID:23925982

  12. Tracing compartmentalized NADPH metabolism in the cytosol and mitochondria of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Caroline A.; Parker, Seth J.; Fiske, Brian P.; McCloskey, Douglas; Gui, Dan Y.; Green, Courtney R.; Vokes, Natalie I.; Feist, Adam M.; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Metallo, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize biochemical processes in different organelles, often relying on metabolic cycles to shuttle reducing equivalents across intracellular membranes. NADPH serves as the electron carrier for the maintenance of redox homeostasis and reductive biosynthesis, with separate cytosolic and mitochondrial pools providing reducing power in each respective location. This cellular organization is critical for numerous functions but complicates analysis of metabolic pathways using available methods. Here we develop an approach to resolve NADP(H)-dependent pathways present within both the cytosol and the mitochondria. By tracing hydrogen in compartmentalized reactions that use NADPH as a cofactor, including the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes, we can observe metabolic pathway activity in these distinct cellular compartments. Using this system we determine the direction of serine/glycine interconversion within the mitochondria and cytosol, highlighting the ability of this approach to resolve compartmentalized reactions in intact cells. PMID:24882210

  13. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  14. Modeling the effects of sodium chloride, acetic acid and intracellular pH on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbiological safety has been a critical issue for acid and acidified foods since it became clear that acid-tolerant pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 can survive (even though they are unable to grow) in a pH range of 3 to 4, which is typical for these classes of food products. The primar...

  15. The effect of acidic pH on the ability of Clostridium sporogenes MD1 to take up and retain intracellular potassium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At pH values less 5.5, Clostridium sporogenes MD1 accumulated potassium even though it had little protonmotive force, and an ATPase inhibitor (N, N'- dicyclohexylcarbodiimide) prevented this uptake. These results suggested that potassium transport was ATP-driven, and a protonophore (3, 3', 4', 5 - ...

  16. Compartmentalization and Organelle Formation in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Elias; Abreu, Nicole; Komeili, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A number of bacterial species rely on compartmentalization to gain specific functionalities that will provide them with a selective advantage. Here, we will highlight several of these modes of bacterial compartmentalization with an eye towards describing the mechanisms of their formation and their evolutionary origins. Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis, outer membrane biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria and protein diffusion barriers of Caulobacter crescentus will be used to demonstrate the physical, chemical and compositional remodeling events that lead to compartmentalization. In addition, magnetosomes and carboxysomes will serve as models to examine the interplay between cytoskeletal systems and the subcellular positioning of organelles. PMID:24440431

  17. Compartmentalization of the foregut tube: developmental origins of the trachea and esophagus.

    PubMed

    Fausett, Sarah R; Klingensmith, John

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian trachea and esophagus share a common embryonic origin. They arise by compartmentalization of a single foregut tube, composed of foregut endoderm (FGE) and surrounding mesenchyme, around midgestation. Aberrant compartmentalization is thought to lead to relatively common human birth defects, such as esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF), which can prevent or disrupt a newborn infant's ability to feed and breathe. Despite its relevance to human health, morphogenesis of the anterior foregut is still poorly understood. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of trachea and esophagus formation from a common precursor, including the embryonic origin of the FGE, current models for foregut morphogenesis, relevant human birth defects, insights from rodent models, and the emerging picture of the mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal foregut compartmentalization. Recent research suggests that a number of intercellular signaling pathways and several intracellular effectors are essential for correct formation of the trachea and esophagus. Different types of defects in the formation of either ventral or dorsal foregut tissues can disrupt compartmentalization in rodent models. This implies that EA/TEF defects in humans may also arise by multiple mechanisms. Although our understanding of foregut compartmentalization is growing rapidly, it is still incomplete. Future research should focus on synthesizing detailed information gleaned from both human patients and rodent models to further our understanding of this enigmatic process. PMID:23801435

  18. Intracellular pH regulation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes: the activity of sodium/proton exchange is oxygen-dependent.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, A; Rissanen, E; Bogdanova, A; Nikinmaa, M

    2003-06-01

    We studied pH regulation in freshly isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes using microspectrofluorometry with the fluorescent dye BCECF. In accordance with earlier data on rainbow trout hepatocytes, ion substitution (N-methyl D-glucamine for sodium and gluconate for chloride) and transport inhibitor [10 microM M methyl isobutyl amiloride (MIA) to inhibit sodium/proton exchange and 100 microM DIDS to inhibit bicarbonate transport] studies in either Hepes-buffered or bicarbonate/carbon dioxide-buffered media (extracellular pH 7.6) indicated a role for sodium/proton exchange, sodium-dependent bicarbonate transport, and sodium-independent anion exchange in the regulation of hepatocyte pH. In Hepes-buffered medium, the activity of the sodium/proton exchanger (i.e. proton extrusion inhibited by MIA) was greater at 1% than at 21% oxygen. The oxygen dependency of the sodium/proton exchange is not caused by hydroxyl radicals, which appear to mediate the oxygen sensitivity of potassium-chloride cotransport in erythrocytes. PMID:12820008

  19. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO/sub 2/, and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment.

  20. Mycothiol protects Corynebacterium glutamicum against acid stress via maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis, scavenging ROS, and S-mycothiolating MetE.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingbao; Yang, Xiaobing; Yin, Yajie; Lin, Jinshui; Chen, Can; Pan, Junfeng; Si, Meiru; Shen, Xihui

    2016-07-14

    Mycothiol (MSH) plays a major role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and detoxification from a broad range of exogenous toxic agents. In the present study, we reveal that intracellular MSH contributes significantly to the adaptation to acidic conditions in the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. We present evidence that MSH confers C. glutamicum with the ability to adapt to acidic conditions by maintaining pHi homeostasis, scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protecting methionine synthesis by the S-mycothiolation modification of methionine synthase (MetE). The role of MSH in acid adaptation was further confirmed by improving the acid tolerance of C. glutamicum by overexpressing the key MSH synthesis gene mshA. Hence, our work provides insights into a previously unknown, but important, aspect of the C. glutamicum cellular response to acid stress. The results reported here may help to understand acid tolerance mechanisms in acid sensitive bacteria and may open a new avenue for improving acid resistance in industry strains for the production of bio-based chemicals from renewable biomass. PMID:27250661

  1. Simultaneous pH measurement in endocytic and cytosolic compartments in living cells using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported(1). Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases(2). Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells(3). This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis(3,4). Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can

  2. Pado, a fluorescent protein with proton channel activity can optically monitor membrane potential, intracellular pH, and map gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bok Eum; Baker, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    An in silico search strategy was developed to identify potential voltage-sensing domains (VSD) for the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). Using a conserved charge distribution in the S2 α-helix, a single in silico search yielded most voltage-sensing proteins including voltage-gated potassium channels, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-gated sodium channels, voltage-gated proton channels, and voltage-sensing phosphatases from organisms ranging from mammals to bacteria and plants. A GEVI utilizing the VSD from a voltage-gated proton channel identified from that search was able to optically report changes in membrane potential. In addition this sensor was capable of manipulating the internal pH while simultaneously reporting that change optically since it maintains the voltage-gated proton channel activity of the VSD. Biophysical characterization of this GEVI, Pado, demonstrated that the voltage-dependent signal was distinct from the pH-dependent signal and was dependent on the movement of the S4 α-helix. Further investigation into the mechanism of the voltage-dependent optical signal revealed that inhibiting the dimerization of the fluorescent protein greatly reduced the optical signal. Dimerization of the FP thereby enabled the movement of the S4 α-helix to mediate a fluorescent response. PMID:27040905

  3. Pado, a fluorescent protein with proton channel activity can optically monitor membrane potential, intracellular pH, and map gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bok Eum; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    An in silico search strategy was developed to identify potential voltage-sensing domains (VSD) for the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). Using a conserved charge distribution in the S2 α-helix, a single in silico search yielded most voltage-sensing proteins including voltage-gated potassium channels, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-gated sodium channels, voltage-gated proton channels, and voltage-sensing phosphatases from organisms ranging from mammals to bacteria and plants. A GEVI utilizing the VSD from a voltage-gated proton channel identified from that search was able to optically report changes in membrane potential. In addition this sensor was capable of manipulating the internal pH while simultaneously reporting that change optically since it maintains the voltage-gated proton channel activity of the VSD. Biophysical characterization of this GEVI, Pado, demonstrated that the voltage-dependent signal was distinct from the pH-dependent signal and was dependent on the movement of the S4 α-helix. Further investigation into the mechanism of the voltage-dependent optical signal revealed that inhibiting the dimerization of the fluorescent protein greatly reduced the optical signal. Dimerization of the FP thereby enabled the movement of the S4 α-helix to mediate a fluorescent response. PMID:27040905

  4. Compartmentalized storage tank for electrochemical cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin Michael (Inventor); Dalton, Luke Thomas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A compartmentalized storage tank is disclosed. The compartmentalized storage tank includes a housing, a first fluid storage section disposed within the housing, a second fluid storage section disposed within the housing, the first and second fluid storage sections being separated by a movable divider, and a constant force spring. The constant force spring is disposed between the housing and the movable divider to exert a constant force on the movable divider to cause a pressure P1 in the first fluid storage section to be greater than a pressure P2 in the second fluid storage section, thereby defining a pressure differential.

  5. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  6. Polymer physics of intracellular phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Tompa, Peter; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular organelles are either membrane-bound vesicles or membrane-less compartments that are made up of proteins and RNA. These organelles play key biological roles, by compartmentalizing the cell to enable spatiotemporal control of biological reactions. Recent studies suggest that membrane-less intracellular compartments are multicomponent viscous liquid droplets that form via phase separation. Proteins that have an intrinsic tendency for being conformationally heterogeneous seem to be the main drivers of liquid-liquid phase separation in the cell. These findings highlight the relevance of classical concepts from the physics of polymeric phase transitions for understanding the assembly of intracellular membrane-less compartments. However, applying these concepts is challenging, given the heteropolymeric nature of protein sequences, the complex intracellular environment, and non-equilibrium features intrinsic to cells. This provides new opportunities for adapting established theories and for the emergence of new physics.

  7. Surface Interactions with Compartmentalized Cellular Phosphates Explain Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticle Hazard and Provide Opportunities for Safer Design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use. PMID:24417322

  8. Metabolic Compartmentation – A System Level Property of Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saks, Valdur; Beraud, Nathalie; Wallimann, Theo

    2008-01-01

    Problems of quantitative investigation of intracellular diffusion and compartmentation of metabolites are analyzed. Principal controversies in recently published analyses of these problems for the living cells are discussed. It is shown that the formal theoretical analysis of diffusion of metabolites based on Fick's equation and using fixed diffusion coefficients for diluted homogenous aqueous solutions, but applied for biological systems in vivo without any comparison with experimental results, may lead to misleading conclusions, which are contradictory to most biological observations. However, if the same theoretical methods are used for analysis of actual experimental data, the apparent diffusion constants obtained are orders of magnitude lower than those in diluted aqueous solutions. Thus, it can be concluded that local restrictions of diffusion of metabolites in a cell are a system-level properties caused by complex structural organization of the cells, macromolecular crowding, cytoskeletal networks and organization of metabolic pathways into multienzyme complexes and metabolons. This results in microcompartmentation of metabolites, their channeling between enzymes and in modular organization of cellular metabolic networks. The perspectives of further studies of these complex intracellular interactions in the framework of Systems Biology are discussed. PMID:19325782

  9. Compartmentation of sucrose during radial transfer in mature sorghum culm

    PubMed Central

    Tarpley, Lee; Vietor, Donald M

    2007-01-01

    Background The sucrose that accumulates in the culm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and other large tropical andropogonoid grasses can be of commercial value, and can buffer assimilate supply during development. Previous study conducted with intact plants showed that sucrose can be radially transferred to the intracellular compartment of mature ripening sorghum internode without being hydrolysed. In this study, culm-infused radiolabelled sucrose was traced between cellular compartments and among related metabolites to determine if the compartmental path of sucrose during radial transfer in culm tissue was symplasmic or included an apoplasmic step. This transfer path was evaluated for elongating and ripening culm tissue of intact plants of two semidwarf grain sorghums. The metabolic path in elongating internode tissue was also evaluated. Results On the day after culm infusion of the tracer sucrose, the specific radioactivity of sucrose recovered from the intracellular compartment of growing axillary-branch tissue was greater (nearly twice) than that in the free space, indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through symplasmic routes. In contrast, the sucrose specific radioactivity in the intracellular compartment of the mature (ripening) culm tissue was probably less (about 3/4's) than that in free space indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through routes that included an apoplasmic step. In growing internodes of the axillary branch of sorghum, the tritium label initially provided in the fructose moiety of sucrose molecules was largely (81%) recovered in the fructose moiety, indicating that a large portion of sucrose molecules is not hydrolysed and resynthesized during radial transfer. Conclusion During radial transfer of sucrose in ripening internodes of intact sorghum plants, much of the sucrose is transferred intact (without hydrolysis and resynthesis) and primarily through a path that includes an apoplasmic step. In

  10. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  11. Compartmentalized Platforms for Neuro-pharmacological Research

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Amol D.; Wei, Li; Shi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Dissociated primary neuronal cell culture remains an indispensable approach for neurobiology research in order to investigate basic mechanisms underlying diverse neuronal functions, drug screening and pharmacological investigation. Compartmentalization, a widely adopted technique since its emergence in 1970s enables spatial segregation of neuronal segments and detailed investigation that is otherwise limited with traditional culture methods. Although these compartmental chambers (e.g. Campenot chamber) have been proven valuable for the investigation of Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) neurons and to some extent within Central Nervous System (CNS) neurons, their utility has remained limited given the arduous manufacturing process, incompatibility with high-resolution optical imaging and limited throughput. The development in the area of microfabrication and microfluidics has enabled creation of next generation compartmentalized devices that are cheap, easy to manufacture, require reduced sample volumes, enable precise control over the cellular microenvironment both spatially as well as temporally, and permit highthroughput testing. In this review we briefly evaluate the various compartmentalization tools used for neurobiological research, and highlight application of the emerging microfluidic platforms towards in vitro single cell neurobiology. PMID:26813122

  12. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  13. A Self-compartmentalizing Hexamer Serine Protease from Pyrococcus Horikoshii

    PubMed Central

    Menyhárd, Dóra K.; Kiss-Szemán, Anna; Tichy-Rács, Éva; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Szeltner, Zoltán; Domokos, Klarissza; Szamosi, Ilona; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László; Harmat, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Oligopeptidases impose a size limitation on their substrates, the mechanism of which has long been under debate. Here we present the structure of a hexameric serine protease, an oligopeptidase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP), revealing a complex, self-compartmentalized inner space, where substrates may access the monomer active sites passing through a double-gated “check-in” system, first passing through a pore on the hexamer surface and then turning to enter through an even smaller opening at the monomers' domain interface. This substrate screening strategy is unique within the family. We found that among oligopeptidases, a residue of the catalytic apparatus is positioned near an amylogenic β-edge, which needs to be protected to prevent aggregation, and we found that different oligopeptidases use different strategies to achieve such an end. We propose that self-assembly within the family results in characteristically different substrate selection mechanisms coupled to different multimerization states. PMID:23632025

  14. Approximating the stabilization of cellular metabolism by compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Fürtauer, Lisa; Nägele, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical regulation in compartmentalized metabolic networks is highly complex and non-intuitive. This is particularly true for cells of higher plants showing one of the most compartmentalized cellular structures across all kingdoms of life. The interpretation and testable hypothesis generation from experimental data on such complex systems is a challenging step in biological research and biotechnological applications. While it is known that subcellular compartments provide defined reaction spaces within a cell allowing for the tight coordination of complex biochemical reaction sequences, its role in the coordination of metabolic signals during metabolic reprogramming due to environmental fluctuations is less clear. In the present study, we numerically analysed the effects of environmental fluctuations in a subcellular metabolic network with regard to the stability of an experimentally observed steady state in the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Applying a method for kinetic parameter normalization, several millions of probable enzyme kinetic parameter constellations were simulated and evaluated with regard to the stability information of the metabolic homeostasis. Information about the stability of the metabolic steady state was derived from real parts of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrices. Our results provide evidence for a differential stabilizing contribution of different subcellular compartments. We could identify stabilizing and destabilizing network components which we could classify according to their subcellular localization. The findings prove that a highly dynamic interplay between intracellular compartments is preliminary for an efficient stabilization of a metabolic homeostasis after environmental perturbation. Further, our results provide evidence that feedback-inhibition originating from the cytosol and plastid seem to stabilize the sucrose homeostasis more efficiently than vacuolar control. In summary, our results indicate stabilizing and

  15. Unchanged mitochondrial organization and compartmentation of high-energy phosphates in creatine-deficient GAMT−/− mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Branovets, Jelena; Sepp, Mervi; Kotlyarova, Svetlana; Jepihhina, Natalja; Sokolova, Niina; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Lygate, Craig A.; Neubauer, Stefan; Birkedal, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the creatine kinase (CK) system in hearts of CK-deficient mice leads to changes in the ultrastructure and regulation of mitochondrial respiration. We expected to see similar changes in creatine-deficient mice, which lack the enzyme guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) to produce creatine. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial organization, regulation of respiration, and intracellular compartmentation associated with GAMT deficiency. Three-dimensional mitochondrial organization was assessed by confocal microscopy. On populations of permeabilized cardiomyocytes, we recorded ADP and ATP kinetics of respiration, competition between mitochondria and pyruvate kinase for ADP produced by ATPases, ADP kinetics of endogenous pyruvate kinase, and ATP kinetics of ATPases. These data were analyzed by mathematical models to estimate intracellular compartmentation. Quantitative analysis of morphological and kinetic data as well as derived model fits showed no difference between GAMT-deficient and wild-type mice. We conclude that inactivation of the CK system by GAMT deficiency does not alter mitochondrial organization and intracellular compartmentation in relaxed cardiomyocytes. Thus, our results suggest that the healthy heart is able to preserve cardiac function at a basal level in the absence of CK-facilitated energy transfer without compromising intracellular organization and the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis. This raises questions on the importance of the CK system as a spatial energy buffer in unstressed cardiomyocytes. PMID:23792673

  16. Time-dependent activity of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 and homeostasis of intracellular pH in astrocytes exposed to CoCl2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Kan, Quancheng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Suyan

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia causes injury to the central nervous system during stroke and has significant effects on pH homeostasis. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is important in the mechanisms of hypoxia and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. As a well-established hypoxia-mimetic agent, CoCl2 stabilizes and increases the expression of hypoxia inducible factor‑1α (HIF-1α), which regulates several genes involved in pH balance, including NHE1. However, it is not fully understood whether NHE1 is activated in astrocytes under CoCl2 treatment. In the current study, pHi and NHE activity were analyzed using the pHi‑sensitive dye BCECF‑AM. Using cariporide (an NHE1‑specific inhibitor) and EIPA (an NHE nonspecific inhibitor), the current study demonstrated that it was NHE1, not the other NHE isoforms, that was important in regulating pHi homeostasis in astrocytes during CoCl2 treatment. Additionally, the present study observed that, during the early period of CoCl2 treatment (the first 2 h), NHE1 activity and pHi dropped immediately, and NHE1 mRNA expression was reduced compared with control levels, whereas expression levels of the NHE1 protein had not yet changed. In the later period of CoCl2 treatment, NHE1 activity and pHi significantly increased compared with the control levels, as did the mRNA and protein expression levels of NHE1. Furthermore, the cell viability and injury of astrocytes was not changed during the initial 8 h of CoCl2 treatment; their deterioration was associated with the higher levels of pHi and NHE1 activity. The current study concluded that NHE1 activity and pHi homeostasis are regulated by CoCl2 treatment in a time-dependent manner in astrocytes, and may be responsible for the changes in cell viability and injury observed under hypoxia-mimetic conditions induced by CoCl2 treatment. PMID:27035646

  17. Synthetic cells and organelles: compartmentalization strategies.

    PubMed

    Roodbeen, Renée; van Hest, Jan C M

    2009-12-01

    The recent development of RNA replicating protocells and capsules that enclose complex biosynthetic cascade reactions are encouraging signs that we are gradually getting better at mastering the complexity of biological systems. The road to truly cellular compartments is still very long, but concrete progress is being made. Compartmentalization is a crucial natural methodology to enable control over biological processes occurring within the living cell. In fact, compartmentalization has been considered by some theories to be instrumental in the creation of life. With the advancement of chemical biology, artificial compartments that can mimic the cell as a whole, or that can be regarded as cell organelles, have recently received much attention. The membrane between the inner and outer environment of the compartment has to meet specific requirements, such as semi-permeability, to allow communication and molecular transport over the border. The membrane can either be built from natural constituents or from synthetic polymers, introducing robustness to the capsule. PMID:19877005

  18. Dual Oxidase 2 (Duox2) Regulates Pannexin 1-mediated ATP Release in Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells via Changes in Intracellular pH and Not H2O2 Production.

    PubMed

    Krick, Stefanie; Wang, Junjie; St-Pierre, Melissa; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dahl, Gerhard; Salathe, Matthias

    2016-03-18

    Human airway epithelial cells express pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels to release ATP, which regulates mucociliary clearance. Airway inflammation causes mucociliary dysfunction. Exposure of primary human airway epithelial cell cultures to IFN-γ for 48 h did not alter Panx1 protein expression but significantly decreased ATP release in response to hypotonic stress. The IFN-γ-induced functional down-regulation of Panx1 was due to the up-regulation of dual oxidase 2 (Duox2). Duox2 suppression by siRNA led to an increase in ATP release in control cells and restoration of ATP release in cells treated with IFN-γ. Both effects were reduced by the pannexin inhibitor probenecid. Duox2 up-regulation stoichiometrically increases H2O2 and proton production. H2O2 inhibited Panx1 function temporarily by formation of disulfide bonds at the thiol group of its terminal cysteine. Long-term exposure to H2O2, however, had no inhibitory effect. To assess the role of cellular acidification upon IFN-γ treatment, fully differentiated airway epithelial cells were exposed to ammonium chloride to alkalinize the cytosol. This led to a 2-fold increase in ATP release in cells treated with IFN-γ that was also inhibited by probenecid. Duox2 knockdown also partially corrected IFN-γ-mediated acidification. The direct correlation between intracellular pH and Panx1 open probability was shown in oocytes. Therefore, airway epithelial cells release less ATP in response to hypotonic stress in an inflammatory environment (IFN-γ exposure). Decreased Panx1 function is a response to cell acidification mediated by IFN-γ-induced up-regulation of Duox2, representing a novel mechanism for mucociliary dysfunction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26823467

  19. Demonstration of nuclear compartmentalization of glutathione in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, G; Vairetti, M; Stivala, L; Mirabelli, F; Richelmi, P; Orrenius, S

    1992-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of glutathione (GSH) in cultured hepatocytes has been investigated by using the compound monochlorobimane (BmCl), which interacts specifically with GSH to form a highly fluorescent adduct. Image analysis of BmCl-labeled hepatocytes predominantly localized the fluorescence in the nucleus; the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration gradient was approximately three. This concentration gradient was collapsed by treatment of the cells with ATP-depleting agents. The uneven distribution of BmCl fluorescence was not attributable to (i) nonspecific interaction of BmCl with protein sulfhydryl groups, (ii) any selective nuclear localization of the GSH transferase(s) catalyzing formation of the GSH-BmCl conjugate, or (iii) any apparent alterations in cell morphology from culture conditions, suggesting that this distribution did, indeed, reflect a nuclear compartmentalization of GSH. That the nuclear pool of GSH was found more resistant to depletion by several agents than the cytoplasmic pool supports the assumption that GSH is essential in protecting DNA and other nuclear structures from chemical injury. Images PMID:1584774

  20. Self-Assembly and Compartmentalization of Nanozymes in Mesoporous Silica-Based Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Lin, Youhui; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-04-11

    Herein, to mimic complex natural system, polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM)-coated mesoporous silica nanoreactors were used to compartmentalize two different artificial enzymes. PEMs coated on the surface of mesoporous silica could serve as a permeable membrane to control the flow of molecules. When assembling hemin on the surface of mesoporous silica, the hemin-based mesoporous silica system possessed remarkable peroxidase-like activity, especially at physiological pH, and could be recycled more easily than traditional graphene-hemin nanocompounds. The hope is that these new findings may pave the way for exploring novel nanoreactors to achieve compartmentalization of nanozymes and applying artificial cascade catalytic systems to mimic cell organelles or important biochemical transformations. PMID:26934043

  1. Compartmentalization of the Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Direct in vivo investigation of human metabolism is complicated by the distinct metabolic functions of various sub-cellular organelles. Diverse micro-environments in different organelles may lead to distinct functions of the same protein and the use of different enzymes for the same metabolic reaction. To better understand the complexity in the human metabolism, a compartmentalized human metabolic network with integrated sub-cellular location information is required. Results We extended the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN) [Ma, et al. Molecular Systems Biology, 3:135, 2007] by integrating the sub-cellular location information for the reactions, adding transport reactions and refining the protein-reaction relationships based on the location information. Firstly, protein location information was obtained from Gene Ontology and complemented by a Swiss-Prot location keywords search. Then all the reactions in EHMN were assigned to a location based on the protein-reaction relationships to get a preliminary compartmentalized network. We investigated the localized sub-networks in each pathway to identify gaps and isolated reactions by connectivity analysis and refined the location information based on information from literature. As a result, location information for hundreds of reactions was revised and hundreds of incorrect protein-reaction relationships were corrected. Over 1400 transport reactions were added to link the location specific metabolic network. To validate the network, we have done pathway analysis to examine the capability of the network to synthesize or degrade certain key metabolites. Compared with a previously published human metabolic network (Human Recon 1), our network contains over 1000 more reactions assigned to clear cellular compartments. Conclusions By combining protein location information, network connectivity analysis and manual literature search, we have reconstructed a more complete

  2. Compartmentalized ATP synthesis in skeletal muscle triads.

    PubMed

    Han, J W; Thieleczek, R; Varsányi, M; Heilmeyer, L M

    1992-01-21

    Isolated skeletal muscle triads contain a compartmentalized glycolytic reaction sequence catalyzed by aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. These enzymes express activity in the structure-associated state leading to synthesis of ATP in the triadic junction upon supply of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. ATP formation occurs transiently and appears to be kinetically compartmentalized, i.e., the synthesized ATP is not in equilibrium with the bulk ATP. The apparent rate constants of the aldolase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase reaction are significantly increased when fructose 1,6-bisphosphate instead of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is employed as substrate. The observations suggest that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is especially effectively channelled into the junctional gap. The amplitude of the ATP transient is decreasing with increasing free [Ca2+] in the range of 1 nM to 30 microM. In the presence of fluoride, the ATP transient is significantly enhanced and its declining phase is substantially retarded. This observation suggests utilization of endogenously synthesized ATP in part by structure associated protein kinases and phosphatases which is confirmed by the detection of phosphorylated triadic proteins after gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Endogenous protein kinases phosphorylate proteins of apparent Mr 450,000, 180,000, 160,000, 145,000, 135,000, 90,000, 54,000, 51,000, and 20,000, respectively. Some of these phosphorylated polypeptides are in the Mr range of known phosphoproteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, which might give a first hint at the functional importance of the sequential glycolytic reactions compartmentalized in triads. PMID:1731894

  3. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ian A.; Hancock, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes. PMID:21924373

  4. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity. PMID:26967282

  5. Intracellular microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Matjaž; Hyun Yun, Seok

    2015-09-01

    Optical microresonators, which confine light within a small cavity, are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers and nonlinear devices to biochemical and optomechanical sensing. Here we use microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explore two distinct types of microresonator—soft and hard—that support whispering-gallery modes. Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (˜500 pN μm-2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN μm-2 (20 Pa). In a second form, whispering-gallery modes within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes.

  6. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  7. Evidence for compartmentalization of mammalian carotenoid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Amengual, Jaume; Hoppel, Charles L.; von Lintig, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The critical role of retinoids (vitamin A and its derivatives) for vision, reproduction, and survival has been well established. Vitamin A is produced from dietary carotenoids such as β-carotene by centric cleavage via the enzyme BCO1. The biochemical and molecular identification of a second structurally related β-carotene metabolizing enzyme, BCO2, has led to a prolonged debate about its relevance in vitamin A biology. While BCO1 cleaves provitamin A carotenoids, BCO2 is more promiscuous and also metabolizes nonprovitamin A carotenoids such as zeaxanthin into long-chain apo-carotenoids. Herein we demonstrate, in cell lines, that human BCO2 is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Different human BCO2 isoforms possess cleavable N-terminal leader sequences critical for mitochondrial import. Subfractionation of murine hepatic mitochondria confirmed the localization of BCO2 to the inner mitochondrial membrane. Studies in BCO2-knockout mice revealed that zeaxanthin accumulates in the inner mitochondrial membrane; in contrast, β-carotene is retained predominantly in the cytoplasm. Thus, we provide evidence for a compartmentalization of carotenoid metabolism that prevents competition between BCO1 and BCO2 for the provitamin and the production of noncanonical β-carotene metabolites.—Palczewski, G., Amengual, J., Hoppel, C. L., von Lintig, J. Evidence for compartmentalization of mammalian carotenoid metabolism. PMID:25002123

  8. Compartmentation of Redox Metabolism in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rahlfs, Stefan; Przyborski, Jude M.; Becker, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito – a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes – glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase – Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI) to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21203490

  9. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Sebastian; Sturm, Nicole; Rahlfs, Stefan; Przyborski, Jude M; Becker, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI) to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21203490

  10. Compartmentalization and molecular traffic in secondary metabolism: a new understanding of established cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Roze, Ludmila V.; Chanda, Anindya; Linz, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Great progress has been made in understanding the regulation of expression of genes involved in secondary metabolism. Less is known about the mechanisms that govern the spatial distribution of the enzymes, cofactors, and substrates that mediate catalysis of secondary metabolites within the cell. Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus synthesize an array of secondary metabolites and provide useful systems to analyze the mechanisms that mediate the temporal and spatial regulation of secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. For example, aflatoxin biosynthesis in A. parasiticus has been studied intensively because this mycotoxin is highly toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic in humans and animals. Using aflatoxin synthesis to illustrate key concepts, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which sub-cellular compartmentalization and intra-cellular molecular traffic contribute to the initiation and completion of secondary metabolism within the cell. We discuss the recent discovery of aflatoxisomes, specialized trafficking vesicles that participate in the compartmentalization of aflatoxin synthesis and export of the toxin to the cell exterior; this work provides a new and clearer understanding of how cells integrate secondary metabolism into basic cellular metabolism via the intracellular trafficking machinery. PMID:20519149

  11. Intracellular microlasers

    PubMed Central

    Humar, Matjaž; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical microresonators1 which confine light within a small cavity are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers2 and nonlinear devices3, 4, 5 to biochemical and optomechanical sensing6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Here we employ microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explored two distinct types of microresonators: soft and hard, that support whispering-gallery modes (WGM). Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (~500 pN/μm2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN/μm2 (20 Pa). In a second form, WGMs within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes. PMID:26417383

  12. Interplay of metagenomics and in vitro compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Manuel; Beloqui, Ana; Vieites, José María; Guazzaroni, María Eugenia; Berger, Ilana; Aharoni, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, the application of approaches for harvesting DNA from the environment, the so‐called, ‘metagenomic approaches’ has proven to be highly successful for the identification, isolation and generation of novel enzymes. Functional screening for the desired catalytic activity is one of the key steps in mining metagenomic libraries, as it does not rely on sequence homology. In this mini‐review, we survey high‐throughput screening tools, originally developed for directed evolution experiments, which can be readily adapted for the screening of large libraries. In particular, we focus on the use of in vitro compartmentalization (IVC) approaches to address potential advantages and problems the merger of culture‐independent and IVC techniques might bring on the mining of enzyme activities in microbial communities. PMID:21261880

  13. Striatal cholinergic interneurons: birthdates predict compartmental localization.

    PubMed

    van Vulpen, E H; van der Kooy, D

    1998-07-01

    The striatal patch and matrix compartment neurons are born at different times during rat development. The majority of the early born neurons preferentially end up in the patch compartment, while the majority of the later born neurons end up in the matrix compartment. Although the cholinergic interneurons are all born early in neurogenesis (between embryonic day E12 and E17), and we would therefore expect them to be located mainly in the patches, they are relatively homogeneously distributed in the adult, with a preference for the matrix area just outside the patches (the intermediate zone). To ask if birthdate can predict the compartmental localization of cholinergic neurons in the striatum, we marked new postmitotic neurons in the embryo with a maternal injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on E13, E15 or E17 and labeled the patch compartment with an injection of the retrograde tracer True Blue into the substantia nigra on postnatal day (P) 1. The pups were sacrificed at P40 and the tissue was processed for BrdU, choline acetyltransferase, and True Blue triple labeling. Cholinergic neurons that became postmitotic at E13, had a higher chance of ending up in the patch compartment compared to either the intermediate zone or the rest of the matrix compartment. On the other hand cholinergic neurons that became postmitotic at E17 had a higher chance of ending up in the matrix compartment (including the intermediate zone). We conclude that birthdate can predict compartmental localization, with the cholinergic neurons in the intermediate zone following the same pattern as the cholinergic neurons in the rest of the matrix compartment. Cholinergic neurons show the same relative birthdate/compartment relationship as do other striatal neurons, although the absolute birthdates of cholinergic neurons are shifted earlier in neurogenesis. PMID:9706390

  14. The compartmentation of phosphorylated thiamine derivatives in cultured neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L

    1994-05-26

    Thiamine transport in cultured neuroblastoma cells is mediated by a high-affinity carrier (KM = 40 nM). In contrast, the uptake of the more hydrophobic sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) is unsaturable and its initial transport rate is 20-times faster than for thiamine. In the cytoplasm, sulbutiamine is rapidly hydrolyzed and reduced to free thiamine, the overall process resulting in a rapid and concentrative thiamine accumulation. Incorporation of radioactivity from [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine into intracellular thiamine diphosphate is slow in both cases. Despite the fact that the diphosphate is probably the direct precursor for both thiamine monophosphate and triphosphate, the specific radioactivity increased much faster for the latter two compounds than for thiamine diphosphate. This suggests the existence of two pools of thiamine diphosphate, the larger one having a very slow turnover (about 17 h); a much smaller, rapidly turning over pool would be the precursor of thiamine mono- and triphosphate. The turnover time for thiamine triphosphate could be estimated to be 1-2 h. When preloading the cells with [14C]sulbutiamine was followed by a chase with the same concentration of the unlabeled compound, the specific radioactivities of thiamine and thiamine monophosphate decreased exponentially as expected, but labeling of the diphosphate continued to increase slowly. Specific radioactivity of thiamine triphosphate increased first, but after 30 min it began to slowly decrease. These results show for the first time the existence of distinct thiamine diphosphate pools in the same homogeneous cell population. They also suggest a complex compartmentation of thiamine metabolism. PMID:8186267

  15. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate compartmentation in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Liliana R.V.; Verde, Ignacio; Cooper, Dermot M.; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2006-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides, such as ANP or BNP, which activate, respectively, the soluble and particulate form of guanylyl cyclase. Yet, natriuretic peptides and NO-donors exert different effects on cardiac and vascular smooth muscle function. We therefore tested whether these differences are due to an intracellular compartmentation of cGMP, and evaluated the role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) subtypes in this process. Methods and Results Subsarcolemmal cGMP signals were monitored in adult rat cardiomyocytes by expression of the rat olfactory CNG channel α subunit and recording of the associated cGMP-gated current (ICNG). ANP (10 nM) or BNP (10 nM) induced a clear activation of ICNG while NO-donors (SNAP, SNP, DEANO, SIN-1, spermine NO, all at 100 μM) had little effect. The ICNG current was strongly potentiated by non-selective PDE inhibition with IBMX (100 μM) and by the PDE2 inhibitors EHNA (10 μM) and Bay 60–7550 (50 nM). Surprisingly, sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, produced a dose-dependent increase of ICNG activated by NO-donors but had no effect (at 100 nM) on the current elicited by ANP. Conclusions These results indicate that, in rat cardiomyocytes: i) the ‘particulate’ cGMP pool is readily accessible at the plasma membrane, while the ‘soluble’ pool is not; ii) PDE5 controls the ‘soluble’ but not the ‘particulate’ pool, whereas the latter is under the exclusive control of PDE2. Differential spatiotemporal distributions of cGMP may therefore contribute to the specific effects of natriuretic peptides and NO-donors on cardiac function. PMID:16651469

  16. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  17. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  18. Effects of cholesterol depletion on compartmentalized cAMP responses in adult cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh R.; MacDougall, David A.; Tyser, Richard; Pugh, Sara D.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Harvey, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    β1-Adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) and E-type prostaglandin receptors (EPRs) both produce compartmentalized cAMP responses in cardiac myocytes. The role of cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts in producing these compartmentalized responses was investigated in adult rat ventricular myocytes. β1ARs were found in lipid raft and non-lipid raft containing membrane fractions, while EPRs were only found in non-lipid raft fractions. Furthermore, β1AR activation enhanced the L-type Ca2+ current, intracellular Ca2+ transient, and myocyte shortening, while EPR activation had no effect, consistent with the idea that these functional responses are regulated by cAMP produced by receptors found in lipid raft domains. Using methyl-β-cyclodextrin to disrupt lipid rafts by depleting membrane cholesterol did not eliminate compartmentalized behavior, but it did selectively alter specific receptor-mediated responses. Cholesterol depletion enhanced the sensitivity of functional responses produced by β1ARs without having any effect on EPR activation. Changes in cAMP activity were also measured in intact cells using two different FRET-based biosensors: a type II PKA-based probe to monitor cAMP in subcellular compartments that include microdomains associated with caveolar lipid rafts and a freely diffusible Epac2-based probe to monitor total cytosolic cAMP. β1AR and EPR activation elicited responses detected by both FRET probes. However, cholesterol depletion only affected β1AR responses detected by the PKA probe. These results indicate that lipid rafts alone are not sufficient to explain the difference between β1AR and EPR responses. They also suggest that β1AR regulation of myocyte contraction involves the local production of cAMP by a subpopulation of receptors associated with caveolar lipid rafts. PMID:21115018

  19. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD+ is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD+ homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD+ metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD+ metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD+ metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD+ metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD+ metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD+ metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD+-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD+ intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD+ homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD+ and NAD+ intermediates shuttle between different

  20. Compartmentalization of Immune Responses in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sayma; Gudetta, Berhanu; Fink, Joshua; Granath, Anna; Ashenafi, Senait; Aseffa, Abraham; Derbew, Milliard; Svensson, Mattias; Andersson, Jan; Brighenti, Susanna Grundström

    2009-01-01

    Immune responses were assessed at the single-cell level in lymph nodes from children with tuberculous lymphadenitis. Tuberculosis infection was associated with tissue remodeling of lymph nodes as well as altered cellular composition. Granulomas were significantly enriched with CD68+ macrophages expressing the M. tuberculosis complex-specific protein antigen MPT64 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. There was a significant increase in CD8+ cytolytic T cells surrounding the granuloma; however, CD8+ T cells expressed low levels of the cytolytic and antimicrobial effector molecules perforin and granulysin in the granulomatous lesions. Quantitative real-time mRNA analysis revealed that interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 were not up-regulated in infected lymph nodes, but there was a significant induction of both transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-13. In addition, granulomas contained an increased number of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells co-expressing the immunoregulatory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor molecules. Low numbers of CD8+ T cells in the lesions correlated with high levels of transforming growth factor-β and FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, suggesting active immunosuppression at the local infection site. Compartmentalization and skewing of the immune response toward a regulatory phenotype may result in an uncoordinated effector T-cell response that reduces granule-mediated killing of M. tuberculosis-infected cells and subsequent disease control. PMID:19435796

  1. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  2. Compartmentalized Innervation of Primate Lateral Rectus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Michelle; Poukens, Vadims; da Silva Costa, Roberta Martins; Yoo, Lawrence; Tychsen, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Skeletal and craniofacial muscles are frequently composed of multiple neuromuscular compartments that serve different physiological functions. Evidence of possible regional selectivity in LR intramuscular innervation was sought in a study of the anatomic potential of lateral rectus (LR) muscle compartmentalization. Methods. Whole orbits of two humans and five macaque monkeys were serially sectioned at 10-μm thickness and stained with Masson trichrome. The abducens nerve (CN6) was traced anteriorly from the deep orbit as it branched to enter the LR and arborized among extraocular muscle (EOM) fibers. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed in human and monkey orbits. Results. Findings were in concordance in the monkey and human orbits. External to the LR global surface, CN6 bifurcated into approximately equal-sized trunks before entering the global layer. Subsequent arborization showed a systematic topography, entering a well-defined inferior zone 0.4 to 2.5 mm more posteriorly than branches entering the largely nonoverlapping superior zone. Zonal innervation remained segregated anteriorly and laterally within the LR. Conclusions. Consistent segregation of intramuscular CN6 arborization in humans and monkeys suggests functionally distinct superior and inferior zones for the LR. Since the LR is shaped as a broad vertical strap, segregated control of the two zones could activate them separately, potentially mediating previously unappreciated but substantial torsional and vertical oculorotary LR actions. PMID:20435590

  3. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  4. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  5. Subcelluar compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits during palate ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Linask, K.K.; Greene, R.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Mammalian palatal ontogeny involves epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, cell differentiation, and cell movement. These events occur on days 12, 13, and 14 of gestation in the C57BL/6J mouse embryo. During this period intracellular cAMP levels and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-dPK) levels in the palate transiently elevate. Cyclic AMP activates cAMP-dPK by binding primarily to two types of regulatory subunits of this enzyme, designated as R{sub I} and R{sub II}. To assess whether differential compartmentalization of the regulatory subunits occurs during palatal ontogeny, cytosolic, nuclear, and particulate fractions were prepared from day 12, 13, and 14 embryonic maxillary and palatal tissue. After photo-affinity labeling of each fraction with 8-azido ({sup 32}P) cAMP, SDS-PAGE, and autoradiography, autoradiograms were analyzed densitometrically. The R{sub I} isoform predominated in the nuclear and particulate fractions on all three developmental days; whereas R{sub II} predominated in the cytosolic fractions. Thus, differential compartmentalization of cAMP-dPK may be a means by which cAMP dependent responses are regulated during palatogenesis.

  6. Blind estimation of compartmental model parameters.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, E V; Clackdoyle, R; Gullberg, G T

    1999-03-01

    Computation of physiologically relevant kinetic parameters from dynamic PET or SPECT imaging requires knowledge of the blood input function. This work is concerned with developing methods to accurately estimate these kinetic parameters blindly; that is, without use of a directly measured blood input function. Instead, only measurements of the output functions--the tissue time-activity curves--are used. The blind estimation method employed here minimizes a set of cross-relation equations, from which the blood term has been factored out, to determine compartmental model parameters. The method was tested with simulated data appropriate for dynamic SPECT cardiac perfusion imaging with 99mTc-teboroxime and for dynamic PET cerebral blood flow imaging with 15O water. The simulations did not model the tomographic process. Noise levels typical of the respective modalities were employed. From three to eight different regions were simulated, each with different time-activity curves. The time-activity curve (24 or 70 time points) for each region was simulated with a compartment model. The simulation used a biexponential blood input function and washin rates between 0.2 and 1.3 min(-1) and washout rates between 0.2 and 1.0 min(-1). The system of equations was solved numerically and included constraints to bound the range of possible solutions. From the cardiac simulations, washin was determined to within a scale factor of the true washin parameters with less than 6% bias and 12% variability. 99mTc-teboroxime washout results had less than 5% bias, but variability ranged from 14% to 43%. The cerebral blood flow washin parameters were determined with less than 5% bias and 4% variability. The washout parameters were determined with less than 4% bias, but had 15-30% variability. Since washin is often the parameter of most use in clinical studies, the blind estimation approach may eliminate the current necessity of measuring the input function when performing certain dynamic studies

  7. Generation of compartmentalized pressure by a nuclear piston governs cell motility in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Koo, Hyun; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-08-29

    Cells use actomyosin contractility to move through three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices. Contractility affects the type of protrusions cells use to migrate in 3D, but the mechanisms are unclear. In this work, we found that contractility generated high-pressure lobopodial protrusions in human cells migrating in a 3D matrix. In these cells, the nucleus physically divided the cytoplasm into forward and rear compartments. Actomyosin contractility with the nucleoskeleton-intermediate filament linker protein nesprin-3 pulled the nucleus forward and pressurized the front of the cell. Reducing expression of nesprin-3 decreased and equalized the intracellular pressure. Thus, the nucleus can act as a piston that physically compartmentalizes the cytoplasm and increases the hydrostatic pressure between the nucleus and the leading edge of the cell to drive lamellipodia-independent 3D cell migration. PMID:25170155

  8. Phosphorylation-mediated RNA/peptide complex coacervation as a model for intracellular liquid organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, William M.; Keating, Christine D.

    2016-02-01

    Biological cells are highly organized, with numerous subcellular compartments. Phosphorylation has been hypothesized as a means to control the assembly/disassembly of liquid-like RNA- and protein-rich intracellular bodies, or liquid organelles, that lack delimiting membranes. Here, we demonstrate that charge-mediated phase separation, or complex coacervation, of RNAs with cationic peptides can generate simple model liquid organelles capable of reversibly compartmentalizing biomolecules. Formation and dissolution of these liquid bodies was controlled by changes in peptide phosphorylation state using a kinase/phosphatase enzyme pair. The droplet-generating phase transition responded to modification of even a single serine residue. Electrostatic interactions between the short cationic peptides and the much longer polyanionic RNAs drove phase separation. Coacervates were also formed on silica beads, a primitive model for localization at specific intracellular sites. This work supports phosphoregulation of complex coacervation as a viable mechanism for dynamic intracellular compartmentalization in membraneless organelles.

  9. The role of carbon dioxide (and intracellular pH) in the pathomechanism of several mental disorders. Are the diseases of civilization caused by learnt behaviour, not the stress itself?

    PubMed

    Sikter, András; Faludi, Gábor; Rihmer, Zoltán

    2009-09-01

    The role of carbon dioxide (CO2) is underestimated in the pathomechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders, though it is an important link between psyche and corpus. The actual spiritual status also influences respiration (we start breathing rarely, frequently, irregularly, etc.) causing pH alteration in the organism; on the other hand the actual cytosolic pH of neurons is one of the main modifiers of Ca2+-conductance, hence breathing directly, quickly, and effectively influences the second messenger system through Ca2+-currents. (Decreasing pCO2 turns pH into alkalic direction, augments psychic arousal, while increasing pCO2 turns pH acidic, diminishes arousal.) One of the most important homeostatic function is to maintain or restore the permanence of H+-concentration, hence the alteration of CO2 level starts cascades of contraregulation. However it can be proved that there is no perfect compensation, therefore compensational mechanisms may generate psychosomatic disorders causing secondary alterations in the "milieu interieur". Authors discuss the special physico-chemical features of CO2, the laws of interweaving alterations of pCO2 and catecholamine levels (their feedback mechanism), the role of acute and chronic hypocapnia in several hyperarousal disorders (delirium, panic disorder, hyperventilation syndrome, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder), the role of "locus minoris resistentiae" in the pathomechanism of psychosomatic disorders. It is supposed that the diseases of civilization are caused not by the stress itself but the lack of human instinctive reaction to it, and this would cause long-lasting CO2 alteration. Increased brain-pCO2, acidic cytosol pH and/or increased basal cytosolic Ca2+ level diminish inward Ca2+-current into cytosol, decrease arousal--they may cause dysthymia or depression. This state usually co-exists with ATP-deficiency and decreased cytosolic Mg2+ content. This energetical- and ion-constellation is also typical of ageing

  10. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DeLoache, William C.; Russ, Zachary N.; Dueber, John E.

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzymemore » pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. Lastly, this work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.« less

  11. A compartmental model for oxygen-carbon dioxide coupled transport in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Ye, G F; Moore, T W; Buerk, D G; Jaron, D

    1994-01-01

    We present a multicompartmental model for an oxygen-carbon dioxide transport system. The compartmental equations and their lumped parameters are derived through space averaging of the corresponding distributed model. The model can predict compartmental distributions of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, oxygen-hemoglobin saturation, and pH. Other unique features include the effects of the radial distribution of partial pressures and the difference in metabolic rates between vessel wall and tissue. A model for the cat brain, based on this formulation, is compared with results of experiments and with two types of earlier models: one without space averaging and one without carbon dioxide transport. The results suggest that space averaging the convective terms significantly affects the behavior of the model. This is consistent with conclusions from our earlier oxygen-only model. Our observations also demonstrate, however, significant differences between the results from the oxygen-carbon dioxide model and the oxygen-only model. For instance, at low blood flow rates or at low level of oxygen input, predicted oxygen partial pressures can differ by as much as 30% between the two models. Results obtained from the present model are supported by available experimental findings. PMID:7825749

  12. GABAAergic stimulation modulates intracellular protein arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Denman, Robert B; Xie, Wen; Merz, George; Sung, Ying-Ju

    2014-06-20

    Changes in cytoplasmic pH are known to regulate diverse cellular processes and influence neuronal activities. In neurons, the intracellular alkalization is shown to occur after stimulating several channels and receptors. For example, it has previously demonstrated in P19 neurons that a sustained intracellular alkalinization can be mediated by the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. In addition, the benzodiazepine binding subtypes of the γ-amino butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor mediate a transient intracellular alkalinization when they are stimulated. Because the activities of many enzymes are sensitive to pH shift, here we investigate the effects of intracellular pH modulation resulted from stimulating GABAA receptor on the protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT) activities. We show that the major benzodiazepine subtype (2α1, 2β2, 1γ2) is constitutively expressed in both undifferentiated P19 cells and retinoic acid (RA) differentiated P19 neurons. Furthermore stimulation with diazepam and, diazepam plus muscimol produce an intracellular alkalinization that can be detected ex vivo with the fluorescence dye. The alkalinization results in significant perturbation in protein arginine methylation activity as measured in methylation assays with specific protein substrates. Altered protein arginine methylation is also observed when cells are treated with the GABAA agonist muscimol but not an antagonist, bicuculline. These data suggest that pH-dependent and pH-independent methylation pathways can be activated by GABAAergic stimulation, which we verified using hippocampal slice preparations from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome. PMID:24793772

  13. Photoacoustic “nanobombs” fight against undesirable vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiping; Xu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Diancheng; Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Kang, Bin; Chen, Hongyuan; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable intracellular vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs in cancer cells is a common cause of chemoresistance. Strategies aimed at circumventing this problem may improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. We report a novel photophysical strategy for controlled-disruption of vesicular sequestration of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), modified with folate, were trapped in acidic vesicles after entering lung cancer cells. Upon irradiation by near-infrared pulsed laser, these vesicles were massively broken by the resulting photoacoustic shockwave, and the vesicle-sequestered contents were released, leading to redistribution of DOX from cytoplasm to the target-containing nucleus. Redistribution resulted in 12-fold decrease of the EC50 of DOX in lung cancer cells, and enhanced antitumor efficacy of low-dose DOX in tumor-bearing mice. Side effects were not observed. These findings provide insights of using nanotechnology to improve cancer chemotherapy, i.e. not only for drug delivery, but also for overcoming intracellular drug-transport hurdles. PMID:26483341

  14. Compartmentalization of metals within the diverse colloidal matrices comprising activated sludge microbial flocs.

    PubMed

    Leppard, Gary G; Droppo, Ian G; West, M Marcia; Liss, Steven N

    2003-01-01

    Activated sludge floc from a wastewater treatment system was characterized, with regard to principal structural, chemical, and microbiological components and properties, in relation to contaminant-colloid associations and settling. Multiscale analytical microscopies, in conjunction with multimethod sample preparations, were used correlatively to characterize diverse colloidal matrices within microbial floc. Transmission electron microscopy, in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), revealed specific associations of contaminant heavy metals with individual bacterial cells and with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Floc structure was mapped from the level of gross morphology down to the nano-scale, and flocs were described with respect to settling properties, size, shape, density, porosity, bound water content, and EPS chemical composition; gross surface properties were also measured for correlation with principal floc features. Compartmentalization results based on 171 EDS analyses and representative high-resolution images showed that nano-scale agglomerations of (i) silver (100%) and (ii) zinc (91%) were confined almost entirely to EPS matrices while (iii) Pb (100%) was confined to intracellular granules and (iv) aluminum was partitioned between EPS matrices (41%) and intracellular matrices (59%). The results suggest that engineered changes in microbial physiology and/or in macromolecular EPS composition may influence metal removal efficiencies. PMID:14674532

  15. A self-compartmentalizing hexamer serine protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii: substrate selection achieved through multimerization.

    PubMed

    Menyhárd, Dóra K; Kiss-Szemán, Anna; Tichy-Rács, Éva; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Szeltner, Zoltán; Domokos, Klarissza; Szamosi, Ilona; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László; Harmat, Veronika

    2013-06-14

    Oligopeptidases impose a size limitation on their substrates, the mechanism of which has long been under debate. Here we present the structure of a hexameric serine protease, an oligopeptidase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP), revealing a complex, self-compartmentalized inner space, where substrates may access the monomer active sites passing through a double-gated "check-in" system, first passing through a pore on the hexamer surface and then turning to enter through an even smaller opening at the monomers' domain interface. This substrate screening strategy is unique within the family. We found that among oligopeptidases, a residue of the catalytic apparatus is positioned near an amylogenic β-edge, which needs to be protected to prevent aggregation, and we found that different oligopeptidases use different strategies to achieve such an end. We propose that self-assembly within the family results in characteristically different substrate selection mechanisms coupled to different multimerization states. PMID:23632025

  16. Compartmentalized PDE4A5 Signaling Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Long-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Park, Alan J.; Tolentino, Rosa E.; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Lee, Yool; Hansen, Rolf T.; Guercio, Leonardo A.; Linton, Edward; Neves-Zaph, Susana R.; Meerlo, Peter; Baillie, George S.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in cAMP signaling are thought to contribute to neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Members of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) family, which contains >25 different isoforms, play a key role in determining spatial cAMP degradation so as to orchestrate compartmentalized cAMP signaling in cells. Each isoform binds to a different set of protein complexes through its unique N-terminal domain, thereby leading to targeted degradation of cAMP in specific intracellular compartments. However, the functional role of specific compartmentalized PDE4 isoforms has not been examined in vivo. Here, we show that increasing protein levels of the PDE4A5 isoform in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons impairs a long-lasting form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and attenuates hippocampus-dependent long-term memories without affecting anxiety. In contrast, viral expression of a truncated version of PDE4A5, which lacks the unique N-terminal targeting domain, does not affect long-term memory. Further, overexpression of the PDE4A1 isoform, which targets a different subset of signalosomes, leaves memory undisturbed. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor-based cAMP measurements reveal that the full-length PDE4A5, in contrast to the truncated form, hampers forskolin-mediated increases in neuronal cAMP levels. Our study indicates that the unique N-terminal localization domain of PDE4A5 is essential for the targeting of specific cAMP-dependent signaling underlying synaptic plasticity and memory. The development of compounds to disrupt the compartmentalization of individual PDE4 isoforms by targeting their unique N-terminal domains may provide a fruitful approach to prevent cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders that are associated with alterations in cAMP signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons exhibit localized signaling processes that enable biochemical cascades to be activated selectively in specific subcellular

  17. The challenges of cellular compartmentalization in plant metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Uwe; Gutensohn, Michael; Dudareva, Natalia; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-04-01

    The complex metabolic networks in plants are highly compartmentalized and biochemical steps of a single pathway can take place in multiple subcellular locations. Our knowledge regarding reactions and precursor compounds in the various cellular compartments has increased in recent years due to innovations in tracking the spatial distribution of proteins and metabolites. Nevertheless, to date only few studies have integrated subcellular localization criteria in metabolic engineering attempts. Here, we highlight the crucial factors for subcellular-localization-based strategies in plant metabolic engineering including substrate availability, enzyme targeting, the role of transporters, and multigene transfer approaches. The availability of compartmentalized metabolic network models for plants in the near future will greatly advance the integration of localization constraints in metabolic engineering experiments and aid in predicting their outcomes. PMID:23246154

  18. Quasi-steady state reduction for compartmental systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeke, Alexandra; Lax, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to determine an asymptotic reduction (in the sense of Tikhonov and Fenichel) for singularly perturbed compartmental systems in the presence of slow transport. It turns out that the reduction can be derived from the individual interaction terms alone. We apply the result to spatially discretized reaction-diffusion systems and obtain (based on the reduced discretized systems) a heuristic to reduce reaction-diffusion systems in presence of slow diffusion.

  19. Fractional two-compartmental model for articaine serum levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronijevic, Branislava; Sarcev, Ivan; Zorica, Dusan; Janev, Marko; Atanackovic, Teodor M.

    2016-06-01

    Two fractional two-compartmental models are applied to the pharmacokinetics of articaine. Integer order derivatives are replaced by fractional derivatives, either of different, or of same orders. Models are formulated so that the mass balance is preserved. Explicit forms of the solutions are obtained in terms of the Mittag-Leffler functions. Pharmacokinetic parameters are determined by the use of the evolutionary algorithm and trust regions optimization to recover the experimental data.

  20. Differential Lateral Rectus Compartmental Contraction during Ocular Counter-Rolling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The lateral rectus (LR) and medial rectus (MR) extraocular muscles (EOMs) have largely nonoverlapping superior and inferior innervation territories, suggesting functional compartmental specialization. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans to investigate differential compartmental activity in the rectus EOMs during head tilt, which evokes ocular counter-rolling, a torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Methods. MRI in quasi-coronal planes was analyzed during target-controlled central gaze in 90° right and left head tilts in 12 normal adults. Cross sections and posterior partial volumes of the transverse portions of the four rectus EOMs were compared in contiguous image planes 2 mm thick spanning the orbit from origins to globe equator, and used as indicators of contractility. Results. Horizontal rectus EOMs had significantly greater posterior volumes and maximum cross sections in their inferior compartments (P < 10−8). In orbit tilt up (extorted) compared with orbit tilt down (intorted) head tilts, contractile changes in LR maximum cross section (P < 0.0001) and posterior partial volume (P < 0.05) were significantly greater in the inferior but not in the superior compartment. These changes were not explainable by horizontal or vertical eye position changes. A weaker compartmental effect was suggested for MR. The vertical rectus EOMs did not exhibit significant compartmental contractile changes during head tilt. Mechanical modeling suggests that differential LR contraction may contribute to physiological cyclovertical effects. Conclusions. Selective activation of the two LR, and possibly MR, compartments correlates with newly recognized segregation of intramuscular innervation into distinct compartments, and probably contributes to noncommutative torsion during the VOR. PMID:22427572

  1. Accelerating compartmental modeling on a graphical processing unit.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shalom, Roy; Liberman, Gilad; Korngreen, Alon

    2013-01-01

    Compartmental modeling is a widely used tool in neurophysiology but the detail and scope of such models is frequently limited by lack of computational resources. Here we implement compartmental modeling on low cost Graphical Processing Units (GPUs), which significantly increases simulation speed compared to NEURON. Testing two methods for solving the current diffusion equation system revealed which method is more useful for specific neuron morphologies. Regions of applicability were investigated using a range of simulations from a single membrane potential trace simulated in a simple fork morphology to multiple traces on multiple realistic cells. A runtime peak 150-fold faster than the CPU was achieved. This application can be used for statistical analysis and data fitting optimizations of compartmental models and may be used for simultaneously simulating large populations of neurons. Since GPUs are forging ahead and proving to be more cost-effective than CPUs, this may significantly decrease the cost of computation power and open new computational possibilities for laboratories with limited budgets. PMID:23508232

  2. Cross-membranes orchestrate compartmentalization and morphogenesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Celler, Katherine; Koning, Roman I.; Willemse, Joost; Koster, Abraham J.; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2016-01-01

    Far from being simple unicellular entities, bacteria have complex social behaviour and organization, living in large populations, and some even as coherent, multicellular entities. The filamentous streptomycetes epitomize such multicellularity, growing as a syncytial mycelium with physiologically distinct hyphal compartments separated by infrequent cross-walls. The viability of mutants devoid of cell division, which can be propagated from fragments, suggests the presence of a different form of compartmentalization in the mycelium. Here we show that complex membranes, visualized by cryo-correlative light microscopy and electron tomography, fulfil this role. Membranes form small assemblies between the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, or, as evidenced by FRAP experiments, large protein-impermeable cross-membrane structures, which compartmentalize the multinucleoid mycelium. All areas containing cross-membrane structures are nucleoid-restricted zones, suggesting that the membrane assemblies may also act to protect nucleoids from cell-wall restructuring events. Our work reveals a novel mechanism of controlling compartmentalization and development in multicellular bacteria. PMID:27291257

  3. Sodium Transport and Compartmentation in Spergularia marina1

    PubMed Central

    Lazof, Dennis; Cheeseman, John M.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a combination of tracer uptake, efflux, and pulse-chase techniques is applied to the problem of compartmentation of Na+ (24Na+) in the roots of intact, midvegetative Spergularia marina (L.) Griseb. plants. An approach is presented for conducting useful compartmental analysis when it is known that the assumptions required for straightforward interpretations of influx and efflux studies are invalid. Linear rates of 24Na+ accumulation in both roots and shoots were attained within at most a few minutes following the start of labeling. Shoot 24Na+ contents equaled root contents within about 20 minutes. Analysis of root accumulation rates, and compartmental and pulse-chase efflux studies indicated that the unidirectional flux rates involved were at least an order of magnitude greater than linear rates of root and shoot accumulation. These rapid fluxes involved only a small portion of the total root Na+ (about 1%). The results suggest the existence of a small symplastic compartment, distinct from the `bulk cytoplasm,' rapidly exchanging with the medium, and responsible for delivery of Na+ to the xylem. The physical identity of this compartment and its physiological significance are discussed with respect to precedents in the literature. PMID:16664895

  4. Compartmentalized Droplets for Continuous Flow Liquid-Liquid Interface Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Huan; Du, Zhiping; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2016-08-17

    To address the limitations of batch organic-aqueous biphasic catalysis, we develop a conceptually novel method termed Flow Pickering Emulsion, or FPE, to process biphasic reactions in a continuous flow fashion. This method involves the compartmentalization of bulk water into micron-sized droplets based on a water-in-oil Pickering emulsion, which are packed into a column reactor. The compartmentalized water droplets can confine water-soluble catalysts, thus "immobilizing" the catalyst in the column reactor, while the interstices between the droplets allow the organic (oil) phase to flow. Key fundamental principles underpinning this method such as the oil phase flow behavior, the stability of compartmentalized droplets and the confinement capability of these droplets toward water-soluble catalysts are experimentally and theoretically investigated. As a proof of this concept, case studies including a sulfuric acid-catalyzed addition reaction, a heteropolyacid-catalyzed ring opening reaction and an enzyme-catalyzed chiral reaction demonstrate the generality and versatility of the FPE method. Impressively, in addition to the excellent durability, the developed FPE reactions exhibit up to 10-fold reaction efficiency enhancement in comparison to the existing batch reactions, indicating a unique flow interface catalysis effect. This study opens up a new avenue to allow conventional biphasic catalysis reactions to access more sustainable and efficient flow chemistry using an innovative liquid-liquid interface protocol. PMID:27429173

  5. Cross-membranes orchestrate compartmentalization and morphogenesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Celler, Katherine; Koning, Roman I; Willemse, Joost; Koster, Abraham J; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-01-01

    Far from being simple unicellular entities, bacteria have complex social behaviour and organization, living in large populations, and some even as coherent, multicellular entities. The filamentous streptomycetes epitomize such multicellularity, growing as a syncytial mycelium with physiologically distinct hyphal compartments separated by infrequent cross-walls. The viability of mutants devoid of cell division, which can be propagated from fragments, suggests the presence of a different form of compartmentalization in the mycelium. Here we show that complex membranes, visualized by cryo-correlative light microscopy and electron tomography, fulfil this role. Membranes form small assemblies between the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, or, as evidenced by FRAP experiments, large protein-impermeable cross-membrane structures, which compartmentalize the multinucleoid mycelium. All areas containing cross-membrane structures are nucleoid-restricted zones, suggesting that the membrane assemblies may also act to protect nucleoids from cell-wall restructuring events. Our work reveals a novel mechanism of controlling compartmentalization and development in multicellular bacteria. PMID:27291257

  6. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  7. Early events elicited by bombesin and structurally related peptides in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. II. Changes in Na/sup +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes, Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump activity, and intracellular pH

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, S.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Lopez-Rivas, A.; Sinnett-Smith, J.W.; Rozengurt, E.

    1986-06-01

    The amphibian tetradecapeptide, bombesin, and structurally related peptides caused a marked increase in ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake (a measure of Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump activity) in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. This effect occurred within seconds after the addition of the peptide and appeared to be mediated by an increase in Na/sup +/ entry into the cells. The effect of bombesin on Na/sup +/ entry and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump activity was concentration dependent with half-maximal stimulation occurring at 0.3-0.4 nM. The structurally related peptides litorin, gastrin-releasing peptide, and neuromedin B also stimulated ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake; the relative potencies of these peptides in stimulating the Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump were comparable to their potencies in increasing DNA synthesis. Bombesin increased Na/sup +/ influx, at least in part, through an Na/sup +//H/sup +/ antiport. The peptide augmented intracellular pH and this effect was abolished in the absence of extracellular Na/sup +/. In addition to monovalent ion transport, bombesin and the structurally related peptides rapidly increased the efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. This Ca/sup 2 +/ came from an intracellular pool and the efflux was associated with a 50% decrease in total intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The peptides also caused a rapid increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration. Prolonged pretreatment of Swiss 3T3 cells with phorbol dibutyrate, which causes a loss of protein kinase C activity, greatly decreased the stimulation of /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake and Na/sup +/ entry by bombesin implicating this phosphotransferase system in the mediation of part of these responses to bombesin. Since some activation of monovalent ion transport by bombesin was seen in phorbol dibutyrate-pretreated cells, it is likely that the peptide also stimulates monovalent ion transport by a second mechanism.

  8. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  9. EFFECT OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN T-DOMAIN ON ENDOSOMAL pH.

    PubMed

    Labyntsev, A J; Korotkevych, N V; Kolybo, D V; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT) is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd) from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td), but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demonstrated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol. PMID:26547959

  10. An Intracellular Nanotrap Redirects Proteins and Organelles in Live Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Sarah; Popp, Felix; Hofmann, Julia; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Owing to their small size and enhanced stability, nanobodies derived from camelids have previously been used for the construction of intracellular “nanotraps,” which enable redirection and manipulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged targets within living plant and animal cells. By taking advantage of intracellular compartmentalization in the magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, we demonstrate that proteins and even entire organelles can be retargeted also within prokaryotic cells by versatile nanotrap technology. Expression of multivalent GFP-binding nanobodies on magnetosomes ectopically recruited the chemotaxis protein CheW1-GFP from polar chemoreceptor clusters to the midcell, resulting in a gradual knockdown of aerotaxis. Conversely, entire magnetosome chains could be redirected from the midcell and tethered to one of the cell poles. Similar approaches could potentially be used for building synthetic cellular structures and targeted protein knockdowns in other bacteria. Importance   Intrabodies are commonly used in eukaryotic systems for intracellular analysis and manipulation of proteins within distinct subcellular compartments. In particular, so-called nanobodies have great potential for synthetic biology approaches because they can be expressed easily in heterologous hosts and actively interact with intracellular targets, for instance, by the construction of intracellular “nanotraps” in living animal and plant cells. Although prokaryotic cells also exhibit a considerable degree of intracellular organization, there are few tools available equivalent to the well-established methods used in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate the ectopic retargeting and depletion of polar membrane proteins and entire organelles to distinct compartments in a magnetotactic bacterium, resulting in a gradual knockdown of magneto-aerotaxis. This intracellular nanotrap approach has the potential to be applied in other bacteria for

  11. Compartmental microfluidic system for studying muscle-neuron communication and neuromuscular junction maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Ariel; Zahavi, Eitan Erez; Gradus, Tal; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Perlson, Eran

    2016-02-01

    Molecular communication between the motoneuron and the muscle is vital for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation and maintenance. Disruption in the structure and function of NMJs is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative processes during both development and pathological events. Still due to the complexity of this process, it is very difficult to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying it, generating a keen interest for developing better tools for investigating it. Here we describe a simplified method to study mechanisms of NMJs formation, maintenance and disruption. A spinal cord explant from mice expressing the Hb9::GFP motoneuron marker is plated on one side of a compartmental chamber, and myotubes derived from muscle satellite progenitor cells are plated on the other. The GFP labeled motoneurons extend their axons via microgrooves in the chamber to innervate the muscle cells and to form functional in-vitro NMJs. Next we provide procedures to measure axon growth and to reliably quantify NMJ activity using imaging of both muscle contractions and fast intracellular calcium changes. This platform allows precise control, monitoring and manipulation of subcellular microenvironments. Specifically, it enables to distinguish local from retrograde signaling mechanisms and allows restricted experimental intervention in local compartments along the muscle-neuron route. PMID:26689471

  12. Compartmentation and turnover of the low density lipoprotein receptor in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hare, J F

    1990-12-15

    The low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) was immunoprecipitated from [35S]methionine-labeled skin fibroblasts derivatized at 4 or 18 degrees C with an impermeant biotinylating reagent. Separation of derivatized and underivatized receptor from immunoprecipitates by selective binding to streptavidin-agarose allowed assessment of receptor protein cellular compartmentation and rates of intercompartmental transfer. At both 4 and 18 degrees C the amount of LDLR that is derivatized in cells labeled to near steady state saturates after 1-2 h of reaction at, respectively, 47 and 70% of total immunoprecipitable receptor protein. On the basis of temperature titration experiments, protein exposed only to the cell surface reacts at 4 degrees C; raising the temperature of biotinylation to 18 degrees C provides access to an additional pool of receptor protein. Remaining LDLR is derivatized at 37 degrees C. LDLR unreactive at 18 degrees C largely resides in membrane compartment(s) devoid of plasma membrane on the basis of its fractionation on Percoll gradients. While total cellular LDLR and 4 degrees C-derivatized LDLR labeled to steady state turn over in a first order manner (t1/2 = 12-13 h), the specific activity of pulse-labeled, 4 degrees C-accessible protein peaks after 1-2 h of chase and reaches a reduced level by 3 h of chase. These latter results show that the newly synthesized LDLR is transiently enriched at the cell surface prior to achieving equilibrium distribution between the cell surface and intracellular pools. PMID:2254328

  13. Compartmental Innervation of the Superior Oblique Muscle in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Le, Alan; Poukens, Vadims; Ying, Howard; Rootman, Daniel; Goldberg, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular innervation of mammalian horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is compartmental. We sought evidence of similar compartmental innervation of the superior oblique (SO) muscle. Methods Three fresh bovine orbits and one human orbit were dissected to trace continuity of SO muscle and tendon fibers to the scleral insertions. Whole orbits were also obtained from four humans (two adults, a 17-month-old child, and a 33-week stillborn fetus), two rhesus monkeys, one rabbit, and one cow. Orbits were formalin fixed, embedded whole in paraffin, serially sectioned in the coronal plane at 10-μm thickness, and stained with Masson trichrome. Extraocular muscle fibers and branches of the trochlear nerve (CN4) were traced in serial sections and reconstructed in three dimensions. Results In the human, the lateral SO belly is in continuity with tendon fibers inserting more posteriorly on the sclera for infraducting mechanical advantage, while the medial belly is continuous with anteriorly inserting fibers having mechanical advantage for incycloduction. Fibers in the monkey superior SO insert more posteriorly on the sclera to favor infraduction, while the inferior portion inserts more anteriorly to favor incycloduction. In all species, CN4 bifurcates prior to penetrating the SO belly. Each branch innervates a nonoverlapping compartment of EOM fibers, consisting of medial and lateral compartments in humans and monkeys, and superior and inferior compartments in cows and rabbits. Conclusions The SO muscle of humans and other mammals is compartmentally innervated in a manner that could permit separate CN4 branches to selectively influence vertical versus torsional action. PMID:26426404

  14. Functional Compartmentalization of the Human Superficial Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A.; Biotti Picand, Jorge L.; de la Rosa, Francisco J. Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle’s motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20–60% MVBF). PMID:25692977

  15. Analytical properties of a three-compartmental dynamical demographic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    The three-compartmental demographic model by Korotaeyv-Malkov-Khaltourina, connecting population size, economic surplus, and education level, is considered from the point of view of dynamical systems theory. It is shown that there exist two integrals of motion, which enables the system to be reduced to one nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The study of its structure provides analytical criteria for the dominance ranges of the dynamics of Malthus and Kremer. Additionally, the particular ranges of parameters enable the derived general ordinary differential equations to be reduced to the models of Gompertz and Thoularis-Wallace.

  16. Dynamic behaviors of a class of HIV compartmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Huang, Lihong; Yu, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Based on heterogeneities in drug efficacy (either spatial or phenotypic), two HIV compartmental models were proposed in Callaway and Perelson (2002) to study the HIV virus dynamics under drug treatment. In this paper, we provide a global analysis on the two models, including the positivity and boundedness of solutions and the global stability of equilibrium solutions. In particular, we show that when the basic reproduction number R0 ⩽ 1 (for which the infection equilibrium does not exist), the infection-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable; while when R0 > 1 (for which the infection equilibrium exists), the infection equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable.

  17. Role of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoforms in cAMP compartmentation following β2-adrenergic stimulation of ICa,L in frog ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jurevičius, Jonas; Skeberdis, V Arvydas; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2003-01-01

    The role of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms in the β2-adrenergic stimulation of the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) was investigated in frog ventricular myocytes using double patch-clamp and double-barrelled microperfusion techniques. Isoprenaline (ISO, 1 nM to 10 μM) was applied on one half of the cell, either alone or in the presence of PDE inhibitors, and the local and distant responses of ICa,L were used to determine the gradient of local vs. distant cAMP concentration (α). IBMX (100 μM), a non-selective PDE inhibitor, reduced α from 40 to 4.4 indicating a 9-fold reduction in intracellular cAMP compartmentation when all PDE activity was blocked. While PDE1 and PDE2 inhibition had no effect, PDE3 inhibition by milrinone (3 μM) or PDE4 inhibition by Ro 20-1724 (3 μM) reduced α by 6- and 4-fold, respectively. A simultaneous application of milrinone and Ro 20-1724 produced a similar effect to IBMX, showing that PDE3 and PDE4 were the major PDEs accounting for cAMP compartmentation. Okadaic acid (3 μM), a non-selective phosphatase inhibitor, or H89 (1 μM), an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), had no effect on the distant response of ICa,L to ISO indicating that PDE activation by PKA played a minor role in cAMP compartmentation. Our results demonstrate that PDE activity determines the degree of cAMP compartmentation in frog ventricular cells upon β2-adrenergic stimulation. PDE3 and PDE4 subtypes play a major role in this process, and contribute equally to ensure a functional coupling of β2-adrenergic receptors with nearby Ca2+ channels via local elevations of cAMP. PMID:12815180

  18. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  19. From Compartmentalized to Agent-based Models of Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macal, Charles

    Supporting decisions in the throes of an impending epidemic poses distinct technical challenges arising from the uncertainties in modeling disease propagation processes and the need for producing timely answers to policy questions. Compartmental models, because of their relative simplicity, produce timely information, but often do not include the level of fidelity of the information needed to answer specific policy questions. Highly granular agent-based simulations produce an extensive amount of information on all aspects of a simulated epidemic, yet complex models often cannot produce this information in a timely manner. We propose a two-phased approach to addressing the tradeoff between model complexity and the speed at which models can be used to answer to questions about an impending outbreak. In the first phase, in advance of an epidemic, ensembles of highly granular agent-based simulations are run over the entire parameter space, characterizing the space of possible model outcomes and uncertainties. Meta-models are derived that characterize model outcomes as dependent on uncertainties in disease parameters, data, and structural relationships. In the second phase, envisioned as during an epidemic, the meta-model is run in combination with compartmental models, which can be run very quickly. Model outcomes are compared as a basis for establishing uncertainties in model forecasts. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357 and National Science Foundation (NSF) RAPID Award DEB-1516428.

  20. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication.

    PubMed

    Ghadessy, F J; Ong, J L; Holliger, P

    2001-04-10

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  1. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  2. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication

    PubMed Central

    Ghadessy, Farid J.; Ong, Jennifer L.; Holliger, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  3. Non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells in batch culture using extracellular labeling highlights metabolic reversibility and compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mapping the intracellular fluxes for established mammalian cell lines becomes increasingly important for scientific and economic reasons. However, this is being hampered by the high complexity of metabolic networks, particularly concerning compartmentation. Results Intracellular fluxes of the CHO-K1 cell line central carbon metabolism were successfully determined for a complex network using non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis. Mass isotopomers of extracellular metabolites were determined using [U-13C6] glucose as labeled substrate. Metabolic compartmentation and extracellular transport reversibility proved essential to successfully reproduce the dynamics of the labeling patterns. Alanine and pyruvate reversibility changed dynamically even if their net production fluxes remained constant. Cataplerotic fluxes of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and mitochondrial malic enzyme and pyruvate carboxylase were successfully determined. Glycolytic pyruvate channeling to lactate was modeled by including a separate pyruvate pool. In the exponential growth phase, alanine, glycine and glutamate were excreted, and glutamine, aspartate, asparagine and serine were taken up; however, all these amino acids except asparagine were exchanged reversibly with the media. High fluxes were determined in the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle. The latter was fueled mainly by glucose but also by amino acid catabolism. Conclusions The CHO-K1 central metabolism in controlled batch culture proves to be robust. It has the main purpose to ensure fast growth on a mixture of substrates and also to mitigate oxidative stress. It achieves this by using compartmentation to control NADPH and NADH availability and by simultaneous synthesis and catabolism of amino acids. PMID:24773761

  4. [Intracellular and extracellular functions of phosphorus compound in the body].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Hiroko; Hanazaki, Ai; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus, as a phosphate is a component of bone, cellular membrane, and also high-energy phosphate compounds, and nucleic acids. Also phosphate acts as a buffer to maintain the pH and is concerned with functional regulation of several proteins and intracellular signaling through the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Thus phosphorus plays a variety of important roles intracellular and extracellular component. A disorder of phosphate homeostasis results bone disorder and general metabolic dysfunction of all body tissues and organs. PMID:26813497

  5. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  6. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-01-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn2+ into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn2+. Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes re-loading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn2+, FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn2+. Therefore, Zn2+-releasing stores were not mitochondria or acidic organelles but rather intracellular Zn2+ ligands. To test which ligands might be involved, the rate of acid-induced Zn2+ release from complexes with cysteine, glutathione, histidine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, and carnosine was investigated; [Zn2+] was monitored in vitro using the ratiometric Zn2+-sensitive fluorescent probe FuraZin-1. Carnosine failed to chelate Zn2+ but did chelate Cu2+; the remaining ligands chelated Zn2+ and upon acidification were releasing it into the medium. However, when pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes rapidly accelerated the rate of Zn2+ release. The zinc-cysteine complexes also released Zn2+ when a histidine-modifying agent, diethylpyrocarbonate, was applied at pH 7.2. Since the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes can contain micromolar amounts of Zn2+, these complexes may represent the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn2+ release. PMID:24606401

  7. Endosomal escape: a bottleneck in intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic science, apart from drugs, newer bioactive moieties like oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides, enzymes and antibodies are constantly being introduced for the betterment of therapeutic efficacy. These moieties have intracellular components of the cells like cytoplasm and nucleus as one of their pharmacological sites for exhibiting therapeutic activity. Despite their promising efficacy, their intracellular bioavailability has been critically hampered leading to failure in the treatment of numerous diseases and disorders. The endosomal uptake pathway is known to be a rate-limiting barrier for such systems. Bioactive molecules get trapped in the endosomal vesicles and degraded in the lysosomal compartment, necessitating the need for effective strategies that facilitate the endosomal escape and enhance the cytosolic bioavailability of bioactives. Microbes like viruses and bacteria have developed their innate mechanistic tactics to translocate their genome and toxins by efficiently penetrating the host cell membrane. Understanding this mechanism and exploring it further for intracellular delivery has opened new avenues to surmount the endosomal barrier. These strategies include membrane fusion, pore formation and proton sponge effects. On the other hand, progress in designing a novel smart polymeric carrier system that triggers endosomal escape by undergoing modulations in the intracellular milieu has further led to an improvement in intracellular delivery. These comprise pH, enzyme and temperature-induced modulators, synthetic cationic lipids and photo-induced physical disruption. Each of the aforementioned strategies has its own unique mechanism to escape the endosome. This review recapitulates the numerous strategies designed to surmount the bottleneck of endosomal escape and thereby achieve successful intracellular uptake of bioactives. PMID:24730275

  8. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  9. An in vitro compartmentalization-based method for the selection of bond-forming enzymes from large libraries.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Paul; Snapp, Erik L; Levy, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a generalized in vitro compartmentalization-based bead display selection strategy that allows for the identification of enzymes that can perform ligation reactions. Although a number of methods have been developed to evolve such enzymes, many of them are limited in library size (10(6) -10(7) ), do not select for enzymes using a scheme that allows for multiple turnover, or only work on enzymes specific to nucleic acids. This approach is amenable to screening libraries of up to 10(12) protein variants by allowing beads to be overloaded with up to 10(4) unique mutants. Using this approach we isolated a variant of sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus that shows a 114-fold enhancement in kcat /KM in the absence of calcium compared to the wild-type and improved resistance to the inhibitory effects of cell lysates. Unlike the wild-type protein, the newly selected variant shows intracellular activity in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells where it may prove useful for intracellular labeling or synthetic biological applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1647-1657. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26806853

  10. Twenty years of fluorescence imaging of intracellular chloride

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Daniele; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloride homeostasis has a pivotal role in controlling neuronal excitability in the adult brain and during development. The intracellular concentration of chloride is regulated by the dynamic equilibrium between passive fluxes through membrane conductances and the active transport mediated by importers and exporters. In cortical neurons, chloride fluxes are coupled to network activity by the opening of the ionotropic GABAA receptors that provides a direct link between the activity of interneurons and chloride fluxes. These molecular mechanisms are not evenly distributed and regulated over the neuron surface and this fact can lead to a compartmentalized control of the intracellular concentration of chloride. The inhibitory drive provided by the activity of the GABAA receptors depends on the direction and strength of the associated currents, which are ultimately dictated by the gradient of chloride, the main charge carrier flowing through the GABAA channel. Thus, the intracellular distribution of chloride determines the local strength of ionotropic inhibition and influences the interaction between converging excitation and inhibition. The importance of chloride regulation is also underlined by its involvement in several brain pathologies, including epilepsy and disorders of the autistic spectra. The full comprehension of the physiological meaning of GABAergic activity on neurons requires the measurement of the spatiotemporal dynamics of chloride fluxes across the membrane. Nowadays, there are several available tools for the task, and both synthetic and genetically encoded indicators have been successfully used for chloride imaging. Here, we will review the available sensors analyzing their properties and outlining desirable future developments. PMID:25221475

  11. Managing intracellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Chua, John J.E.; Jahn, Reinhard; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.

    2013-01-01

    Formation and normal function of neuronal synapses are intimately dependent on the delivery to and removal of biological materials from synapses by the intracellular transport machinery. Indeed, defects in intracellular transport contribute to the development and aggravation of neurodegenerative disorders. Despite its importance, regulatory mechanisms underlying this machinery remain poorly defined. We recently uncovered a phosphorylation-regulated mechanism that controls FEZ1-mediated Kinesin-1-based delivery of Stx1 into neuronal axons. Using C. elegans as a model organism to investigate transport defects, we show that FEZ1 mutations resulted in abnormal Stx1 aggregation in neuronal cell bodies and axons. This phenomenon closely resembles transport defects observed in neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, diminished transport due to mutations of FEZ1 and Kinesin-1 were concomitant with increased accumulation of autophagosomes. Here, we discuss the significance of our findings in a broader context in relation to regulation of Kinesin-mediated transport and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24058857

  12. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  15. Hydrological Compartmentalization: A Grand Challenge in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Orlowski, N.; Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    Current terrestrial biosphere models assume that plant transpiration, groundwater and streamflow are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed soil reservoir. Recent stable water isotope data from Oregon and Mexico and now global meta-analysis and remote sensing measurements have all shown evidence of hydrological compartmentalization: a mobile compartment that forms groundwater and streamflow and a poorly mobile compartment that supplies plant transpiration. The way we now measure and model this poorly mobile water is a grand challenge for understanding subsurface mixing, water residence time, and its interaction and feedback to ecosystem processes. Here we review the latest results from this work and outline some of the future research challenges for understanding soil-plant-atmospheric interactions between the bedrock and the boundary layer.

  16. Hydrological Compartmentalization: A Grand Challenge in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Orlowski, N.; Jasechko, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current terrestrial biosphere models assume that plant transpiration, groundwater and streamflow are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed soil reservoir. Recent stable water isotope data from Oregon and Mexico and now global meta-analysis and remote sensing measurements have all shown evidence of hydrological compartmentalization: a mobile compartment that forms groundwater and streamflow and a poorly mobile compartment that supplies plant transpiration. The way we now measure and model this poorly mobile water is a grand challenge for understanding subsurface mixing, water residence time, and its interaction and feedback to ecosystem processes. Here we review the latest results from this work and outline some of the future research challenges for understanding soil-plant-atmospheric interactions between the bedrock and the boundary layer.

  17. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  18. Organs-on-a-chip: a focus on compartmentalized microdevices.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Christopher; Mehta, Geeta; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-06-01

    Advances in microengineering technologies have enabled a variety of insights into biomedical sciences that would not have been possible with conventional techniques. Engineering microenvironments that simulate in vivo organ systems may provide critical insight into the cellular basis for pathophysiologies, development, and homeostasis in various organs, while curtailing the high experimental costs and complexities associated with in vivo studies. In this article, we aim to survey recent attempts to extend tissue-engineered platforms toward simulating organ structure and function, and discuss the various approaches and technologies utilized in these systems. We specifically focus on microtechnologies that exploit phenomena associated with compartmentalization to create model culture systems that better represent the in vivo organ microenvironment. PMID:22065201

  19. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchwalow, Igor B. . E-mail: buchwalo@uni-muenster.de; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2005-05-06

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma.

  20. Partitioning Variability of a Compartmentalized In Vitro Transcriptional Thresholding Circuit.

    PubMed

    Kapsner, Korbinian; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2015-10-16

    Encapsulation of in vitro biochemical reaction circuits into small, cell-sized compartments can result in considerable variations in the dynamical properties of the circuits. As a model system, we here investigate a simple in vitro transcriptional reaction circuit, which generates an ultrasensitive fluorescence response when the concentration of an RNA transcript reaches a preset threshold. The reaction circuit is compartmentalized into spherical water-in-oil microemulsion droplets, and the reaction progress is monitored by fluorescence microscopy. A quantitative statistical analysis of thousands of individual droplets ranging in size from a few up to 20 μm reveals a strong variability in effective RNA production rates, which by computational modeling is traced back to a larger-than-Poisson variability in RNAP activities in the droplets. The noise level in terms of the noise strength (the Fano factor) is strongly dependent on the ratio between transcription templates and polymerases, and increases for higher template concentrations. PMID:25974035

  1. Sharpness of Spike Initiation in Neurons Explained by Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2013-01-01

    In cortical neurons, spikes are initiated in the axon initial segment. Seen at the soma, they appear surprisingly sharp. A standard explanation is that the current coming from the axon becomes sharp as the spike is actively backpropagated to the soma. However, sharp initiation of spikes is also seen in the input–output properties of neurons, and not only in the somatic shape of spikes; for example, cortical neurons can transmit high frequency signals. An alternative hypothesis is that Na channels cooperate, but it is not currently supported by direct experimental evidence. I propose a simple explanation based on the compartmentalization of spike initiation. When Na channels are placed in the axon, the soma acts as a current sink for the Na current. I show that there is a critical distance to the soma above which an instability occurs, so that Na channels open abruptly rather than gradually as a function of somatic voltage. PMID:24339755

  2. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Harrington, C.

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Compartmentalization and Biomineralization in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are remarkable organisms with the ability to exploit the earth’s magnetic field for navigational purposes. To do this, they build specialized compartments called magnetosomes that consist of a lipid membrane and a crystalline magnetic mineral. These organisms have the potential to serve as models for the study of compartmentalization as well as biomineralization in bacteria. Additionally, they offer the opportunity to design applications that take advantage of the particular properties of magnetosomes. In recent years, a sustained effort to identify the molecular basis of this process has resulted in a clearer understanding of the magnetosome formation and biomineralization. Here, I present an overview of magnetotactic bacteria and explore the possible molecular mechanisms of membrane remodeling, protein sorting, cytoskeletal organization, iron transport and biomineralization that lead to the formation of a functional magnetosome organelle. PMID:22092030

  4. Evolution of energy metabolism and its compartmentation in Kinetoplastida

    PubMed Central

    Hannaert, Véronique; Bringaud, Frédéric; Opperdoes, Fred R; Michels, Paul AM

    2003-01-01

    Kinetoplastida are protozoan organisms that probably diverged early in evolution from other eukaryotes. They are characterized by a number of unique features with respect to their energy and carbohydrate metabolism. These organisms possess peculiar peroxisomes, called glycosomes, which play a central role in this metabolism; the organelles harbour enzymes of several catabolic and anabolic routes, including major parts of the glycolytic and pentosephosphate pathways. The kinetoplastid mitochondrion is also unusual with regard to both its structural and functional properties. In this review, we describe the unique compartmentation of metabolism in Kinetoplastida and the metabolic properties resulting from this compartmentation. We discuss the evidence for our recently proposed hypothesis that a common ancestor of Kinetoplastida and Euglenida acquired a photosynthetic alga as an endosymbiont, contrary to the earlier notion that this event occurred at a later stage of evolution, in the Euglenida lineage alone. The endosymbiont was subsequently lost from the kinetoplastid lineage but, during that process, some of its pathways of energy and carbohydrate metabolism were sequestered in the kinetoplastid peroxisomes, which consequently became glycosomes. The evolution of the kinetoplastid glycosomes and the possible selective advantages of these organelles for Kinetoplastida are discussed. We propose that the possession of glycosomes provided metabolic flexibility that has been important for the organisms to adapt easily to changing environmental conditions. It is likely that metabolic flexibility has been an important selective advantage for many kinetoplastid species during their evolution into the highly successful parasites today found in many divergent taxonomic groups. Also addressed is the evolution of the kinetoplastid mitochondrion, from a supposedly pluripotent organelle, attributed to a single endosymbiotic event that resulted in all mitochondria and

  5. Virus-Mediated Compartmentalization of the Host Translational Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Emily A.; Anguish, Lynne J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses require the host translational apparatus to synthesize viral proteins. Host stress response mechanisms that suppress translation, therefore, represent a significant obstacle that viruses must overcome. Here, we report a strategy whereby the mammalian orthoreoviruses compartmentalize the translational machinery within virus-induced inclusions known as viral factories (VF). VF are the sites of reovirus replication and assembly but were thought not to contain ribosomes. It was assumed viral mRNAs exited the VF to undergo translation by the cellular machinery, and proteins reentered the factory to participate in assembly. Here, we used ribopuromycylation to visualize active translation in infected cells. These studies revealed that active translation occurs within VF and that ribosomal subunits and proteins required for translation initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling localize to the factory. Interestingly, we observed components of the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) concentrating primarily at factory margins, suggesting a spatial and/or dynamic organization of translation within the VF. Similarly, the viral single-stranded RNA binding protein σNS localized to the factory margins and had a tubulovesicular staining pattern that extended a short distance from the margins of the factories and colocalized with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) markers. Consistent with these colocalization studies, σNS was found to associate with both eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit A (eIF3A) and the ribosomal subunit pS6R. Together, these findings indicate that σNS functions to recruit 43S PIC machinery to the primary site of viral translation within the viral factory. Pathogen-mediated compartmentalization of the translational apparatus provides a novel mechanism by which viruses might avoid host translational suppression. PMID:25227463

  6. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  7. Nanovehicular intracellular delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Ales; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood-brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list "elementary" phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  8. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  9. MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL DISTRIBUTION OF TOXICS (MEND-TOX): PART I, HYBRID COMPARTMENTAL-SPATIAL MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated hybrid spatial-compartmental modeling approach is presented for analyzing the dynamic distribution of chemicals in the multimedia environment. Information obtained from such analysis, which includes temporal chemical concentration profiles in various media, mass ...

  10. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; et al

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  11. Compartmentalization - A Prerequisite for Maintaining and Changing an Identity.

    PubMed

    Rottmann, Philipp; Ward, Thomas; Panke, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The chemical manipulation of DNA is much more convenient than the manipulation of the bioproducts, such as enzymes, that it encodes. The optimization of bioproducts requires cycles of diversification of DNA followed by read-out of the information into the bioproduct. Maintaining the link between the information - the genotype - and the properties of the bioproduct - the phenotype - through some form of compartmentalization is therefore an essential aspect in directed evolution. While the ideal compartment is a biological cell, many projects involving more radical changes in the bioproduct, such as the introduction of novel cofactors, may not be suitable for expression of the information in cells, and alternative in vitro methods have to be applied. Consequently, the possibility to produce simple and advanced micro compartments at high rates and to combine them with the ability to translate the information into proteins represents a unique opportunity to explore demanding enzyme engineering projects that require the evaluation of at least hundreds of thousands of enzyme variants over multiple generations. PMID:27363372

  12. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  13. Metabolic Flux and Compartmentation Analysis in the Brain In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Through significant developments and progresses in the last two decades, in vivo localized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) became a method of choice to probe brain metabolic pathways in a non-invasive way. Beside the measurement of the total concentration of more than 20 metabolites, 1H MRS can be used to quantify the dynamics of substrate transport across the blood-brain barrier by varying the plasma substrate level. On the other hand, 13C MRS with the infusion of 13C-enriched substrates enables the characterization of brain oxidative metabolism and neurotransmission by incorporation of 13C in the different carbon positions of amino acid neurotransmitters. The quantitative determination of the biochemical reactions involved in these processes requires the use of appropriate metabolic models, whose level of details is strongly related to the amount of data accessible with in vivo MRS. In the present work, we present the different steps involved in the elaboration of a mathematical model of a given brain metabolic process and its application to the experimental data in order to extract quantitative brain metabolic rates. We review the recent advances in the localized measurement of brain glucose transport and compartmentalized brain energy metabolism, and how these reveal mechanistic details on glial support to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. PMID:24194729

  14. Spatiotemporal compartmentalization of key physiological processes during muscle precursor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ozbudak, Ertugrul M; Tassy, Olivier; Pourquié, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    The development of multicellular organisms is controlled by transcriptional networks. Understanding the role of these networks requires a full understanding of transcriptome regulation during embryogenesis. Several microarray studies have characterized the temporal evolution of the transcriptome during development in different organisms [Wang QT, et al. (2004) Dev Cell 6:133-144; Furlong EE, Andersen EC, Null B, White KP, Scott MP (2001) Science 293:1629-1633; Mitiku N, Baker JC (2007) Dev Cell 13:897-907]. In all cases, however, experiments were performed on whole embryos, thus averaging gene expression among many different tissues. Here, we took advantage of the local synchrony of the differentiation process in the paraxial mesoderm. This approach provides a unique opportunity to study the systems-level properties of muscle differentiation. Using high-resolution, spatiotemporal profiling of the early stages of muscle development in the zebrafish embryo, we identified a major reorganization of the transcriptome taking place in the presomitic mesoderm. We further show that the differentiation process is associated with a striking modular compartmentalization of the transcription of essential components of cellular physiological programs. Particularly, we identify a tight segregation of cell cycle/DNA metabolic processes and translation/oxidative metabolism at the tissue level, highly reminiscent of the yeast metabolic cycle. These results should expand more investigations into the developmental control of metabolism. PMID:20160088

  15. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  16. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  17. Potassium Fluxes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (II. Compartmental Analysis).

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, B.; Glass, ADM.

    1995-01-01

    42K+ and 86Rb+ were used to determine the subcellular distribution of potassium in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by compartmental analysis. In both wild type and a mutant strain, three distinct compartments (referred to as I, II, and III) were apparent. Using 42K+, we found that these had half-lives for K+ exchange of 1.07 min, 12.8 min, and 2.9 h, respectively, in wild-type cells and 0.93 min, 14.7 min, and 9.8 h, respectively, for the mutants. Half-lives were not significantly different when 86Rb+ was used to trace K+. Compartments I and II probably correspond to the cell wall and cytoplasm, respectively. Based on the lack of a large central vacuole in Chlamydomonas, the effect of a dark pretreatment on the kinetic properties of compartment III and the similarity between the [K+] of compartment III and that of isolated chloroplasts, this slowly exchanging compartment was identified as the chloroplast. Growth of wild-type cells at 100 [mu]M (instead of 10 mM K+) caused no change of cytoplasmic [K+] but reduced chloroplast [K+] very substantially. The mutants failed to grow at 100 [mu]M K+. PMID:12228560

  18. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. In this paper we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to directly compare compartments of the larval and adult brain. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain where they form a “protomap” of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms. PMID:20533357

  19. Development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain.

    PubMed

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-08-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period, when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. Here we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to compare compartments of the larval and adult brain directly. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain, where they form a "protomap" of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early-acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms. PMID:20533357

  20. Compartmentalized gene regulatory network of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Zhao, Guoyi; Xu, Jin-Rong; Kistler, H Corby; Gao, Lixin; Ma, Li-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum threatens world-wide wheat production, resulting in both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination. We reconstructed the global F. graminearum gene regulatory network (GRN) from a large collection of transcriptomic data using Bayesian network inference, a machine-learning algorithm. This GRN reveals connectivity between key regulators and their target genes. Focusing on key regulators, this network contains eight distinct but interwoven modules. Enriched for unique functions, such as cell cycle, DNA replication, transcription, translation and stress responses, each module exhibits distinct expression profiles. Evolutionarily, the F. graminearum genome can be divided into core regions shared with closely related species and variable regions harboring genes that are unique to F. graminearum and perform species-specific functions. Interestingly, the inferred top regulators regulate genes that are significantly enriched from the same genomic regions (P < 0.05), revealing a compartmentalized network structure that may reflect network rewiring related to specific adaptation of this plant pathogen. This first-ever reconstructed filamentous fungal GRN primes our understanding of pathogenicity at the systems biology level and provides enticing prospects for novel disease control strategies involving the targeting of master regulators in pathogens. The program can be used to construct GRNs of other plant pathogens. PMID:26990214

  1. Compartmentation of Malate in Relation to Ion Absorption in Beet

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, C. B.; Laties, George G.

    1969-01-01

    Malate in beet discs treated in different salt solutions was labeled by a 30 min pulse of 14CO2, and subsequent changes in specific activity were followed for several hr. In treatments which resulted in net acid synthesis in response to excess cation absorption, malate specific activity fell slowly after removal of 14CO2. In solutions where no net acid synthesis occurred, and from which cation and anion were absorbed equally, malate specific activity fell rapidly when 14CO2 was removed. The foregoing suggests that the net synthesis of organic acids in response to excess cation absorption leads to the removal of organic anions from cytoplasmic metabolic pools as counter-ions in salt transport to the vacuole. The latter hypothesis was further examined by direct measurement of the distribution of labeled malate between cytoplasm and vacuole using the wash-exchange method of compartmental analysis, previously described for inorganic ions. The method satisfied the criterion of exchange specificity necessary for this purpose. Much higher retention of label in the cytoplasm was observed in KCl solutions (no net synthesis) than in K2SO4 solutions (net synthesis) after 3 hr 14CO2 fixation and subsequent wash-exchange. The observed distribution is consistent with the rapid removal of organic anions to the vacuole during net acid synthesis. The significance of organic acid transport in relation to metabolism is discussed. PMID:16657035

  2. Dual responsive nanogels for intracellular doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Hamed; Khoee, Sepideh

    2016-09-10

    Nanosized polymeric delivery systems that encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific intracellular stimulus are of promising interest for cancer therapy. Here, we demonstrated a simple and fast synthetic protocol of redox-responsive nanogels with high drug encapsulation efficiency and stability. The prepared nanogels displayed narrow size distributions and versatility of surface modification. The polymer precursor of these nanogels is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. The nanogels were prepared through a lock-in strategy in aqueous media via self cross-linking of PDS groups. By changing polymer concentration, we could control the size of nanogels in range of 80-115nm. The formed nanogels presented high doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulation efficiency (70% (w/w)) and displayed pH and redox-controlled drug release triggered by conditions mimicking the reducible intracellular environment. The nanogels displayed an excellent cytocompatibility and were effectively endocytosed by A2780CP ovarian cancer cells, which make them promising nanomaterials for the efficient intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27444549

  3. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-07-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn(2+) . Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes reloading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn(2+) , FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn(2+) . Therefore, Zn(2+) -releasing stores were not mitochondria or acidic organelles but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. To test which ligands might be involved, the rate of acid-induced Zn(2+) release from complexes with cysteine, glutathione, histidine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, and carnosine was investigated; [Zn(2+) ] was monitored in vitro using the ratiometric Zn(2+) -sensitive fluorescent probe FuraZin-1. Carnosine failed to chelate Zn(2+) but did chelate Cu(2+) ; the remaining ligands chelated Zn(2+) and upon acidification were releasing it into the medium. However, when pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes rapidly accelerated the rate of Zn(2+) release. The zinc-cysteine complexes also released Zn(2+) when a histidine-modifying agent, diethylpyrocarbonate, was applied at pH 7.2. Since the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes can contain micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) , these complexes may represent the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release. This study aimed at identifying intracellular stores which release Zn(2+) when pHi drops from 6.6 to 6.1. It was found that these stores are not mitochondria or acidic organelles, but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. When the pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes showed a rapid acceleration in the rate of Zn(2+) release. Therefore, the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release in neurons may be the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes

  4. Mechanisms of salt tolerance in habanero pepper plants (Capsicum chinense Jacq.): Proline accumulation, ions dynamics and sodium root-shoot partition and compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bojórquez-Quintal, Emanuel; Velarde-Buendía, Ana; Ku-González, Ángela; Carillo-Pech, Mildred; Ortega-Camacho, Daniela; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana; Pottosin, Igor; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Despite its economic relevance, little is known about salt tolerance mechanisms in pepper plants. To address this question, we compared differences in responses to NaCl in two Capsicum chinense varieties: Rex (tolerant) and Chichen-Itza (sensitive). Under salt stress (150 mM NaCl over 7 days) roots of Rex variety accumulated 50 times more compatible solutes such as proline compared to Chichen-Itza. Mineral analysis indicated that Na+ is restricted to roots by preventing its transport to leaves. Fluorescence analysis suggested an efficient Na+ compartmentalization in vacuole-like structures and in small intracellular compartments in roots of Rex variety. At the same time, Na+ in Chichen-Itza plants was compartmentalized in the apoplast, suggesting substantial Na+ extrusion. Rex variety was found to retain more K+ in its roots under salt stress according to a mineral analysis and microelectrode ion flux estimation (MIFE). Vanadate-sensitive H+ efflux was higher in Chichen-Itza variety plants, suggesting a higher activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, which fuels the extrusion of Na+, and, possibly, also the re-uptake of K+. Our results suggest a combination of stress tolerance mechanisms, in order to alleviate the salt-induced injury. Furthermore, Na+ extrusion to apoplast does not appear to be an efficient strategy for salt tolerance in pepper plants. PMID:25429292

  5. Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Oral Amprenavir with Secondary Peaks▿

    PubMed Central

    Okusanya, Olanrewaju; Forrest, Alan; DiFrancesco, Robin; Bilic, Sanela; Rosenkranz, Susan; Para, Michael F.; Adams, Elizabeth; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Reichman, Richard C.; Morse, Gene D.

    2007-01-01

    Amprenavir is a protease inhibitor that has been shown to have secondary peaks postulated to be due to enterohepatic recycling. We propose a model to describe the pharmacokinetics of amprenavir which accommodates the secondary peak(s). A total of 82 healthy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seronegative subjects were administered a single 600-mg dose of amprenavir as part of adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5043. Serial blood samples were obtained over 24 h. Samples were analyzed for amprenavir and fit to a compartmental model using ADAPT II software, with all relevant parameters conditional with respect to bioavailability. The model accommodated secondary peaks by incorporating clearance out of the central compartment with delayed instantaneous release back into the gut compartment. The data were weighted by the inverse of the estimated measurement error variance; model discrimination was determined using Akaike's Information Criteria. A total of 76 subjects were evaluable in the study analysis. The data were best fit by a two-compartment model, with 98.7% of the subjects demonstrating a secondary peak. Amprenavir had a mean total clearance of 1.163 liters/h/kg of body weight (0.7), a central volume of distribution of 1.208 liters/kg (0.8), a peripheral volume of distribution of 8.2 liters/kg (0.81), and distributional clearance of 0.04 liters/h/kg (0.81). The time to the secondary peak was 7.86 h (0.17), and clearance into a recycling compartment was 0.111 liters/kg/h (0.74). Amprenavir pharmacokinetics has been well described using a two-compartment model with clearance to a recycling compartment and release back into the gut. The nature of the secondary peaks may be an important consideration for the interpretation of amprenavir plasma concentrations during therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:17283195

  6. In vivo compartmental analysis of leukocytes in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijesh V; Tatham, Kate C; Wilson, Michael R; O'Dea, Kieran P; Takata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The lung has a unique structure consisting of three functionally different compartments (alveolar, interstitial, and vascular) situated in an extreme proximity. Current methods to localize lung leukocytes using bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung perfusion have significant limitations for determination of location and phenotype of leukocytes. Here we present a novel method using in vivo antibody labeling to enable accurate compartmental localization/quantification and phenotyping of mouse lung leukocytes. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal labeling with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CD45 antibodies, and lung single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry. The combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal CD45 labeling enabled robust separation of the alveolar, interstitial, and vascular compartments of the lung. In naive mice, the alveolar compartment consisted predominantly of resident alveolar macrophages. The interstitial compartment, gated by events negative for both intratracheal and intravenous CD45 staining, showed two conventional dendritic cell populations, as well as a Ly6C(lo) monocyte population. Expression levels of MHCII on these interstitial monocytes were much higher than on the vascular Ly6C(lo) monocyte populations. In mice exposed to acid aspiration-induced lung injury, this protocol also clearly distinguished the three lung compartments showing the dynamic trafficking of neutrophils and exudative monocytes across the lung compartments during inflammation and resolution. This simple in vivo dual-labeling technique substantially increases the accuracy and depth of lung flow cytometric analysis, facilitates a more comprehensive examination of lung leukocyte pools, and enables the investigation of previously poorly defined "interstitial" leukocyte populations during models of inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:26254421

  7. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    PubMed Central

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their “strange” behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs. PMID:24065978

  8. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwen; Liu, Jiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xianjun; Wang, Daxing; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible—exposed—infectious šC recovered) model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V), which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk) for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics. PMID:27233015

  9. Compartmental Intrathecal Radioimmunotherapy: Results for Treatment for Metastatic CNS Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Kim; Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Smith-Jones, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John L.; Xu, Hong; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Souweidane, Mark M.; Larson, Steven M.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the management of brain metastases is needed. We evaluated the addition of compartmental intrathecal antibody-based radioimmunotherapy (cRIT) in patients with recurrent metastatic central nervous system (CNS) neuroblastoma following surgery, craniospinal irradiation, and chemotherapy. 21 patients treated for recurrent neuroblastoma metastatic to the CNS received a cRIT-containing salvage regimen incorporating intrathecal 131I-monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) targeting GD2 or B7H3 following surgery and radiation. Most patients also received outpatient craniospinal irradiation, 3F8/GMCSF immunotherapy, 13-cis-retinoic acid and oral temozolomide for systemic control. Seventeen of 21 cRIT-salvage patients are alive 7-74 months (median 33) since CNS relapse, with all 17 remaining free of CNS neuroblastoma. One patient died of infection at 22 months with no evidence of disease at autopsy, and one of lung and bone marrow metastases at 15 months, and one of progressive bone marrow disease at 30 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen was well tolerated, notable for myelosuppression minimized by stem cell support (n=5), and biochemical hypothyroidism (n=5). One patient with a 7-year history of metastatic neuroblastoma is in remission from MLL-associated secondary leukemia. This is significantly improved to published results with non-cRIT based where relapsed CNS NB has a median time to death of approximately 6 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen for CNS metastases was well tolerated by young patients, despite their prior history of intensive cytotoxic therapies. It has the potential to increase survival with better than expected quality of life. PMID:19890606

  10. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants.

    PubMed

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their "strange" behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs. PMID:24065978

  11. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  12. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  13. Functional morphometry demonstrates extraocular muscle compartmental contraction during vertical gaze changes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert A; Demer, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical studies demonstrate selective compartmental innervation of most human extraocular muscles (EOMs), suggesting the potential for differential compartmental control. This was supported by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating differential lateral rectus (LR) compartmental contraction during ocular counterrolling, differential medial rectus (MR) compartmental contraction during asymmetric convergence, and differential LR, inferior rectus (IR), and superior oblique (SO) compartmental contraction during vertical vergence. To ascertain possible differential compartmental EOM contraction during vertical ductions, surface coil MRI was performed over a range of target-controlled vertical gaze positions in 25 orbits of 13 normal volunteers. Cross-sectional areas and partial volumes of EOMs were analyzed in contiguous, quasi-coronal 2-mm image planes spanning origins to globe equator to determine morphometric features correlating best with contractility. Confirming and extending prior findings for horizontal EOMs during horizontal ductions, the percent change in posterior partial volume (PPV) of vertical EOMs from 8 to 14 mm posterior to the globe correlated best with vertical duction. EOMs were then divided into equal transverse compartments to evaluate the effect of vertical gaze on changes in PPV. Differential contractile changes were detected in the two compartments of the same EOM during infraduction for the IR medial vs. lateral (+4.4%, P = 0.03), LR inferior vs. superior (+4.0%, P = 0.0002), MR superior vs. inferior (-6.0%, P = 0.001), and SO lateral vs. medial (+9.7%, P = 0.007) compartments, with no differential contractile changes in the superior rectus. These findings suggest that differential compartmental activity occurs during normal vertical ductions. Thus all EOMs may contribute to cyclovertical actions. PMID:26538608

  14. Natural Isotopic Signatures of Variations in Body Nitrogen Fluxes: A Compartmental Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poupin, Nathalie; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Fouillet, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Body tissues are generally 15N-enriched over the diet, with a discrimination factor (Δ15N) that varies among tissues and individuals as a function of their nutritional and physiopathological condition. However, both 15N bioaccumulation and intra- and inter-individual Δ15N variations are still poorly understood, so that theoretical models are required to understand their underlying mechanisms. Using experimental Δ15N measurements in rats, we developed a multi-compartmental model that provides the first detailed representation of the complex functioning of the body's Δ15N system, by explicitly linking the sizes and Δ15N values of 21 nitrogen pools to the rates and isotope effects of 49 nitrogen metabolic fluxes. We have shown that (i) besides urea production, several metabolic pathways (e.g., protein synthesis, amino acid intracellular metabolism, urea recycling and intestinal absorption or secretion) are most probably associated with isotope fractionation and together contribute to 15N accumulation in tissues, (ii) the Δ15N of a tissue at steady-state is not affected by variations of its P turnover rate, but can vary according to the relative orientation of tissue free amino acids towards oxidation vs. protein synthesis, (iii) at the whole-body level, Δ15N variations result from variations in the body partitioning of nitrogen fluxes (e.g., urea production, urea recycling and amino acid exchanges), with or without changes in nitrogen balance, (iv) any deviation from the optimal amino acid intake, in terms of both quality and quantity, causes a global rise in tissue Δ15N, and (v) Δ15N variations differ between tissues depending on the metabolic changes involved, which can therefore be identified using simultaneous multi-tissue Δ15N measurements. This work provides proof of concept that Δ15N measurements constitute a new promising tool to investigate how metabolic fluxes are nutritionally or physiopathologically reorganized or altered. The existence of such

  15. Differential expression of intracellular acidosis in rat brainstem regions in response to hypercapnic ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Joseph C; Neal, Maxwell; Xu, Kui; Haxhiu, Musa A

    2003-01-01

    We determined the regional intracellular pH (pHi) of rat brainstem in response to hypercapnia. Neutral red spectrophotometry was used to characterize changes in intracellular pH along the dorsal and ventral aspects of the medulla oblongata. Male Wistar rats (250-350 g) were infused with 3 ml of 2% Neutral Red over the course of 30 minutes. After 20 minutes of infusion, the rats were ventilated with either 7% CO2, 21% O2 in N2 or room air for 15 minutes. Our data indicate that hypercapnia induces prominent intracellular acidification in neurons within putative chemosensitive regions of the ventral aspect of medulla oblongata. On the contrary, minimal or no changes were observed in neurons within the nucleus tractus solitarius. These findings suggest that brainstem neurons differentially regulate intracellular pH during hypercapnic stress. PMID:14635694

  16. Proton Fall or Bicarbonate Rise: GLYCOLYTIC RATE IN MOUSE ASTROCYTES IS PAVED BY INTRACELLULAR ALKALINIZATION.

    PubMed

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Weber, Tobias; Schmälzle, Jana; Ruminot, Ivàn; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-09-01

    Glycolysis is the primary step for major energy production in the cell. There is strong evidence suggesting that glucose consumption and rate of glycolysis are highly modulated by cytosolic pH/[H(+)], but those can also be stimulated by an increase in the intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Because proton and bicarbonate shift concomitantly, it remained unclear whether enhanced glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were mediated by the changes in intracellular [H(+)] or [HCO3 (-)]. We have asked whether glucose metabolism is enhanced by either a fall in intracellular [H(+)] or a rise in intracellular [HCO3 (-)], or by both, in mammalian astrocytes. We have recorded intracellular glucose in mouse astrocytes using a FRET-based nanosensor, while imposing different intracellular [H(+)] and [CO2]/[HCO3 (-)]. Glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were augmented by a fall in intracellular [H(+)], irrespective of a concomitant rise or fall in intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Transport of HCO3 (-) into and out of astrocytes by the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) played a crucial role in causing changes in intracellular pH and [HCO3 (-)], but was not obligatory for the pH-dependent changes in glucose metabolism. Our results clearly show that it is the cytosolic pH that modulates glucose metabolism in cortical astrocytes, and possibly also in other cell types. PMID:27422823

  17. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  18. Compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling: A question of when, where, and why?

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Moon, Chang Suk; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2013-01-01

    Preciseness of cellular behavior depends upon how an extracellular cue mobilizes a correct orchestra of cellular messengers and effector proteins spatially and temporally. This concept, termed compartmentalization of cellular signaling, is now known to form the molecular basis of many aspects of cellular behavior in health and disease. The cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous cellular messengers that can be compartmentalized in three ways: first, by their physical containment; second, by formation of multiple protein signaling complexes; and third, by their selective depletion. Compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide signaling is a very prevalent response among all cell types. In order to understand how it becomes relevant to cellular behavior, it is important to know how it is executed in cells to regulate physiological responses and, also, how its execution or dysregulation can lead to a pathophysiological condition, which forms the current scope of the presented review. PMID:23604972

  19. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  20. Characterization of Golgi scaffold proteins and their roles in compartmentalizing cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenna; Lei, Qiang; Jiang, Zheng; Hu, Zhiping

    2014-08-01

    Subcellular compartmentalization has become an important theme in cell signaling. In particular, the Golgi apparatus (GA) plays a prominent role in compartmentalizing signaling cascades that originate at the plasma membrane or other organelles. To precisely regulate this process, cells have evolved a unique class of organizer proteins, termed "scaffold proteins". Sef, PAQR3, PAQR10 and PAQR11 are scaffold proteins that have recently been identified on the GA and are referred to as Golgi scaffolds. The major cell growth signaling pathways, such as Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, insulin and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), are tightly regulated spatially and temporally by these Golgi scaffolds to ensure a physiologically appropriate outcome. Here, we discuss the subcellular localization and characterization of the topology and functional domains of these Golgi scaffolds and summarize their roles in the compartmentalization of cell signaling. We also highlight the physiological and pathological roles of these Golgi scaffolds in tumorigenesis and developmental disorders. PMID:24337566

  1. Establishment and maintenance of compartmental boundaries: role of contractile actomyosin barriers.

    PubMed

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2011-06-01

    During animal development, tissues and organs are partitioned into compartments that do not intermix. This organizing principle is essential for correct tissue morphogenesis. Given that cell sorting defects during compartmentalization in humans are thought to cause malignant invasion and congenital defects such as cranio-fronto-nasal syndrome, identifying the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries between compartments is important. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, transcription factors and short-range signalling pathways, such as EPH/Ephrin, Hedgehog, or Notch signalling, govern compartmental cell sorting. However, the mechanisms that mediate cell sorting downstream of these factors have remained elusive for decades. Here, we review recent data gathered in Drosophila that suggest that the generation of cortical tensile forces at compartmental boundaries by the actomyosin cytoskeleton could be a general mechanism that inhibits cell mixing between compartments. PMID:21437644

  2. Male genital tract compartmentalization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV).

    PubMed

    Diem, Kurt; Nickle, David C; Motoshige, Alexis; Fox, Alan; Ross, Susan; Mullins, James I; Corey, Lawrence; Coombs, Robert W; Krieger, John N

    2008-04-01

    We present phylogenetic evidence supporting viral compartmentalization between the blood (peripheral blood mononuclear cells or plasma) and multiple genitourinary sites in HIV-infected men. Four of the five subjects evaluated demonstrated compartmentalization of viral sequences between urogenital tract specimens (tissue or fluid) and at least one blood category. HIV sequence migration from blood to urogenital tract was detected in four of five men, with migration from urogenital tract to blood in the fifth, and cross migration between both compartments noted in one man. These observations add 5 additional cases to the 27 total reported cases in which male urogenital tract compartmentalization has been studied, investigate surgical samples/specimens that have not been evaluated previously, and provide further evidence for restricted flow of HIV between the blood and the genital tract. As such, our study findings are important for understanding the long-term response to antiretroviral therapy, the design of vaccines, and the sexual transmission of HIV. PMID:18426336

  3. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  4. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  5. Multiple sampling and discriminatory fingerprinting reveals clonally complex and compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Yurena; Romero, Beatriz; Copano, María Francisca; Bouza, Emilio; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2015-01-30

    The combination of new genotyping tools and a more exhaustive sampling policy in the analysis of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has shown that infection by this pathogen is more complex than initially expected. Mixed infections, coexistence of clonal variants from a parental strain, and compartmentalized infections are all different modalities of this clonal complexity. Until recently, genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis in animal populations was based on spoligotyping and analysis of a single isolate per infection; therefore, clonal complexity is probably underdetected. We used multiple sampling combined with highly discriminatory MIRU-VNTR to study compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in a low-tuberculosis prevalence setting. We spoligotyped the M. bovis isolates from two or more anatomic locations sampled from 55 animals on 39 independent farms. Compartmentalized infections, with two different strains infecting independent lymph nodes in the same animal, were found in six cases (10.9%). MIRU-VNTR analysis confirmed that the compartmentalization was strict and that only one strain was present in each infected node. MIRU-VNTR analysis of additional infected animals on one of the farms confirmed that the compartmentalized infection was a consequence of superinfection, since the two strains were independently infecting other animals. This same analysis revealed the emergence of a microevolved clonal variant in one of the lymph nodes of the compartmentalized animal. Clonal complexity must also be taken into consideration in M. bovis infection, even in low-prevalence settings, and analyses must be adapted to detect it and increase the accuracy of molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:25439651

  6. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes as targets of the intracellular signalling network: benefits of PDE inhibitors in various diseases and perspectives for future therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Keravis, Thérèse; Lugnier, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that specifically inactivate the intracellular messengers cAMP and cGMP in a compartmentalized manner represent an important enzyme class constituted by 11 gene-related families of isozymes (PDE1 to PDE11). Downstream receptors, PDEs play a major role in controlling the signalosome at various levels of phosphorylations and protein/protein interactions. Due to the multiplicity of isozymes, their various intracellular regulations and their different cellular and subcellular distributions, PDEs represent interesting targets in intracellular pathways. Therefore, the investigation of PDE isozyme alterations related to various pathologies and the design of specific PDE inhibitors might lead to the development of new specific therapeutic strategies in numerous pathologies. This manuscript (i) overviews the different PDEs including their endogenous regulations and their specific inhibitors; (ii) analyses the intracellular implications of PDEs in regulating signalling cascades in pathogenesis, exemplified by two diseases affecting cell cycle and proliferation; and (iii) discusses perspectives for future therapeutic developments. PMID:22014080

  7. Compartmentation of cAMP signalling in cardiomyocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perera, R K; Nikolaev, V O

    2013-04-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger critically involved in the regulation of heart function. It has been shown to act in discrete subcellular signalling compartments formed by differentially localized receptors, phosphodiesterases and protein kinases. Cardiac diseases such as hypertrophy or heart failure are associated with structural and functional remodelling of these microdomains which leads to changes in cAMP compartmentation. In this review, we will discuss recent key findings which provided new insights into cAMP compartmentation in cardiomyocytes with a particular focus on its alterations in heart disease. PMID:23383621

  8. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  10. Water Diffusion, T2, and Compartmentation in Frog Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Sharon; Cory, David G.; Raymond, Stephen A.; Kirschner, Daniel A.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2010-01-01

    A potential relationship between structural compartments in neural tissue and NMR parameters may increase the specificity of MRI in diagnosing diseases. Nevertheless, our understanding of MR of nerves and white matter is limited, particularly the influence of various water compartments on the MR signal is not known. In this study, components of the 1H transverse relaxation decay curve in frog peripheral nerve were correlated with the diffusion characteristics of the water in the nerve. Three T2 values were identified with nerve. Water mobility was found to be unrestricted on the timescale of 100 msec in the component of the signal with the intermediate T2 time, suggesting some contribution from the interstitial space to this T2 component. Restricted diffusion was observed in the component with the longest T2 time, supporting the assignment of at least part of the spins contributing to this component to an intracellular compartment. The observed nonexponential behavior of the diffusion attenuation curves was investigated and shown to be potentially caused by the wide range of axon sizes in the nerve. PMID:10542350

  11. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  12. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  13. Beyond Compartmentalization: A Relational Approach towards Agency and Vulnerability of Young Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huijsmans, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Based on fieldwork material from Lao People's Democratic Republic, this paper introduces an analytical framework that transcends compartmentalized approaches towards migration involving young people. The notions of fluid and institutionalized forms of migration illuminate key differences and commonalities in the relational fabric underpinning…

  14. Origin of reservoir compartmentalization in Lower Ordovician Karstic Dolostones, Ellenburger Group, West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerans, C.

    1988-01-01

    Ellenburger Group reservoirs constitute a major play in the Permian basin of west Texas, with over 1.4 billion bbl cumulative production through 1985. These reservoirs typically have been developed by assuming homogeneous fracture-related pore system. Examination of core, log, and production data demonstrates that most Ellenburger reservoirs are characterized by pronounced vertical and lateral heterogeneities created by post-Ellenburger karst development. Vertical reservoir compartmentalization in the Ellenburger evolved from development of a laterally extensive cave system between 100 and 300 ft beneath the original land surface. Caves were filled by relatively impermeable siliciclastics from the overlying Simpson Group, effectively isolating permeable cave-roof breccias (uppermost Ellenburger) from collapse breccias deposited on cave floors prior to shale infill. Lateral compartmentalization of Ellenburger reservoirs originated by localized collapse of the cave system both during karst formation and after burial. In the Shafter Lake field, lateral compartmentalization is the result of a 200-ft vertical collapse during deposition of Simpson Group sands. Abrupt lateral discontinuities in the Big Lake and Glasco fields may represent similar collapse-related features, such as are spectacularly displayed in Ellenburger-equivalent outcrops of the Franklin Mountains. An estimated 750 million bbl of remaining mobile oil, in addition to conventional reserves, occurs in this mature but complexly compartmentalized play. Considering this paleokarst model will aid in further exploitation of Ellenburger reservoirs.

  15. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Donald L.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single ‘turnover’ parameter, a single ‘exchange’ parameter and a single ‘delay’ parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained. PMID:25497960

  16. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    Fire-resistance rated (or area separation) wall assemblies present a great difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. To address this challenge, Building Science Corporation partnered with builder K. Hovnanian Homes to determine whether taping exterior sheathing details improves air sealing in townhouse and multifamily construction, and to better understand air leakage pathways.

  17. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained. PMID:25497960

  18. A-kinase anchoring proteins: cAMP compartmentalization in neurodegenerative and obstructive pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, W J; Muñoz-Llancao, P; González-Billault, C; Schmidt, M

    2014-01-01

    The universal second messenger cAMP is generated upon stimulation of Gs protein-coupled receptors, such as the β2-adreneoceptor, and leads to the activation of PKA, the major cAMP effector protein. PKA oscillates between an on and off state and thereby regulates a plethora of distinct biological responses. The broad activation pattern of PKA and its contribution to several distinct cellular functions lead to the introduction of the concept of compartmentalization of cAMP. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are of central importance due to their unique ability to directly and/or indirectly interact with proteins that either determine the cellular content of cAMP, such as β2-adrenoceptors, ACs and PDEs, or are regulated by cAMP such as the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. We report on lessons learned from neurons indicating that maintenance of cAMP compartmentalization by AKAP5 is linked to neurotransmission, learning and memory. Disturbance of cAMP compartments seem to be linked to neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease. We translate this knowledge to compartmentalized cAMP signalling in the lung. Next to AKAP5, we focus here on AKAP12 and Ezrin (AKAP78). These topics will be highlighted in the context of the development of novel pharmacological interventions to tackle AKAP-dependent compartmentalization. PMID:25132049

  19. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  20. Analysis of a non-structural gene reveals evidence of possible hepatitis C virus (HCV) compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Jason T.; Ma, Gang; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Martin, Christina M.; Sherman, Kenneth E.; Taylor, Lynn E.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2011-01-01

    Viral diversity is a hallmark of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection; however, only limited data are available regarding HCV variability in extrahepatic sites, and none have systematically compared diversity in non-structural and structural genomic regions. Therefore, HCV diversity in the NS5B and envelope 1 (E1) hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) genes was evaluated in matched sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 13 HCV-infected women. Multiple clonal sequences were compared to evaluate quasispecies diversity and viral compartmentalization in PBMCs. Genetic distances were higher for E1/HVR1 compared to NS5B in both the sera and PBMCs (p = 0.0511 and p = 0.0284). Genetic distances were higher in serum NS5B compared to PBMC NS5B (p = 0.0003); however, they were not different when comparing E1/HVR1 in sera to PBMCs. By phylogenetic analysis of NS5B, evidence of possible PBMC compartmentalization was observed for 1 woman, while statistical methods were consistent with PBMC compartmentalization for 6 women. Evidence of compartmentalization within a non-structural genomic region may suggest that viral adaptation to a unique extracellular microenvironment(s) may be required for efficient replication and could contribute to HCV persistence. PMID:22170544

  1. Compartmentalization of Calcium Extrusion Mechanisms in the Outer and Inner Segments of Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Copenhagen, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Differential localization of calcium channel subtypes in divergent regions of individual neurons strongly suggests that calcium signaling and regulation could be compartmentalized. Region-specific expression of calcium extrusion transporters would serve also to partition calcium regulation within single cells. Little is known about selective localization of the calcium extrusion transporters, nor has compartmentalized calcium regulation within single neurons been studied in detail. Sensory neurons provide an experimentally tractable preparation to investigate this functional compartmentalization. We studied calcium regulation in the outer segment (OS) and inner segment/synaptic terminal (IS/ST) regions of rods and cones. We report these areas can function as separate compartments. Moreover, ionic, pharmacological, and immunolocalization results show that a Ca-ATPase, but not the Na+/K+, Ca2+ exchanger found in the OSs, extrudes calcium from the IS/ST region. The compartmentalization of calcium regulation in the photoreceptor outer and inner segments implies that transduction and synaptic signaling can be independently controlled. Similar separation of calcium-dependent functions is likely to apply in many types of neuron. PMID:9697868

  2. An actomyosin-based barrier inhibits cell mixing at compartmental boundaries in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Brand, Andrea H; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning tissues into compartments that do not intermix is essential for the correct morphogenesis of animal embryos and organs. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain compartmental cell sorting, mainly differential adhesion, but also regulation of the cytoskeleton or of cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries remain unclear. Here we demonstrate, in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos, that actomyosin-based barriers stop cells from invading neighbouring compartments. Our analysis shows that cells can transiently invade neighbouring compartments, especially when they divide, but are then pushed back into their compartment of origin. Actomyosin cytoskeletal components are enriched at compartmental boundaries, forming cable-like structures when the epidermis is mitotically active. When MyoII (non-muscle myosin II) function is inhibited, including locally at the cable by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), in live embryos, dividing cells are no longer pushed back, leading to compartmental cell mixing. We propose that local regulation of actomyosin contractibility, rather than differential adhesion, is the primary mechanism sorting cells at compartmental boundaries. PMID:19966783

  3. Self-structure and self-esteem stability: the hidden vulnerability of compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Zeigler-Hill, Virgil; Showers, Carolin J

    2007-02-01

    The present studies examined the association between self-concept structure and stability of self-esteem. In two daily diary studies, evaluative integration (organizing positively and negatively valenced self-beliefs into the same self-aspects) was associated with more stable self-esteem than evaluative compartmentalization (organizing positively and negatively valenced self-beliefs into separate self-aspects) among individuals with generally high self-esteem. Moreover, analyses of self-esteem reactivity confirmed that the sensitivity of state self-esteem to daily events was greater for compartmentalized individuals than for individuals with relatively integrative self-concept structures. Compartmentalization also was associated with greater sensitivity to experiences of social rejection in the laboratory, consistent with the view that integration affords greater stability of self-evaluations. These results suggest that some of the benefits believed to be associated with compartmentalization (such as high self-esteem) may have hidden costs that have not previously been considered. PMID:17259577

  4. Intracellular auxin transport in pollen

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Cristina; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Cellular auxin homeostasis is controlled at many levels that include auxin biosynthesis, auxin metabolism, and auxin transport. In addition to intercellular auxin transport, auxin homeostasis is modulated by auxin flow through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PIN5, a member of the auxin efflux facilitators PIN protein family, was the first protein to be characterized as an intracellular auxin transporter. We demonstrated that PIN8, the closest member of the PIN family to PIN5, represents another ER-residing auxin transporter. PIN8 is specifically expressed in the male gametophyte and is located in the ER. By combining genetic, physiological, cellular and biochemical data we demonstrated a role for PIN8 in intracellular auxin homeostasis. Although our investigation shed light on intracellular auxin transport in pollen, the physiological function of PIN8 still remains to be elucidated. Here we discuss our data taking in consideration other recent findings. PMID:22990451

  5. Hybrid stochastic simulations of intracellular reaction-diffusion systems

    PubMed Central

    Kalantzis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    With the observation that stochasticity is important in biological systems, chemical kinetics have begun to receive wider interest. While the use of Monte Carlo discrete event simulations most accurately capture the variability of molecular species, they become computationally costly for complex reaction-diffusion systems with large populations of molecules. On the other hand, continuous time models are computationally efficient but they fail to capture any variability in the molecular species. In this study a novel hybrid stochastic approach is introduced for simulating reaction-diffusion systems. We developed a dynamic partitioning strategy using fractional propensities. In that way processes with high frequency are simulated mostly with deterministic rate-based equations, and those with low frequency mostly with the exact stochastic algorithm of Gillespie. In this way we preserve the stochastic behavior of cellular pathways while being able to apply it to large populations of molecules. In this article we describe this hybrid algorithmic approach, and we demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency compared with the Gillespie algorithm for two different systems. First, a model of intracellular viral kinetics with two steady states and second, a compartmental model of the postsynaptic spine head for studying the dynamics of Ca+2 and NMDA receptors. PMID:19414282

  6. Compartmentalization of the deep cerebellar nuclei based on afferent projections and aldolase C expression.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Izumi

    2011-09-01

    The distribution of aldolase C (zebrin II)-positive and -negative Purkinje cells (PCs) can be used to define about 20 longitudinally extended compartments in the cerebellar cortex of the rat, which may correspond to certain aspects of cerebellar functional localization. An equivalent compartmental organization may exist in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). This DCN compartmentalization is primarily represented by the afferent projection pattern in the DCN. PC projections and collateral nuclear projections of olivocerebellar climbing fiber axons have a relatively localized terminal arbor in the DCN. Projections of these axons make a closed olivo-cortico-nuclear circuit to connect a longitudinal stripe-shaped cortical compartment to a small subarea in the DCN, which can be defined as a DCN compartment. The actual DCN compartmentalization, which has been revealed by systematically mapping these projections, is quite different from the cortical compartmentalization. The stripe-shaped alternation of aldolase C-positive and -negative narrow longitudinal compartments in the cerebellar cortex is transformed to the separate clustering of positive and negative compartments in the caudoventral and rostrodorsal DCN, respectively. The distinctive projection of aldolase C-positive and -negative PCs to the caudoventral and rostrodorsal DCN underlies this transformation. Accordingly, the medial cerebellar nucleus is divided into the rostrodorsal aldolase C-negative and caudoventral aldolase C-positive parts. The anterior and posterior interposed nuclei generally correspond to the aldolase C-negative and -positive parts, respectively. DCN compartmentalization is important for understanding functional localization in the DCN since it is speculated that aldolase C-positive and -negative compartments are generally associated with somatosensory and other functions, respectively. PMID:20981512

  7. Elevated compartmentalization of Na+ into vacuoles improves salt and cold stress tolerance in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Fan, Weijuan; Deng, Gaifang; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Salinity and low temperature are the main limiting factors for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) growth and agricultural productivity. Various studies have shown that plant NHX-type antiporter plays a crucial role in regulating plant tolerance to salt stress by intracellular Na(+) compartmentalization. The Arabidopsis thaliana AtNHX1 gene that encodes a vacuolar Na(+) /H(+) antiporter was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Xushu-22 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to confer abiotic stress tolerance. Stable insertion of AtNHX1 into the sweet potato genome and its expression was confirmed by Southern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A remarkably higher Na(+) /H(+) exchange activity of tonoplast membrane from transgenic sweet potato lines (NOE) in comparison with wild-type (WT) plants confirmed the vacuolar antiporter function in mediating Na(+) /H(+) exchange. Under salt stress, NOE plants accumulated higher Na(+) and K(+) levels in their tissues compared with WT plants, maintaining high K(+) /Na(+) ratios. Consequently, NOE plants showed enhanced protection against cell damage due to the increased proline accumulation, preserved cell membrane integrity, enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging (e.g. increased superoxide dismutase activity), and reduced H2 O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Moreover, the transgenic plants showed improved cold tolerance through multiple mechanisms of action, revealing the first molecular evidence for NHX1 function in cold response. The transgenic plants showed better biomass production and root yield under stressful conditions. These findings demonstrate that overexpressing AtNHX1 in sweet potato renders the crop tolerant to both salt and cold stresses, providing a greater capacity for the use of AtNHX1 in improving crop performance under combined abiotic stress conditions. PMID:25307930

  8. Co-compartmentalization of MAP kinases and cytosolic phospholipase A2 at cytoplasmic arachidonate-rich lipid bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W.; Bozza, P. T.; Tzizik, D. M.; Gray, J. P.; Cassara, J.; Dvorak, A. M.; Weller, P. F.

    1998-01-01

    Lipid bodies are inducible lipid domains abundantly present in leukocytes engaged in inflammation. They are rich in esterified arachidonate and are also potential sites for eicosanoid-forming enzyme localization. It is therefore of interest to know whether arachidonate-releasing cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) localizes at lipid bodies. Here, we present evidence that cPLA2 and its activating protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, co-localize at lipid bodies. U937 cells express high levels of cPLA2 and contain numerous cytoplasmic lipid bodies. Using double-labeling immunocytochemistry we demonstrated punctate cytoplasmic localizations of both cPLA2 and MAP kinases in U937 cells that were perfectly concordant with fluorescent fatty-acid-labeled lipid bodies. The co-localization of cPLA2 and MAP kinases at lipid bodies was confirmed by subcellular fractionation and immunoblot. Lipid body fractions free of cytosol and other organelles contained significant amounts of [14C]arachidonate-labeled phosphatidylcholine and cPLA2 enzymatic activities. Immunoblotting with specific antibodies identified cPLA2 as well as MAP kinases, including ERK1, ERK2, p85, and p38, in lipid bodies. The co-compartmentalization within arachidonate-rich lipid bodies of cPLA2 and its potentially activating protein kinases suggests that lipid bodies may be structurally distinct intracellular sites active in extracellular ligand-induced arachidonate release and eicosanoid formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9502418

  9. CFTR regulation in human airway epithelial cells requires integrity of the actin cytoskeleton and compartmentalized cAMP and PKA activity

    PubMed Central

    Monterisi, Stefania; Favia, Maria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Cardone, Rosa A.; Marzulli, Domenico; Reshkin, Stephan J.; Casavola, Valeria; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation ΔF508CFTR still causes regulatory defects when rescued to the apical membrane, suggesting that the intracellular milieu might affect its ability to respond to cAMP regulation. We recently reported that overexpression of the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor NHERF1 in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway cell line CFBE41o-rescues the functional expression of ΔF508CFTR by promoting F-actin organization and formation of the NHERF1–ezrin–actin complex. Here, using real-time FRET reporters of both PKA activity and cAMP levels, we find that lack of an organized subcortical cytoskeleton in CFBE41o-cells causes both defective accumulation of cAMP in the subcortical compartment and excessive cytosolic accumulation of cAMP. This results in reduced subcortical levels and increased cytosolic levels of PKA activity. NHERF1 overexpression in CFBE41o-cells restores chloride secretion, subcortical cAMP compartmentalization and local PKA activity, indicating that regulation of ΔF508CFTR function requires not only stable expression of the mutant CFTR at the cell surface but also depends on both generation of local cAMP signals of adequate amplitude and activation of PKA in proximity of its target. Moreover, we found that the knockdown of wild-type CFTR in the non-CF 16HBE14o-cells results in both altered cytoskeletal organization and loss of cAMP compartmentalization, whereas stable overexpression of wt CFTR in CF cells restores cytoskeleton organization and re-establishes the compartmentalization of cAMP at the plasma membrane. This suggests that the presence of CFTR on the plasma membrane influences the cytoskeletal organizational state and, consequently, cAMP distribution. Our data show that a sufficiently high concentration of cAMP in the subcortical compartment is required to achieve PKA-mediated regulation of CFTR activity. PMID:22302988

  10. Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Of Dynamic Intracellular Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec T.; Kao, J. P.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1989-12-01

    Traditional biochemical assays of cellular messengers require grinding up thousands or millions of cells for each data point. Such destructive measurements use up large amounts of tissue, have poor time resolution, and cannot assess heterogeneity between individual cells or dynamic spatial localizations. Recent technical advances now enable important ionic signals to be continuously imaged inside individual living cells with micron spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. This methodology relies on the molecular engineering of indicator dyes whose fluorescence is strong and highly sensitive to ions such as Ca2+, H+, or Na+. Binding of these ions shifts the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the corresponding indicator. The ratio of excitation amplitudes at two wavelengths measures the free ion concentration while canceling out intensity variations due to nonuniform cell thickness or dye content. By rapidly alternating between the two ion-sensitive excitation wavelengths, a fluorescence microscope equipped with a low-light television camera and digital image processor can produce dynamic images of intracellular messenger levels. In many populations of cells traditionally assumed to be homogeneous, we find that neighboring individual cells can differ enormously in their cytosolic Ca2+ response to agonist stimulation, some ignoring the stimulus, others raising cytosolic Ca2+ transiently, others showing oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of graded inputs; we are investigating the mechanism of their generation using light flashes to generate pulses of intracellular messengers. Spatial gradients of cytosolic Ca t+ within single cells have been observed in embryos during fertilization and development, neurons exposed to electrical or drug stimulation and in cytotoxic T lymphocytes during killing of target

  11. Deciphering the Intracellular Fate of Propionibacterium acnes in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Natalie; Mak, Tim N.; Shinohara, Debika Biswal; Sfanos, Karen S.; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23862148

  12. ROS and intracellular ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known driver of numerous pathological processes involving protein and lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The resulting increase of pro-apoptotic pressure drives tissue damage in a host of conditions, including ischemic stroke and reperfusion injury, diabetes, death in acute pancreatitis and neurodegenerative diseases. Somewhat less frequently discussed, but arguably as important, is the signaling function of oxidative stress stemming from the ability of oxidative stress to modulate ion channel activity. The evidence for the modulation of the intracellular ion channels and transporters by oxidative stress is constantly emerging and such evidence suggests new regulatory and pathological circuits that can be explored towards new treatments for diseases in which oxidative stress is an issue. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the effects of oxidative stress on the intracellular ion channels and transporters and their role in cell function. PMID:26995054

  13. Lipidomics Analyses Reveal Temporal and Spatial Lipid Organization and Uncover Daily Oscillations in Intracellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Kopelman, Naama; Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Zwighaft, Ziv; Elimelech, Meytar; Adamovich, Yaarit; Golik, Marina; Wang, Chunyan; Han, Xianlin; Asher, Gad

    2016-05-19

    Cells have evolved mechanisms to handle incompatible processes through temporal organization by circadian clocks and by spatial compartmentalization within organelles defined by lipid bilayers. Recent advances in lipidomics have led to identification of plentiful lipid species, yet our knowledge regarding their spatiotemporal organization is lagging behind. In this study, we quantitatively characterized the nuclear and mitochondrial lipidome in mouse liver throughout the day, upon different feeding regimens, and in clock-disrupted mice. Our analyses revealed potential connections between lipid species within and between lipid classes. Remarkably, we uncovered diurnal oscillations in lipid accumulation in the nucleus and mitochondria. These oscillations exhibited opposite phases and readily responded to feeding time. Furthermore, we found that the circadian clock coordinates the phase relation between the organelles. In summary, our study provides temporal and spatial depiction of lipid organization and reveals the presence and coordination of diurnal rhythmicity in intracellular organelles. PMID:27161994

  14. Intracellular Unbound Atorvastatin Concentrations in the Presence of Metabolism and Transport.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Priyanka; Korzekwa, Kenneth; Nagar, Swati

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of drug target activity and rational dosing regimen design require knowledge of drug concentrations at the target. It is important to understand the impact of processes such as membrane permeability, partitioning, and active transport on intracellular drug concentrations. The present study aimed to predict intracellular unbound atorvastatin concentrations and characterize the effect of enzyme-transporter interplay on these concentrations. Single-pass liver perfusion studies were conducted in rats using atorvastatin (ATV, 1 µM) alone at 4°C and at 37°C in presence of rifampin (RIF, 20 µM) and 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, 1 mM), separately and in combination. The unbound intracellular ATV concentration was predicted with a five-compartment explicit membrane model using the parameterized diffusional influx clearance, active basolateral uptake clearance, and metabolic clearance. Chemical inhibition of uptake and metabolism at 37°C proved to be better controls relative to studies at 4°C. The predicted unbound intracellular concentration at the end of the 50-minute perfusion in the +ABT , +ABT+RIF, and the ATV-only groups was 6.5 µM, 0.58 µM, and 5.14 µM, respectively. The predicted total liver concentrations and amount recovered in bile were within 0.94-1.3 fold of the observed value in all groups. The fold difference in total liver concentration did not always extrapolate to the fold difference in predicted unbound concentration across groups. Together, these results support the use of compartmental modeling to predict intracellular concentrations in dynamic organ-based systems. These predictions can provide insight into the role of uptake transporters and metabolizing enzymes in determining drug tissue concentrations. PMID:27451408

  15. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  16. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in the Basic Protocol. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM). PMID:24894836

  17. Use of a simulated annealing algorithm to fit compartmental models with an application to fractal pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Rebeccah E; Riauka, Terence A; McQuarrie, Steve A

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, fractals are being incorporated into pharmacokinetic models to describe transport and chemical kinetic processes occurring in confined and heterogeneous spaces. However, fractal compartmental models lead to differential equations with power-law time-dependent kinetic rate coefficients that currently are not accommodated by common commercial software programs. This paper describes a parameter optimization method for fitting individual pharmacokinetic curves based on a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, which always converged towards the global minimum and was independent of the initial parameter values and parameter bounds. In a comparison using a classical compartmental model, similar fits by the Gauss-Newton and Nelder-Mead simplex algorithms required stringent initial estimates and ranges for the model parameters. The SA algorithm is ideal for fitting a wide variety of pharmacokinetic models to clinical data, especially those for which there is weak prior knowledge of the parameter values, such as the fractal models. PMID:17706176

  18. A note on the compartmental analysis and related issues in laser Doppler flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, J; Nilsson, G E; Salerud, G E; Seifalian, A M

    1998-04-01

    Compartmental analysis (CA) in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) means deciphering the nutritional and thermoregulating flows from the measured perfusion flux. Based on the new theories proposed in [1] and [2], the CA is formulated here as an optimal approximation without directly involving the geometric information of the vessel network. It is seen that this approximation approach could also solve the biological zero (BZ) problem simultaneously, therefore, it actually provides a systematic solution to the BZ problem without estimating the BZ flux experimentally. In addition, the BZ problem with compartmental differences is reformulated, and the condition under which multiple compartments can be treated as a single one is investigated. The result, together with some computer simulations, showed that the theory in [2] is still an easy and useful approximation in practice. This note serves as an useful supplement to [1] and [2] and may help to solve and clarify some critical problems in LDF. PMID:9556971

  19. Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.D.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Recurrent basement faulting is the primary controlling mechanism for aligning and compartmentalizing upper Cretaceous aged tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan and Piceance Basins. Northwest trending structural lineaments that formed in conjunction with the Uncompahgre Highlands have profoundly influenced sedimentation trends and created boundaries for gas migration; sealing and compartmentalizing sedimentary packages in both basins. Fractures which formed over the structural lineaments provide permeability pathways which allowing gas recovery from otherwise tight gas reservoirs. Structural alignments and associated reservoir compartments have been accurately targeted by integrating advanced remote sensing imagery, high resolution aeromagnetics, seismic interpretation, stratigraphic mapping and dynamic structural modelling. This unifying methodology is a powerful tool for exploration geologists and is also a systematic approach to tight gas resource assessment in frontier basins.

  20. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves the production of branched-chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Avalos, José L; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeting metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production compared with overexpression of the enzymes involved in the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalization of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overproducing enzymes involved in only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains revealed that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves greater local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  1. The MATCHIT Automaton: Exploiting Compartmentalization for the Synthesis of Branched Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Weyland, Mathias S.; Fellermann, Harold; Hadorn, Maik; Sorek, Daniel; Lancet, Doron; Rasmussen, Steen; Füchslin, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an automaton, a theoretical framework that demonstrates how to improve the yield of the synthesis of branched chemical polymer reactions. This is achieved by separating substeps of the path of synthesis into compartments. We use chemical containers (chemtainers) to carry the substances through a sequence of fixed successive compartments. We describe the automaton in mathematical terms and show how it can be configured automatically in order to synthesize a given branched polymer target. The algorithm we present finds an optimal path of synthesis in linear time. We discuss how the automaton models compartmentalized structures found in cells, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, and we show how this compartmentalization can be exploited for the synthesis of branched polymers such as oligosaccharides. Lastly, we show examples of artificial branched polymers and discuss how the automaton can be configured to synthesize them with maximal yield. PMID:24489601

  2. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  3. Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages: mimicking cellular compartmentalization for the engineering of functional proteins

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Liisa D.; Colin, Pierre-Yves; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The idea of compartmentalization of genotype and phenotype in cells is key for enabling Darwinian evolution. This contribution describes bioinspired systems that use in vitro compartments—water-in-oil droplets and gel-shell beads—for the directed evolution of functional proteins. Technologies based on these principles promise to provide easier access to protein-based therapeutics, reagents for processes involving enzyme catalysis, parts for synthetic biology and materials with biological components. PMID:26464791

  4. Simulation of Drug Uptake in a Two Compartmental Fractional Model for a Biological System.

    PubMed

    Petráš, Ivo; Magin, Richard L

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a very effective numerical method for the solution of the two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model for oral drug administration. This model consists of a set of two fractional order differential equations which connect the two compartments. The first compartment represents the gut while the second compartment corresponds to the drug concentration in the target tissue. For ease of computation, the numerical solution is also created as a Matlab function. PMID:21822359

  5. GM130 is required for compartmental organization of dendritic Golgi outposts

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Chang, Jin; Wang, Xin; Savelieff, Masha G.; Zhao, Yinyin; Ke, Shanshan; Ye, Bing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Golgi complexes (Golgi) play important roles in the development and function of neurons [1–3]. Not only are Golgi present in the neuronal soma (somal Golgi) but they also exist in the dendrites as Golgi outposts [4–7]. Previous studies have shown that Golgi outposts serve as local microtubule organizing centers [8] and secretory stations in dendrites [6, 9]. It is unknown whether the structure and function of Golgi outposts differ from those of somal Golgi. Here we show in Drosophila that, unlike somal Golgi, the biochemically distinct cis, medial, and trans compartments of Golgi are often disconnected in dendrites in vivo. The Golgi structural protein GM130 is responsible for connecting distinct Golgi compartments in soma and dendritic branch points, and specific distribution of GM130 determines the compartmental organization of dendritic Golgi in dendritic shafts. We further show that compartmental organization regulates the role of Golgi in acentrosomal microtubule growth in dendrites and in dendritic branching. Our study provides insights into the structure and function of dendritic Golgi outposts as well as the regulation of compartmental organization of Golgi in general. PMID:24835455

  6. Compartmentalization Approaches in Soft Matter Science: From Nanoreactor Development to Organelle Mimics.

    PubMed

    Schoonen, Lise; van Hest, Jan C M

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization is an essential feature found in living cells to ensure that biological processes occur without being affected by undesired external influences. Over the years many scientists have designed self-assembled soft matter structures that mimic these natural catalytic compartments. The rationale behind this research is threefold. First of all, compartmentalization leads to the creation of a secluded environment for the catalytic species, which solves compatibility issues and which can improve catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Secondly, nano- and micro-compartments are constructed with the aim to obtain microenvironments that more closely mimic the cellular architecture. These biomimetic platforms are used to attain a better understanding of how cellular processes are executed. Thirdly, natural design rules are applied to create biomolecular assemblies with unusual functionality, which for example are used as artificial organelles. Here, recent developments will be discussed regarding these compartmentalized catalytic systems, with a selected number of illustrative examples to demonstrate which strategies have been followed, and to show to what extent the ambitious goals of this field of science have been reached. The focus here is on the field of soft matter science, covering the wide spectrum from polymeric assemblies to protein nanocages. PMID:26509964

  7. Compartmentalization of incompatible reagents within Pickering emulsion droplets for one-pot cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengquan; Fu, Luman; Wei, Lijuan; Liang, Jifen; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-01-28

    It is a dream that future synthetic chemistry can mimic living systems to process multistep cascade reactions in a one-pot fashion. One of the key challenges is the mutual destruction of incompatible or opposing reagents, for example, acid and base, oxidants and reductants. A conceptually novel strategy is developed here to address this challenge. This strategy is based on a layered Pickering emulsion system, which is obtained through lamination of Pickering emulsions. In this working Pickering emulsion, the dispersed phase can separately compartmentalize the incompatible reagents to avoid their mutual destruction, while the continuous phase allows other reagent molecules to diffuse freely to access the compartmentalized reagents for chemical reactions. The compartmentalization effects and molecular transport ability of the Pickering emulsion were investigated. The deacetalization-reduction, deacetalization-Knoevenagel, deacetalization-Henry and diazotization-iodization cascade reactions demonstrate well the versatility and flexibility of our strategy in processing the one-pot cascade reactions involving mutually destructive reagents. PMID:25603470

  8. The mechanics of cellular compartmentalization as a model for tumor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Pawlizak, Steve; Zink, Mareike; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Based on a recently developed surgical method of Michael H"ockel, which makes use of cellular confinement to compartments in the human body, we study the mechanics of the process of cell segregation. Compartmentalization is a fundamental process of cellular organization and occurs during embryonic development. A simple model system can demonstrate the process of compartmentalization: When two populations of suspended cells are mixed, this mixture will eventually segregate into two phases, whereas mixtures of the same cell type will not. In the 1960s, Malcolm S. Steinberg formulated the so-called differential adhesion hypothesis which explains the segregation in the model system and the process of compartmentalization by differences in surface tension and adhesiveness of the interacting cells. We are interested in to which extend the same physical principles affect tumor growth and spreading between compartments. For our studies, we use healthy and cancerous breast cell lines of different malignancy as well as primary cells from human cervix carcinoma. We apply a set of techniques to study their mechanical properties and interactions. The Optical Stretcher is used for whole cell rheology, while Cell-cell-adhesion forces are directly measured with a modified AFM. In combination with 3D segregation experiments in droplet cultures we try to clarify the role of surface tension in tumor spreading.

  9. Verification of Compartmental Epidemiological Models using Metamorphic Testing, Model Checking and Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Steed, Chad A; Pullum, Laura L

    2012-01-01

    Compartmental models in epidemiology are widely used as a means to model disease spread mechanisms and understand how one can best control the disease in case an outbreak of a widespread epidemic occurs. However, a significant challenge within the community is in the development of approaches that can be used to rigorously verify and validate these models. In this paper, we present an approach to rigorously examine and verify the behavioral properties of compartmen- tal epidemiological models under several common modeling scenarios including birth/death rates and multi-host/pathogen species. Using metamorphic testing, a novel visualization tool and model checking, we build a workflow that provides insights into the functionality of compartmental epidemiological models. Our initial results indicate that metamorphic testing can be used to verify the implementation of these models and provide insights into special conditions where these mathematical models may fail. The visualization front-end allows the end-user to scan through a variety of parameters commonly used in these models to elucidate the conditions under which an epidemic can occur. Further, specifying these models using a process algebra allows one to automatically construct behavioral properties that can be rigorously verified using model checking. Taken together, our approach allows for detecting implementation errors as well as handling conditions under which compartmental epidemiological models may fail to provide insights into disease spread dynamics.

  10. Analysis of the Compartmentalized Metabolome – A Validation of the Non-Aqueous Fractionation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Klie, Sebastian; Krueger, Stephan; Krall, Leonard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Willmitzer, Lothar; Steinhauser, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    With the development of high-throughput metabolic technologies, a plethora of primary and secondary compounds have been detected in the plant cell. However, there are still major gaps in our understanding of the plant metabolome. This is especially true with regards to the compartmental localization of these identified metabolites. Non-aqueous fractionation (NAF) is a powerful technique for the determination of subcellular metabolite distributions in eukaryotic cells, and it has become the method of choice to analyze the distribution of a large number of metabolites concurrently. However, the NAF technique produces a continuous gradient of metabolite distributions, not discrete assignments. Resolution of these distributions requires computational analyses based on marker molecules to resolve compartmental localizations. In this article we focus on expanding the computational analysis of data derived from NAF. Along with an experimental workflow, we describe the critical steps in NAF experiments and how computational approaches can aid in assessing the quality and robustness of the derived data. For this, we have developed and provide a new version (v1.2) of the BestFit command line tool for calculation and evaluation of subcellular metabolite distributions. Furthermore, using both simulated and experimental data we show the influence on estimated subcellular distributions by modulating important parameters, such as the number of fractions taken or which marker molecule is selected. Finally, we discuss caveats and benefits of NAF analysis in the context of the compartmentalized metabolome. PMID:22645541

  11. Diminished viral replication and compartmentalization of hepatitis C virus in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Harouaka, Djamila; Engle, Ronald E; Wollenberg, Kurt; Diaz, Giacomo; Tice, Ashley B; Zamboni, Fausto; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Alter, Harvey; Kleiner, David E; Farci, Patrizia

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and quasispecies distribution within the tumor of patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can provide insight into the role of HCV in hepatocarcinogenesis and, conversely, the effect of HCC on the HCV lifecycle. In a comprehensive study of serum and multiple liver specimens from patients with HCC who underwent liver transplantation, we found a sharp and significant decrease in HCV RNA in the tumor compared with surrounding nontumorous tissues, but found no differences in multiple areas of control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Diminished HCV replication was not associated with changes in miR-122 expression. HCV genetic diversity was significantly higher in livers containing HCC compared with control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Tracking of individual variants demonstrated changes in the viral population between tumorous and nontumorous areas, the extent of which correlated with the decline in HCV RNA, suggesting HCV compartmentalization within the tumor. In contrast, compartmentalization was not observed between nontumorous areas and serum, or in controls between different areas of the cirrhotic liver or between liver and serum. Our findings indicate that HCV replication within the tumor is restricted and compartmentalized, suggesting segregation of specific viral variants in malignant hepatocytes. PMID:26787866

  12. Multi-scale hierarchical approach for parametric mapping: assessment on multi-compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, G; Turkheimer, F E; Bertoldo, A

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates a new hierarchical method to apply basis function to mono- and multi-compartmental models (Hierarchical-Basis Function Method, H-BFM) at a voxel level. This method identifies the parameters of the compartmental model in its nonlinearized version, integrating information derived at the region of interest (ROI) level by segmenting the cerebral volume based on anatomical definition or functional clustering. We present the results obtained by using a two tissue-four rate constant model with two different tracers ([(11)C]FLB457 and [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY100635), one of the most complex models used in receptor studies, especially at the voxel level. H-BFM is robust and its application on both [(11)C]FLB457 and [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY100635 allows accurate and precise parameter estimates, good quality parametric maps and a low percentage of voxels out of physiological bound (<8%). The computational time depends on the number of basis functions selected and can be compatible with clinical use (~6h for a single subject analysis). The novel method is a robust approach for PET quantification by using compartmental modeling at the voxel level. In particular, different from other proposed approaches, this method can also be used when the linearization of the model is not appropriate. We expect that applying it to clinical data will generate reliable parametric maps. PMID:23220428

  13. A global comparison between nuclear and cytosolic transcriptomes reveals differential compartmentalization of alternative transcript isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses have typically disregarded nucleocytoplasmic differences. This approach has ignored some post-transcriptional regulations and their effect on the ultimate protein expression levels. Despite a longstanding interest in the differences between the nuclear and cytosolic transcriptomes, it is only recently that data have become available to study such differences and their associated features on a genome-wide scale. Here, we compared the nuclear and cytosolic transcriptomes of HepG2 and HeLa cells. HepG2 and HeLa cells vary significantly in the differential compartmentalization of their transcript isoforms, indicating that nucleocytoplasmic compartmentalization is a cell-specific characteristic. The differential compartmentalization is manifested at the transcript isoform level instead of the gene level because alternative isoforms of one gene can display different nucleocytoplasmic distributions. The isoforms enriched in the cytosol tend to have more introns and longer introns in their pre-mRNAs. They have more functional RNA folds and unique exons in the 3′ regions. These isoforms are more conserved than the isoforms enriched in the nucleus. Surprisingly, the presence of microRNAs does not have a significant impact on the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of their target isoforms. In contrast, nonsense-mediated decay is significantly more associated with the isoforms enriched in the nucleus than those enriched in the cytosol. PMID:19969546

  14. Compartmental models: theory and practice using the SAAM II software system.

    PubMed

    Cobelli, C; Foster, D M

    1998-01-01

    Understanding in vivo the functioning of metabolic systems at the whole-body or regional level requires one to make some assumptions on how the system works and to describe them mathematically, that is, to postulate a model of the system. Models of systems can have different characteristics depending on the properties of the system and the database available for their study; they can be deterministic or stochastic, dynamic or static, with lumped or distributed parameters. Metabolic systems are dynamic systems and we focus here on the most widely used class of dynamic (differential equation) models: compartmental models. This is a class of models for which the governing law is conservation of mass. It is a very attractive class to users because it formalizes physical intuition in a simple and reasonable way. Compartmental models are lumped parameter models, in that the events in the system are described by a finite number of changing variables, and are thus described by ordinary differential equations. While stochastic compartment models can also be defined, we discuss here the deterministic versions--those that can work with exact relationships between model variables. These are the models most widely used in discussions of endocrinology and metabolism. In this chapter, we will discuss the theory of compartmental models, and then discuss how the SAAM II software system, a system designed specifically to aid in the development and testing of multicompartmental models, can be used. PMID:9781383

  15. Diminished viral replication and compartmentalization of hepatitis C virus in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Harouaka, Djamila; Engle, Ronald E.; Wollenberg, Kurt; Diaz, Giacomo; Tice, Ashley B.; Zamboni, Fausto; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Alter, Harvey; Kleiner, David E.; Farci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and quasispecies distribution within the tumor of patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can provide insight into the role of HCV in hepatocarcinogenesis and, conversely, the effect of HCC on the HCV lifecycle. In a comprehensive study of serum and multiple liver specimens from patients with HCC who underwent liver transplantation, we found a sharp and significant decrease in HCV RNA in the tumor compared with surrounding nontumorous tissues, but found no differences in multiple areas of control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Diminished HCV replication was not associated with changes in miR-122 expression. HCV genetic diversity was significantly higher in livers containing HCC compared with control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Tracking of individual variants demonstrated changes in the viral population between tumorous and nontumorous areas, the extent of which correlated with the decline in HCV RNA, suggesting HCV compartmentalization within the tumor. In contrast, compartmentalization was not observed between nontumorous areas and serum, or in controls between different areas of the cirrhotic liver or between liver and serum. Our findings indicate that HCV replication within the tumor is restricted and compartmentalized, suggesting segregation of specific viral variants in malignant hepatocytes. PMID:26787866

  16. Combined Noninvasive Imaging and Modeling Approaches Reveal Metabolic Compartmentation in the Barley Endosperm[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rolletschek, Hardy; Melkus, Gerd; Grafahrend-Belau, Eva; Fuchs, Johannes; Heinzel, Nicolas; Schreiber, Falk; Jakob, Peter M.; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    The starchy endosperm of cereals is a priori taken as a metabolically uniform tissue. By applying a noninvasive assay based on 13C/1H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains, we uncovered metabolic compartmentation in the endosperm. 13C-Suc feeding during grain filling showed that the primary site of Ala synthesis was the central region of the endosperm, the part of the caryopsis experiencing the highest level of hypoxia. Region-specific metabolism in the endosperm was characterized by flux balance analysis (FBA) and metabolite profiling. FBA predicts that in the central region of the endosperm, the tricarboxylic acid cycle shifts to a noncyclic mode, accompanied by elevated glycolytic flux and the accumulation of Ala. The metabolic compartmentation within the endosperm is advantageous for the grain's carbon and energy economy, with a prominent role being played by Ala aminotransferase. An investigation of caryopses with a genetically perturbed tissue pattern demonstrated that Ala accumulation is a consequence of oxygen status, rather than being either tissue specific or dependent on the supply of Suc. Hence the 13C-Ala gradient can be used as an in vivo marker for hypoxia. The combination of MRI and metabolic modeling offers opportunities for the noninvasive analysis of metabolic compartmentation in plants. PMID:21856793

  17. Near-infrared light responsive multi-compartmental hydrogel particles synthesized through droplets assembly induced by superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rongcong; Cao, Ye; Shi, Peng; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-12-10

    Light-responsive hydrogel particles with multi-compartmental structure are useful for applications in microreactors, drug delivery and tissue engineering because of their remotely-triggerable releasing ability and combinational functionalities. The current methods of synthesizing multi-compartmental hydrogel particles typically involve multi-step interrupted gelation of polysaccharides or complicated microfluidic procedures with limited throughput. In this study, a two-step sequential gelation process is developed to produce agarose/alginate double network multi-compartmental hydrogel particles using droplets assemblies induced by superhydrophobic surface as templates. The agarose/alginate double network multi-compartmental hydrogel particles can be formed with diverse hierarchical structures showing combinational functionalities. The synthesized hydrogel particles, when loaded with polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles that act as photothermal nanotransducers, are demonstrated to function as near-infrared (NIR) light triggerable and deformation-free hydrogel materials. Periodic NIR laser switching is applied to stimulate these hydrogel particles, and pulsatile release profiles are collected. Compared with massive reagents released from single-compartmental hydrogel particles, more regulated release profiles of the multi-compartmental hydrogel particles are observed. PMID:25059988

  18. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2016-01-01

    The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a K m of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a K m of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose. PMID:27190649

  19. New Insight into the Mechanism of Accumulation and Intraerythrocytic Compartmentation of Albitiazolium, a New Type of Antimalarial

    PubMed Central

    Tran Van Ba, Christophe; Maynadier, Marjorie; Bordat, Yann; Perez, Julie; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bis-thiazolium salts constitute a new class of antihematozoan drugs that inhibit parasite phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. They specifically accumulate in Plasmodium- and Babesia-infected red blood cells (IRBC). Here, we provide new insight into the choline analogue albitiazolium, which is currently being clinically tested against severe malaria. Concentration-dependent accumulation in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes reached steady state after 90 to 120 min and was massive throughout the blood cycle, with cellular accumulation ratios of up to 1,000. This could not occur through a lysosomotropic effect, and the extent did not depend on the food vacuole pH, which was the case for the weak base chloroquine. Analysis of albitiazolium accumulation in P. falciparum IRBC revealed a high-affinity component that was restricted to mature stages and suppressed by pepstatin A treatment, and thus likely related to drug accumulation in the parasite food vacuole. Albitiazolium also accumulated in a second high-capacity component present throughout the blood cycle that was likely not related to the food vacuole and also observed with Babesia divergens-infected erythrocytes. Accumulation was strictly glucose dependent, drastically inhibited by H+/K+ and Na+ ionophores upon collapse of ionic gradients, and appeared to be energized by the proton-motive force across the erythrocyte plasma membrane, indicating the importance of transport steps for this permanently charged new type of antimalarial agent. This specific, massive, and irreversible accumulation allows albitiazolium to restrict its toxicity to hematozoa-infected erythrocytes. The intraparasitic compartmentation of albitiazolium corroborates a dual mechanism of action, which could make this new type of antimalarial agent resistant to parasite resistance. PMID:25001307

  20. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  1. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  2. Intracellular ion channels and cancer.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; Biasutto, Lucia; Managò, Antonella; Gulbins, Erich; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2013-01-01

    Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome, and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K(+) channels (Ca(2+)-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K(+) channel-3 (TASK-3)), Ca(2+) uniporter MCU, Mg(2+)-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC) and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP) contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, the ER-located Ca(2+) depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1), a component of the store-operated Ca(2+) channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:24027528

  3. Intracellular accumulation of azithromycin by cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Gladue, R P; Snider, M E

    1990-01-01

    Azithromycin was shown to achieve high concentrations in human skin fibroblasts. Intracellular penetration occurred rapidly (10 micrograms/mg of cellular protein after 3 h) and then increased progressively over a 3-day period; azithromycin accumulated up to 21 times more than erythromycin (61.1 versus 2.9 micrograms/mg of protein). Uptake was dependent on the extracellular concentration, was inhibited at 4 degrees C, did not occur in nonviable cells, and was reduced by a low pH. Intracellular accumulation was not affected by the metabolic inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol or sodium fluoride or by the nucleoside transport inhibitor 2-chloradenosine. Once concentrated in cells, azithromycin remained intracellular and was released slowly in the absence of extracellular drug, compared with erythromycin (17 versus 78% released after 1 h). After 48 h of incubation in drug-free medium, 27% of the initial amount of azithromycin remained cell associated. The release of azithromycin was not affected by various monokines reported to stimulate fibroblasts (interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor) or by exposure to bacteria. Incubation of azithromycin-loaded fibroblasts with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes resulted in a higher intracellular accumulation of azithromycin in polymorphonuclear leukocytes than in cells incubated with free nonintracellular azithromycin for the same time (8.3 versus 2.2 micrograms/ml after 2 h), suggesting a more efficient or rapid uptake through cell-to-cell interaction. The widespread distribution of fibroblasts in tissues suggests a potential for these cells, and possibly other lysosome-containing tissue cells, to serve as a reservoir for azithromycin, slowly releasing it for activity against extracellular organisms at sites of infection and passing it to phagocytes for activity against intracellular pathogens and potential transport to sites of infection. PMID:2168141

  4. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  5. The molecular environment of intracellular sodium: 23Na NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rooney, W D; Springer, C S

    1991-10-01

    The comprehensive approach described in the accompanying paper is illustrated here with the 23Na signal of a concentrated solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in saline and the intracellular (Nai) 23Na resonance of a dense suspension of Na(+)-loaded yeast cells. We use frequency shift reagents to discriminate the latter from the extracellular resonance. We find that the Nai signal corresponds to that of an effective single population of Na+ ions exhibiting a single type c spectrum. This is true despite the fact that the yeast protoplasm is too large and too compartmentalized for a given Na+ ion to sample its entirety on the relevant NMR timescale. Our results show clearly that, in addition to the decay of transverse magnetization, the recovery of longitudinal magnetization is biexponential. This is required for a type c spectrum but has not often been detected. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate constants of the Nai resonance is not consistent with either a simple Debye process or a discrete exchange mechanism connecting two sites in the fast limit. We have fitted the data using an asymmetric continuous distribution of correlation times for the fluctuations of electric field gradients sensed by the Nai nuclei. The analogous distribution function for the Na+ in a 44% (w/w) BSA solution is quite similar to that of the Nai at the same temperature. This suggests that while the macromolecular environment of the Nai ions is quite congested, it is also isotropic on quite a small spatial scale. Also, one can use the correlation time distribution function, obtained from fitting the relaxation data, to calculate a relaxometry curve. This is useful because experimental 23Na relaxometry is difficult. The calculated curve may be a reasonable model for the mostly extracellular 23Na resonance encountered in vivo. PMID:1751346

  6. Synthesis of Photo- and pH Dual-Sensitive Amphiphilic Copolymer PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) and Its Micellization as Leakage-Free Drug Delivery System for UV-Triggered Intracellular Delivery of Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xubo; Qi, Mingzhu; Liang, Shuo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Jia, Xu; Li, Jiagen; Liu, Peng

    2016-08-31

    Novel photo- and pH dual-sensitive amphiphilic copolymers containing photolabile o-nitrobenzyl (NB) groups were designed via combination of ATRP, hydrolyzation, and simple esterification reaction and self-assembled into stimuli-regulated amphiphilic micelles in aqueous solution. On the basis of the optimization of the morphology and particle size of the micelles via modulating the number of the photocleavable o-nitrobenzyl acrylate (NBA) units, the unique ones assembled from PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) with an average hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of 163 nm was selected as a potential drug delivery system (DDS) for UV-triggered delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). The micelles possessed a favorable drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 27.5%, with the hydrodynamic diameter of 213 nm after DOX-loading. Most importantly, the DOX-loaded PEG43-b-P(AA76-co-NBA35-co-tBA9) micelles exhibited a cumulative DOX release ratio of only 3.69% in the simulated physiological medium within 6 days without UV-irradiation, indicating their potential as leakage-free DDS. As in the acidic media mimicking the tumor microenvironment, a high cumulative DOX release ratio of 74.70% was achieved within 6 days after UV-irradiation for 20 min, showing a sustained release behavior. Under UV-irradiation, the photolabile o-nitrobenzyl moieties were cleaved off, the amphiphilic copolymer transformed into a water-soluble polymer, favoring the metabolism of drug carriers, and the micelles were demicellized to accelerate the drug release in a triggered or on-demand manner. PMID:27513439

  7. The Role of Cell Compartmentalization and Cell Differentiation in Cyanobacterial Excavation of Miineral Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Guida, B. S.; Couradeau, E.

    2015-12-01

    The bioerosion of coastal limestones and biogenic carbonates by boring filamentous or pseudo-filamentous cyanobacteria is not only a geomicrobial phenomenon of global proportions, but also plays an important role in the demise of coral reefs, and affects significantly human enterprises like bivalve fisheries. In spite of its importance, the mechanism by which cyanobacteria excavate carbonates constitutes an apparent paradox, in that their metabolism will tend to precipitate carbonates, not dissolved them. We have previously advanced, and obtained evidence for, a mechanism of excavation that relies on the uptake of Ca2+ by cells at the boring front, its trans-cellular transport along the filaments, and its eventual active excretion at the solid/liquid interface. It was postulated that the mechanism involved the strategically organized deployment of Ca2+ transport enzymes like P-type Ca2+ ATPases and Ca2+ channels. Here we present evidence that confirms this basic mechanism, but also reveals that it is based on an unexpected level of cellular complexity. The model organism Mastigocoleus testarum BC008, transports Ca2+ from the mineral to the external medium using a repetitive, polar arrangement of Ca2+ ATPases, localized preferentially on one cellular pole, in a ring conformation on the cell membrane adjacent to the trans-cellular septum, pumping Ca2+ locally towards the periplasmic space, from which it passively enters the next cell. This strain also develops specialized groups of cells, which we named calcicytes, often but not exclusively located at the ends of filaments, that accumulate large concentrations of Ca2+, some 40-fold higher than typical in microbes, and seem to act as sinks or capacitors in the trans-cellular Ca2+ transport. Calcicytes are also characterized by a lack of photosynthetic pigments, and a very high intracellular pH. These cellular adaptations can also be found in evolutionary distant euendoliths such as the pseudofilamentous Hyella sp.

  8. Photosynthetic Characteristics of Portulaca grandiflora, a Succulent C(4) Dicot : CELLULAR COMPARTMENTATION OF ENZYMES AND ACID METABOLISM.

    PubMed

    Ku, S B; Shieh, Y J; Reger, B J; Black, C C

    1981-11-01

    The succulent, cylindrical leaves of the C(4) dicot Portulaca grandiflora possess three distinct green cell types: bundle sheath cells (BSC) in radial arrangement around the vascular bundles; mesophyll cells (MC) in an outer layer adjacent to the BSC; and water storage cells (WSC) in the leaf center. Unlike typical Kranz leaf anatomy, the MC do not surround the bundle sheath tissue but occur only in the area between the bundle sheath and the epidermis. Intercellular localization of photosynthetic enzymes was characterized using protoplasts isolated enzymatically from all three green cell types.Like other C(4) plants, P. grandiflora has ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the decarboxylating enzyme, NADP(+)-malic enzyme, in the BSC. Unlike other C(4) plants, however, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, and NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase of the C(4) pathway were present in all three green cell types, indicating that all are capable of fixing CO(2) via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and regenerating phosphoenolpyruvate. Other enzymes were about equally distributed between MC and BSC similar to other C(4) plants. The enzyme profile of the WSC was similar to that of the MC but with reduced activity in most enzymes, except mitochondrion-associated enzymes.Intracellular localization of enzymes was studied in organelles partitioned by differential centrifugation using mechanically ruptured mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was a cytosolic enzyme in both cells; whereas, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and NADP(+)-malic enzyme were exclusively compartmentalized in the bundle sheath chloroplasts. NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, aspartate aminotransferase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, and NADP(+)-triose-P dehydrogenase were predominantly localized in the chloroplasts while alanine aminotransferase and NAD(+)-malate dehydrogenase were mainly present in the cytosol of both cell types. Based

  9. Development and testing of a compartmentalized reaction network model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, R.H.; Loague, K.; Kent, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The work reported here is the first part of a larger effort focused on efficient numerical simulation of redox zone development in contaminated aquifers. The sequential use of various electron acceptors, which is governed by the energy yield of each reaction, gives rise to redox zones. The large difference in energy yields between the various redox reactions leads to systems of equations that are extremely ill-conditioned. These equations are very difficult to solve, especially in the context of coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical simulations. We have developed a general, rational method to solve such systems where we focus on the dominant reactions, compartmentalizing them in a manner that is analogous to the redox zones that are often observed in the field. The compartmentalized approach allows us to easily solve a complex geochemical system as a function of time and energy yield, laying the foundation for our ongoing work in which we couple the reaction network, for the development of redox zones, to a model of subsurface fluid flow and solute transport. Our method (1) solves the numerical system without evoking a redox parameter, (2) improves the numerical stability of redox systems by choosing which compartment and thus which reaction network to use based upon the concentration ratios of key constituents, (3) simulates the development of redox zones as a function of time without the use of inhibition factors or switching functions, and (4) can reduce the number of transport equations that need to be solved in space and time. We show through the use of various model performance evaluation statistics that the appropriate compartment choice under different geochemical conditions leads to numerical solutions without significant error. The compartmentalized approach described here facilitates the next phase of this effort where we couple the redox zone reaction network to models of fluid flow and solute transport.

  10. Study of compartmentalization in the visna clinical form of small ruminant lentivirus infection in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A central nervous system (CNS) disease outbreak caused by small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) has triggered interest in Spain due to the rapid onset of clinical signs and relevant production losses. In a previous study on this outbreak, the role of LTR in tropism was unclear and env encoded sequences, likely involved in tropism, were not investigated. This study aimed to analyze heterogeneity of SRLV Env regions - TM amino terminal and SU V4, C4 and V5 segments - in order to assess virus compartmentalization in CNS. Results Eight Visna (neurologically) affected sheep of the outbreak were used. Of the 350 clones obtained after PCR amplification, 142 corresponded to CNS samples (spinal cord and choroid plexus) and the remaining to mammary gland, blood cells, bronchoalveolar lavage cells and/or lung. The diversity of the env sequences from CNS was 11.1-16.1% between animals and 0.35-11.6% within each animal, except in one animal presenting two sequence types (30% diversity) in the CNS (one grouping with those of the outbreak), indicative of CNS virus sequence heterogeneity. Outbreak sequences were of genotype A, clustering per animal and compartmentalizing in the animal tissues. No CNS specific signature patterns were found. Conclusions Bayesian approach inferences suggested that proviruses from broncoalveolar lavage cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells represented the common ancestors (infecting viruses) in the animal and that neuroinvasion in the outbreak involved microevolution after initial infection with an A-type strain. This study demonstrates virus compartmentalization in the CNS and other body tissues in sheep presenting the neurological form of SRLV infection. PMID:22281181

  11. Excimer laser channel creation in polyethersulfone hollow fibers for compartmentalized in vitro neuronal cell culture scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Brayfield, Candace A; Marra, Kacey G; Leonard, John P; Tracy Cui, X; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2008-03-01

    Hollow fiber scaffolds that compartmentalize axonal processes from their cell bodies can enable neuronal cultures with directed neurite outgrowth within a three-dimensional (3-D) space for controlling neuronal cell networking in vitro. Controllable 3-D neuronal networks in vitro could provide tools for studying neurobiological events. In order to create such a scaffold, polyethersulfone (PES) microporous hollow fibers were ablated with a KrF excimer laser to generate specifically designed channels for directing neurite outgrowth into the luminal compartments of the fibers. Excimer laser modification is demonstrated as a reproducible method to generate 5microm diameter channels within PES hollow fiber walls that allow compartmentalization of neuronal cell bodies from their axons. Laser modification of counterpart flat sheet PES membranes with peak surface fluences of 1.2Jcm(-2) results in increased hydrophobicity and laminin adsorption on the surface compared with the unmodified PES surface. This is correlated to enhanced PC12 cell adhesion with increasing fluence onto laser-modified PES membrane surfaces coated with laminin when compared with unmodified surfaces. Adult rat neural progenitor cells differentiated on PES fibers with laser-created channels resulted in spontaneous cell process growth into the channels of the scaffold wall while preventing entrance of cell bodies. Therefore, laser-modified PES fibers serve as scaffolds with channels conducive to directing neuronal cell process growth. These hollow fiber scaffolds can potentially be used in combination with perfusion and oxygenation hollow fiber membrane sets to construct a hollow fiber-based 3-D bioreactor for controlling and studying in vitro neuronal networking in three dimensions between compartmentalized cultures. PMID:18060849

  12. Directed clustering in driven compartmentalized granular gas systems in zero gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Hou, M.; Evesque, P.

    2011-12-01

    Clustering of shaken fluidized granular matter in connected compartments has been observed and studied in the laboratory. This clustering behavior in granular gas systems is related to the dissipative nature of granular system, and therefore shall not depend on gravity. This clustering phenomenon in compartmental configuration may provide a means for particle depletion and transportation in microgravity environment. In this work we propose different configurations for possible directed clustering in zero gravity. The related experiment has been planned for the Chinese satellite SJ-10.

  13. Stop and restart of granular clock in a vibrated compartmentalized bidisperse granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi-Yi; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jiang, Rui; Wu, Yong-Hong

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a bidisperse granular mixture consisting of two species of stainless steel spheres in a vertically vibrated compartmentalized container. The experiments show that with proper vibration acceleration, the granular clock stops when horizontal segregation of the large spheres residing in the far end from the barrier wall occurs. When the segregation is broken, the granular clock restarts. We present the phase diagrams of vibration acceleration versus container width and small particle number, which exhibits three different regions, namely, clustering state, stop-restart of the granular clock, and the granular clock. A generalized flux model is proposed to reproduce the phenomenon of stop and restart of the granular clock.

  14. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Jurgen R; Bakker, Barbara M; Michels, Paul A M

    2014-11-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei. The recent finding of pore-forming activities in glycosomal membrane preparations and extensions of the trypanosome glycolysis computer model with size-selective pores sparked again an old debate on the extent of (im)permeability of the glycosomal membrane and whether glycosomally located glycolytic enzymes could and should also be present with some activity in the cytosol. This review presents a critical discussion of the experimental and theoretical evidence for and against the different hypotheses. PMID:25476771

  15. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  16. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  17. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  18. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  19. Inhibition of Glutathione Biosynthesis Alters Compartmental Redox Status and the Thiol Proteome in Organogenesis-Stage Rat Conceptuses

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Craig; Shuster, Daniel Z.; Gomez, Rosaicela Roman; Sant, Karilyn E.; Reed, Matthew S.; Pohl, Jan; Hansen, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    significant net oxidation was seen in the BSO-treated AF compartment after 6 hr. Biotinylated iodoacetamide (BIAM) labeling of proteins revealed the significant thiol-oxidation of many EMB proteins following BSO treatment. Quantitative changes in the thiol proteome, associated with developmentally-relevant pathways, were detected using isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling and mass spectroscopy. Adaptive pathways were selectively enriched with increased concentrations of proteins involved in mRNA processing (splicesome) and mRNA stabilization (glycolysis, GAPDH), as well as, protein synthesis (aminoacyl-tRNA) and protein folding (antigen processing, Hsp70, protein disulfide isomerase). These results show the ability of chemical and environmental modulators to selectively alter compartmental intracellular and extracellular GSH and Cys concentrations and change their corresponding Eh within the intact viable conceptus. The altered Eh were also of sufficient magnitude to alter the redox proteome and change relative protein concentrations suggesting that the mechanistic links through which environmental factors inform and regulate developmental signaling pathways may be discovered using systems developmental biology techniques. PMID:23736079

  20. Inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis alters compartmental redox status and the thiol proteome in organogenesis-stage rat conceptuses.

    PubMed

    Harris, Craig; Shuster, Daniel Z; Roman Gomez, Rosaicela; Sant, Karilyn E; Reed, Matthew S; Pohl, Jan; Hansen, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    oxidation was seen in the BSO-treated AF compartment after 6 h. Biotinylated iodoacetamide (BIAM) labeling of proteins revealed the significant thiol oxidation of many EMB proteins following BSO treatment. Quantitative changes in the thiol proteome, associated with developmentally relevant pathways, were detected using isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling and mass spectroscopy. Adaptive pathways were selectively enriched with increased concentrations of proteins involved in mRNA processing (splicesome) and mRNA stabilization (glycolysis, GAPDH), as well as protein synthesis (aminoacyl-tRNA) and protein folding (antigen processing, Hsp70, protein disulfide isomerase). These results show the ability of chemical and environmental modulators to selectively alter compartmental intracellular and extracellular GSH and Cys concentrations and change their corresponding E(h) within the intact viable conceptus. The altered E(h) were also of sufficient magnitude to alter the redox proteome and change relative protein concentrations, suggesting that the mechanistic links through which environmental factors inform and regulate developmental signaling pathways may be discovered using systems developmental biology techniques. PMID:23736079

  1. Intracellular alkalization causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Fumitaka; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Tomoko; Shima, Asako; Shibasaki, Koji; Inada, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Takaaki; Tominaga, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate cells require a very narrow pH range for survival. Cells accordingly possess sensory and defense mechanisms for situations where the pH deviates from the viable range. Although the monitoring of acidic pH by sensory neurons has been attributed to several ion channels, including transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), the mechanisms by which these cells detect alkaline pH are not well understood. Here, using Ca2+ imaging and patch-clamp recording, we showed that alkaline pH activated transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) and that activation of this ion channel was involved in nociception. In addition, intracellular alkalization activated TRPA1 at the whole-cell level, and single-channel openings were observed in the inside-out configuration, indicating that alkaline pH activated TRPA1 from the inside. Analyses of mutants suggested that the two N-terminal cysteine residues in TRPA1 were involved in activation by intracellular alkalization. Furthermore, intraplantar injection of ammonium chloride into the mouse hind paw caused pain-related behaviors that were not observed in TRPA1-deficient mice. These results suggest that alkaline pH causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 and may provide a molecular explanation for some of the human alkaline pH–related sensory disorders whose mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:19033673

  2. A lipid based multi-compartmental system: Liposomes-in-double emulsion for oral vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Liau, Jin Jau; Hook, Sarah; Prestidge, Clive A; Barnes, Timothy J

    2015-11-01

    The gastric mucosa provides the entry point for the majority of pathogens, as well as being the induction site for protective immunity; however, there remain few examples of oral vaccines due to the challenges presented by the gastrointestinal route. In this study, we develop a lipid-based multi-compartmental system for oral vaccine delivery. Specifically, we have optimised the formulation of a water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion prepared from a triglyceride - soya bean oil, using surfactants Span 80/Tween 80 and Pluronic F127 to stabilise the internal and external water phases, respectively. Into the internal water phase, we also incorporated a PEGylated liposome, prepared using hydrogenated phosphatidyl choline as a carrier for our model protein, FITC-labelled ovalbumin. We demonstrated the successful incorporation of intact liposomes into the internal water phase of the double emulsion using imaging techniques including cryo-SEM and confocal microscopy. Finally, we use in vitro release studies of FITC-ovalbumin, to provide further confirmation of the multi-compartmental structure of the double emulsion system and demonstrate significant extended release of the entrapped model antigen compared with PEG-liposomes; these characteristics are attractive for oral vaccine delivery. PMID:26455337

  3. Compartmentalized self-replication: a novel method for the directed evolution of polymerases and other enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ghadessy, Farid J; Holliger, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) is a novel method for the directed evolution of enzymes and, in particular, polymerases. In its simplest form, CSR consists of a simple feedback loop involving a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene (self-replication). Self-replication occurs in discrete, spatially separate, noncommunicating compartments formed by a heat-stable water-in-oil emulsion. Compartmentalization ensures the linkage of phenotype and genotype (i.e., it ensures that each polymerase replicates only its own encoding gene to the exclusion of those in the other compartments). As a result, adaptive gains by the polymerase directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding polymerase gene. CSR has proven to be a useful strategy for the directed evolution of polymerases directly from diverse repertoires of polymerase genes. In this chapter, we describe some of the CSR protocols used successfully to evolve variants of T. aquaticus Pol I (Taq) polymerase with novel and useful properties, such as increased thermostability or resistance to the potent inhibitor, heparin, from a repertoire of randomly mutated Taq polymerase genes. PMID:17041269

  4. Metabolism of monoterpenes: evidence for compartmentation of l-menthone metabolism in peppermint (Mentha piperita) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Martinkus, C.; Croteau, R.

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the monoterpene ketone l-(G-/sup 3/H)-menthone is reduced to the epimeric alcohols l-menthol and d-neomenthol in leaf discs of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), and that a portion of the menthol is converted to menthyl acetate while the bulk of the neomenthol is transformed to neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside. When l-(3-/sup 3/H)menthol and d-(3-/sup 3/H)neomenthol are separately administered to leaf discs, both menthyl and neomenthyl acetates and menthyl and neomenthyl glucosides are formed with nearly equal facility, suggesting that the metabolic specificity observed with the ketone precursor was not a function of the specificity of the transglucosylase or transacetylase but rather a result of compartmentation of each stereospecific dehydrogenase with the appropriate transferase. Co-purification of the acceptor-mediated activities, and differential activation and inhibition studies, provided strong evidence that the same UDP-glucose-dependent enzyme could transfer glucose to either l-menthol or d-neometnthol. These results demonstrate that the specific in vivo conversion of l-menthone to l-menthyl acetate and d-neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside cannot be attributed to the selectivity of the transferases, and they clearly indicate that the metabolic specificity observed is a result of compartmentation effects.

  5. A compartmental-spatial system dynamics approach to ground water modeling.

    PubMed

    Roach, Jesse; Tidwell, Vince

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially distributed ground water flow models can prove unsuitable for the rapid, interactive analysis that is increasingly demanded to support a participatory decision environment. To address this shortcoming, we extend the idea of multiple cell (Bear 1979) and compartmental (Campana and Simpson 1984) ground water models developed within the context of spatial system dynamics (Ahmad and Simonovic 2004) for rapid scenario analysis. We term this approach compartmental-spatial system dynamics (CSSD). The goal is to balance spatial aggregation necessary to achieve a real-time integrative and interactive decision environment while maintaining sufficient model complexity to yield a meaningful representation of the regional ground water system. As a test case, a 51-compartment CSSD model was built and calibrated from a 100,0001 cell MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh 1988) model of the Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico (McAda and Barroll 2002). Seventy-seven percent of historical drawdowns predicted by the MODFLOW model were within 1 m of the corresponding CSSD estimates, and in 80% of the historical model run years the CSSD model estimates of river leakage, reservoir leakage, ground water flow to agricultural drains, and riparian evapotranspiration were within 30% of the corresponding estimates from McAda and Barroll (2002), with improved model agreement during the scenario period. Comparisons of model results demonstrate both advantages and limitations of the CCSD model approach. PMID:19459984

  6. Synaptic compartmentalization by micropatterned masking of a surface adhesive cue in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Jang, Min Jee; Jo, Youhwa; Joo, Sunghoon; Lee, Do Hoon; Lee, Byung Yang; Nam, Yoonkey; Sun, Woong

    2016-06-01

    Functions of neuronal circuit are fundamentally modulated by its quality and quantity of connections. Assessment of synapse, the basic unit for a neuronal connection, is labor-intensive and time-consuming in conventional culture systems, due to the small size and the spatially random distribution. In the present study, we propose a novel 'synapse compartmentalization' culture system, in which synapses are concentrated at controlled locations. We fabricated a negative dot array pattern by coating the entire surface with poly-l-lysine (PLL) and subsequent microcontact printing of 1) substrates which mask positive charge of PLL (Fc, BSA and laminin), or 2) a chemorepulsive protein (Semaphorin 3F-Fc). By combination of physical and biological features of these repulsive substrates, functional synapses were robustly concentrated in the PLL-coated dots. This synapse compartmentalization chip can be combined with the various high-throughput assay formats based on the synaptic morphology and function. Therefore, this quantifiable and controllable dot array pattern by microcontact printing will be potential useful for bio-chip platforms for the high-density assays used in synapse-related neurobiological studies. PMID:27035488

  7. Modeling the Kinetics of a Memory-Associated Immediate Early Gene's Compartmental Expression After Sensory Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willats, Adam; Ivanova, Tamara; Prinz, Astrid; Liu, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Immediate Early Genes (IEGs) are rapidly and transiently transcribed in neurons after a sensory experience. Some of these genes act as effector IEGs, which mediate specific effects on cellular function. Arc is one such effector IEG that is essential for synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation in hippocampus and cortex. The expression of Arc in neurons has previously been examined using an imaging method known as Compartmental Analysis of Temporal Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization. Previous work found that the time course of Arc expression within the nuclear and perinuclear cytoplasmic compartments of a neuron is altered by prior sensory experience. We explore a simple model of the kinetics of IEG transcription and nuclear export, with the aim of eventually uncovering possible mechanisms for how experience alters expression kinetics. Thus far, we characterize our compartmental model using phase-plane analysis and validate it against several IEG expression data sets, including one where prior experience with vocalizing mice alters the time course of call-induced Arc expression in the auditory cortex of a listening mouse. Our model provides a framework to explore why Arc expression may change depending on a receiver's past sound experience and internal state. Adam Willats was supported by NIH Training Grant 5T90DA032466. This research was also supported by NIDCD R01 DC8343.

  8. Subcellular compartmentalization of docking protein-1 contributes to progression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Teresa; Söhn, Michaela; Gutting, Tobias; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Ebert, Matthias P A; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-06-01

    Full-length (FL) docking protein-1 (DOK1) is an adapter protein which inhibits growth factor and immune response pathways in normal tissues, but is frequently lost in human cancers. Small DOK1 variants remain in cells of solid tumors and leukemias, albeit, their functions are elusive. To assess the so far unknown role of DOK1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), we generated DOK1 mutants which mimic the domain structure and subcellular distribution of DOK1 protein variants in leukemia patients. We found that cytoplasmic DOK1 activated peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPARγ) resulting in inhibition of the c-FOS promoter and cell proliferation, whereas nuclear DOK1 was inactive. PPARγ-agonist increased expression of endogenous DOK1 and interaction with PPARγ. Forward translation of this cell-based signaling model predicted compartmentalization of DOK1 in patients. In a large series of CRC patients, loss of DOK1 protein was associated with poor prognosis at early tumor stages (*p=0.001; n=1492). In tumors with cytoplasmic expression of DOK1, survival was improved, whereas nuclear localization of DOK1 correlated with poor outcome, indicating that compartmentalization of DOK1 is critical for CRC progression. Thus, DOK1 was identified as a prognostic factor for non-metastatic CRC, and, via its drugability by PPARγ-agonist, may constitute a potential target for future cancer treatments. PMID:27428427

  9. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    PubMed Central

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  10. Intramuscular Innervation of Primate Extraocular Muscles: Unique Compartmentalization in Horizontal Recti

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Costa, Roberta Martins; Kung, Jennifer; Poukens, Vadims; Yoo, Lawrence; Tychsen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. It has been proposed that the lateral rectus (LR), like many skeletal and craniofacial muscles, comprises multiple neuromuscular compartments subserving different physiological functions. To explore the anatomic potential of compartmentalization in all four rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs), evidence was sought of possible regional selectivity in intramuscular innervation of all rectus EOMs. Methods. Whole orbits of two humans and one macaque monkey were serially sectioned at 10 μm thickness and stained with Masson's trichrome. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed of the intramuscular courses of motor nerves from the deep orbit to the anterior extents of their arborizations within all four rectus EOMs in each orbit. Results. Findings concorded in monkey and human orbits. Externally to the global surface of the lateral (LR) and medial rectus (MR) EOMs, motor nerve trunks bifurcated into approximately equal-sized branches before entering the global layer and observing a segregation of subsequent arborization into superior zones that exhibited minimal overlap along the length of the LR and only modest overlap for MR. In contrast, intramuscular branches of the superior and the nasal portion of the inferior rectus were highly mixed. Conclusions. Consistent segregation of intramuscular motor nerve arborization suggests functionally distinct superior and inferior zones within the horizontal rectus EOMs in both humans and monkeys. Reduced or absent compartmentalization in vertical rectus EOMs supports a potential functional role for differential innervation in horizontal rectus zones that could mediate previously unrecognized vertical oculorotary actions. PMID:21220556

  11. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    PubMed

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25451863

  12. Vacuolar compartmentalization as indispensable component of heavy metal detoxification in plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shanti S; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2016-05-01

    Plant cells orchestrate an array of molecular mechanisms for maintaining plasmatic concentrations of essential heavy metal (HM) ions, for example, iron, zinc and copper, within the optimal functional range. In parallel, concentrations of non-essential HMs and metalloids, for example, cadmium, mercury and arsenic, should be kept below their toxicity threshold levels. Vacuolar compartmentalization is central to HM homeostasis. It depends on two vacuolar pumps (V-ATPase and V-PPase) and a set of tonoplast transporters, which are directly driven by proton motive force, and primary ATP-dependent pumps. While HM non-hyperaccumulator plants largely sequester toxic HMs in root vacuoles, HM hyperaccumulators usually sequester them in leaf cell vacuoles following efficient long-distance translocation. The distinct strategies evolved as a consequence of organ-specific differences particularly in vacuolar transporters and in addition to distinct features in long-distance transport. Recent molecular and functional characterization of tonoplast HM transporters has advanced our understanding of their contribution to HM homeostasis, tolerance and hyperaccumulation. Another important part of the dynamic vacuolar sequestration syndrome involves enhanced vacuolation. It involves vesicular trafficking in HM detoxification. The present review provides an updated account of molecular aspects that contribute to the vacuolar compartmentalization of HMs. PMID:26729300

  13. Detecting compartmental non-Gaussian diffusion with symmetrized double-PFG MRI.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Özarslan, Evren; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion in tissue and porous media is known to be non-Gaussian and has been used for clinical indications of stroke and other tissue pathologies. However, when conventional NMR techniques are applied to biological tissues and other heterogeneous materials, the presence of multiple compartments (pores) with different Gaussian diffusivities will also contribute to the measurement of non-Gaussian behavior. Here we present symmetrized double PFG (sd-PFG), which can separate these two contributions to non-Gaussian signal decay as having distinct angular modulation frequencies. In contrast to prior angular d-PFG methods, sd-PFG can unambiguously extract kurtosis as an oscillation from samples with isotropic or uniformly oriented anisotropic pores, and can generally extract a combination of compartmental anisotropy and kurtosis. The method further fixes its sensitivity with respect to the time dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient. We experimentally demonstrate the measurement of the fourth cumulant (kurtosis) of diffusion and find it consistent with theoretical predictions. By enabling the unambiguous identification of contributions of compartmental kurtosis to the signal, sd-PFG has the potential to help identify the underlying micro-structural changes corresponding to current kurtosis based diagnostics, and act as a novel source of contrast to better resolve tissue micro-structure. PMID:26434812

  14. HIV-1 in genital tract and plasma of women: Compartmentalization of viral sequences, coreceptor usage, and glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Kemal, Kimdar Sherefa; Foley, Brian; Burger, Harold; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard; Kitchen, Christina; Philpott, Sean M.; Gao, Wei; Robison, Esther; Holman, Susan; Dehner, Carolyn; Beck, Suzanne; Meyer, William A.; Landay, Alan; Kovacs, Andrea; Bremer, James; Weiser, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Worldwide, 90% of HIV-1 infections are transmitted heterosexually. Because the genital mucosa are the sites of initial contact with HIV-1 for most exposed individuals, study of the virus from the genital tract is critical for the development of vaccines and therapeutics. Previous analyses of HIV-1 in various tissues have documented compartmentalization of viral genomes. Whether compartmentalization was associated with viral phenotypic differences or immune status, however, was not well understood. We compared HIV-1 gp120 env sequences from the genital tract and plasma of 12 women. Eight women displayed compartmentalized HIV-1 RNA genomes, with viral sequences from each site that were clearly discrete, yet phylogenetically related. The remaining four exhibited env sequences that were intermingled between the two sites. Women with compartmentalized HIV-1 genomes had higher CD4+ cell counts than those displaying intermingled strains (P = 0.02). Intrapatient HIV-1 recombinants comprising sequences that were characteristic of both sites were identified. We next compared viral phenotypes in each compartment. HIV-1 coreceptor usage was often compartmentalized (P ≤ 0.01). The number of N-linked glycosylation sites, associated with neutralization resistance, also differed between compartments (P < 0.01). Furthermore, disparities between the density of gp120 glycosylations in each compartment correlated with higher CD4+ counts (P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that the genital tract and plasma can harbor populations of replicating HIV-1 with different phenotypes. The association of higher CD4+ cell counts with compartmentalization of viral genomes and density of gp120 glycosylations suggests that the immune response influences the development of viral genotypes in each compartment. These findings are relevant to the prevention and control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:14557540

  15. Secretome of obligate intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Kaur, Simran J.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen; Sears, Khandra T.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae) is comprised of obligate intracellular parasites, with virulent species of interest both as causes of emerging infectious diseases and for their potential deployment as bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no effective commercially available vaccines, with treatment limited primarily to tetracycline antibiotics, although others (e.g. josamycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin) are also effective. Much of the recent research geared toward understanding mechanisms underlying rickettsial pathogenicity has centered on characterization of secreted proteins that directly engage eukaryotic cells. Herein, we review all aspects of the Rickettsia secretome, including six secretion systems, 19 characterized secretory proteins, and potential moonlighting proteins identified on surfaces of multiple Rickettsia species. Employing bioinformatics and phylogenomics, we present novel structural and functional insight on each secretion system. Unexpectedly, our investigation revealed that the majority of characterized secretory proteins have not been assigned to their cognate secretion pathways. Furthermore, for most secretion pathways, the requisite signal sequences mediating translocation are poorly understood. As a blueprint for all known routes of protein translocation into host cells, this resource will assist research aimed at uniting characterized secreted proteins with their apposite secretion pathways. Furthermore, our work will help in the identification of novel secreted proteins involved in rickettsial ‘life on the inside’. PMID:25168200

  16. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  17. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  18. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm. PMID:26235337

  19. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na+/K+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na+/K+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. PMID:26173069

  20. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  1. Intracellular diffusion of adenosine phosphates is locally restricted in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Eimre, Margus; Seppet, Evelin; Peet, Nadezda; Andrienko, Tatiana; Lemba, Maris; Engelbrecht, Jiiri; Seppet, Enn K; Saks, Valdur A

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the structural and functional interactions between mitochondria, myofibrils and sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac cells. Direct channeling of adenosine phosphates between organelles identified in the experiments indicates that diffusion of adenosine phosphates is limited in cardiac cells due to very specific intracellular structural organization. However, the mode of diffusion restrictions and nature of the intracellular structures in creating the diffusion barriers is still unclear, and, therefore, a subject of active research. The aim of this work is to analyze the possible role of two principally different modes of restriction distribution for adenosine phosphates (a) the uniform diffusion restriction and (b) the localized diffusion limitation in the vicinity of mitochondria, by fitting the experimental data with the mathematical model. The reaction-diffusion model of compartmentalized energy transfer was used to analyze the data obtained from the experiments with the skinned muscle fibers, which described the following processes: mitochondrial respiration rate dependency on exogenous ADP and ATP concentrations; inhibition of endogenous ADP-stimulated respiration by pyruvate kinase (PK) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) system; kinetics of oxygen consumption stabilization after addition of 2 mM MgATP or MgADP; ATPase activity with inhibited mitochondrial respiration; and buildup of MgADP concentration in the medium after addition of MgATP. The analysis revealed that only the second mechanism considered--localization of diffusion restrictions--is able to account for the experimental data. In the case of uniform diffusion restrictions, the model solution was in agreement only with two measurements: the respiration rate as a function of ADP or ATP concentrations and inhibition of respiration by PK + PEP. It was concluded that intracellular diffusion restrictions for adenosine phosphates are not distributed uniformly, but rather are

  2. A hybrid input-output approach to model metabolic systems: an application to intracellular thiamine kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, R; Guglielmann, R; Ironi, L; Patrini, C

    2001-08-01

    Models of the dynamics of complex metabolic systems offer potential benefits to the deep comprehension of the system under study as well as for the performance of certain tasks. Unfortunately, dynamic modeling of a great deal of metabolic systems may be problematic due to the incompleteness of the available knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and to the lack of an adequate observational data set. In theory, a valid alternative to classical structural modeling through ordinary differential equations could be represented by input-output approaches. But, in practice, such methods, which learn the nonlinear dynamics of the system from input-output data, fail when the experimental data set is poor either in size or in quality. Such a situation is not rare in the case of metabolic systems. This paper deals with a hybrid approach which aims at overcoming the problems addressed above. More specifically, it allows us to solve the identification problems of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The method, which is half way between the structural and input-output approach, uses the outcomes of the simulation of a qualitative structural model to build a good initialization of a fuzzy system identifier. Such an initialization allows us to efficiently cope with both the incompleteness of knowledge and the inadequacy of the available data set, and to derive an input-output model of the intracellular thiamine kinetics in the intestine tissue. The comparison of the predictions of the intracellular thiamine kinetics obtained by the application of such a model with those obtained by traditional approaches, namely compartmental models, neural networks, and fuzzy systems, highlighted a better performance of our model. As the structural assumptions are relaxed, we obtained a model slightly less informative than a purely structural one but robust enough to be used as a simulator. The paper also discusses the interpretative potential offered by such a model

  3. Detection of intracellular lactate with localized diffusion { 1H- 13C}-spectroscopy in rat glioma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Lin, Joseph C.; DelaBarre, Lance; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diffusion characteristic of lactate and alanine in a brain tumor model to that of normal brain metabolites known to be mainly intracellular such as N-acetylaspartate or creatine. The diffusion of 13C-labeled metabolites was measured in vivo with localized NMR spectroscopy at 9.4 T (400 MHz) using a previously described localization and editing pulse sequence known as ACED-STEAM ('adiabatic carbon editing and decoupling'). 13C-labeled glucose was administered and the apparent diffusion coefficients of the glycolytic products, { 1H- 13C}-lactate and { 1H- 13C}-alanine, were determined in rat intracerebral 9L glioma. To obtain insights into { 1H- 13C}-lactate compartmentation (intra- versus extracellular), the pulse sequence used very large diffusion weighting (50 ms/μm 2). Multi-exponential diffusion attenuation of the lactate metabolite signals was observed. The persistence of a lactate signal at very large diffusion weighting provided direct experimental evidence of significant intracellular lactate concentration. To investigate the spatial distribution of lactate and other metabolites, 1H spectroscopic images were also acquired. Lactate and choline-containing compounds were consistently elevated in tumor tissue, but not in necrotic regions and surrounding normal-appearing brain. Overall, these findings suggest that lactate is mainly associated with tumor tissue and that within the time-frame of these experiments at least some of the glycolytic product ([ 13C] lactate) originates from an intracellular compartment.

  4. Lattice theory of reaction efficiency in compartmentalized systems. II. Reduction of dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pil H.; Kozak, John J.

    1984-01-01

    The timing and efficiency of a diffusion-controlled kinetic process in a compartmentalized system can be enhanced by reducing the dimensionality of the reaction space of the system. This idea, introduced by Adam and Delbrück and referred to as ``reduction of dimensionality,'' is explored quantitatively in this paper using a lattice theory of reaction efficiency developed in our earlier work. In particular, we study the interplay between system geometry and reaction efficiency using an approach in which group theoretic arguments are used within the framework of the theory of finite Markov processes to determine the average number of steps required for a diffusing coreactant A to undergo an irreversible reaction with a stationary target molecule B. We study in detail three classes of problems in this paper. First, we study as a function of the position of the reaction center how the efficiency of the underlying, irreversible, reaction-diffusion process A+B → C changes with increase in system size for symmetrical geometries. We show how reducing the dimensionality of the flow of the diffusing co-reactant leads to a crossover in reaction efficiency with increase in the size of the system, and document this effect as a function of N (the total number of sites characterizing the reaction space of the system), d (the dimensionality of the system), and ν (the valency or connectivity between adjacent sites in the reaction space). Secondly, we study how the calculated value of , and hence the efficiency of the process, changes when the compartmentalized system is characterized by tubular or platelet geometries, and show how the process of reduction of dimensionality is dependent on the further geometrical characteristics of eccentricity ɛ and the surface-to-volume ratio S/V. Finally, we study the consequences of reduction of dimensionality for (two) consecutive (say, enzymatic) reactions taking place in a compartmentalized system and demonstrate the advantages of

  5. A mesoporous silica nanoparticle with charge-convertible pore walls for efficient intracellular protein delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Sung; Kim, Chan Woo; Lee, Hong Jae; Hye Choi, Ji; Lee, Se Geun; Yun, Young-Pil; Kwon, Ick Chan; Lee, Seung Jin; Jeong, Seo Young; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2010-06-01

    We report a smart mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) with a pore surface designed to undergo charge conversion in intracellular endosomal condition. The surface of mesopores in the silica nanoparticles was engineered to have pH-hydrolyzable citraconic amide. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses confirmed the successful modification of the pore surfaces. MSNs (MSN-Cit) with citraconic amide functionality on the pore surfaces exhibited a negative zeta potential (-10 mV) at pH 7.4 because of the presence of carboxylate end groups. At cellular endosomal pH (~5.0), MSN-Cit have a positive zeta potential (16 mV) indicating the dramatic charge conversion from negative to positive by hydrolysis of surface citraconic amide. Cytochrome c (Cyt c) of positive charges could be incorporated into the pores of MSN-Cit by electrostatic interactions. The release of Cyt c can be controlled by adjusting the pH of the release media. At pH 7.4, the Cyt c release was retarded, whereas, at pH 5.0, MSN-Cit facilitated the release of Cyt c. The released Cyt c maintained the enzymatic activity of native Cyt c. Hemolytic activity of MSN-Cit over red blood cells (RBCs) was more pronounced at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.0, indicating the capability of intracellular endosomal escape of MSN carriers. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that MSN-Cit effectively released Cyt c in endosomal compartments after uptake by cancer cells. The MSN developed in this work may serve as efficient intracellular carriers of many cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins.

  6. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

    PubMed

    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation. PMID:6198869

  7. Intracellular sodium homeostasis in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, C R; Ransom, B R

    1996-01-01

    1. We determined the intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) and mechanisms of its regulation in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes using fluorescence ratio imaging of the Na+ indicator SBFI-AM (acetoxymethylester of sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate, 10 microM). Dye signal calibration within the astrocytes showed that the ratiometric dye signal changed monotonically with changes in [Na+]i from 0 to 140 nM. The K+ sensitivity of the dye was negligible; intracellular pH changes, however, slightly affected the 'Na+' signal. 2. Baseline [Na+]i was 14.6 +/- 4.9 mM (mean +/- S.D.) in CO2/HCO3(-)-containing saline with 3 mM K+. Removal of extracellular Na+ decreased [Na+]i in two phases: a rapid phase of [Na+]i reduction (0.58 +/- 0.32 mM min-1) followed by a slower phase (0.15 +/- 0.09 mM min-1). 3. Changing from CO2/HCO3(-)-free to CO2/HCO3(-)-buffered saline resulted in a transient increase in [Na+]i of approximately 5 mM, suggesting activation of inward Na(+)-HCO3- cotransport by CO2/HCO3-. During furosemide (frusemide, 1 mM) or bumetanide (50 microM) application, a slow decrease in [Na+]i of approximately 2 mM was observed, indicating a steady inward transport of Na+ via Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl- cotransport under control conditions. Tetrodotoxin (100 microM) did not influence [Na+]i in the majority of cells (85%), suggesting that influx of Na+ through voltage-gated Na+ channels contributed to baseline [Na+]i in only a small subpopulation of hippocampal astrocytes. 4. Blocking Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity with cardiac glycosides (ouabain or strophanthidin, 1 mM) or removal of extracellular K+ led to an increase in [Na+]i of about 2 and 4 mM min-1, respectively. This indicated that Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity was critical in maintaining low [Na+]i in the face of a steep electrochemical gradient, which would favour a much higher [Na+]i. 5. Elevation of extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) by as little as 1 mM (from 3 to 4 mM) resulted in a rapid and reversible decrease in

  8. Autophagy and checkpoints for intracellular pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Geraldine L.C.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autophagy plays a crucial role in intracellular defense against various pathogens. Xenophagy is a form of selective autophagy that targets intracellular pathogens for degradation. In addition, several related yet distinct intracellular defense responses depend on autophagy-related (ATG) genes. This review gives an overview of these processes, pathogen strategies to subvert them, and their crosstalk with various cell death programs. Recent findings The recruitment of ATG proteins plays a key role in multiple intracellular defense programs, specifically xenophagy, LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), and the IFNγ-mediated elimination of pathogens such as Toxoplasma gondii and murine norovirus. Recent progress has revealed methods employed by pathogens to resist these intracellular defense mechanisms and/or persist in spite of them. The intracellular pathogen load can tip the balance between cell survival and cell death. Further, it was recently observed that LAP is indispensable for the efficient clearance of dying cells. Summary Autophagy-dependent and ATG gene-dependent pathways are essential in intracellular defense against a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25394238

  9. Compartmentalized and contrasted response of ectomycorrhizal and soil fungal communities of Scots pine forests along elevation gradients in France and Spain.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Ana; Santamaría-Pérez, Blanca; Rabasa, Sonia G; Coince, Aurore; Marçais, Benoit; Buée, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Fungi are principal actors of forest soils implied in many ecosystem services and the mediation of tree's responses. Forecasting fungal responses to environmental changes is necessary for maintaining forest productivity, although our partial understanding of how abiotic and biotic factors affect fungal communities is restricting the predictions. We examined fungal communities of Pinus sylvestris along elevation gradients to check potential responses to climate change-associated factors. Fungi of roots and soils were analysed at a regional scale, by using a high-throughput sequencing approach. Overall soil fungal richness increased with pH, whereas it did not vary with climate. However, when representative sub-assemblages, i.e. Ascomycetes/Basidiomycetes, and families were analysed, they differentially answered to climatic and edaphic variables. This response was dependent on where they settled, i.e. soil versus roots, and/or on their lifestyle, i.e. mycorrhizal or not, suggesting different potential functional weights within the community. Our results revealed a highly compartmentalized and contrasted response of fungal communities in forest soils. The different response of fungal sub-assemblages indicated a range of possible selective direct and indirect (i.e. via host) impacts of climatic variations on these communities, of unknown functional consequences, that helps in understanding potential fungal responses under future global change scenarios. PMID:25953485

  10. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  11. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are required for the dynamic regulation of neutral lipid compartmentation in plant cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols (TAGs) in seeds, their biogenesis and function in non-seed tissues is poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-sp...

  12. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron.

    PubMed

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity. PMID:24730883

  13. Visualization of Intracellular Tyrosinase Activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes produce the melanin pigments in melanosomes and these organelles protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Tyrosinase is the key cuproenzyme which initiates the pigment synthesis using its substrate amino acid tyrosine or L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Moreover, the activity of tyrosinase directly correlates to the cellular pigmentation. Defects in tyrosinase transport to melanosomes or mutations in the enzyme or reduced intracellular copper levels results in loss of tyrosinase activity in melanosomes, commonly observed in albinism. Here, we described a method to detect the intracellular activity of tyrosinase in mouse melanocytes. This protocol will visualize the active tyrosinase present in the intracellular vesicles or organelles including melanosomes. PMID:27231711

  14. Ultrasensitive quantification of TAP-dependent antigen compartmentalization in scarce primary immune cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Hanna; Döring, Marius; Nikles, Daphne; Lehnert, Elisa; Baldauf, Christoph; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) is essential for the establishment and maintenance of self-tolerance, priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and the exertion of several T-cell effector functions. Cytosolic proteasomes continuously degrade proteins into peptides, which are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER lumen antigenic peptides are loaded onto MHC I, which is displayed on the cell surface. Here we describe an innovative flow cytometric approach to monitor time-resolved ER compartmentalization of antigenic peptides. This assay allows the analysis of distinct primary human immune cell subsets at reporter peptide concentrations of 1 nM. Thus, this ultrasensitive method for the first time permits quantification of TAP activity under close to physiological conditions in scarce primary cell subsets such as antigen cross-presenting dendritic cells. PMID:25656091

  15. Compartmentalized liquid crystal alignment induced by sparse polymer ribbons with surface relief gratings.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhichao; Zhang, Xinzheng; Shi, Bin; Li, Wei; Luo, Weiwei; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-01-15

    We report on the liquid crystal (LC) alignment induced by sparse polymer ribbons fabricated by the two-photon polymerization-based direct laser writing method. Each ribbon is fabricated by a single scan of the laser through the photoresist and possesses surface relief gratings on both sides. The relief gratings are caused by the optical interference between the incident and reflected laser beams. With the aid of these relief gratings, LC molecules can be well aligned along the selected direction of the ribbons. LC cells with the Z-shaped and checkerboard-type microstructures are constructed based on the sparse out-of-plane polymeric ribbons. Our results show that with such polymer ribbons a compartmentalized LC alignment in the arbitrary microstructures can be realized. PMID:26766708

  16. Ultrasensitive quantification of TAP-dependent antigen compartmentalization in scarce primary immune cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Hanna; Döring, Marius; Nikles, Daphne; Lehnert, Elisa; Baldauf, Christoph; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) is essential for the establishment and maintenance of self-tolerance, priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and the exertion of several T-cell effector functions. Cytosolic proteasomes continuously degrade proteins into peptides, which are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER lumen antigenic peptides are loaded onto MHC I, which is displayed on the cell surface. Here we describe an innovative flow cytometric approach to monitor time-resolved ER compartmentalization of antigenic peptides. This assay allows the analysis of distinct primary human immune cell subsets at reporter peptide concentrations of 1 nM. Thus, this ultrasensitive method for the first time permits quantification of TAP activity under close to physiological conditions in scarce primary cell subsets such as antigen cross-presenting dendritic cells. PMID:25656091

  17. Information Processing in Single Cells and Small Networks: Insights from Compartmental Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirazi, Panayiota

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a set of predictions generated by detailed compartmental models regarding the ways in which information may be processed, encoded and propagated by single cells and neural assemblies. Towards this goal, I will review a number of modelling studies from our lab that investigate how single pyramidal neurons and small neural networks in different brain regions process incoming signals that are associated with learning and memory. I will first discuss the computational capabilities of individual pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus [1-3] and how these properties may allow a single cell to discriminate between different memories [4]. I will then present biophysical models of prefrontal layer V neurons and small networks that exhibit sustained activity under realistic synaptic stimulation and discuss their potential role in working memory [5].

  18. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes. PMID:26972005

  19. Compartmentalization of gypsum and halite associated with cyanobacteria in saline soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Canfora, Loredana; Vendramin, Elisa; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Jungblut, Anne D; Pinzari, Flavia

    2016-06-01

    The interface between biological and geochemical components in the surface crust of a saline soil was investigated using X-ray diffraction, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Mineral compounds such as halite and gypsum were identified crystallized around filaments of cyanobacteria. A total of 92 genera were identified from the bacterial community based on 16S gene pyrosequencing analysis. The occurrence of the gypsum crystals, their shapes and compartmentalization suggested that they separated NaCl from the immediate microenvironment of the cyanobacteria, and that some cyanobacteria and communities of sulfur bacteria may had a physical control over the distinctive halite and gypsum structures produced. This suggests that cyanobacteria might directly or indirectly promote the formation of a protective envelope made of calcium and sulfur-based compounds. PMID:27090760

  20. Substrate-induced Nuclear Export and Peripheral Compartmentalization of Hepatic Glucokinase Correlates with Glycogen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Masa; Knobel, Susan M.; Piston, David W.; Cherrington, Alan D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic glucokinase (GK) is acutely regulated by binding to its nuclear-anchored regulatory protein (GKRP). Although GK release by GKRP is tightly coupled to the rate of glycogen synthesis, the nature of this association is obscure. To gain insight into this coupling mechanism under physiological stimulating conditions in primary rat hepatocytes, we analyzed the subcellular distribution of GK and GKRP with immunofluorescence, and glycogen deposition with glycogen cytochemical fluorescence, using confocal microscopyand quantitative image analysis. Following stimulation, a fraction of the GK signal translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The reduction in the nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of GK, an index of nuclear export, correlated with a >50% increase in glycogen cytochemical fluorescence over a 60min stimulation period. Furthermore, glycogen accumulation was initially deposited in a peripheral pattern in hepatocytes similar to that of GK. These data suggest that a compartmentalization exists of both active GK and the initial sites of glycogen deposition at the hepatocyte surface. PMID:12369705

  1. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation. PMID:25987563

  2. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-07-10

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation. PMID:25987563

  3. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves production of branched chain alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, José L.; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeted expression of metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production levels compared with expression of the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalisation of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overexpressing only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains reveals that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves higher local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion, and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  4. The planar cell polarity protein Vangl2 is involved in postsynaptic compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Kishi, Masashi

    2016-01-26

    The excitatory postsynaptic region of the vertebrate hippocampus is usually compartmentalized into the postsynaptic density (PSD) and N-cadherin-rich domain, which is important for synaptic adhesion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the compartment formation are unknown. In the present report, we show that the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) plays a role in this regionalization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons that were subjected to Vangl2 expression silencing, the formed clusters of PSD-95, one of the major scaffolding proteins in PSD, tended to overlap with those of N-cadherin. Further, in the dendrites of these neurons, the immunofluorescence of PSD-95 was to some extent diffused, without a significant change in the total signal. Because Vangl2 physically interacts with both PSD-95 and N-cadherin in vivo, these results suggest that a PCP-related direct molecular mechanism underlies the horizontal polarization of the postsynaptic regions. PMID:26683906

  5. Engineering of customized meganucleases via in vitro compartmentalization and in cellulo optimization

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Choi, Michael; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (also referred to as ‘meganucleases’) are compact DNA cleaving enzymes that specifically recognize long target sequences (approximately 20 base pairs), and thus serve as useful tools for therapeutic genome engineering. While stand-alone meganucleases are sufficiently active to introduce targeted genome modification, they can be fused to additional sequence-specific DNA binding domains in order to improve their performance in target cells. In this chapter, we describe an approach to retarget meganucleases to DNA targets of interest (such as sequences found in genes and cis regulatory regions), which is feasible in an academic laboratory environment. A combination of two selection systems, in vitro compartmentalization and two-plasmid cleavage assay in bacteria, allow for efficient engineering of meganucleases that specifically cleave a wide variety of DNA sequences. PMID:25408403

  6. Cellular compartmentation of cadmium and zinc in relation to other elements in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Küpper, H; Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2000-12-01

    The cellular compartmentation of elements was analysed in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (=Cardaminopsis halleri) using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated tissues. Quantitative data were obtained using oxygen as an internal standard in the analyses of vacuoles, whereas a peak/background ratio method was used for quantification of elements in pollen and dehydrated trichomes. Arabidopsis halleri was found to hyperaccumulate not only Zn but also Cd in the shoot biomass. While large concentrations of Zn and Cd were found in the leaves and roots, flowers contained very little. In roots grown hydroponically, Zn and Cd accumulated in the cell wall of the rhizodermis (root epidermis), mainly due to precipitation of Zn/Cd phosphates. In leaves, the trichomes had by far the largest concentrations of Zn and Cd. Inside the trichomes there was a striking sub-cellular compartmentation, with almost all the Zn and Cd being accumulated in a narrow ring in the trichome base. This distribution pattern was very different from that for Ca and P. The epidermal cells other than trichomes were very small and contained lower concentrations of Zn and Cd than mesophyll cells. In particular, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in the mesophyll cells increased markedly in response to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations in the nutrient solution. This indicates that the mesophyll cells in the leaves of A. halleri are the major storage site for Zn and Cd, and play an important role in their hyperaccumulation. PMID:11219586

  7. Compartmental distribution of GABAB receptor-mediated currents along the somatodendritic axis of hippocampal principal cells

    PubMed Central

    Degro, Claudius E.; Kulik, Akos; Booker, Sam A.; Vida, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Activity of cortical principal cells is controlled by the GABAergic system providing inhibition in a compartmentalized manner along their somatodendritic axis. While GABAAR-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission has been extensively characterized in hippocampal principal cells, little is known about the distribution of postsynaptic effects of GABABRs. In the present study, we have investigated the functional localization of GABABRs and their effector inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir3) channels by combining electrophysiological recordings in acute rat hippocampal slices, high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic analysis and single cell simulations. Pharmacologically isolated slow inhibitory postsynaptic currents were elicited in the three major hippocampal principal cell types by endogenous GABA released by electrical stimulation, photolysis of caged-GABA, as well as the canonical agonist baclofen, with the highest amplitudes observed in the CA3. Spatially restricted currents were assessed along the axis of principal cells by uncaging GABA in the different hippocampal layers. GABABR-mediated currents were present along the entire somatodendritic axis of principal cells, but non-uniformly distributed: largest currents and the highest conductance densities determined in the simulations were consistently found on the distal apical dendrites. Finally, immunocytochemical localization of GABABRs and Kir3 channels showed that distributions overlap but their densities diverge, particularly on the basal dendrites of pyramidal cells. GABABRs current amplitudes and the conductance densities correlated better with Kir3 density, suggesting a bottlenecking effect defined by the effector channel. These data demonstrate a compartmentalized distribution of the GABABR-Kir3 signaling cascade and suggest differential control of synaptic transmission, dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity at afferent pathways onto hippocampal principal cells. PMID:25852540

  8. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6–C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 & C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27230732

  9. Subcellular Compartmentation of the Diterpene Carnosic Acid and Its Derivatives in the Leaves of Rosemary1

    PubMed Central

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Alegre, Leonor

    2001-01-01

    The potent antioxidant properties of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extracts have been attributed to its major diterpene, carnosic acid. Carnosic acid has received considerable attention in food science and biomedicine, but little is known about its function in the plant in vivo. We recently found that highly oxidized diterpenes increase in rosemary plants exposed to drought and high light stress as a result of the antioxidant activity of carnosic acid (S. Munné-Bosch, K. Schwarz, L. Alegre [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1047–1052). To elucidate the significance of the antioxidant function of carnosic acid in vivo we measured the relative amounts of carnosic acid and its metabolites in different compartments of rosemary leaves. Subcellular localization studies show that carnosic acid protects chloroplasts from oxidative stress in vivo by following a highly regulated compartmentation of oxidation products. Carnosic acid scavenges free radicals within the chloroplasts, giving rise to diterpene alcohols, mainly isorosmanol. This oxidation product is O-methylated within the chloroplasts, and the resulting form, 11,12-di-O-methylisorosmanol, is transferred to the plasma membrane. This appears to represent a mechanism of a way out for free radicals from chloroplasts. Carnosic acid also undergoes direct O-methylation within the chloroplasts, and its derived product, 12-O-methylcarnosic acid, accumulates in the plasma membrane. O-methylated diterpenes do not display antioxidant activity, but they may influence the stability of the plasma membrane. This study shows the relevance of the compartmentation of carnosic acid metabolism to the protection of rosemary plants from oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:11161064

  10. Probabilistic geomechanical analysis of compartmentalization at the Snøhvit CO2 sequestration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaramonte, Laura; White, Joshua A.; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2015-02-01

    Pressure buildup caused by large-scale CO2 injection is a key concern during a carbon sequestration project. Large overpressures can compromise seal integrity, reactivate faults, and induce seismicity. Furthermore, pressure buildup is directly related with storage capacity. In this work we study the geomechanical response to CO2 injection at Snøhvit, to understand the potential for fault reactivation, leakage, and contamination of the producing interval through bounding faults. Furthermore, we evaluate the potential contribution of a structural component to reservoir compartmentalization. We combine simplified analytical models, based on critically stressed fracture theory and a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, with a rigorous sensitivity analysis. Large stress uncertainties are present and reflected in the modeling results. It was found that under the most likely stress state the faults are fairly stable and caprock hydrofracturing would be expected before fault reactivation. In most of the analyzed cases, the critical pressure perturbation needed for reactivation is above 13 MPa, which was the limiting pressure increase before reaching the fracture pressure. Faults were found to be ~ 20% less stable when considering variations in SHmax orientation. In those cases, fault reactivation could be expected before caprock failure if injection continued. However, if the pressure increase did reach the critical values for seal failure estimated under the worst case (and least likely) stress state, no indication of such failure can be observed in the measured pressure response. Finally, the potential role of a structural component in the compartmentalization and fluid migration is difficult to assess due to the stress state uncertainty.

  11. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction. PMID:25855081

  12. The role of the bi-compartmental stem cell niche in delaying cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriyari, Leili; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, by using modern imaging techniques, scientists have found evidence of collaboration between different types of stem cells (SCs), and proposed a bi-compartmental organization of the SC niche. Here we create a class of stochastic models to simulate the dynamics of such a heterogeneous SC niche. We consider two SC groups: the border compartment, S1, is in direct contact with transit-amplifying (TA) cells, and the central compartment, S2, is hierarchically upstream from S1. The S1 SCs differentiate or divide asymmetrically when the tissue needs TA cells. Both groups proliferate when the tissue requires SCs (thus maintaining homeostasis). There is an influx of S2 cells into the border compartment, either by migration, or by proliferation. We examine this model in the context of double-hit mutant generation, which is a rate-limiting step in the development of many cancers. We discover that this type of a cooperative pattern in the stem niche with two compartments leads to a significantly smaller rate of double-hit mutant production compared with a homogeneous, one-compartmental SC niche. Furthermore, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs, consistent with the literature. Finally, the optimal architecture (which minimizes the rate of double-hit mutant production) requires a large proliferation rate of S1 cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of S2 cells. This result is remarkably similar to the niche structure described recently by several authors, where one of the two SC compartments was found more actively engaged in tissue homeostasis and turnover, while the other was characterized by higher levels of quiescence (but contributed strongly to injury recovery). Both numerical and analytical results are presented.

  13. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H.; Zhang, Huili

    2015-01-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction. PMID:25855081

  14. Consequences of plant invasions on compartmentalization and species' roles in plant-pollinator networks.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Matthias; Padrón, Benigno; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Traveset, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Compartmentalization-the organization of ecological interaction networks into subsets of species that do not interact with other subsets (true compartments) or interact more frequently among themselves than with other species (modules)-has been identified as a key property for the functioning, stability and evolution of ecological communities. Invasions by entomophilous invasive plants may profoundly alter the way interaction networks are compartmentalized. We analysed a comprehensive dataset of 40 paired plant-pollinator networks (invaded versus uninvaded) to test this hypothesis. We show that invasive plants have higher generalization levels with respect to their pollinators than natives. The consequences for network topology are that-rather than displacing native species from the network-plant invaders attracting pollinators into invaded modules tend to play new important topological roles (i.e. network hubs, module hubs and connectors) and cause role shifts in native species, creating larger modules that are more connected among each other. While the number of true compartments was lower in invaded compared with uninvaded networks, the effect of invasion on modularity was contingent on the study system. Interestingly, the generalization level of the invasive plants partially explains this pattern, with more generalized invaders contributing to a lower modularity. Our findings indicate that the altered interaction structure of invaded networks makes them more robust against simulated random secondary species extinctions, but more vulnerable when the typically highly connected invasive plants go extinct first. The consequences and pathways by which biological invasions alter the interaction structure of plant-pollinator communities highlighted in this study may have important dynamical and functional implications, for example, by influencing multi-species reciprocal selection regimes and coevolutionary processes. PMID:24943368

  15. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter T; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; O'Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Sikkel, Markus B; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A; Lyon, Alexander R; Harding, Sian E; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors. PMID:24345421

  16. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter T.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; O’Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Sikkel, Markus B.; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Harding, Sian E.; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors. PMID:24345421

  17. PKA Compartmentalization via AKAP220 and AKAP12 Contributes to Endothelial Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Radeva, Mariya Y.; Kugelmann, Daniela; Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    cAMP-mediated PKA signaling is the main known pathway involved in maintenance of the endothelial barrier. Tight regulation of PKA function can be achieved by discrete compartmentalization of the enzyme via physical interaction with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we investigated the role of AKAPs 220 and 12 in endothelial barrier regulation. Analysis of human and mouse microvascular endothelial cells as well as isolated rat mesenteric microvessels was performed using TAT-Ahx-AKAPis peptide, designed to competitively inhibit PKA-AKAP interaction. In vivo microvessel hydraulic conductivity and in vitro transendothelial electrical resistance measurements showed that this peptide destabilized endothelial barrier properties, and dampened the cAMP-mediated endothelial barrier stabilization induced by forskolin and rolipram. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that TAT-Ahx-AKAPis led to both adherens junctions and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Those effects were paralleled by redistribution of PKA and Rac1 from endothelial junctions and by Rac1 inactivation. Similarly, membrane localization of AKAP220 was also reduced. In addition, depletion of either AKAP12 or AKAP220 significantly impaired endothelial barrier function and AKAP12 was also shown to interfere with cAMP-mediated barrier enhancement. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that AKAP220 interacts not only with PKA but also with VE-cadherin and ß-catenin. Taken together, these results indicate that AKAP-mediated PKA subcellular compartmentalization is involved in endothelial barrier regulation. More specifically, AKAP220 and AKAP12 contribute to endothelial barrier function and AKAP12 is required for cAMP-mediated barrier stabilization. PMID:25188285

  18. Bioaccessibility of selenium after human ingestion in relation to its chemical species and compartmentalization in maize.

    PubMed

    Mombo, Stéphane; Schreck, Eva; Dumat, Camille; Laplanche, Christophe; Pierart, Antoine; Longchamp, Mélanie; Besson, Philippe; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse

    2016-06-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient needed by all living organisms including humans, but often present in low concentration in food with possible deficiency. From another side, at higher concentrations in soils as observed in seleniferous regions of the world, and in function of its chemical species, Se can also induce (eco)toxicity. Root Se uptake was therefore studied in function of its initial form for maize (Zea mays L.), a plant widely cultivated for human and animal food over the world. Se phytotoxicity and compartmentalization were studied in different aerial plant tissues. For the first time, Se oral human bioaccessibility after ingestion was assessed for the main Se species (Se(IV) and Se(VI)) with the BARGE ex vivo test in maize seeds (consumed by humans), and in stems and leaves consumed by animals. Corn seedlings were cultivated in hydroponic conditions supplemented with 1 mg L(-1) of selenium (Se(IV), Se(VI), Control) for 4 months. Biomass, Se concentration, and bioaccessibility were measured on harvested plants. A reduction in plant biomass was observed under Se treatments compared to control, suggesting its phytotoxicity. This plant biomass reduction was higher for selenite species than selenate, and seed was the main affected compartment compared to control. Selenium compartmentalization study showed that for selenate species, a preferential accumulation was observed in leaves, whereas selenite translocation was very limited toward maize aerial parts, except in the seeds where selenite concentrations are generally high. Selenium oral bioaccessibility after ingestion fluctuated from 49 to 89 % according to the considered plant tissue and Se species. Whatever the tissue, selenate appeared as the most human bioaccessible form. A potential Se toxicity was highlighted for people living in seleniferous regions, this risk being enhanced by the high Se bioaccessibility. PMID:26387097

  19. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6-C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 &C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27230732

  20. HIV-1 Nef sequence and functional compartmentalization in the gut is not due to differential cytotoxic T lymphocyte selective pressure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Martha J; Frohnen, Patricia; Ibarrondo, F Javier; Reed, Diane; Iyer, Varun; Ng, Hwee L; Elliott, Julie; Yang, Otto O; Anton, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The gut is the largest lymphoid organ in the body and a site of active HIV-1 replication and immune surveillance. The gut is a reservoir of persistent infection in some individuals with fully suppressed plasma viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) although the cause of this persistence is unknown. The HIV-1 accessory protein Nef contributes to persistence through multiple functions including immune evasion and increasing infectivity. Previous studies showed that Nef's function is shaped by cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and that there are distinct populations of Nef within tissue compartments. We asked whether Nef's sequence and/or function are compartmentalized in the gut and how compartmentalization relates to local CTL immune responses. Primary nef quasispecies from paired plasma and sigmoid colon biopsies from chronically infected subjects not on therapy were sequenced and cloned into Env(-) Vpu(-) pseudotyped reporter viruses. CTL responses were mapped by IFN-γ ELISpot using expanded CD8+ cells from blood and gut with pools of overlapping peptides covering the entire HIV proteome. CD4 and MHC Class I Nef-mediated downregulation was measured by flow cytometry. Multiple tests indicated compartmentalization of nef sequences in 5 of 8 subjects. There was also compartmentalization of function with MHC Class I downregulation relatively well preserved, but significant loss of CD4 downregulation specifically by gut quasispecies in 5 of 7 subjects. There was no compartmentalization of CTL responses in 6 of 8 subjects, and the selective pressure on quasispecies correlated with the magnitude CTL response regardless of location. These results demonstrate that Nef adapts via diverse pathways to local selective pressures within gut mucosa, which may be predominated by factors other than CTL responses such as target cell availability. The finding of a functionally distinct population within gut mucosa offers some insight into how HIV-1 may persist in

  1. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  2. Resolving the Compartmentation and Function of C4 Photosynthesis in the Single-Cell C4 Species Bienertia sinuspersici1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Offermann, Sascha; Okita, Thomas W.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Bienertia sinuspersici is a land plant known to perform C4 photosynthesis through the location of dimorphic chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic domains within a single photosynthetic cell. A protocol was developed with isolated protoplasts to obtain peripheral chloroplasts (P-CP), a central compartment (CC), and chloroplasts from the CC (C-CP) to study the subcellular localization of photosynthetic functions. Analyses of these preparations established intracellular compartmentation of processes to support a NAD-malic enzyme (ME)-type C4 cycle. Western-blot analyses indicated that the CC has Rubisco from the C3 cycle, the C4 decarboxylase NAD-ME, a mitochondrial isoform of aspartate aminotransferase, and photorespiratory markers, while the C-CP and P-CP have high levels of Rubisco and pyruvate, Pidikinase, respectively. Other enzymes for supporting a NAD-ME cycle via an aspartate-alanine shuttle, carbonic anhydrase, phosophoenolpyruvate carboxylase, alanine, and an isoform of aspartate aminotransferase are localized in the cytosol. Functional characterization by photosynthetic oxygen evolution revealed that only the C-CP have a fully operational C3 cycle, while both chloroplast types have the capacity to photoreduce 3-phosphoglycerate. The P-CP were enriched in a putative pyruvate transporter and showed light-dependent conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate. There is a larger investment in chloroplasts in the central domain than in the peripheral domain (6-fold more chloroplasts and 4-fold more chlorophyll). The implications of this uneven distribution for the energetics of the C4 and C3 cycles are discussed. The results indicate that peripheral and central compartment chloroplasts in the single-cell C4 species B. sinuspersici function analogous to mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type C4 species. PMID:21263039

  3. The nature and origin of chemical shift for intracellular water nuclei in artemia cysts.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, S R; Hazlewood, C F; Yamanashi, W S; Dennis, L W

    1987-08-01

    We investigated the possible existence of chemical shift of water nuclei in Artemia cysts using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The results conducted at 60, 200, and 500 MHz revealed an unusually large chemical shift for intracellular water protons. After correcting for bulk susceptibility effects, a residual downfield chemical shift of 0.11 ppm was observed in fully hydrated cysts. Similar results have been observed for the deuterium and (17)O nuclei.We have ruled out unusual intracellular pH, diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular water, or interaction of water molecules with lipids, glycerol, and/or trehalose as possible origins of the residual chemical shift. We conclude that the residual chemical shift observed for water nuclei ((1)H, (2)H, and (17)O) is due to significant water-macromolecular interactions. PMID:19431702

  4. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  5. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications. PMID:22110866

  6. Fluorescent nanosensors for intracellular measurements: synthesis, characterization, calibration, and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arpan S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Esler, Tim; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular acidification is important for understanding fundamental biological pathways as well as developing effective therapeutic strategies. Fluorescent pH nanosensors are an enabling technology for real-time monitoring of intracellular acidification. The physicochemical characteristics of nanosensors can be engineered to target specific cellular compartments and respond to external stimuli. Therefore, nanosensors represent a versatile approach for probing biological pathways inside cells. The fundamental components of nanosensors comprise a pH-sensitive fluorophore (signal transducer) and a pH-insensitive reference fluorophore (internal standard) immobilized in an inert non-toxic matrix. The inert matrix prevents interference of cellular components with the sensing elements as well as minimizing potentially harmful effects of some fluorophores on cell function. Fluorescent nanosensors are synthesized using standard laboratory equipment and are detectable by non-invasive widely accessible imaging techniques. The outcomes of studies employing this technology are dependent on reliable methodology for performing measurements. In particular, special consideration must be given to conditions for sensor calibration, uptake conditions and parameters for image analysis. We describe procedures for: (1) synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide and silica based nanosensors, (2) nanosensor calibration and (3) performing measurements using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24474936

  7. Silica nanoparticles for cell imaging and intracellular sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniowska, B.; Nooney, R.; Wencel, D.; McDonagh, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications. In particular, nanobiophotonic approaches using fluorescence offers the potential of high sensitivity and selectivity in applications such as cell imaging and intracellular sensing. In this review, we focus primarily on the use of fluorescent silica NPs for these applications and, in so doing, aim to enhance and complement the key recent review articles on these topics. We summarize the main synthetic approaches, namely the Stöber and microemulsion processes, and, in this context, we deal with issues in relation to both covalent and physical incorporation of different types of dyes in the particles. The important issue of NP functionalization for conjugation to biomolecules is discussed and strategies published in the recent literature are highlighted and evaluated. We cite recent examples of the use of fluorescent silica NPs for cell imaging in the areas of cancer, stem cell and infectious disease research, and we review the current literature on the use of silica NPs for intracellular sensing of oxygen, pH and ionic species. We include a short final section which seeks to identify the main challenges and obstacles in relation to the potential widespread use of these particles for in vivo diagnostics and therapeutics.

  8. pH sensitive quantum dot-anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pKa ranging ˜5-8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated.

  9. Nanoparticle PEBBLE Sensors for Quantitative Nanomolar Imaging of Intracellular Free Calcium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Si, Di; Epstein, Tamir; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is a universal second messenger and plays a major role in intracellular signaling, metabolism and a wide range of cellular processes. To date, one of the most successful approaches for intracellular Ca2+ measurement involves introduction of optically sensitive Ca2+ indicators into living cells, combined with digital imaging microscopy. However, the use of free Ca2+ indicators for intracellular sensing and imaging has several limitations, such as nonratiometric measurement for the most sensitive indicators, cytotoxicity of the indicators, interference from non-specific binding caused by cellular biomacromolecules, challenging calibration and unwanted sequestration of the indicator molecules. These problems are minimized when the Ca2+ indicators are encapsulated inside porous and inert polyacrylamide nanoparticles. We present PEBBLE nanosensors encapsulated with rhodamine based Ca2+ fluorescence indicators. The here presented rhod-2 containing PEBBLEs show a stable sensing range at near-neutral pH (pH 6–9). Due to the protection of the PEBBLE matrix, the interference of protein non-specific binding to the indicator is minimal. The rhod-2 PEBBLEs give a nanomolar dynamic sensing range for both in-solution (Kd = 478 nM) and intracellular (Kd = 293 nM) measurements. These nanosensors are a useful quantitative tool for the measurement and imaging of the cytosolic nanomolar free Ca2+ levels. PMID:22122409

  10. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin.

    PubMed

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  11. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  12. Methotrexate loaded self stabilized calcium phosphate nanoparticles: a novel inorganic carrier for intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, Ukawala; Kulkarni, Vijay; Tushar, Rajyaguru; Murthy, R S R

    2009-02-01

    Calcium phosphate is considered as a potential biomaterial for drug and gene delivery because of its excellent features. In this study, we reported the formulation and characterization of calcium phosphate nanoparticle containing anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX). Calcium phosphate nanoparticles containing MTX (CaPi-MTX) were prepared by reverse micelles technique. CaPi-MTX nanoparticles of average size 262 +/- 47.64 nm with entrapment efficiency of 58.04 +/- 4.09% were obtained. The IR spectrum of CaPi-MTX showed characteristics of composite formation of hydroxyapatite with MTX. X-RD analysis revealed that, CaPi-MTX nanoparticles were crystalline and in hydroxyapatite form. TEM studies showed that CaPi-MTX nanoparticles were spherical in shape. In vitro release study of CaPi-MTX nanoparticles showed slow release of MTX at physiological pH (pH 7.4) while > 90% release was observed within 3-4 hours at endosomal pH (pH 5.5 and pH 6.0). Confocal microscopy was performed using CHO cell lines, showed intracellular localization of FITC-Dextran loaded calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Results indicate that prepared CaPi-MTX nanoparticles could serve the purpose for intracellular drug delivery. PMID:20055112

  13. Fed-batch control based upon the measurement of intracellular NADH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armiger, W. B.; Lee, J. F.; Montalvo, L. M.; Forro, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A series of experiments demonstrating that on-line measurements of intracellular NADH by culture fluorescence can be used to monitor and control the fermentation process are described. A distinct advantage of intercellular NADH measurements over other monitoring techniques such as pH and dissolved oxygen is that it directly measures real time events occurring within the cell rather than changes in the environment. When coupled with other measurement parameters, it can provide a finer degree of sophistication in process control.

  14. The paraveinal mesophyll of soybean leaves in relation to assimilate transfer and compartmentation : II. Structural, metabolic and compartmental changes during reproductive growth.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, V R; Giaquinta, R T

    1983-04-01

    Nitrogen and carbohydrate assimilates were temporally and spatially compartmented among various cell types in soybean (Glycine max L., Merr.) leaves during seed filling. The paraveinal mesophyll (PVM), a unique cell layer found in soybean, was demonstrated to function in the synthesis, compartmentation and remobilization of nitrogen reserves prior to and during the seed-filling stages. At anthesis, the PVM vacuoles contain substantial protein which completely disappears by two weeks into the seed filling. Distinct changes in the PVM cytoplasm, tonoplast and organelles were correlated with the presence or absence of the vacuolar material. Microautoradiography following the accumulation of several radiolabeled sugars and amino acids demonstrated the glycoprotein nature of the vacuolar material. Incorporation of methionine, leucine, glucose, and glucosamine resulted in heavy labelling of the PVM vacuole, in contrast to galactose, proline, and mannose which resulted in a much reduced labelling pattern. In addition, starch is unequally compartmented and degraded among the various leaf cells during seed filling. At the end of the photoperiod at the flowering stage, the highest starch accumulation was in the second palisade layer followed by the spongy mesophyll and the first (uppermost) palisade layer. Starch in the first palisade layer was completely degraded during the dark whereas the starch in the second palisade and spongy mesophyll was not remobilized to any appreciable extent. By mid-podfilling (approximately five weeks postanthesis) starch was absent in the first palisade layer at the end of the photoperiod while the second palisade and spongy mesophyll layers contained substantial starch. Starch was remobilized from these latter cells during the remainder of seed filling when current photosynthetic production is low. Structural changes associated with cell senescence first appear in the upper palisade layer and then progress (excluding the PVM) to the second

  15. Catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase isoform IX is displayed both extra- and intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Klier, Michael; Jamali, Somayeh; Ames, Samantha; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    Most carbonic anhydrases catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, either as soluble cytosolic enzymes, in or at intracellular organelles, or at the extracellular face of the cell membrane as membrane-anchored proteins. Carbonic anhydrase isoform IX (CA IX), a membrane-bound enzyme with catalytic activity at the extracellular membrane surface, has come to prominence in recent years because of its association with hypoxic tissue, particularly tumours, often indicating poor prognosis. We have evaluated the catalytic activity of CA IX heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by measuring the amplitude and rate of cytosolic pH changes as well as pH changes at the outer membrane surface (pHs ) during addition and removal of 5% CO2 /25 mm HCO3-, and by mass spectrometry. Our results indicate both extracellular and intracellular catalytic activity of CA IX. Reduced rates of CO2 -dependent intracellular pH changes after knockdown of CA IX confirmed these findings in two breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our results demonstrate a new function of CA IX that may be important in the search for therapeutic cancer drugs targeting CA IX. PMID:26470855

  16. Three-Dimensional Compartmentalization of Subsurface Ground Water Flow in Eastern North American Mesozoic Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. P.; Sutphin, D. M.; Daniels, D. L.; Pierce, H. A.; Smoot, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    An extensive network of diabase intrusions occurs in several of the largest Mesozoic basins of Eastern North America, including the Culpeper, Gettysburg, Newark, and Hartford basins. Within each, great dikes, inclined sheets, and lopoliths cut through the surrounding sandstones, siltstones, and conglomerates in ways that subdivide the regional subsurface flow field, and thus compartmentalize the basin. In the Culpeper basin, for example, the scale- and direction-dependent permeability of diabase spans the range 10-17 to 10-21 m2, whereas the permeability of the heavily fractured sediments is in the range 10-12 to 10-14 m2. Thus there is at least three, and upwards of nine, orders of magnitude difference in permeability between the diabase and the surrounding sediments. This great permeability contrast is at the heart of basin compartmentalization and the related subsurface hydrologic phenomena. In the Culpeper basin, our understanding of compartmentalization is guided by the following geological, geophysical, and hydrologic measurements and observations: (1) Short wavelength aeromagnetic anomalies constrain the geometry of the up-turned margins of diabase lopoliths. These lopoliths bound compartments horizontally and vertically; (2) Deep compartment structure has been resolved to 800 meters by in-situ AudioMagnetotelluric experiments; (3) Alignments of hornfels-hosted springs parallel to the diabase-hornfels contact along a compartment wall. We posit that eastward-migrating ground water is forced up and out to the surface when it comes into contact with the low permeability diabase at depth; (4) Direct observations of high fluid flow from bedding plane fractures within hornfels in the diabase-hornfels contact ``no-flow boundary condition'' region of a compartment's walls; (5) Direct drilling into and through a compartment's margins. Pumping yields within diabase are ~2 gal./min., whereas penetration of the compartment margins (drilling from diabase into the

  17. Effect of systemic pH on pH sub i and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S. Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington )

    1988-09-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH{sub i}), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH{sub 4}Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO{sub 3} (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH{sub i} and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH{sub i} did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability.

  18. Polymersome-mediated intracellular delivery of antibiotics to treat Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Thornhill, Martin H; Douglas, C W Ian; Lewis, Andrew L; Warren, Nicholas J; Pinnock, Abigail; Armes, Steven P; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Murdoch, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The gram-negative anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis colonizes the gingival crevice and is etiologically associated with periodontal disease that can lead to alveolar bone damage and resorption, promoting tooth loss. Although susceptible to antibiotics, P. gingivalis can evade antibiotic killing by residing within gingival keratinocytes. This provides a reservoir of organisms that may recolonize the gingival crevice once antibiotic therapy is complete. Polymersomes are nanosized amphiphilic block copolymer vesicles that can encapsulate drugs. Cells internalize polymersomes by endocytosis into early endosomes, where they are disassembled by the low pH, causing intracellular release of their drug load. In this study, polymersomes were used as vehicles to deliver antibiotics in an attempt to kill intracellular P. gingivalis within monolayers of keratinocytes and organotypic oral mucosal models. Polymersome-encapsulated metronidazole or doxycycline, free metronidazole, or doxycycline, or polymersomes alone as controls, were used, and the number of surviving intracellular P. gingivalis was quantified after host cell lysis. Polymersome-encapsulated metronidazole or doxycycline significantly (P<0.05) reduced the number of intracellular P. gingivalis in both monolayer and organotypic cultures compared to free antibiotic or polymersome alone controls. Polymersomes are effective delivery vehicles for antibiotics that do not normally gain entry to host cells. This approach could be used to treat recurrent periodontitis or other diseases caused by intracellular-dwelling organisms. PMID:23921377

  19. Engineering nanostructured polymer blends with controlled nanoparticle location for excellent microwave absorption: a compartmentalized approach.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Kar, Goutam Prasanna; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-07-14

    In order to obtain better materials, control over the precise location of nanoparticles is indispensable. It is shown here that ordered arrangements of nanoparticles, possessing different characteristics (electrical/magnetic dipoles), in the blend structure can result in excellent microwave absorption. This is manifested from a high reflection loss of ca. -67 dB for the best blend structure designed here. To attenuate electromagnetic radiation, the key parameters of high electrical conductivity and large dielectric/magnetic loss are targeted here by including a conductive material [multiwall carbon nanotubes, MWNTs], ferroelectric nanostructured material with associated relaxations in the GHz frequency [barium titanate, BT] and lossy ferromagnetic nanoparticles [nickel ferrite, NF]. In this study, bi-continuous structures were designed using 50/50 (by wt) blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). The MWNTs were modified using an electron acceptor molecule, a derivative of perylenediimide, which facilitates π-π stacking with the nanotubes and stimulates efficient charge transport in the blends. The nanoscopic materials have specific affinity towards the PVDF phase. Hence, by introducing surface-active groups, an ordered arrangement can be tailored. To accomplish this, both BT and NF were first hydroxylated followed by the introduction of amine-terminal groups on the surface. The latter facilitated nucleophilic substitution reactions with PC and resulted in their precise location. In this study, we have shown for the first time that by a compartmentalized approach, superior EM attenuation can be achieved. For instance, when the nanoparticles were localized exclusively in the PVDF phase or in both the phases, the minimum reflection losses were ca. -18 dB (for the MWNT/BT mixture) and -29 dB (for the MWNT/NF mixture), and the shielding occurred primarily through reflection. Interestingly, by adopting the compartmentalized approach wherein the

  20. Compartmental modeling of PAH transport in soil column experiments under variably-saturated flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, F.; Sericano, J. L.; Wade, T. L.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from PAH-laden soils or sediments is important to understand their bioavailability, and ultimately assess the environmental risk of PAH transport from surface soils into the groundwater. The transport and kinetics of three PAH from a spiked soil layer (2-3 cm soil depth), Phenanthrene-d10 (1900 ng/g), Naphthalene-d8 (1500 ng/g), and Pyrene-d10 (1800 ng/g), were investigated by performing a series of 8 rainfall events during 25 days in two large, replicate soil columns (length: 35 cm; diameter: 14.5 cm; 1 Pore Volume [PV]=2.29 L) under variably-saturated flow conditions. The water-methanol displacing solutions were at volumetric fractions of 0.3 and 0.6 during day 1 (E1) through E8 and E12-E22, respectively. Soil matric potential (h) was monitored at 5-cm and 20-cm depth and volumetric water content (θ) at 12.5-cm and 27.5-cm depth. Soil solution was sampled at 5 cm- (n=46) and 27.5-cm depth (n=46), and the effluent at the bottom of the column (n=163). HYDRUS-1D was used for inverse modeling of h and θ data and to predict θ at specific times and soil depth increments. First-order kinetics, compartmental models describing the transfer of PAH from the soil compartment to the soil solution compartment (desorption) and vice versa (sorption), were used to estimate mass transfer rates (φs, sorption; φd, desorption; φe, elimination), PAH mass in each compartment, and partition coefficients (Kd). Phenanthrene breakthrough curve could be interpreted through a two-parameter, two-compartment model corresponding to the common two-site sorption model, whose parameter estimates (and 95% confidence intervals) were φd=2.72 (2.31, 3.19) PV-1 and φe=4.67 (3.82, 5.7 ) PV-1. Naphthalene breakthrough curve followed a simple one-compartment elimination model, φe=2.0 (1.9, 2.1) PV-1, and that of Pyrene a three-parameter, two-compartment model, φs=0.0454 (0.00853, 0.0603) PV-1, φd=0.165 (0.0319, 0.855) PV

  1. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus

    SciTech Connect

    Mliki, A.; Zimmermann, W. )

    1992-03-01

    Peroxidases play an important role in the oxidation of a large number of aromatic compounds, including recalcitrant substances. An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a K{sub m} of 17.8 {mu}M and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a K{sub m} of 2.07 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C{alpha}-C{beta} bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydroxy-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl) propane, a nonphenolic dimeric lignin model compound. The spectrum of te peroxidase showed a soret band at 405 nm, which disappeared after reduction with sodium dithionite, indicating that the enzyme is a hemoprotein. Testing the effects of various inhibitors on the enzyme activity showed that it is a bifunctional enzyme having catalase and peroxidase activities.

  2. Chemical development of intracellular protein heterodimerizers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Dominik; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Jacques, Olivier; Wittwer, Matthias B; Ernst, Beat; Constable, Edwin; Zvelebil, Marketa; Beaufils, Florent; Wymann, Matthias P

    2013-04-18

    Cell activation initiated by receptor ligands or oncogenes triggers complex and convoluted intracellular signaling. Techniques initiating signals at defined starting points and cellular locations are attractive to elucidate the output of selected pathways. Here, we present the development and validation of a protein heterodimerization system based on small molecules cross-linking fusion proteins derived from HaloTags and SNAP-tags. Chemical dimerizers of HaloTag and SNAP-tag (HaXS) show excellent selectivity and have been optimized for intracellular reactivity. HaXS force protein-protein interactions and can translocate proteins to various cellular compartments. Due to the covalent nature of the HaloTag-HaXS-SNAP-tag complex, intracellular dimerization can be easily monitored. First applications include protein targeting to cytoskeleton, to the plasma membrane, to lysosomes, the initiation of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, and multiplexed protein complex formation in combination with the rapamycin dimerization system. PMID:23601644

  3. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  4. Organization of the marmoset cerebellum in three-dimensional space: lobulation, aldolase C compartmentalization and axonal projection.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Oh-Nishi, Arata; Obayashi, Shigeru; Sugihara, Izumi

    2010-05-15

    The cerebellar cortex is organized by transverse foliation and longitudinal compartmentalization. Although the latter, which is recognized through the molecular expression in subsets of Purkinje cells (PCs), is closely related to topographic axonal projection and represents functional divisions, the details have not been fully clarified in mammals other than rodents. Therefore, we examined folial and compartmental organization of the marmoset cerebellum, which resembles the macaque cerebellum, and compared it with that of the rodent cerebellum by aldolase C immunostaining, three-dimensional reconstruction of the PC layer, and labeling of olivocerebellar and corticonuclear projections. Longitudinal stripes of different aldolase C expression intensities separated the entire cerebellar cortex into multiple compartments. Lobule VIIAb-d was equivalent to rodent lobule VIc in that it contained a transverse gap in the cortical layers and served as the rostrocaudal boundary for compartments and axonal branching. Olivocortical and corticonuclear projection patterns in major compartments indicated that the compartmental organization in the marmoset cerebellum was generally equivalent to that in the rodent cerebellum, although two compartments were missing in the pars intermedia and several compartments that have not been seen in rodents were recognized in the flocculus, nodulus, and the most lateral hemisphere. Reconstruction showed that the paraflocculus and flocculus were formed by a single longitudinal sheet, the axis of which was parallel to the aldolase C compartments, PC dendrites, and olivocerebellar climbing fiber distribution. The results indicate that molecular compartmentalization in the marmoset cerebellum reflected both the common fundamental organization of the mammalian cerebellum and species-dependent differentiation. PMID:20235174

  5. Compartmental analysis of technetium-99m-teboroxime kinetics employing fast dynamic SPECT at rest and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, P.C.; Ficaro, E.P.; Dayaniki, F.

    1994-08-01

    The authors have examined the feasibility of compartmental analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics in measuring physiological changes in response to adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation. To evaluate the effect of tracer recirculation on {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics in the myocardium, they also compared compartmental analysis with washout analysis (monoexponertial fitting), which does not account for this effect. Eight healthy male volunteers were imaged using fast dynamic SPECT protocols (5 sec per tomographic image) at rest and during adenosine infusion. A two-compartment model was used and compartmental parameters K1 and k2 (characterizing the diffusion of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime from the blood to the myocardium and from the myocardium to the blood, respectively) were fitted from myocardial time-activity curves and left ventricular input functions. Both K1 and washout estimates for the whole left ventricular myocardium changed significantly in response to coronary vasodilation. Mean stress-to-rest (S/R) ratios were almost two times higher for K1 (S/R = 2.7 {plus_minus} 1.1) than for washout estimates (S/R = 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3). Estimation of K1 for all local regions, except the septal wall, is feasible because variations in K1 estimates for all local regions, except the septum during stress, are comparable with those for the global region. The authors conclude that quantitative compartmental analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics provides a sensitive indicator for changes in response to adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation. 39 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Hernán E; Imtiaz, Sarah; Zamir, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Cellular functions emerge from the collective action of a large number of different proteins. Understanding how these protein networks operate requires monitoring their components in intact cells. Due to intercellular and intracellular molecular variability, it is important to monitor simultaneously multiple components at high spatiotemporal resolution. However, inherent trade-offs narrow the boundaries of achievable multiplexed imaging. Pushing these boundaries is essential for a better understanding of cellular processes. Here the motivations, challenges and approaches for multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks are discussed. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27183498

  7. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  8. The association of HPV-16 seropositivity and natural immunity to reinfection: insights from compartmental models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Seroreactivity, processes of seroconversion and seroreversion, in the context of HPV infection has been investigated in numerous studies. However, the data resulting from these studies are usually not accounted for in mathematical transmission models of various HPV types due to gaps in our understanding of the nature of seroreactivity and its implications for HPV natural history. Methods In this study we selected a number of simple but plausible compartmental transmission models of HPV-16, differing in assumptions regarding the relation between seropositivity and immunity, and attempted to calibrate them to Australian HPV seroprevalence data for females and males, as well as DNA prevalence data for females, using a Bayesian model comparison procedure. We ranked the models according to both their simplicity and ability to be fitted to the data. Results Our results demonstrate that models with seroreversion where seropositivity indicates only a partial or very short-term full protection against re-infection generate age-specific HPV DNA prevalence most consistent with the observed data when compared with other models. Conclusions Models supporting the notion that seropositive individuals are fully immune to reinfection demonstrated consistently inferior fits to the data than other models making no such assumption. PMID:23402400

  9. A bulk sub-femtoliter in vitro compartmentalization system using super-fine electrosprays.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bineet; Takamura, Yuzuru; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Biyani, Manish

    2016-01-01

    The extreme miniaturization of biological and chemical assays in aqueous-droplet compartments enables spatiotemporal control for large-scale parallel experimentation and can thus permit new capabilities for "digitizing" directed molecular evolution methodologies. We report a remarkably facile bulk method to generate mega-scale monodisperse sub-femtoliter aqueous droplets by electrospray, using a prototype head with super-fine inkjet technology. Moreover, the electrostatic inkjet nozzle that injects the aqueous phase when immersed within an immiscible phase (an optimized oil/surfactant mixture) has the advantage of generating cell-like sub-femtoliter compartments for biomolecule encapsulation and successive biological and chemical reactions. Sub-femtoliter droplets of both liquid (water-in-oil, volumes ranging from 0.2 to 6.4 fL) and gel bead (agarose-in-oil, volume ranging from 0.3 to 15.6 fL) compartments with average sizes of 1.3 μm and 1.5 μm, respectively, were successfully generated using an inkjet nozzle at a speed of more than 10(5) droplets per second. We demonstrated the applicability of this system by synthesizing fluorescent proteins using a cell-free expression system inside electrosprayed sub-femtoliter droplets at an accelerated rate, thereby extending the utility of in vitro compartmentalization with improved analytical performance for a top-down artificial cellular system. PMID:27199080

  10. Compositional compartmentalization and compositional patterns in the nuclear genomes of plants.

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, J; Matassi, G; Montero, L M; Bernardi, G

    1988-01-01

    We report here results which indicate (i) that the nuclear genomes of angiosperms is characterized by a compositional compartmentalization and an isochore structure; and (ii) that the nuclear genomes of some Gramineae exhibit strikingly different compositional patterns compared to those of many dicots. Indeed, the compositional distribution of nuclear DNA molecules (in the 50-100 Kb size range) from three dicots (pea, sunflower and tobacco) and three monocots (maize, rice and wheat) were found to be centered around lower (41%) and higher (45% for rice, 48% for maize and wheat) GC levels, respectively (and to trail towards even higher GC values in maize and wheat). Experiments on gene localization in density gradient fractions showed a remarkable compositional homogeneity in vast (greater than 100-200 Kb) regions surrounding the genes. On the other hand, the compositional distribution of coding sequences (GenBank and literature data) from dicots (several orders) was found to be narrow, symmetrical and centered around 46% GC, that from monocots (essentially barley, maize and wheat) to be broad, asymmetrical and characterized by an upward trend towards high GC values, with the majority of sequences between 60 and 70% GC. Introns exhibited a similar compositional distribution, but lower GC levels, compared to exons from the same genes. Images PMID:3380684

  11. Bystander effects and compartmental stress response to X-ray irradiation in L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Temelie, Mihaela; Stroe, Daniela; Petcu, Ileana; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Savu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Bystander effects are indirect consequences of radiation and many other stress factors. They occur in cells that are not directly exposed to these factors, but receive signals from affected cells either by gap junctions or by molecules released in the medium. Characterizing these effects and deciphering the underlying mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects are relevant for cancer radiotherapy and radioprotection. At doses of X-ray radiation 0.5 and 1 Gy, we detected bystander effects as increased numbers of micronuclei shortly after the treatment, through medium transfer and by co-cultures. Interestingly, bystander cells did not exhibit long-term adverse changes in viability. Evaluation of several compartmental stress markers (CHOP, BiP, mtHsp60, cytHsp70) by qRT-PCR did not reveal expression changes at transcriptional level. We investigated the involvement of ROS and NO in this process by addition of specific scavengers of these molecules, DMSO or c-PTIO in the transferred medium. This approach proved that ROS but not NO is involved in the induction of lesions in the acceptor cells. These results indicate that L929 cells are susceptible to stress effects of radiation-induced bystander signaling. PMID:27025606

  12. Compartmentalization and Ca2+ buffering are essential for prevention of light induced retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shirley; Kohn, Elkana; Dadon, Daniela; Katz, Ben; Peters, Maximilian; Lebendiker, Mario; Kosloff, Mickey; Jo Colley, Nansi; Minke, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    Fly photoreceptors are polarized cells, which have an extended interface between their cell body and the light signaling compartment, the rhabdomere. Upon intense illumination, rhabdomeric calcium concentration reaches millimolar levels that would be toxic if Ca2+ diffusion between the rhabdomere and cell body was not robustly attenuated. Yet, it is not clear how such effective attenuation is obtained. Here we show that Ca2+ homeostasis in the photoreceptor cell relies on the protein calphotin. This unique protein functions as an immobile Ca2+ buffer, which is localized along the base of the rhabdomere, separating the signaling compartment from the cell body. Generation and analyses of transgenic Drosophila strains, in which calphotin expression levels were reduced in a graded manner, showed that moderately reduced calphotin expression impaired Ca2+ homeostasis while calphotin elimination resulted in severe light dependent photoreceptor degeneration. Electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optical methods revealed that the degeneration was rescued by prevention of Ca2+ overload via overexpression of CalX, the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, Ca2+ imaging experiments showed that reduced calphotin levels resulted in abnormally fast kinetics of Ca2+elevation in photoreceptor cells. Together, the data suggest that calphotin functions as a Ca2+ buffer; a possibility which we directly demonstrate by expressing calphotin in a heterologous expression system. We propose that calphotin-mediated compartmentalization and Ca2+ buffering constitute an effective strategy to protect cells from Ca2+ overload and light induced degeneration. PMID:23077055

  13. Identification of HIV-1 Genitourinary Tract Compartmentalization by Analyzing the env Gene Sequences in Urine

    PubMed Central

    BLASI, Maria; CARPENTER, J. Harris; BALAKUMARAN, Bala; CARA, Andrea; GAO, Feng; KLOTMAN, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-1 persists indefinitely in memory CD4+ T cells and other long-lived cellular reservoirs despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our group had previously demonstrated that HIV-1 can establish a productive infection in renal epithelial cells and that the kidney represents a separate compartment for HIV-1 replication. Here, to better understand the viruses in this unique site, we genetically characterized and compared the viruses in blood and urine specimens from twenty-four HIV-1 infected subjects with detectable viremia. Design and Methods Blood and urine samples were obtained from 35 HIV-1 positive subjects. Single-genome amplification was performed on HIV-1 env RNA and DNA isolated from urine supernatants and urine derived cell pellets respectively, as well as from plasma and PBMC from the same individuals. Neighbor-joining trees were constructed under the Kimura 2-parameter mode. Results We amplified and sequenced the full-length HIV-1 envelope (env) gene from twelve of the twenty-four individuals, indicating that fifty percent (50%) of the viremic HIV-1 positive patients had viral RNA in their urine. Phylogenetic analysis of the env sequences from four subjects with more than fifteen urine-derived env sequences showed that the majority of the sequences from urine formed distinct cluster(s) independent of those PBMC and plasma-derived sequences, consistent with viral compartmentalization in the urine. Conclusions Our results suggest the presence of a distinct HIV compartment in the genitourinary tract. PMID:26372275

  14. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G.

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  15. Modeling Heterogeneity in Direct Infectious Disease Transmission in a Compartmental Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingcai; Wang, Jinfeng; Han, Weiguo; Cao, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models have been used to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and to assess the impact of intervention strategies. Traditional mathematical models usually assume a homogeneous mixing in the population, which is rarely the case in reality. Here, we construct a new transmission function by using as the probability density function a negative binomial distribution, and we develop a compartmental model using it to model the heterogeneity of contact rates in the population. We explore the transmission dynamics of the developed model using numerical simulations with different parameter settings, which characterize different levels of heterogeneity. The results show that when the reproductive number, R0, is larger than one, a low level of heterogeneity results in dynamics similar to those predicted by the homogeneous mixing model. As the level of heterogeneity increases, the dynamics become more different. As a test case, we calibrated the model with the case incidence data for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing in 2003, and the estimated parameters demonstrated the effectiveness of the control measures taken during that period. PMID:26927140

  16. Immunometabolism of obesity and diabetes: microbiota link compartmentalized immunity in the gut to metabolic tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Joseph B; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    The bacteria that inhabit us have emerged as factors linking immunity and metabolism. Changes in our microbiota can modify obesity and the immune underpinnings of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes. Obesity coincides with a low-level systemic inflammation, which also manifests within metabolic tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. This metabolic inflammation can promote insulin resistance and dysglycaemia. However, the obesity and metabolic disease-related immune responses that are compartmentalized in the intestinal environment do not necessarily parallel the inflammatory status of metabolic tissues that control blood glucose. In fact, a permissive immune environment in the gut can exacerbate metabolic tissue inflammation. Unravelling these discordant immune responses in different parts of the body and establishing a connection between nutrients, immunity and the microbiota in the gut is a complex challenge. Recent evidence positions the relationship between host gut barrier function, intestinal T cell responses and specific microbes at the crossroads of obesity and inflammation in metabolic disease. A key problem to be addressed is understanding how metabolite, immune or bacterial signals from the gut are relayed and transferred into systemic or metabolic tissue inflammation that can impair insulin action preceding Type 2 diabetes. PMID:26464517

  17. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    PubMed Central

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  18. Redesign of extensive protein–DNA interfaces of meganucleases using iterative cycles of in vitro compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Choi, Michael; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2014-01-01

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (meganucleases) are sequence-specific DNA cleavage enzymes used for genome engineering. Recently, meganucleases fused to transcription activator-like effectors have been demonstrated to efficiently introduce targeted genome modifications. However, retargeting meganucleases to genomic sequences of interest remains challenging because it usually requires extensive alteration of a large number of amino acid residues that are situated in and near the DNA interface. Here we describe an effective strategy to extensively redesign such an extensive biomolecular interface. Well-characterized meganucleases are computationally screened to identify the best candidate enzyme to target a genomic region; that protein is then redesigned using iterative rounds of in vitro selections within compartmentalized aqueous droplets, which enable screening of extremely large numbers of protein variants at each step. The utility of this approach is illustrated by engineering three different meganucleases to cleave three human genomic sites (found in two exons and one flanking intron in two clinically relevant genes) and a fourth endonuclease that discriminates between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants of one of those targets. Fusion with transcription activator-like effector DNA binding domains significantly enhances targeted modification induced by meganucleases engineered in this study. Simultaneous expression of two such fusion endonucleases results in efficient excision of a defined genomic region. PMID:24591643

  19. Compartmental modelling of the pharmacokinetics of a breast cancer resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Mike J; Yates, James T W; Jones, Kevin; Wood, Gemma; Coleman, Tanya

    2011-11-01

    A mathematical model for the pharmacokinetics of Hoechst 33342 following administration into a culture medium containing a population of transfected cells (HEK293 hBCRP) with a potent breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor, Fumitremorgin C (FTC), present is described. FTC is reported to almost completely annul resistance mediated by BCRP in vitro. This non-linear compartmental model has seven macroscopic sub-units, with 14 rate parameters. It describes the relationship between the concentration of Hoechst 33342 and FTC, initially spiked in the medium, and the observed change in fluorescence due to Hoechst 33342 binding to DNA. Structural identifiability analysis has been performed using two methods, one based on the similarity transformation/exhaustive modelling approach and the other based on the differential algebra approach. The analyses demonstrated that all models derived are uniquely identifiable for the experiments/observations available. A kinetic modelling software package, namely FACSIMILE (MPCA Software, UK), was used for parameter fitting and to obtain numerical solutions for the system equations. Model fits gave very good agreement with in vitro data provided by AstraZeneca across a variety of experimental scenarios. PMID:20971524

  20. A bulk sub-femtoliter in vitro compartmentalization system using super-fine electrosprays

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bineet; Takamura, Yuzuru; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Biyani, Manish

    2016-01-01

    The extreme miniaturization of biological and chemical assays in aqueous-droplet compartments enables spatiotemporal control for large-scale parallel experimentation and can thus permit new capabilities for “digitizing” directed molecular evolution methodologies. We report a remarkably facile bulk method to generate mega-scale monodisperse sub-femtoliter aqueous droplets by electrospray, using a prototype head with super-fine inkjet technology. Moreover, the electrostatic inkjet nozzle that injects the aqueous phase when immersed within an immiscible phase (an optimized oil/surfactant mixture) has the advantage of generating cell-like sub-femtoliter compartments for biomolecule encapsulation and successive biological and chemical reactions. Sub-femtoliter droplets of both liquid (water-in-oil, volumes ranging from 0.2 to 6.4 fL) and gel bead (agarose-in-oil, volume ranging from 0.3 to 15.6 fL) compartments with average sizes of 1.3 μm and 1.5 μm, respectively, were successfully generated using an inkjet nozzle at a speed of more than 105 droplets per second. We demonstrated the applicability of this system by synthesizing fluorescent proteins using a cell-free expression system inside electrosprayed sub-femtoliter droplets at an accelerated rate, thereby extending the utility of in vitro compartmentalization with improved analytical perf